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Sample records for albicans streptococcus mutans

  1. Coaggregation of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Dashper, Stuart; Catmull, Deanne; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbial interactions are necessarily associated with the development of polymicrobial oral biofilms. The objective of this study was to determine the coaggregation of eight strains of Candida albicans with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans. In autoaggregation assays, C. albicans strains were grown in RPMI-1640 and artificial saliva medium (ASM) whereas bacteria were grown in heart infusion broth. C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans were suspended to give 10(6), 10(7) and 10(8) cells mL(-1) respectively, in coaggregation buffer followed by a 1 h incubation. The absorbance difference at 620 nm (ΔAbs) between 0 h and 1 h was recorded. To study coaggregation, the same protocol was used, except combinations of microorganisms were incubated together. The mean ΔAbs% of autoaggregation of the majority of RPMI-1640-grown C. albicans was higher than in ASM grown. Coaggregation of C. albicans with A. naeslundii and/or S. mutans was variable among C. albicans strains. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that A. naeslundii and S. mutans coaggregated with C. albicans in dual- and triculture. In conclusion, the coaggregation of C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans is C. albicans strain dependent. PMID:26054855

  2. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  3. Binding Force Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans-glucosyltransferase B to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, G; Marsh, G; Gao, L; Waugh, R; Koo, H

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans cells are often detected with Streptococcus mutans in plaque biofilms from children affected with early childhood caries. The coadhesion between these 2 organisms appears to be largely mediated by the S. mutans-derived exoenzyme glucosyltransferase B (GtfB); GtfB readily binds to C. albicans cells in an active form, producing glucans locally that provide enhanced binding sites for S. mutans. However, knowledge is limited about the mechanisms by which the bacterial exoenzyme binds to and functions on the fungal surface to promote this unique cross-kingdom interaction. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to understand the strength and binding dynamics modulating GtfB-C. albicans adhesive interactions in situ. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with GtfB-functionalized atomic force microscopy tips demonstrated that the enzyme binds with remarkable strength to the C. albicans cell surface (~2 nN) and showed a low dissociation rate, suggesting a highly stable bond. Strikingly, the binding strength of GtfB to the C. albicans surface was ~2.5-fold higher and the binding stability, ~20 times higher, as compared with the enzyme adhesion to S. mutans. Furthermore, adhesion force maps showed an intriguing pattern of GtfB binding. GtfB adhered heterogeneously on the surface of C. albicans, showing a higher frequency of adhesion failure but large sections of remarkably strong binding forces, suggesting the presence of GtfB binding domains unevenly distributed on the fungal surface. In contrast, GtfB bound uniformly across the S. mutans cell surface with less adhesion failure and a narrower range of binding forces (vs. the C. albicans surface). The data provide the first insights into the mechanisms underlying the adhesive and mechanical properties governing GtfB interactions with C. albicans. The strong and highly stable GtfB binding to C. albicans could explain, at least in part, why this bacterially derived exoenzyme effectively modulates this

  4. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms. PMID:26456320

  5. Cross-feeding and interkingdom communication in dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Sztajer, Helena; Szafranski, Szymon P; Tomasch, Jürgen; Reck, Michael; Nimtz, Manfred; Rohde, Manfred; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial biofilms are of large medical importance, but relatively little is known about the role of interspecies interactions for their physiology and virulence. Here, we studied two human pathogens co-occuring in the oral cavity, the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans and the caries-promoting bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Dual-species biofilms reached higher biomass and cell numbers than mono-species biofilms, and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) by S. mutans was strongly suppressed, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and transcriptome analysis. To detect interkingdom communication, C. albicans was co-cultivated with a strain of S. mutans carrying a transcriptional fusion between a green fluorescent protein-encoding gene and the promoter for sigX, the alternative sigma factor of S. mutans, which is induced by quorum sensing signals. Strong induction of sigX was observed in dual-species biofilms, but not in single-species biofilms. Conditioned media from mixed biofilms but not from C. albicans or S. mutans cultivated alone activated sigX in the reporter strain. Deletion of comS encoding the synthesis of the sigX-inducing peptide precursor abolished this activity, whereas deletion of comC encoding the competence-stimulating peptide precursor had no effect. Transcriptome analysis of S. mutans confirmed induction of comS, sigX, bacteriocins and the downstream late competence genes, including fratricins, in dual-species biofilms. We show here for the first time the stimulation of the complete quorum sensing system of S. mutans by a species from another kingdom, namely the fungus C. albicans, resulting in fundamentally changed virulence properties of the caries pathogen. PMID:24824668

  6. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis. PMID:25821503

  7. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis. PMID:25821503

  8. Role of Glucosyltransferase B in Interactions of Candida albicans with Streptococcus mutans and with an Experimental Pellicle on Hydroxyapatite Surfaces ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, S.; Xiao, J.; Silva, B. B.; Gonzalez, I.; Agidi, P. S.; Klein, M. I.; Ambatipudi, K. S.; Rosalen, P. L.; Bauserman, R.; Waugh, R. E.; Koo, H.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and mutans streptococci are frequently detected in dental plaque biofilms from toddlers afflicted with early childhood caries. Glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) secreted by Streptococcus mutans bind to saliva-coated apatite (sHA) and to bacterial surfaces, synthesizing exopolymers in situ, which promote cell clustering and adherence to tooth enamel. We investigated the potential role Gtfs may play in mediating the interactions between C. albicans SC5314 and S. mutans UA159, both with each other and with the sHA surface. GtfB adhered effectively to the C. albicans yeast cell surface in an enzymatically active form, as determined by scintillation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging. The glucans formed on the yeast cell surface were more susceptible to dextranase than those synthesized in solution or on sHA and bacterial cell surfaces (P < 0.05), indicating an elevated α-1,6-linked glucose content. Fluorescence imaging revealed that larger numbers of S. mutans cells bound to C. albicans cells with glucans present on their surface than to yeast cells without surface glucans (uncoated). The glucans formed in situ also enhanced C. albicans interactions with sHA, as determined by a novel single-cell micromechanical method. Furthermore, the presence of glucan-coated yeast cells significantly increased the accumulation of S. mutans on the sHA surface (versus S. mutans incubated alone or mixed with uncoated C. albicans; P < 0.05). These data reveal a novel cross-kingdom interaction that is mediated by bacterial GtfB, which readily attaches to the yeast cell surface. Surface-bound GtfB promotes the formation of a glucan-rich matrix in situ and may enhance the accumulation of S. mutans on the tooth enamel surface, thereby modulating the development of virulent biofilms. PMID:21803906

  9. Preparation and evaluation of antimicrobial activity of nanosystems for the control of oral pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pupe, Carolina Gonçalves; Villardi, Michele; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes; Maia, Lucianne Cople; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2011-01-01

    Background Diseases that affect the buccal cavity are a public health concern nowadays. Chlorhexidine and nystatin are the most commonly used drugs for the control of buccal affections. In the search for more effective antimicrobials, nanotechnology can be successfully used to improve the physical chemical properties of drugs whilst avoiding the undesirable side effects associated with its use. Herein described are studies using nystatin and chlorhexidine with sodium montmorillonite (MMTNa), and chlorhexidine with β-cyclodextrin and two derivatives methyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in the development of antimicrobial nanosystems. Methods The nanosystems were prepared by kneading and solubilization followed by freeze-drying technique. The nanosystems were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Nanosystem antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans strains was evaluated with inhibition halo analysis. Results The nanocarriers MMTNa and cyclodextrins showed good yields. XRPD, FTIR, and DSC analysis confirmed the proposed nanosystems formation and the suitability of the production methods. The nanosystems that showed best antimicrobial effect were chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes and CHX:MMTNa 60% cation exchange capacity – 24 hours. Conclusion The nanosystem formulations present higher stability for all chlorhexidine inclusion complexes compared with pure chlorhexidine. The nystatin nanosystems have the potential to mask the bitter taste, justifying subsequent in-vivo studies. For these reasons, further studies are being carried out to evaluate their application in professional formulations. PMID:22114490

  10. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  11. Serum and salivary IgA antibody responses to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans in orofacial granulomatosis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Savage, N W; Barnard, K; Shirlaw, P J; Rahman, D; Mistry, M; Escudier, M P; Sanderson, J D; Challacombe, S J

    2004-03-01

    Orofacial granulomatosis (OFG) is a condition of unknown aetiology with histological and, in some cases, clinical association with Crohn's disease (CD). However, the exact relationship between OFG and CD remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to determine whether OFG could be distinguished immunologically from CD by comparing non-specific and specific aspects of humoral immunity in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva in three groups of patients: (a) OFG only (n = 14), (b) those with both oral and gut CD (OFG + CD) (n = 12) and (c) CD without oral involvement (n = 22) and in healthy controls (n = 29). Non-specific immunoglobulin (IgA, SigA, IgA subclasses and IgG) levels and antibodies to whole cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum, whole saliva and parotid saliva. Serum IgA and IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were raised in all patient groups (P < 0.01). Salivary IgA (and IgG) levels were raised in OFG and OFG + CD (P < 0.01) but not in the CD group. Parotid IgA was also raised in OFG and OFG + CD but not in CD. The findings suggest that serum IgA changes reflect mucosal inflammation anywhere in the GI tract but that salivary IgA changes reflect involvement of the oral cavity. Furthermore, the elevated levels of IgA in parotid saliva suggest involvement of the salivary glands in OFG. Serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae were raised markedly in the two groups with gut disease while serum IgA (or IgG) antibodies to C. albicans were elevated significantly in all three patient groups (P < 0.02). No differences were found with antibodies to S. mutans. Whole saliva IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae (and C. albicans) were raised in the groups with oral involvement. These findings suggest that raised serum IgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae may reflect gut inflammation while raised SIgA antibodies to S. cerevisiae or raised IgA or IgA2 levels in saliva reflect oral but

  12. Mannitol transport in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Maryanski, J H; Wittenberger, C L

    1975-01-01

    A hexitol-inducible, phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system was demonstrated in Streptococcus mutans. Cell-free extracts obtained from mannitol-grown cells from a representative strain of each of the five S. mutans serotypes (AHT, BHT, C-67-1, 6715, and LM7) were capable of converting mannitol to mannitol-1-phosphate by a reaction which required phosphoenolpyruvate and Mg2+. Mannitol and sorbitol phosphotransferase activities were found in cell-free extracts prepared from cells grown on the respective substrate, but neither hexitol phosphotransferase activity was present in extracts obtained from cells grown on other substrates examined. A heat-stable, low-molecular-weight component was partially purified from glucose-grown cells and found to stimulate the mannitol phosphotransferase system. Divalent cations Mn2+ and Ca2+ partially replaced Mg2+, while Zn2+ was found to be highly inhibitory. PMID:1194241

  13. Galactose metabolism by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Abranches, Jacqueline; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Burne, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    The galK gene, encoding galactokinase of the Leloir pathway, was insertionally inactivated in Streptococcus mutans UA159. The galK knockout strain displayed only marginal growth on galactose, but growth on glucose or lactose was not affected. In strain UA159, the sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) for lactose and the PTS for galactose were induced by growth in lactose and galactose, although galactose PTS activity was very low, suggesting that S. mutans does not have a galactose-specific PTS and that the lactose PTS may transport galactose, albeit poorly. To determine if the galactose growth defect of the galK mutant could be overcome by enhancing lactose PTS activity, the gene encoding a putative repressor of the operon for lactose PTS and phospho-beta-galactosidase, lacR, was insertionally inactivated. A galK and lacR mutant still could not grow on galactose, although the strain had constitutively elevated lactose PTS activity. The glucose PTS activity of lacR mutants grown in glucose was lower than in the wild-type strain, revealing an influence of LacR or the lactose PTS on the regulation of the glucose PTS. Mutation of the lacA gene of the tagatose pathway caused impaired growth in lactose and galactose, suggesting that galactose can only be efficiently utilized when both the Leloir and tagatose pathways are functional. A mutation of the permease in the multiple sugar metabolism operon did not affect growth on galactose. Thus, the galactose permease of S. mutans is not present in the gal, lac, or msm operons. PMID:15466549

  14. Coaggregation of Streptococcus sanguis and other streptococci with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, H F; Lala, H C; Shepherd, M G

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen strains of viridans group streptococci and two strains of other streptococci were tested for coaggregation with Candida albicans. Streptococcus sanguis strains generally exhibited low levels of adherence to 28 degrees C-grown exponential-phase yeast cells, but starvation of yeast cells for glucose at 37 degrees C (or at 28 degrees C) increased their coaggregating activity with these streptococci by at least tenfold. This was a property common to four C. albicans strains tested, two of which were able to form mycelia (6406 and MEN) and two of which were not (MM2002 and CA2). The expression of the coaggregation adhesin during yeast cell starvation was inhibited by addition of trichodermin or amphotericin B. The strains of S. sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus oralis tested for coaggregating activity encompassed a diverse range of physiological and morphological types, yet all exhibited saturable coaggregation with starved C. albicans cells. There was no correlation of cell surface hydrophobicity, of either yeast or streptococcal cells, with their abilities to coaggregate. Strains of Streptococcus anginosus also coaggregated with starved yeast cells; Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus pyogenes coaggregated to a lesser degree with C. albicans, and the coaggregation with S. pyogenes was not promoted by yeast cell starvation; Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis did not coaggregate with yeast. The coaggregation reactions of S. sanguis and S. gordonii with C. albicans were inhibited by EDTA and by heat or protease treatment of the yeast cells and were not reversible by the addition of lactose or other simple sugars. These observations extend the range of intergeneric coaggregations that are known to occur between oral microbes and suggest that coaggregations of C. albicans with viridans group streptococci may be important for colonization of oral surfaces by the yeast. PMID:2182544

  15. Intracellular α-Amylase of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Christine L.; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1998-01-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding α-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single α-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  16. Intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Simpson, C L; Russell, R R

    1998-09-01

    Sequencing upstream of the Streptococcus mutans gene for a CcpA gene homolog, regM, revealed an open reading frame, named amy, with homology to genes encoding alpha-amylases. The deduced amino acid sequence showed a strong similarity (60% amino acid identity) to the intracellular alpha-amylase of Streptococcus bovis and, in common with this enzyme, lacked a signal sequence. Amylase activity was found only in S. mutans cell extracts, with no activity detected in culture supernatants. Inactivation of amy by insertion of an antibiotic resistance marker confirmed that S. mutans has a single alpha-amylase activity. The amylase activity was induced by maltose but not by starch, and no acid was produced from starch. S. mutans can, however, transport limit dextrins and maltooligosaccharides generated by salivary amylase, but inactivation of amy did not affect growth on these substrates or acid production. The amylase digested the glycogen-like intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) purified from S. mutans, but the amy mutant was able to digest and produce acid from IPS; thus, amylase does not appear to be essential for IPS breakdown. However, when grown on excess maltose, the amy mutant produced nearly threefold the amount of IPS produced by the parent strain. The role of Amy has not been established, but Amy appears to be important in the accumulation of IPS in S. mutans grown on maltose. PMID:9721315

  17. Ferrous iron transport in Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, S.L.; Arcenaeux, J.E.L.; Byers, B.R.; Martin, M.E.; Aranha, H.

    1986-12-01

    Radioiron uptake from /sup 59/FeCl/sub 3/ by Streptococcus mutans OMZ176 was increased by anaerobiosis, sodium ascorbate, and phenazine methosulfate (PMS), although there was a 10-min lag before PMS stimulation was evident. The reductant ascorbate may have provided ferrous iron. The PMS was reduced by the cells, and the reduced PMS then may have generated ferrous iron for transport; reduced PMS also may have depleted dissolved oxygen. It was concluded that S. mutans transports only ferrous iron, utilizing reductants furnished by glucose metabolism to reduce iron prior to its uptake.

  18. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  19. Phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in dentin.

    PubMed

    Rupf, S; Hannig, M; Breitung, K; Schellenberger, W; Eschrich, K; Remmerbach, T; Kneist, S

    2008-12-01

    Information concerning phenotypic heterogeneity of Streptococcus mutans in carious dentin is sparse. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) facilitates the phenotypic differentiation of bacteria to the subspecies level. To verify a supposed influence of restorative treatment on the phenotypic heterogeneity of S. mutans, we isolated and compared a total of 222 S. mutans strains from dentin samples of 21 human deciduous molars during caries excavation (T(1)) and 8 wks (T(2)) after removal of the temporary restoration. Phenotypic heterogeneity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS and hierarchical clustering. Thirty-six distinct S. mutans phenotypes could be identified. Although indistinguishable phenotypes were found in the same teeth at T(1) and T(2), as well as in different teeth of individual participants, the phenotypic heterogeneity increased significantly, from 1.4 phenotypes per S. mutans-positive dentin sample at T(1) to 2.2 phenotypes at T(2). We attribute this to an adaptation of S. mutans to the modified environment under the restoration following caries excavation. PMID:19029088

  20. Purification and certain properties of a bacteriocin from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, T; Iwanami, T; Hirasawa, M; Watanabe, C; McGhee, J R; Shiota, T

    1982-03-01

    An inhibition factor from Streptococcus mutans strain C3603 (serotype c) was purified and isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin. Bacteriocin C3603 is a basic protein with a pI value of 10 and a molecular weight of 4,800. The activity of this bacteriocin was not affected by pH over a range of 1.0 to 12.0 or by storage at 100 degrees C for 10 min at pH 2.0 to 7.0 or storage at 121 degrees C for 15 min at pH 4.0. Pronase; papain, phospholipase C, trypsin, and alpha-amylase had no effect on the activity of the bacteriocin, whereas alpha-chymotrypsin and pancreatin were partially active against it. Bacteriocin activity was greater against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes b, c, e, and f than against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes a, d, and g. Bacteriocin C3603 was also effective against selected strains of S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. bovis, S. faecium, S. lactis, Lactobacillus casei, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus, but it was not effective against certain strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Corynebacterium parvum, and Candida albicans. The inhibition of S. mutans strains BHT and PS-14 by bacteriocin C3603 was found to be due to the bacteriocidal activity of the bacteriocin. When water or a diet containing bacteriocin C3603 was consumed by gnotobiotic and specific pathogen-free rats infected with S. mutans PS-14, the caries score was found to be significantly reduced. PMID:7068219

  1. Purification and certain properties of a bacteriocin from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, T; Iwanami, T; Hirasawa, M; Watanabe, C; McGhee, J R; Shiota, T

    1982-01-01

    An inhibition factor from Streptococcus mutans strain C3603 (serotype c) was purified and isolated, and its properties indicated that it was a bacteriocin. Bacteriocin C3603 is a basic protein with a pI value of 10 and a molecular weight of 4,800. The activity of this bacteriocin was not affected by pH over a range of 1.0 to 12.0 or by storage at 100 degrees C for 10 min at pH 2.0 to 7.0 or storage at 121 degrees C for 15 min at pH 4.0. Pronase; papain, phospholipase C, trypsin, and alpha-amylase had no effect on the activity of the bacteriocin, whereas alpha-chymotrypsin and pancreatin were partially active against it. Bacteriocin activity was greater against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes b, c, e, and f than against certain S. mutans strains of serotypes a, d, and g. Bacteriocin C3603 was also effective against selected strains of S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. bovis, S. faecium, S. lactis, Lactobacillus casei, L. plantarum, L. fermentum, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium longum, Propionibacterium acnes, and Bacteroides melaninogenicus, but it was not effective against certain strains of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Corynebacterium parvum, and Candida albicans. The inhibition of S. mutans strains BHT and PS-14 by bacteriocin C3603 was found to be due to the bacteriocidal activity of the bacteriocin. When water or a diet containing bacteriocin C3603 was consumed by gnotobiotic and specific pathogen-free rats infected with S. mutans PS-14, the caries score was found to be significantly reduced. Images PMID:7068219

  2. Immunochemical Properties of Glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Kazuhiro; Kokeguchi, Susumu; Kato, Keijiro; Miyake, Yoichiro; Nogami, Ryuzo; Moriyama, Takafumi

    1983-01-01

    Antiserum against purified mutansynthetase (EC 2.4.1.?) of Streptococcus mutans 6715 (serotype g), which is responsible for the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan (ISG) in the presence of both sucrose and water-soluble glucan, was prepared. The specificity of the antiserum was tested by using crude enzyme preparations (CEPs) of S. mutans strains of various serotypes. On immunodiffusion, the antiserum cross-reacted with CEPs from strains of serotypes a (HS-6 and AHT), d (OMZ176), and g (OMZ65 and KIR), but not with those from strains of serotypes b (BHT and FA-1) and c (GS-5 and Ingbritt). The antiserum inhibited the synthesis of ISG by crude or purified mutansynthetase of S. mutans 6715. The activities of ISG synthesis by CEPs from the strains antigenically related in the foregoing immunodiffusion were inhibited by the antiserum against strain 6715 mutansynthetase. The antiserum, however, also inhibited the enzyme activity of the strains of serotype b. The finding that the antiserum against purified dextransucrase of S. mutans HS-6 inhibited ISG synthesis by a CEP of strain HS-6 and also by CEPs of antigenically related strains suggested that dextransucrase activity is involved in ISG synthesis. Images PMID:6187685

  3. Acid tolerance mechanisms utilized by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Robert; Cvitkovitch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1924 by J Clarke, Streptococcus mutans has been the focus of rigorous research efforts due to its involvement in caries initiation and progression. Its ability to ferment a range of dietary carbohydrates can rapidly drop the external environmental pH, thereby making dental plaque inhabitable to many competing species and can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid production by this oral pathogen would prove suicidal if not for its remarkable ability to withstand the acid onslaught by utilizing a wide variety of highly evolved acid-tolerance mechanisms. The elucidation of these mechanisms will be discussed, serving as the focus of this review. PMID:20210551

  4. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  5. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  6. Glucosyltransferase gene polymorphism among Streptococcus mutans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Chia, J S; Hsu, T Y; Teng, L J; Chen, J Y; Hahn, L J; Yang, C S

    1991-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases were detected among Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains by Southern blot analysis with DNA probes located within the gtfB gene (H. Aoki, T. Shiroza, M. Hayakawa, S. Sato, and H. K. Kuramitsu, Infect. Immun. 53:587-594, 1986). Restriction endonucleases were used to examine genomic DNAs isolated from serotype a to h strains. The variations were readily detected among 33 strains of serotype c by EcoRI and PstI restriction enzyme digestions. Serotypes e and f, which are genetically similar to serotype c, also had comparable polymorphism; however, serotypes a, b, d, g, and h did not hybridize to the same DNA probes in parallel experiments. Further analysis of enzymatic activities for glucan synthesis and sucrose-dependent adherence revealed no significant differences among the serotype c strains. Our results suggested that genetic polymorphisms existing in S. mutans serotype c strains may reflect a complexity in genes coding for the glucosyltransferases, which are produced ubiquitously in members of the S. mutans group. Images PMID:1826894

  7. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, A R; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation of C. albicans and S. gordonii cells in the fluid phase. When fixed to microtiter plate wells, the S. gordonii polysaccharide was bound by all strains of C. albicans tested. The polysaccharide contained Rha, Glc, GalNAc, GlcNAc, and Gal and was related compositionally to previously characterized cell wall polysaccharides from strains of S. oralis and S. sanguis. The adherence of yeast cells to the immobilized polysaccharide was not inhibitable by a number of saccharides. Antiserum raised to the S. gordonii NCTC 7869 polysaccharide blocked adherence of C. albicans ATCC 10261 to the polysaccharide. The results identify a complex cell wall polysaccharide of S. gordonii as the coaggregation receptor for C. albicans. Adherent interactions of yeast cells with streptococci and other bacteria may be important for colonization of both hard and soft oral surfaces by C. albicans. PMID:7729891

  8. Anticariogenic activity of some tropical medicinal plants against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Shim, Jae-Seok; Chung, Jae-Youn

    2004-09-01

    The methanol extracts of five tropical plants, Baeckea frutescens, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Kaempferia pandurata, Physalis angulata and Quercus infectoria, exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. In particular, G. glabra, K. pandurata and P. angulata conferred fast killing bactericidal effect against S. mutans in 2 min at 50 microg/ml of extract concentration. PMID:15351117

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En; Smith, Lief

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain's superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Oral Bacterium Streptococcus mutans JH1140

    PubMed Central

    Escano, Jerome; Deng, Peng; Lu, Shi-En

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans JH1140 is an oral bacterium known to produce the bacteriocin mutacin 1140, and the strain has been genetically engineered to combat dental caries. Here, we report the 2.0-Mb draft genome of S. mutans JH1140. This genome provides new insights into the strain’s superior colonization properties and its utility in replacement therapy. PMID:27257196

  11. Lactam inhibiting Streptococcus mutans growth on titanium.

    PubMed

    Xavier, J G; Geremias, T C; Montero, J F D; Vahey, B R; Benfatti, C A M; Souza, J C M; Magini, R S; Pimenta, A L

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the activity of novel synthetic lactams on preventing biofilm formation on titanium surfaces. Titanium (Ti6Al4V) samples were exposed to Streptococcus mutans cultures in the presence or absence of a synthetic lactam. After 48h incubation, planktonic growth was determined by spectrophotometry. Biofilm was evaluated by crystal violet staining and colony forming units (CFU·ml(-)(1)), followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the average of adhered viable cells was approximately 1.5×10(2)CFU/ml in the presence of lactam and 4×10(2)CFU/ml in its absence. This novel compound was considerable active in reducing biofilm formation over titanium surfaces, indicating its potential for the development of antimicrobial drugs targeting the inhibition of the initial stages of bacterial biofilms on dental implants abutments. PMID:27524086

  12. Genetic regulation of fructosyltransferase in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Kiska, D L; Macrina, F L

    1994-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans possesses several extracellular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes which have been implicated as important virulence factors in dental caries. This study was initiated to investigate the genetic regulation of one of these enzymes, the extracellular fructosyltransferase (Ftf). Fusions were constructed with the region upstream of the S. mutans GS5 Ftf gene (ftf) and a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The fusions were integrated at a remote site in the chromosome, and transcriptional activity in response to the addition of various carbohydrates to the growth medium was measured. A significant increase in CAT activity was observed when glucose-grown cells were shifted to sucrose-containing medium. Sucrose-induced expression was repressed immediately upon addition of phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system sugars to the growth media. Deletion analysis of the ftf upstream region revealed that an inverted repeat structure was involved in the control of ftf expression in response to carbohydrate. However, the control of the level of ftf transcription appeared to involve a region distinct from that mediating carbohydrate regulation. CAT gene fusions also were constructed with the ftf upstream region from S. mutans V403, a fructan-hyperproducing strain which synthesizes increased levels of Ftf. Sequence analysis of the upstream ftf region in this strain revealed several nucleotide sequence changes which were associated with high-level ftf expression. Comparison of the GS5 and V403 ftf expression patterns suggested the presence of a trans-acting factor(s) involved in modulation of ftf expression in response to carbohydrate. This factor(s) was either absent or altered in V403, resulting in the inability of this organism to respond to the presence of carbohydrate. The sequences of the ftf regions from three additional fructan-hyperproducing strains were determined and compared with that of V403. Only one strain displayed nucleotide

  13. Fluoride uptake by Streptococcus mutans 6715.

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, G M; Schuster, G S; Pashley, D H; Venkateswarlu, P

    1977-01-01

    The short-term kinetics of fluoride uptake by cells from 20- to 22-h cultures of Streptococcus mutans strain 6715 were studied using rapid filtration and centrifugation techniques. Saline-suspended organisms were diluted with fluoride-containing solutions buffered at four different pH values (2.0, 4.0, 5.5, and 8.2). Fluoride disappearance from the medium was inversely related to pH and to the duration of the exposure at any given pH. The uptake was rapid and extensive at the lower pH values and decreased as the pH increased. Media fluoride concentrations subsequently increased; i.e., fluoride was released from the cells. The presence of glucose, cyanide, or iodoacetate did not influence the results. However, preincubation of the cells in fluoride-free buffers, followed by the addition of fluoride, reduced fluoride uptake markedly. Cell-to-media pH gradients were determined by the distribution of 14C-labeled 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolidinedione. Fluoride uptake was found to be a function of the magnitude of the pH gradient (P less than 0.001). It is hypothesized that fluoride uptake occurs by the diffusion of hydrogen fluoride and the subsequent trapping of ionic fluoride. PMID:22490

  14. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health. PMID:25176247

  15. Association of Streptococcus mutans with Human Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Loesche, W. J.; Rowan, J.; Straffon, L. H.; Loos, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The association of Streptococcus mutans with human dental decay was investigated by using several types of samples: (i) paraffin-stimulated saliva samples taken from children with from 0 to 15 decayed teeth; (ii) pooled occlusal and approximal plaque taken from children with no decayed or filled teeth, or from children with rampant caries of 10 or more teeth; (iii) plaque removed from single occlusal fissures that were either carious or noncarious. The results showed a significant association between plaque levels of S. mutans and caries. The strongest association, P < 0.0001, was found when plaque was removed from single occlusal fissures. Seventy-one percent of the carious fissures had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 70% of the fissures that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Sixty-five percent of the pooled plaque samples from the children with rampant caries had S. mutans accounting for more than 10% of the viable flora, whereas 40% of the pooled samples from children that were caries free had no detectable S. mutans. Saliva samples tended to have low levels of S. mutans and were equivocal in demonstrating a relationship between S. mutans and caries. PMID:1140847

  16. Effect of a chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans in saliva.

    PubMed

    Piovano, Susana; Marcantoni, Mabel; Doño, Raquel; Bellagamba, Hebe

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of a thymol/chlorhexidine varnish at 1% on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in saliva applied after teaching and evaluating an oral hygiene technique and dressing the cavities to reduce the bacterial load. Streptococcus mutans levels in saliva samples and dental status were evaluated in 38 girls between 6 and 13 years of age with high risk of caries. The girls were then trained and assessed in oral hygiene. On day seven, oral hygiene assessment was repeated and supragingival plaque control was performed. After 15 days (day 21) another culture was performed and the level of S. mutans in saliva samples was determined. Evaluation and reinforcement of the oral hygiene technique were repeated and the cavities were dressed to reduce the bacterial load. At 36 days from the onset of the experiment, culture S. mutans counts were performed; evaluation and reinforcement of the oral hygiene technique were undertaken and the girls were divided randomly into two groups: 1 The teeth of the experimental group were painted with a varnish containing 1% chlorhexidine and thymol. 2 The teeth of the control group were painted with a placebo varnish containing only thymol. After a further 15 days (day 51), another culture and S. mutans counts were performed. The results showed a gradual reduction in the S. mutans counts in saliva in each subsequent experimental period analyzed. Significant differences between the experimental group and the control group were recorded after treatment. It can be concluded that the levels of S. mutans decreased in each subsequent experimental period and that the application of a 1% chlorhexidine varnish elicited a significant reduction in S. mutans levels. PMID:16302455

  17. Streptococcus mutans in a wild, sucrose-eating rat population.

    PubMed

    Coykendall, A L; Specht, P A; Samol, H H

    1974-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, an organism implicated in dental caries and not previously found outside of man and certain laboratory animals, was isolated from the mouths of wild rats which ate sugar cane. The strains isolated fermented mannitol and sorbitol, and failed to grow in 6.5% NaCl or at 45 C. They formed in vitro plaques on nichrome wires when grown in sucrose broth. They also stored intracellular polysaccharide which could be catabolized by washed, resting cells. Deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid reassociations revealed two genetic types. One type shared extensive deoxyribonucleic acid base sequences with S. mutans strains HS6 and OMZ61, two members of a genetic type found in man and laboratory hamsters. The other type seemed unrelated to any S. mutans genetic type previously encountered. It is concluded that the ecological triad of tooth-sucrose-S. mutans is not a phenomenon unique to man and experimental animals. PMID:4601769

  18. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  19. Expression of the Streptococcus mutans fructosyltransferase gene within a mammalian host.

    PubMed Central

    Grey, W T; Curtiss, R; Hudson, M C

    1997-01-01

    In vivo expression of the virulence-associated fructosyltransferase gene (ftf) of Streptococcus mutans has been examined. S. mutans ftf expression is affected by both the specific carbohydrate consumed and the age of the host animal. PMID:9169798

  20. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries. PMID:24961744

  1. Essential oil of Curcuma longa inhibits Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoi; Chang, Byoung-Soo; Ra, Ji-Young; Moon, Hae-Dalma; Seo, Bo-Ra; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) has been used as a spice in foods and as an antimicrobial in Oriental medicine. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of an essential oil isolated from C. longa on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), which is an important bacterium in dental plaque and dental caries formation. First, the inhibitory effects of C. longa essential oil on the growth and acid production of S. mutans were tested. Next, the effect of C. longa essential oil on adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HAs) was investigated. C. longa essential oil inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mg/mL. The essential oil also exhibited significant inhibition of S. mutans adherence to S-HAs at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. The essential oil of C. longa inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. The components of C. longa essential oil were then analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the major components were α-turmerone (35.59%), germacrone (19.02%), α-zingiberene (8.74%), αr-turmerone (6.31%), trans-β-elemenone (5.65%), curlone (5.45%), and β-sesquiphellandrene (4.73%). These results suggest that C. longa may inhibit the cariogenic properties of S. mutans. PMID:22416707

  2. Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xianhui; Huang Jun; Lv Guohua; Liu Xiaodi; Peng Lei; Guo Lihong; Chen Wei; Feng Kecheng; Yang Size

    2009-03-15

    A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O{sub 2} does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

  3. Magnetic response in cultures of Streptococcus mutans ATCC-27607.

    PubMed

    Adamkiewicz, V W; Bassous, C; Morency, D; Lorrain, P; Lepage, J L

    1987-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans ATCC-27607 produces exopolysaccharides that adhere to glass. In the normal geomagnetic field about 50% more polysaccharide adhere preferentially to glass surfaces facing North as compared to South facing surfaces. Reversal of the direction of the magnetic field by 180 degrees produces a similar reversal in the direction of the preferential accumulation. Reduction of the field by 90% abolishes the preferential accumulation. PMID:3582582

  4. Binding of Todd-Hewitt broth antigens by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Jones, C A

    1983-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans 10449, grown in chemically defined culture medium, was tested for its ability to bind 3H-labeled Todd-Hewitt broth components (greater than 12,000 Mr). Maximum adsorption of radioactivity occurred within 5 min at room temperature, and cell-bound material was not completely removed by extended washing with buffer. Heat-killed, arsenate-inhibited, and viable bacteria bound similar quantities. Only 0.09% of the radioactivity in the preparation of high Mr Todd-Hewitt broth components was removed by absorption with excess numbers of S. mutans 10449 cells. Binding followed saturation kinetics and was competitively inhibited by unlabeled medium components, both the dialyzable and nondialyzable fractions. Other oral streptococci were also found to bind these complex medium components. Rabbit antiserum elicited to the high-molecular-weight Todd-Hewitt broth components reacted with monkey cardiac muscle and with S. mutans coated with medium components. Absorption of the anti-Todd-Hewitt broth serum with homogenized heart removed antibodies that reacted with Todd-Hewitt broth-coated S. mutans. Therefore, the tissue-specific antigens of this beef heart infusion medium that adsorb to S. mutans can interfere with the detection and characterization of antigens shared by these bacteria and animal tissues. Images PMID:6852915

  5. Characterization and Streptococcus mutans adhesion on air polishing dentin.

    PubMed

    Tada, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotake; Inatomi, Michitomo; Sato, Soh

    2014-07-01

    Air polishing is known as an effective and time saving tooth cleaning method. However, this method increased surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on dentin surface. The aim of this study was to characterize and examine Streptococcus mutans adhesion on dentin surface after air polishing as compared to the conventional method. The dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm) were polished by a rubber cup with polishing material (Polishing) and air-polished by 25 μm glycine (G25), 65 μm glycine (G65), and 65 μm sodium bicarbonate (NHC65) microparticles. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a laser electron microscope. The amount of adhered S. mutans was quantified using a resazurin reduction assay (alamarBlue(®)). The Ra of G25 and G65 was significantly (p < 0.01) smaller than that of NHC65 and greater than that of Polishing. However, there was no significant difference in S. mutans adhesion among Polishing, G25, and G65, while NHC65 showed significantly (p < 0.01) higher S. mutans adhesion. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, air polishing using glycine microparticles conditioned S. mutans adhesion on dentin surface in a similar fashion than the conventional method, and less than air polishing using sodium bicarbonate microparticles. PMID:23744363

  6. Characteristics of Streptococcus mutans genotypes and dental caries in children.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Wiener, Howard W; Whiddon, Jennifer; Momeni, Stephanie S; Ruby, John D; Cutter, Gary R; Childers, Noel K

    2013-06-01

    This longitudinal cohort study evaluated the diversity, commonality, and stability of Streptococcus mutans genotypes associated with dental caries history. Sixty-seven 5- and 6-yr-old children, considered as being at high caries risk, had plaque collected from baseline through 36 months for S. mutans isolation and genotyping using repetitive extragenic palindromic-PCR (4,392 total isolates). Decayed, missing, or filled surfaces (dmfs (primary teeth)/DMFS (secondary teeth)) for each child were recorded at baseline. At baseline, 18 distinct genotypes were found among 911 S. mutans isolates from 67 children (diversity), and 13 genotypes were shared by at least two children (commonality). The number of genotypes per individual was positively associated with the proportion of decayed surfaces (p-ds) at baseline. Twenty-four of the 39 children who were available at follow-up visits maintained a predominant genotype for the follow-up periods (stability) and this was negatively associated with the p-ds. The observed diversity, commonality, and stability of S. mutans genotypes represent a pattern of dental caries epidemiology in this high-caries-risk community, which suggests that fewer decayed surfaces are significantly associated with lower diversity and higher stability of S. mutans genotypes. PMID:23659236

  7. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans strains by different mitis-salivarius agar preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Staat, R H

    1976-01-01

    Several Streptococcus mutans strains were markedly inhibited by mitis-salivarius agar manufactured by Baltimore Biological Laboratories, but little, if any, inhibition was noted using Difco Laboratories' mitis-salivarius agar. Supplementation of the basic medium with sucrose and bacitracin for specific selection of S. mutans resulted in suppression of representative S. mutans type a strains regardless of manufacturer. PMID:1270597

  8. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results represent the first description of a compound that targets Gtfs and that has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans. PMID:26482298

  9. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results represent the first description of a compound that targets Gtfs and that has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans. PMID:26482298

  10. β-Phosphoglucomutase contributes to aciduricity in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Andrew A.; Faustoferri, Roberta C.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans encounters an array of sugar moieties within the oral cavity due to a varied human diet. One such sugar is β-d-glucose 1-phosphate (βDG1P), which must be converted to glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) before further metabolism to lactic acid. The conversion of βDG1P to G6P is mediated by β-phosphoglucomutase, which has not been previously observed in any oral streptococci, but has been extensively characterized and the gene designated pgmB in Lactococcus lactis. An orthologue was identified in S. mutans, SMU.1747c, and deletion of the gene resulted in the inability of the deletion strain to convert βDG1P to G6P, indicating that SMU.1747c is a β-phosphoglucomutase and should be designated pgmB. In this study, we sought to characterize how deletion of pgmB affected known virulence factors of S. mutans, specifically acid tolerance. The ΔpgmB strain showed a decreased ability to survive acid challenge. Additionally, the strain lacking β-phosphoglucomutase had a diminished glycolytic profile compared with the parental strain. Deletion of pgmB had a negative impact on the virulence of S. mutans in the Galleria mellonella (greater wax worm) animal model. Our results indicate that pgmB plays a role at the juncture of carbohydrate metabolism and virulence. PMID:24509501

  11. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marlise I; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H S; Campanella, Osvaldo H; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases. PMID:25763359

  12. Streptococcus mutans-derived extracellular matrix in cariogenic oral biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Hwang, Geelsu; Santos, Paulo H. S.; Campanella, Osvaldo H.; Koo, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are highly structured microbial communities that are enmeshed in a self-produced extracellular matrix. Within the complex oral microbiome, Streptococcus mutans is a major producer of extracellular polymeric substances including exopolysaccharides (EPS), eDNA, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). EPS produced by S. mutans-derived exoenzymes promote local accumulation of microbes on the teeth, while forming a spatially heterogeneous and diffusion-limiting matrix that protects embedded bacteria. The EPS-rich matrix provides mechanical stability/cohesiveness and facilitates the creation of highly acidic microenvironments, which are critical for the pathogenesis of dental caries. In parallel, S. mutans also releases eDNA and LTA, which can contribute with matrix development. eDNA enhances EPS (glucan) synthesis locally, increasing the adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated apatitic surfaces and the assembly of highly cohesive biofilms. eDNA and other extracellular substances, acting in concert with EPS, may impact the functional properties of the matrix and the virulence of cariogenic biofilms. Enhanced understanding about the assembly principles of the matrix may lead to efficacious approaches to control biofilm-related diseases. PMID:25763359

  13. Evaluation of Melia azedarach extracts against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Nedel, Fernanda

    2015-02-01

    Although the incidence of caries worldwide has declined in recent years, it is necessary to search for new means to overcome this disease and its microbiological agents. Phytochemistry can become an effective alternative to antibiotics, offering a promising strategy in the prevention and therapy of dental caries. This study aimed to evaluate in vitro the bactericide activity of a bioactive phytocomponent from Melia azedarach against Streptococcus mutans. The crude extract (CEx) from leaves and stem barks of M. azedarach in chloroform, petroleum ether, acetate ethyl, butanol, and aqueous fractions was evaluated using seven different concentrations. Disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration assays were used to evaluate the antibacterial activity. 0.12% chlorhexidine was used as a positive control. The CEx and the petroleum ether fraction from M. azedarach showed significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans, confirming its antibiotic potential. PMID:25069066

  14. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  15. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  16. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro. PMID:21088146

  17. Streptococcus mutans: Fructose Transport, Xylitol Resistance, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J.M.; Thompson, A.; Wen, Z.T.; Burne, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiological agent of human dental caries, possesses at least two fructose phosphotransferase systems (PTSs), encoded by fruI and fruCD. fruI is also responsible for xylitol transport. We hypothesized that fructose and xylitol transport systems do not affect virulence. Thus, colonization and cariogenicity of fruI− and fruCD− single and double mutants, their WT (UA159), and xylitol resistance (Xr) of S. mutans were studied in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. A sucrose phosphorylase (gtfA−) mutant and a reference strain (NCTC-10449S) were additional controls. Recoveries of fruI mutant from the teeth were decreased, unlike those for the other strains. The fruCD mutation was associated with a slight loss of cariogenicity on enamel, whereas mutation of fruI was associated with a loss of cariogenicity in dentin. These results also suggest why xylitol inhibition of caries is paradoxically associated with spontaneous emergence of so-called Xr S. mutans in habitual human xylitol users. PMID:16567561

  18. Effect of Honey on Streptococcus mutans Growth and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyun

    2012-01-01

    Because of the tradition of using honey as an antimicrobial medicament, we investigated the effect of natural honey (NH) on Streptococcus mutans growth, viability, and biofilm formation compared to that of an artificial honey (AH). AH contained the sugars at the concentrations reported for NH. NH and AH concentrations were obtained by serial dilution with tryptic soy broth (TSB). Several concentrations of NH and AH were tested for inhibition of bacterial growth, viability, and biofilm formation after inoculation with S. mutans UA159 in 96-well microtiter plates to obtain absorbance and CFU values. Overall, NH supported significantly less (P < 0.05) bacterial growth than AH at 25 and 12.5% concentrations. At 50 and 25% concentrations, both honey groups provided significantly less bacterial growth and biofilm formation than the TSB control. For bacterial viability, the results for all honey concentrations except 50% NH were not significantly different from those for the TSB control. NH was able to decrease the maximum velocity of S. mutans growth compared to AH. In summary, NH demonstrated more inhibition of bacterial growth, viability, and biofilm formation than AH. This study highlights the potential antibacterial properties of NH and could suggest that the antimicrobial mechanism of NH is not solely due to its high sugar content. PMID:22038612

  19. Binding Forces of Streptococcus mutans P1 Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Sullan, Ruby May A.; Li, James K.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive oral bacterium that is a primary etiological agent associated with human dental caries. In the oral cavity, S. mutans adheres to immobilized salivary agglutinin (SAG) contained within the salivary pellicle on the tooth surface. Binding to SAG is mediated by cell surface P1, a multifunctional adhesin that is also capable of interacting with extracellular matrix proteins. This may be of particular importance outside of the oral cavity as S. mutans has been associated with infective endocarditis and detected in atherosclerotic plaque. Despite the biomedical importance of P1, its binding mechanisms are not completely understood. In this work, we use atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule and single-cell force spectroscopy to quantify the nanoscale forces driving P1-mediated adhesion. Single-molecule experiments show that full-length P1, as well as fragments containing only the P1 globular head or C-terminal region, binds to SAG with relatively weak forces (~50 pN). In contrast, single-cell analyses reveal that adhesion of a single S. mutans cell to SAG is mediated by strong (~500 pN) and long-range (up to 6000 nm) forces. This is likely due to the binding of multiple P1 adhesins to self-associated gp340 glycoproteins. Such a cooperative, long-range character of the S. mutans–SAG interaction would therefore dramatically increase the strength and duration of cell adhesion. We also demonstrate, at single-molecule and single-cell levels, the interaction of P1 with fibronectin and collagen, as well as with hydrophobic, but not hydrophilic, substrates. The binding mechanism (strong forces, cooperativity, broad specificity) of P1 provides a molecular basis for its multifunctional adhesion properties. Our methodology represents a valuable approach to probe the binding forces of bacterial adhesins and offers a tractable methodology to assess anti-adhesion therapy. PMID:25671413

  20. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  1. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  2. Glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the presence of human saliva.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1982-12-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72x41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was also restored when saliva-inhibited cells were subsequently exposed to DTT. The inclusion of catalase in the saliva incubation mixtures resulted in protection equal to that obtained with DTT. The S. mitis strains were also inhibited by saliva but to a far lesser extent that S. mutans. DTT and catalase also protected S. mitis from saliva inhibition. Both A. viscosus strains were completely refractory to saliva inhibition of glucose uptake. Based on (i) the sensitivity of the catalase-negative streptococci and the resistance of catalase-positive actinomyces to saliva inhibition and (ii) the equal and complete protection to saliva inhibition afforded by DTT and catalase, we conclude that the lactoperoxidase-SCN(-)-H(2)O(2) system in saliva was the only antibacterial system expressed under our experimental conditions. The relative resistance of S. mitis 9811 (compared with S. mutans BHT) to saliva inhibition was shown not to result from poor H(2)O(2) production in either glucose-supplemented buffer or saliva solutions. S. mitis produced inhibitory quantities of H(2)O(2) that equaled or exceeded S. mutans H(2)O(2) accumulation. It is suggested that S. mitis might possess a greater ability to repair lactoperoxidase-mediated damage than does S. mutans. Every organism studied exhibited a saliva concentration-dependent, cell growth-independent stimulation of glucose uptake after 60 to 90 min of incubation. The A. viscosus and S. mitis strains showed saliva stimulation (or stabilization

  3. Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Actinomyces viscosus in the Presence of Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, Greg, R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1982-01-01

    Glucose uptake was examined by using whole-cell suspensions of Streptococcus mutans (strains BHT, Ingbritt, and GS-5), Streptococcus mitis (strains 9811 and 72×41), and Actinomyces viscosus (strains T6 and WVU626) incubated for up to 90 min in 0 to 82% (vol/vol) human whole salivary supernatant. Glucose uptake by the S. mutans strains was completely inhibited at all saliva concentrations. Dithiothreitol (DTT), present during saliva incubation, prevented saliva inhibition. Glucose uptake was also restored when saliva-inhibited cells were subsequently exposed to DTT. The inclusion of catalase in the saliva incubation mixtures resulted in protection equal to that obtained with DTT. The S. mitis strains were also inhibited by saliva but to a far lesser extent that S. mutans. DTT and catalase also protected S. mitis from saliva inhibition. Both A. viscosus strains were completely refractory to saliva inhibition of glucose uptake. Based on (i) the sensitivity of the catalase-negative streptococci and the resistance of catalase-positive actinomyces to saliva inhibition and (ii) the equal and complete protection to saliva inhibition afforded by DTT and catalase, we conclude that the lactoperoxidase-SCN−-H2O2 system in saliva was the only antibacterial system expressed under our experimental conditions. The relative resistance of S. mitis 9811 (compared with S. mutans BHT) to saliva inhibition was shown not to result from poor H2O2 production in either glucose-supplemented buffer or saliva solutions. S. mitis produced inhibitory quantities of H2O2 that equaled or exceeded S. mutans H2O2 accumulation. It is suggested that S. mitis might possess a greater ability to repair lactoperoxidase-mediated damage than does S. mutans. Every organism studied exhibited a saliva concentration-dependent, cell growth-independent stimulation of glucose uptake after 60 to 90 min of incubation. The A. viscosus and S. mitis strains showed saliva stimulation (or stabilization) of glucose

  4. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus mutans GS-5, a serotype c strain.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2012-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a principal causative agent of dental caries, is considered to be the most cariogenic among all oral streptococci. Of the four S. mutans serotypes (c, e, f, and k), serotype c strains predominate in the oral cavity. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of S. mutans GS-5, a serotype c strain originally isolated from human carious lesions, which is extensively used as a laboratory strain worldwide. PMID:22887682

  5. Effect of topical anti-Streptococcus mutans IgY gel on quantity of S. mutans on rats' tooth surface.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Afdhal, Anggraeni; Meidyawati, Ratna; Soejoedono, Retno D; Poerwaningsih, Erni

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of anti-Streptococcus mutans IgY gel on quantity of S. mutans on rats' tooth surface. Sprague Dawley rats were exposed intra-orally with S. mutans Xc and were fed a caries-inducing diet 2000. The 24 rats were divided into four groups: group A had their teeth coated with IgY gel; group B received sterilized water as a control; group C had their teeth coated with IgY gel starting on the 29(th) day; and group D had their teeth coated with a gel without IgY. Plaque samples were swabbed from the anterior teeth for S. mutans colony quantification, and saliva was collected to measure immunoreactivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that the quantity of S. mutans in rats treated with IgY gel showed significant difference compared with the controls. After coating with IgY anti-S. mutans gel, the mean immunoreactivity in rat saliva was higher than that of the no treatment group. In conclusion, topical application with anti-S. mutans IgY gel reduced the quantity of S. mutans on the tooth surface. PMID:27352970

  6. Differential recovery of Streptococcus mutans from various mitis-salivarius agar preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Liljemark, W F; Okrent, D H; Bloomquist, C G

    1976-01-01

    Recoveries of Streptococcus mutans from human dental plaque were lower when plated on mitis-salivarius agar obtained from Baltimore Biological Laboratories as compared with mitis-salivarius agar obtained from Difco Laboratories. However, no difference in recoveries of established laboratory strains of S. mutans was observed between these two agar preparations. PMID:956358

  7. Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Genomically-Diverse Isolates of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Sara R.; Miller, James H.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Zeng, Lin; Lefebure, Tristan; Richards, Vincent P.; Lemos, José A.; Stanhope, Michael J.; Burne, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    High coverage, whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of 57 geographically- and genetically-diverse isolates of Streptococcus mutans from individuals of known dental caries status was recently completed. Of the 57 sequenced strains, fifteen isolates, were selected based primarily on differences in gene content and phenotypic characteristics known to affect virulence and compared with the reference strain UA159. A high degree of variability in these properties was observed between strains, with a broad spectrum of sensitivities to low pH, oxidative stress (air and paraquat) and exposure to competence stimulating peptide (CSP). Significant differences in autolytic behavior and in biofilm development in glucose or sucrose were also observed. Natural genetic competence varied among isolates, and this was correlated to the presence or absence of competence genes, comCDE and comX, and to bacteriocins. In general strains that lacked the ability to become competent possessed fewer genes for bacteriocins and immunity proteins or contained polymorphic variants of these genes. WGS sequence analysis of the pan-genome revealed, for the first time, components of a Type VII secretion system in several S. mutans strains, as well as two putative ORFs that encode possible collagen binding proteins located upstream of the cnm gene, which is associated with host cell invasiveness. The virulence of these particular strains was assessed in a wax-worm model. This is the first study to combine a comprehensive analysis of key virulence-related phenotypes with extensive genomic analysis of a pathogen that evolved closely with humans. Our analysis highlights the phenotypic diversity of S. mutans isolates and indicates that the species has evolved a variety of adaptive strategies to persist in the human oral cavity and, when conditions are favorable, to initiate disease. PMID:23613838

  8. Genetic analysis of fructan-hyperproducing strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Kiska, D L; Macrina, F L

    1994-01-01

    Fructan polymer, synthesized from sucrose by the extracellular fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans, is thought to contribute to the progression of dental caries. It may serve as an extracellular storage polysaccharide facilitating survival and acid production. It may also have a role in adherence or accumulation of bacterial cells on the tooth surface. A number of clinical isolates of S. mutans which produce large, mucoid colonies on sucrose-containing agar as a result of increased production of fructan have been discovered. By using eight independent isolates, we sought to determine if such fructan-hyperproducing strains represented a genetically homogeneous group of organisms. Restriction fragment patterns of total cellular DNA were examined by using pulsed-field and conventional gel electrophoresis. Four genetic types which appeared to correlate with the serotype of the organism and the geographic site of isolation were evident. Southern blot analysis of several genetic loci for extracellular enzymes revealed some minor differences between the strains, but the basic genomic organizations of these loci were similar. To evaluate whether the excess fructan produced by these strains enhanced the virulence of these organisms in the oral cavity, it was of interest to create mutants deficient in fructosidase (FruA), the extracellular enzyme which degrades this polymer. The fruA gene was inactivated by allelic exchange in two fructan-hyperproducing strains as well as in S. mutans GS5, a strain which does not hyperproduce fructan. All of the fruA mutant strains were devoid of fructan hydrolase activity when levan was used as a substrate. However, the fructan-hyperproducing strains retained the ability to hydrolyze inulin, suggesting the presence of a second fructosidase with specificity for inulin in these strains. Images PMID:7911782

  9. Discovery of Novel Peptides Regulating Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Kim, Jeong Nam; Seaton, Kinda

    2014-01-01

    A MarR-like transcriptional repressor (RcrR) and two predicted ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) encoded by a single operon were recently shown to be dominant regulators of stress tolerance and development of genetic competence in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Here, we focused on polar (ΔrcrR-P) and nonpolar (ΔrcrR-NP) rcrR mutants, which are hyper- and nontransformable, respectively, to dissect the mechanisms by which these mutations impact competence. We discovered two open reading frames (ORFs) in the 3′ end of the rcrQ gene that encode peptides of 27 and 42 amino acids (aa) which are also dramatically upregulated in the ΔrcrR-NP strain. Deletion of, or start codon mutations in, the ORFs for the peptides in the ΔrcrR-NP background restored competence and sensitivity to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to levels seen in the ΔrcrR-P strain. Overexpression of the peptides adversely affected competence development. Importantly, overexpression of mutant derivatives of the ABC exporters that lacked the peptides also resulted in impaired competence. FLAG-tagged versions of the peptides could be detected in S. mutans, and FLAG tagging of the peptides impaired their function. The competence phenotypes associated with the various mutations, and with overexpression of the peptides and ABC transporters, were correlated with the levels of ComX protein in cells. Collectively, these studies revealed multiple novel mechanisms for regulation of competence development by the components of the rcrRPQ operon. Given their intimate role in competence and stress tolerance, the rcrRPQ-encoded peptides may prove to be useful targets for therapeutics to diminish the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:25135217

  10. Phenotypic heterogeneity of genomically-diverse isolates of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sara R; Miller, James H; Abranches, Jacqueline; Zeng, Lin; Lefebure, Tristan; Richards, Vincent P; Lemos, José A; Stanhope, Michael J; Burne, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    High coverage, whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of 57 geographically- and genetically-diverse isolates of Streptococcus mutans from individuals of known dental caries status was recently completed. Of the 57 sequenced strains, fifteen isolates, were selected based primarily on differences in gene content and phenotypic characteristics known to affect virulence and compared with the reference strain UA159. A high degree of variability in these properties was observed between strains, with a broad spectrum of sensitivities to low pH, oxidative stress (air and paraquat) and exposure to competence stimulating peptide (CSP). Significant differences in autolytic behavior and in biofilm development in glucose or sucrose were also observed. Natural genetic competence varied among isolates, and this was correlated to the presence or absence of competence genes, comCDE and comX, and to bacteriocins. In general strains that lacked the ability to become competent possessed fewer genes for bacteriocins and immunity proteins or contained polymorphic variants of these genes. WGS sequence analysis of the pan-genome revealed, for the first time, components of a Type VII secretion system in several S. mutans strains, as well as two putative ORFs that encode possible collagen binding proteins located upstream of the cnm gene, which is associated with host cell invasiveness. The virulence of these particular strains was assessed in a wax-worm model. This is the first study to combine a comprehensive analysis of key virulence-related phenotypes with extensive genomic analysis of a pathogen that evolved closely with humans. Our analysis highlights the phenotypic diversity of S. mutans isolates and indicates that the species has evolved a variety of adaptive strategies to persist in the human oral cavity and, when conditions are favorable, to initiate disease. PMID:23613838

  11. The influence of Brazilian plant extracts on Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    BARNABÉ, Michele; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Coury; DUTRA-CORREA, Maristela; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen plant extracts obtained from plants from the Brazilian Amazon showed activity against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, an important bacterium involved in the first steps of biofilm formation and the subsequent initiation of several oral diseases. Objective Our goal was to verify whether plant extracts that showed activity against planktonic S. mutans could prevent the organization of or even disrupt a single-species biofilm made by the same bacteria. Material and Methods Plant extracts were tested on a single-bacteria biofilm prepared using the Zürich method. Each plant extract was tested at a concentration 5 times higher than its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Discs of hydroxyapatite were submersed overnight in brain-heart infusion broth enriched with saccharose 5%, which provided sufficient time for biofilm formation. The discs were then submersed in extract solutions for one minute, three times per day, for two subsequent days. The discs were then washed with saline three times, at ten seconds each, after each treatment. Supports were allowed to remain in the enriched medium for one additional night. At the end of the process, the bacteria were removed from the discs by vortexing and were counted. Results Only two of 19 plant extracts showed activity in the present assay: EB1779, obtained from Dioscorea altissima, and EB1673, obtained from Annona hypoglauca. Although the antibacterial activity of the plant extracts was first observed against planktonic S. mutans, influence over biofilm formation was not necessarily observed in the biofilm model. The present results motivate us to find new natural products to be used in dentistry. PMID:25466471

  12. Chamaecyparis obtusa Suppresses Virulence Genes in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Kang, Sun-Young; Park, Bog-Im; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Young-Rae; Hoe, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Ra, Ji-Young; An, So-Youn; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa) is known to have antimicrobial effects and has been used as a medicinal plant and in forest bathing. This study aimed to evaluate the anticariogenic activity of essential oil of C. obtusa on Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the most important bacterial causes of dental caries and dental biofilm formation. Essential oil from C. obtusa was extracted, and its effect on bacterial growth, acid production, and biofilm formation was evaluated. C. obtusa essential oil exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth over 0.025 mg/mL, with 99% inhibition at a concentration of 0.2 mg/mL. The bacterial biofilm formation and acid production were also significantly inhibited at the concentration greater than 0.025 mg/mL. The result of LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability Kit showed a concentration-dependent bactericidal effect on S. mutans and almost all bacteria were dead over 0.8 mg/mL. Real-time PCR analysis showed that gene expression of some virulence factors such as brpA, gbpB, gtfC, and gtfD was also inhibited. In GC and GC-MS analysis, the major components were found to be α-terpinene (40.60%), bornyl acetate (12.45%), α-pinene (11.38%), β-pinene (7.22%), β-phellandrene (3.45%), and α-terpinolene (3.40%). These results show that C. obtusa essential oil has anticariogenic effect on S. mutans. PMID:27293453

  13. Antibacterial effects of several current orthodontic materials against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Catalbaş, B; Kamak, H; Demir, A; Nur, M; Hadimli, H H

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the antibacterial effect of several current orthodontic materials against a certain oral bacterium. The antibacterial activities of six orthodontic composite resins (Transbond LR, Light Cure Retainer (LCR), Light Bond, System 1+, Kurasper F, Transbond XT adhesive), two orthodontic bonding materials (Transbond XT primer and System 1+ activator) and two glass ionomer cements (GIC) [Multicure Glass Ionomer and Ketac Cem GIC] were evaluated against Streptococcus mutans. The hard materials were put into the Teflon mould. The liquid materials were put on a paper disc. All materials were handled under aseptic conditions and placed on agar culture plates. All plates were incubated at 5% CO2 and 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The bacterial growth inhibition zones including the diameter of the sample were measured in millimetres. As a result of this study, the multicure GIC showed the highest antibacterial effectiveness, but no inhibition zones were noted for ketac cem GIC. The light bond adhesive of the Reliance orthodontic bonding system produced high antibacterial effect against S mutans, while the Reliance composite (LCR) did not show any antibacterial effect (p < 0.05). Both composite and primer of the transbond XT system demonstrated significant antibacterial effect against the test bacterium when compared to transbond LR (p < 0.05). Among the materials tested, kurasper F, Ormco system 1+ and system 1+ activator showed slight or no inhibitory effect against the test bacterium in this study In patients who have relatively high salivary levels of Streptococci mutans before treatment, the multicure GIC, the Reliance light bond adhesive, and transbond XT system which had high level antibacterial properties could be applied. PMID:23757904

  14. Intracerebral hemorrhage and deep microbleeds associated with cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans; a hospital cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tonomura, Shuichi; Ihara, Masafumi; Kawano, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okuno, Yoshinori; Saito, Satoshi; Friedland, Robert P.; Kuriyama, Nagato; Nomura, Ryota; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Oral infectious diseases are epidemiologically associated with stroke. We previously showed that oral Streptococcus mutans with the cnm gene encoding a collagen-binding Cnm protein induced intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) experimentally and was also associated with cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in our population-based cohort study. We therefore investigated the roles of cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans in this single hospital-based, observational study that enrolled 100 acute stroke subjects. The cnm gene in Streptococcus mutans isolated from saliva was screened using PCR techniques and its collagen-binding activities examined. CMBs were evaluated on T2* gradient-recalled echo MRI. One subject withdrew informed consent and 99 subjects (63 males) were analyzed, consisting of 67 subjects with ischemic stroke, 5 with transient ischemic attack, and 27 with ICH. Eleven cases showed Streptococcus mutans strains positive for cnm. The presence of cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans was significantly associated with ICH [OR vs. ischemic stroke, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.17–19.1] and increased number of deep CMBs [median (IQR), 3 (2–9) vs. 0 (0–1), p = 0.0002]. In subjects positive for Streptococcus mutans, collagen binding activity was positively correlated with the number of deep CMBs (R2 = 0.405; p < 0.0001). These results provide further evidence for the key role of oral health in stroke. PMID:26847666

  15. Growth of Streptococcus mutans protoplasts is not inhibited by penicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Parks, L C; Shockman, G D; Higgins, M L

    1980-01-01

    A method is described in which cells of Streptococcus mutans BHT can be converted to spherical, osmotically fragile protoplasts. Exponential-phase cells were suspended in a solution containing 0.5 M melezitose, and their cell walls were hydrolyzed with mutanolysin (M-1 enzyme). When the resultant protoplasts were incubated in a chemically defined growth medium containing 0.5 M NH4Cl, the protoplast suspensions increased in turbidity, protein, ribonucleic acid, and deoxyribonucleic acid in a balanced fashion. In the presence of benzylpenicillin (5 microgram/ml), balanced growth of protoplasts was indistinguishable from untreated controls. This absence of inhibition of protoplast growth in the presence of benzylpenicillin was apparently not due to inactivation of the antibiotic. When exponential-phase cells of S. mutans BHT were first exposed to 5 microgram of benzyl-penicillin per ml for 1 h and then converted to protoplasts, these protoplasts were also able to grow in chemically defined, osmotically stabilized medium. The ability of wall-free protoplasts to grow and to synthesize ribonucleic acid and protein in the presence of a relatively high concentration of benzylpenicillin contrasts with the previously reported rapid inhibition of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis in intact streptococci. These data suggest that this secondary inhibition of ribonucleic acid and protein synthesis in whole cells is due to factors involved with the continued assembly of an intact, insoluble cell wall rather than with earlier stages of peptidoglycan synthesis. Images PMID:6997274

  16. Identification of essential amino acids in the Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Tsumori, H; Minami, T; Kuramitsu, H K

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of the amino acid sequences of the glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci with those from the alpha-amylase family of enzymes revealed a number of conserved amino acid positions which have been implicated as essential in catalysis. Utilizing a site-directed mutagenesis approach with the GTF-I enzyme of Streptococcus mutans GS-5, we identified three of these conserved amino acid positions, Asp413, Trp491, and His561, as being important in enzymatic activity. Mutagenesis of Asp413 to Thr resulted in a GTF which expressed only about 12% of the wild-type activity. In contrast, mutagenesis of Asp411 did not inhibit enzyme activity. In addition, the D413T mutant was less stable than was the parental enzyme when expressed in Escherichia coli. Moreover, conversion of Trp491 or His561 to either Gly or Ala resulted in enzymes devoid of GTF activity, indicating the essential nature of these two amino acids for activity. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the four Tyr residues present at positions 169 to 172 which are part of a subdomain with homology to the direct repeating sequences present in the glucan-binding domain of the GTFs had little overall effect on enzymatic activity, although the glucan products appeared to be less adhesive. These results are discussed relative to the mechanisms of catalysis proposed for the GTFs and related enzymes. PMID:9171379

  17. Functional analysis of glucan binding protein B from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Mattos-Graner, Renata O; Porter, Kristen A; Smith, Daniel J; Hosogi, Yumiko; Duncan, Margaret J

    2006-06-01

    Mutans streptococci are major etiological agents of dental caries, and several of their secreted products contribute to bacterial accumulation on teeth. Of these, Streptococcus mutans glucan binding protein B (GbpB) is a novel, immunologically dominant protein. Its biological function is unclear, although GbpB shares homology with a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase from S. agalactiae and S. pneumoniae, indicative of a role in murein biosynthesis. To determine the cellular function of GbpB, we used several approaches to inactivate the gene, analyze its expression, and identify interacting proteins. None of the transformants analyzed were true gbpB mutants, since they all contained both disrupted and wild-type gene copies, and expression of functional GbpB was always conserved. Thus, the inability to obtain viable gbpB null mutants supports the notion that gbpB is an essential gene. Northern blot and real-time PCR analyses suggested that induction of gbpB expression in response to stress was a strain-dependent phenomenon. Proteins that interacted with GbpB were identified in pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays, and these data suggest that GbpB interacts with ribosomal protein L7/L12, possibly as part of a protein complex involved in peptidoglycan synthesis and cell division. PMID:16707674

  18. Regulation of gbpC expression in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Indranil; Drake, Laura; Biswas, Saswati

    2007-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the principal causative agent of dental caries, produces four glucan-binding proteins (Gbp) that play major roles in bacterial adherence and pathogenesis. One of these proteins, GbpC, is an important cell surface protein involved in biofilm formation. GbpC is also important for cariogenesis, bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. In this study, we examined the regulation of gbpC expression in S. mutans strain UA159. We found that gbpC expression attains the maximum level at mid-exponential growth phase, and the half-life of the transcript is less than 2 min. Expression from PgbpC was measured using a PgbpC-gusA transcriptional fusion reporter and was analyzed under various stress conditions, including thermal, osmotic, and acid stresses. Expression of gbpC is induced under conditions of thermal stress but is repressed during growth at low pH, whereas osmotic stress had no effect on expression from PgbpC. The results from the expression analyses were further confirmed using semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis. Our results also reveal that CovR, a global response regulator in many Streptococcus spp., represses gbpC expression at the transcriptional level. We demonstrated that purified CovR protein binds directly to the promoter region of PgbpC to repress gbpC expression. Using a DNase I protection assay, we showed that CovR binds to DNA sequences surrounding PgbpC from bases -68 to 28 (where base 1 is the start of transcription). In summary, our results indicate that various stress conditions modulate the expression of gbpC and that CovR negatively regulates the expression of the gbpC gene by directly binding to the promoter region. PMID:17616585

  19. Streptococcus mutans copes with heat stress by multiple transcriptional regulons modulating virulence and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Niu, Yulong; Zhou, Xuedong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Shida; Guo, Qiang; Li, Yuqing; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Yang, Yi; Ding, Yi; Lamont, Richard J.; Xu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the virulence of Streptococcus mutans. The virulence expression of S. mutans is linked to its stress adaptation to the changes in the oral environment. In this work we used whole-genome microarrays to profile the dynamic transcriptomic responses of S. mutans during physiological heat stress. In addition, we evaluated the phenotypic changes, including, eDNA release, initial biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharides generation, acid production/acid tolerance, and ATP turnover of S. mutans during heat stress. There were distinct patterns observed in the way that S. mutans responded to heat stress that included 66 transcription factors for the expression of functional genes being differentially expressed. Especially, response regulators of two component systems (TCSs), the repressors of heat shock proteins and regulators involved in sugar transporting and metabolism co-ordinated to enhance the cell’s survival and energy generation against heat stress in S. mutans. PMID:26251057

  20. Mutan: A mixed linkage α-[(1,3)- and (1,6)]-d-glucan from Streptococcus mutans, that induces osteoclast differentiation and promotes alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung Min; Han, Kook-Il; Jung, Eui-Gil; Kim, Yong Hyun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Yoon, Mi Sook; Chung, Sung Kyun; Kim, Wan Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2016-02-10

    Mutan is an extracellular polysaccharide of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that consists of α-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in main chains and α-(1,6) bonds in side chains. In the present study, mutan was isolated from S. mutans, and its structural characteristics were determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effects of mutan on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. Furthermore, microCT and morphometric analyses were used to determine the contribution of mutan to alveolar bone loss in the maxilla of a rat periodontitis model. Mutan increased (more than 2-fold) RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Mutan also enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the rat maxilla 2.3-fold. In mutan-treated rats, the bone mineral density, bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness decreased, whereas trabecular separation significantly increased. In addition, mutan and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced similar microarray profiles in RAW 264.7 cells. A total of 43 genes related to osteoclastogenesis were differentially expressed after either mutan or LPS treatment. Five-fold increases in the expression of several genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6, and chemokine ligands, were observed in mutan-treated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inflammation induced by S. mutans during the establishment of periodontal disease. PMID:26686164

  1. Development of species-specific primers for detection of Streptococcus mutans in mixed bacterial samples

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhou; Saxena, Deepak; Caufield, Page W.; Ge, Yao; Wang, Minqi; Li, Yihong

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the major microbial pathogen associated with dental caries in children. The objectives of this study were to design and evaluate species-specific primers for the identification of S. mutans. Validation of the best primer set, Sm479F/R, was performed using 7 S. mutans reference strains, 48 ATCC non-S. mutans strains, 92 S. mutans clinical isolates, DNA samples of S. mutans-S. sobrinus or S. mutans-S. sanguinis, and mixed bacterial DNA of saliva samples from 33 18-month-old children. All of the S. mutans samples tested positive, and no PCR products were amplified from members of the other streptococci or non-streptococci strains examined. The lowest detection level for PCR was 10−2 nanograms of S. mutans DNA (approximately 4.6 × 103 copies) in the test samples. The results of our study suggest that the Sm479F/R primer pair is highly specific and sensitive for identification of S. mutans in either purified or mixed DNA samples. PMID:17521362

  2. Lack of the Delta Subunit of RNA Polymerase Increases Virulence Related Traits of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoli; Sztajer, Helena; Buddruhs, Nora; Petersen, Jörn; Rohde, Manfred; Talay, Susanne R.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    The delta subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoE, maintains the transcriptional specificity in Gram-positive bacteria. Lack of RpoE results in massive changes in the transcriptome of the human dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we analyzed traits of the ΔrpoE mutant which are important for biofilm formation and interaction with oral microorganisms and human cells and performed a global phenotypic analysis of its physiological functions. The ΔrpoE mutant showed higher self-aggregation compared to the wild type and coaggregated with other oral bacteria and Candida albicans. It formed a biofilm with a different matrix structure and an altered surface attachment. The amount of the cell surface antigens I/II SpaP and the glucosyltransferase GtfB was reduced. The ΔrpoE mutant displayed significantly stronger adhesion to human extracellular matrix components, especially to fibronectin, than the wild type. Its adhesion to human epithelial cells HEp-2 was reduced, probably due to the highly aggregated cell mass. The analysis of 1248 physiological traits using phenotype microarrays showed that the ΔrpoE mutant metabolized a wider spectrum of carbon sources than the wild type and had acquired resistance to antibiotics and inhibitory compounds with various modes of action. The reduced antigenicity, increased aggregation, adherence to fibronection, broader substrate spectrum and increased resistance to antibiotics of the ΔrpoE mutant reveal the physiological potential of S. mutans and show that some of its virulence related traits are increased. PMID:21625504

  3. Effect of Fluoride Varnish on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva of Caries Free Children Using Dentocult SM Strip Mutans Test: A Randomized Controlled Triple Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    A, Deepti; Jeevarathan, J; Muthu, MS; Prabhu V, Rathna; Chamundeswari

    2008-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to estimate the count of Streptococcus mutans in saliva of caries free children using Dentocult SM strip mutans and to evaluate the effect of fluoride varnish on the Streptococcus mutans count in saliva of these caries free children. Methods and material: Thirty caries free children were selected for the study based on the information obtained from a questionnaire prepared. They were randomly assigned into the control group and the study group consisting of ten and twenty children respectively. Samples of saliva were collected using the saliva strips from the Dentocult SM kit and after incubation the presence of the Streptococcus mutans was evaluated using the manufacturers’ chart. The study group was subjected to Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application after 24 hours following which the samples were collected again. Results: The average Streptococcus mutans count in primary dentition of caries free children was in the range of 104 to 105 colony forming units/ml. The average Streptococcus mutans count in primary dentition of caries free children after Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application was below 104 colony forming units/ml. Conclusion: Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application showed a statistically significant reduction in the Streptococcus mutans count in saliva of the caries free children in the study group. PMID:25206081

  4. Effect of Propolis on Streptococcus mutans Counts: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, K Sundeep; Rao, Ajay; Sain, Shaniya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Propolis, a natural antibiotic, is a resinous substance that honey bees (Apis mellifera) produce. The main chemical classes present in propolis are flavonoids, phenolics and other various aromatic compounds. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial action of propolis on the concentration of Streptococcus mutans colonizing the oral cavity of children. Materials and methods: Thirty children performed the rinses, with no other changes in their oral hygiene and dietary habits. Saliva was collected at two time points: Before using the product, 1 hour after the rinse. Results: Paired t-test was used for analysis of the results. A reduction in the concentration of Streptococcus mutans was observed in samples collected after use of the extract. There was a reduction in Streptococcus mutans count when compared to samples obtained in baseline. Significant reductions were seen at the end of 1 hour. The result was statistically significant. There were no side effects in soft and hard tissues of mouth. Conclusion and clinical implication: The propolis possesses in vivo antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans present in the oral cavity and might be used as a measure to prevent dental caries. How to cite this article: Hegde KS, Bhat SS, Rao A, Sain S. Effect of Propolis on Streptococcus mutans Counts: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2013;6(1):22-25. PMID:25206182

  5. Aspartokinase of Streptococcus mutans: purification, properties, and regulation.

    PubMed Central

    McCarron, R M; Chang, Y F

    1978-01-01

    Aspartokinase from Streptococcus mutans BHT was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 242,000 by gel filtration. Cross-linking of aspartokinase with dimethyl suberimidate and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the amidinated enzyme in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed the enzyme to be composed of six identical subunits with a molecular wieght of 40,000. The optimal pH range for enzyme activity was 6.5 to 8.5. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants for aspartate and ATP were 5.5 and 2.2 mM, respectively. The enzyme was stable within the temperature range of 10 to 35 degrees C. Aspartokinase was not feedback inhibited by individual amino acids, but was concertedly inhibited by L-lysine and L-threonine (93.5% inhibition at 10 mM each). The inhibition was noncompetitive with respect to aspartate (Ki = 10 mM) and mixed with respect to ATP. L-Threonine methyl ester and L-threonine amide were able to substitute for L-threonine in feedback inhibition, but the requirement for L-lysine uas strict. The feedback inhibitor pair protected the enzyme against heat denaturation. Aspartokinase synthesis was repressed by L-threonine; this repression was enhanced by L-lysine, but was slightly attenuated by L-methionine. Images PMID:26656

  6. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo Bedran, Telma Blanca; Azelmat, Jabrane; Palomari Spolidorio, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis. PMID:24222906

  7. Virulence of Streptococcus mutans: a sensitive method for evaluating cariogenicity in young gnotobiotic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, S M; McGhee, J R; Navia, J M

    1975-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rats infected with Streptococcus mutans 6715 at 19 days of age and fed a purified diet (305) containing 5% sucrose developed extensive caries lesions on all molar surfaces within 16 days (35 days of age). Approximately twice as many lesions developed when infected rats were maintained until 45 days of age, whereas noninfected rats did not develop caries when fed diet 305. Gnotobiotic rats infected with S. mutans 6715 and fed a purified diet containing no sucrose (300) until day 25 and subsequently fed diet 305 for 10 days developed lesions similar to rats fed diet 305 for 16 days. Furthermore, rats infected with S. mutans 6715 and fed diet 300 until 45 days of age developed approximately one-half the smooth surface lesions as infected rats fed diet 305 for the same length of time. The level of caries on buccal and proximal molar surfaces in 45-day-old gnotobiotic rats varied when animals were infected with S. mutans AHT, BHT, NCTC 10449, 6715, or LM-7. Animals infected with S. mutans AHT showed more severe lesions on the buccal surfaces than those observed in animals infected with the other strains of S. mutans tested, whereas S. mutans 6715 caused significantly more caries on proximal surfaces. On the other hand, rats infected with S. mutans LM-7 exhibited the lowest level of caries on all molar surfaces of the five strains of S. mutans tested. Images PMID:1140853

  8. The collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans is involved in haemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Hokamura, Kazuya; Taniguchi, Naho; Wada, Koichiro; Kudo, Chiho; Nomura, Ryota; Kojima, Ayuchi; Naka, Shuhei; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Thura, Min; Nakajima, Atsushi; Masuda, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Speziale, Pietro; Shimada, Nobumitsu; Amano, Atsuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Umemura, Kazuo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Although several risk factors for stroke have been identified, one-third remain unexplained. Here we show that infection with Streptococcus mutans expressing collagen-binding protein (CBP) is a potential risk factor for haemorrhagic stroke. Infection with serotype k S. mutans, but not a standard strain, aggravates cerebral haemorrhage in mice. Serotype k S. mutans accumulates in the damaged, but not the contralateral hemisphere, indicating an interaction of bacteria with injured blood vessels. The most important factor for high-virulence is expression of CBP, which is a common property of most serotype k strains. The detection frequency of CBP-expressing S. mutans in haemorrhagic stroke patients is significantly higher than in control subjects. Strains isolated from haemorrhagic stroke patients aggravate haemorrhage in a mouse model, indicating that they are haemorrhagic stroke-associated. Administration of recombinant CBP causes aggravation of haemorrhage. Our data suggest that CBP of S. mutans is directly involved in haemorrhagic stroke. PMID:21952219

  9. Antibiofilm Activity of Chilean Propolis on Streptococcus mutans Is Influenced by the Year of Collection

    PubMed Central

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Lillo, Alexis; Alvear, Marysol; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of propolis varies according to factors that could have an influence on its biological properties. Polyphenols from propolis have demonstrated an inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans growth. However, it is not known if different years of propolis collection may affect its activity. We aimed to elucidate if the year of collection of propolis influences its activity on Streptococcus mutans. Polyphenol-rich extracts were prepared from propolis collected in three different years, characterized by LC-MS and quantified the content of total polyphenols and flavonoids groups. Finally, was evaluated the antibacterial effect on Streptococcus mutans and the biofilm formation. Qualitative differences were observed in total polyphenols, flavones, and flavonols and the chemical composition between the extracts, affecting the strength of inhibition of biofilm formation but not the antimicrobial assays. In conclusion, chemical composition of propolis depends on the year of collection and influences the strength of the inhibition of biofilm formation. PMID:26247015

  10. Competitive displacement of mutans streptococci and inhibition of tooth decay by Streptococcus salivarius TOVE-R.

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J M; Kurasz, A B; Clive, J

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus salivarius TOVE-R to displace virulent representatives of the most prevalent human mutans streptococci from the teeth of rats, and thereby to inhibit caries, was studied. Streptococcus mutans 10449S- or Streptococcus sobrinus 6715-13WT-infected specific-pathogen-free rats consuming a high-sucrose diet were inoculated by TOVE-R. The infectants were differentially recovered from swabs of the teeth over the time course of infection and from sonically treated material of extracted teeth and excised tongues. Despite initial colonization of the teeth by the mutans streptococci, TOVE-R colonized the teeth, unlike other essentially nonvirulent plaque formers already described. It did not colonize the tongues of the rats. TOVE-R emerged and persisted as a prominent member of the plaque ecology. There was an associated decline in the mutans streptococci on the teeth, and this decline was associated with significant inhibition of the caries component attributable to 10449S infection (56%) and to 6715-13WT infection (52%). TOVE-R did not reliably inhibit the component of fissure caries attributable to the nonmutans indigenous flora of the rats. TOVE-R itself induced no detectable decay. The data suggest the potential therapeutic utility of TOVE-R to inhibit caries by displacement of mutans streptococci from the teeth. These results supplement the already reported ability of TOVE-R to preempt initial colonization of teeth by the mutans streptococci. PMID:3980093

  11. Binding of Streptococcus mutans antigens to heart and kidney basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Barua, P K; Bergey, E J; Nisengard, R J; Neiders, M E; Albini, B

    1984-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, alkali-extracted components of Streptococcus mutans were found to bind in vitro to capillary walls and sarcolemmal sheaths of monkey cardiac muscle and to glomerular and tubular basement membranes of monkey kidney. Adsorption of S. mutans components to tissue fragments was also detected by indirect radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting on nitrocellulose paper. Antibodies did not bind to untreated, control tissues in these experiments, proving that antigens shared by S. mutans and tissue components were not involved. Rabbit and monkey heart and kidney components bound S. mutans antigens of 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr. Monkey heart also bound molecules of 90,000 and 120,000 Mr. Rabbits immunized by intravenous injection of disrupted S. mutans cells developed severe nephritis that was characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulins, complement component C3, and S. mutans antigens in the glomeruli. Immunoglobulin G eluted from nephritic kidneys reacted in immunoblots with the 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr components of S. mutans extract, indicating that the antigens that bound to tissue in vitro also bound in vivo and reacted with antibodies in situ. Antibodies to other S. mutans antigens were not detected in the kidney eluate, although they were present in the serum of the same rabbit. Images PMID:6384042

  12. New small-molecule inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase inhibit Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Nguyen, Thao; McMichael, Megan; Velu, Sadanandan E; Zou, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Wu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major aetiological agent of dental caries. Formation of biofilms is a key virulence factor of S. mutans. Drugs that inhibit S. mutans biofilms may have therapeutic potential. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a critical role in regulating the metabolism of folate. DHFR inhibitors are thus potent drugs and have been explored as anticancer and antimicrobial agents. In this study, a library of analogues based on a DHFR inhibitor, trimetrexate (TMQ), an FDA-approved drug, was screened and three new analogues that selectively inhibited S. mutans were identified. The most potent inhibitor had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 454.0±10.2nM for the biofilm and 8.7±1.9nM for DHFR of S. mutans. In contrast, the IC50 of this compound for human DHFR was ca. 1000nM, a >100-fold decrease in its potency, demonstrating the high selectivity of the analogue. An analogue that exhibited the least potency for the S. mutans biofilm also had the lowest activity towards inhibiting S. mutans DHFR, further indicating that inhibition of biofilms is related to reduced DHFR activity. These data, along with docking of the most potent analogue to the modelled DHFR structure, suggested that the TMQ analogues indeed selectively inhibited S. mutans through targeting DHFR. These potent and selective small molecules are thus promising lead compounds to develop new effective therapeutics to prevent and treat dental caries. PMID:26022931

  13. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-03-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  14. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-01-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  15. The usefulness of biotyping in the determination of selected pathogenicity determinants in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus mutans is known to be a primary etiological factor of dental caries, a widespread and growing disease in Polish children. Recognition of novel features determining the pathogenicity of this pathogen may contribute to understanding the mechanisms of bacterial infections. The goal of the study was to determine the activity of prephenate dehydrogenase (PHD) and to illuminate the role of the enzyme in S. mutans pathogenicity. The strains were biotyped based on STREPTOtest 24 biochemical identification tests and the usefulness of biotyping in the determination of S. mutans pathogenicity determinants was examined. Results Out of ninety strains isolated from children with deciduous teeth fifty three were classified as S. mutans species. PDH activity was higher (21.69 U/mg on average) in the experimental group compared to the control group (5.74 U/mg on average) (P <0.001). Moreover, it was demonstrated that biotype I, established basing on the biochemical characterization of the strain, was predominant (58.5%) in oral cavity streptococcosis. Its dominance was determined by higher PDH activity compared to biotypes II and III (P = 0.0019). Conclusions The usefulness of biotyping in the determination of Streptococcus mutans pathogenicity determinants was demonstrated. The obtained results allow for better differentiation of S. mutans species and thus may contribute to recognition of pathogenic bacteria transmission mechanisms and facilitate treatment. PMID:25096795

  16. Identification of a fourth gene involved in dTDP-rhamnose synthesis in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukioka, Y; Yamashita, Y; Nakano, Y; Oho, T; Koga, T

    1997-01-01

    We had isolated three genes (rmlA, rmlB, and rmlC) involved in dTDP-rhamnose synthesis in Streptococcus mutans and found that three genes were insufficient for dTDP-rhamnose synthesis (Y. Tsukioka, Y. Yamashita, T. Oho, Y. Nakano, and T. Koga, J. Bacteriol. 179:1126-1134, 1997). The rmlD gene of S. mutans, encoding the enzyme which catalyzes the last step of dTDP-rhamnose synthesis, has been cloned and sequenced. The cell extract of Escherichia coli expressing the rmlD gene of S. mutans exhibited enzymatic activity corresponding to its counterpart in Shigella flexneri, a gram-negative bacterium. Rhamnose was not detected in the cell wall preparation purified from the mutant in which the cloned gene was insertionally inactivated. Rabbit antiserum against S. mutans serotype c-specific antigen did not react with autoclaved extracts from the mutant. The rmlD gene product of S. mutans compensated for the incompleteness of dTDP-rhamnose synthesis by the three previously isolated genes. These results indicate that the rmlD gene product is indispensable for the dTDP-rhamnose pathway and subsequently for the synthesis of serotype-specific antigen in S. mutans. Furthermore, conservation of the rmlD gene in Streptococcus species was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis. PMID:9209063

  17. Effects of simulated microgravity on Streptococcus mutans physiology and biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Wang, Renke; Jia, Wenxiang; Li, Yu-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Long-term spaceflights will eventually become an inevitable occurrence. Previous studies have indicated that oral infectious diseases, including dental caries, were more prevalent in astronauts due to the effect of microgravity. However, the impact of the space environment, especially the microgravity environment, on the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major caries-associated bacterium, is yet to be explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on the physiology and biofilm structure of S. mutans. We also explored the dual-species interaction between S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis under a simulated microgravity condition. Results indicated that the simulated microgravity condition can enhance the acid tolerance ability, modify the biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution of S. mutans, and increase the proportion of S. mutans within a dual-species biofilm, probably through the regulation of various gene expressions. We hypothesize that the enhanced competitiveness of S. mutans under simulated microgravity may cause a multispecies micro-ecological imbalance, which would result in the initiation of dental caries. Our current findings are consistent with previous studies, which revealed a higher astronaut-associated incidence of caries. Further research is required to explore the detailed mechanisms. PMID:25109245

  18. Characterization of a P1-deficient strain of Streptococcus mutans that expresses the SpaA protein of Streptococcus sobrinus.

    PubMed

    Kuykindoll, R J; Holt, R G

    1996-09-01

    The Streptococcus sobrinus SpaA protein and the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein share 66% sequence homology at the amino acid level. To determine if the SpaA protein can be expressed in S. mutans and functionally replace the P1 protein, the spaA gene of S. sobrinus 6715 was isolated from plasmid pX1303 and inserted into the Escherichia coli-Streptococcus shuttle vector pVA838. The resulting plasmid pX1600 was transformed into the P1-deficient strain S. mutans 834 that has defects in saliva-mediated aggregation and in the ability to adhere to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surfaces. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of cellular protein fractions of S. mutans 834 (pX1600) detected in mutanolysin-solubilized cell walls a major protein of 210 kDa with an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of S. sobrinus SpaA protein and a minor 210-kDa protein and a major 64-kDa protein in the extracellular protein fraction. Analysis of virulence traits showed that expression of SpaA protein by S. mutans 834(pX1600) cells had restored the ability of the S. mutans 834 cells to aggregate in the presence of saliva or salivary agglutinin but not to adhere to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite. This cell aggregation was inhibited specifically by antisera to S. sobrinus SpaA protein. These results indicate that SpaA plays a role in the virulence of S. sobrinus by specifically interacting with fluid-phase salivary agglutinin to mediate cell aggregation. PMID:8751913

  19. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus detection by Polymerase Chain Reaction and their relation to dental caries in 12 and 15 year-old schoolchildren in Valencia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Acedo, Mateo; Montiel-Company, José M.; Dasí-Fernández, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus and the association of the two in a random sample (n=614) of the child population of the region of Valencia (Spain). Saliva samples were analyzed by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method to study the relation of these bacteria to caries prevalence and the DMFT index. The prevalence of S. mutans was 35.4% at age 12 and 22.9% at age 15, that of S. sobrinus 18.9% and 8.4% and that of the S. mutans-S. sobrinus association 18.2% and 6.8% respectively. At both 12 and 15 years of age, the caries prevalence rates were lower in the Streptococcus-free group of children (37.6% and 48.5% respectively) and higher in the S.mutans-only group (67.3% and 74.0%). At the age of 12, the DMFT index was significantly higher in the mutans-only carriers (2.1) than in the Streptococcus-free and S. mutans-S. sobrinus association groups (both 0.9). At the age of 15, the DMFT index was significantly higher in the S. mutans-S. sobrinus association (3.71) and mutans-only (3.1) carrier groups than in the Streptococcus-free group (1.4). Determination of S. mutans and S. sobrinus by real-time quantitative PCR can provide valuable information for caries risk assessment in epidemiological studies. Key words:Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, polymerase chain reaction, dental caries, cross-sectional studies. PMID:23722138

  20. Typing of Streptococcus mutans strains isolated from caries free and susceptible subjects by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Shirian, Hannaneh; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Tahmourespour, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    This study was evaluated the clonal diversity of Streptococcus mutans in caries-free and caries-active subjects using MLEE. Strains from caries-free subjects were grouped in a single taxon. Unrooted dendrogram showed that different strains clustered in four different clades, also showed that more than one clonal type can be found in a same individual. PMID:24516455

  1. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  2. Typing of Streptococcus mutans strains isolated from caries free and susceptible subjects by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Shirian, Hannaneh; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Tahmourespour, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    This study was evaluated the clonal diversity of Streptococcus mutans in caries-free and caries-active subjects using MLEE. Strains from caries-free subjects were grouped in a single taxon. Unrooted dendrogram showed that different strains clustered in four different clades, also showed that more than one clonal type can be found in a same individual. PMID:24516455

  3. Detection of Streptococcus mutans Genomic DNA in Human DNA Samples Extracted from Saliva and Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Deeley, Kathleen B.; Callahan, Nicholas F.; Noel, Jacqueline B.; Anjomshoaa, Ida; Carricato, Wendy M.; Schulhof, Louise P.; DeSensi, Rebecca S.; Gandhi, Pooja; Resick, Judith M.; Brandon, Carla A.; Rozhon, Christopher; Patir, Asli; Yildirim, Mine; Poletta, Fernando A.; Mereb, Juan C.; Letra, Ariadne; Menezes, Renato; Wendell, Steven; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Orioli, Iêda M.; Seymen, Figen; Weyant, Robert J.; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W.; Modesto, Adriana; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Caries is a multifactorial disease, and studies aiming to unravel the factors modulating its etiology must consider all known predisposing factors. One major factor is bacterial colonization, and Streptococcus mutans is the main microorganism associated with the initiation of the disease. In our studies, we have access to DNA samples extracted from human saliva and blood. In this report, we tested a real-time PCR assay developed to detect copies of genomic DNA from Streptococcus mutans in 1,424 DNA samples from humans. Our results suggest that we can determine the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in both DNA samples from caries-free and caries-affected individuals. However, we were not able to detect the presence of genomic DNA copies of Streptococcus mutans in any DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood, which suggests the assay may not be sensitive enough for this goal. Values of the threshold cycle of the real-time PCR reaction correlate with higher levels of caries experience in children, but this correlation could not be detected for adults. PMID:21731912

  4. Reciprocal interaction between dental alloy biocorrosion and Streptococcus mutans virulent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songmei; Qiu, Jing; Ren, Yanfang; Yu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of dental alloys is a major concern in dental restorations. Streptococcus mutans reduces the pH in oral cavity and induces demineralization of the enamel as well as corrosion of restorative dental materials. The rough surfaces of dental alloys induced by corrosion enhance the subsequent accumulation of plaque. In this study, the corrosion process of nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys in a nutrient-rich medium containing S. mutans was studied using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical corrosion test. Our results showed that the release of Ni and Co ions increased, particularly after incubation for 3 days. The electrochemical corrosion results showed a significant decrease in the corrosion resistance (Rp) value after the alloys were immersed in the media containing S. mutans for 3 days. Correspondingly, XPS revealed a reduction in the relative dominance of Ni, Co, and Cr in the surface oxides after the alloys were immersed in the S. mutans culture. After removal of the biofilm, the pre-corroded alloys were re-incubated in S. mutans medium, and the expressions of genes associated with the adhesion and acidogenesis of S. mutans, including gtfBCD, gbpB, fif and ldh, were evaluated by detecting the mRNA levels using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We found that the gtfBCD, gbpB, ftf and Idh expression of S. mutans were noticeably increased after incubation with pre-corroded alloys for 24 h. This study demonstrated that S. mutans enhanced the corrosion behavior of the dental alloys, on the other hand, the presence of corroded alloy surfaces up-regulated the virulent gene expression in S. mutans. Compared with smooth surfaces, the rough corroded surfaces of dental alloys accelerated the bacteria-adhesion and corrosion process by changing the virulence gene expression of S. mutans. PMID:26896953

  5. Genotypic characterization of initial acquisition of Streptococcus mutans in American Indian children

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David J.; Villhauer, Alissa L.; Warren, John J.; Marshall, Teresa A.; Dawson, Deborah V.; Blanchette, Derek R.; Phipps, Kathy R.; Starr, Delores E.; Drake, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe-early childhood caries (S-ECC) is one of the most common infectious diseases in children and is prevalent in lower socio-economic populations. American Indian children suffer from the highest levels of S-ECC in the United States. Members of the mutans streptococci, Streptococcus mutans, in particular, are key etiologic agents in the development of caries. Children typically acquire S. mutans from their mothers and early acquisition is often associated with higher levels of tooth decay. Methods We have conducted a 5-year birth cohort study with a Northern Plains Tribe to determine the temporality and fidelity of S. mutans transmission from mother to child in addition to the genotypic diversity of S. mutans in this community. Plaque samples were collected from 239 mother/child dyads at regular intervals from birth to 36 months and S. mutans were isolated and genotyped by arbitrarily primed-polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR). Results Here we present preliminary findings from a subset of the cohort. The focus for this paper is on initial acquisition events in the children. We identified 17 unique genotypes in 711 S. mutans isolates in our subset of 40 children, 40 mothers and 14 primary caregivers. Twelve of these genotypes were identified in more than one individual. S. mutans colonization occurred by 16 months in 57.5% of the children and early colonization was associated with higher decayed, missing and filled surface (DMFS) scores (p=0.0007). Children colonized by S. mutans shared a common genotype with their mothers 47.8% of the time. While multiple genotypes were common in adults, only 10% of children harbored multiple genotypes. Conclusion These children acquire S. mutans at an earlier age than the originally described ‘window of infectivity’ and often, but not exclusively, from their mothers. Early acquisition is associated with both the caries status of the children and the mothers. PMID:25840611

  6. Effect of immunization on susceptibility to experimental Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Durack, D T; Gilliland, B C; Petersdorf, R G

    1978-01-01

    It has been asserted that humoral immunity is an important potentiating factor in pathogenesis of infective endocarditis, in that prior immunization to certain bacteria may predispose the host to endocarditis caused by those organisms. If so, possible future vaccination of humans with streptococcal antigens for the prevention of dental caries might increase the susceptibility of the population to streptococcal endocarditis. To examine this hypothesis further, we immunized rabbits with killed Streptococcus sanguis or Streptococcus mutans. After complement-fixing antibody had developed, the rabbits were tested for susceptibility to experimental infective endocarditis. Rabbits with high titers of complement-fixing antibody to the infecting organism developed streptococcal endocarditis less often (13%) than animals with lower titers (69%; P less than 0.0002). These findings do not support the hypothesis that pre-immunization predisposes to infective endocarditis and lend no credence to the concept that vaccination of human subjects against dental caries might increase their susceptibility to streptococcal endocarditis. On the contrary, the results of these experiments indicate that specific antibody can confer relative immunity to infective endocarditis. PMID:730349

  7. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of an herbal dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Yogesh Kumar; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Sharma, Kanika

    2008-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of a herbal dentifrice Arodent against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was evaluated using Colgate as standard. Both bacterial strains were isolated from the oral cavity on selective media and identified by standard methods. The antibacterial activity was assayed by cup-well method. The bacterial lawn of facultative anaerobe S. mutans was established between two layers of agar under microaerophilic conditions. Five and a half millimeters and 10 mm zones of inhibition were produced by Arodent against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic conditions. On the other hand, the standard dentifrice Colgate produced 5.83 mm and 10.17 mm zones of inhibition against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic condition. The results suggest that Arodent is an effective antibacterial herbal dentifrice. PMID:18245920

  8. Isolation of a Novel Phage with Activity against Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, Marion; de Haas, Eric; Neve, Horst; Strain, Ronan; Cousin, Fabien J.; Stockdale, Stephen R.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the principal agents of caries formation mainly, because of its ability to form biofilms at the tooth surface. Bacteriophages (phages) are promising antimicrobial agents that could be used to prevent or treat caries formation by S. mutans. The aim of this study was to isolate new S. mutans phages and to characterize their antimicrobial properties. A new phage, ɸAPCM01, was isolated from a human saliva sample. Its genome was closely related to the only two other available S. mutans phage genomes, M102 and M102AD. ɸAPCM01 inhibited the growth of S. mutans strain DPC6143 within hours in broth and in artificial saliva at multiplicity of infections as low as 2.5x10-5. In the presence of phage ɸAPCM01 the metabolic activity of a S. mutans biofilm was reduced after 24 h of contact and did not increased again after 48 h, and the live cells in the biofilm decreased by at least 5 log cfu/ml. Despite its narrow host range, this newly isolated S. mutans phage exhibits promising antimicrobial properties. PMID:26398909

  9. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liping; Tong, Zhongchun; Linghu, Dake; Lin, Yuan; Tao, Rui; Liu, Jun; Tian, Yu; Ni, Longxing

    2012-05-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of antimicrobial agents can inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. However, the mechanisms by which antimicrobial agents at sub-MICs inhibit biofilm formation remain unclear. At present, most studies are focused on Gram-negative bacteria; however, the effects of sub-MICs of antimicrobial agents on Gram-positive bacteria may be more complex. Streptococcus mutans is a major cariogenic bacterium. In this study, the S. mutans growth curve as well as the expression of genes related to S. mutans biofilm formation were evaluated following treatment with 0.5× MIC of chlorhexidine (CHX), tea polyphenols and sodium fluoride (NaF), which are common anticaries agents. The BioFlux system was employed to generate a biofilm under a controlled flow. Morphological changes of the S. mutans biofilm were observed and analysed using field emission scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The results indicated that these three common anticaries agents could significantly upregulate expression of the genes related to S. mutans biofilm formation, and S. mutans exhibited a dense biofilm with an extensive extracellular matrix following treatment with sub-MICs of NaF and CHX. These findings suggest that sub-MICs of anticaries agents favour S. mutans biofilm formation, which might encourage dental caries progression. PMID:22421330

  10. Assessment of clonality and serotypes of Streptococcus mutans among children by multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Stephanie S; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A; Childers, Noel K

    2015-12-01

    Studies using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) have demonstrated that Streptococcus mutans isolates are genetically diverse. Our laboratory previously demonstrated clonality of S. mutans using MLST but could not discount the possibility of sampling bias. In this study, the clonality of randomly selected S. mutans plaque isolates from African-American children was examined using MLST. Serotype and the presence of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) encoded by cnm/cbm were also assessed. One-hundred S. mutans isolates were randomly selected for MLST analysis. Sequence analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were generated using start2 and mega. Thirty-four sequence types were identified, of which 27 were unique to this population. Seventy-five per cent of the isolates clustered into 16 clonal groups. The serotypes observed were c (n = 84), e (n = 3), and k (n = 11). The prevalence of S. mutans isolates of serotype k was notably high, at 17.5%. All isolates were cnm/cbm negative. The clonality of S. mutans demonstrated in this study illustrates the importance of localized population studies and are consistent with transmission. The prevalence of serotype k, a recently proposed systemic pathogen, observed in this study, is higher than reported in most populations and is the first report of S. mutans serotype k in a United States population. PMID:26443288

  11. Exopolysaccharides produced by Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases modulate the establishment of microcolonies within multispecies biofilms.

    PubMed

    Koo, H; Xiao, J; Klein, M I; Jeon, J G

    2010-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a key contributor to the formation of the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) matrix in dental biofilms. The exopolysaccharides, which are mostly glucans synthesized by streptococcal glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), provide binding sites that promote accumulation of microorganisms on the tooth surface and further establishment of pathogenic biofilms. This study explored (i) the role of S. mutans Gtfs in the development of the EPS matrix and microcolonies in biofilms, (ii) the influence of exopolysaccharides on formation of microcolonies, and (iii) establishment of S. mutans in a multispecies biofilm in vitro using a novel fluorescence labeling technique. Our data show that the ability of S. mutans strains defective in the gtfB gene or the gtfB and gtfC genes to form microcolonies on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surfaces was markedly disrupted. However, deletion of both gtfB (associated with insoluble glucan synthesis) and gtfC (associated with insoluble and soluble glucan synthesis) is required for the maximum reduction in EPS matrix and biofilm formation. S. mutans grown with sucrose in the presence of Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces naeslundii steadily formed exopolysaccharides, which allowed the initial clustering of bacterial cells and further development into highly structured microcolonies. Concomitantly, S. mutans became the major species in the mature biofilm. Neither the EPS matrix nor microcolonies were formed in the presence of glucose in the multispecies biofilm. Our data show that GtfB and GtfC are essential for establishment of the EPS matrix, but GtfB appears to be responsible for formation of microcolonies by S. mutans; these Gtf-mediated processes may enhance the competitiveness of S. mutans in the multispecies environment in biofilms on tooth surfaces. PMID:20233920

  12. Antibacterial properties of composite resins incorporating silver and zinc oxide nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Sami, Lida; Hendi, Sareh; AliKhani, Mohammad-Yousef; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Recurrent caries was partly ascribed to lack of antibacterial properties in composite resin. Silver and zinc nanoparticles are considered to be broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of composite resins containing 1% silver and zinc-oxide nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. Materials and Methods Ninety discoid tablets containing 0%, 1% nano-silver and 1% nano zinc-oxide particles were prepared from flowable composite resin (n = 30). The antibacterial properties of composite resin discs were evaluated by direct contact test. Diluted solutions of Streptococcus mutans (PTCC 1683) and Lactobacillus (PTCC 1643) were prepared. 0.01 mL of each bacterial species was separately placed on the discs. The discs were transferred to liquid culture media and were incubated at 37℃ for 8 hr. 0.01 mL of each solution was cultured on blood agar and the colonies were counted. Data was analyzed with Kruskall-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results Composites containing nano zinc-oxide particles or silver nanoparticles exhibited higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The effect of zinc-oxide on Streptococcus mutans was significantly higher than that of silver (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the antibacterial activity against Lactobacillus between composites containing silver nanoparticles and those containing zinc-oxide nanoparticles. Conclusions Composite resins containing silver or zinc-oxide nanoparticles exhibited antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus. PMID:24790923

  13. Regulation of ATP-dependent P-(Ser)-HPr formation in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, T; Brochu, D; Vadeboncoeur, C; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Sugar transport via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) phosphotransferase system involves PEP-dependent phosphorylation of the general phosphotransferase system protein, HPr, at histidine 15. However, gram-positive bacteria can also carry out ATP-dependent phosphorylation of HPr at serine 46 by means of (Ser)HPr kinase. In this study, we demonstrate that (Ser)HPr kinase in crude preparations of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 25975 is membrane associated, with pH optima of 7.0 and 7.5, respectively. The latter organism possessed 7- to 27-fold-higher activity than S. mutans NCTC 10449, GS-5, and Ingbritt strains. The enzyme in S. salivarius was activated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) twofold with 0.05 mM ATP, but this intermediate was slightly inhibitory with 1.0 mM ATP at FBP concentrations up to 10 mM. Similar inhibition was observed with the enzyme from S. mutans Ingbritt. A variety of other glycolytic intermediates had no effect on kinase activity under these conditions. The activity and regulation of (Ser)HPr kinase were assessed in vivo by monitoring P-(Ser)-HPr formation in steady-state cells of S. mutans Ingbritt grown in continuous culture with limiting glucose (10 and 50 mM) and with excess glucose (100 and 200 mM). All four forms of HPr [free HPr, P approximately (His)-HPr, P-(Ser)-HPr, and P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] could be detected in the cells; however, significant differences in the intracellular levels of the forms were apparent during growth at different glucose concentrations. The total HPr pool increased with increasing concentrations of glucose in the medium, with significant increases in the P-(Ser)-HPr and P approximately HHis)-P-(Ser)-HPr concentrations. For example, while total PEP-dependent phosphorylation [P approximately(His)-HPr plus P approximately (His)-P-(Ser)-HPr] varied only from 21.5 to 52.5 microgram mg of cell protein (-1) in cells grown at the four glucose concentrations, the total ATP

  14. Oral ecology and virulence of Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans in gnotobiotic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, S M; Hirasawa, M; Kiyono, H; Ochiai, K; McGhee, J R

    1981-01-01

    Lactobacilli comprise a small percentage of the normal oral microbial flora of humans and are isolated commonly from saliva and frequently from an active caries lesion. We have compared the pathogenesis and colonization pattern of Lactobacillus casei with that of Streptococcus mutans strain 6715 in gnotobiotic rats. Of the two L. casei strains tested, L. casei strain ATCC 4646 caused slightly more caries than L. casei strain ATCC 11578. However, the level of caries induced by either L. casei strain was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) than that observed in similar-aged rats monoassociated with S. mutans strain 6715. When groups of rats were infected with mixtures of L. casei strain ATCC 4646 and S. mutans strain 6715, or with L. casei followed by S. mutans, higher numbers of L. casei than S. mutans were found associated with the tongue and in saliva; S. mutans always predominated in plaque. The level of caries observed in these groups of rats was similar to that seen with rats monoassociated with S. mutans except when L. casei comprised greater than 1% of the plaque microflora. In this latter situation, the level of caries was significantly lower (P less than or equal to 0.05) than that obtained in S. mutans-monoassociated rats. The results of this study suggest that L. casei colonizes sites in the oral cavity (including the tongue and saliva) other than the tooth surface in rats. The effect of L. casei in plaque toward reduction of S. mutans-induced dental caries in rats is discussed. PMID:6793515

  15. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Calotropis gigentica against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus: An in vitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Tandon, Sandeep; Aggarwal, Vishal; Bhat, Kishore G; Kappadi, Damodhar; Chandrashekhar, Pavitra; Dorwal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to evaluate in vitro antibacterial potential of ethanolic extract of Calotropis gigentica. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory effect of the ethanolic extract was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli casei by using disc diffusion method. Results: Ethanolic extract of Calotropis gigentica showed 16 mm and 14 mm of minimum inhibition zone at 1.25% concentration for S. mutans and lactobacilli, respectively. Conclusion: Calotropis gigentica was found to effective against S. mutans and lactobacilli. PMID:26752839

  16. Comparing the cariogenic species Streptococcus sobrinus and S. mutans on whole genome level

    PubMed Central

    Conrads, Georg; de Soet, Johannes J.; Song, Lifu; Henne, Karsten; Sztajer, Helena; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Two closely related species of mutans streptococci, namely Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, are associated with dental caries in humans. Their acidogenic and aciduric capacity is directly associated with the cariogenic potential of these bacteria. To survive acidic and temporarily harsh conditions in the human oral cavity with hundreds of other microbial co-colonizers as competitors, both species have developed numerous mechanisms for adaptation. Objectives The recently published novel genome information for both species is used to elucidate genetic similarities but especially differences and to discuss the impact on cariogenicity of the corresponding phenotypic properties including adhesion, carbohydrate uptake and fermentation, acid tolerance, signaling by two component systems, competence, and oxidative stress resistance. Conclusions S. sobrinus can down-regulate the SpaA-mediated adherence to the pellicle. It has a smaller number of two-component signaling systems and bacteriocin-related genes than S. mutans, but all or even more immunity proteins. It lacks the central competence genes comC, comS, and comR. There are more genes coding for glucosyltransferases and a novel energy production pathway formed by lactate oxidase, which is not found in S. mutans. Both species show considerable differences in the regulation of fructan catabolism. However, both S. mutans and S. sobrinus share most of these traits and should therefore be considered as equally virulent with regard to dental caries. PMID:25475081

  17. Zoocin A and lauricidin in combination reduce Streptococcus mutans growth in a multispecies biofilm.

    PubMed

    Lester, K; Simmonds, R S

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent human infection. It is a multifactorial disease in which the microbial composition of dental plaque plays a major role in the development of clinical symptoms. The bacteria most often implicated in the development of caries are that group of streptococci referred to as the mutans streptococci, in particular Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. One approach to the prevention of caries is to reduce the numbers of mutans streptococci in plaque to a level insufficient to support demineralization of the tooth. In this study, zoocin A, a peptidoglycan hydrolase, combined with lauricidin, a cell membrane active lipid, was shown over a 72 h period to selectively suppress the growth of S. mutans in a triple species biofilm. Growth of the non-target species Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces viscosus was not inhibited. In treated systems the amount of extracellular polysaccharide matrix produced was much reduced as determined by use of fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated wheat germ agglutinin. The pH of treated biofilms remained above neutral as opposed to a value of 4.3 in untreated controls. We conclude that use of antimicrobial compounds that specifically target cariogenic bacteria should be further explored. PMID:22508519

  18. Hydroxychalcone inhibitors of Streptococcus mutans glucosyl transferases and biofilms as potential anticaries agents.

    PubMed

    Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Casals, Luke; Zheng, Ruowen; Wu, Hui; Velu, Sadanandan E

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as the major etiological agent in the initiation and the development of dental caries due to its robust capacity to form tenacious biofilms. Ideal therapeutics for this disease will aim to selectively inhibit the biofilm formation process while preserving the natural bacterial flora of the mouth. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacies of flavonols on S. mutans biofilms and have suggested the mechanism of action through their effect on S. mutans glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). These enzymes metabolize sucrose into water insoluble and soluble glucans, which are an integral measure of the dental caries pathogenesis. Numerous studies have shown that flavonols and polyphenols can inhibit Gtf and biofilm formation at millimolar concentrations. We have screened a group of 14 hydroxychalcones, synthetic precursors of flavonols, in an S. mutans biofilm assay. Several of these compounds emerged to be biofilm inhibitors at low micro-molar concentrations. Chalcones that contained a 3-OH group on ring A exhibited selectivity for biofilm inhibition. Moreover, we synthesized 6 additional analogs of the lead compound and evaluated their potential activity and selectivity against S. mutans biofilms. The most active compound identified from these studies had an IC50 value of 44μM against biofilm and MIC50 value of 468μM against growth displaying >10-fold selectivity inhibition towards biofilm. The lead compound displayed a dose dependent inhibition of S. mutans Gtfs. The lead compound also did not affect the growth of two commensal species (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus gordonii) at least up to 200μM, indicating that it can selectively inhibit cariogenic biofilms, while leaving commensal and/or beneficial microbes intact. Thus non-toxic compounds have the potential utility in public oral health regimes. PMID:27371109

  19. The Collagen Binding Protein Cnm Contributes to Oral Colonization and Cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James H.; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Gregoire, Stacy; Watson, Gene E.; Sampson, Edith; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Koo, Hyun; Bowen, William H.; Lemos, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries and one of the many bacterial species implicated in infective endocarditis. The expression of the collagen-binding protein Cnm by S. mutans has been associated with extraoral infections, but its relevance for dental caries has only been theorized to date. Due to the collagenous composition of dentinal and root tissues, we hypothesized that Cnm may facilitate the colonization of these surfaces, thereby enhancing the pathogenic potential of S. mutans in advancing carious lesions. As shown for extraoral endothelial cell lines, Cnm mediates the invasion of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts by S. mutans. In this study, we show that in the Cnm+ native strain, OMZ175, Cnm mediates stringent adhesion to dentinal and root tissues as well as collagen-coated surfaces and promotes both cariogenicity and carriage in vivo. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments revealed that while Cnm is not universally required for S. mutans cariogenicity, it contributes to (i) the invasion of the oral epithelium, (ii) enhanced binding on collagenous surfaces, (iii) implantation of oral biofilms, and (IV) the severity of caries due to a native Cnm+ isolate. Taken together, our findings reveal that Cnm is a colonization factor that contributes to the pathogenicity of certain S. mutans strains in their native habitat, the oral cavity. PMID:25733523

  20. Antibacterial activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in planktonic cultures and biofilms of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane A; Costa, Anna Carolina B Pereira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane S; Rego, Marcos A; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important cariogenic microorganism, and alternative methods for its elimination are required. Different concentrations of Baccharis dracunculifolia essential oil (EO) were tested to determine its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in planktonic cultures, and this concentration was used in S. mutans biofilms. Additionally, we assessed the effect of a 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and saline solution in S. mutans biofilms. The biofilms were grown in discs of composite resin for 48h and exposed to B. dracunculifolia, CHX or saline solution for 5min. The viability of the biofilms was determined by counting the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) in agar, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The MIC of the B. dracunculifolia EO to planktonic growth of S. mutans was 6%. In biofilms of S. mutans clinical isolates, B. dracunculifolia EO (6%) and CHX resulted in reductions of 53.3-91.1% and 79.1-96.6%, respectively. For the biofilm formed by the S. mutans reference strain, the reductions achieved with B. dracunculifolia EO and CHX were, respectively, 39.3% and 88.1%. It was concluded that B. dracunculifolia EO showed antibacterial activity and was able to control this oral microorganism, which otherwise causes dental caries. PMID:26614752

  1. Effect of LongZhang Gargle on Biofilm Formation and Acidogenicity of Streptococcus mutans In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yutao; Liu, Shiyu; He, Yuanli

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, with the ability of high-rate acid production and strong biofilm formation, is considered the predominant bacterial species in the pathogenesis of human dental caries. Natural products which may be bioactive against S. mutans have become a hot spot to researches to control dental caries. LongZhang Gargle, completely made from Chinese herbs, was investigated for its effects on acid production and biofilm formation by S. mutans in this study. The results showed an antimicrobial activity of LongZhang Gargle against S. mutans planktonic growth at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 16% and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 32%. Acid production was significantly inhibited at sub-MIC concentrations. Biofilm formation was also significantly disrupted, and 8% was the minimum concentration that resulted in at least 50% inhibition of biofilm formation (MBIC50). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed an effective disruption of LongZhang Gargle on S. mutans biofilm integrity. In addition, a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) suggested that the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis could be inhibited by LongZhang Gargle at a relatively low concentration. These findings suggest that LongZhang Gargle may be a promising natural anticariogenic agent in that it suppresses planktonic growth, acid production, and biofilm formation against S. mutans. PMID:27314029

  2. Mutanase from Paenibacillus sp. MP-1 produced inductively by fungal α-1,3-glucan and its potential for the degradation of mutan and Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wiater, A.; Szczodrak, J.

    2010-01-01

    Laetiporus sulphureus is a source of α-1,3-glucan that can substitute for the commercially-unavailable streptococcal mutan used to induce microbial mutanases. The water-insoluble fraction of its fruiting bodies from 0.15 to 0.2% (w/v) induced mutanase activity in Paenibacillus sp. MP-1 at 0.35 μ ml−1. The mutanase extensively hydrolyzed streptococcal mutan, giving 23% of saccharification, and 83% of solubilization of glucan after 6 h. It also degraded α-1,3-polymers of biofilms, formed in vitro by Streptococcus mutans, even after only 3 min of contact. PMID:20623316

  3. Mutanase from Paenibacillus sp. MP-1 produced inductively by fungal α-1,3-glucan and its potential for the degradation of mutan and Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Pleszczyńska, M; Wiater, A; Szczodrak, J

    2010-11-01

    Laetiporus sulphureus is a source of α-1,3-glucan that can substitute for the commercially-unavailable streptococcal mutan used to induce microbial mutanases. The water-insoluble fraction of its fruiting bodies from 0.15 to 0.2% (w/v) induced mutanase activity in Paenibacillus sp. MP-1 at 0.35 μ ml(-1). The mutanase extensively hydrolyzed streptococcal mutan, giving 23% of saccharification, and 83% of solubilization of glucan after 6 h. It also degraded α-1,3-polymers of biofilms, formed in vitro by Streptococcus mutans, even after only 3 min of contact. PMID:20623316

  4. Lack of effect of chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans transmission and caries in mothers and children.

    PubMed

    Dasanayake, A P; Wiener, H W; Li, Y; Vermund, S H; Vermund, S V; Caufield, P W

    2002-01-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, we evaluated the effect of a 10% chlorhexidine varnish (Chlorzoin) on the mother-child transmission of Streptococcus mutans and on subsequent caries experience. Chlorhexidine (n = 38) or a placebo varnish (n = 37) was applied to the dentitions of 75 mothers at a time when their first babies were about 6 months old (approximate time of first tooth emergence). Three more applications at weekly intervals and subsequent applications at 6-month intervals followed the initial application. The mother-child pairs were followed up until the child's fourth birthday. Maternal salivary S. mutans levels in the treatment group remained significantly lower (p < 0.05) compared to the control group up to 12 months after the initial application. However, this intervention did not significantly alter the S. mutans colonization in children or the caries increment in either the mother or the child. PMID:12218279

  5. The Antibacterial Effects of Apacaries Gel on Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Peerapattana, Jomjai; Ratanathongkam, Ariya; Nualkaew, Nartsajee; Chatchiwiwattana, Supaporn; Treesuwan, Panta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: New approaches for chemomechanical caries removal require effective materials with antibacterial properties for removal of infected dentin. Apacaries gel is a newly developed material comprised polyphenol from mangosteen extracts and papain mixed in gel preparation. Aim: This study evaluated the antibacterial effects of Apacaries gel on Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Materials and methods: Mangosteen pericarp powder was extracted. The amount of phenolic compounds was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The time-kill kinetics were investigated. Mangosteen extract and papain were mixed with gel base to develop Apacaries gel. The inhibition zone of the Apacaries gel was determined using agar well diffusion methods. Results: The mangosteen pericarp extract, which contains α-mangostin, was active against S. mutans strain ATCC25175. The time-kill kinetics curve showed that applying 1 mg/ml of mangosteen extract can reduce S. mutans by 50% within approximately 5 seconds; after this reduction, the bacterial count rapidly dropped to 0 within 60 seconds. Using mangosteen extract and papain mixture gel preparation resulted in a larger inhibition zone than using the mangosteen extract gel or papain gel separately. Conclusion: Apacaries gel can effectively inhibit S. mutans strain ATCC25175. Apacaries is capable of S. mutans inhibition better than both mangosteen extract or papain separately. How to cite this article: Juntavee A, Peerapattana J, Ratanathongkam A, Nualkaew N, Chatchiwiwattana S, Treesuwan P. The Antibacterial Effects of Apacaries Gel on Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):77-81. PMID:25356004

  6. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  7. Conserved and divergent functions of RcrRPQ in Streptococcus gordonii and S. mutans

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    In the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans, an MarR-like transcriptional regulator (RcrR), two ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) and two effector peptides encoded in the rcrRPQ operon provide molecular connections between stress tolerance, (p)ppGpp metabolism and genetic competence. Here, we examined the role of RcrRPQ in the oral commensal S. gordonii. Unlike in S. mutans, introduction of polar or non-polar rcrR mutations into S. gordonii elicited no significant changes in transformation efficiency. However, S. gordonii rcrR mutants were markedly impaired in their ability to grow in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, low pH or elevated temperature. Sensitivity to paraquat could also be conferred by mutation of cysteine residues that are present in the RcrR protein of S. gordonii, but not in S. mutans RcrR. Thus, stress tolerance is a conserved function of RcrRPQ in a commensal and pathogenic streptococcus, but the study reveals additional differences in regulation of genetic competence development between S. mutans and S. gordonii. PMID:26229070

  8. Conserved and divergent functions of RcrRPQ in Streptococcus gordonii and S. mutans.

    PubMed

    Shields, Robert C; Burne, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    In the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans, an MarR-like transcriptional regulator (RcrR), two ABC efflux pumps (RcrPQ) and two effector peptides encoded in the rcrRPQ operon provide molecular connections between stress tolerance, (p)ppGpp metabolism and genetic competence. Here, we examined the role of RcrRPQ in the oral commensal S. gordonii. Unlike in S. mutans, introduction of polar or non-polar rcrR mutations into S. gordonii elicited no significant changes in transformation efficiency. However, S. gordonii rcrR mutants were markedly impaired in their ability to grow in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, low pH or elevated temperature. Sensitivity to paraquat could also be conferred by mutation of cysteine residues that are present in the RcrR protein of S. gordonii, but not in S. mutans RcrR. Thus, stress tolerance is a conserved function of RcrRPQ in a commensal and pathogenic streptococcus, but the study reveals additional differences in regulation of genetic competence development between S. mutans and S. gordonii. PMID:26229070

  9. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana.

    PubMed

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  10. Laser light scattering measurement of dextran-induced Streptococcus mutans aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, V; Hart, T R; Schiller, R

    1980-01-01

    Intensity fluctuation spectroscopy was used to study dextran-induced aggregation of Streptococcus mutans bacteria. Smoluchowski's theory of colloidal flocculation provided a consistent model of the agglutination process. Our experiments indicated that aggregation was inhibited by the negatively charged surfaces of the cells, while dextran polymers effectively bound organisms together. Our experimental data were consistent with the quantitative predictions of a polymer bridge model of agglutination. PMID:6168309

  11. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  12. Effect of sodium fluoride, ampicillin, and chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm detachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ling, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Li-Jun; Ning, Yang

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of three clinically used antimicrobials on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm detachment under flow conditions. Sodium fluoride (NaF) and chlorhexidine at MIC levels promoted biofilm detachment and inhibited detachment when concentrations were higher than the MIC and reduced detached-cell viability only at high concentrations. Ampicillin at all concentrations tested inhibited detachment and reduced the percentage of viable biofilm-detached cells. All the three antimicrobial treatments reduced biofilm live/dead cell ratios. PMID:22664966

  13. Effect of Sodium Fluoride, Ampicillin, and Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Li-Jun; Ning, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of three clinically used antimicrobials on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm detachment under flow conditions. Sodium fluoride (NaF) and chlorhexidine at MIC levels promoted biofilm detachment and inhibited detachment when concentrations were higher than the MIC and reduced detached-cell viability only at high concentrations. Ampicillin at all concentrations tested inhibited detachment and reduced the percentage of viable biofilm-detached cells. All the three antimicrobial treatments reduced biofilm live/dead cell ratios. PMID:22664966

  14. Calcium fluoride nanoparticles induced suppression of Streptococcus mutans biofilm: an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Shatavari; Khan, Shakir; Hasan, Sadaf; Khan, M Ehtisham; Misba, Lama; Khan, Asad U

    2016-02-01

    Biofilm formation on the tooth surface is the root cause of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Streptococcus mutans is known to produce biofilm which is one of the primary causes of dental caries. Acid production and acid tolerance along with exopolysaccharide (EPS) formation are major virulence factors of S. mutans biofilm. In the current study, calcium fluoride nanoparticles (CaF2-NPs) were evaluated for their effect on the biofilm forming ability of S. mutans in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro studies revealed 89 % and 90 % reduction in biofilm formation and EPS production, respectively. Moreover, acid production and acid tolerance abilities of S. mutans were also reduced considerably in the presence of CaF2-NPs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were in accordance with the other results indicating inhibition of biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. The qRT-PCR gene expression analysis showed significant downregulation of various virulence genes (vicR, gtfC, ftf, spaP, comDE) associated with biofilm formation. Furthermore, CaF2-NPs were found to substantially decrease the caries in treated rat groups as compared to the untreated groups in in vivo studies. Scanning electron micrographs of rat's teeth further validated our results. These findings suggest that the CaF2-NPs may be used as a potential antibiofilm applicant against S. mutans and may be applied as a topical agent to reduce dental caries. PMID:26610805

  15. Effect of citrus lemon oil on growth and adherence of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Yuzhi; Chen, Feifei; Yu, Zhifen; Wang, Li; Chen, Shuanglu; Guo, Maoding

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit novel anticaries agents, we investigated the effects of citrus lemon oil (CLO), a type of natural product, on growth and adherence of the primary oral cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). The growth inhibitory effect was explored with a micro-dilution assay. Adherence was analyzed by colony counts on the respective surfaces and the adherence inhibition rate (AIR). Real time-PCR was used to investigate the effects of CLO on transcription of glucosyltransferase (Gtf) encoding genes, gtfB, C and D. Neson-Somogyi method was used to measure the effects of CLO on Gtf activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CLO against S. mutans was 4.5 mg/ml. The CLO effectively reduced the adherence of S. mutans on glass surface (the AIR were from 98.3 to 100 %, P > 0.05) and saliva-coated enamel surface (the AIR were from 54.8 to 79.2 %, P < 0.05). CLO effectively reduced the activity of Gtf and the transcription of gtfs in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CLO can effectively inhibit the growth and the adherence to glass and saliva-coated enamel surfaces of S. mutans. It can also inhibit the transcription of gtfs, as well as the Gtf enzyme activity. PMID:23381618

  16. Antibacterial effect of dental adhesive containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate on the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H K; Weir, Michael D; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05). In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  17. Effect of Punica granatum on the virulence factors of cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Gulube, Zandiswa; Patel, Mrudula

    2016-09-01

    Dental caries is caused by acids produced by biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans from fermentable carbohydrates and bacterial byproducts. Control of these bacteria is important in the prevention of dental caries. This study investigated the effect of the fruit peel of Punica granatum on biofilm formation, acid and extracellular polysaccharides production (EPS) by S. mutans. Pomegranate fruit peels crude extracts were prepared. The Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) were determined against S. mutans. At 3 sub-bactericidal concentrations, the effect on the acid production, biofilm formation and EPS production was determined. The results were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank Sum Tests. The lowest MBC was 6.25 mg/mL. Punica granatum significantly inhibited acid production (p < 0.01). After 6 and 24 h, it significantly reduced biofilm-formation by 91% and 65% respectively (p < 0.01). The plant extract did not inhibit the production of soluble EPS in either the biofilm or the planktonic growth. However, it significantly reduced the insoluble EPS in the biofilm and the plantktonic (p = < 0.01) form of S. mutans. The crude extract of P. granatum killed cariogenic S. mutans at high concentrations. At sub-bactericidal concentrations, it reduced biofilm formation, acid and EPS production. This suggests that P. granatum extract has the potential to prevent dental caries. PMID:27354207

  18. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05). In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  19. Contribution of chloride channel permease to fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takatoshi; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2016-06-01

    Genes encoding fluoride transporters have been identified in bacterial and archaeal species. The genome sequence of the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans bacteria suggests the presence of a putative fluoride transporter, which is referred to as a chloride channel permease. Two homologues of this gene (GenBank locus tags SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c) reside in tandem in the genome of S. mutans The aim of this study was to determine whether the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance. We constructed SMU_1290c- and SMU_1289c-knockout S. mutans UA159 strains. We also constructed a double-knockout strain lacking both genes. SMU_1290c or SMU_1289c was transformed into a fluoride transporter- disrupted Escherichia coli strain. All bacterial strains were cultured under appropriate conditions with or without sodium fluoride, and fluoride resistance was evaluated. All three gene-knockout S. mutans strains showed lower resistance to sodium fluoride than did the wild-type strain. No significant changes in resistance to other sodium halides were recognized between the wild-type and double-knockout strains. Both SMU_1290c and SMU_1289c transformation rescued fluoride transporter-disrupted E. coli cell from fluoride toxicity. We conclude that the chloride channel permeases contribute to fluoride resistance in S. mutans. PMID:27190286

  20. Silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto; Boegli, Laura; James, Garth; Velasquillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Martínez-Martínez, Rita-Elizabeth; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-10-01

    Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. The goal of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against a clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans, antibiofilm activity against mature S. mutans biofilms and the compatibility with human fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs against the planktonic clinical isolate was size and concentration dependent, with smaller AgNPs having a lower minimum inhibitory concentration. A reduction of 2.3 log in the number of colony-forming units of S. mutans was observed when biofilms grown in a CDC reactor were exposed to 100 ppm of AgNPs of 9.5±1.1 nm. However, AgNPs at high concentrations (>10 ppm) showed a cytotoxic effect upon human dermal fibroblasts. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a planktonic S. mutans clinical isolate and killed established S. mutans biofilms, which suggests that AgNPs could be used for prevention and treatment of dental caries. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into therapeutic and preventive strategies. PMID:26117766

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus mutans and their Antiproliferative Effects

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Bersan, Salete Meyre Fernandes; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Góis; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Sartoratto, Adilson; Rehder, Vera Lúcia Garcia; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Teixeira Duarte, Marta Cristina; Ikegaki, Masarahu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines. PMID:22685486

  2. MecA Protein Acts as a Negative Regulator of Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Liu, Tianlei; Gomez, Zubelda A.; Wahl, Astrid; Hols, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans develops competence for genetic transformation through a complex network that receives inputs from at least two signaling peptides, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) and sigX-inducing peptide (XIP). The key step of competence induction is the transcriptional activation of comX, which encodes an alternative sigma factor, SigX (σX), controlling the expression of late competence genes essential for DNA uptake and recombination. In this study, we provide evidence that MecA acts as a negative regulator in the posttranslational regulation of SigX in S. mutans. Using luxAB transcriptional reporter strains, we demonstrate that MecA represses the expression of late competence genes in S. mutans grown in a complex medium that is subpermissive for competence induction by CSP. The negative regulation of competence by MecA requires the presence of a functional SigX. Accordingly, inactivation of MecA results in a prolonged competence state of S. mutans under this condition. We have also found that the AAA+ protease ClpC displays a similar repressing effect on late competence genes, suggesting that both MecA and ClpC function coordinately to regulate competence in the same regulatory circuit in S. mutans. This suggestion is strongly supported by the results of bacterial two-hybrid assays, which demonstrate that MecA interacts with both SigX and ClpC, forming a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex. Western blot analysis also confirms that inactivation of MecA or ClpC results in the intracellular accumulation of the SigX in S. mutans. Together, our data support the notion that MecA mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex that sequesters SigX and thereby negatively regulates genetic competence in S. mutans. PMID:24039267

  3. Evaluation of biofilm removal activity of Quercus infectoria galls against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Sichani, Maryam; Karbasizadeh, Vajihe; Dokhaharani, Samaneh Chaharmiri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases affecting humans of all ages. Streptococcus mutans has an important role in the development of dental caries by acid production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and biofilm disinfective effects of the oak tree Quercus infectoria galls against S. mutans. Materials and Methods: The bacterial strain used in this study was S. mutans (ATCC: 35668). Two kinds of galls, Mazouj and Ghalghaf were examined. Galls were extracted by methanol, ethanol and acetone by Soxhlet apparatus, separately. Extracts were dissolved in sterile distilled water to a final concentration of 10.00, 5.00, 2.50, 1.25, 0.63, 0.31, and 0.16 mg/ml. Microdilution determined antibacterial activities. The biofilm removal activities of the extracts were examined using crystal violet-stained microtiter plate method. One-way ANOVA was used to compare biofilm formation in the presence or absence of the extracts. Results: The methanolic, ethanolic, and acetonic extracts of Q. infectoria galls showed the strong inhibitory effects on S. mutans (P < 0.05). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for the Mazouj and Ghalghaf gall extracts against S. mutans were identical. The MIC values ranged from 160 μg/ml to 320 μg/ml, whereas the MBC values ranged from 320 μg/ml to 640 μg/ml. All extracts of Q. infectoria galls significantly (P < 0.05) reduced biofilm biomass of S. mutans at the concentrations higher than 9.8 μg/ml. Conclusion: Three different extracts of Q. infectoria galls were similar in their antibacterial activity against S. mutans. These extracts had the highest biofilm removal activities at 312.5 μg/ml concentration. The galls of Q. infectoria are potentially good sources of antibacterial and biofilm disinfection agent. PMID:26962315

  4. Genome-wide characterization of the SloR metalloregulome in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Kevin P; Shaw, Jeremy D; Pesesky, Mitchell W; Cook, Brian T; Roberts, Susanne M; Bond, Jeffrey P; Spatafora, Grace A

    2010-03-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of human dental caries, a ubiquitous infectious disease for which effective treatment strategies remain elusive. We investigated a 25-kDa SloR metalloregulatory protein in this oral pathogen, along with its target genes that contribute to cariogenesis. Previous studies have demonstrated manganese- and SloR-dependent repression of the sloABCR metal ion transport operon in S. mutans. In the present study, we demonstrate that S. mutans coordinates this repression with that of certain virulence attributes. Specifically, we noted virulence gene repression in a manganese-containing medium when SloR binds to promoter-proximal sequence palindromes on the S. mutans chromosome. We applied a genome-wide approach to elucidate the sequences to which SloR binds and to reveal additional "class I" genes that are subject to SloR- and manganese-dependent repression. These analyses identified 204 S. mutans genes that are preceded by one or more conserved palindromic SloR recognition elements (SREs). We cross-referenced these genes with those that we had identified previously as SloR and/or manganese modulated in microarray and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments. From this analysis, we identified a number of S. mutans virulence genes that are subject to transcriptional upregulation by SloR and noted that such "class II"-type regulation is dependent on direct SloR binding to promoter-distal SREs. These observations are consistent with a bifunctional role for the SloR metalloregulator and implicate it as a target for the development of therapies aimed at alleviating S. mutans-induced caries formation. PMID:19915021

  5. Scanning Electron Microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175

    PubMed Central

    RAHIM, Zubaidah Haji Abdul; THURAIRAJAH, Nalina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. Objectives: In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and on partially purified cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. Material and Methods S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1); with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL-1 and 4 mg mL-1)]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract) was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. Results It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (p<0.001). S. mutans adhering to 100 µm2 glass surfaces (with/without sucrose) exhibited reduced cell surface area, fluffy extracellular appearance and cell population in the presence of the Piper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL-1 corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL-1 of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. Conclusion The SEM analysis confirmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are involved. PMID

  6. Antimicrobial Activity of Peganum Harmala L. on Streptococcus mutans Compared to 0.2% Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Khosropanah, Hengameh; Dabiri, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Dental caries is one the most prevalent diseases that affects humans throughout their lives. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is recognized as the most important microorganism during tooth cariogenicity. Reducing this germ in oral cavity can reduce the rate of tooth decays in humans. Purpose The present study compared the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract of Peganum harmala L. seeds and 0.2% chlorhexidine on S. mutans. Materials and Method Agar diffusion technique and micro broth dilution method were employed to test the antimicrobial effects of these two agents on S. mutans. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of P. harmala was studied on Vero cells by MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium dye) colorimetric method. The data were analyzed with descriptive methods. Results Concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL of the extract made inhibition zones of bacterial growth around the wells; but, lower concentrations could not inhibit the growth of S. mutans. Besides, the antimicrobial effect of 0.2% chlorhexidine was more than 50 mg/mL of the extract. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract on S. mutans was 1.83±0.6 mg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 4.3±1 mg/mL. The MIC and MBC for 0.2% chlorhexidine were reported to be 0.19 mg/mL, and 0.78 mg/mL, respectively. The extract concentrations more than 0.5 mg/mL were toxic and caused more than 50% Vero cell death. Conclusion Despite the remarkable antimicrobial effects of high concentrations of P. harmala on S. mutans, high cell toxicity of this plant would restrict its in vivo therapeutic use. PMID:27602397

  7. Specificity of monoclonal antibodies in local passive immunization against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J K; Hunjan, M; Smith, R; Lehner, T

    1989-01-01

    and that the ecological niche vacated by this streptococcus is filled by other organisms from the oral flora, thereby discouraging re-colonization by S. mutans. PMID:2478321

  8. Streptococcus mutans protein synthesis during mixed-species biofilm development by high-throughput quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marlise I; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M; Yates, John R; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (P<0.05). Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the

  9. Comparative genotyping of Streptococcus mutans by repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction and multilocus sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Momeni, S S; Whiddon, J; Moser, S A; Cheon, K; Ruby, J D; Childers, N K

    2013-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Streptococcus mutans has been extensively studied using a variety of genotyping methods. Repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) is a genotyping approach used for screening large numbers of bacterial isolates. This two-part study used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis to evaluate genotypes previously identified as unique using rep-PCR. In part one, an isolate was selected from each of the 22 S. mutans rep-PCR genotype groups representing 8000 clinical isolates. For part two, four additional isolates were selected from the six most commonly occurring genotype groups (GG) for further analysis. Real-time PCR was performed using eight housekeeping S. mutans gene loci and the amplicons were sequenced. Sequence data analysis was performed using CLC DNA Workbench and alleles were compared with the PubMLST database for Oral Streptococcus using the Nakano scheme. Concatenated sequences were evaluated with MEGA using a minimum evolution method with bootstrap. All 22 rep-PCR genotypes were unique by MLST analysis. Within rep-PCR GGs, MLST matched rep-PCR in three groups demonstrating clonality; three groups exhibited more diversity with MLST. The discovery of three clonal groups is unique to this study and suggests that S. mutans genotypes are shared between unrelated subjects. Furthermore, MLST defined 19 new alleles and 26 new sequence types that have been confirmed and registered with PubMLST. Methods for processing were streamlined and a process for using MLST with rep-PCR is suggested. In conclusion, MLST verified that rep-PCR is a reliable and cost-effective method for screening large numbers of S. mutans strains for epidemiological study. PMID:23194334

  10. Influence of time, toothpaste and saliva in the retention of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, Julia Caroline; BUX, Miriam; FILIPUZZI-JENNY, Elisabeth; KULIK, Eva Maria; WALTIMO, Tuomas; WEIGER, Roland; WALTER, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The intraoral transmission of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic species seems to be facilitated by contaminated toothbrushes and other oral hygiene devices. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the in vitro retention and survival rate of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes. The impacts of human saliva and antimicrobial toothpaste on these parameters were further evaluated. Material and Methods Part I: Four toothbrushes (Colgate 360°, Curaprox CS5460 ultra soft, elmex InterX, Trisa Flexible Head3) were contaminated by S. mutans DSM 20523 or S. sanguinis DSM 20068 suspensions for three minutes. Bacteria were removed from the toothbrushes after either three minutes (T0) or 24 hours (T24) of dry storage and grown on Columbia blood agar plates for the quantification of colony-forming units (CFUs). Part II: The effects of saliva from a caries-active or a caries-inactive person and of toothpaste containing 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate were also tested. Results Part I: After three minutes of dry storage, approximately one percent of the bacteria were still detectable on the toothbrushes. After 24 hours, S. sanguinis exhibited a more pronounced decrease in viable cell numbers compared with S. mutans but the differences were not significant (Kruskal-Wallis test, p>0.05). Part II: The addition of human saliva from a caries-active or caries-inactive person slightly increased the retention of both streptococcal species at T0. The use of toothpaste had no influence on the amount of viable streptococci at T0, but it reduced the microbial load after 24 hours of storage. There were only slight nonsignificant differences (p>0.05) between the four toothbrushes. Conclusions In vitro bacterial retention and survival of S. sanguinis and S. mutans on different toothbrushes occurred. Within the limitations of this study, the use of human saliva or an antimicrobial toothpaste did not lead to significant differences in the

  11. Antibacterial activity of clove, gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448

    PubMed Central

    Mirpour, Mirsasan; Gholizadeh Siahmazgi, Zohreh; Sharifi Kiasaraie, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antimicrobial compounds from herbal sources have good therapeutic potential. In this study, the antibacterial effects of clove and gall nut, methanolic and ethanolic extractions, were evaluated for their effect on Streptococcus mutans PTCC 1683 and Streptococcus salivarius PTCC 1448, as both the two cause oral diseases. Method The clove and gall nut methanolic and ethanolic extracts were prepared and antibacterial activity was evaluated for S. mutans and S. salivarius in the base of inhibition zone diameter using agar diffusion method. In this part minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were assessed. Results These extracts showed effective antibacterial activity on bacteria. Antibacterial activity of Methanolic extract of clove was more than that of ethanolic extract, and ethanolic extracts of gall nut had antibacterial activity more than that of methanolic extracts. MIC and MBC results for clove methanolic extract were 1.5 mg/ml and 3 mg/ml for S. mutans and 6.25 mg/ml and 12.5 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for clove ethanolic extracts were 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. MIC and MBC results for gall nut methanolic extract were 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. mutans and 12.5 mg/ml and 25 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. These results for gall nut ethanolic extracts were 3.1 mg/ml and 6.2 mg/ml for S. mutans and 25 mg/ml and 50 mg/ml for S. salivarius, respectively. Discussion The results showed effective antibacterial activity using clove and gall nut methanolic extracts. If other properties such as tolerance of tissue can also be studied, these extracts can be used as a mouthwash. PMID:25853041

  12. Effect of Cervitec varnish on the salivary Streptococcus mutans levels in the patients with fixed orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Eronat, C; Alpöz, A R

    1997-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of a 1% chlorhexidine-containing varnish (Cervitec, Vivadent, Liechtenstein) on the levels of Streptococcus mutans in saliva of patients with fixed orthodontic appliances using the Dentocult-SM (Vivadent, Liechtenstein) technique for the microbiological investigation. Eighty subjects participated in the study and, divided randomly into two equal groups in which one group was treated with the placebo varnish (Vivadent, Liechtenstein) for negative controls. Streptococcus mutans in saliva of the subject was sampled and enumerated by using the Dentocult-SM dip-slide technique for periods of one, two four and twelve weeks after a single varnish application. The results were evaluated statistically. After the chlorhexidine containing varnish treatment the levels of Streptococcus mutans in saliva were significantly reduced after one week (p < 0.01) and continued reduction for one month (p < 0.05). After twelve weeks Streptococcus mutans levels in saliva were given a relative increase. No significant suppression was found in the placebo group (p > 0.05). The results suggested that Cervitec varnish reduces salivary Streptococcus mutans levels and that the application should be repeated every 3 months to get antibacterial effect. PMID:9569785

  13. Genetic Diversity and Evidence for Transmission of Streptococcus mutans by DiversiLab rep-PCR.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Stephanie S; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Ghazal, Tariq; Moser, Stephen A; Childers, Noel K

    2016-09-01

    This two-part study investigated the genetic diversity and transmission of Streptococcus mutans using the DiversiLab repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) approach. For children with S. mutans and participating household members, analysis for evidence of unrelated child-to-child as well as intra-familial transmission was evaluated based on commonality of genotypes. A total of 169 index children and 425 household family members from Uniontown, Alabama were evaluated for genetic diversity using rep-PCR. Thirty-four unique rep-PCR genotypes were observed for 13,906 S. mutans isolates. For transmission, 117 child and household isolates were evaluated for shared genotype (by child and by genotype cases, multiple matches possible for each child). Overall, children had 1-9 genotypes and those with multiple genotypes were 2.3 times more likely to have caries experience (decayed, missing and filled teeth/surfaces>0). Only 28% of children shared all genotypes within the household, while 72% had at least 1 genotype not shared with anyone in the household. Children had genotype(s) not shared with any household members in 157 cases. In 158 cases children and household members shared a genotype in which 55% (87/158 cases) were shared with more than one family member. Children most frequently shared genotypes with their mothers (54%; 85/158), siblings (46%; 72/158) and cousins (23%; 37/158). A reference library for S. mutans for epidemiological surveillance using the DiversiLab rep-PCR approach is detailed. The genetic diversity of S. mutans in this population demonstrated frequent commonality of genotypes. Evidence for both child-to-child and intra-familial transmission of S. mutans was observed by rep-PCR. PMID:27432341

  14. Glucans synthesized in situ in experimental salivary pellicle function as specific binding sites for Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, K M; Bowen, W H

    1992-01-01

    Many researchers have suggested that the role of glucan-mediated interactions in the adherence of Streptococcus mutans is restricted to accumulation of this cariogenic bacterium following its sucrose (i.e., glucan)-independent binding to saliva-coated tooth surfaces. However, the presence of enzymatically active glucosyltransferase in salivary pellicle suggests that glucans could also promote the initial adherence of S. mutans to the teeth. In the present study, the commonly used hydroxyapatite adherence assay was modified to include the incorporation of glucosyltransferase and the synthesis of glucans in situ on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads. Several laboratory strains and clinical isolates of S. mutans were examined for their ability to adhere to experimental pellicles, either with or without the prior formation of glucans in situ. Results showed that most strains of S. mutans bound stereospecifically to glucans synthesized in pellicle. Inhibition studies with various polysaccharides and fungal dextranase indicated that alpha 1,6-linked glucose residues were of primary importance in the glucan binding observed. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed direct binding of S. mutans to hydroxyapatite surface-associated polysaccharide and revealed no evidence of trapping or cell-to-cell binding. S. mutans strains also attached to host-derived structures in experimental pellicles, and the data suggest that the bacterial adhesins which recognize salivary binding sites were distinct from glucan-binding adhesins. Furthermore, glucans formed in experimental pellicles appeared to mask the host-derived components. These results support the concept that glucans synthesized in salivary pellicle can promote the selective adherence of the cariogenic streptococci which colonize human teeth. Images PMID:1530843

  15. Differential localization of the Streptococcus mutans GS-5 fructan hydrolase enzyme, FruA.

    PubMed

    Burne, R A; Penders, J E

    1994-08-15

    Streptococcus mutans GS-5 synthesizes an exo-beta-D-fructosidase, FruA, capable of degrading levans, inulins, sucrose and raffinose, with the greatest activity on levans. A previous analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the FruA protein revealed the presence of a C-terminus with an LPXTGX membrane sorting sequence and membrane spanning domain, characteristic of many Gram-positive cocci surface proteins. Here it is demonstrated that FruA, which had been previously shown to exist almost exclusively as an extracellular enzyme, can be detected in significant proportions at the surface of S. mutans cells. Moreover, growth of S. mutans GS-5 at steady state in continuous culture at pH values of 7.0, 6.0, or 5.0 revealed that the amount of cell-associated enzyme increased with decreasing pH values, such that roughly 50% of the total fructanase activity of pH 5.0-grown organisms was cell-associated. This result was confirmed using anti-recombinant-FruA antisera in Western blotting of culture supernate and cell-associated enzyme preparations from chemostat-grown cells. Incubation of S. mutans at pH values of 5.0, 6.0 or 7.0 in buffered media yielded results similar to those observed in the chemostat experiments. The release of FruA from S. mutans was also shown to be inhibitable by copper, which is known to interfere with the release of the surface adhesin, P1, from intact cells and protoplasts of S. mutans. These data provide evidence for a unique post-translational mechanism for the regulation of the catabolism of polysaccharides by bacteria.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7926677

  16. Photo Inactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm by Violet-Blue light.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Grace F; Huang, Ruijie; MacPherson, Meoghan; Ferreira Zandona, Andrea G; Gregory, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Among various preventive approaches, non-invasive phototherapy/photodynamic therapy is one of the methods used to control oral biofilm. Studies indicate that light at specific wavelengths has a potent antibacterial effect. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of violet-blue light at 380-440 nm to inhibit biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans or kill S. mutans. S. mutans UA159 biofilm cells were grown for 12-16 h in 96-well flat-bottom microtiter plates using tryptic soy broth (TSB) or TSB with 1 % sucrose (TSBS). Biofilm was irradiated with violet-blue light for 5 min. After exposure, plates were re-incubated at 37 °C for either 2 or 6 h to allow the bacteria to recover. A crystal violet biofilm assay was used to determine relative densities of the biofilm cells grown in TSB, but not in TSBS, exposed to violet-blue light. The results indicated a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease compared to the non-treated groups after the 2 or 6 h recovery period. Growth rates of planktonic and biofilm cells indicated a significant reduction in the growth rate of the violet-blue light-treated groups grown in TSB and TSBS. Biofilm viability assays confirmed a statistically significant difference between violet-blue light-treated and non-treated groups in TSB and TSBS. Visible violet-blue light of the electromagnetic spectrum has the ability to inhibit S. mutans growth and reduce the formation of S. mutans biofilm. This in vitro study demonstrated that violet-blue light has the capacity to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. Potential clinical applications of light therapy in the future remain bright in preventing the development and progression of dental caries. PMID:27278805

  17. The SloR/Dlg Metalloregulator Modulates Streptococcus mutans Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rolerson, Elizabeth; Swick, Adam; Newlon, Lindsay; Palmer, Cameron; Pan, Yong; Keeshan, Britton; Spatafora, Grace

    2006-01-01

    Metal ion availability in the human oral cavity plays a putative role in Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and in appropriate formation of the plaque biofilm. In this report, we present evidence that supports such a role for the DtxR-like SloR metalloregulator (called Dlg in our previous publications) in this oral pathogen. Specifically, the results of gel mobility shift assays revealed the sloABC, sloR, comDE, ropA, sod, and spaP promoters as targets of SloR binding. We confirmed differential expression of these genes in a GMS584 SloR-deficient mutant versus the UA159 wild-type progenitor by real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR experiments. The results of additional expression studies support a role for SloR in S. mutans control of glucosyltransferases, glucan binding proteins, and genes relevant to antibiotic resistance. Phenotypic analysis of GMS584 revealed that it forms aberrant biofilms on an abiotic surface, is compromised for genetic competence, and demonstrates heightened incorporation of iron and manganese as well as resistance to oxidative stress compared to the wild type. Taken together, these findings support a role for SloR in S. mutans adherence, biofilm formation, genetic competence, metal ion homeostasis, oxidative stress tolerance, and antibiotic gene regulation, all of which contribute to S. mutans-induced disease. PMID:16816176

  18. EVALUATION OF GENOTYPIC DIVERSITY OF Streptococcus mutans USING DISTINCT ARBITRARY PRIMERS

    PubMed Central

    Tabchoury, Cínthia Pereira Machado; Sousa, Maria Clara K.; Arthur, Rodrigo Alex; Mattos-Graner, Renata Oliveira; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans has been considered one of the main etiological agents of dental caries and the genotypic diversity rather than its salivary counts may be considered as a virulence factor of this bacterium. For genotyping with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with arbitrary primers, several primers have been used in order to improve complexity and specificity of amplicon patterns. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of agreement of genotypic identification among AP-PCR reactions performed with 5 distinct arbitrary primers of S. mutans isolated from saliva. Stimulated saliva was collected from 11 adult volunteers for isolation of S. mutans, and a total of 88 isolates were genotyped with arbitrary primers OPA 02, 03, 05, 13 and 18. Fourteen distinct genotypes were identified in the saliva samples. Most volunteers (9 out of 11) presented only one genotype. The results of the present study suggest that primers OPA 02, 03, 05 and 13 were suitable for genotypic identification of S. mutans isolates of saliva from adult volunteers. PMID:19082399

  19. Apolar Bioactive Fraction of Melipona scutellaris Geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Franchin, Marcelo; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Ikegaki, Masaharu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bioactive nonpolar fraction of geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans biofilm. The ethanolic extract of Melipona scutellaris geopropolis was subjected to a liquid-liquid partition, thus obtaining the bioactive hexane fraction (HF) possessing antimicrobial activity. The effects of HF on S. mutans UA159 biofilms generated on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were analyzed by inhibition of formation, killing assay, and glycolytic pH-drop assays. Furthermore, biofilms treated with vehicle control and HF were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HF at 250  μ g/mL and 400  μ g/mL caused 38% and 53% reduction in the biomass of biofilm, respectively, when compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05) subsequently observed at SEM images, and this reduction was noticed in the amounts of extracellular alkali-soluble glucans, intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides, and proteins. In addition, the S. mutans viability (killing assay) and acid production by glycolytic pH drop were not affected (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the bioactive HF of geopropolis was promising to control the S. mutans biofilm formation, without affecting the microbial population but interfering with its structure by reducing the biochemical content of biofilm matrix. PMID:23843868

  20. Apolar Bioactive Fraction of Melipona scutellaris Geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bioactive nonpolar fraction of geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans biofilm. The ethanolic extract of Melipona scutellaris geopropolis was subjected to a liquid-liquid partition, thus obtaining the bioactive hexane fraction (HF) possessing antimicrobial activity. The effects of HF on S. mutans UA159 biofilms generated on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were analyzed by inhibition of formation, killing assay, and glycolytic pH-drop assays. Furthermore, biofilms treated with vehicle control and HF were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HF at 250 μg/mL and 400 μg/mL caused 38% and 53% reduction in the biomass of biofilm, respectively, when compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05) subsequently observed at SEM images, and this reduction was noticed in the amounts of extracellular alkali-soluble glucans, intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides, and proteins. In addition, the S. mutans viability (killing assay) and acid production by glycolytic pH drop were not affected (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the bioactive HF of geopropolis was promising to control the S. mutans biofilm formation, without affecting the microbial population but interfering with its structure by reducing the biochemical content of biofilm matrix. PMID:23843868

  1. The SloR/Dlg metalloregulator modulates Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rolerson, Elizabeth; Swick, Adam; Newlon, Lindsay; Palmer, Cameron; Pan, Yong; Keeshan, Britton; Spatafora, Grace

    2006-07-01

    Metal ion availability in the human oral cavity plays a putative role in Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and in appropriate formation of the plaque biofilm. In this report, we present evidence that supports such a role for the DtxR-like SloR metalloregulator (called Dlg in our previous publications) in this oral pathogen. Specifically, the results of gel mobility shift assays revealed the sloABC, sloR, comDE, ropA, sod, and spaP promoters as targets of SloR binding. We confirmed differential expression of these genes in a GMS584 SloR-deficient mutant versus the UA159 wild-type progenitor by real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR experiments. The results of additional expression studies support a role for SloR in S. mutans control of glucosyltransferases, glucan binding proteins, and genes relevant to antibiotic resistance. Phenotypic analysis of GMS584 revealed that it forms aberrant biofilms on an abiotic surface, is compromised for genetic competence, and demonstrates heightened incorporation of iron and manganese as well as resistance to oxidative stress compared to the wild type. Taken together, these findings support a role for SloR in S. mutans adherence, biofilm formation, genetic competence, metal ion homeostasis, oxidative stress tolerance, and antibiotic gene regulation, all of which contribute to S. mutans-induced disease. PMID:16816176

  2. EFFECT OF A PROPOLIS EXTRACT ON STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS COUNTS IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Duailibe, Silvana Alves de Carvalho; Gonçalves, Azizedite Guedes; Ahid, Fernando Jorge Mendes

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial action of an extract of geopropolis produced by the bee Melipona compressipes fasciculata on the concentration of Streptococcus mutans colonizing the oral cavity of young patients. Forty-one young volunteers performed 21 mouth rinses divided into three rinses per day for 7 days, with no other changes in their oral hygiene and dietary habits. Saliva was collected at three time points: before the first rinse, and one hour and 7 days after the first rinse. A reduction in the concentration of S. mutans was observed in 49% of all samples collected after use of the extract, 26% showed no alterations, and an increasing in S. mutans was observed in 25%. Was performed with the Statistica for Windows 5.9 program using the Kruskal-Wallis test for analysis of variance and the Mann-Whitney U test, with the level of significance set at 5%. The propolis extract possesses in vivo antimicrobial activity against S. mutans present in the oral cavity and might be used as an alternative measure to prevent dental caries. PMID:19089172

  3. Biological function of the dTDP-rhamnose synthesis pathway in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Tsukioka, Y; Yamashita, Y; Oho, T; Nakano, Y; Koga, T

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned a new gene locus that comprises three genes concerned with the biosynthesis of the serotype c-specific polysaccharide antigen in Streptococcus mutans. The genes encode proteins exhibiting significant homology to the rfbA, rfbB, and rfbD gene products that are involved in the anabolism of dTDP-L-rhamnose from D-glucose-1-phosphate. This anabolism pathway pertains to biosynthesis of the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide in gram-negative bacteria. The cell extract of Escherichia coli expressing each of the cloned genes of S. mutans exhibited enzymatic activity corresponding to the homologous counterpart of the rfb gene products. Rhamnose was not detected in the cell wall preparation purified from the mutant in which each of the three cloned genes was insertionally inactivated. Rabbit antiserum against S. mutans serotype c-specific antigen did not react with the autoclaved extracts from these mutants. These results indicate that the gene products identified in the present study are involved in the dTDP-L-rhamnose synthesis pathway and that the pathway relates to the biosynthesis of the serotype-specific polysaccharide antigen of S. mutans. Southern hybridization analysis revealed that genes homologous to the cloned genes involved in the dTDP-L-rhamnose synthesis pathway were widely distributed in a variety of streptococci. This is the first report of the biological function of the dTDP-rhamnose pathway in streptococci. PMID:9023194

  4. Effect of sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Nurit; Redlich, Meir; Harari, Doron; Friedman, Michael; Steinberg, Doron

    2003-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish on orthodontic patients. Ten children, ages 10 to 16 years, participated. Bacterial levels of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus and total counts were evaluated in sputum samples. These counts were evaluated at 4 stages: before orthodontic treatment, at least 2 weeks after bonding of the brackets, 1 week after application of chlorhexidine varnish, and 3 weeks after application of chlorhexidine varnish. Increases in bacterial levels of S mutans and in the total bacterial count were detected after the brackets were bonded. One week after the sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish was applied, a significant decrease of total bacterial levels and S mutans was observed. This decrease persisted for 3 weeks after the first application. No significant change in A viscosus levels occurred during that period. The results provide additional evidence that sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish decreases S mutans levels in orthodontic patients with fixed appliances and therefore might be useful in preventing caries lesions. PMID:12637907

  5. Effect of Weissella cibaria isolates on the formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kang, M-S; Chung, J; Kim, S-M; Yang, K-H; Oh, J-S

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to isolate and identify lactic acid bacteria able to inhibit the in vitro formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm as well as the in vivo formation of oral biofilm. Two strains, CMS1 and CMS3, exhibiting profound inhibitory effects on the formation of S. mutans biofilm and the proliferation of S. mutans, were isolated from children's saliva and identified as Weissella cibaria by 16S rDNA sequencing. The water-soluble polymers produced from sucrose by the W. cibaria isolates also inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilm. According to the results of thin-layer chromatographic analysis, the hydrolysates of water-soluble polymers produced by the isolates were identical to those of dextran, forming mostly alpha-(1-6) glucose linkages. In the clinical study, the subjects mouthrinsed with a solution containing W. cibaria CMS1 evidenced plaque index reduction of approximately 20.7% (p < 0.001). These results indicate that the W. cibaria isolates possess the ability to inhibit biofilm formation, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:16946611

  6. Regulation of Streptococcus mutans PTS Bio by the transcriptional repressor NigR.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, M; Iyer, V S; Sengupta, M; Ajdic, D

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is implicated in human dental caries, and the carbohydrate metabolism of this organism plays an important role in the formation of this disease. Carbohydrate transport and metabolism are essential for the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity. It is known that a unique phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system PTS(B) (io) of S. mutans UA159 is expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms (Mol Oral Microbiol 28: 2013; 114). In this study we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the operon (O(B) (io) ) encoding the PTS(B) (io) and showed that it was repressed by NigR, a LacI-like transcriptional regulator. Using electro-mobility shift assay, we described two operators to which NigR bound with different affinities. We also identified the transcriptional start site and showed that one of the operators overlaps with the promoter and presumably represses initiation of transcription. Mutational analyses revealed the key nucleotides in the operators required for high-affinity binding of NigR. PTS(B) (io) is expressed in S. mutans biofilms so understanding its regulation may provide improved strategies for caries treatment and prevention. PMID:25580872

  7. Uptake of saccharin and related intense sweeteners by Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, S C; Siebert, G

    1988-09-01

    In a 1-octanol/phosphate buffer system, saccharin was much more lipophilic than would be inferred from its dissociation constant which, however, determined the partition behavior of acesulfame and cyclamate. The uptake of saccharin into Streptococcus mutans led to a 30 to 40-fold higher concentration of this intense sweetener within cells than in the incubation medium. Acesulfame and cyclamate were distributed between cells and medium essentially in a diffusion-controlled manner. The uptake of saccharin into S. mutans was found to depend strongly on simultaneous sugar fermentation, and in addition, on external pH, sweetener concentrations, and cell densities. Without glycolysis, caused, for example, by an exhaustion of added sucrose, too acidic external pH, or the addition of glycolysis inhibitors, the uptake of saccharin was diffusion-controlled as in the case of acesulfame and cyclamate. The uptake of saccharin was inhibited by a reversal of the direction of the lactate gradient from in----out to out----in. The activation energy of saccharin uptake into glycolyzing S. mutans was near 18 kJ/mol, while glycolysis itself required 82-98 kJ/mol as activation energy, depending somewhat on experimental conditions. Up to 100 attomol of saccharin per bacterial cell was observed. It was concluded that the cytomembrane of S. mutans was involved in mediating the inhibitory effects of saccharin by an antiport of saccharin into cells in exchange for lactate. PMID:2467446

  8. Effect of fluoride on glucose incorporation and metabolism in biofilm cells of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Balzar Ekenbäck, S; Linder, L E; Sund, M L; Lönnies, H

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to study the effect of high fluoride concentrations on carbohydrate metabolism in Streptococcus mutans present in biofilms on hydroxyapatite; and, secondly, to evaluate the effect of fluoride-bound hydroxyapatite on lactic acid formation in growing biofilms of Strep. mutans. Biofilms of a clinical strain of Strep. mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads were incubated with sodium fluoride over a wide range of concentrations. At high fluoride concentrations (>10 mM) the incorporation of [14C]-labeled glucose decreased by 80-85%, at both pH 7.0 and 5.6. At lower fluoride concentrations, the effect of fluoride on the incorporation of labeled glucose was pH-dependent in both biofilm cells and in planktonic cells. At pH 7.0, fluoride at concentrations < 10 mM had little or no effect. Pretreatment of hydroxyapatite discs with fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector) or fluoride solutions caused a statistically significant reduction of lactic acid formation in associated, growing biofilms of Strep. mutans. Fluoride varnish and 0.2% (47.6 mM) sodium fluoride solution exhibited a statistically significant inhibitory effect on lactate production. PMID:11456349

  9. Effects of 7-Epiclusianone on Streptococcus mutans and Caries Development in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Branco-de-Almeida, Luciana Salles; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça; Franco, Eliane Melo; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Koo, Hyun; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 7-epiclusianone (7-epi) on specific virulence attributes of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and on development of dental caries in vivo. 7-Epi was obtained and purified from fruits of Rheedia brasiliensis. We investigated its influence on surface-adsorbed glucosyltransferase (Gtf) B activity, acid production, and viability of S. mutans in biofilms, as well as on caries development using a rodent model. 7-Epi (100 μg/mL) significantly reduced the activity of surface-adsorbed GtfB (up to 48.0 ± 1.8 of inhibition at 100 μg/mL) and glycolytic pH-drop by S. mutans in biofilms (125 and 250 μg/mL) (vs. vehicle control, p < 0.05). In contrast, the test compound did not significantly affect the bacterial viability when compared to vehicle control (15% ethanol, p > 0.05). Wistar rats treated topically with 7-epi (twice daily, 60-s exposure) showed significantly smaller number of and less severe smooth- and sulcal-surface carious lesions (p < 0.05), without reducing the S. mutans viable population from the animals’ dental biofilms. In conclusion, the natural compound 7-epiclusianone may be a potentially novel pharmacological agent to prevent and control dental caries disease. PMID:20665370

  10. Effects of 7-epiclusianone on Streptococcus mutans and caries development in rats.

    PubMed

    Branco-de-Almeida, Luciana Salles; Murata, Ramiro Mendonça; Franco, Eliane Melo; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Koo, Hyun; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 7-epiclusianone (7-epi) on specific virulence attributes of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and on development of dental caries in vivo. 7-Epi was obtained and purified from fruits of Rheedia brasiliensis. We investigated its influence on surface-adsorbed glucosyltransferase (Gtf) B activity, acid production, and viability of S. MUTANS in biofilms, as well as on caries development using a rodent model. 7-Epi (100 µg/mL) significantly reduced the activity of surface-adsorbed GtfB (up to 48.0 ± 1.8 of inhibition at 100 µg/mL) and glycolytic pH-drop by S. mutans in biofilms (125 and 250 µg/mL) (vs. vehicle control, p < 0.05). In contrast, the test compound did not significantly affect the bacterial viability when compared to vehicle control (15 % ethanol, p > 0.05). Wistar rats treated topically with 7-epi (twice daily, 60-s exposure) showed significantly smaller number of and less severe smooth- and sulcal-surface carious lesions (p < 0.05), without reducing the S. mutans viable population from the animals' dental biofilms. In conclusion, the natural compound 7-epiclusianone may be a potentially novel pharmacological agent to prevent and control dental caries disease. PMID:20665370

  11. Effects of oral environment stabilization procedures on Streptococcus mutans counts in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Flavia Cristina; Jeremias, Fabiano; Spolidório, Denise Madalena Palomari; Silva, Silvio Rocha Corrêa da; Valsecki Junior, Aylton; Rosell, Fernanda Lopez

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral environment stabilization (OES) on the counting of Streptococcus mutans in high-caries-risk pregnant women participants of a prevention program in a public teaching institution. The sample was composed of 30 pregnant women aged 18 to 43 years, who looked for treatment at the Preventive Dentistry Clinic of the Araraquara Dental School, UNESP. Saliva samples were collected before and after the OES procedures and were forwarded to the pathology for observation and quantification of S. mutans CFU. There was a decrease in the number of S. mutans CFU, which was significantly different (p<0.0001) between samples. Considering the age group, 70.0% were between 18 to 30 years old and 30.0% belonged to the 31-43-year-old age group. Data related to the pregnancy period showed that 73.4% were in the second trimester, 13.3% in the first and 13.3% in third trimester. OES showed to be an effective clinical procedure in diminishing the number of S. mutans CFU in the saliva of high-caries-risk pregnant women. This management is simple and effective, corresponding to the basic treatment needs of pregnant women that search dental care in this public service. PMID:21861025

  12. Activity of two Streptococcus mutans bacteriocins in the presence of saliva, levan, and dextran.

    PubMed Central

    Delisle, A L

    1976-01-01

    The extracellular dextrans produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans strains BHT and GS-5 did not prevent the synthesis or release of active bacteriocins by these two strains. In addition, several streptococci that were genetically sensitive to these bacteriocins, and that could synthesize a variety of extracellular dextrans and levans from sucrose, remained phenotypically sensitive when grown in the presence of sucrose. Bacteriocin activity was not altered by treatment with high-molecular-weight dextran or by human saliva. The bacteriocins produced by, and active against, S. mutans thus appear to be capable of acting in vivo and may play a role in regulating the bacterial ecology of the oral cavity. Images PMID:4376

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Streptococcus mutans dextran glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Saburi, Wataru; Hondoh, Hironori; Unno, Hideaki; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Nakada, Toshitaka; Matsuura, Yoshiki; Kimura, Atsuo

    2007-09-01

    Dextran glucosidase from S. mutans was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution. Dextran glucosidase from Streptococcus mutans is an exo-hydrolase that acts on the nonreducing terminal α-1,6-glucosidic linkage of oligosaccharides and dextran with a high degree of transglucosylation. Based on amino-acid sequence similarity, this enzyme is classified into glycoside hydrolase family 13. Recombinant dextran glucosidase was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.72, b = 86.47, c = 104.30 Å. A native data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal.

  14. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.573, a putative sugar kinase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Lan-Fen; Yang, Cheng; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    SMU.573 from S. mutans was expressed in E. coli and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group I4 and 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data were collected at an in-house chromium radiation source. SMU.573 from Streptococcus mutans is a structurally and functionally uncharacterized protein that was selected for structural biology studies. Native and SeMet-labelled proteins were expressed with an N-His tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the SeMet-labelled protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data set was collected using an in-house chromium radiation source. The crystals belong to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.53, c = 56.26 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  15. Antibacterial activity of Capsicum annuum extract and synthetic capsaicinoid derivatives against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Santos, Moema Mocaiber Peralva; Vieira-da-Motta, Olney; Vieira, Ivo José Curcino; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Gonçalves, Paula Santos; Maria, Edmilsom José; Terra, Wagner Silva; Rodrigues, Rosana; Souza, Claudio Luiz Melo

    2012-04-01

    The inhibitory effects of the ethyl acetate extract and capsaicin (1) and dihydrocapsaicin (2) isolated from fruits of Capsicum annuum chili pepper type, and synthetic capsaicinoid derivatives (N-(4-hydroxyphenylethyl)decamide (3), (E)-N-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3,7-dimethylocta- 2,6-dienamide (4), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-N-((E)-3, 7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)benzamide (5) andN-(4-hydroxy- 3-methoxybenzyl)decamide (6) at different concentrations were evaluated against Streptococcus mutans. The minimum inhibitory concentration at which the ethyl acetate extract prevented the growth of S. mutans was 2.5 mg/mL; those of the isolated compounds 1 and 2 were 1.25 μg/mL, while 3 was 5.0 μg/mL, and 4, 5 and 6 were 2.5 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:21858615

  16. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L.; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL−1). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them. PMID:24294257

  17. The antimicrobial sensitivity of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sangius to colloidal solutions of different nanoparticles applied as mouthwashes

    PubMed Central

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Eslami, Neda; Rajabi, Omid; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Barati, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metal nanoparticles have been recently applied in dentistry because of their antibacterial properties. This study aimed to evaluate antibacterial effects of colloidal solutions containing zinc oxide (ZnO), copper oxide (CuO), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silver (Ag) nanoparticles on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sangius and compare the results with those of chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride mouthrinses. Materials and Methods: After adding nanoparticles to a water-based solution, six groups were prepared. Groups I to IV included colloidal solutions containing nanoZnO, nanoCuO, nanoTiO2 and nanoAg, respectively. Groups V and VI consisted of 2.0% sodium fluoride and 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwashes, respectively as controls. We used serial dilution method to find minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and with subcultures obtained minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the solutions against S. mutans and S. sangius. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and Duncan test and P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The sodium fluoride mouthrinse did not show any antibacterial effect. The nanoTiO2-containing solution had the lowest MIC against both microorganisms and also displayed the lowest MBC against S. mutans (P < 0.05). The colloidal solutions containing nanoTiO2 and nanoZnO showed the lowest MBC against S. sangius (P < 0.05). On the other hand, chlorhexidine showed the highest MIC and MBC against both streptococci (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The nanoTiO2-containing mouthwash proved to be an effective antimicrobial agent and thus it can be considered as an alternative to chlorhexidine or sodium fluoride mouthrinses in the oral cavity provided the lack of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on biologic tissues. PMID:25709674

  18. Effect of Human Saliva on Glucose Uptake by Streptococcus mutans and Other Oral Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, Greg R.; Tellefson, Lois M.

    1981-01-01

    We examined the effects of human whole salivary supernatant and parotid fluid on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The following three effects of saliva were observed: (i) inhibition of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), (ii) promotion of a transient, rapid (0 to 30 s) burst of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), and (iii) enhancement of glucose uptake (S. mitis, A. viscosus, S. aureus, E. coli). We observed no differences between the effects of whole salivary supernatant and the effects of parotid fluid. Heat treatment (80°C, 10 min) of saliva or the addition of dithiothreitol abolished inhibition of glucose uptake. Supplementation of saliva with H2O2 potentiated inhibition of glucose uptake. S. mitis and A. viscosus, which were stimulated by saliva alone, were inhibited by H2O2-supplemented saliva; 50% inhibition of glucose uptake by S. mutans and S. mitis required ca. 10 μM H2O2 in 50% (vol/vol) saliva. Loss of the inhibitory action of saliva occurred at about 5% (vol/vol) saliva. Supplementation of saliva dilutions with SCN− and H2O2 extended the inhibitory activity to solutions containing ca. 0.2% (vol/vol) saliva. We suggest that the salivary lactoperoxidase-SCN−-H2O2 system is responsible for the inhibitory activity of saliva reported here. Furthermore, we concluded that lactoperoxidase and SCN− are present in saliva specimens in concentrations that exceed minimal inhibitory levels by factors of ca. 500 and 10 to 20, respectively. The resistance of A. viscosus, S. aureus, and E. coli to the inhibitory potential of saliva alone was probably due to the production of catalase by these organisms. The resistance of S. mitis may have been due to special effects of saliva on H2O2 accumulation by this organism compared with S. mutans and S. sanguis. The basis of saliva-dependent enhancement of glucose uptake and the basis of promotion

  19. Effect of human saliva on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans and other oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1981-02-01

    We examined the effects of human whole salivary supernatant and parotid fluid on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. The following three effects of saliva were observed: (i) inhibition of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), (ii) promotion of a transient, rapid (0 to 30 s) burst of glucose uptake (S. mutans, S. sanguis), and (iii) enhancement of glucose uptake (S. mitis, A. viscosus, S. aureus, E. coli). We observed no differences between the effects of whole salivary supernatant and the effects of parotid fluid. Heat treatment (80 degrees C, 10 min) of saliva or the addition of dithiothreitol abolished inhibition of glucose uptake. Supplementation of saliva with H(2)O(2) potentiated inhibition of glucose uptake. S. mitis and A. viscosus, which were stimulated by saliva alone, were inhibited by H(2)O(2)-supplemented saliva; 50% inhibition of glucose uptake by S. mutans and S. mitis required ca. 10 muM H(2)O(2) in 50% (vol/vol) saliva. Loss of the inhibitory action of saliva occurred at about 5% (vol/vol) saliva. Supplementation of saliva dilutions with SCN(-) and H(2)O(2) extended the inhibitory activity to solutions containing ca. 0.2% (vol/vol) saliva. We suggest that the salivary lactoperoxidase-SCN(-)-H(2)O(2) system is responsible for the inhibitory activity of saliva reported here. Furthermore, we concluded that lactoperoxidase and SCN(-) are present in saliva specimens in concentrations that exceed minimal inhibitory levels by factors of ca. 500 and 10 to 20, respectively. The resistance of A. viscosus, S. aureus, and E. coli to the inhibitory potential of saliva alone was probably due to the production of catalase by these organisms. The resistance of S. mitis may have been due to special effects of saliva on H(2)O(2) accumulation by this organism compared with S. mutans and S. sanguis. The basis of saliva-dependent enhancement of glucose

  20. Metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and gene expression during exposure to xylitol and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Decker, Eva-Maria; Klein, Christian; Schwindt, Dimitri; von Ohle, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown under different dietary conditions by using multifaceted methodological approaches to gain deeper insight into the cariogenic impact of carbohydrates. S. mutans biofilms were generated during a period of 24 h in the following media: Schaedler broth as a control medium containing endogenous glucose, Schaedler broth with an additional 5% sucrose, and Schaedler broth supplemented with 1% xylitol. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)-based analyses of the microbial vitality, respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC) and production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) were performed separately in the inner, middle and outer biofilm layers. In addition to the microbiological sample testing, the glucose/sucrose consumption of the biofilm bacteria was quantified, and the expression of glucosyltransferases and other biofilm-associated genes was investigated. Xylitol exposure did not inhibit the viability of S. mutans biofilms, as monitored by the following experimental parameters: culture growth, vitality, CTC activity and EPS production. However, xylitol exposure caused a difference in gene expression compared to the control. GtfC was upregulated only in the presence of xylitol. Under xylitol exposure, gtfB was upregulated by a factor of 6, while under sucrose exposure, it was upregulated by a factor of three. Compared with glucose and xylitol, sucrose increased cell vitality in all biofilm layers. In all nutrient media, the intrinsic glucose was almost completely consumed by the cells of the S. mutans biofilm within 24 h. After 24 h of biofilm formation, the multiparametric measurements showed that xylitol in the presence of glucose caused predominantly genotypic differences but did not induce metabolic differences compared to the control. Thus, the availability of dietary carbohydrates in either a pure or combined form seems to affect the

  1. Cariogenicity of a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans serotype c in gnotobiotic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, R J; Adams, B O; Sandham, H J; Abhyankar, S

    1989-01-01

    A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient (Ldh-) mutant of a human isolate of Streptococcus mutans serotype c was tested in a gnotobiotic rat caries model. Compared with the wild-type Ldh-positive (Ldh+) strains, it was significantly (alpha less than or equal to 0.005) less cariogenic in experiments with two different sublines of Sprague-Dawley rats. The Ldh- mutant strain 044 colonized the oral cavity of the test animals to the same extent as its parent strain 041, although its initial implantation was slightly but not significantly (P greater than or equal to 0.2) less. Multiple oral or fecal samples plated on 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium indicator medium revealed no evidence of back mutation from Ldh- to Ldh+ in vivo. Both Ldh+ strain 041 and Ldh- strain 044 demonstrated bacteriocinlike activity in vitro against a number of human strains of mutans streptococci representing serotype a (S. cricetus) and serotypes c and e (S. mutans). Serotypes b (S. rattus) and f (S. mutans) and strains of S. mitior, S. sanguis, and S. salivarius were not inhibited. Thus, Ldh mutant strain 044 possesses a number of desirable traits that suggest it should be investigated further as a possible effector strain for replacement therapy of dental caries. These traits include its stability and low cariogenicity in the sensitive gnotobiotic rat caries model, its bacteriocinlike activity against certain other cariogenic S. mutans (but not against more inocuous indigenous oral streptococci), and the fact that it is a member of the most prevalent human serotype of cariogenic streptococci. PMID:2917788

  2. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  3. Hydrophilicity of dentin bonding systems influences in vitro Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Cadenaro, Milena; Gagliani, Massimo; Ferraroni, Monica; Tay, Franklin; Pashley, David; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate in vitro Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm formation on the surface of five light-curing experimental dental bonding systems (DBS) with increasing hydrophilicity. The null hypothesis tested was that resin chemical composition and hydrophilicity does not affect S. mutans biofilm formation. Methods Five light-curing versions of experimental resin blends with increasing hydrophilicity were investigated (R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5). R1 and R2 contained ethoxylated BisGMA/TEGDMA or BisGMA/TEGDMA, respectively, and were very hydrophobic, were representative of pit-and-fissure bonding agents. R3 was representative of a typical two-step etch- and-rinse adhesive, while R4 and R5 were very hydrophilic resins analogous to self-etching adhesives. Twenty-eight disks were prepared for each resin blend. After a 24 h-incubation at 37 °C, a multilayer monospecific biofilm of S. mutans was obtained on the surface of each disk. The adherent biomass was determined using the MTT assay and evaluated morphologically with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results R2 and R3 surfaces showed the highest biofilm formation while R1 and R4 showed a similar intermediate biofilm formation. R5 was more hydrophilic and acidic and was significantly less colonized than all the other resins. A significant quadratic relationship between biofilm formation and hydrophilicity of the resin blends was found. CLSM and SEM evaluation confirmed MTT assay results. Conclusions The null hypothesis was rejected since S. mutans biofilm formation was influenced by hydrophilicity, surface acidity and chemical composition of the experimental resins. Further studies using a bioreactor are needed to confirm the results and clarify the role of the single factors. PMID:24954666

  4. Genetic adaptation of Streptococcus mutans during biofilm formation on different types of surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Adhesion and successful colonization of bacteria onto solid surfaces play a key role in biofilm formation. The initial adhesion and the colonization of bacteria may differ between the various types of surfaces found in oral cavity. Therefore, it is conceivable that diverse biofilms are developed on those various surfaces. The aim of the study was to investigate the molecular modifications occurring during in vitro biofilm development of Streptococcus mutans UA159 on several different dental surfaces. Results Growth analysis of the immobilized bacterial populations generated on the different surfaces shows that the bacteria constructed a more confluent and thick biofilms on a hydroxyapatite surface compared to the other tested surfaces. Using DNA-microarray technology we identified the differentially expressed genes of S. mutans, reflecting the physiological state of biofilms formed on the different biomaterials tested. Eight selected genes were further analyzed by real time RT-PCR. To further determine the impact of the tested material surfaces on the physiology of the bacteria, we tested the secretion of AI-2 signal by S. mutans embedded on those biofilms. Comparative transcriptome analyses indicated on changes in the S. mutans genome in biofilms formed onto different types of surfaces and enabled us to identify genes most differentially expressed on those surfaces. In addition, the levels of autoinducer-2 in biofilms from the various tested surfaces were different. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that gene expression of S. mutans differs in biofilms formed on tested surfaces, which manifest the physiological state of bacteria influenced by the type of surface material they accumulate onto. Moreover, the stressful circumstances of adjustment to the surface may persist in the bacteria enhancing intercellular signaling and surface dependent biofilm formation. PMID:20167085

  5. Modulation of covR expression in Streptococcus mutans UA159.

    PubMed

    Chong, Patrick; Drake, Laura; Biswas, Indranil

    2008-07-01

    The biofilm-forming Streptococcus mutans is a gram-positive bacterium that resides in the human oral cavity and is considered to be the primary etiological agent in the formation of dental caries. The global response regulator CovR, which lacks a cognate sensor kinase, is essential for the pathogenesis and biofilm formation of this bacterium, but it is not clear how covR expression is regulated in S. mutans. In this communication, we present the results of our studies examining various factors that regulate the expression of covR in S. mutans UA159. The results of Southern hybridization and PCR analysis indicated that CovR is an orphan response regulator in various isolates of S. mutans. The transcriptional start site for covR was found to be 221 base pairs upstream of the ATG start codon, and site-directed mutagenesis of the upstream TATAAT box confirmed our findings. The expression of covR is growth phase dependent, with maximal expression observed during exponential-growth phase. While changes to the growth temperature did not significantly affect the expression of covR, increasing the pH or the concentration of Mg(2+) in the growth medium leads to an increase in covR expression. The results of semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis and in vivo transcriptional-fusion reporter assays indicated that CovR autoregulates its own expression; this was verified by the results of electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I protection assays, which demonstrated direct binding of CovR to the promoter region. Apparently, regulation by Mg(2+) and the autoregulation of covR are not linked. A detailed analysis of the regulation of CovR may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of S. mutans, as well as providing further insight into the prevention of dental caries. PMID:18469111

  6. Identification and Functional Analysis of an Ammonium Transporter in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ardin, Arifah Chieko; Fujita, Kazuyo; Nagayama, Kayoko; Takashima, Yukiko; Nomura, Ryota; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Ooshima, Takashi; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive bacterium, is considered to be a major etiologic agent of human dental caries and reported to form biofilms known as dental plaque on tooth surfaces. This organism is also known to possess a large number of transport proteins in the cell membrane for export and import of molecules. Nitrogen is an essential nutrient for Gram-positive bacteria, though alternative sources such as ammonium can also be utilized. In order to obtain nitrogen for macromolecular synthesis, nitrogen-containing compounds must be transported into the cell. However, the ammonium transporter in S. mutans remains to be characterized. The present study focused on characterizing the ammonium transporter gene of S. mutans and its operon, while related regulatory genes were also analyzed. The SMU.1658 gene corresponding to nrgA in S. mutans is homologous to the ammonium transporter gene in Bacillus subtilis and SMU.1657, located upstream of the nrgA gene and predicted to be glnB, is a member of the PII protein family. Using a nrgA-deficient mutant strain (NRGD), we examined bacterial growth in the presence of ammonium, calcium chloride, and manganese sulfate. Fluorescent efflux assays were also performed to reveal export molecules associated with the ammonium transporter. The growth rate of NRGD was lower, while its fluorescent intensity was much higher as compared to the parental strain. In addition, confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the structure of biofilms formed by NRGD was drastically different than that of the parental strain. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis showed that the nrgA gene was co-transcribed with the glnB gene. These results suggest that the nrgA gene in S. mutans is essential for export of molecules and biofilm formation. PMID:25229891

  7. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  8. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on composite resins containing ursolic acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyeon; Song, Minju; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Park, Sung-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid (UA)-containing composites on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm. Materials and Methods Composite resins with five different concentrations (0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 wt%) of UA (U6753, Sigma Aldrich) were prepared, and their flexural strengths were measured according to ISO 4049. To evaluate the effect of carbohydrate source on biofilm formation, either glucose or sucrose was used as a nutrient source, and to investigate the effect of saliva treatment, the specimen were treated with either unstimulated whole saliva or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). For biofilm assay, composite disks were transferred to S. mutans suspension and incubated for 24 hr. Afterwards, the specimens were rinsed with PBS and sonicated. The colony forming units (CFU) of the disrupted biofilm cultures were enumerated. For growth inhibition test, the composites were placed on a polystyrene well cluster, and S. mutans suspension was inoculated. The optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was recorded by Infinite F200 pro apparatus (TECAN). One-way ANOVA and two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni correction were used for the data analyses. Results The flexural strength values did not show significant difference at any concentration (p > 0.01). In biofilm assay, the CFU score decreased as the concentration of UA increased. The influence of saliva pretreatment was conflicting. The sucrose groups exhibited higher CFU score than glucose group (p < 0.05). In bacterial growth inhibition test, all experimental groups containing UA resulted in complete inhibition. Conclusions Within the limitations of the experiments, UA included in the composite showed inhibitory effect on S. mutans biofilm formation and growth. PMID:23741708

  9. [The effect of PH on the growth of lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutan

    PubMed

    Gu, S P; Liu, Z; Song, P Z

    1998-12-01

    OBJECTIVE:The purpose of this study was to understand the effect of pH of culture media on the growth of lactobacillus and streptococcus mutan.METHODS: In this study the growth of two bacteria in differential pH culture media was measured by spectrophotometry. RESULTS: It was found that the growth of the bacteria was equal when the pH of the culture media was 6.2. CONCLUSION: This pH should be selected for the culture media which is used for the analysis of the cariogenicity of the two bacteria. PMID:15071633

  10. Treatment protocol to control Streptococcus mutans level in an orthodontic patient with high caries risk.

    PubMed

    Alves, Patrícia V M; Alviano, Wagner S; Bolognese, Ana M; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a protocol for treating an orthodontic patient with a high risk of developing caries. The salivary level of Streptococcus mutans was evaluated during various stages of orthodontic treatment. It was significantly high before professional application of 1% chlorhexidine collagen gel, daily mouth rinsing with 0.05% sodium fluoride solution, and bonding of the bands and brackets. Although there were no other changes in hygiene habits, microbiologic tests showed that the microbiota was in balance during the follow-up periods. At the end of orthodontic treatment, periodontal health was observed, and enamel surfaces showed signs of remineralization. PMID:18174078

  11. Comparison of the physicochemical surface properties of Streptococcus rattus with those of other mutans streptococcal species.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, H C; de Soet, J J; de Graaff, J; Rouxhet, P G; Busscher, H J

    1991-01-01

    Mutans streptococci comprise a group of seven closely related, yet distinct species. The distinction between the four species used in this study, namely Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus cricetus, Streptococcus rattus, and Streptococcus mutans, has been made only recently on the basis of DNA homologies. In order to determine if there is a difference in the physicochemical surface properties of these species, strains were characterized by contact angles, zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEP), elemental surface compositions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and molecular moieties by infrared spectroscopy. Contact angles, particularly when measured with water, can be considered a measure of cell surface hydrophobicity; zeta potentials reflect the charge of the outermost cell surface; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yields the relative abundance of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and phosphorus over the outer 5 nm of the bacterial cell surface; infrared spectroscopy enables a molecular characterization in terms of proteins, phosphates, and polysaccharides. All four species were homogeneous with regard to their physicochemical surface properties. However, the S. rattus species were clearly different from the others on the basis of the low water contact angle (21 +/- 2 vs. 26-31 degrees), highly negative zeta potential and lack of IEP, and high oxygen/carbon (0.50 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.41-0.43) and phosphorus/carbon (0.016 +/- 0.001 vs. 0.006-0.008) surface concentration ratios. Amongst the other differences observed, each species had a characteristic pH dependence of their zeta potential measured in phosphate buffer, yielding an IEP of 1.7, 2.1, and 2.5 for S. cricetus, S. sobrinus, and S. mutans, respectively. However, a cluster analysis on the zeta potential data showed only an isolated cluster for the S. rattus species. Thus it is likely that the higher cariogenicity of S. sobrinus with respect to S. cricetus and S. mutans is, in addition to a higher acidogenicity

  12. Genome editing by natural genetic transformation in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D A; Khan, R; Junges, R; Åmdal, H A; Petersen, F C

    2015-12-01

    Classical mutagenesis strategies using selective markers linked to designed mutations are powerful and widely applicable tools for targeted mutagenesis via natural genetic transformation in bacteria and archaea. However, the markers that confer power are also potentially problematic as they can be cumbersome, risk phenotypic effects of the inserted genes, and accumulate as unwanted genes during successive mutagenesis cycles. Alternative mutagenesis strategies use temporary plasmid or cassette insertions and can in principle achieve equally flexible mutation designs, but design of suitable counter-selected markers can be complex. All these drawbacks are eased by use of direct genome editing. Here we describe a strategy for directly editing the genome of S. mutans, which is applied to the widely studied reference strain UA159 (ATCC 700610) and has the advantage of extreme simplicity, requiring construction of only one synthetic donor amplicon and a single transformation step, followed by a simple PCR screen among a few dozen clones to identify the desired mutant. The donor amplicon carries the mutant sequence and extensive flanking segments of homology, which ensure efficient and precise integration by the recombination machinery specific to competent cells. The recipients are highly competent cells, in a state achieved by treatment with a synthetic competence pheromone. PMID:26481669

  13. Evaluation of changes in Streptococcus mutans colonies in microflora of the Indian population with fixed orthodontics appliances

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Chandresh; Maurya, Raj Kumar; Singh, Vinod; Tijare, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orthodontic therapy has oral ecological changes causing increased numbers of mutans streptococci in saliva and plaque. The purpose of this study was to estimate counts and colonization pattern of Streptococcus mutans after application of fixed orthodontic appliances. Materials and Methods: Plaque samples of randomly selected sixty patients were collected before placement of orthodontic appliances from buccal and labial aspects of the anterior teeth and four first molars and readings were recorded as T0. After placement of appliances (0.22 MBT preadjusted Gemini), i.e., 2nd and 3rd month, the plaque samples were collected again from same site and readings were recorded as T1 and T2, respectively. Counts of S. mutans in these patients were determined by using DM Strips (Orion Diagnostic, Espoo, Finland). Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to find out significant differences between different time interval for Dentocult score for S. mutans in orthodontic patients (P < 0.001). Results: Prior to the treatment, 46 patients (76%) showed mild and 14 patients (24%) showed moderate colonization of S. mutans. After treatment, the severity of colonization increased showing fifty patients (84%) moderate and six patients (10%) showing severe colonization of S. mutans at T1, which further increased in severity at T2 with 54 patients (90%) showing severe colonization with S. mutans. Conclusion: Results showed that fixed orthodontic appliance increases colonization of S. mutans during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27605987

  14. Role of interbacterial adherence in colonization of the oral cavities of gnotobiotic rats infected with Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella alcalescens.

    PubMed Central

    McBride, B C; Van der Hoeven, J S

    1981-01-01

    The role of interbacterial adherence in the colonization of the rate oral cavity was investigated with aggregating and nonaggregating strains of Veillonella alcalescens and Streptococcus mutans. V. alcalescens V-1 and S. mutans M-7 rapidly formed large stable aggregates when mixed in vitro. Aggregates could be reduced in size by sonication, but they could not be completely dispersed, indicating that bonding between the organisms was strong. V. alcalescens V-1 did not coaggregate with S. mutans C67-1, and V. alcalescens OMZ193 did not coaggregate with either S. mutans strain C67-1 or M-7. Osborne-Mendel rats monoassociated with either S. mutans C67-1 or M-7 were inoculated with veillonellae, molar teeth were removed at 2 h and at 14 days, and the number of veillonellae was determined. At 2 h post-inoculation there were 600 times as many colony-forming units of V. alcalescens V-1 adherent to the teeth of animals monoassociated with S. mutans M-7 when compared with animals monoassociated with the nonaggregating S. mutans C67-1. The number of colony-forming units of V. alcalescens V-1 was 1,000 times greater than the number of nonaggregating V. alcalescens OMZ193 in S. mutans M-7-infected animals. Similar results were obtained when teeth were samples 14 days after inoculation. Veillonellae inoculated into the mouths of germfree animals rapidly disappeared from tooth surfaces. PMID:7275312

  15. Lectin-Like Constituents of Foods Which React with Components of Serum, Saliva, and Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R. J.; Dankers, I.

    1981-01-01

    Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared from 22 commonly ingested fruits, vegetables, and seeds. When tested by agar diffusion, extracts from 13 and 10 of the foods formed precipitin bands with samples of normal rabbit serum and human saliva, respectively; extracts from four of the foods also reacted with antigen extracts of strains of Streptococcus mutans. When added to rabbit antiserum, extracts from 18 of 21 foods tested inhibited reactivity with antigen extracts derived from S. mutans MT3. Extracts from 16 foods agglutinated whole S. mutans cells, whereas those from 10 foods agglutinated human erythrocytes of blood types A and B. The lectin-like activities of extracts which reacted with human saliva were studied further. Pretreatment of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (S-HA) beads with extracts of bananas, coconuts, carrots, alfalfa, and sunflower seeds markedly reduced the subsequent adsorption of S. mutans MT3. Pretreatment of S-HA with banana extract also strongly inhibited adsorption of S. mutans H12 and S. sanguis C1, but it had little effect on attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii L13 or A. viscosus LY7. Absorption experiments indicated that the component(s) in banana extract responsible for inhibiting streptococcal adsorption to S-HA was identical to that which bound to human erythrocytes. The banana hemagglutinin exhibited highest activity between pH 7 and 8, and it was inhibited by high concentrations of glucosamine, galactosamine, and, to a lesser extent, mannosamine. Other sugars tested had no effect. The selective bacterial adsorption-inhibiting effect noted for banana extract was also observed in studies with purified lectins. Thus, pretreating S-HA with wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A inhibited adsorption of S. mutans MT3 cells, whereas peanut agglutinin, Ulex agglutinin, Dolichos agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin had little effect; none of these lectins affected attachment of A. viscosus LY7. Collectively, the observations suggest that

  16. Microfluidic study of environmental control of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Minjun; Ghoreishilangroudi, Seyedehdelaram; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert; Hagen, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus mutans has the ability to enter a transient state of genetic competence in which it can integrate exogenous DNA. It regulates the competent state in response to several environmental inputs that include two quorum sensing peptides (CSP and XIP) as well as pH and other variables. However the interplay of these variables in regulating the competent state is poorly understood. We are using microfluidics to isolate and control environmental inputs and examine how the competence regulatory circuit responds at the single cell level. Our studies reveal that the pH of the growth environment plays a critical role in determining how cells respond to the quorum sensing signals: The response to both peptides is sharply tuned to a narrow window of near-neutral pH. Within this optimal pH range, a population responds unimodally to a XIP stimulus, and bimodally to CSP; outside this range the response to both signals is suppressed. Because a growing S. mutans culture acidifies its medium, our findings suggest that the passage of the pH through the sensitivity window transiently activates the competence circuit. In this way a sharply tuned environmental response gives S. mutans fine control over the duration of its competent state. This work is supported by the NIH under NIDCR awards R01 DE023339.

  17. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  19. Identification of amino acid residues in Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferases influencing the structure of the glucan product.

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, A; Nakano, Y J; Mukasa, H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1994-01-01

    The glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of mutans streptococci are important virulence factors in the sucrose-dependent colonization of tooth surfaces by these organisms. To investigate the structure-function relationship of the GTFs, an approach was initiated to identify amino acid residues of the GTFs which affect the incorporation of glucose residues into the glucan polymer. Conserved amino acid residues were identified in the GTF-S and GTF-I enzymes of the mutans streptococci and were selected for site-directed mutagenesis in the corresponding enzymes from Streptococcus mutans GS5. Conversion of six amino acid residues of the GTF-I enzyme to those present at the corresponding positions in GTF-S, either singly or in multiple combinations, resulted in enzymes synthesizing increased levels of soluble glucans. The enzyme containing six alterations synthesized 73% water-soluble glucan in the absence of acceptor dextran T10, while parental enzyme GTF-I synthesized no such glucan product. Conversely, when residue 589 of the GTF-S enzyme was converted from Thr to either Asp or Glu, the resulting enzyme synthesized primarily water-insoluble glucan in the absence of the acceptor. Therefore, this approach has identified several amino acid positions which influence the nature of the glucan product synthesized by GTFs. PMID:8050997

  20. The photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans biofilms using erythrosine and dental halogen curing unit

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Ho; Park, Ho-Won; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Si-Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using erythrosine as a photosensitizing agent and a dental halogen curing unit as a light source, on Streptococcus mutans in a biofilm phase. The S. mutans biofilms were formed in a 24-well cell culture cluster. Test groups consisted of biofilms divided into four groups: group 1: no photosensitizer or light irradiation treatment (control group); group 2: photosensitizer treatment alone; group 3: light irradiation alone; group 4: photosensitizer treatment and light irradiation. After treatments, the numbers of colony-forming unit (CFU) were counted and samples were examined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). Only group 4 (combined treatment) resulted in significant increases in cell death, with rates of 75% and 55% after 8 h of incubation, and 74% and 42% at 12 h, for biofilms formed in brain–heart infusion (BHI) broth supplemented with 0% or 0.1% sucrose, respectively. Therefore, PDT of S. mutans biofilms using a combination of erythrosine and a dental halogen curing unit, both widely used in dental clinics, resulted in a significant increase in cell death. The PDT effects are decreased in biofilms that form in the presence of sucrose. PMID:23222991

  1. Composition Analysis and Inhibitory Effect of Sterculia lychnophora against Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Park, Bok-Im; Hwang, Eun-Hee; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Pangdahai is a traditional Chinese drug, specifically described in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia as the seeds of Sterculia lychnophora Hance. Here, we separated S. lychnophora husk and kernel, analyzed the nutrient contents, and investigated the inhibitory effects of S. lychnophora ethanol extracts on cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans, important bacteria in dental caries and plaque formation. Ethanol extracts of S. lychnophora showed dose-dependent antibacterial activity against S. mutans with significant inhibition at concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/mL compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, biofilm formation was decreased by S. lychnophora at concentrations > 0.03 mg/mL, while bacterial viability was decreased dose-dependently at high concentrations (0.04, 0.08, 0.16, and 0.32 mg/mL). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanol extract revealed a strong presence of alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides while the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and organic acids was low. The S. lychnophora husk had higher moisture and ash content than the kernel, while the protein and fat content of the husk were lower (p < 0.05) than those of the kernel. These results indicate that S. lychnophora may have antibacterial effects against S. mutans, which are likely related to the alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides, the major components of S. lychnophora. PMID:27190540

  2. The photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans biofilms using erythrosine and dental halogen curing unit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ho; Park, Ho-Won; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Si-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT), using erythrosine as a photosensitizing agent and a dental halogen curing unit as a light source, on Streptococcus mutans in a biofilm phase. The S. mutans biofilms were formed in a 24-well cell culture cluster. Test groups consisted of biofilms divided into four groups: group 1: no photosensitizer or light irradiation treatment (control group); group 2: photosensitizer treatment alone; group 3: light irradiation alone; group 4: photosensitizer treatment and light irradiation. After treatments, the numbers of colony-forming unit (CFU) were counted and samples were examined by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy (CLSM). Only group 4 (combined treatment) resulted in significant increases in cell death, with rates of 75% and 55% after 8 h of incubation, and 74% and 42% at 12 h, for biofilms formed in brain-heart infusion (BHI) broth supplemented with 0% or 0.1% sucrose, respectively. Therefore, PDT of S. mutans biofilms using a combination of erythrosine and a dental halogen curing unit, both widely used in dental clinics, resulted in a significant increase in cell death. The PDT effects are decreased in biofilms that form in the presence of sucrose. PMID:23222991

  3. Streptococcus mutans biofilm transient viscoelastic fluid behaviour during high-velocity microsprays.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, S; Johnston, D A; Rmaile, A; Gottenbos, B; De Jager, M; Aspiras, M; Starke, E M; Ward, M T; Stoodley, P

    2016-06-01

    Using high-speed imaging we assessed Streptococcus mutans biofilm-fluid interactions during exposure to a 60-ms microspray burst with a maximum exit velocity of 51m/s. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were grown for 72h on 10mm-length glass slides pre-conditioned with porcine gastric mucin. Biofilm stiffness was measured by performing uniaxial-compression tests. We developed an in-vitro interproximal model which allowed the parallel insertion of two biofilm-colonized slides separated by a distance of 1mm and enabled high-speed imaging of the removal process at the surface. S. mutans biofilms were exposed to either a water microspray or an air-only microburst. High-speed videos provided further insight into the mechanical behaviour of biofilms as complex liquids and into high-shear fluid-biofilm interaction. We documented biofilms extremely transient fluid behaviour when exposed to the high-velocity microsprays. The presence of time-dependent recoil and residual deformation confirmed the pivotal role of viscoelasticity in biofilm removal. The air-only microburst was effective enough to remove some of the biofilm but created a smaller clearance zone underlying the importance of water and the air-water interface of drops moving over the solid surface in the removal process. Confocal and COMSTAT analysis showed the high-velocity water microspray caused up to a 99.9% reduction in biofilm thickness, biomass and area coverage, within the impact area. PMID:26771168

  4. Cationic Lipid Content in Liposome-Encapsulated Nisin Improves Sustainable Bactericidal Activity against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yamakami, Kazuo; Tsumori, Hideaki; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yutaka; Nagatoshi, Kohei; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An oral infectious disease, dental caries, is caused by the cariogenic streptococci Streptococcus mutans. The expected preventive efficiency for prophylactics against dental caries is not yet completely observed. Nisin, a bacteriocin, has been demonstrated to be microbicidal against S. mutans, and liposome-encapsulated nisin improves preventive features that may be exploited for human oral health. Here we examined the bactericidal effect of charged lipids on nisin-loaded liposomes against S. mutans and inhibitory efficiency for insoluble glucan synthesis by the streptococci for prevention of dental caries. Cationic liposome, nisin-loaded dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/phytosphingosine, exhibited higher bactericidal activities than those of electroneutral liposome and anionic liposome. Bactericidal efficiency of the cationic liposome revealed that the vesicles exhibited sustained inhibition of glucan synthesis and the lowest rate of release of nisin from the vesicles. The optimizing ability of cationic liposome-encapsulated nisin that exploit the sustained preventive features of an anti-streptococcal strategy may improve prevention of dental caries. PMID:27583045

  5. Death and survival in Streptococcus mutans: differing outcomes of a quorum-sensing signaling peptide

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Vincent; Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are considered “social” organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones) in a process called quorum-sensing (QS). These signaling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, QS is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial QS could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (cavities). In S. mutans, its CSP QS signaling peptide does not act as a classical QS signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induce the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signaling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial “suicide” and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same QS signaling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes. PMID:26557114

  6. Cationic Lipid Content in Liposome-Encapsulated Nisin Improves Sustainable Bactericidal Activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yamakami, Kazuo; Tsumori, Hideaki; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yutaka; Nagatoshi, Kohei; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An oral infectious disease, dental caries, is caused by the cariogenic streptococci Streptococcus mutans. The expected preventive efficiency for prophylactics against dental caries is not yet completely observed. Nisin, a bacteriocin, has been demonstrated to be microbicidal against S. mutans, and liposome-encapsulated nisin improves preventive features that may be exploited for human oral health. Here we examined the bactericidal effect of charged lipids on nisin-loaded liposomes against S. mutans and inhibitory efficiency for insoluble glucan synthesis by the streptococci for prevention of dental caries. Cationic liposome, nisin-loaded dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/phytosphingosine, exhibited higher bactericidal activities than those of electroneutral liposome and anionic liposome. Bactericidal efficiency of the cationic liposome revealed that the vesicles exhibited sustained inhibition of glucan synthesis and the lowest rate of release of nisin from the vesicles. The optimizing ability of cationic liposome-encapsulated nisin that exploit the sustained preventive features of an anti-streptococcal strategy may improve prevention of dental caries. PMID:27583045

  7. Composition Analysis and Inhibitory Effect of Sterculia lychnophora against Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Park, Bok-Im; Hwang, Eun-Hee; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Pangdahai is a traditional Chinese drug, specifically described in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia as the seeds of Sterculia lychnophora Hance. Here, we separated S. lychnophora husk and kernel, analyzed the nutrient contents, and investigated the inhibitory effects of S. lychnophora ethanol extracts on cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans, important bacteria in dental caries and plaque formation. Ethanol extracts of S. lychnophora showed dose-dependent antibacterial activity against S. mutans with significant inhibition at concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/mL compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, biofilm formation was decreased by S. lychnophora at concentrations > 0.03 mg/mL, while bacterial viability was decreased dose-dependently at high concentrations (0.04, 0.08, 0.16, and 0.32 mg/mL). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanol extract revealed a strong presence of alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides while the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and organic acids was low. The S. lychnophora husk had higher moisture and ash content than the kernel, while the protein and fat content of the husk were lower (p < 0.05) than those of the kernel. These results indicate that S. lychnophora may have antibacterial effects against S. mutans, which are likely related to the alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides, the major components of S. lychnophora. PMID:27190540

  8. Cellular Adherence, Glucosyltransferase Adsorption, and Glucan Synthesis of Streptococcus mutans AHT Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Toshihiko; Inoue, Masakazu

    1978-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans AHT mutants M1, M2, and M13 failed to adhere to a glass surface, whereas mutants M9 and M35 exhibited decreased and increased adherence, respectively, as compared with the parent strain, when grown in sucrose broth. Extracellular glucosyltransferase prepared from glucose-grown cultures of the adherent strains (wild type, M9, and M35) induced adherence of heat-killed cells of the homologous and heterologous streptococcal strains as well as of Escherichia coli K-12 and uncoated resin particles. The glucosyltransferase was adsorbed on all the streptococcal cells and glucan-coated resins, but not on E. coli cells and the uncoated resins. Glucosyltransferase from the nonadhering mutants (M1, M2, M13) neither was significantly adsorbed on nor induced adherence of any of the cells and resins. Cell-free enzymes from the glucose-grown adherent strains produced water-soluble and water-insoluble glucans, whereas those from the nonadhering mutants produced only water-soluble glucans. Small amounts of alkali-soluble, cell-associated glucan were recovered from the sucrose-grown nonadhering mutants. Thus, the relative proportions of glucosyltransferase isozymes elaborated by the S. mutans mutants, insofar as they affect the physico-chemical properties of the glucans produced, seem to determine the adherence abilities of the cells. The adsorption of glucosyltransferase on glucan molecules on the cell surface is not required for the adherence of S. mutans, but de novo glucan synthesis is important in the adherence process. PMID:631879

  9. Suppression of salivary Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli by topical caries preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Juric, H; Dukic, W; Jankovic, B; Karlovic, Z; Pavelic, B

    2003-12-01

    Reduction of cariogenic bacteria, especially salivary Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli is a valuable clinical procedure that in many ways alleviates implementation of targeted caries preventive procedures in the entire population. The aim of this study was to investigate the caries preventive values of certain preventive procedures in in vivo conditions. Four groups of subjects, each with 18 children aged from 4-5 and 10-12 years (n = 72) were treated with different caries preventive agent (aminfluoride solution, Proxyt paste, chewing gum containing xylitol and fluoride and chlorhexidine solution). During a period of two months five control measurements for number of salivary Streptococcus mutans (SM) and lactobacilli (LB) were performed. At the end of the study the best result in the reduction of the bacteria was achieved by the application of Proxyt paste and daily use of chewing gum (p < 0.001). In patients treated with this preventive procedure the number of SM was reduced by 1 class and LB to < 10(4) CFU/ml saliva after two months of study. The results obtained indicate that professional teeth cleaning and use of chewing gum with xylitol and fluorides on daily basis can be very effective protocol for cariogenic bacteria reduction and in the individual caries prevention. PMID:14768786

  10. Effects of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Counts- A Randomised Control Trail

    PubMed Central

    R, Srinivas; B, Vikram Simha; Y, Sandhya Sree; T, Chandra Shekar; P, Siva Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mouth rinses have been in use from time immemorial as a supplement for routine oral hygiene. There are many number of mouth rinses currently available in the market in which many of them possess certain drawback, which has necessitated the search for alternate mouth rinses. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of rinsing with green tea in comparison with chlorhexidine and plain water on Streptococcus mutans count. Setting and Design: A short term, single blinded, cross over randomised control clinical trial. Materials and Methods: Study includes a total of 30 subjects aged 20 to 25 years divided into three groups that is green tea group, chlorhexidine group, and plain water group. A baseline plaque samples were collected and under supervision of examiner all the subjects rinsed with 10 ml of respective solutions for one minute. Plaque samples were collected at five minutes after rinsing. All the 30 subjects were exposed to all the three rinses with a wash out period of seven days between the interventions. All the samples were sent to microbial analysis. Results: Wilcoxon matched pair test and Mann-Whitney U test showed that both chlorhexidine and green tea significantly reduced Streptococcus mutans colony counts compared to plain water. Conclusion: The results of present study indicate that green tea mouth rinse proved to be equally effective compared to chlorhexidine which is considered as gold standard. This may also be a valuable public health intervention as it is economical and has multiple health benefits. PMID:25584303

  11. Antimicrobial activity of alexidine, chlorhexidine and cetrimide against Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of antimicrobial solutions has been recommended to disinfect demineralized dentin prior to placing the filling material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of several antimicrobials in controlling Streptococcus mutans (SM) biofilm formed in dentin. Methods Antimicrobial activity of 0.2% and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX), 0.2% cetrimide (CTR) and 0.2%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% alexidine (ALX) was assayed on 1-week SM biofilm formed on standardized coronal dentin blocks. Results of SM biofilm antimicrobial activity by different protocols were expressed as the kill percentage of biofilm and the term “eradication” was used to denote the kill of 100% of the bacterial population. To compare the efficacies of the different protocols the Student t test was used, previously subjecting data to the Anscombe transformation. Results All ALX concentrations tested and 0.2% CTR achieved a kill percentage higher than 99%, followed by 2% CHX with percentages above 96% (no statistically significant difference among them). Whereas 2% ALX and 0.2% CTR respectively showed eradication in 10 and 9 of the twelve specimens, 0.2% CHX did not produce eradication in any case. Conclusions The present study shows that, when used for one minute, 2% and 1% alexidine, and 0.2% cetrimide, achieve eradication of Streptococcus mutans biofilm in most specimens when applied to a dentin-volumetric model. PMID:25139679

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of Six Indian Plant Extracts against Streptococcus Mutans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pankaj; Bisht, Dakshina; Sharma, Alosha; Srivastava, Binita; Gupta, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To assess the antimicrobial efficacy of six plant extracts of Indian origin often used as traditional medicine against standard strains of Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of six plant extracts was determined by the agar well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the crude (raw), Organic solvent based, aqueous extracts was determined by the agar well diffusion method. Results: Out of all the six extracts evaluated, organic solvent based and aqueous extracts of all the extracts were found to have variable antimicrobial activities against the oral pathogen. The crude extract of Garlic was the most effective against Streptococcus mutans with the highest zone of inhibition (24.62 mm) followed by the aqueous extract of Amla (19.47mm) and organic solvent based extract of Ginger (18.76 mm). Conclusion: Despite of the fact that the extracts were not pure compounds and antimicrobial results were obtained. This recommends the potency of these extracts. The figment of the derivation of antimicrobial compounds from plants seems lucrative as it will lead to the development of a phytomedicine to act against microbes. PMID:25859526

  13. CovR-controlled global regulation of gene expression in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Alexander; Mohapatra, Saswat S; Chong, Patrick; Neely, Melody; Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    CovR/S is a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) that controls the expression of various virulence related genes in many streptococci. However, in the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, the response regulator CovR appears to be an orphan since the cognate sensor kinase CovS is absent. In this study, we explored the global transcriptional regulation by CovR in S. mutans. Comparison of the transcriptome profiles of the wild-type strain UA159 with its isogenic covR deleted strain IBS10 indicated that at least 128 genes (∼6.5% of the genome) were differentially regulated. Among these genes, 69 were down regulated, while 59 were up regulated in the IBS10 strain. The S. mutans CovR regulon included competence genes, virulence related genes, and genes encoded within two genomic islands (GI). Genes encoded by the GI TnSmu2 were found to be dramatically reduced in IBS10, while genes encoded by the GI TnSmu1 were up regulated in the mutant. The microarray data were further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Furthermore, direct regulation of some of the differentially expressed genes was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using purified CovR protein. A proteomic study was also carried out that showed a general perturbation of protein expression in the mutant strain. Our results indicate that CovR truly plays a significant role in the regulation of several virulence related traits in this pathogenic streptococcus. PMID:21655290

  14. CovR-Controlled Global Regulation of Gene Expression in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Alexander; Mohapatra, Saswat S.; Chong, Patrick; Neely, Melody; Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    CovR/S is a two-component signal transduction system (TCS) that controls the expression of various virulence related genes in many streptococci. However, in the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, the response regulator CovR appears to be an orphan since the cognate sensor kinase CovS is absent. In this study, we explored the global transcriptional regulation by CovR in S. mutans. Comparison of the transcriptome profiles of the wild-type strain UA159 with its isogenic covR deleted strain IBS10 indicated that at least 128 genes (∼6.5% of the genome) were differentially regulated. Among these genes, 69 were down regulated, while 59 were up regulated in the IBS10 strain. The S. mutans CovR regulon included competence genes, virulence related genes, and genes encoded within two genomic islands (GI). Genes encoded by the GI TnSmu2 were found to be dramatically reduced in IBS10, while genes encoded by the GI TnSmu1 were up regulated in the mutant. The microarray data were further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Furthermore, direct regulation of some of the differentially expressed genes was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays using purified CovR protein. A proteomic study was also carried out that showed a general perturbation of protein expression in the mutant strain. Our results indicate that CovR truly plays a significant role in the regulation of several virulence related traits in this pathogenic streptococcus. PMID:21655290

  15. Effect of an Orphan Response Regulator on Streptococcus mutans Sucrose-Dependent Adherence and Cariogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Idone, Vincent; Brendtro, Stacy; Gillespie, Robert; Kocaj, Steve; Peterson, Erica; Rendi, Mara; Warren, Wayne; Michalek, Suzanne; Krastel, Kirsten; Cvitkovitch, Dennis; Spatafora, Grace

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the principal acidogenic component of dental plaque that demineralizes tooth enamel, leading to dental decay. Cell-associated glucosyltransferases catalyze the sucrose-dependent synthesis of sticky glucan polymers that, together with glucan binding proteins, promote S. mutans adherence to teeth and cell aggregation. We generated an S. mutans Tn916 transposon mutant, GMS315, which is defective in sucrose-dependent adherence and significantly less cariogenic than the UA130 wild-type progenitor in germfree rats. The results of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and N-terminal sequence analysis confirmed the absence of a 155-kDa glucosyltransferase S (Gtf-S) from GMS315 protein profiles. Mapping of the unique transposon insertion in GMS315 revealed disruption of a putative regulatory region located upstream of gcrR, a gene previously described by Sato et al. that shares significant amino acid identity with other bacterial response regulators (Y. Sato, Y. Yamamoto, and H. Kizaki, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 186: 187-191, 2000). The gcrR regulator, which we call “tarC,” does not align with any of the 13 proposed two-component signal transduction systems derived from in silico analysis of the S. mutans genome, but rather represents one of several orphan response regulators in the genome. The results of Northern hybridization and/or real-time reverse transcription-PCR experiments reveal increased expression of both Gtf-S and glucan binding protein C (GbpC) in a tarC knockout mutant (GMS900), thereby supporting the notion that TarC acts as a negative transcriptional regulator. In addition, we noted that GMS900 has altered biofilm architecture relative to the wild type and is hypocariogenic in germfree rats. Taken collectively, these findings support a role for signal transduction in S. mutans sucrose-dependent adherence and aggregation and implicate TarC as a potential target for controlling S. mutans

  16. Effect of gallium on growth of Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 and dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Valappil, S P; Owens, G J; Miles, E J; Farmer, N L; Cooper, L; Miller, G; Clowes, R; Lynch, R J M; Higham, S M

    2014-01-01

    Gallium-doped phosphate-based glasses (Ga-PBG) were assessed for their impact on Streptococcus mutans and dental mineralisation, firstly by disc diffusion assays followed by biofilms grown on nitrocellulose filter membrane (NFM) and constant-depth film fermentor (CDFF). Short-time exposure (10 min) effects of Ga-PBG on S. mutans biofilm were compared with that of 0.2% chlorhexidine. The effects of Ga-PBG on bovine enamel (which was investigated under pH-cycling condition) and dentine were analysed using transverse microradiography (TMR), profilometry and inductively coupled plasma optical-emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The disc diffusion assays showed inhibition zones of 24.5 ± 0.5 mm for Ga-PBG compared with controls (C-PBG). Ga-PBG showed statistically significant growth inhibition of S. mutans biofilms on NFM (p = 0.001) and CDFF (p < 0.046) compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) and C-PBG. The CDFF assay revealed a maximum of 2.11 log colony-forming unit (CFU) reduction at 48 h, but short-time exposure effects were comparable with that of 0.2% chlorhexidine only on older biofilms (maximum of 0.59 vs. 0.69 log CFU reduction at 120 h). TMR analyses of the enamel revealed non-significant mineral loss (p = 0.37) only in the case of Ga-PBG samples compared with controls including sodium fluoride. ICP-OES analyses indicated transient gallium adsorption into dentine by calcium displacement. The results confirmed that gallium inhibited S. mutans growth and appears to have the potential to protect the enamel surface under conditions representative of the oral environment. Further work is needed to establish whether it has an application in daily oral hygiene procedures to prevent or reduce caries. PMID:24335164

  17. PlsX deletion impacts fatty acid synthesis and acid adaptation in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Cross, Benjamin; Garcia, Ariana; Faustoferri, Roberta; Quivey, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary causative agents of dental caries in humans, ferments dietary sugars in the mouth to produce organic acids. These acids lower local pH values, resulting in demineralization of the tooth enamel, leading to caries. To survive acidic environments, Strep. mutans employs several adaptive mechanisms, including a shift from saturated to unsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids. PlsX is an acyl-ACP : phosphate transacylase that links the fatty acid synthase II (FASII) pathway to the phospholipid synthesis pathway, and is therefore central to the movement of unsaturated fatty acids into the membrane. Recently, we discovered that plsX is not essential in Strep. mutans. A plsX deletion mutant was not a fatty acid or phospholipid auxotroph. Gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters indicated that membrane fatty acid chain length in the plsX deletion strain differed from those detected in the parent strain, UA159. The deletion strain displayed a fatty acid shift similar to WT, but had a higher percentage of unsaturated fatty acids at low pH. The deletion strain survived significantly longer than the parent strain when cultures were subjected to an acid challenge of pH 2.5.The ΔplsX strain also exhibited elevated F-ATPase activity at pH 5.2, compared with the parent. These results indicate that the loss of plsX affects both the fatty acid synthesis pathway and the acid-adaptive response of Strep. mutans. PMID:26850107

  18. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates. PMID:25792295

  19. Sustained effects of blue light on Streptococcus mutans in regrown biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Berneron, Julie; Steinberg, Doron; Featherstone, John D B; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2016-04-01

    In prior studies, exposure of Streptococcus mutans in biofilm to blue light using high fluences of up to 680 J/cm(2) did not interfere with bacterial capability to reform an initial biofilm; however, a delayed antibacterial effect was observed. Our aim was to determine the sustained effecttts of blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light on the pathogenicity of the newly formed biofilm. S. mutans were grown to form biofilm that was exposed to blue light (wavelengths, 460-480 nm) for 1, 3, and 7 min (equivalent to 37, 112, and 262 J/cm(2), respectively). Then, bacteria were suspended and allowed to regrow into new biofilms. The regrown biofilms were assessed for bacterial quantification by optical density (OD) measurement and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), bacterial viability and extracellular polysaccharide production by fluorescent staining using confocal scanning laser microscopy, acid production by bacteria (acidogenicity), and bacterial survival at low pH (aciduricity) using qPCR. Bacterial growth in the regrown biofilms was increased when samples were previously exposed to light; however, under the confocal microscopy, a higher proportion of dead bacteria and a reduction in polysaccharide production were observed. The acidogenicity from the regrown biofilm was lowered as fluences of light increased. The aciduricity of the regrown biofilm was decreased, meaning less growth of bacteria into biofilm in low pH with increasing fluences. Blue light has sustained effects on S. mutans bacteria grown into new biofilm. Although bacterial growth in biofilm increased, bacterial viability and virulence characteristics were impaired. The cariogenic potential over time of S. mutans previously exposed to blue light when grown on tooth surfaces is yet to be determined. PMID:26796707

  20. Effect of Chewing Xylitol Containing and Herbal Chewing Gums on Salivary Mutans Streptococcus Count among School Children

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sangeeta; Lakashminarayan, Nagesh; Kemparaj, Umesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study aims to assess and compare the reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci counts after chewing Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums among high school children. Methods: The study was conducted among 72 school children (12–15 years) from 3 randomly selected schools (blocks). Xylitol, herbal and placebo gums were randomly allocated to 3 blocks. Subjects were instructed to chew one pellet four times a day for 21 days. The mean reduction in salivary Streptococcus mutans count was assessed. Results: The 100% Xylitol sweetened chewing gum “Xylitol”has shown statistically significant reduction in salivary Mutans Streptococci colony forming units at the end of 21 days (P < 0.01). The reduction was not statistically significant in herbal and placebo chewing gum. Conclusions: Hundred percentage Xylitol sweetened chewing gum was found to be more effective in reducing salivary Mutans Streptococci count when compared to herbal and placebo chewing gums. PMID:26097673

  1. A Novel PTS of Streptococcus mutans is Responsible for Transport of Carbohydrates with α-1,3 linkage

    PubMed Central

    Ajdic, Dragana; Chen, Zhiyun

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The most common type of carbohydrate-transport system in Streptococcus mutans is the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). We previously showed that fourteen PTSs exist in S. mutans UA159 (Ajdic et al., 2002). Several studies have shown that microorganisms growing in biofilms express different genes as compared to their planktonic counterparts. In this study, we showed that one PTS of S. mutans was expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms. Furthermore, the same PTS was also responsible for the transport and metabolism of disaccharide nigerose (3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose). Additionally, the results indicate that the studied PTS might be involved in the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates synthesized by glucosyltransferase B (GtfB) and glucosyltransferase C (GtfC) of S. mutans. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows PTS transport of a disaccharide (and possibly extracellular oligosaccharides) with α-1,3 linkage. PMID:23193985

  2. The Effects of Chlorhexidine and Persica Mouthwashes on Colonization of Streptococcus mutans on Fixed Orthodontics O-rings

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Fereshteh; Danesh Ardakani, Mohammad; Zandi, Hengameh; Heidarzadeh, Hamed; Moshafi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Fixed orthodontic appliances predispose patients to dental caries. Use of mouthrinses has been introduced as the effective way for reducing dental plaque accumulation. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Persica mouthwash and Chlorhexidine (CHX) on colonization of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on fixed orthodontic O-rings. Materials and Method Thirty patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and proper oral hygiene were randomly provided by CHX and Persica and trained to use these mouthwashes according to the manufacturer’s instruction. Sampling was carried out right before and 4 weeks after mouthrinsing treatment. The mean amounts of S. mutans colonies in these groups were compared. Results Comparison of S. mutans colonization within each group revealed both mouthrinses to be efficient. However, this difference was found to be significant only in CHX group. Conclusion Persica cannot be a good alternative mouthwash and patients on orthodontic treatment are still recommended to use CHX. PMID:25759859

  3. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries. PMID:27151293

  4. Helper plasmid cloning in Streptococcus sanguis: cloning of a tetracycline resistance determinant from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tobian, J A; Macrina, F L

    1982-01-01

    A model system for testing the helper plasmid cloning system of Gryczan et al. (Mol. Gen. Genet. 177:459-467, 1980) was devised for the Streptococcus sanguis (Challis) host-vector system. In this system, linearized pVA736 plasmid efficiently transformed an S. sanguis (Challis) host containing a homologous plasmid, pVA380-1, but did not transform a plasmidless host or a host containing a nonhomologous plasmid, pVA380. In addition, whereas monomeric circular pVA736 transformed a plasmidless host with two-hit kinetics, it transformed a pVA380-1-containing host with one-hit kinetics. This helper plasmid cloning system was used to isolate two HindIII fragments (5.0 megadaltons [Mdal] and 1.9 Mdal in size) from the chromosome of Streptococcus mutans V825 which conferred high-level tetracycline resistance. One tetracycline-resistant clone was examined and found to contain three plasmids which were sized and designated pVA868 (9.0 Mdal), pVA869 (9.5 Mdal), and pVA870 (9.8 Mdal). Results of Southern blot hybridization and restriction endonuclease digestion confirmed that all three chimeras were composed of two HindIII fragments of the S. mutans V825 chromosome, as well as a large portion, varying in size for each chimera, of the 2.8 Mdal cloning vector, pVA380-1. Incompatibility observed between pVA380-1 and each of the chimeras indicated that replication of the chimeras was governed by the pVA380-1 replicative origin. Southern blotting experiments revealed that the chimeras hybridized to Tn916, providing the first evidence that transposon-related genes of enteric streptococcal origin are disseminated among oral streptococci. Images PMID:6288658

  5. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (P<0.001). In addition, CBP-positive strains induced HDPF proliferation, which is a possible mechanism related to development of hyperplastic pulpitis. The distribution of S. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases. PMID:27442266

  6. Surface Lipoprotein PpiA of Streptococcus mutans Suppresses Scavenger Receptor MARCO-Dependent Phagocytosis by Macrophages ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mukouhara, Tadashi; Arimoto, Takafumi; Cho, Kasei; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Igarashi, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is associated with the initiation and progression of human dental caries and is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis. For the pathogen to survive in the infected host, surface lipoproteins of S. mutans are likely to play important roles in interactions with the innate immune system. To clarify the role that a putative lipoprotein, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase (PpiA), of S. mutans plays in the macrophage response, we investigated the response of THP-1-derived macrophages to S. mutans challenge. The deletion of the gene encoding Lgt eliminated PpiA on the cell surface of S. mutans, which implies that PpiA is a lipoprotein that is lipid anchored in the cell membrane by Lgt. Human and murine peritoneal macrophages both showed higher phagocytic activities for the ppiA and lgt mutants than the wild type, which indicates that the presence of PpiA reduces S. mutans phagocytosis. In addition, infection with S. mutans markedly induced mRNAs of macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) and scavenger receptor A (SR-A) in human macrophages. In particular, transcriptional and translational levels of MARCO in human macrophages infected with the ppiA mutant were higher than those in macrophages infected with the wild type. Phagocytosis of S. mutans by human macrophages markedly decreased after treatment with anti-MARCO IgG. These results demonstrate that the S. mutans lipoprotein PpiA contributes to suppression of MARCO-mediated phagocytosis of this bacterium by macrophages. PMID:21986627

  7. Clinical Efficacy of a Specifically Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide Mouth Rinse: Targeted Elimination of Streptococcus mutans and Prevention of Demineralization

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, R.; Santarpia, P.; Lavender, S.; Gittins, E.; Liu, Z.; Anderson, M.H.; He, J.; Shi, W.; Eckert, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of dental caries, has a measurable impact on domestic and global health care costs. Though persistent in the oral cavity despite conventional oral hygiene, S. mutans can be excluded from intact oral biofilms through competitive exclusion by other microorganisms. This suggests that therapies capable of selectively eliminating S. mutans while limiting the damage to the normal oral flora might be effective long-term interventions to fight cariogenesis. To meet this challenge, we designed C16G2, a novel synthetic specifically targeted antimicrobial peptide with specificity for S. mutans. C16G2 consists of a S. mutans-selective ‘targeting region’ comprised of a fragment from S. mutans competence stimulation peptide (CSP) conjoined to a ‘killing region’ consisting of a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide (G2). In vitro studies have indicated that C16G2 has robust efficacy and selectivity for S. mutans, and not other oral bacteria, and affects targeted bacteria within seconds of contact. Methods In the present study, we evaluated C16G2 for clinical utility in vitro, followed by a pilot efficacy study to examine the impact of a 0.04% (w/v) C16G2 rinse in an intra-oral remineralization/demineralization model. Results and Conclusions C16G2 rinse usage was associated with reductions in plaque and salivary S. mutans, lactic acid production, and enamel demineralization. The impact on total plaque bacteria was minimal. These results suggest that C16G2 is effective against S. mutans in vivo and should be evaluated further in the clinic. PMID:21860239

  8. Tight genetic linkage of a glucosyltransferase and dextranase of Streptococcus mutans GS-5.

    PubMed

    Burne, R A; Rubinfeld, B; Bowen, W H; Yasbin, R E

    1986-12-01

    A genetic library consisting of over 5000 clones with an average insert size of 6.9 kilobasepairs (kbp) of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 has been constructed in a bivalent plasmid vector pMK3, which is capable of replicating in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The recombinant plasmid pSUCRI, containing a 6.0 kbp fragment of S. mutans GS-5 DNA, was the focus of this study. Using Southern hybridization, in vitro and in vivo gene expression techniques, and biochemical analysis, this clone was shown to encode the 55 kiloDalton (kDal) GS-5 gtfA gene product, as well as a 38 and a 66 kDal polypeptide. In addition to the gtfA gene, pSUCRI encodes a dextranase activity with specificity for alpha(1----6)-linked glucans, and with no detectable activity on mutan. The dextranase enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 66 kDal as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE analysis of the proteins produced by a dextranase-negative deletion derivative. The pH optimum of the enzyme was approximately 6.0, and there was no detectable activity below pH 5.0. By subcloning various combinations of DNA fragments from pSUCRI, it was demonstrated that the dextranase gene (designated dexB) can be separated from the gtfA gene and still be efficiently expressed in both E. coli and B. subtilis. The dexB gene contained its own promoter and ribosome-binding site. The genetic linkage of the gtfA and dexB genes in the S. mutans GS-5 chromosome was confirmed by Southern hybridization and by the independent isolation of four distinct clones containing the gtfA gene and common flanking sequences. In addition to a glucosyltransferase and dextranase, an invertase-like activity is also encoded on pSUCRI, indicating that there is a cluster of genes on the S. mutans GS-5 chromosome which is devoted to the dissimilation of sucrose and concomitant synthesis or modification of glucans into a water-insoluble form, perhaps constituting an operon for glucan modification which can be coordinately regulated in response to

  9. α-Mangostin disrupts the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and facilitates its mechanical removal.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Thi Mai; Falsetta, Megan L; Hwang, Geelsu; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    α-Mangostin (αMG) has been reported to be an effective antimicrobial agent against planktonic cells of Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-forming and acid-producing cariogenic organism. However, its anti-biofilm activity remains to be determined. We examined whether αMG, a xanthone purified from Garcinia mangostana L grown in Vietnam, disrupts the development, acidogenicity, and/or the mechanical stability of S. mutans biofilms. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice-daily, 60 s exposure each) were used to assess the bioactivity of αMG using a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) biofilm model. Topical applications of early-formed biofilms with αMG (150 µM) effectively reduced further biomass accumulation and disrupted the 3D architecture of S. mutans biofilms. Biofilms treated with αMG had lower amounts of extracellular insoluble and intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides (30-45%) than those treated with vehicle control (P<0.05), while the number of viable bacterial counts was unaffected. Furthermore, αMG treatments significantly compromised the mechanical stability of the biofilm, facilitating its removal from the sHA surface when subjected to a constant shear stress of 0.809 N/m2 (>3-fold biofilm detachment from sHA vs. vehicle-treated biofilms; P<0.05). Moreover, acid production by S. mutans biofilms was disrupted following αMG treatments (vs. vehicle-control, P<0.05). The activity of enzymes associated with glucan synthesis, acid production, and acid tolerance (glucosyltransferases B and C, phosphotransferase-PTS system, and F1F0-ATPase) were significantly inhibited by αMG. The expression of manL, encoding a key component of the mannose PTS, and gtfB were slightly repressed by αMG treatment (P<0.05), while the expression of atpD (encoding F-ATPase) and gtfC genes was unaffected. Hence, this study reveals that brief exposures to αMG can disrupt the development and structural integrity of S. mutans biofilms, at least in part

  10. Modulation of Biofilm Exopolysaccharides by the Streptococcus mutans vicX Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Yang, Yingming; Mao, Mengying; Li, Hong; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Yin, Jiaxin; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans effectively utilizes dietary sucrose for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide, which act as a scaffold for its biofilm, thus contributing to its pathogenicity, environmental stress tolerance, and antimicrobial resistance. The two-component system VicRK of S. mutans regulates a group of virulence genes that are associated with biofilm matrix synthesis. Knockout of vicX affects biofilm formation, oxidative stress tolerance, and transformation of S. mutans. However, little is known regarding the vicX-modulated structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharides underlying the biofilm formation and the phenotypes of the vicX mutants. Here, we identified the role of vicX in the structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm physiology. The vicX mutant (SmuvicX) biofilms seemingly exhibited “desertification” with architecturally impaired exopolysaccharide-enmeshed cell clusters, compared with the UA159 strain (S. mutans wild type strain). Concomitantly, SmuvicX showed a decrease in water-insoluble glucan (WIG) synthesis and in WIG/water-soluble glucan (WSG) ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed that the WIG isolated from the SmuvicX biofilms had a much lower molecular weight compared with the UA159 strain indicating differences in polysaccharide chain lengths. A monosaccharide composition analysis demonstrated the importance of the vicX gene in the glucose metabolism. We performed metabolite profiling via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that several chemical shifts were absent in both WSG and WIG of SmuvicX biofilms compared with the UA159 strain. Thus, the modulation of structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide by vicX provides new insights into the interaction between the exopolysaccharide structure, gene functions, and cariogenicity. Our results suggest that vicX gene modulates the structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide associated with

  11. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mogen, Austin B; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  12. α-Mangostin Disrupts the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms and Facilitates Its Mechanical Removal

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Phuong Thi Mai; Falsetta, Megan L.; Hwang, Geelsu; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    α-Mangostin (αMG) has been reported to be an effective antimicrobial agent against planktonic cells of Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-forming and acid-producing cariogenic organism. However, its anti-biofilm activity remains to be determined. We examined whether αMG, a xanthone purified from Garcinia mangostana L grown in Vietnam, disrupts the development, acidogenicity, and/or the mechanical stability of S. mutans biofilms. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice-daily, 60 s exposure each) were used to assess the bioactivity of αMG using a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) biofilm model. Topical applications of early-formed biofilms with αMG (150 µM) effectively reduced further biomass accumulation and disrupted the 3D architecture of S. mutans biofilms. Biofilms treated with αMG had lower amounts of extracellular insoluble and intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides (30–45%) than those treated with vehicle control (P<0.05), while the number of viable bacterial counts was unaffected. Furthermore, αMG treatments significantly compromised the mechanical stability of the biofilm, facilitating its removal from the sHA surface when subjected to a constant shear stress of 0.809 N/m2 (>3-fold biofilm detachment from sHA vs. vehicle-treated biofilms; P<0.05). Moreover, acid production by S. mutans biofilms was disrupted following αMG treatments (vs. vehicle-control, P<0.05). The activity of enzymes associated with glucan synthesis, acid production, and acid tolerance (glucosyltransferases B and C, phosphotransferase-PTS system, and F1F0-ATPase) were significantly inhibited by αMG. The expression of manL, encoding a key component of the mannose PTS, and gtfB were slightly repressed by αMG treatment (P<0.05), while the expression of atpD (encoding F-ATPase) and gtfC genes was unaffected. Hence, this study reveals that brief exposures to αMG can disrupt the development and structural integrity of S. mutans biofilms, at least in part

  13. Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans transcriptome in response to starch and sucrose during biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marlise I; DeBaz, Lena; Agidi, Senyo; Lee, Herbert; Xie, Gary; Lin, Amy H-M; Hamaker, Bruce R; Lemos, José A; Koo, Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The combination of sucrose and starch in the presence of surface-adsorbed salivary α-amylase and bacterial glucosyltransferases increase the formation of a structurally and metabolically distinctive biofilm by Streptococcus mutans. This host-pathogen-diet interaction may modulate the formation of pathogenic biofilms related to dental caries disease. We conducted a comprehensive study to further investigate the influence of the dietary carbohydrates on S. mutans-transcriptome at distinct stages of biofilm development using whole genomic profiling with a new computational tool (MDV) for data mining. S. mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on amylase-active saliva coated hydroxyapatite discs in the presence of various concentrations of sucrose alone (ranging from 0.25 to 5% w/v) or in combination with starch (0.5 to 1% w/v). Overall, the presence of sucrose and starch (suc+st) influenced the dynamics of S. mutans transcriptome (vs. sucrose alone), which may be associated with gradual digestion of starch by surface-adsorbed amylase. At 21 h of biofilm formation, most of the differentially expressed genes were related to sugar metabolism, such as upregulation of genes involved in maltose/maltotriose uptake and glycogen synthesis. In addition, the groEL/groES chaperones were induced in the suc+st-biofilm, indicating that presence of starch hydrolysates may cause environmental stress. In contrast, at 30 h of biofilm development, multiple genes associated with sugar uptake/transport (e.g. maltose), two-component systems, fermentation/glycolysis and iron transport were differentially expressed in suc+st-biofilms (vs. sucrose-biofilms). Interestingly, lytT (bacteria autolysis) was upregulated, which was correlated with presence of extracellular DNA in the matrix of suc+st-biofilms. Specific genes related to carbohydrate uptake and glycogen metabolism were detected in suc+st-biofilms in more than one time point, indicating an association between presence of starch hydrolysates

  14. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Austin B.; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  15. Effects of compounds found in Nidus Vespae on the growth and cariogenic virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaoxu; Zhou, Yi; Liang, Xue; Xiao, Jin; He, Libang; Li, Jiyao

    2012-01-20

    Nidus Vespae (honeycomb) is a kind of traditional Chinese medicine that has been demonstrated to inhibit the growth and acid-production of oral cariogenic bacteria. Subsequent studies showed that the chloroform/methanol (Chl/MeOH) chemical extraction of Nidus Vespae was the most effective inhibitor of growth and acidogenicity of Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we isolated the chemical compounds of the Nidus Vespae Chl/MeOH extraction, tested their antimicrobial activity against six cariogenic bacteria and further evaluated the acid inhibition properties, anti-F-ATPase activity and anti-LDH activity against S. mutans. The isolated flavonoids, quercetin and kaempferol, inhibited the growth of bacteria (S. mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus sanguis, Actinomyces viscosus, Actinomyces naeslundii and Lactobacillus rhamnosus) with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 1 to 4 mg/ml and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) from 4 to 16 mg/ml. In addition, quercetin and kaempferol at sub-MIC levels significantly inhibited acidogenicity and acidurity of S. mutans cells. Treated with the test agents, the F-ATPase activity was reduced by 47.37% with 1mg/ml quercetin and by 49.66% with 0.5mg/ml kaempferol. The results showed that quercetin and kaempferol contained in Chl/MeOH extraction presented remarkably biological activity, suggesting that Nidus Vespae might be useful as a potential preventive and therapeutic agent in dental caries. PMID:21498060

  16. Streptococcus gordonii comCDE (competence) operon modulates biofilm formation with Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Alison A.; Daniels, Debbie E.; Jepson, Mark A.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pleiomorphic fungus that forms mixed species biofilms with Streptococcus gordonii, an early colonizer of oral cavity surfaces. Activation of quorum sensing (QS; intercellular signalling) promotes monospecies biofilm development by these micro-organisms, but the role of QS in mixed species communities is not understood. The comCDE genes in S. gordonii encode a sensor–regulator system (ComDE), which is activated by the comC gene product (CSP, competence stimulating peptide) and modulates expression of QS-regulated genes. Dual species biofilms of S. gordonii ΔcomCDE or ΔcomC mutants with C. albicans showed increased biomass compared to biofilms of S. gordonii DL1 wild-type with C. albicans. The ΔcomCDE mutant dual species biofilms in particular contained more extracellular DNA (eDNA), and could be dispersed with DNase I or protease treatment. Exogenous CSP complemented the S. gordonii ΔcomC transformation deficiency, as well as the ΔcomC-C. albicans biofilm phenotype. Purified CSP did not affect C. albicans hyphal filament formation but inhibited monospecies biofilm formation by C. albicans. The results suggest that the S. gordonii comCDE QS-system modulates the production of eDNA and the incorporation of C. albicans into dual species biofilms. PMID:25505189

  17. Impact of Streptococcus mutans on the generation of fluorescence from artificially induced enamel and dentin carious lesions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shigetani, Yoshimi; Takenaka, Shoji; Okamoto, Akira; Abu-Bakr, Neamat; Iwaku, Masaaki; Okiji, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether Streptococcus mutans is implicated in the generation of fluorescence detected in carious lesions. Enamel surfaces and dentin cavities of extracted human teeth were subjected to artificial caries generation by exposing them either to a culture medium containing S. mutans or to a lactic acid buffer for 2 weeks. Fluorescence from the lesions was detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy or fluorescence microscopy at various excitation wavelengths, and maximum fluorescence radiance was computed using imageanalyzing software. Culture media of S. mutans were also examined for fluorescence generation. The results demonstrated that S. mutans-induced enamel and dentin lesions exhibited increased fluorescence in the red and green spectral regions, with the signal stronger in the red region. In the blue region, however, fluorescence signals in the corresponding area were below the background level. Significantly weaker or virtually no fluorescence was detected in lactic acid-demineralized lesions at all excitation wavelengths. Neither bacterial cells nor culture media generated any fluorescence. These results indicate that, although the presence of S. mutans may be a prerequisite for the emission of fluorescence from carious lesions, some interaction of S. mutans with exposed tooth matrix elements may also be required for the generation or unmasking of fluorophores. PMID:18661200

  18. Combinatorial Effects of Aromatic 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas and Fluoride on In vitro Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Balamurugan, P.; Uma Maheswari, C.; Anitha, A.; Princy, S. Adline

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries occur as a result of disequilibrium between acid producing pathogenic bacteria and alkali generating commensal bacteria within a dental biofilm (dental plaque). Streptococcus mutans has been reported as a primary cariogenic pathogen associated with dental caries. Emergence of multidrug resistant as well as fluoride resistant strains of S. mutans due to over use of various antibiotics are a rising problem and prompted the researchers worldwide to search for alternative therapies. In this perspective, the present study was aimed to screen selective inhibitors against ComA, a bacteriocin associated ABC transporter, involved in the quorum sensing of S. mutans. In light of our present in silico findings, 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives which had better affinity to ComA were chemically synthesized in the present study for in vitro evaluation of S. mutans biofilm inhibition. The results revealed that 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives showed good biofilm inhibition. In addition, synthesized compounds exhibited potent synergy with a very low concentration of fluoride (31.25–62.5 ppm) in inhibiting the biofilm formation of S. mutans without affecting the bacterial growth. Further, the results were supported by confocal laser scanning microscopy. On the whole, from our experimental results we conclude that the combinatorial application of fluoride and disubstituted ureas has a potential synergistic effect which has a promising approach in combating multidrug resistant and fluoride resistant S. mutans in dental caries management. PMID:27375583

  19. The well-coordinated linkage between acidogenicity and aciduricity via insoluble glucans on the surface of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lihong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the principal cariogenic bacterium for dental caries. Despite the recognition of their importance for cariogenesis, the possible coordination among S. mutans’ main virulence factors, including glucan production, acidogenicity and aciduricity, has been less well studied. In the present study, using S. mutans strains with surface-displayed pH-sensitive pHluorin, we revealed sucrose availability- and Gtf functionality-dependent proton accumulation on S. mutans surface. Consistent with this, using a pH-sensitive dye, we demonstrated that both in vivo cell-produced and in vitro enzymatically synthesized insoluble glucans displayed proton-concentrating ability. Global transcriptomics revealed proton accumulation triggers the up-regulation of genes encoding functions involved in acid tolerance response in a glucan-dependent manner. Our data suggested that this proton enrichment around S. mutans could pre-condition the bacterium for acid-stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found S. mutans strains defective in glucan production were more acid sensitive. Our study revealed for the first time that insoluble glucans is likely an essential factor linking acidogenicity with aciduricity. The coordination of these key virulence factors could provide new insights on how S. mutans may have become a major cariogenic pathogen. PMID:26657939

  20. Polyphenol-Rich Extract from Propolis Reduces the Expression and Activity of Streptococcus mutans Glucosyltransferases at Subinhibitory Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Alvear, Marysol; Zambrano, Tomás; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Tooth decay is an infectious disease, whose main causative agent identified is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Diverse treatments have been used to eradicate this microorganism, including propolis. To date, it has been shown that polyphenols from Chilean propolis inhibit S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unclear. In the present study, we assessed the effect of Chilean propolis on the expression and activity of the glycosyltransferases enzymes and their related genes. Polyphenol-rich extract from propolis inhibited gene expression of glycosyltransferases (GtfB, GtfC, and GtfD) and their related regulatory genes, for example, VicK, VicR, and CcpA. Moreover, the treatment inhibited glucosyltransferases activity measured by the formation of sucrose-derived glucans. Additionally, an inhibitory effect was observed in the expression of SpaP involved in sucrose-independent virulence of S. mutans. In summary, our results suggest that Chilean propolis has a dose-dependent effect on the inhibition of genes involved in S. mutans virulence and adherence through the inhibition of glucosyltransferases, showing an anticariogenic potential of polyphenols from propolis beyond S. mutans growth inhibition. PMID:27110563

  1. Polyphenol-Rich Extract from Propolis Reduces the Expression and Activity of Streptococcus mutans Glucosyltransferases at Subinhibitory Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Alvear, Marysol; Zambrano, Tomás; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth decay is an infectious disease, whose main causative agent identified is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Diverse treatments have been used to eradicate this microorganism, including propolis. To date, it has been shown that polyphenols from Chilean propolis inhibit S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unclear. In the present study, we assessed the effect of Chilean propolis on the expression and activity of the glycosyltransferases enzymes and their related genes. Polyphenol-rich extract from propolis inhibited gene expression of glycosyltransferases (GtfB, GtfC, and GtfD) and their related regulatory genes, for example, VicK, VicR, and CcpA. Moreover, the treatment inhibited glucosyltransferases activity measured by the formation of sucrose-derived glucans. Additionally, an inhibitory effect was observed in the expression of SpaP involved in sucrose-independent virulence of S. mutans. In summary, our results suggest that Chilean propolis has a dose-dependent effect on the inhibition of genes involved in S. mutans virulence and adherence through the inhibition of glucosyltransferases, showing an anticariogenic potential of polyphenols from propolis beyond S. mutans growth inhibition. PMID:27110563

  2. The effect of two types chewing gum containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate and xylitol on salivary Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Emamieh, Shila; Khaterizadeh, Yosra; Goudarzi, Hossein; Ghasemi, Amir; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh; Torabzadeh, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of sugar-free chewing gum containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and xylitol on salivary Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 dental students of 20-25 years old, who volunteered after checking their health condition and signing an informed consent, were randomly allocated to receive one of the following interventions: (A) Chewing gum containing CPP-ACP; (B) containing xylitol. Subjects within the experimental groups were taken the gums 3 times daily, after each meal for a period of 3 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention unstimulated saliva samples were quantified for S. mutans counts. Results: A statistically significant reduction of salivary S. mutans was displayed in both groups A and B after the intervention when compared with baseline (P < 0.001), and group A shows more statistically significant reduction of salivary S. mutans than group B (P = 0.011). Conclusion: Daily consumption of chewing gum containing CPP-ACP and xylitol significantly reduces the level of salivary S. mutans, but chewing gum containing CPP-ACP can reduce the level of salivary S. mutans in more than xylitol chewing gum. PMID:26069402

  3. An in vitro synergetic evaluation of the use of nisin and sodium fluoride or chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Wenkai; Kuang, Rong; Li, Jie; Tao, Rui; Ni, Longxing

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the synergetic action between nisin and sodium fluoride or chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans, a primary cariogenic pathogen. In the antibacterial assay, a synergetic effect on S. mutans was found between nisin and sodium fluoride, but there was no interaction between nisin and chlorhexidine by the checkerboard, the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) and the fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) tests. S. mutans survival rates showed a significant decline after treatment with a combination of nisin and sodium fluoride in a time-kill study. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the damage to S. mutans with the combined nisin and sodium fluoride treatment was the most severe among all of the different single and combined antimicrobial treatments. Furthermore, in the antibiofilm test, nisin in combination with sodium fluoride produced a stronger bactericidal effect on a S. mutans biofilm for 4 h and 16 h compared with sodium fluoride alone by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Nisin in combination with sodium fluoride exerted a high bactericidal effect on S. mutans and thereby has the potential to be used as an effective drug combination to prevent dental caries. PMID:21930172

  4. Multiple sugar: phosphotransferase system permeases participate in catabolite modification of gene expression in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is particularly well adapted for high-affinity, high-capacity catabolism of multiple carbohydrate sources. S. mutansenzyme II (EII(Lev)), a fructose/mannose permease encoded by the levDEFG genes, and fruA, which encodes a hydrolase that releases fructose from fructan polymers, are transcriptionally regulated by the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system. Here, we demonstrate that: (i) levDEFGX are co-transcribed and the levE/F intergenic region is required for optimal expression of levFGX; (ii) D-mannose is a potent inducer of the levD and fruA operons; (iii) CcpA regulates levD expression in a carbohydrate-specific manner; (iv) deletion of the genes for the fructose/mannose-EII enzymes of S. mutans (manL, fruI and levD) enhances levD expression; (v) repression of the LevQRST regulon by EII enzymes depends on the presence of their substrates and requires LevR, but not LevQST; and (vi) CcpA inhibits expression of the manL and fruI genes to indirectly control the LevQRST regulon. Further, the manL, ccpA, fruI/fruCD and levD gene products differentially exert control over the cellobiose and lactose operons. Collectively, the results reveal the existence of a global regulatory network in S. mutans that governs the utilization of non-preferred carbohydrates in response to the availability and source of multiple preferred carbohydrates. PMID:18699864

  5. The dlt genes play a role in antimicrobial tolerance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Martin; Rybtke, Morten; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Twetman, Svante; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and therefore cause problematic infections. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance will aid the development of antibiofilm drugs. Screening of a Streptococcus mutans transposon mutant library for genes that are important for biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance provided evidence that the dlt genes play a role in the tolerance of S. mutans biofilms towards gentamicin. The minimum bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBC-B) for a dltA transposon mutant was eight-fold lower than that of the wild-type. The minimum bactericidal concentration for planktonic cells (MBC-P) was only slightly reduced, indicating that the mechanism involved in the observed antimicrobial tolerance has a predominant role specifically in biofilms. Experiments with a knockout dltA mutant and complemented strain confirmed that the dlt genes in S. mutans play a role in biofilm-associated tolerance to gentamicin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses of biofilms grown on glass slides showed that the dltA mutant produced roughly the same amount of biofilm as the wild-type, indicating that the reduced antimicrobial tolerance of the dltA mutant is not due to a defect in biofilm formation. The products of the dlt genes have been shown to mediate alanylation of teichoic acids, and in accordance the dltA mutant showed a more negatively charged surface than the wild-type, which likely is an important factor in the reduced tolerance of the dltA mutant biofilms towards the positively charged gentamicin. PMID:27502751

  6. Uptake and Metabolism of N-Acetylglucosamine and Glucosamine by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Zachary D.; Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine are among the most abundant sugars on the planet, and their introduction into the oral cavity via the diet and host secretions, and through bacterial biosynthesis, provides oral biofilm bacteria with a source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In this study, we demonstrated that the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans possesses an inducible system for the metabolism of N-acetylglucosamine and glucosamine. These amino sugars are transported by the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), with the glucose/mannose enzyme II permease encoded by manLMN playing a dominant role. Additionally, a previously uncharacterized gene product encoded downstream of the manLMN operon, ManO, was shown to influence the efficiency of uptake and growth on N-acetylglucosamine and, to a lesser extent, glucosamine. A transcriptional regulator, designated NagR, was able to bind the promoter regions in vitro, and repress the expression in vivo, of the nagA and nagB genes, encoding N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, respectively. The binding activity of NagR could be inhibited by glucosamine-6-phosphate in vitro. Importantly, in contrast to the case with certain other Firmicutes, the gene for de novo synthesis of glucosamine-6-phosphate in S. mutans, glmS, was also shown to be regulated by NagR, and NagR could bind the glmS promoter region in vitro. Finally, metabolism of these amino sugars by S. mutans resulted in the production of significant quantities of ammonia, which can neutralize cytoplasmic pH and increase acid tolerance, thus contributing to enhanced persistence and pathogenic potential. PMID:24928869

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals that ClpXP proteolysis controls key virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    The ClpXP proteolytic complex is critical for maintaining cellular homeostasis, as well as expression of virulence properties. However, with the exception of the Spx global regulator, the molecular mechanisms by which the ClpXP complex exerts its influence in Streptococcus mutans are not well understood. Here, microarray analysis was used to provide novel insights into the scope of ClpXP proteolysis in S. mutans. In a ΔclpP strain, 288 genes showed significant changes in relative transcript amounts (P≤0.001, twofold cut-off) as compared with the parent. Similarly, 242 genes were differentially expressed by a ΔclpX strain, 113 (47 %) of which also appeared in the ΔclpP microarrays. Several genes associated with cell growth were downregulated in both mutants, consistent with the slow-growth phenotype of the Δclp strains. Among the upregulated genes were those encoding enzymes required for the biosynthesis of intracellular polysaccharides (glg genes) and malolactic fermentation (mle genes). Enhanced expression of glg and mle genes in ΔclpP and ΔclpX strains correlated with increased storage of intracellular polysaccharide and enhanced malolactic fermentation activity, respectively. Expression of several genes known or predicted to be involved in competence and mutacin production was downregulated in the Δclp strains. Follow-up transformation efficiency and deferred antagonism assays validated the microarray data by showing that competence and mutacin production were dramatically impaired in the Δclp strains. Collectively, our results reveal the broad scope of ClpXP regulation in S. mutans homeostasis and identify several virulence-related traits that are influenced by ClpXP proteolysis. PMID:21816882

  8. Identification and characterization of a collagen-binding protein, Cbm, in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Nomura, R; Nakano, K; Naka, S; Nemoto, H; Masuda, K; Lapirattanakul, J; Alaluusua, S; Matsumoto, M; Kawabata, S; Ooshima, T

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with infective endocarditis. Bacterial attachment of exposed collagen tissue in the impaired endothelium is an important step in the onset of infective endocarditis. In our previous studies, some S. mutans strains were shown to possess collagen-binding activities and most of them had an approximately 120-kDa cell-surface collagen-binding protein called Cnm. However, several strains without Cnm proteins show collagen-binding properties. In the present study, another collagen-binding protein, Cbm, was characterized and its coding gene cbm was sequenced in these strains. The amino acid alignment in the putative collagen-binding domain of Cbm was shown to have approximately 80% identity and 90% similarity to the comparable region of Cnm. Cbm-deficient isogenic mutant strains constructed by insertional inactivation of the cbm gene, lacked collagen-binding properties, which were recovered in the complemented mutant. Analyses of a large number of clinical isolates from Japan, Thailand and Finland revealed that cbm-positive strains were present in all of these countries and that cnm-positive and cbm-positive strains were detected in the oral cavity of approximately 10 and 2% of systemically healthy subjects, respectively. In addition, cnm-positive strains were predominantly identified in the serotype f group, whereas cbm-positive strains were frequently detected in serotype k. These results suggest that Cbm as well as Cnm are major cell surface proteins of S. mutans associated with binding to type I collagen and predominantly identified in serotype k strains. PMID:22759315

  9. A human salivary protein which promotes adhesion of Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains to hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, E; Hay, D I; Gibbons, R J

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of one of the factors in human submandibular-sublingual (SMSL) saliva which promotes the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans serotype c strains to hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. Gel filtration chromatography of SMSL saliva on Trisacryl GF2000 gave a void volume peak which contained the major fraction of adhesion-promoting activity for S. mutans JBP to HA. Maximum adhesion-promoting activity, however, eluted slightly later than the maximum 220-nm absorbance of the void volume peak. Gel filtration of the void volume material after treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gave an early-eluting larger peak followed by a smaller peak with which the adhesion-promoting activity was associated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed the presence of relatively slowly migrating material associated with the larger inactive peak, presumably mucin, and a faster-migrating band(s) associated with the smaller active peak. SDS-PAGE indicated molecular weights in the range of 300,000 to 350,000 by extrapolation from size standards. Comparison of SMSL from five individuals showed the presence of single bands or double bands associated with adhesion-promoting activity, indicating genetic polymorphism. The active material did not resemble either secretory immunoglobulin A, based on SDS-PAGE and immunoassay, or fibronectin, based on SDS-PAGE, and also differed in molecular weight from salivary mucins and salivary constituents previously reported to promote aggregation of certain oral bacteria, but a relationship to these materials cannot be excluded. This adhesion-promoting material may play a significant role in the initial colonization of tooth surfaces by S. mutans strains. Images PMID:2807544

  10. Activation of the SMU.1882 transcription by CovR in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Chong, Patrick; Chattoraj, Partho; Biswas, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, the global response regulator CovR plays an important role in biofilm formation, stress-tolerance response, and caries production. We have previously shown that CovR acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to the upstream promoter regions of its target genes. Here, we report that in vivo, CovR activates the transcription of SMU.1882, which encodes a small peptide containing a double-glycine motif. We also show that SMU.1882 is transcriptionally linked to comA that encodes a putative ABC transporter protein. Several genes from man gene clusters that encode mannose phosphotranferase system flank SMU.1882 -comA genes. Genomic comparison with other streptococci indicates that SMU.1882 is uniquely present in S. mutans, while the man operon is conserved among all streptococci, suggesting that a genetic rearrangement might have taken place at this locus. With the use of a transcriptional reporter system and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrated the transcriptional regulation of SMU.1882 by CovR. In vitro gel shift and DNase I foot-printing analyses with purified CovR suggest that CovR binds to a large region surrounding the -10 region of the P(1882). Using this information and comparing with other CovR regulated promoters, we have developed a putative consensus binding sequence for CovR. Although CovR binds to P(1882), in vitro experiments using purified S. mutans RpoD, E. coli RNA polymerase, and CovR did not activate transcription from this promoter. Thus, we speculate that in vivo, CovR may interfere with the binding of a repressor or requires a cofactor. PMID:21124877

  11. Gene Regulation by the LiaSR Two-Component System in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Manoharan; Mohapatra, Saswat S.; Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2015-01-01

    The LiaSR two-component signal transduction system regulates cellular responses to several environmental stresses, including those that induce cell envelope damages. Downstream regulons of the LiaSR system have been implicated in tolerance to acid, antibiotics and detergents. In the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans, the LiaSR system is necessary for tolerance against acid, antibiotics, and cell wall damaging stresses during growth in the oral cavity. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which LiaSR regulates gene expression, we created a mutant LiaR in which the conserved aspartic acid residue (the phosphorylation site), was changed to alanine residue (D58A). As expected, the LiaR-D58A variant was unable to acquire the phosphate group and bind to target promoters. We also noted that the predicted LiaR-binding motif upstream of the lia operon does not appear to be well conserved. Consistent with this observation, we found that LiaR was unable to bind to the promoter region of lia; however, we showed that LiaR was able to bind to the promoters of SMU.753, SMU.2084 and SMU.1727. Based on sequence analysis and DNA binding studies we proposed a new 25-bp conserved motif essential for LiaR binding. Introducing alterations at fully conserved positions in the 25-bp motif affected LiaR binding, and the binding was dependent on the combination of positions that were altered. By scanning the S. mutans genome for the occurrence of the newly defined LiaR binding motif, we identified the promoter of hrcA (encoding a key regulator of the heat shock response) that contains a LiaR binding motif, and we showed that hrcA is negatively regulated by the LiaSR system. Taken together our results suggest a putative role of the LiaSR system in heat shock responses of S. mutans. PMID:26020679

  12. Recovery of Acid Production in Streptococcus mutans Biofilms after Short-Term Fluoride Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dang, Minh-Huy; Jung, Ji-Eun; Lee, Dae-Woo; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride is commonly used as an ingredient of topical oral hygiene measures. Despite the anti-acidogenic activities of fluoride against cariogenic biofilms, the recovery of the biofilms from fluoride damage is unclear. Herein, we investigated the recovery of acid production in Streptococcus mutans biofilms after short-term or during periodic 1-min fluoride treatments. For this study, 46-hour-old S. mutans biofilms were treated with fluoride (0-2,000 ppm F-) for 1-8 min and then incubated in saliva for 0-100 min. The 74-hour-old biofilms were also periodically treated with the fluoride concentration during biofilm formation (1 min/treatment). Changes in acidogenicity and viability were determined via pH drop and colony-forming unit assays, respectively. In this study, acid production after a 1-min fluoride treatment was recovered as saliva incubation time increased, which followed a linear pattern of concentration dependence (R = 0.99, R2 = 0.98). The recovery pattern was in a biphasic pattern, with an initial rapid rate followed by a second slow recovery. Furthermore, recovery from fluoride damage was retarded in a concentration-dependent manner as treatment time increased. In periodic 1-min fluoride treatments, acid production in the biofilms was not diminished during the non-fluoride treatment period; however, it was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner during the fluoride treatment period. The viability of the biofilm cells did not change, even at high fluoride concentrations. Collectively, our results suggest that brief fluoride treatment does not sustain anti-acidogenic activity against S. mutans in biofilms since the damage is recoverable with time. PMID:27355469

  13. Regulation of competence and gene expression in Streptococcus mutans by the RcrR transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An intimate linkage between the regulation of biofilm formation, stress tolerance and genetic competence exists in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. The rcrRPQ genes encode ABC exporters (RcrPQ) and a MarR-family transcriptional repressor of the rcr operon (RcrR) play a dominant role in regulation of the development of genetic competence and connect competence with stress tolerance and (p)ppGpp production in S. mutans. Here we identify the target for efficient RcrR binding in the rcr promoter region using purified recombinant RcrR (rRcrR) protein in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and show that DNA fragments carrying mutations in the binding region were not bound as efficiently by rRcrR in vitro. Mutations in the RcrR binding site impacted expression from the rcrR promoter in vivo and elicited changes in transformation efficiency, competence gene expression, and growth inhibition by competence stimulating peptide; even when the changes in rcrRPQ transcription were minor. An additional mechanistic linkage of RcrR with competence and (p)ppGpp metabolism was identified by showing that the rRcrR protein could bind to the promoter regions of comX, comYA and relP, although the binding was not as efficient as to the rcrRPQ promoter under the conditions tested. Thus, tightly controlled autogenous regulation of the rcrRPQ operon by RcrR binding to specific target sites is essential for cellular homeostasis, and RcrR contributes to the integration of genetic competence, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and acid and oxidative stress tolerance in S. mutans through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:25146832

  14. Activation of the SMU.1882 Transcription by CovR in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Indranil

    2010-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, the global response regulator CovR plays an important role in biofilm formation, stress-tolerance response, and caries production. We have previously shown that CovR acts as a transcriptional repressor by binding to the upstream promoter regions of its target genes. Here, we report that in vivo, CovR activates the transcription of SMU.1882, which encodes a small peptide containing a double-glycine motif. We also show that SMU.1882 is transcriptionally linked to comA that encodes a putative ABC transporter protein. Several genes from man gene clusters that encode mannose phosphotranferase system flank SMU.1882 -comA genes. Genomic comparison with other streptococci indicates that SMU.1882 is uniquely present in S. mutans, while the man operon is conserved among all streptococci, suggesting that a genetic rearrangement might have taken place at this locus. With the use of a transcriptional reporter system and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we demonstrated the transcriptional regulation of SMU.1882 by CovR. In vitro gel shift and DNase I foot-printing analyses with purified CovR suggest that CovR binds to a large region surrounding the -10 region of the P1882. Using this information and comparing with other CovR regulated promoters, we have developed a putative consensus binding sequence for CovR. Although CovR binds to P1882, in vitro experiments using purified S. mutans RpoD, E. coli RNA polymerase, and CovR did not activate transcription from this promoter. Thus, we speculate that in vivo, CovR may interfere with the binding of a repressor or requires a cofactor. PMID:21124877

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of argininosuccinate lyase from Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan-Li; Li, Gui-Lan; Wang, Kai-Tuo; Zhang, Hong-Yin; Li, Lan-Fen

    2011-01-01

    Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is an important enzyme in arginine synthesis and the urea cycle, which are highly conserved from bacteria to eukaryotes. The gene encoding Streptococcus mutans ASL (smASL) was amplified and cloned into expression vector pET28a. The recombinant smASL protein was expressed in a soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) and purified to homogeneity by two-step column chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis were obtained and X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.5 Å. The crystals belonged to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 254.5, c = 78.3 Å. PMID:21636911

  16. Structural investigation of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans strain UA159.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Gerwig, Gerrit J

    2012-09-01

    The structure of an extracellular polysaccharide EPS159 produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans UA159 was investigated through the main oligosaccharides obtained from partial acid hydrolysis, monosaccharide/methylation analysis, and 1D/2D (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that EPS159 contained terminal, 3-substituted, 6-substituted, and 3,6-disubstituted α-D-glucopyranose residues in a molar percentage of 14, 18, 54, and 14%. The backbone of EPS159 was composed of →6)Glcp(1→ residues, and about 20% of the →6)Glcp(1→ residues was substituted at 3-OH by →3)Glcp(1→ and/or Glcp(1→ residues to form side chains. A composite model of EPS159, that includes all identified structural features, was formulated: [Formula, see text:]. PMID:24751092

  17. Preliminary crystallographic studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qiao-Ming; Liu, Xiang; Brostromer, Erik; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    The punA gene of the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), which is a pivotal enzyme in the nucleotide-salvage pathway, catalyzing the phosphorolysis of purine nucleosides to generate purine bases and α-ribose 1-phosphate. In the present work, the PNP protein was expressed in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) in a soluble form at a high level. After purification of the PNP enzyme, the protein was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique; the crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution at best. The crystals belonged to space group H3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 113.0, c = 60.1 Å. PMID:20054131

  18. Sequence analysis of the gene for the glucan-binding protein of Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt.

    PubMed Central

    Banas, J A; Russell, R R; Ferretti, J J

    1990-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the gbp gene, which encodes the glucan-binding protein (GBP) of Streptococcus mutans, was determined. The reading frame for gbp was 1,689 bases. A ribosome-binding site and putative promoter preceded the start codon, and potential stem-loop structures were identified downstream from the termination codon. The deduced amino acid sequence of the GBP revealed the presence of a signal peptide of 35 amino acids. The molecular weight of the processed protein was calculated to be 59,039. Two series of repeats spanned three-quarters of the carboxy-terminal end of the protein. The repeats were 32 to 34 and 17 to 20 amino acids in length and shared partial identity within each series. The repeats were found to be homologous to sequences hypothesized to be involved in glucan binding in the GTF-I of S. downei and to sequences within the protein products encoded by gtfB and gtfC of S. mutans. The repeated sequences may represent peptide segments that are important to glucan binding and may be distributed among GBPs from other bacterial inhabitants of plaque or the oral cavity. PMID:2307516

  19. Anti-Streptococcus mutans property of a chitosan: Containing resin sealant

    PubMed Central

    Rajabnia, Ramazan; Ghasempour, Maryam; Gharekhani, Samane; Gholamhoseinnia, Sepide; Soroorhomayoon, Sepide

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the inhibitory effect of chitosan-containing sealants against Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of the resin sealant was evaluated by direct contact test following the addition of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 wt% chitosan. At 3, 6, 9, 24 and 48 h, 1 and 3 months, 10 μl of the microbial suspension in contact with resin sealant was cultured to count the number of colonies. Data were analyzed by one-way one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA, and Scheffe test. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration of chitosan against S. mutans was 2 wt%. At 3 h, bacterial count in the presence of 2–5 wt% chitosan was significantly lower than that at 0 and 1 wt% (P < 0.05). However, this difference in bacterial count between 2 and 3 wt% chitosan and between 4 and 5 wt% chitosan was not significant. At 6 h, the difference in bacterial count between 3 and 4 wt% chitosan was not significant, whereas the remaining groups were significantly different in terms of bacterial count at this time (P < 0.05). At the remaining time points, significant differences were found between 2 wt% chitosan and higher concentrations (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Sealants containing 2–5 wt% chitosan show an antimicrobial property that is intensified by increasing the concentration of chitosan. PMID:27011933

  20. Binding of a Streptococcus mutans cationic protein to kidney in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, S H; Stinson, M W

    1991-01-01

    An 8-kDa protein, with binding activity for heparin and heparan sulfate of basal laminae of animal tissues, was isolated from Streptococcus mutans MT703 and purified to homogeneity. Binding of radioiodinated 8-kDa protein to rabbit kidney tissue in vitro showed a high degree of specificity, as indicated by saturation kinetics, time dependence, and competitive inhibition by unlabeled protein. Binding activity for kidney tissue was competitively inhibited by selected glycosaminoglycans and polyanions in the following order: heparin greater than dextran sulfate greater than heparan sulfate greater than chondroitin sulfate greater than lipoteichoic acid greater than keratan sulfate greater than hyaluronic acid. Binding of the streptococcal protein to rabbit kidney tissue was also strongly inhibited by protamine sulfate, polylysine, and a random copolymer of lysine and alanine. Among the monosaccharides tested at 50 mM, glucosamine 2,3- or 2,6-disulfate, glucuronic acid, glucose 6-phosphate, and glucose 6-sulfate inhibited 50% or more of the binding activity, whereas N-acetylglucosamine 3-sulfate, glucosamine 6-sulfate, N-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and a selection of neutral sugars were not inhibitory. The heparin-binding protein was detected on the cell wall of S. mutans and in the culture medium following growth. Several other species of streptococci produce an immunologically related protein of similar size. Images PMID:1987071

  1. RNases J1 and J2 are critical pleiotropic regulators in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Nan; Khajotia, Sharukh; Qi, Fengxia

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that post-transcriptional control mechanisms are the principal source of gene regulation for a large number of prokaryotic genetic pathways, particularly those involved in virulence and environmental adaptation. Post-transcriptional regulation is largely governed by RNA stability, which itself is determined by target accessibility to RNase degradation. In most Firmicutes species, mRNA stability is strongly impacted by the activity of two recently discovered RNases referred to as RNase J1 and RNase J2. Little is known about RNase J1 function in bacteria and even less is known about RNase J2. In the current study, we mutated both RNase J orthologues in Streptococcus mutans to determine their functional roles in the cell. Single and double RNase J mutants were viable, but grew very slowly on agar plates. All of the mutants shared substantial defects in growth, morphology, acid tolerance, natural competence and biofilm formation. However, most of these defects were more severe in the RNase J2 mutant. Phenotypic suppression results also implicate a role for RNase J2 as a regulator of RNase J1 function. Unlike Bacillus subtilis, RNase J2 is a major pleiotropic regulator in S. mutans, which indicates some fundamental differences from B. subtilis in global gene regulation. Key conserved residues among the RNase J2 orthologues of lactic acid bacteria may hint at a greater role for RNase J2 in these species. PMID:25635274

  2. Disinfection of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qing; Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Xu, Yuanxi; Sun, Hongmin; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the argon plasma treatment effect on disinfecting dental biofilm by using an atmospheric pressure plasma brush. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were developed for 3 days on the surfaces of hydroxyapatite (HA) discs, which were used to simulate human tooth enamel. After plasma treatment, cell viability in the S. mutans biofilms was characterized by using 3-(4,5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Compared with the untreated control group, about 90% bacterial reduction in the biofilms was observed after 1 min plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicated severe cell damages occurred on the top surface of the plasma treated biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that plasma treatment was effective as deep as 20 µm into the biofilms. When combined with antibiotic treatment using 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution, the plasma treatment became more effective and over 96% bacterial reduction was observed with 1 min plasma treatment.

  3. Relationship between cell-bound dextransucrase and the agglutination of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    McCabe, M M; Smith, E E

    1975-09-01

    Dextran-induced agglutination of Streptococcus mutans cells is independent of cell-bound dextransucrase activity. Toluene extraction or the presence of Hg2+ or Cu2+ markedly decreased or completely abolished cell-bound dextransucrase activity without adversely affecting dextran-induced cell agglutination. Cells treated by heating at 100 C until cell-bound dextransucrase was completely inactivated continued to agglutinate when induced by dextran-induced cell agglutination resulted from cell treatment with trypsin and several other enzymes, as well as from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment, without a corresponding loss of cell-bound dextransucrase activity. Cells possessed a greater avidity for branched dextrans of low molecular weight than for linear dextrans of the same weight, indicating that size alone does not determine the efficiency of dextran as an inducer of agglutination. Divalent metal ions were required for both sucrose- and dextran-induced agglutination of S. mutans K1-R cells. Although normal cells of strain 6715-49 did not appear to require divalent cations for agglutination, heat- and ethlyenediaminetetraacetic acid-treated cells specifically required Ca2+. The role of Ca2+ in cell agglutination may be either to activate the cell-surface dextran receptor or to form specific intercellular Ca2+ bridges. PMID:809356

  4. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Diaz, David; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Garza-Enriquez, Marianela; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam A; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities. Results Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM. Conclusion These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation. PMID:22619547

  5. Fueling the caries process: carbohydrate metabolism and gene regulation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Zachary D.; Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the oral cavity and host behaviors has mandated that the oral microbiota evolve mechanisms for coping with environmental fluctuations, especially changes in the type and availability of carbohydrates. In the case of human dental caries, the presence of excess carbohydrates is often responsible for altering the local environment to be more favorable for species associated with the initiation and progression of disease, including Streptococcus mutans. Some of the earliest endeavors to understand how cariogenic species respond to environmental perturbations were carried out using chemostat cultivation, which provides fine control over culture conditions and bacterial behaviors. The development of genome-scale methodologies has allowed for the combination of sophisticated cultivation technologies with genome-level analysis to more thoroughly probe how bacterial pathogens respond to environmental stimuli. Recent investigations in S. mutans and other closely related streptococci have begun to reveal that carbohydrate metabolism can drastically impact pathogenic potential and highlight the important influence that nutrient acquisition has on the success of pathogens; inside and outside of the oral cavity. Collectively, research into pathogenic streptococci, which have evolved in close association with the human host, has begun to unveil the essential nature of careful orchestration of carbohydrate acquisition and catabolism to allow the organisms to persist and, when conditions allow, initiate or worsen disease. PMID:25317251

  6. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans polysaccharide synthesis by molecules targeting glycosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi; Chen, Lulu; Li, Jiyao; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase (Gtf) is one of the crucial virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological pathogen of dental caries. All the available evidence indicates that extracellular polysaccharide, particularly glucans produced by S. mutans Gtfs, contribute to the cariogenicity of dental biofilms. Therefore, inhibition of Gtf activity and the consequential polysaccharide synthesis may impair the virulence of cariogenic biofilms, which could be an alternative strategy to prevent the biofilm-related disease. Up to now, many Gtf inhibitors have been recognized in natural products, which remain the major and largely unexplored source of Gtf inhibitors. These include catechin-based polyphenols, flavonoids, proanthocyanidin oligomers, polymeric polyphenols, and some other plant-derived compounds. Metal ions, oxidizing agents, and some other synthetic compounds represent another source of Gtf inhibitors, with some novel molecules either discovered by structure-based virtual screening or synthesized based on key structures of known inhibitors as templates. Antibodies that inhibit one or more Gtfs have also been developed as topical agents. Although many agents have been shown to possess potent inhibitory activity against glucan synthesis by Gtfs, bacterial cell adherence, and caries development in animal models, much research remains to be performed to find out their mechanism of action, biological safety, cariostatic efficacies, and overall influence on the entire oral community. As a strategy to inhibit the virulence of cariogenic microbes rather than eradicate them from the microbial community, Gtf inhibition represents an approach of great potential to prevent dental caries. PMID:27105419

  7. Effect of penicillin on fatty acid synthesis and excretion in Streptococcus mutans BHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, J.L.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans BHT with growth-inhibitory concentrations (0.2 microgram/ml) of benzylpenicillin stimulates the incorporation of (2-/sup 14/C) acetate into lipids excreted by the cells by as much as 69-fold, but does not change the amount of /sup 14/C incorporated into intracellular lipids. At this concentration of penicillin cellular lysis does not occur. The radioactive label is incorporated exclusively into the fatty acid moieties of the glycerolipids. During a 4-hr incubation in the presence of penicillin, the extracellular fatty acid ester concentration increases 1.5 fold, even though there is no growth or cellular lysis. An indication of the relative rate of fatty acid synthesis was most readily obtained by placing S. mutans BHT in a buffer containing /sup 14/C-acetate. Under these nongrowing conditions free fatty acids are the only lipids labeled, a factor which simplifies the assay. The addition of glycerol to the buffer causes all of the nonesterified fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipid. The cells excrete much of the lipid whether glycerol is present or not. Addition of penicillin to the nongrowth supporting buffer system does not stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into fatty acids.

  8. Regulation of Recombination between gtfB/gtfC Genes in Streptococcus mutans by Recombinase A

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Satoko; Fujita, Kazuyo; Takashima, Yukiko; Nagayama, Kayoko; Ardin, Arifah C.; Matsumi, Yuki; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces 3 types of glucosyltransferases (GTFs), whose cooperative action is essential for cellular adhesion. The recombinase A (RecA) protein is required for homologous recombination. In our previous study, we isolated several strains with a smooth colony morphology and low GTF activity, characteristics speculated to be derived from the GTF fusions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of those fusions. S. mutans strain MT8148 was grown in the presence of recombinant RecA (rRecA) protein, after which smooth colonies were isolated. The biological functions and sequences of the gtfB and gtfC genes of this as well as other clinical strains were determined. The sucrose-dependent adherence rates of those strains were reduced as compared to that of MT8148. Determination of the sequences of the gtfB and gtfC genes showed that an approximately 3500 bp region was deleted from the area between them. Furthermore, expression of the recA gene was elevated in those strains as compared to MT8148. These results suggest that RecA has an important role in fusions of gtfB and gtfC genes, leading to alteration of colony morphology and reduction in sucrose-dependent adhesion. PMID:23476132

  9. Evaluation of Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Dental Caries in Children with Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Behjatolmolook; Abolfathi, Ghazale; Mahmoudi, Eftekhar; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. In the presence of certain systemic diseases, oral microflora may aggravate the condition of the disease. Microbial population in the oral cavity especially with heart disease can increase the risk of bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of oral Streptococcus mutansand the rate of caries in children suffering from heart disease. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional research, 66 children with congenital or acquired heart disease and 50 healthy children were selected. Children were orally examined and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was recorded for each subject. Saliva samples were taken from all subjects, and cultured on a special laboratory media and another specific media for S. mutans (sorbitoll +manitol). Bacterial counts were recorded, and for statistical analysis, chi square, Pearson’s, and Exact Fisher tests were performed using SPSS 16 software. Results. The rate of S. mutans in children with congenital heart disease was significantly higher than the rates in childrenwith acquired heart disease and healthy control subjects. The mean DMFT in children with acquired heart disease who tookpenicillin as prophylaxis monthly was significantly lower than the other groups. Conclusion. The results revealed lower oral bacteria counts and comparatively lower caries rates in children with heart diseases, probably because of an effect of the regular prophylactic antibiotic regimen. PMID:26236437

  10. Effect of xylitol, sodium fluoride and triclosan containing mouth rinse on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Priya; Nandan, N.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Prevention of dental caries is one of the main strategies in contemporary pediatric dental practice. Mouth rinses are widely used as an adjunct to maintain oral hygiene. It is important for these products to be effective and safe for regular use in children. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a newly introduced xylitol, sodium fluoride and triclosan containing mouth rinse in reducing levels of plaque Streptococcus mutans and to compare it with that of a 0.12% chlorhexidine mouth rinse. Materials and Methods: Thirty children were randomly divided into two groups of 15 children each. Group I (study group) was given a mouth rinse containing xylitol (5%), sodium fluoride (0.05%) and triclosan (0.03%) and Group II (control group) was given a chlorhexidine (0.12%) mouth rinse. Both mouth rinses were alcohol free. Mouth rinsing was carried out twice daily, half an hour after breakfast and half an hour following dinner, for a period of 21 days under the supervision of the investigator. Results: In both groups, there was a significant reduction in the mean S. mutans count at the end of 21 days (P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed between the two mouth rinses. Conclusion: The use of a low fluoride–xylitol based mouth rinse appears to be a suitable choice for regular use in children. PMID:22346154

  11. Identification of the Operon for the Sorbitol (Glucitol) Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, David A.; Thevenot, Tracy; Gumbmann, Markus; Honeyman, Allen L.; Hamilton, Ian R.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon mutagenesis and marker rescue were used to isolate and identify an 8.5-kb contiguous region containing six open reading frames constituting the operon for the sorbitol P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase transport system (PTS) of Streptococcus mutans LT11. The first gene, srlD, codes for sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, followed downstream by srlR, coding for a transcriptional regulator; srlM, coding for a putative activator; and the srlA, srlE, and srlB genes, coding for the EIIC, EIIBC, and EIIA components of the sorbitol PTS, respectively. Among all sorbitol PTS operons characterized to date, the srlD gene is found after the genes coding for the EII components; thus, the location of the gene in S. mutans is unique. The SrlR protein is similar to several transcriptional regulators found in Bacillus spp. that contain PTS regulator domains (J. Stülke, M. Arnaud, G. Rapoport, and I. Martin-Verstraete, Mol. Microbiol. 28:865–874, 1998), and its gene overlaps the srlM gene by 1 bp. The arrangement of these two regulatory genes is unique, having not been reported for other bacteria. PMID:10639465

  12. The impact of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans in an artificial biofilm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Martin; Kirfel, Gregor; Krause, Felix; Berthold, Michael; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of laser induced antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on the viability of Streptococcus mutans cells employing an aritificial biofilm model. Employing sterile chambered coverglasses, a salivary pellicle layer formation was induced in 19 chambers. Streptococcus mutans cells were inoculated in a sterile culture medium. Using a live/dead bacterial viability kit, bacteria with intact cell membranes stain fluorescent green. Test chambers containing each the pellicle layer and 0.5 ml of the bacterial culture were analyzed using a confocal laser scan microscope within a layer of 10 μm at intervals of 1 μm from the pellicle layer. A photosensitizer was added to the test chambers and irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength: 660 nm, output power: 100 mW, Helbo) for 2 min each. Comparing the baseline fluorescence (median: 13.8 [U], min: 3.7, max: 26.2) with the values after adding the photosensitizer (median: 3.7, min: 1.1, max: 9), a dilution caused decrease of fluorescence could be observed (p<0.05). After irradiation of the samples with a diode laser, an additional 48 percent decrease of fluorescence became evident (median: 2.2, min: 0.4, max: 3.4) (p<0.05). Comparing the samples with added photosensitizer but without laser irradiation at different times, no decrease of fluorescence could be measured (p>0.05). The present study indicates that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy can reduce living bacteria within a layer of 10 μm in an artificial biofilm model. Further studies have to evaluate the maximum biofilm thickness that still allows a toxic effect on microorganisms.

  13. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge. PMID:27589264

  14. Transcriptional and Phenotypic Characterization of Novel Spx-Regulated Genes in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Lívia C. C.; Miller, James H.; Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Freires, Irlan A.; Franco, Gilson C. N.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Lemos, José A.

    2015-01-01

    In oral biofilms, two of the major environmental challenges encountered by the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans are acid and oxidative stresses. Previously, we showed that the S. mutans transcriptional regulators SpxA1 and SpxA2 (formerly SpxA and SpxB, respectively) are involved in stress survival by activating the expression of classic oxidative stress genes such as dpr, nox, sodA and tpx. We reasoned that some of the uncharacterized genes under SpxA1/A2 control are potentially involved in oxidative stress management. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use Spx-regulated genes as a tool to identify novel oxidative stress genes in S. mutans. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to evaluate the responses of ten Spx-regulated genes during H2O2 stress in the parent and Δspx strains. Transcription activation of the H2O2-induced genes (8 out of 10) was strongly dependent on SpxA1 and, to a lesser extent, SpxA2. In vitro transcription assays revealed that one or both Spx proteins directly regulate three of these genes. The gene encoding the FeoB ferrous permease was slightly repressed by H2O2 but constitutively induced in strains lacking SpxA1. Nine genes were selected for downstream mutational analysis but inactivation of smu127, encoding a subunit of the acetoin dehydrogenase was apparently lethal. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the viable mutants indicated that, in addition to the transcriptional activation of reducing and antioxidant pathways, Spx performs an important role in iron homeostasis by regulating the intracellular availability of free iron. In particular, inactivation of the genes encoding the Fe-S biogenesis SUF system and the previously characterized iron-binding protein Dpr resulted in impaired growth under different oxidative stress conditions, increased sensitivity to iron and lower infectivity in rats. These results serve as an entryway into the characterization of novel genes and pathways that allow S. mutans to cope with

  15. Effects of Two Fluoride Varnishes and One Fluoride/Chlorhexidine Varnish on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus Biofilm Formation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pinar Erdem, Arzu; Sepet, Elif; Kulekci, Güven; Trosola, Sule Can; Guven, Yegane

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate and to compare the effect of two fluoride varnishes and one fluoride/chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus biofilm formation, in vitro. Study design: Standard acrylic discs were prepared and divided into groups based on the varnish applied to the disc surface: Fluor Protector, Bifluoride 12, and Fluor Protector + Cervitec (1:1). Untreated discs served as controls. In the study groups, biofilms of S. mutans and S. sobrinus were formed over 24 h, 48 h, and 5 days. The fluoride concentrations in the monospecies biofilms and viable counts of S. mutans and S. sobrinus were investigated. Results: In all study groups, a statistically significant increase in the viable number of S. mutans and S. sobrinus cells was observed between 24 h and 5 days. In both monospecies biofilms, the greatest antibacterial efficacy was detected in the Fluor Protector and Fluor Protector + Cervitec groups at 24 h. For all groups, the amount of fluoride released was highest during the first 24 h, followed by a significant decrease over the next 4 days. A negative correlation was detected between fluoride concentration and antibacterial effect in those groups with biofilms containing both species. Despite the release of high levels of fluoride, the greatest number of viable S. mutans and S. sobrinus cells was detected in the Bifluoride 12 group. Statistics: The data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism software (ver. 3). Conclusions: The Fluor Protector + Cervitec varnish exerted prolonged antibacterial effects on S. mutans and S. sobrinus biofilms compared to the other varnishes tested. PMID:22253559

  16. The effect of eugenol on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans and dental caries development in rats

    PubMed Central

    XU, JING-SHU; LI, YAO; CAO, XUE; CUI, YUN

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol has been widely used in medicine due to its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer and analgesic properties. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of eugenol on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans and dental caries development in rats. Eugenol demonstrated significant inhibitory effects against acid production by S. mutans. The synthesis of water-insoluble glucans by glucosyltransferases was reduced by eugenol. Eugenol also markedly suppressed the adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads. Furthermore, topical application of eugenol reduced the incidence and severity of carious lesions in rats. These results suggest that the natural compound eugenol may be a useful therapeutic agent for dental caries. PMID:23837051

  17. The effect of eugenol on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans and dental caries development in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Shu; Li, Yao; Cao, Xue; Cui, Yun

    2013-06-01

    Eugenol has been widely used in medicine due to its antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer and analgesic properties. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of eugenol on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans and dental caries development in rats. Eugenol demonstrated significant inhibitory effects against acid production by S. mutans. The synthesis of water-insoluble glucans by glucosyltransferases was reduced by eugenol. Eugenol also markedly suppressed the adherence of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads. Furthermore, topical application of eugenol reduced the incidence and severity of carious lesions in rats. These results suggest that the natural compound eugenol may be a useful therapeutic agent for dental caries. PMID:23837051

  18. Deactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms on a Tooth Surface Using He Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imola, Molnar; Judit, Papp; Alpar, Simon; Sorin, Dan Anghel

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the low temperature atmospheric helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on tooth surface. Pig jaws were also treated by plasma to detect if there is any harmful effect on the gingiva. The plasma was characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy. Experimental data indicated that the discharge is very effective in deactivating Streptococcus mutans biofilms. It can destroy them with an average decimal reduction time (D-time) of 19 s and about 98% of them were killed after a treatment time of 30 s. According to the survival curve kinetic an overall 32 s treatment time would be necessary to perform a complete sterilization. The experimental results presented in this study indicated that the helium dielectric barrier discharge, in plan-parallel electrode configuration, could be a very effective tool for deactivation of oral bacteria and might be a promising technique in various dental clinical applications.

  19. Genotypic Diversity and Virulence Traits of Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Carious Dentin after Partial Caries Removal and Sealing

    PubMed Central

    Damé-Teixeira, Nailê; Arthur, Rodrigo Alex; Parolo, Clarissa Cavalcanti Fatturi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the genotypic diversity and virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans isolated from carious dentin before and after partial dentin caries removal (PDR) and sealing. Carious dentin samples were obtained three months before and after the PDR and cavity sealing. Up to seven isolates of each morphological type of S. mutans were selected and strain identity was confirmed using gtfB primer. Genotyping was performed by arbitrary primer-PCR (AP-PCR). Acidogenesis and acidurance of the genotypes were evaluated as virulence traits. A paired t-test and a Wilcoxon test were used to compare the virulence of genotypes. A total of 48 representative S. mutans isolates were genotyped (31 before and 17 after the sealing). At least one of the genotypes found before the sealing was also found on dentin after the sealing. The number of genotypes found before the sealing ranged from 2 to 3 and after the sealing from 1 to 2 genotypes. No difference was observed in the acidogenesis and acidurance between genotypes isolated before and after the sealing. In conclusion, genotypic diversity of S. mutans decreased after the PDR and sealing, but the virulence traits of S. mutans remained unchangeable. PMID:24578618

  20. GlmS and NagB Regulate Amino Sugar Metabolism in Opposing Directions and Affect Streptococcus mutans Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Mazda, Yusuke; Oogai, Yuichi; Kajiya, Mikihito; Kawai, Toshihisa; Yamada, Sakuo; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Oho, Takahiko; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a cariogenic pathogen that produces an extracellular polysaccharide (glucan) from dietary sugars, which allows it to establish a reproductive niche and secrete acids that degrade tooth enamel. While two enzymes (GlmS and NagB) are known to be key factors affecting the entrance of amino sugars into glycolysis and cell wall synthesis in several other bacteria, their roles in S. mutans remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the roles of GlmS and NagB in S. mutans sugar metabolism and determined whether they have an effect on virulence. NagB expression increased in the presence of GlcNAc while GlmS expression decreased, suggesting that the regulation of these enzymes, which functionally oppose one another, is dependent on the concentration of environmental GlcNAc. A glmS-inactivated mutant could not grow in the absence of GlcNAc, while nagB-inactivated mutant growth was decreased in the presence of GlcNAc. Also, nagB inactivation was found to decrease the expression of virulence factors, including cell-surface protein antigen and glucosyltransferase, and to decrease biofilm formation and saliva-induced S. mutans aggregation, while glmS inactivation had the opposite effects on virulence factor expression and bacterial aggregation. Our results suggest that GlmS and NagB function in sugar metabolism in opposing directions, increasing and decreasing S. mutans virulence, respectively. PMID:22438919

  1. Biochemical characterization and evaluation of virulence of a fructosyltransferase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans V403.

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, V A; Michalek, S M; Macrina, F L

    1989-01-01

    The Streptococcus mutans extracellular fructosyltransferase (FTF) enzyme may play a role in the formation of dental caries by synthesizing a fructan polymer that serves as an extracellular storage polysaccharide. We sought to determine if an FTF-deficient strain of S. mutans was less virulent than wild-type cells in a rat animal model system. Cloned ftf gene sequences from S. mutans GS5 were used to generate a defective copy of the ftf gene by inserting into the ftf coding region a DNA fragment which encoded erythromycin resistance. The plasmid which carried the defective ftf construct was introduced into S. mutans V403 by using genetic transformation. This defective construct replaced, by allelic exchange, the wild-type copy of the ftf gene carried on the V403 chromosome. FTF activity assays indicated that the recombinant strain, V1741, was deficient in fructan synthesis. However, extracellular protein preparations from this strain displayed an increased ability to generate glucose polymers (glucans) compared with V403 preparations. Levels of adherence to glass and rat tooth surfaces by strain V1741 were similar to those of the V403 strain. Both strains caused moderate decay on rat tooth surfaces; however, the FTF-deficient strain was less pathogenic compared with the wild-type strain. These results suggest that FTF activity contributes to the pathogenicity of S. mutans V403, possibly by generating extracellular fructans which serve as storage compounds. Images PMID:2807537

  2. Effect of Traditionally Used Neem and Babool Chewing Stick (Datun) on Streptococcus Mutans: An In–Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, Bharat; Parkar, Sujal M; Hongal, Sudheer; K, Thanveer; CG, Ajithkrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There are various plants, which are used as chewing sticks in different parts of the world. Several studies have been reported on the antimicrobial effects of chewing sticks on oral bacteria. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of traditionally used neem and babool chewing sticks (datun) extracts on Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The present invitro study was conducted to assess effectiveness of 5%, 10%, and 50% neem and babool extract on Streptococcus mutans. The ditch plate method was used to test the antimicrobial activity. Ditches were prepared on blood agar plates with the help of punch having 6mm diameter. The plates were left for 1h at room temperature and then incubated at 37°C for 48h and examined for zone of inhibition. Results: There was no zone of inhibition observed with 5% babool and neem aqueous extract. There was significant difference in mean diameter of zone of inhibition of 10% neem and babool extract (p-value 0.001 < 0.05). Similarly the mean difference in 50% neem and babool extract was found to be significant (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion: Both neem and babool extracts had antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, while antimicrobial activity was significantly higher in neem aqueous extract than babool aqueous extract. PMID:25177629

  3. The Effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy with Radachlorin and Toluidine Blue on Streptococcus Mutans: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, S.; Fekrazad, R.; Ayremlou, S.; Taheri, S.; Zangeneh, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Dental caries and periodontal diseases are caused by infection of teeth and supporting tissues due to complex aggregate of bacteria known as biofilm, firstly colonized by streptococci. The main purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of toluidine blue O (TBO) and Radachlorin® in combination with a diode laser on the viability of Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus mutans were exposed to either 0.1% TBO associated with (20 mW, 633 nm diode laser, continuous mode, 150 s) or 0.1% Radachlorin® and laser irradiation (100 mW, 662 nm diode laser, continuous mode, 120 s). Those in control groups were subjected to laser irradiation alone or TBO/Radachlorin® alone or received neither TBO/Radachlorin® nor laser exposure. The suspensions were then spread over specific agar plates and incubated aerobically at 37°C. Finally, the bactericidal effects were evaluated based on colony formation. Results: Potential bacterial cell killing was only observed following photosensitization with TBO and 3 j/cm2 laser exposure (p<0.05), whereas Radachlorin® showed significant reduction in dark condition compared to laser exposure (p<0.05). Conclusion: TBO-mediated photodynamic therapy seems to be more efficient than Radachlorin® in significantly reducing the viability of Streptococcus mutans in vitro. PMID:21998808

  4. [Effect of sodium fluoride mouth rinses containing xylitol and sorbitol on the number of Streptococcus mutans from human saliva].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, N C; Valsecki Júnior, A; Salvador, S L; Bergamo, G C

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of 0.05% sodium fluoride solutions containing 2.5% or 12.5% xylitol on the number of Streptococcus mutans in the human mouth. Fifty boys between 8 and 16 years of age participated in this double-blind crossover study. Of the original 50 boys, 33 finished the study. Participants were randomly divided into four groups. The following solutions were employed: placebo solution; 0.05% sodium fluoride solution; 0.05% sodium fluoride + 2.5% xylitol + 2% sorbitol; 0.05% sodium fluoride + 12.5% xylitol + 2% sorbitol. Each solution was used for a 28-day period (20 mL/day, twice a day), with a 10-day washout period between solutions. There were no significant differences (P = 0.32) between the two xylitol-containing solutions (2.5% vs. 12.5%) concerning the number of Streptococcus mutans. However, there was a significant difference between these two xylitol-containing solutions and the sodium fluoride and placebo solutions (P < 0.001). Our results suggest that the 0.05% sodium fluoride solutions containing either 2.5% or 12.5% xylitol caused a significant reduction in the number of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:11253275

  5. Regulation of lactose catabolism in Streptococcus mutans: purification and regulatory properties of phospho-beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Calmes, R; Brown, A T

    1979-01-01

    Phospho-beta-galactosidase (P-beta-gal), the enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the metabolism of intracellular lactose phosphate, occurred at high specific activity in the cytoplasm in 12 of 13 strains of streptococcus mutans grown on lactose but not other carbon sources. The P-beta-gal from S. mutans SL1 was purified 13-fold using diethylaminoethyl-cellulose ion exchange and agarose A--0.5 M molecular exclusion column chromatography. The molecualr weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 40,000, and its pH optimum was 6.5 in three different buffer systems. P-beta-gal activity was inhibited by Co2+, Zn2+, and Cu2+, but other cations, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, orthophosphate, and fluoride had no effect upon enzyme activity. The kinetic response of P-beta-gal to a model substrate, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside-6-phosphate, obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the Km for this substrate was 0.19 mM. In addition to being under genetic control, P-beta-gal activity was regulated by a number of biologically active metabolites. Enzyme activity was inhibited in a sigmoidal fashion by phosphoenolpyruvate. The M 0.5 V value for phosphoenolpyruvate was 2.8 mM, and the Hill coefficient (n) was 3. In addition, P-beta-gal exhibited strong inhibition by ATP, galactose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. In contrast to inhibition of P-beta-gal activity by phosphoenolpyruvate, the inhibition exerted by ATP, galactose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate obeyed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the Ki values for these inhibitors were 0.55, 1.6, and 4.0 mM, respectively. PMID:33899

  6. Utilization of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans: transport, toxicity, and carbon catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A

    2010-05-01

    Abundant in milk and other dairy products, lactose is considered to have an important role in oral microbial ecology and can contribute to caries development in both adults and young children. To better understand the metabolism of lactose and galactose by Streptococcus mutans, the major etiological agent of human tooth decay, a genetic analysis of the tagatose-6-phosphate (lac) and Leloir (gal) pathways was performed in strain UA159. Deletion of each gene in the lac operon caused various alterations in expression of a P(lacA)-cat promoter fusion and defects in growth on either lactose (lacA, lacB, lacF, lacE, and lacG), galactose (lacA, lacB, lacD, and lacG) or both sugars (lacA, lacB, and lacG). Failure to grow in the presence of galactose or lactose by certain lac mutants appeared to arise from the accumulation of intermediates of galactose metabolism, particularly galatose-6-phosphate. The glucose- and lactose-PTS permeases, EII(Man) and EII(Lac), respectively, were shown to be the only effective transporters of galactose in S. mutans. Furthermore, disruption of manL, encoding EIIAB(Man), led to increased resistance to glucose-mediated CCR when lactose was used to induce the lac operon, but resulted in reduced lac gene expression in cells growing on galactose. Collectively, the results reveal a remarkably high degree of complexity in the regulation of lactose/galactose catabolism. PMID:20190045

  7. Genetic Characterization of a Streptococcus mutans LraI Family Operon and Role in Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kitten, Todd; Munro, Cindy L.; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Macrina, Francis L.

    2000-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the LraI (for “lipoprotein receptor antigen”) family function as adhesins in several streptococci, as a virulence factor for endocarditis in at least one of these species, and potentially as metal transporters in many bacteria. We have identified and characterized the chromosomal locus containing the LraI family gene (designated sloC) from Streptococcus mutans, an agent of dental caries and endocarditis in humans. Northern blot analysis indicated that sloC is cotranscribed with three other genes. As with other LraI operons, the sloA and sloB genes apparently encode components of an ATP-binding cassette transport system. The product of the fourth gene, sloR, has homology to the metal-dependent regulator from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, DtxR. A potential binding site for SloR was identified upstream from the sloABCR operon and was conserved upstream from LraI operons in several other streptococci. Potential SloR homologs were identified in the unfinished genomic sequences from two of these, S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes. Mutagenesis of sloC in S. mutans resulted in apparent loss of expression of the entire operon as assessed by Northern blot analysis. The sloC mutant was indistinguishable from its wild-type parent in a gnotobiotic rat model of caries but was significantly less virulent in a rat model of endocarditis. Virulence for endocarditis was restored by correction of the sloC mutation but not by provision of the sloC gene in trans, suggesting that virulence requires the expression of other genes in the sloC operon. PMID:10899841

  8. Genetics and Physiology of Acetate Metabolism by the Pta-Ack Pathway of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Ahn, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    In the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans, phosphotransacetylase (Pta) catalyzes the conversion of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetyl phosphate (AcP), which can be converted to acetate by acetate kinase (Ack), with the concomitant generation of ATP. A ΔackA mutant displayed enhanced accumulation of AcP under aerobic conditions, whereas little or no AcP was observed in the Δpta or Δpta ΔackA mutant. The Δpta and Δpta ΔackA mutants also had diminished ATP pools compared to the size of the ATP pool for the parental or ΔackA strain. Surprisingly, when exposed to oxidative stress, the Δpta ΔackA strain appeared to regain the capacity to produce AcP, with a concurrent increase in the size of the ATP pool compared to that for the parental strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants exhibited enhanced (p)ppGpp accumulation, whereas the strain lacking Pta produced less (p)ppGpp than the wild-type strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants displayed global changes in gene expression, as assessed by microarrays. All strains lacking Pta, which had defects in AcP production under aerobic conditions, were impaired in their abilities to form biofilms when glucose was the growth carbohydrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate the complex regulation of the Pta-Ack pathway and critical roles for these enzymes in processes that appear to be essential for the persistence and pathogenesis of S. mutans. PMID:25979891

  9. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  10. Effect of anti-biofilm glass-ionomer cement on Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-Ping; Ge, Yang; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Xu, Hockin Hk; Weir, Michael D; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Hao-Hao; Hannig, Matthias; Rupf, Stefan; Li, Qian; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Dental restorative materials with antimicrobial properties can inhibit bacterial colonization, which may result in a reduction of caries at tooth-filling interaction zones. This study aimed to develop antibacterial glass-ionomer cements (GIC) containing a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM), and to investigate their effect on material performance and antibacterial properties. Different mass fractions (0, 1.1% and 2.2%) of DMADDM were incorporated into the GIC. The flexure strength, surface charge density, surface roughness and fluoride release were tested. A Streptococcus mutans biofilm model was used. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm matrix. In addition, biofilm metabolic activity, lactic acid metabolism and the expression of glucosyltransferase genes gtfB, gtfC and gtfD were measured. GIC containing 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM had flexural strengths matching those of the commercial control (P>0.1). DMADDM was able to increase the surface charge density but reduced surface roughness (P<0.05). The incorporation of 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM elevated the release of fluoride by the GIC in the first 2 days (P<0.05). The novel DMADDM-modified GIC significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity (P<0.05) and decreased lactic acid production (P<0.05). The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results showed that the expression of gtfB, gtfC and gtfD decreased when mass fractions of DMADDM increased (P<0.05). EPS staining showed that both the bacteria and EPS in biofilm decreased in the DMADDM groups. The incorporation of DMADDM could modify the properties of GIC to influence the development of S. mutans biofilms. In this study, we investigated the interface properties of antibacterial materials for the first time. GIC containing DMADDM can improve material performance and antibacterial properties and may contribute to the better management of secondary caries. PMID:27357319

  11. Transcriptional profile of glucose-shocked and acid-adapted strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Baker, J L; Abranches, J; Faustoferri, R C; Hubbard, C J; Lemos, J A; Courtney, M A; Quivey, R

    2015-12-01

    The aciduricity of Streptococcus mutans is an important virulence factor of the organism, required to both out-compete commensal oral microorganisms and cause dental caries. In this study, we monitored transcriptional changes that occurred as a continuous culture of either an acid-tolerant strain (UA159) or an acid-sensitive strain (fabM::Erm) moved from steady-state growth at neutral pH, experienced glucose-shock and acidification of the culture, and transitioned to steady-state growth at low pH. Hence, the timing of elements of the acid tolerance response (ATR) could be observed and categorized as acute vs. adaptive ATR mechanisms. Modulation of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA/protein repair mechanisms, reactive oxygen species metabolizers and phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase systems occurred in the initial acute phase, immediately following glucose-shock, while upregulation of F1 F0 -ATPase did not occur until the adaptive phase, after steady-state growth had been re-established. In addition to the archetypal ATR pathways mentioned above, glucose-shock led to differential expression of genes suggesting a re-routing of resources away from the synthesis of fatty acids and proteins, and towards synthesis of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids. These adjustments were largely transient, as upon establishment of steady-state growth at acidic pH, transcripts returned to basal expression levels. During growth at steady-state pH 7, fabM::Erm had a transcriptional profile analogous to that of UA159 during glucose-shock, indicating that even during growth in rich media at neutral pH, the cells were stressed. These results, coupled with a recently established collection of deletion strains, provide a starting point for elucidation of the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:26042838

  12. Action of agents on glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans in solution and adsorbed to experimental pellicle.

    PubMed

    Wunder, D; Bowen, W H

    1999-03-01

    Glucosyltransferase (Gtf) activity mediates sucrose-dependent adherence of mutans streptococci to the tooth surface, is essential for the cariogenicity of these micro-organisms, and contributes significantly to the exopolysaccharide component of the dental-plaque matrix. Clearly, agents that inhibit Gtfs could have therapeutic benefit. Here the effects of agents that inhibit Gtfs in solution and adsorbed to a surface were explored. Various classes of chemical reagents were tested for their ability to inhibit the enzymes responsible for insoluble-glucan synthesis (GtfB), insoluble/soluble glucan synthesis (GtfC), and soluble-glucan (GtfD) from Streptococcus mutans. Standard inhibition assays were done with Gtf enzyme in solution or with Gtf adsorbed to parotid saliva-coated hydroxylapatite (surface phase). Reagents tested included the metallic cations Li+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+; the oxidizing compounds hypochlorite, Rose Bengal, perborate, and sodium-meta-periodate; and a panel of sugars and sugar analogues including sorbitol, xylitol, 1',4',6' trideoxy-trichloro-galactosucrose (TGS), and 1-deoxynojirimycin (dNJ). In solution, Gtf activity was inhibited significantly, at the highest concentrations tested: by the metal ions Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Fe3+ (approx. 40-80% inhibition); by Rose Bengal and hypochlorite (approx. 80-90% inhibition); and by TGS and dNJ (approx. 50-80%). However, surface-adsorbed Gtfs displayed increased resistance to inhibition by the same metal cations and oxidizing compounds that inhibited them in solution. In contrast, both TGS and dNJ possessed similar inhibition profiles for both surface-bound Gtf and enzyme in solution. These data indicate that the nature of the inhibitor is important, and also whether the Gtf enzyme is in solution or adsorbed to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite. PMID:10217511

  13. Regulation and physiologic significance of the agmatine deiminase system of Streptococcus mutans UA159.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Ann R; Jameson-Lee, Max; Burne, Robert A

    2006-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that Streptococcus mutans expresses a functional agmatine deiminase system (AgDS) encoded by the agmatine-inducible aguBDAC operon (A. R. Griswold, Y. Y. Chen, and R. A. Burne, J. Bacteriol. 186:1902-1904, 2004). The AgDS yields ammonia, CO2, and ATP while converting agmatine to putrescine and is proposed to augment the acid resistance properties and pathogenic potential of S. mutans. To initiate a study of agu gene regulation, the aguB transcription initiation site was identified by primer extension and a putative sigma70-like promoter was mapped 5' to aguB. Analysis of the genome database revealed an open reading frame (SMU.261c) encoding a putative transcriptional regulator located 239 bases upstream of aguB. Inactivation of SMU.261c decreased AgD activity by sevenfold and eliminated agmatine induction. AgD was also found to be induced by certain environmental stresses, including low pH and heat, implying that the AgDS may also be a part of a general stress response pathway of this organism. Interestingly, an AgDS-deficient strain was unable to grow in the presence of 20 mM agmatine, suggesting that the AgDS converts a growth-inhibitory substance into products that can enhance acid tolerance and contribute to the competitive fitness of the organism at low pH. The capacity to detoxify and catabolize agmatine is likely to have major ramifications on oral biofilm ecology. PMID:16428386

  14. Subcellular localization of the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein C terminus.

    PubMed

    Homonylo-McGavin, M K; Lee, S F; Bowden, G H

    1999-06-01

    To determine the subcellular location of the Streptococcus mutans P1 protein C-terminal anchor, cell envelope fractionation experiments were conducted in combination with Western immunoblotting, using monoclonal antibody MAb 6-8C specific for an epitope that maps near the C terminus of P1 protein and also a polyclonal antibody preparation directed against the P1 C-terminal 144 amino acids (P1COOH). P1 protein was detected in cell walls but not the membrane purified from S. mutans cells by the monoclonal antibody. In contrast, P1 protein was not detected in the same cell wall preparation using the anti-P1COOH polyclonal antibody. However, proteins released from the cell walls by treatment with mutanolysin contained antigen that was recognized by the anti-P1COOH antibody, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by the antibody were masked by peptidoglycan in the cell wall preparations. When cell walls were treated with boiling trichloroacetic acid to solubilize cell-wall-associated carbohydrate, P1 antigen could not be detected in either the solubilized carbohydrate, or in the remaining peptidoglycan, regardless of whether polyclonal or monoclonal antibody was used. However, when the peptidoglycan was treated with mutanolysin, P1 antigen could be detected in the mutanolysin solubilized fraction by MAb 6-8C. Collectively, these data suggest that the C-terminal 144 amino acids of the P1 protein are embedded within the cell wall, and associated exclusively with the peptidoglycan. Furthermore, the ability of the anti-P1COOH antibody to recognize P1 antigen only after mutanolysin treatment of cell walls suggests these C-terminal 144 amino acids are tightly intercalated within the peptidoglycan strands. PMID:10453480

  15. Effect of anti-biofilm glass–ionomer cement on Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su-Ping; Ge, Yang; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Xu, Hockin HK; Weir, Michael D; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Hao-Hao; Hannig, Matthias; Rupf, Stefan; Li, Qian; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Dental restorative materials with antimicrobial properties can inhibit bacterial colonization, which may result in a reduction of caries at tooth-filling interaction zones. This study aimed to develop antibacterial glass–ionomer cements (GIC) containing a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM), and to investigate their effect on material performance and antibacterial properties. Different mass fractions (0, 1.1% and 2.2%) of DMADDM were incorporated into the GIC. The flexure strength, surface charge density, surface roughness and fluoride release were tested. A Streptococcus mutans biofilm model was used. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm matrix. In addition, biofilm metabolic activity, lactic acid metabolism and the expression of glucosyltransferase genes gtfB, gtfC and gtfD were measured. GIC containing 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM had flexural strengths matching those of the commercial control (P>0.1). DMADDM was able to increase the surface charge density but reduced surface roughness (P<0.05). The incorporation of 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM elevated the release of fluoride by the GIC in the first 2 days (P<0.05). The novel DMADDM-modified GIC significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity (P<0.05) and decreased lactic acid production (P<0.05). The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results showed that the expression of gtfB, gtfC and gtfD decreased when mass fractions of DMADDM increased (P<0.05). EPS staining showed that both the bacteria and EPS in biofilm decreased in the DMADDM groups. The incorporation of DMADDM could modify the properties of GIC to influence the development of S. mutans biofilms. In this study, we investigated the interface properties of antibacterial materials for the first time. GIC containing DMADDM can improve material performance and antibacterial properties and may contribute to the better management of secondary caries. PMID

  16. Promotion of Streptococcus mutans glucose transport by human whole saliva and parotid fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1985-01-01

    Human saliva and parotid fluid have two effects on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans: a reduction in the overall rate of uptake, and the promotion of a biphasic mode of uptake. The former effect had been previously shown to result from lactoperoxidase-mediated inhibition of transport or metabolism or both. The objective of the present study was to uncover the basis of the second effect. Biphasic glucose uptake consisted of a rapid phase of low capacity and short duration (approximately 10 to 15 s) followed by a slower phase of high capacity and long duration (several minutes). The slow phase is typical of cells not exposed to the secretions (control cells). S. mutans BHT cells pretreated with as little as 10 microM glucose for 10 min at 37 degrees C, followed by its removal, subsequently exhibit biphasic glucose uptake typical of saliva- or parotid fluid-treated cells. Since pretreatment of the organism with glucose, whole saliva supernatant, or parotid fluid supported subsequent transport of the nonmetabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose, we concluded that pretreatments established a relatively stable pool of glycolytic intermediates (i.e., a phosphoenolpyruvate potential). Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of extracts from [14C]glucose-pretreated cells confirmed the presence of a stable pool of triose phosphates. Dialysis experiments indicated that high-molecular-weight substrates in the secretions were readily utilized by the organism to establish a phosphoenolpyruvate potential, especially when the lactoperoxidase system was rendered inactive. A survey of several carbohydrate constituents of salivary glycoproteins revealed that mannose, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine, in addition to glucose, established phosphoenolpyruvate potentials in the organisms. Inactive substances included, among others, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid. In a survey of selected amino acids, arginine alone promoted 2-deoxyglucose accumulation by the organism

  17. Promotion of Streptococcus mutans glucose transport by human whole saliva and parotid fluid.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1985-04-01

    Human saliva and parotid fluid have two effects on glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans: a reduction in the overall rate of uptake, and the promotion of a biphasic mode of uptake. The former effect had been previously shown to result from lactoperoxidase-mediated inhibition of transport or metabolism or both. The objective of the present study was to uncover the basis of the second effect. Biphasic glucose uptake consisted of a rapid phase of low capacity and short duration (approximately 10 to 15 s) followed by a slower phase of high capacity and long duration (several minutes). The slow phase is typical of cells not exposed to the secretions (control cells). S. mutans BHT cells pretreated with as little as 10 microM glucose for 10 min at 37 degrees C, followed by its removal, subsequently exhibit biphasic glucose uptake typical of saliva- or parotid fluid-treated cells. Since pretreatment of the organism with glucose, whole saliva supernatant, or parotid fluid supported subsequent transport of the nonmetabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxyglucose, we concluded that pretreatments established a relatively stable pool of glycolytic intermediates (i.e., a phosphoenolpyruvate potential). Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of extracts from [14C]glucose-pretreated cells confirmed the presence of a stable pool of triose phosphates. Dialysis experiments indicated that high-molecular-weight substrates in the secretions were readily utilized by the organism to establish a phosphoenolpyruvate potential, especially when the lactoperoxidase system was rendered inactive. A survey of several carbohydrate constituents of salivary glycoproteins revealed that mannose, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine, in addition to glucose, established phosphoenolpyruvate potentials in the organisms. Inactive substances included, among others, N-acetylgalactosamine and N-acetylneuraminic acid. In a survey of selected amino acids, arginine alone promoted 2-deoxyglucose accumulation by the organism

  18. Expression, purification, and characterization of an exo-beta-D-fructosidase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Burne, R A; Schilling, K; Bowen, W H; Yasbin, R E

    1987-01-01

    A genetic library of Streptococcus mutans GS-5, constructed in an Escherichia coli plasmid vector, was screened for cells which could utilize sucrose as the sole carbon and energy source. The recombinant plasmid pFRU1, containing a 4.2-kilobase pair insert of S. mutans DNA, was shown to confer this phenotype. Further characterization of the gene product encoded by pFRU1 revealed that the enzyme was a beta-D-fructosidase with the highest specificity for the beta (2----6)-linked fructan polymer levan. The enzyme could also hydrolyze inulin [beta (2----1)-linked fructan], sucrose, and raffinose with 34, 21, and 12%, respectively, of the activity observed for levan. The gene (designated fruA) appeared to be expressed under its own control in E. coli, as judged by the lack of influence on gene product activity of induction or repression of the beta-galactosidase promoter adjacent to the insertion site on the cloning vector. The protein was purified to homogeneity, as judged by silver staining of purified protein in denaturing and reducing conditions in polyacrylamide gels, from sonic lysate of E. coli, as well as from culture supernatants of S. mutans GS-5 grown in a chemostat at low dilution rate with fructose as the sole carbohydrate source. Both purified proteins had an apparent molecular mass of 140,000 daltons in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, were immunologically related and comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as determined by Western blotting with antisera raised against the cloned gene product, and were identical in all physical and biochemical properties tested. The pH optimum of the enzyme acting on fructan polymers was 5.5, with a significant amount of activity remaining at pH 4.0. The optimum pH for sucrose degradation was broader and lower, with a peak at approximately 4.5. Enzyme activity was inhibited almost completely by Hg2+ and Ag2+, inhibited partially by Cu2+, not inhibited by fluoride

  19. Identification of antigenic epitopes in a surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, K; Nisizawa, T; Nagaoka, S; Kawagoe, M; Koga, T

    1994-01-01

    The reactivities of antibodies in human serum and saliva to a cell surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans and synthetic peptides covering the PAc molecule were examined. Both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting (immunoblotting) showed that all the serum samples from five adult subjects harboring serotype c S. mutans in their oral cavity reacted with recombinant PAc (rPAc). On the other hand, the serum from a 4-month-old infant did not react with rPAc in ELISA. The immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies in saliva samples from the five adult subjects reacted with rPAc. However, in saliva samples from these subjects, the titers of IgA antibody to rPAc did not correlate with the titers of serum antibody to the antigen. To map continuous antigenic epitopes in the PAc molecule, we synthesized 153 decapeptides covering the entire mature PAc molecule, 121 overlapping decapeptides covering the alanine-rich repeating region (A-region) of the PAc molecule, and 21 overlapping decapeptides covering the middle region (residues 824 to 853) according to multiple pin-coupled peptide synthesis technology. Of 153 decapeptides covering the mature PAc, 27 decapeptides showed a strong reaction with the antibodies in serum from the adult subjects. The epitope-scanning patterns in the serum samples from these subjects were also very similar to each other. The antigenic epitope patterns in the saliva resembled those in the serum. However, the ELISA titers of salivary IgA antibodies to these decapeptides differed from the titers of the serum antibody. Of the 121 overlapping decapeptides covering the A-region, 27 decapeptides showed a positive reaction with the antibodies in serum from the adult subjects. All of these 27 decapeptides had either one or two of the five common sequences YQAXL, NADAKA, VQKAN, NNAKNA, and IKKRNA. Six decapeptides of the 21 overlapping decapeptides covering the middle region reacted strongly with the serum antibodies from a

  20. Sublingual immunization with the phosphate-binding-protein (PstS) reduces oral colonization by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, E L; Batista, M T; Cavalcante, R C M; Pegos, V R; Passos, H M; Silva, D A; Balan, A; Ferreira, L C S; Ferreira, R C C

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters play a crucial role in the physiology and pathogenicity of different bacterial species. Components of ABC transporters have also been tested as target antigens for the development of vaccines against different bacterial species, such as those belonging to the Streptococcus genus. Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries, and previous studies have demonstrated that deletion of the gene encoding PstS, the substrate-binding component of the phosphate uptake system (Pst), reduced the adherence of the bacteria to abiotic surfaces. In the current study, we generated a recombinant form of the S. mutans PstS protein (rPstS) with preserved structural features, and we evaluated the induction of antibody responses in mice after sublingual mucosal immunization with a formulation containing the recombinant protein and an adjuvant derived from the heat-labile toxin from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains. Mice immunized with rPstS exhibited systemic and secreted antibody responses, measured by the number of immunoglobulin A-secreting cells in draining lymph nodes. Serum antibodies raised in mice immunized with rPstS interfered with the adhesion of bacteria to the oral cavity of naive mice challenged with S. mutans. Similarly, mice actively immunized with rPstS were partially protected from oral colonization after challenge with the S. mutans NG8 strain. Therefore, our results indicate that S. mutans PstS is a potential target antigen capable of inducing specific and protective antibody responses after sublingual administration. Overall, these observations raise interesting perspectives for the development of vaccines to prevent dental caries. PMID:26462737

  1. Effect of Probiotic Curd on Salivary pH and Streptococcus mutans: A Double Blind Parallel Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Sabyasachi; Kumari, Minti; Mohd, Shafaat

    2016-01-01

    Background Dairy products like curd seem to be the most natural way to ingest probiotics which can reduce Streptococcus mutans level and also increase salivary pH thereby reducing the dental caries risk. Objectives To estimate the role of probiotic curd on salivary pH and Streptococcus mutans count, over a period of 7 days. Materials and Methods This double blind parallel randomized clinical trial was conducted at the institution with 60 caries free volunteers belonging to the age group of 20-25 years who were randomly allocated into two groups. Test Group consisted of 30 subjects who consumed 100ml of probiotic curd daily for seven days while an equal numbered Control Group were given 100ml of regular curd for seven days. Saliva samples were assessed at baseline, after ½ hour 1 hour and 7 days of intervention period using pH meter and Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar to estimate salivary pH and S. mutans count. Data was statistically analysed using Paired and Unpaired t-test. Results The study revealed a reduction in salivary pH after ½ hour and 1 hour in both the groups. However after 7 days, normal curd showed a statistically significant (p< 0.05) reduction in salivary pH while probiotic curd showed a statistically significant (p< 0.05) increase in salivary pH. Similarly with regard to S. mutans colony counts probiotic curd showed statistically significant reduction (p< 0.05) as compared to normal curd. Conclusion Short-term consumption of probiotic curds showed marked salivary pH elevation and reduction of salivary S. mutans counts and thus can be exploited for the prevention of enamel demineralization as a long-term remedy keeping in mind its cost effectiveness. PMID:27042577

  2. Antibacterial effect of water-soluble chitosan on representative dental pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli brevis

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Chih-YU; CHUNG, Ying-CHIEN

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is still a major oral health problem in most industrialized countries. The development of dental caries primarily involves Lactobacilli spp. and Streptococcus mutans. Although antibacterial ingredients are used against oral bacteria to reduce dental caries, some reports that show partial antibacterial ingredients could result in side effects. Objectives The main objective is to test the antibacterial effect of water-soluble chitosan while the evaluation of the mouthwash appears as a secondary aim. Material and Methods The chitosan was obtained from the Application Chemistry Company (Taiwan). The authors investigated the antibacterial effects of water-soluble chitosan against oral bacteria at different temperatures (25-37ºC) and pH values (pH 5-8), and evaluated the antibacterial activities of a self-made water-soluble chitosan-containing mouthwash by in vitro and in vivo experiments, and analyzed the acute toxicity of the mouthwashes. The acute toxicity was analyzed with the pollen tube growth (PTG) test. The growth inhibition values against the logarithmic scale of the test concentrations produced a concentrationresponse curve. The IC50 value was calculated by interpolation from the data. Results The effect of the pH variation (5-8) on the antibacterial activity of water-soluble chitosan against tested oral bacteria was not significant. The maximal antibacterial activity of water-soluble chitosan occurred at 37ºC. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of water-soluble chitosan on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli brevis were 400 µg/mL and 500 µg/mL, respectively. Only 5 s of contact between water-soluble chitosan and oral bacteria attained at least 99.60% antibacterial activity at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. The water-soluble chitosan-containin g mouthwash significantly demonstrated antibacterial activity that was similar to that of commercial mouthwashes (>99.91%) in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. In addition, the alcohol

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Chrysanthemum boreale Essential Oil on Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factor Expression of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Park, Sun-Ju; Kim, Myung-Kon; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Sang-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Lee, Young-Eun; You, Yong-Ouk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of essential oil extracted from Chrysanthemum boreale (C. boreale) on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). To investigate anticariogenic properties, and bacterial growth, acid production, biofilm formation, bacterial adherence of S. mutans were evaluated. Then gene expression of several virulence factors was also evaluated. C. boreale essential oil exhibited significant inhibition of bacterial growth, adherence capacity, and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations 0.1-0.5 mg/mL and 0.25-0.5 mg/mL, respectively. The safranin staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the biofilm formation was also inhibited. The result of live/dead staining showed the bactericidal effect. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of some virulence factors such as gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, spaP, brpA, relA, and vicR of S. mutans was significantly decreased in a dose dependent manner. In GC and GC-MS analysis, seventy-two compounds were identified in the oil, representing 85.42% of the total oil. The major components were camphor (20.89%), β-caryophyllene (5.71%), α-thujone (5.46%), piperitone (5.27%), epi-sesquiphellandrene (5.16%), α-pinene (4.97%), 1,8-cineole (4.52%), β-pinene (4.45%), and camphene (4.19%). These results suggest that C. boreale essential oil may inhibit growth, adhesion, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation of S. mutans through the partial inhibition of several of these virulence factors. PMID:25763094

  4. Enhancement of the killing effect of low-temperature plasma on Streptococcus mutans by combined treatment with gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma sources have been used for biomedical applications such as sterilization, cancer treatment, blood coagulation, and wound healing. Gold nanoparticles (gNPs) have unique optical properties and are useful for biomedical applications. Although low-temperature plasma has been shown to be effective in killing oral bacteria on agar plates, its bactericidal effect is negligible on the tooth surface. Therefore, we used 30-nm gNPs to enhance the killing effect of low-temperature plasma on human teeth. Results We tested the sterilizing effect of low-temperature plasma on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) strains. The survival rate was assessed by bacterial viability stains and colony-forming unit counts. Low-temperature plasma treatment alone was effective in killing S. mutans on slide glasses, as shown by the 5-log decrease in viability. However, plasma treatment of bacteria spotted onto tooth surface exhibited a 3-log reduction in viability. After gNPs were added to S. mutans, plasma treatment caused a 5-log reduction in viability, while gNPs alone did not show any bactericidal effect. The morphological changes in S. mutans caused by plasma treatment were examined by transmission electron microscopy, which showed that plasma treatment only perforated the cell walls, while the combination treatment with plasma and gold nanoparticles caused significant cell rupture, causing loss of intracellular components from many cells. Conclusions This study demonstrates that low-temperature plasma treatment is effective in killing S. mutans and that its killing effect is further enhanced when used in combination with gNPs. PMID:25104171

  5. Inhibitory Effects of Chrysanthemum boreale Essential Oil on Biofilm Formation and Virulence Factor Expression of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom-Su; Park, Sun-Ju; Kim, Myung-Kon; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Sang-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Young-Rae; Lee, Young-Eun; You, Yong-Ouk

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of essential oil extracted from Chrysanthemum boreale (C. boreale) on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). To investigate anticariogenic properties, and bacterial growth, acid production, biofilm formation, bacterial adherence of S. mutans were evaluated. Then gene expression of several virulence factors was also evaluated. C. boreale essential oil exhibited significant inhibition of bacterial growth, adherence capacity, and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations 0.1–0.5 mg/mL and 0.25–0.5 mg/mL, respectively. The safranin staining and scanning electron microscopy results showed that the biofilm formation was also inhibited. The result of live/dead staining showed the bactericidal effect. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of some virulence factors such as gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, spaP, brpA, relA, and vicR of S. mutans was significantly decreased in a dose dependent manner. In GC and GC-MS analysis, seventy-two compounds were identified in the oil, representing 85.42% of the total oil. The major components were camphor (20.89%), β-caryophyllene (5.71%), α-thujone (5.46%), piperitone (5.27%), epi-sesquiphellandrene (5.16%), α-pinene (4.97%), 1,8-cineole (4.52%), β-pinene (4.45%), and camphene (4.19%). These results suggest that C. boreale essential oil may inhibit growth, adhesion, acid tolerance, and biofilm formation of S. mutans through the partial inhibition of several of these virulence factors. PMID:25763094

  6. Adhesion of Streptococcus Mutans to Glass Ionomer, BisCem Cement and Enamel: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalalian, Ezzatollah; Ahmadpour, Sogol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Considering the adhesion of some microorganisms such as Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to restorative materials and the unrecognized consequences of this phenomenon, and due to the controversies in this regard, it is important to discover the materials to which the lowest adhesion of S. mutans occurs. The objective of this study was to assess the level of adhesion of S. mutans to glass ionomer (GI), BisCem Cement and enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 12 specimens including five GI blocks (GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), five BisCem blocks (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA) and two enamel blocks were exposed to a bacterial suspension (1×106 mg/mL). After incubation for one hour at 37°C, the swab samples were taken and cultured in blood agar. The S. mutans colonies were counted by unaided vision after 48 hours of incubation. The results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by the Tukey’s test. Results: The number of colonies attributed to enamel, GI, and BisCem blocks was 24±2, 24.2±2.7 and 14.8±1.7 colonies/mm2, respectively. There was no difference between enamel and GI in terms of adhesion of S. mutans (P=0.08 and P>0.001, respectively); however, the difference between these two and BisCem was statistically significant (P= 0.00075 and P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, BisCem cement is superior to GI for the cementation of indirect restorations. PMID:27148379

  7. Influences of naturally occurring agents in combination with fluoride on gene expression and structural organization of Streptococcus mutans in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The association of specific bioactive flavonoids and terpenoids with fluoride can modulate the development of cariogenic biofilms by simultaneously affecting the synthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS) and acid production by Streptococcus mutans, which enhanced the cariostatic effectiveness of fluoride in vivo. In the present study, we further investigated whether the biological actions of combinations of myricetin (flavonoid), tt-farnesol (terpenoid) and fluoride can influence the expression of specific genes of S. mutans within biofilms and their structural organization using real-time PCR and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Results Twice-daily treatment (one-minute exposure) during biofilm formation affected the gene expression by S. mutans both at early (49-h) and later (97-h) stages of biofilm development. Biofilms treated with combination of agents displayed lower mRNA levels for gtfB and gtfD (associated with exopolysaccharides synthesis) and aguD (associated with S. mutans acid tolerance) than those treated with vehicle-control (p < 0.05). Furthermore, treatment with combination of agents markedly affected the structure-architecture of S. mutans biofilms by reducing the biovolume (biomass) and proportions of both EPS and bacterial cells across the biofilm depth, especially in the middle and outer layers (vs. vehicle-control, p < 0.05). The biofilms treated with combination of agents were also less acidogenic, and had reduced amounts of extracellular insoluble glucans and intracellular polysaccharides than vehicle-treated biofilms (p < 0.05). Conclusion The data show that the combination of naturally-occurring agents with fluoride effectively disrupted the expression of specific virulence genes, structural organization and accumulation of S. mutans biofilms, which may explain the enhanced cariostatic effect of our chemotherapeutic approach. PMID:19863808

  8. Influence of Salivary Components and Extracellular Polysaccharide Synthesis from Sucrose on the Attachment of Streptococcus mutans 6715 to Hydroxyapatite Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. B.; Gibbons, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The adsorption of 3H-labeled Streptococcus mutans 6715 cells to disks of hydroxyapatite (HA) was studied. The number of streptococci that adsorbed was logarithmically related to the concentration of cells available up to at least 2 × 108 per ml; equilibrium occurred within 45 min. Assay reliability was verified by direct scanning electron microscopic counts. Untreated HA disks exposed to buffered saline (PBS)-suspended streptococci at a concentration of 1.1 × 108 per ml absorbed 3.2 × 106 cells per cm2; approximately 3% of the surface area was, therefore, occupied by adsorbed organisms. The presence of adsorbed salivary components on HA reduced the number of attaching S. mutans cells by half. When S. mutans cells were suspended in saliva to mimic conditions existing in the mouth, the number of streptococci adsorbing to saliva-treated HA was reduced more than 30-fold compared to untreated HA. Approximately one-half of the streptococci adsorbed to untreated or to saliva-treated HA disks could be desorbed over a 4-h period with 0.067 M phosphate buffer. S. mutans cells exposed to sucrose to permit extracellular polysaccharide synthesis before or during adsorption attached in fewer numbers to both saliva-treated and untreated HA than PBS-treated organisms. When S. mutans cells adsorbed on untreated HA were exposed to sucrose, fewer organisms could be desorbed; thus, in situ polysaccharide synthesis promoted their more firm attachment to untreated HA. However, when saliva-suspended streptococci were adsorbed to saliva-treated HA surfaces, exposure to sucrose before or subsequent to adsorption did not promote more firm attachment. Evidently, the powerful adherence-inhibiting and desorptive effects of salivary components overshadowed any promoting effects attributable to glucan synthesis from sucrose. Similarly, no differences were noted in the desorption of S. mutans cells from human teeth after exposure to sucrose, glucose, or PBS relative to a strain of

  9. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity. PMID:27293967

  10. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity. PMID:27293967

  11. Glucan-Binding Proteins are Essential for Shaping Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, David J.; Fountain, Tracey L.; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.

    2006-01-01

    Glucan plays a central role in sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans. This organism synthesizes several proteins capable of binding glucan. These are divided into the glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that catalyze the synthesis of glucan and the non-Gtf glucan-binding proteins (Gbps). The biological significance of the Gbps has not been thoroughly defined, but studies suggest these proteins influence virulence and play a role in maintaining biofilm architecture by linking bacteria and extracellular molecules of glucan. We engineered a panel of Gbp mutants, targeting GbpA, GbpC, and GbpD, in which each gene encoding a Gbp was deleted individually and in combination. These strains were then analyzed by confocal microscopy and the biofilm properties quantified by the biofilm quantification software COMSTAT. All biofilms produced by mutant strains lost significant depth, but the basis for the reduction in height depended on which particular Gbp was missing. The loss of the cell-bound GbpC appeared dominant as might be expected based on losing the principal receptor for glucan. The loss of an extracellular Gbp, either GbpA or GbpD, also profoundly changed the biofilm architecture, each in a unique manner. PMID:17214736

  12. Purification and properties of glucosyltransferase responsible for water-insoluble glucan synthesis from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, K; Moriyama, T; Miyake, Y; Mizutani, K; Tanaka, O

    1982-01-01

    A glucosyltransferase responsible for water-insoluble glucan synthesis was purified from the culture fluids of Streptococcus mutans 6715-15 strain by column chromatography on Toyopearl HW-60 and subsequently on hydroxyapatite. The enzyme preparation gave a single band on analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The pH dependency of the activity showed two optimal peaks at 5.8 and 7.3 and the Km values for sucrose were 1.4 and 3.3 mM at the respective optimal pHs. The molecular weight determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis was 180,000. Although the enzyme scarcely synthesized water-insoluble and water-soluble glucans from sucrose, water-insoluble glucan formed from sucrose in the presence of dextran T10 consisted of over 93% alpha-1, 3-glucosidic linkage. Analysis of the structure of water-insoluble glucan indicated that the enzyme catalyzed the formation of branch points in alpha-1,6-glucan (dextran) and transferred the glucosyl moiety of sucrose to the C-3 position of the branching glucose residue of dextran. Since this enzyme has not yet been registered, we named it mutansynthetase (EC 2.4.1.?). Images PMID:6179873

  13. A Phenotypic microarray analysis of Streptococcus mutans liaS mutant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqin; Biswas, Indranil

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a bioflim-forming gram-positive bacterium that resides in the human oral cavity, is considered to be the primary etiological agent of human dental caries. A cell-envelope stress sensing histidine kinase, LiaS, is considered to be important for expression of virulence factors such as glucan-binding protein C and mutacin production. In this communication, a liaS mutant was subjected to phenotypic microarray (PM) analysis of about 2000 phenotypes that includes utilization of various carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, and sulfur sources; osmolytes; metabolic inhibitors; and susceptibility to toxic compounds, including several types of antibiotics. Compared to the parental strain UA159, the liaS mutant strain (IBS148) was more tolerant to various inhibitors that target protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, and cell-wall biosynthesis. Some of the key findings of the PM analysis were confirmed in independent growth studies and by using antibiotic discs and E-test strips for susceptibility testing. PMID:19118347

  14. Antibacterial effect of self-etching adhesive systems on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activity of self-etching adhesive systems against Streptococcus mutans using the agar diffusion method. Materials and Methods Three 2-step systems, Clearfil SE Bond (SE, Kuraray), Contax (CT, DMG), and Unifil Bond (UnB, GC), and three 1-step systems, Easy Bond (EB, 3M ESPE), U-Bond (UB, Vericom), and All Bond SE (AB, BISCO) were used. 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX, Bukwang) and 37% phosphoric acid gel (PA, Vericom) were used as positive controls. Results The antibacterial activity of CHX and PA was stronger than that of the other groups, except SE. After light activation, the inhibition zone was reduced in the case of all 2-step systems except CT. However, all 1-step systems did not exhibit any inhibition zone upon the light activation. Conclusions SE may be better than CT or UnB among the 2-step systems with respect to antibacterial activity, however, 1-step systems do not exhibit any antibacterial activity after light curing. PMID:24516827

  15. Purification and properties of extracellular glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans serotype a.

    PubMed

    Tsumori, H; Shimamura, A; Mukasa, H

    1983-10-01

    Extracellular glucosyltransferases (sucrose: 1,6-alpha-D-glucan 3-alpha- and 6-alpha-glucosyltransferase) of Streptococcus mutans HS6 (serotype a) were purified from the culture supernatant by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, ConA-Sepharose chromatography and chromatofocusing. The enzymes I and II with specific activities of 6.20 and 5.86 i.u. mg-1, respectively, exhibited slightly different isoelectric points (pI 4.5 and 4.2) and the molecular weights were estimated to be 161000 and 174000, respectively, by SDS-PAGE. The enzymes had the same optimum pH of 5.5 and the same Km values of 1.3 mM for sucrose and of 83 microM-glucose equivalent for dextran T10. By double immunodiffusion test on agar, these enzymes were immunologically identical to each other. Analysis by GLC of the glucans synthesized de novo from sucrose by the enzymes (I and II) established that they were 1,6-alpha-D-glucans with 20 and 24.5 mol% 1,3,6-branch points, respectively. Both are therefore bifunctional enzymes. PMID:6228638

  16. Streptococcus mutans wall-associated protein A promotes TLR4-induced dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Wang, D

    2014-08-01

    Dendritic cells orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses, which are central to establishing efficient responses to vaccination. Wall-associated protein A (WapA) of Streptococcus mutans was previously used as a vaccine in animal studies for immunization against dental caries. However, as a cell surface protein, whether WapA activates innate immune responses and the effects of WapA on DCs remain unclear. In this study, WapA was cloned into the GST fusion vector pEBG, which can be expressed efficiently in mammalian cells. We found that when added before stimulation with LPS, purified WapA-GST protein increased TLR4-induced NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathway activation. Pretreatment with WapA-GST also increased LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by DCs, including IL-12, IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, expression of the DC maturation markers CD80/86, CD40 and MHC II was also increased by WapA pretreatment. These data indicate that WapA is recognized by DCs and promotes DC maturation. PMID:24846569

  17. ClpL Is Required for Folding of CtsR in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Liang

    2013-01-01

    ClpL, a member of the HSP100 family, is widely distributed in Gram-positive bacteria but is absent in Gram-negative bacteria. Although ClpL is involved in various cellular processes, such as the stress tolerance response, long-term survival, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, the detailed molecular mechanisms are largely unclear. Here we report that ClpL acts as a chaperone to properly fold CtsR, a stress response repressor, and prevents it from forming protein aggregates in Streptococcus mutans. In vitro, ClpL was able to successfully refold urea-denatured CtsR but not aggregated proteins. We suggest that ClpL recognizes primarily soluble but denatured substrates and prevents the formation of large protein aggregates. We also found that in vivo, the C-terminal D2-small domain of ClpL is essential for the observed chaperone activity. Since ClpL widely contributes to various cellular functions, we speculate that ClpL chaperone activity is necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:23204456

  18. Assessment of cervical demineralization induced by Streptococcus mutans using swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroki; Shimada, Yasushi; Matin, Khairul; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Exposed root surfaces due to gingival recession are subject to biofilm stagnation that can result in caries formation. Cervical enamel and dentin demineralization induced by a cariogenic biofilm was evaluated using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The cementoenamel junction (CEJ) sections of extracted human teeth were subjected to demineralization for 1, 2, or 3 weeks. A suspension of Streptococcus mutans was applied to form a cariogenic biofilm using an oral biofilm reactor. After incubation, demineralization was observed by SS-OCT. For the analysis of SS-OCT signal, the value of the area under the curve (AUC) of the signal profile was measured. Statistical analyses were performed with 95% level of confidence. Cervical demineralization was displayed as a bright zone in SS-OCT. The demineralization depth of dentin was significantly deeper than that of enamel ([Formula: see text]). Enamel near the CEJ demonstrated a significant increase of AUC over the other enamel region after the demineralization. The gaps along the dentinoenamel junction were additionally observed in SS-OCT. SS-OCT was capable of monitoring the cervical demineralization induced by a cariogenic biofilm and is considered to be a promising modality for the diagnosis of cervical demineralization. PMID:27014718

  19. Regulation of the glucosyltransferase (gtfBC) operon by CovR in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2006-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important etiological agent of dental caries in humans. The extracellular polysaccharides synthesized by cell-associated glucosyltransferases (encoded by gtfBC) from sucrose have been recognized as one of the important virulence factors that promote cell aggregation and adherence to teeth, leading to dental plaque formation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of CovR, a global response regulator, on glucosyltransferase expression. Inactivation of covR in strain UA159 resulted in a marked increase in the GtfB and GtfC proteins, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. With the use of a transcriptional reporter system of a single chromosomal copy of the PgtfB-gusA and PgtfC-gusA fusions, we confirmed the transcriptional regulation of these promoters by CovR. By in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified CovR protein, we showed that CovR regulates these promoters directly. DNase I footprinting analyses suggest that CovR binds to large regions on these promoters near the transcription start sites. Taken together, our results indicate that CovR negatively regulates the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes by directly binding to the promoter region. PMID:16428403

  20. Immunization with purified protein antigens from Streptococcus mutans against dental caries in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Russell, M W; Caldwell, J; Smith, R

    1981-01-01

    Protein antigens I, I/II, II, and III were prepared from Streptococcus mutans (serotype c). Their immunogenicities and protective effects against dental caries were investigated in 40 rhesus monkeys kept entirely on a human-type diet, containing about 15% sucrose. Antigens I, I/II and, to a lesser extent, antigen II induced significant reductions in dental caries, as compared with sham-immunized monkeys. This was achieved with 1 or 2 doses of antigen, the first of which was administered with adjuvant (Freund incomplete adjuvant or aluminum hydroxide). There was no reduction in caries in monkeys immunized with antigen III. The reduction in caries in the animals immunized with antigens I or I/II was comparable to that in monkeys immunized with whole cells. Protection against caries was associated predominantly with serum and gingival crevicular fluid immunoglobulin G antibodies, which appeared to be directed against the antigen I determinant, but antibodies to antigen II, though not to antigen III, were also protective. PMID:7309233

  1. ClpL is required for folding of CtsR in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tao, Liang; Biswas, Indranil

    2013-02-01

    ClpL, a member of the HSP100 family, is widely distributed in Gram-positive bacteria but is absent in Gram-negative bacteria. Although ClpL is involved in various cellular processes, such as the stress tolerance response, long-term survival, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, the detailed molecular mechanisms are largely unclear. Here we report that ClpL acts as a chaperone to properly fold CtsR, a stress response repressor, and prevents it from forming protein aggregates in Streptococcus mutans. In vitro, ClpL was able to successfully refold urea-denatured CtsR but not aggregated proteins. We suggest that ClpL recognizes primarily soluble but denatured substrates and prevents the formation of large protein aggregates. We also found that in vivo, the C-terminal D2-small domain of ClpL is essential for the observed chaperone activity. Since ClpL widely contributes to various cellular functions, we speculate that ClpL chaperone activity is necessary to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:23204456

  2. Biochemical characterisation of a glycogen branching enzyme from Streptococcus mutans: Enzymatic modification of starch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Ryu, Soo-In; Bae, Hyun-Ah; Huong, Nguyen Thi; Lee, Soo-Bok

    2008-10-15

    A gene encoding a putative glycogen branching enzyme (SmGBE) in Streptococcus mutans was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The biochemical properties of the purified enzyme were examined relative to its branching specificity for amylose and starch. The activity of the approximately 75kDa enzyme was optimal at pH 5.0, and stable up to 40°C. The enzyme predominantly transferred short maltooligosyl chains with a degree of polymerization (dp) of 6 and 7 throughout the branching process for amylose. When incubated with rice starch, the enzyme modified its optimal branch chain-length from dp 12 to 6 with large reductions in the longer chains, and simultaneously increased its branching points. The results indicate that SmGBE can make a modified starch with much shorter branches and a more branched structure than to native starch. In addition, starch retrogradation due to low temperature storage was significantly retarded along with the enzyme reaction. PMID:26047289

  3. Antiaggregation potential of berry fractions against pairs of Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii.

    PubMed

    Riihinen, Kaisu; Ryynänen, Anu; Toivanen, Marko; Könönen, Eija; Törrönen, Riitta; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2011-01-01

    Coaggregation is an interspecies adhesion process, which is essential to the development of dental plaque. This is an in vitro study of the composition of the soluble solids in the berry juice molecular size fractions (<10 kDa, FI; 10-100 kDa, FII; >100 kDa, FIII) derived from apple, bilberry, blackcurrant, cloudberry, crowberry and lingonberry and their ability to inhibit and reverse coaggregation of the pairs of common species in dental plaque: Streptococcus mutans with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Actinomyces naeslundii. Inhibitory and reversal activity was found in the molecular size fractions FII and FIII of bilberry, blackcurrant, crowberry and lingonberry. The active fractions contained higher amounts of polyphenols (5-12% of soluble solids) than those without activity (<2% of soluble solids). Proanthocyanidins dominated in the active lingonberry juice fractions FII and FIII and also small amounts of anthocyanins were detected. Anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and flavonol glycosides were prevalent in FII and FIII fractions of bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices. Comparable amounts of sugars and titratable acids were present in the latter three berry juice fractions of different size. The results indicate that the high molecular size fractions of lingonberry, bilberry, blackcurrant and crowberry juices have antiaggregation potential on common oral bacteria, the potential being associated with their polyphenolic content. PMID:20623601

  4. Time effect and aliquot concentration in Streptococcus mutans elimination by plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alcantara, E.; López-Callejas, R.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Lagunas-Bernabé, S.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric plasma needle systems are being intensively studied with a view to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study is the improved elimination of Streptococcus Mutants (S. mutans) bacteria. A 5 ml volume of Luria-Bertani culture medium has been inoculated with a test bacterial population and incubated during 24 hours, followed by ten dilutions producing aliquots at 20, 50 and 100 micro l per dilution. Each aliquot is deposited on a paper filter and then exposed to a 2 W RF room pressure helium plasma needle discharge at a 1.5 l.p.m. rate for 1, 3, 5 or 7 minutes. Each sample paper is placed in a test tube, again containing Luria-Bertani fluid, in order to develop a new bacterium colony after a 24h incubation period. The plasma needle lethality has been evaluated from absorbance studies by means of a 6305 Jeway spectrophotometer at a 600 nm wavelength, indicating a clear correlation with exposure time. These studies validate the high disinfection efficacy of the plasma needle.

  5. Regulation of the Glucosyltransferase (gtfBC) Operon by CovR in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saswati; Biswas, Indranil

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important etiological agent of dental caries in humans. The extracellular polysaccharides synthesized by cell-associated glucosyltransferases (encoded by gtfBC) from sucrose have been recognized as one of the important virulence factors that promote cell aggregation and adherence to teeth, leading to dental plaque formation. In this study, we have characterized the effect of CovR, a global response regulator, on glucosyltransferase expression. Inactivation of covR in strain UA159 resulted in a marked increase in the GtfB and GtfC proteins, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. With the use of a transcriptional reporter system of a single chromosomal copy of the PgtfB-gusA and PgtfC-gusA fusions, we confirmed the transcriptional regulation of these promoters by CovR. By in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified CovR protein, we showed that CovR regulates these promoters directly. DNase I footprinting analyses suggest that CovR binds to large regions on these promoters near the transcription start sites. Taken together, our results indicate that CovR negatively regulates the expression of the gtfB and gtfC genes by directly binding to the promoter region. PMID:16428403

  6. Antibacterial effects of hybrid tooth colored restorative materials against Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hotwani, Kavita; Thosar, Nilima; Baliga, Sudhindra; Bundale, Sunita; Sharma, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of two hybrid restoratives, namely resin modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II™ LC, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and giomer (Beautifil-II, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) against Streptococcus mutans [Microbial Type Culture Collection (MTCC), 890]. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial effect was evaluated using an agar diffusion test. The prepared wells in petri dishes were completely filled with chlorhexidine (positive control group), resin modified glass ionomer cement and giomer respectively. Prepared bacterial suspension was poured over the petri dish and was spread evenly using the plate spreader. The culture plates were placed in the incubator for 24 h at 37°C. The antibacterial activity was evaluated after 24 h, 48 h, and 7 days for each group in triplicates. Results and Conclusion: The results of the antibacterial effect of the tested materials were collected, statistically analyzed using the ANOVA test to determine the difference between the mean diameters of the inhibition zone produced. The mean zone of bacterial inhibition was found to be more with the giomer specimens at all time periods. However, this inhibitory activity showed a gradual decrease over a period of 7 days and the maximum inhibition was evident after 24 h with both the test materials. PMID:23956533

  7. [[Streptococcus mutans Acquisition and Dental Caries Development in First-Born Children].

    PubMed

    Noce, Erica; Rubira, Cassia Maria Fischer; da Silva Rosa, Odila Pereira; da Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio; Bretz, Walter Antonio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the moment of streptococcus mutans (SM) acquisition, caries development and their associate variables along 23 months, in first-born children of low socioeconomic status families, starting at 7 months of age. METHOD: The sample was chosen based on highly SM-colonized mothers, including all members of 14 families living in the same houses. The study included 14 mothers, 14 fathers and 14 first-borns and 8 relatives (mostly grandparents). Initial clinical examinations and radiographs determined the caries indices and periodontal conditions of the adults. SM count in all adults was made in the first 2 visits. The children were examined for SM count, number of teeth and number of carious lesions, in 4 visits. RESULTS: SM prevalence was high in the adults, being absent in only one of the parents. SM was found in 1, 2, 3 and 10 children in the first, second, third and fourth visits. Dental caries was detected in only 3 children in the last visit (at 30 months), who presented significantly higher SM scores than the children without caries in the same visit. CONCLUSION: A low income social condition and mothers highly colonized by SM do not mean necessarily early SM colonization and high caries activity in children with oral homecare. Caries development is significantly associated with high SM scores in the children. PMID:22022218

  8. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.2055 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wang-Hong; Zhan, Xiu-Rong; Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi-Fei; Lin, Jiuxiang; Li, Lan-Fen; Wei, Shi-Cheng; Su, Xio-Dong

    2010-01-01

    The SMU.2055 gene from the major caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is annotated as a putative acetyltransferase with 163 amino-acid residues. In order to identify its function via structural studies, the SMU.2055 gene was cloned into the expression vector pET28a. Native and SeMet-labelled SMU.2055 proteins with a His6 tag at the N-terminus were expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) and purified to homogeneity by Ni2+-chelating affinity chromatography. Diffraction-quality crystals of SeMet-labelled SMU.2055 were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to a resolution of 2.5 Å on beamline BL17A at the Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 92.0, b = 95.0, c = 192.2 Å. The asymmetric unit contained four molecules, with a solvent content of 57.1%. PMID:20445252

  9. Antimicrobial Effects of Dental Luting Glass Ionomer Cements on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Altenburger, Markus; Spitzmüller, Bettina; Anderson, Annette; Hellwig, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To reduce secondary caries, glass ionomer luting cements are often used for cementing of indirect restorations. This is because of their well-known antimicrobial potential through the release of fluoride ions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of five dental luting cements which were based on glass ionomer cement technology. Methods. Five different glass ionomer based luting cements were tested for their antimicrobial effects on Streptococcus mutans in two different experimental setups: (i) determination of colony-forming units (CFUs) in a plate-counting assay; (ii) live/dead staining (LDS) and fluorescence microscopy. All experiments were conducted with or without prior treatment of the materials using sterilized human saliva. Antimicrobial effects were evaluated for adherent and planktonic bacteria. Bovine enamel slabs (BES) were used as negative control. BES covered with 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) served as positive control. Results. Each of the tested materials significantly reduced the number of initially adhered CFUs; this reduction was even more pronounced after prior incubation in saliva. Antimicrobial effects on adherent bacteria were confirmed by live-dead staining. Conclusion. All five luting cements showed an antimicrobial potential which was increased by prior incubation with human saliva, suggesting an enhanced effect in vivo. PMID:24795539

  10. Nanoscale characterization of effect of L-arginine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Lavender, Stacey; Woo, JungReem; Guo, Lihong; Shi, Wenyuan; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya; Gimzewski, James K

    2014-07-01

    A major aetiological factor of dental caries is the pathology of the dental plaque biofilms. The amino acid L-arginine (Arg) is found naturally in saliva as a free molecule or as a part of salivary peptides and proteins. Plaque bacteria metabolize Arg to produce alkali and neutralize glycolytic acids, promoting a less cariogenous oral microbiome. Here, we explored an alternative and complementary mechanism of action of Arg using atomic force microscopy. The nanomechanical properties of Streptococcus mutans biofilm extracellular matrix were characterized under physiological buffer conditions. We report the effect of Arg on the adhesive behaviour and structural properties of extracellular polysaccharides in S. mutans biofilms. High-resolution imaging of biofilm surfaces can reveal additional structural information on bacterial cells embedded within the surrounding extracellular matrix. A dense extracellular matrix was observed in biofilms without Arg compared to those grown in the presence of Arg. S. mutans biofilms grown in the presence of Arg could influence the production and/or composition of extracellular membrane glucans and thereby affect their adhesion properties. Our results suggest that the presence of Arg in the oral cavity could influence the adhesion properties of S. mutans to the tooth surface. PMID:24763427

  11. Construction of a counterselection-based in-frame deletion system for genetic studies of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J; Tsang, P; Zheng, L; Shi, W; Qi, F

    2007-04-01

    Genetic studies of Streptococcus mutans have benefited greatly from the numerous techniques that have been successfully adapted for use in this organism. One notable exception is the lack of a negative selection system that can be employed for the easy isolation of markerless in-frame deletions. In this study, we report the development of a galK/galactose-based negative selection system in S. mutans for this purpose. This system consists of a recipient strain (IFD140) that contains a deletion in the galKTE operon and a suicide vector (pIFD-Sm) that carries the S. mutans galK open reading frame fused to the constitutive lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) promoter. Using this system we created a markerless in-frame deletion in the beta-galactosidase (lacG) gene within the S. mutans lactose operon. After vector integration, plasmid excision after counterselection appeared to have occurred in 100% of the galactose-resistant colonies and resulted in in-frame deletions in 50% of the screened isolates. Based on the ratio of galactose-resistant cells to total cells, we determined that plasmid excision occurred at a frequency of approximately 1/3000 cells. Furthermore, the simplicity of this system should make it adaptable for use in numerous other gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. PMID:17311632

  12. Effects of silver diamine fluoride on dentine carious lesions induced by Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chun Hung; Mei, Lei; Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Lo, Edward Chin Man

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) has been shown to be a successful treatment for arresting caries. However, the mechanism of SDF is to be elucidated. AIM. To characterize the effects of SDF on dentine carious induced by Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces naeslundii. DESIGN.  Thirty-two artificially demineralized human dentine blocks were inoculated: 16 with S. mutans and 16 with A. naeslundii. Either SDF or water was applied to eight blocks in each group. Biofilm morphology, microbial kinetics and viability were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, colony forming units, and confocal microscopy. The crosssection of the dentine carious lesions were assessed by microhardness testing, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. RESULTS. Biofilm counts were reduced in SDF group than control (P < 0.01). Surfaces of carious lesions were harder after SDF application than after water application (P < 0.05), in S. mutans group, Ca and P weight percentage after SDF application than after water application (P < 0.05). Lesions showed a significantly reduced level of matrix to phosphate after SDF treatment (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION. Present study showed that SDF posses an anti-microbial activity against cariogenic biofilm of S. mutans or A. naeslundii formed on dentine surfaces. SDF slowed down demineralization of dentine. This dual activity could be the reason behind clinical success of SDF. PMID:21702854

  13. A protein fragment of streptococcal cell surface antigen I/II which prevents adhesion of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, G H; Evans, P; Todryk, S; Buckett, P; Kelly, C G; Lehner, T

    1993-01-01

    Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to the tooth surface involves a cell surface protein with an M(r) of 185,000, termed streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II. Four overlapping fragments of the gene encoding SA I/II were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant polypeptides were assayed for adhesion-binding activity to salivary receptors and for recognition by a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against SA I/II. Two of the MAbs which are known to prevent colonization of S. mutans in vivo bound the recombinant polypeptide comprising residues 816 to 1161. In vitro adhesion of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads was also inhibited specifically by a polypeptide (residues 816 to 1213) encompassing the same region. The evidence from the MAbs preventing colonization of S. mutans and the adherence inhibition assay suggests that an adhesion-binding activity resides within the portion of SA I/II comprising residues 816 to 1213, which is highly conserved among oral streptococcal species. Images PMID:7691754

  14. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by the antibiotic streptozotocin: mechanisms of uptake and the selection of carbohydrate-negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, G R; Poy, F; Lengeler, J W

    1990-01-01

    The antibiotic streptozotocin [2-deoxy-2-(3-methyl-3-nitrosoureido)-D-glucopyranoside], an analog of N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), has been shown to be useful for the selection of carbohydrate-negative and auxotrophic bacterial mutants. We have adapted this method for use with the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans, a gram-positive, aerotolerant anaerobe that uses predominantly carbohydrates as carbon sources for growth. Streptozotocin selectively kills growing cells of S. mutans GS-5, and under appropriate conditions it can reduce the number of viable cells in actively growing cultures by a factor of 10(3) to 10(4). However, unlike in enteric bacteria, which take up this antibiotic by a single NAG-specific transport system, streptozotocin appears to be taken up in S. mutans by both a NAG-specific system and a relatively nonspecific system that is also involved in glucose, fructose, and mannose uptake. Combining streptozotocin selection and a screening procedure involving indicator plates containing triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride, we developed a general method for the isolation of carbohydrate-negative and auxotrophic mutants of S. mutans. A preliminary characterization of both pleiotropic and specific carbohydrate-negative mutants isolated by using this procedure is presented. Images PMID:2137113

  15. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  16. Salivary Streptococcus mutans count and gingivitis in children after rinsing with a chlorhexidine-fluoride solution with and without strontium.

    PubMed

    Spets-Happonen, S; Markkanen, H; Pöllänen, L; Kauppinen, T; Luoma, H

    1985-08-01

    Thirty schoolchildren, 9-12 yr old with high DMF score, rinsed their mouths twice a day for 3 days with a chlorhexidine-fluoride (CXF) solution or a chlorhexidine-fluoride-strontium (CXFSr) solution. Streptococcus mutans counts (CFU) were made from saliva incubated on MSB agar and the gingival bleeding was recorded both before and after the rinsing period. S. mutans count decreased significantly immediately after the rinsing with each of the solutions (from 650 X 10(3) to 170 X 10(3) CFU/ml by CXF and from 500 to 170 X 10(3) CFU/ml by CXFSr). Within about 18 days after the rinsing with each solution the salivary S. mutans counts returned to the original level. Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI) was significantly reduced by half through the CXF rinsing while the slight reduction by CXFSr was nonsignificant. Both of these changes were temporary. The results suggest that short rinsing periods with the CXF solution may be more advisable than daily rinses as a contribution to the maintenance of oral health in subjects or groups in need of such a prophylaxis. The weaker effect found with the CXFSr solution suggests that the cariostatic effect recently found in rats with the same solution may be due to other mechanisms than reduction of the oral S. mutans count. PMID:3862233

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia on the Virulence Properties of the Oral Pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Owotade, Foluso John

    2013-01-01

    Aim. This study investigated the effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia (DVA) on the virulence properties of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis implicated in periodontal diseases. Methods. S. mutans was cultured in tryptone broth containing a crude leaf extract of DVA for 16 hours, and the pH was measured after 10, 12, 14, and 16 h. Biofilms of S. mutans were grown on glass slides for 48 hours and exposed to plant extract for 30 minutes; the adherent cells were reincubated and the pH was measured at various time intervals. Minimum bactericidal concentration of the extracts against the four periodontal pathogens was determined. The effect of the subinhibitory concentration of plant extract on the production of proteinases by P. gingivalis was also evaluated. Results. DVA had no effect on acid production by S. mutans biofilms; however, it significantly inhibited acid production in planktonic cells. Periodontal pathogens were completely eliminated at low concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.02 mg/mL of crude plant extracts. At subinhibitory concentrations, DVA significantly reduced Arg-gingipain (24%) and Lys-gingipain (53%) production by P. gingivalis (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions. These results suggest that DVA has the potential to be used to control oral infections including dental caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:24223061

  18. The copYAZ Operon Functions in Copper Efflux, Biofilm Formation, Genetic Transformation, and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, copper homeostasis is closely monitored to ensure proper cellular functions while avoiding cell damage. Most Gram-positive bacteria utilize the copYABZ operon for copper homeostasis, where copA and copB encode copper-transporting P-type ATPases, whereas copY and copZ regulate the expression of the cop operon. Streptococcus mutans is a biofilm-forming oral pathogen that harbors a putative copper-transporting copYAZ operon. Here, we characterized the role of copYAZ operon in the physiology of S. mutans and delineated the mechanisms of copper-induced toxicity in this bacterium. We observed that copper induced toxicity in S. mutans cells by generating oxidative stress and disrupting their membrane potential. Deletion of the copYAZ operon in S. mutans strain UA159 resulted in reduced cell viability under copper, acid, and oxidative stress relative to the viability of the wild type under these conditions. Furthermore, the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms and develop genetic competence was impaired under copper stress. Briefly, copper stress significantly reduced cell adherence and total biofilm biomass, concomitantly repressing the transcription of the gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, and gbpC genes, whose products have roles in maintaining the structural and/or functional integrity of the S. mutans biofilm. Furthermore, supplementation with copper or loss of copYAZ resulted in significant reductions in transformability and in the transcription of competence-associated genes. Copper transport assays revealed that the ΔcopYAZ strain accrued significantly large amounts of intracellular copper compared with the amount of copper accumulation in the wild-type strain, thereby demonstrating a role for CopYAZ in the copper efflux of S. mutans. The complementation of the CopYAZ system restored copper expulsion, membrane potential, and stress tolerance in the copYAZ-null mutant. Taking these results collectively, we have established the function of the S. mutans

  19. Effects of xylitol on xylitol-sensitive versus xylitol-resistant Streptococcus mutans strains in a three-species in vitro biofilm.

    PubMed

    Marttinen, Aino M; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Saari, Markku A; Ihalin, Riikka A; Söderling, Eva M

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effects of xylitol on biofilms containing xylitol-resistant (Xr) and xylitol-sensitive (Xs) Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and S. sanguinis. The biofilms were grown for 8 and 24 h on hydroxyapatite discs. The viable microorganisms were determined by plate culturing techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using a S. mutans-specific probe. Extracellular cell-bound polysaccharides (EPS) were determined by spectrofluorometry from single-species S. mutans biofilms. In the presence of 5 % xylitol, the counts of the Xs S. mutans decreased tenfold in the young (8 h) biofilm (p < 0.05) but no effect was seen in the mature (24 h) biofilm. No decrease was observed for the Xr strains, and FISH confirmed these results. No differences were detected in the EPS production of the Xs S. mutans grown with or without xylitol, nor between Xr and Xs S. mutans strains. Thus, it seems that xylitol did not affect the EPS synthesis of the S. mutans strains. Since the Xr S. mutans strains, not inhibited by xylitol, showed no xylitol-induced decrease in the biofilms, we conclude that growth inhibition could be responsible for the decrease of the counts of the Xs S. mutans strains in the clinically relevant young biofilms. PMID:22645015

  20. Role of Aqueous Extract of Morinda Citrifolia (Indian Noni) Ripe Fruits in Inhibiting Dental Caries-Causing Streptococcus Mutans and Streptococcus Mitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasamy, Barani; Manipal, Sunayana; Duraisamy, Prabu; Ahmed, Adil; Mohanaganesh, SP; Jeevika, C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Use of alternative medicine to control oral streptococci is a new topic worthy of further investigation. This study aimed to elucidate the dose-dependent anti-bacterial activity of crude aqueous extract of ripe Morinda citrifolia L. (Family: Rubiaceae) fruits against oral streptococci i.e. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis, that cause dental caries in humans. Methods: Fresh ripe M. citrifolia fruits (750g) were ground in an electronic blender with sterile water (500ml). The crude aqueous extract was lyophilized to yield a brown colored powder. Various concentrations (1000-100μg/ ml) of the extract were tested for its antibacterial activity (Kirby and Bauer method) against whole cells of S. mutans and S. mitis. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by micro-dilution method, using serially diluted (2 folds) fruit extract, according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Results: Crude aqueous extract (1000μg/ ml) of ripe M. citrifolia fruits effectively inhibited the growth of S. mutans (19±0.5 mm) and S. mitis (18.6±0.3 mm) compared to the streptomycin control (21.6±0.3 mm). The growth inhibition was clearly evident with “nil” bacteriostasis, even after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. The MIC of the extract for S. mutans and S. mitis was 125 μg and 62.5 μg, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that phytochemicals naturally synthesized by M. citrifolia have an inhibitory effect on oral streptococci. Furthermore, purification and molecular characterization of the “bioactive principle” would enable us to formulate a sustainable oral hygiene product. PMID:25628701

  1. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the methionine synthase (MetE) from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tian-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2006-10-01

    Methionine synthase (MetE) from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The Streptococcus mutans metE gene encodes methionine synthase (MetE), which catalyzes the direct transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine in the last step of methionine synthesis. metE was cloned into pET28a and the gene product was expressed at high levels in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). MetE was purified to homogeneity using Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.85, b = 99.48, c = 77.88 Å, β = 94.55°.

  2. A Biochemical Characterization of the DNA Binding Activity of the Response Regulator VicR from Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Eduardo; Downey, Jennifer S.; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are ubiquitous among bacteria and are among the most elegant and effective sensing systems in nature. They allow for efficient adaptive responses to rapidly changing environmental conditions. In this study, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the Streptococcus mutans protein VicR, an essential response regulator that is part of the VicRK TCS. We dissected the DNA binding requirements of the recognition sequences for VicR in its phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms. In doing so, we were able to make predictions for the expansion of the VicR regulon within S. mutans. With the ever increasing number of bacteria that are rapidly becoming resistant to even the antibiotics of last resort, TCSs such as the VicRK provide promising targets for a new class of antimicrobials. PMID:25229632

  3. Immunochemistry of the Streptococcus mutans BHT cell membrane: detection of determinants cross-reactive with human heart tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Ayakawa, G Y; Siegel, J L; Crowley, P J; Bleiweis, A S

    1985-01-01

    Cell membranes of Streptococcus mutans BHT serotype b were prepared after glass bead disruption or mutanolysin digestion of whole cells. Immunoblot analyses of BHT membrane extracts revealed major polypeptides of 42,000, 46,000, 62,000, and 82,000 daltons, as well as several minor bands, to be reactive with rabbit anti-human heart immunoglobulins. Heart cross-reactive antigens have been reported in the cell walls and culture fluids of several S. mutans serotypes. This represents the first report of cell membrane-localized heart cross-reactive antigens in this oral pathogen. Positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot reactions were also obtained with heart tissue antigen and anti-BHT sera, indicating mutual cross-reactivity. The major cross-reactive component detected by immunoblotting of human heart extracts was a 69,000-dalton polypeptide. Images PMID:3886543

  4. Effect of aqueous and alcoholic Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) extracts against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in comparison to chlorhexidine: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Shamarao, Supreetha; Battur, Hemant; Tikare, Shreyas; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Al Sayed, Mohammed Sayed Al Esawy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stevia (S. rebaudiana) a herb which has medicinal value and was used in ancient times as a remedy for a great diversity of ailments and sweetener. Leaves of Stevia contain a high concentration of Stevioside and Rebaudioside which are supposed to be sweetening agents. Aim: To compare the efficacy of aqueous and alcoholic S. rebaudiana extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in comparison to chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: In the first part of the study, various concentrations of aqueous and ethanolic Stevia extract were prepared in the laboratory of Pharmacy College. It was then subjected to microbiological assay to determine its zone of inhibition using Agar disk diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using serial broth dilution method against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Chlorhexidine was used as a positive control. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Tukey post hoc for group wise comparisons. Results: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of aqueous and ethnolic Stevia extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus were 25% and 12.5% respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the aqueous and alcoholic Stevia extracts against Streptococcus mutans at 48 hours were 22.8 mm and 26.7 mm respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the aqueous and alcoholic Stevia extracts against Lactobacillus acidophilus at 48 hours were 14.4 mm and 15.1 mm respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus at 48 hours was 20.5 and 13.2 respectively. Conclusion: The inhibitory effect shown by alcoholic Stevia extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was superior when compared with that of aqueous form and was inferior when compared with Chlorhexidine. PMID:25558451

  5. Interactions of the Metalloregulatory Protein SloR from Streptococcus mutans with Its Metal Ion Effectors and DNA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, John; Cornacchione, Louis; Daly, William; Galan, Diego; Wysota, Michael; Tivnan, Patrick; Collins, Justin; Nye, Dillon; Levitz, Talya; Breyer, Wendy A.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans is the causative agent of dental caries, a significant concern for human health, and therefore an attractive target for therapeutics development. Previous work in our laboratory has identified a homodimeric, manganese-dependent repressor protein, SloR, as an important regulator of cariogenesis and has used site-directed mutagenesis to map functions to specific regions of the protein. Here we extend those studies to better understand the structural interaction between SloR and its operator and its effector metal ions. The results of DNase I assays indicate that SloR protects a 42-bp region of DNA that overlaps the sloABC promoter on the S. mutans UA159 chromosome, while electrophoretic mobility shift and solution binding assays indicate that each of two SloR dimers binds to this region. Real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time semi-qRT-PCR) experiments were used to determine the individual base pairs that contribute to SloR-DNA binding specificity. Solution studies indicate that Mn2+ is better than Zn2+ at specifically activating SloR to bind DNA, and yet the 2.8-Å resolved crystal structure of SloR bound to Zn2+ provides insight into the means by which selective activation by Mn2+ may be achieved and into how SloR may form specific interactions with its operator. Taken together, these experimental observations are significant because they can inform rational drug design aimed at alleviating and/or preventing S. mutans-induced caries formation. IMPORTANCE This report focuses on investigating the SloR protein as a regulator of essential metal ion transport and virulence gene expression in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans and on revealing the details of SloR binding to its metal ion effectors and binding to DNA that together facilitate this expression. We used molecular and biochemical approaches to characterize the interaction of SloR with Mn2+ and with its SloR recognition element to gain a clearer picture

  6. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S.; Bitoun, J.P.; Nguyen, A.H.; Bozner, D.; Yao, X.; Wen, Z.T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by realtime polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyl-transferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6. Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. PMID:25421565

  7. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. PMID:25421565

  8. Comparison of Antibacterial Effects of ZnO and CuO Nanoparticles Coated Brackets against Streptococcus Mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Baratali; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Yaghoubi, Masoud; Shahtahmassbi, Nasser; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Shakeri, Mohammadtaghi; Shafaee, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem During the orthodontic treatment, microbial plaques may accumulate around the brackets and cause caries, especially in high-risk patients. Finding ways to eliminate this microbial plaque seems to be essential. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of nano copper oxide (CuO) and nano zinc oxide (ZnO) coated brackets against Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) in order to decrease the risk of caries around the orthodontic brackets during the treatment. Materials and Method Sixty brackets were coated with nanoparticles of ZnO (n=20), CuO (n=20) and CuO-ZnO (n=20). Twelve uncoated brackets constituted the control group. The brackets were bonded to the crowns of extracted premolars, sterilized and prepared for antimicrobial tests (S.mutans ATCC35668). The samples taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours were cultured on agar plates. Colonies were counted 24 hours after incubation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Results In CuO and CuO-ZnO coated brackets, no colony growth was seen after two hours. Between 0-6 hours, the mean colony counts were not significantly different between the ZnO and the control group (p>0.05). During 6-24 hours, the growth of S.mutans was significantly reduced by ZnO nanoparticles in comparison with the control group (p< 0.001). However, these bacteria were not totally eliminated. Conclusion CuO and ZnO-CuO nanoparticles coated brackets have better antimicrobial effect on S.mutans than ZnO coated brackets. PMID:26331150

  9. Natural Immunoreactivity of Secretory IgA to Indigenous Strains of Streptococcus mutans From Chinese Spousal Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Min; Chen, Dong; Gao, Zhenyan; Wu, Xinyu; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Background Dental caries is a well-known biofilm-mediated disease initiated by Streptococcus mutans, which should infect and colonize in a milieu perfused with components of the mucosal immune system. Little is known, however, regarding the relationship between the natural secretory IgA activity and S. mutans of a variety of diverse genotypes. Objectives The current study aimed to use spousal pairs to investigate the natural immunoreactivity of salivary secretory IgA to different genotype strains of S. mutans. Patients and Methods Indigenous strains were characterized from nine spousal pairs using polymerase reaction chain (PCR) and arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) by genotype monitoring. Unstimulated submandibular/sublingual secretions were collected and the concentrations of secretory IgA were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Each saliva sample was examined by Western blot to analyze the immunoreactivity of naturally occurring salivary secretory IgA antibodies for his/her own indigenous strain, spouse’s strain and reference strains including S. mutans GS-5 and Ingbritt (C). Results The results showed that naturally induced salivary IgA antibodies against S. mutans were present in all subjects. Almost all subjects had the similar individual immunoblotting profiles to different genotype strains. Conclusions The current study indicated that the immunoreactivity of secretory IgA might have no direct correlation with the colonization of indigenous flora and rejection of exogenous strains in adults. The relationship of microbes, host and dental caries should be in the light of coevolved microecosystem as a whole, but not caused by one factor alone. PMID:27303613

  10. A 30-month longitudinal study of the effects of some oral hygiene measures on Streptococcus mutans and approximal dental caries.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, P; Kristoffersson, K; Karlsson, R; Bratthall, D

    1987-03-01

    The effects of some oral hygiene measures on Streptococcus mutants and approximal dental caries were evaluated. One hundred and eighty-seven 13-year-old individuals with high levels of salivary S. mutans (greater than 10(6)/mL) were selected. They were randomly distributed into three groups. Group I initially received professional mechanical tooth-cleaning, tongue-scraping, chlorhexidine treatment, and oral hygiene instructions concentrated on the approximal surfaces most colonized by S. mutans. The treatment was given four times with intervals of two days, followed by one single treatment every six months throughout the experimental period. The initial treatment period for group II, also consisting of four visits, included the same oral hygiene instructions as for group I. The instructions were repeated every six months. Group III was maintained in the preventive program provided by the local Dental Health Office, based on mechanical plaque control and topical use of fluorides and chlorhexidine at individualized intervals. Group I showed a significant immediate reduction of S. mutans in saliva as well as an approximal tooth surfaces. After six months, there were no differences among the three groups regarding these variables. Compared with baseline, there was a significant reduction of S. mutans in all groups. There was no significant difference in caries progression among the three groups. However, the selected "high-risk" individuals in group I developed 0.25 new manifest caries lesions approximally/year, compared with 0.27 for all children of the same age group in the area. Seventeen individuals had approximal surfaces with consistently high or consistently low S. mutans levels. Forty-six percent of the surfaces with high values developed new or progressive caries, compared with 2% of the surfaces with low values. PMID:3475309

  11. Streptococcus mutans endocarditis: report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ullman, R F; Miller, S J; Strampfer, M J; Cunha, B A

    1988-03-01

    Our findings indicate that S. mutans endocarditis is capable of causing significant morbidity and mortality, as exemplified by the prolonged and complicated hospital course of our patients and the ultimate death of one of them. S. mutans endocarditis is probably underreported because most clinical laboratories do not speciate the viridans streptococci. Isolates of S. mutans should be tested for tolerance that would require the addition of an aminoglycoside to the penicillin regimen. Our experience agrees with the literature and indicates that S. mutans is primarily a pathogen in elderly patients with heart disease and may be associated with IHSS. PMID:3350687

  12. Effect of human saliva on the fluoride sensitivity of glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1981-12-01

    The fluoride (F) sensitivity of glucose uptake by whole cell suspensions of streptococcus mutans in the presence and absence of human whole salivary supernatant was studied. It was observed that dithiothreitol (DTT) and other thiols markedly reduced the F sensitivity of cells when saliva (50%, vol/vol) was present during glucose uptake. In the absence of saliva, cells were sensitive to 2 to 2.5 mM F regardless of the presence of thiols. Supplementation of cells in phosphate or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-hydrochloride buffers with physiological concentrations of calcium or phosphate had no effect on the F sensitivity of the organism. Experiments with permeabilized cells suggested that thiols themselves had no direct effect on the F sensitivity of enolase (a principal F target). Cells pretreated with DDT subsequently exhibited decreased F sensitivity when examined in the presence of saliva but not in the absence of saliva. Cells pretreated with whole salivary supernatant were found to be subsequently less sensitive to F in the absence of saliva during glucose uptake. Furthermore, in cases where cells were pretreated with saliva, subsequent additions of DDT were unnecessary to obtain maximal reduction in the F sensitivity of glucose uptake. It was concluded that the saliva-dependent reduction in F sensitivity of glucose uptake was not due to sequestration of available F by salivary constituents. The data suggest that a salivary component(s) interacts directly with the microorganism in some manner which results in reduced F sensitivity of the process under study. Possible mechanisms of saliva action are discussed. PMID:7333673

  13. Effect of human saliva on the fluoride sensitivity of glucose uptake by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Germaine, G R; Tellefson, L M

    1981-01-01

    The fluoride (F) sensitivity of glucose uptake by whole cell suspensions of streptococcus mutans in the presence and absence of human whole salivary supernatant was studied. It was observed that dithiothreitol (DTT) and other thiols markedly reduced the F sensitivity of cells when saliva (50%, vol/vol) was present during glucose uptake. In the absence of saliva, cells were sensitive to 2 to 2.5 mM F regardless of the presence of thiols. Supplementation of cells in phosphate or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-hydrochloride buffers with physiological concentrations of calcium or phosphate had no effect on the F sensitivity of the organism. Experiments with permeabilized cells suggested that thiols themselves had no direct effect on the F sensitivity of enolase (a principal F target). Cells pretreated with DDT subsequently exhibited decreased F sensitivity when examined in the presence of saliva but not in the absence of saliva. Cells pretreated with whole salivary supernatant were found to be subsequently less sensitive to F in the absence of saliva during glucose uptake. Furthermore, in cases where cells were pretreated with saliva, subsequent additions of DDT were unnecessary to obtain maximal reduction in the F sensitivity of glucose uptake. It was concluded that the saliva-dependent reduction in F sensitivity of glucose uptake was not due to sequestration of available F by salivary constituents. The data suggest that a salivary component(s) interacts directly with the microorganism in some manner which results in reduced F sensitivity of the process under study. Possible mechanisms of saliva action are discussed. PMID:7333673

  14. A Pleiotropic Regulator, Frp, Affects Exopolysaccharide Synthesis, Biofilm Formation, and Competence Development in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Kuramitsu, Howard K.

    2006-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide synthesis, biofilm formation, and competence are important physiologic functions and virulence factors for Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we report the role of Frp, a transcriptional regulator, on the regulation of these traits crucial to pathogenesis. An Frp-deficient mutant showed decreased transcription of several genes important in virulence, including those encoding fructosyltransferase (Ftf), glucosyltransferase B (GtfB), and GtfC, by reverse transcription and quantitative real-time PCR. Expression of Ftf was decreased in the frp mutant, as assessed by Western blotting as well as by the activity assays. Frp deficiency also inhibited the production of GtfB in the presence of glucose and sucrose as well as the production of GtfC in the presence of glucose. As a consequence of the effects on GtfB and -C, sucrose-induced biofilm formation was decreased in the frp mutant. The expression of competence mediated by the competence-signaling peptide (CSP) system, as assessed by comC gene transcription, was attenuated in the frp mutant. As a result, the transformation efficiency was decreased in the frp mutant but was partially restored by adding synthetic CSP. Transcription of the frp gene was significantly increased in the frp mutant under all conditions tested, indicating that frp transcription is autoregulated. Furthermore, complementation of the frp gene in the frp mutant restored transcription of the affected genes to levels similar to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest that Frp is a novel pleiotropic effector of multiple cellular functions and is involved in the modulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis, sucrose-dependent biofilm formation, and competence development. PMID:16861645

  15. Identification and Functional Analysis of Genome Mutations in a Fluoride-Resistant Streptococcus mutans Strain

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance. PMID:25856576

  16. Hydroxy decenoic acid down regulates gtfB and gtfC expression and prevents Streptococcus mutans adherence to the cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 10-Hydroxy-2-decenoic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid is the most active and unique component to the royal jelly that has antimicrobial properties. Streptococcus mutans is associated with pathogenesis of oral cavity, gingivoperiodontal diseases and bacteremia following dental manipulations. In the oral cavity, S. mutans colonize the soft tissues including tongue, palate, and buccal mucosa. When considering the role of supragingival dental plaque in caries, the proportion of acid producing bacteria (particularly S. mutans), has direct relevance to the pathogenicity of the plaque. The genes that encode glucosyltransferases (gtfs) especially gtfB and gtfC are important in S. mutans colonization and pathogenesis. This study investigated the hydroxy-decenoic acid (HDA) effects on gtfB and gtfC expression and S. mutans adherence to cells surfaces. Methods Streptococcus mutans was treated by different concentrations of HPLC purified HDA supplied by Iran Beekeeping and Veterinary Association. Real time RT-PCR and western blot assays were conducted to evaluate gtfB and gtfC genes transcription and translation before and after HDA treatment. The bacterial attachment to the cell surfaces was evaluated microscopically. Results 500 μg ml-1 of HDA inhibited gtfB and gtfC mRNA transcription and its expression. The same concentration of HDA decreased 60% the adherence of S. mutans to the surface of P19 cells. Conclusion Hydroxy-decenoic acid prevents gtfB and gtfC expression efficiently in the bactericide sub-concentrations and it could effectively reduce S. mutans adherence to the cell surfaces. In the future, therapeutic approaches to affecting S. mutans could be selective and it’s not necessary to put down the oral flora completely. PMID:22839724

  17. The adaptive response of Streptococcus mutans towards oral care products: involvement of the ClpP serine protease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong Mei; ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2007-10-01

    In the oral cavity a balanced physiological response is essential for Streptococcus mutans to survive various types of external challenges. In this study we examined the role of the ClpP serine protease in the response of S. mutans towards sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and chlorhexidine. By constructing a clpP promoter-green fluorescent protein reporter strain, we showed increased fluorescence intensities under all types of stress, indicating a need for ClpP under all these challenges. We constructed a clpP knockout mutant, which proved to be more sensitive to all the challenges than the wild-type strain. This knockout strain also displayed a reduced growth rate, hyperaggregation, and increased biofilm formation. Furthermore, an increased resistance to toxic levels of hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine after pre-incubation with sublethal levels of the corresponding compounds was found in the wild-type strain but not in the knockout mutant. In conclusion, ClpP is involved in the general stress response of S. mutans and assists the bacteria to resist killing through adaptation. PMID:17850424

  18. The effect of pomegranate mouthrinse on Streptococcus mutans count and salivary pH: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Dilshad; Dilshad, Bahija; Farhan, Mohammed; Ali, Arshiya; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Herbal mouthwashes have been considered to be a more advantageous option to their chemical counterparts, for a long-time. The use of pomegranate fruit dates from ancient times and reports of its therapeutic abilities have echoed throughout the ages. To evaluate the effect on the salivary pH and the Streptococcus mutans count in healthy subjects before and after pomegranate mouthrinse. Fifty healthy patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 subjects each. Group A was treated with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse; while Group B was treated with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) mouthrinse and the saliva samples were collected at three different intervals: Prerinse, after 10 min, and 60 min. The salivary pH was measured using a digital pH meter and the S. mutans count was determined by the commercial system Dentocult SM. The statistical analyses used in this study are Mann–Whitney U-test and t-test. PPE mouthrinse had an inhibitory effect on S. mutans count in adults. There was also an increase in the salivary pH after 10 min of the mouthrinse. PPE mouthrinse may be considered as a potential anticariogenic mouthrinse. PMID:26955605

  19. The effect of pomegranate mouthrinse on Streptococcus mutans count and salivary pH: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Umar, Dilshad; Dilshad, Bahija; Farhan, Mohammed; Ali, Arshiya; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Herbal mouthwashes have been considered to be a more advantageous option to their chemical counterparts, for a long-time. The use of pomegranate fruit dates from ancient times and reports of its therapeutic abilities have echoed throughout the ages. To evaluate the effect on the salivary pH and the Streptococcus mutans count in healthy subjects before and after pomegranate mouthrinse. Fifty healthy patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 subjects each. Group A was treated with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse; while Group B was treated with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) mouthrinse and the saliva samples were collected at three different intervals: Prerinse, after 10 min, and 60 min. The salivary pH was measured using a digital pH meter and the S. mutans count was determined by the commercial system Dentocult SM. The statistical analyses used in this study are Mann-Whitney U-test and t-test. PPE mouthrinse had an inhibitory effect on S. mutans count in adults. There was also an increase in the salivary pH after 10 min of the mouthrinse. PPE mouthrinse may be considered as a potential anticariogenic mouthrinse. PMID:26955605

  20. Serum and salivary antibody responses in rats orally immunized with Streptococcus mutans carbohydrate protein conjugate associated with liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P; Scholler, M; Ogier, J; Ackermans, F; Frank, R M

    1986-01-01

    In this study we describe the preparation of a Streptococcus mutans vaccine consisting of a purified polysaccharide antigen, derived from S. mutans OMZ175 serotype f, covalently coupled through reductive amination to a previously isolated 74,000-molecular-weight (74K) cell wall protein which interacts with saliva proteins (74K-SR). We also investigated the local and systemic immune response to the poly-74K-SR conjugate after oral administration of the conjugate associated with liposomes. Intragastric administration of liposome-associated poly-74K-SR conjugate in rats produced a local immunoglobulin A (IgA) response directed against the polysaccharide and the cell surface protein, whereas liposome-associated polysaccharide was unable to induce any detectable local IgA response. The antigenicity of the polysaccharide in the conjugate was not affected by the coupling reaction, while that of the cell surface protein was reduced. We showed that the immunogenicity of S. mutans polysaccharide could be improved by chemical coupling with a carrier cell surface protein. If such a conjugate were orally administered with liposomes it could constitute a potential vaccine against dental caries. Images PMID:3699888

  1. Sucrose- and Fructose-Specific Effects on the Transcriptome of Streptococcus mutans, as Determined by RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-scale studies have begun to establish the scope and magnitude of the impacts of carbohydrate source and availability on the regulation of gene expression in bacteria. The effects of sugars on gene expression are particularly profound in a group of lactic acid bacteria that rely almost entirely on their saccharolytic activities for energy production and growth. For Streptococcus mutans, the major etiologic agent of human dental caries, sucrose is the carbohydrate that contributes in the most significant manner to establishment, persistence, and virulence of the organism. However, because this organism produces multiple extracellular sucrolytic enzymes that can release hexoses from sucrose, it has not been possible to study the specific effects of sucrose transport and metabolism on gene expression in the absence of carbohydrates that by themselves can elicit catabolite repression and induce expression of multiple genes. By employing RNA deep-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology and mutants that lacked particular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, we compared the transcriptomes of S. mutans bacteria growing on glucose, fructose, or sucrose as the sole carbohydrate source. The results provide a variety of new insights into the impact of sucrose transport and metabolism by S. mutans, including the likely expulsion of fructose after sucrose internalization and hydrolysis, and identify a set of genes that are differentially regulated by sucrose versus fructose. The findings significantly enhance our understanding of the genetics and physiology of this cariogenic pathogen. PMID:26475108

  2. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition study of a β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; De Luca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-07-01

    The oral pathogenic bacterium involved in human dental caries formation Streptococcus mutans, encodes for two carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) one belonging to the α- and the other one to the β-class. This last enzyme (SmuCA) has been cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with a major class of CA inhibitors, the inorganic anions. Here we show that SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with kcat 4.2×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7)M(-1)×s(-1), being inhibited by cyanate, carbonate, stannate, divannadate and diethyldithiocarbamate in the submillimolar range (KIs of 0.30-0.64mM) and more efficiently by sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid (KIs of 15-46μM). The anion inhibition profile of the S. mutans enzyme is very different from other α- and β-CAs investigated earlier. Identification of effective inhibitors of this new enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action. PMID:26014482

  3. Role of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate in remineralization of white spot lesions and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans?

    PubMed Central

    Vashisht, Ruchi; Indira, Rajamani; Ramachandran, S; Kumar, Anil; Srinivasan, Manali Ramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To promote the remineralization by ionic exchange mechanism instead of invasive techniques many remineralizing agents can be used. Objective: To evaluate the remineralization effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSLs) and its inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans colonization. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 60 subjects exhibiting at least 1-WSL. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: A test group using CPP-ACP cream (GC-Tooth Mousse, Leuven, Belgium) and a control group using only fluoride containing toothpaste for a period of 3-month. Baseline WSLs were scored using DIAGNOdent device (KaVo Germany) and the saliva samples were collected to measure S. mutans counts. After the 3-month period the WSLs were again recorded and the saliva collection was repeated. Result: DIAGNOdent measurements were increased by time (P = 0.002) in the control group and no statistically significant difference (P = 0.217) was found in the test group by the 3-month period. In both groups, the mutans counts were decreased in the 3-month experimental period. Conclusion: These clinical and laboratory results suggested that CPP-ACP containing cream had a slight remineralization effect on the WSL in the 3-month evaluation period however, longer observation is recommended to confirm whether the greater change in WSLs is maintained. PMID:23956538

  4. Sucrose- and Fructose-Specific Effects on the Transcriptome of Streptococcus mutans, as Determined by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-scale studies have begun to establish the scope and magnitude of the impacts of carbohydrate source and availability on the regulation of gene expression in bacteria. The effects of sugars on gene expression are particularly profound in a group of lactic acid bacteria that rely almost entirely on their saccharolytic activities for energy production and growth. For Streptococcus mutans, the major etiologic agent of human dental caries, sucrose is the carbohydrate that contributes in the most significant manner to establishment, persistence, and virulence of the organism. However, because this organism produces multiple extracellular sucrolytic enzymes that can release hexoses from sucrose, it has not been possible to study the specific effects of sucrose transport and metabolism on gene expression in the absence of carbohydrates that by themselves can elicit catabolite repression and induce expression of multiple genes. By employing RNA deep-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology and mutants that lacked particular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, we compared the transcriptomes of S. mutans bacteria growing on glucose, fructose, or sucrose as the sole carbohydrate source. The results provide a variety of new insights into the impact of sucrose transport and metabolism by S. mutans, including the likely expulsion of fructose after sucrose internalization and hydrolysis, and identify a set of genes that are differentially regulated by sucrose versus fructose. The findings significantly enhance our understanding of the genetics and physiology of this cariogenic pathogen. PMID:26475108

  5. Effects of low-level laser therapy combined with toluidine blue on polysaccharides and biofilm of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Farias, S S; Nemezio, M A; Corona, S A M; Aires, C P; Borsatto, M C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-level laser therapy in combination with toluidine blue on polysaccharides and biofilm of Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans biofilms were formed on acrylic resin blocks. These biofilms were exposed eight times/day to 10 % sucrose, and two times/day, they were subjected to one of the following treatments: G1, 0.9 % NaCl as a negative control; G2, 0.12 % chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) as a positive antibacterial control; and G3 and G4 antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) combined with toluidine blue using dosages of 320 and 640 J/cm(2), respectively. The experiment was performed in triplicate. The biofilm formed on each block was collected for determination of the viable bacteria and concentration of insoluble extracellular polysaccharides (IEPS) and intracellular polysaccharides (IPS). CHX and aPDT treatments were able to inhibit bacterial growth in comparison with negative control (p < 0.05). The aPDT treatment reduced the number of viable bacteria formed in the S. mutans biofilm, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). The concentration of IEPS and IPS in the biofilms formed in presence of aPDT did not differ each other or in comparison to CHX (p > 0.05). The results suggest that low-level laser therapy presents effects on biofilm bacteria viability and in polysaccharides concentration. PMID:27147073

  6. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients.

  7. Action of silver nanoparticles towards biological systems: cytotoxicity evaluation using hen's egg test and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Freire, Priscila L L; Stamford, Thayza C M; Albuquerque, Allan J R; Sampaio, Fabio C; Cavalcante, Horacinna M M; Macedo, Rui O; Galembeck, André; Flores, Miguel A P; Rosenblatt, Aronita

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of four silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloids and their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel. The cytotoxicity of AgNPs was evaluated based on signs of vascular change on the chorioallantoic membrane using the hen's egg test (HET-CAM). Bactericidal properties and inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation were determined using a parallel-flow cell system and a dichromatic fluorescent stain. The percentage of viable cells was calculated from regression data generated from a viability standard. AgNP colloids proved to be non-irritating, as they were unable to promote vasoconstriction, haemorrhage or coagulation. AgNP colloids inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel, and cell viability measured by fluorescence was 0% for samples S1, S2, S3 and S4 and 36.5% for the positive control (diluted 30% silver diamine fluoride). AgNPs are new products with a low production cost because they have a lower concentration of silver, with low toxicity and an effective bactericidal effect against a cariogenic oral bacterium. Moreover, they do not promote colour change in dental enamel, which is an aesthetic advantage compared with traditional silver products. PMID:25455849

  8. Loss of NADH Oxidase Activity in Streptococcus mutans Leads to Rex-Mediated Overcompensation in NAD+ Regeneration by Lactate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Faustoferri, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans have determined that this Gram-positive facultative anaerobe mounts robust responses to both acid and oxidative stresses. The water-forming NADH oxidase (Nox; encoded by nox) is thought to be critical for the regeneration of NAD+, for use in glycolysis, and for the reduction of oxygen, thereby preventing the formation of damaging reactive oxygen species. In this study, the free NAD+/NADH ratio in a nox deletion strain (Δnox) was discovered to be remarkably higher than that in the parent strain, UA159, when the strains were grown in continuous culture. This unanticipated result was explained by significantly elevated lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh; encoded by ldh) activity and ldh transcription in the Δnox strain, which was mediated in part by the redox-sensing regulator Rex. cDNA microarray analysis of S. mutans cultures exposed to simultaneous acid stress (growth at a low pH) and oxidative stress (generated through the deletion of nox or the addition of exogenous oxygen) revealed a stress response synergistically heightened over that with either stress alone. In the Δnox strain, this elevated stress response included increased glucose phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (PTS) activity, which appeared to be due to elevated manL transcription, mediated in part, like elevated ldh transcription, by Rex. While the Δnox strain does possess a membrane composition different from that of the parent strain, it did not appear to have defects in either membrane permeability or ATPase activity. However, the altered transcriptome and metabolome of the Δnox strain were sufficient to impair its ability to compete with commensal peroxigenic oral streptococci during growth under aerobic conditions. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is an oral pathogen whose ability to outcompete commensal oral streptococci is strongly linked to the formation of dental caries. Previous work has demonstrated that the S

  9. The antibacterial effect of sage extract (Salvia officinalis) mouthwash against Streptococcus mutans in dental plaque: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti-Rouy, Maryam; Azarsina, Mohadese; Rezaie-Soufi, Loghman; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Roshanaie, Ghodratollah; Komaki, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical effects of a mouthwash containing Sage (Salvia officinalis) extracts on Streptococcus mutans (SM) causing dental plaque in school-aged children. Material and Methods: A double blind clinical trial study was conducted in a dormitory on 70 girls aged 11–14 years having the same socioeconomic and oral hygiene conditions. These students were randomly divided into 2 groups; the first group (N=35) using Sage mouthwash, and the second group (N=35) using placebo mouthwash without active any ingredients. At the baseline, plaque samples obtained from the buccal surfaces of teeth were sent to laboratory to achieve SM colony count. These tests were reevaluated after 21 days of using the mouthwashes. Statistical data analysis was performed using t-student tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: Sage mouthwash significantly reduced the colony count (P=0.001). Average number of colonies in test group was 3900 per plaque sample at the baseline, and 300 after mouthwash application. In the control group, pre-test colony count was 4400 that was reduced to 4000; although this reduction wasn't significant. Conclusion: The Sage mouthwash effectively reduced the number of Streptococcus mutans in dental plaque. PMID:26668706

  10. Molecular analysis of a Streptococcus mutans strain exhibiting polymorphism in the tandem gtfB and gtfC genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Y; Bowen, W H; Kuramitsu, H K

    1992-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans UA101, which was previously demonstrated to be highly cariogenic in gnotobiotic rats, exhibited much lower water-insoluble glucan (IG) synthetic activity compared with that of S. mutans GS5 and was unable to express sucrose-dependent colonization of smooth surfaces in vitro. On the basis of Southern and Western blot (immunoblot) analyses, it was demonstrated that, unlike most S. mutans strains, strain UA101 contained a single copy of a gene coding for IG synthesis. The gene was isolated from a clone bank constructed with the plasmid pTH10 clone bank in Escherichia coli and had apparently evolved after homologous recombination of the gtfB and gtfC genes present on the chromosome of a recent ancestor of strain UA101. The enzyme expressed from the gene, gtfBC, was purified to near homogeneity by utilizing a single-step preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system and was characterized. A derivative of strain UA101, UA101LBS, containing a chromosomal insertion of the GS5 gtfC gene was constructed after transformation. UA101LBS exhibited high IG synthetic activity and colonized smooth surfaces in vitro. By utilizing a conventional rat model system involving animals fed a high-sucrose diet, strain UA101 exhibited low levels of smooth surface caries activity relative to Streptococcus sobrinus 6715. By contrast, UA101LBS was as cariogenic as strain 6715. However, sulcal caries occurred equally well with all of the strains tested. These results are evaluated relative to the role of gtf gene products in cariogenicity. Images PMID:1532167

  11. Inhibited biofilm formation and improved antibacterial activity of a novel nanoemulsion against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Fei; Sun, Hong Wu; Gao, Rong; Liu, Kai Yun; Zhang, Hua Qi; Fu, Qi Huan; Qing, Sheng Li; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a novel nanoemulsion loaded with poorly water-soluble chlorhexidine acetate (CNE) to improve its solubility, and specifically enhance the antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans in vitro and in vivo. In this study, a novel CNE nanoemulsion with an average size of 63.13 nm and zeta potential of −67.13 mV comprising 0.5% CNE, 19.2% Tween 80, 4.8% propylene glycol, and 6% isopropyl myristate was prepared by the phase inversion method. Important characteristics such as the content, size, zeta potential, and pH value of CNE did not change markedly, stored at room temperature for 1 year. Also, compared with chlorhexidine acetate water solution (CHX), the release profile results show that the CNE has visibly delayed releasing effect in both phosphate-buffered saline and artificial saliva solutions (P<0.005). The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of CHX for S. mutans (both 0.8 μg/mL) are both two times those of CNE (0.4 μg/mL). Besides, CNE of 0.8 μg/mL exhibited fast-acting bactericidal efficacy against S. mutans, causing 95.07% death within 5 minutes, compared to CHX (73.33%) (P<0.01). We observed that 5 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL CNE were both superior to CHX, significantly reducing oral S. mutans numbers and reducing the severity of carious lesions in Sprague Dawley rats (P<0.05), in an in vivo test. CNE treatment at a concentration of 0.2 μg/mL inhibited biofilm formation more effectively than CHX, as indicated by the crystal violet staining method, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The cell membrane of S. mutans was also severely disrupted by 0.2 μg/mL CNE, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. These results demonstrated that CNE greatly improved the solubility and antimicrobial activity of this agent against S. mutans both in vitro and in vivo. This novel nanoemulsion is a promising medicine for preventing and curing dental caries. PMID:25624759

  12. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  13. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  14. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S F

    1992-01-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. Images PMID:1398915

  15. Effects of extracellular plaque components on the chlorhexidine sensitivity of strains of Streptococcus mutans and human dental plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, L.E.; Hume, W.R.

    1985-08-01

    An in vitro study was undertaken to determine the effects of sucrose-derived extracellular plaque components on the sensitivity of selected oral bacteria to chlorhexidine (CX). Cultures of Streptococcus mutans HS-6, OMZ-176, Ingbritt C, 6715-wt13, and pooled human plaque were grown in trypticase soy media with or without 1% sucrose. The sensitivity to CX of bacteria grown in each medium was determined by fixed-time exposure to CX and subsequent measurement of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake. One-hour exposure to CX at concentrations of 10(-4) M (0.01% w/v) or greater substantially inhibited subsequent cellular division among all the S. mutans strains and human plaque samples tested. An IC50 (the CX concentration which depressed /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation to 50% of control level) of close to 10(-4) M was noted for S. mutans strains HS-6, OMZ-176, and 6715-wt13 when grown in the presence of sucrose. The same strains grown in cultures without added sucrose showed about a ten-fold greater sensitivity to CX (IC50 close to 10(-5) M). A three-fold difference was noted for S. mutans Ingbritt C. Only a slight increase in the IC50 was noted for the plaque samples cultured in sucrose-containing media, but their threshold for depression of /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake by CX was lower than that for the sucrose-free plaque samples. The study showed that extracellular products confer some protection against CX to the bacteria examined, and provided an explanation for the disparity between clinically-recommended concentrations for plaque suppression and data on in vitro susceptibility.

  16. The GlnR Regulon in Streptococcus mutans Is Differentially Regulated by GlnR and PmrA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Chen, Yueh-Ying; Hung, Jui-Lung; Chen, Pei-Min; Chia, Jean-San

    2016-01-01

    GlnR-mediated repression of the GlnR regulon at acidic pH is required for optimal acid tolerance in Streptococcus mutans, the etiologic agent for dental caries. Unlike most streptococci, the GlnR regulon is also regulated by newly identified PmrA (SMUGS5_RS05810) at the transcriptional level in S. mutans GS5. Results from gel mobility shift assays confirmed that both GlnR and PmrA recognized the putative GlnR box in the promoter regions of the GlnR regulon genes. By using a chemostat culture system, we found that PmrA activated the expression of the GlnR regulon at pH 7, and that this activation was enhanced by excess glucose. Deletion of pmrA (strain ΔPmrA) reduced the survival rate of S. mutans GS5 at pH 3 moderately, whereas the GlnR mutant (strain ΔGlnR) exhibited an acid-sensitive phenotype in the acid killing experiments. Elevated biofilm formation in both ΔGlnR and ΔPmrA mutant strains is likely a result of indirect regulation of the GlnR regulon since GlnR and PmrA regulate the regulon differently. Taken together, it is suggested that activation of the GlnR regulon by PmrA at pH 7 ensures adequate biosynthesis of amino acid precursor, whereas repression by GlnR at acidic pH allows greater ATP generation for acid tolerance. The tight regulation of the GlnR regulon in response to pH provides an advantage for S. mutans to better survive in its primary niche, the oral cavity. PMID:27454482

  17. Contribution of the Interaction of Streptococcus mutans Serotype k Strains with Fibrinogen to the Pathogenicity of Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Otsugu, Masatoshi; Naka, Shuhei; Teramoto, Noboru; Kojima, Ayuchi; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Ooshima, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen responsible for dental caries, is occasionally isolated from the blood of patients with bacteremia and infective endocarditis (IE). Our previous study demonstrated that serotype k-specific bacterial DNA is frequently detected in S. mutans-positive heart valve specimens extirpated from IE patients. However, the reason for this frequent detection remains unknown. In the present study, we analyzed the virulence of IE from S. mutans strains, focusing on the characterization of serotype k strains, most of which are positive for the 120-kDa cell surface collagen-binding protein Cbm and negative for the 190-kDa protein antigen (PA) known as SpaP, P1, antigen I/II, and other designations. Fibrinogen-binding assays were performed with 85 clinical strains classified by Cbm and PA expression levels. The Cbm+/PA− group strains had significantly higher fibrinogen-binding rates than the other groups. Analysis of platelet aggregation revealed that SA31, a Cbm+/PA− strain, induced an increased level of aggregation in the presence of fibrinogen, while negligible aggregation was induced by the Cbm-defective isogenic mutant SA31CBD. A rat IE model with an artificial impairment of the aortic valve created using a catheter showed that extirpated heart valves in the SA31 group displayed a prominent vegetation mass not seen in those in the SA31CBD group. These findings could explain why Cbm+/PA− strains are highly virulent and are related to the development of IE, and the findings could also explain the frequent detection of serotype k DNA in S. mutans-positive heart valve clinical specimens. PMID:25287921

  18. Ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid isolated from Iostephane heterophylla as a promising antibacterial agent against Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Dulce M; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Rivero-Cruz, Blanca E; Bye, Robert A; Aguilar, María Isabel; Rivero-Cruz, J Fausto

    2012-04-01

    From the roots of Iostephane heterophylla, six known compounds, namely, ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid (1), the mixture of ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (2) and ent-beyer-15-en-19-oic acid (3), xanthorrhizol (4), 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane (5) and 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaur-11-en-19-oic acid (6) were isolated using a bioassay-guided fractionation method. The known compounds (1-6) were identified by comparison of their spectroscopic data with reported values in the literature. In an attempt to increase the resultant antimicrobial activity of 1 and 4, a series of reactions was performed on ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid (1) and xanthorrhizol (4), to obtain derivatives 1a, 1b, and 4a-4d. All the isolated compounds (1-6) and the derivatives 1a, 1b, and 4a-4d were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against two oral pathogens, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with caries and periodontal disease, respectively. Compounds 1, 1b, 2+3, 4 and 4d inhibited the growth of S. mutans with concentrations ranging from 4.1 μg/mL to 70.5 μg/mL. No significant activity was found on P. gingivalis except for 4 with an MIC of 6.8 μg/mL. The ability of 1, 1b, 2+3, 4 and 4d to inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans was evaluated. It was found that 1, 1b, 4 and 4d interfered with the establishment of S. mutans biofilms, inhibiting their development at 32.5, 125.0, 14.1 and 24.4 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:22245083

  19. Identification and characterization of a surface protein-releasing activity in Streptococcus mutans and other pathogenic streptococci.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F

    1992-10-01

    Surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans have been reported to be released into the culture filtrate at concentrations that vary with the growth conditions. The reason for this is not clear. The present study attempts to investigate the mechanism of the protein release. The results showed that whole cells and raffinose-stabilized protoplasts of S. mutans NG8, when incubated in buffers, were capable of releasing their surface proteins in a pH-dependent manner with optimal release at pH 5 to 6. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that the released proteins were very complex. Two proteins, adhesin P1, which has been previously shown to interact with a human salivary agglutinin, and glucosyltransferase have been identified among the released proteins. The release of adhesin P1 and other proteins was found to be inhibited by heat, Cu2+,Zn2+, and thiol-blocking reagents. The inhibition by heat and Cu2+ was irreversible, whereas that by the thiol-blocking reagents was reversible. EDTA, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, and N-p-tosyl-L-lysyl-chloromethyl ketone had no effect on the release of P1, indicating that the release was probably not due to proteolytic activity. Adhesin P1 from Cu(2+)-inactivated S. mutans NG8 protoplasts could be released by mixing with fresh whole cells and protoplasts, but not the culture filtrate, of a P1-negative mutant of NG8, suggesting that the enzyme is located on the cell surface. This P1-releasing activity was also detected in two other strains of S. mutans and one strain each of S. gordonii, S. agalactiae, S. pneumoniae, and S. pyogenes. The biological role(s) of this enzyme activity remains to be determined. However, owing to its ability to release virulent surface proteins from the cell, it may play an important role in cell surface modulation among the pathogenic streptococci. PMID:1398915

  20. The ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Streptococcus mutans provides evidence for the regulation of polysaccharide biosynthesis in Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Asención Diez, Matías D; Demonte, Ana M; Guerrero, Sergio A; Ballicora, Miguel A; Iglesias, Alberto A

    2013-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the leading cause of dental caries worldwide. The bacterium accumulates a glycogen-like internal polysaccharide, which mainly contributes to its carionegic capacity. S.mutans has two genes (glgC and glgD) respectively encoding putative ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (ADP-Glc PPase), a key enzyme for glycogen synthesis in most bacteria. Herein, we report the molecular cloning and recombinant expression of both genes (separately or together) followed by the characterization of the respective enzymes. When expressed individually GlgC had ADP-Glc PPase activity, whereas GlgD was inactive. Interestingly, the coexpressed GlgC/GlgD protein was one order of magnitude more active than GlgC alone. Kinetic characterization of GlgC and GlgC/GlgD pointed out remarkable differences between them. Fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate activated GlgC by twofold, but had no effect on GlgC/GlgD. Conversely, phospho-enol-pyruvate and inorganic salts inhibited GlgC/GlgD without affecting GlgC. However, in the presence of fructose-1,6-bis-phosphate GlgC acquired a GlgC/GlgD-like behaviour, becoming sensitive to the stated inhibitors. Results indicate that S. mutans ADP-Glc PPase is an allosteric regulatory enzyme exhibiting sensitivity to modulation by key intermediates of carbohydrates metabolism in the cell. The particular regulatory properties of the S.mutans enzyme agree with phylogenetic analysis, where GlgC and GlgD proteins found in other Firmicutes arrange in distinctive clusters. PMID:24112771

  1. The GlnR Regulon in Streptococcus mutans Is Differentially Regulated by GlnR and PmrA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Chen, Yueh-Ying; Hung, Jui-Lung; Chen, Pei-Min; Chia, Jean-San

    2016-01-01

    GlnR-mediated repression of the GlnR regulon at acidic pH is required for optimal acid tolerance in Streptococcus mutans, the etiologic agent for dental caries. Unlike most streptococci, the GlnR regulon is also regulated by newly identified PmrA (SMUGS5_RS05810) at the transcriptional level in S. mutans GS5. Results from gel mobility shift assays confirmed that both GlnR and PmrA recognized the putative GlnR box in the promoter regions of the GlnR regulon genes. By using a chemostat culture system, we found that PmrA activated the expression of the GlnR regulon at pH 7, and that this activation was enhanced by excess glucose. Deletion of pmrA (strain ΔPmrA) reduced the survival rate of S. mutans GS5 at pH 3 moderately, whereas the GlnR mutant (strain ΔGlnR) exhibited an acid-sensitive phenotype in the acid killing experiments. Elevated biofilm formation in both ΔGlnR and ΔPmrA mutant strains is likely a result of indirect regulation of the GlnR regulon since GlnR and PmrA regulate the regulon differently. Taken together, it is suggested that activation of the GlnR regulon by PmrA at pH 7 ensures adequate biosynthesis of amino acid precursor, whereas repression by GlnR at acidic pH allows greater ATP generation for acid tolerance. The tight regulation of the GlnR regulon in response to pH provides an advantage for S. mutans to better survive in its primary niche, the oral cavity. PMID:27454482

  2. Inhibition of Major Virulence Pathways of Streptococcus mutans by Quercitrin and Deoxynojirimycin: A Synergistic Approach of Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Sadaf; Singh, Kunal; Danisuddin, Mohd; Verma, Praveen K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the synergistic effect of Quercitrin and Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) together with their individual inhibitory effect against virulence pathways of Streptococcus mutans. Methodology MICs of both the compounds were determined by the microdilution method, followed by their in vitrosynergy using checkerboard and time kill assay. The nature of interaction was classified as synergistic on the basis of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) value of ≤0.5. Furthermore, the activity of Quercitrin and DNJ was evaluated individually and in combination against various cariogenic properties of S. mutans UA159 such as acidogenesis, aciduracity, glucan production, hydrophobicity, biofilm and adherence. Moreover, expression of virulent genes in S. mutans was analysed by quantitative RT- PCR (qRT-PCR) and inhibition of F1F0-ATPase, lactate dehydrogenase and enolase was also evaluated. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate structural obliteration of biofilm. Results The in vitro synergism between Quercitrin and DNJ was observed, with a FICI of 0.313. Their MIC values were found to be 64 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml respectively. The synergistic combination consistently showed best activity against all the virulence factors as compared to Quercitrin and DNJ individually. A reduction in glucan synthesis and biofilm formation was observed at different phases of growth. The qRT-PCR revealed significant downregulation of various virulent genes. Electron micrographs depicted the obliteration of biofilm as compared to control and the activity of cariogenic enzymes was also inhibited. Conclusions The whole study reflects a prospective role of Quercitrin and DNJ in combination as a potent anticariogenic agent against S. mutans. PMID:24622055

  3. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  4. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss. PMID:27129365

  5. Streptococcus oralis and Candida albicans Synergistically Activate μ-Calpain to Degrade E-cadherin From Oral Epithelial Junctions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongbin; Sobue, Takanori; Bertolini, Martinna; Thompson, Angela; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2016-09-15

    Streptococcus oralis forms robust mucosal biofilms with Candida albicans that have increased pathogenic potential. In this study, using oral epithelial cultures, organotypic oral mucosal constructs, and a mouse model of oral infection, we demonstrated that S. oralis augmented C. albicans invasion through epithelial junctions. C. albicans and S. oralis decreased epithelial E-cadherin levels by synergistically increasing µ-calpain, a proteolytic enzyme that targets E-cadherin. In the mouse coinfection model this was accompanied by increased fungal kidney dissemination. Coinfection with a secreted aspartyl protease (sap) mutant sap2456 and S. oralis increased μ-calpain and triggered mucosal invasion and systemic dissemination, suggesting that fungal protease activity is not required for invasion during coinfection. We conclude that C. albicans and S. oralis synergize to activate host enzymes that cleave epithelial junction proteins and increase fungal invasion. PMID:27190184

  6. Isolation and purification of Flavobacterium alpha-1,3-glucanase-hydrolyzing, insoluble, sticky glucan of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebisu, S; Kato, K; Kotani, S; Misaki, A

    1975-01-01

    Studies were made on the physical and chemical properties of polysaccharides synthesized by cell-free extracts of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus sp. and their susceptibilities to dextranases. Among the polysaccharides examined, insoluble glucans were rather resistant to available dextranase preparations, and the insoluble, sticky glucan produced by S. mutans OMZ 176, which could be important in formation of dental plaques, was the most resistant. By enrichment culture of soil specimens, using OMZ 176 glucans as the sole carbon source, an organism was isolated that produced colonies surrounded by a clear lytic zone on opaque agar plates containing the OMZ 176 glucan. The organism was identified as a strain of Flavobacterium and named the Ek-14 bacterium. EK-14 bacterium was grown in Trypticase soy broth, and an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing the OMZ 176 glucan was concentrated from the culture supernatant and purified by negative adsorption on a diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DE-32) column and gradient elution chromatography with a carboxymethyl-cellulose (CM-32) column. The enzyme was a basic protein with an isoelectric point of pH 8.5 and molecular weight of 65,000. Its optimum pH was 6.3 and its optimal temperature was 42 C. The purified enzyme released 11% of the total glucose residues of the OMZ 176 glucan as reducing sugars and solubilized about half of the substrate glucan. The products were found to be isomaltose, nigerose, and nigerotriose, with some oligosaccharides. The purified enzyme split the alpha-1,3-glucan endolytically and was inactive toward glucans containing alpha-1,6, alpha-1,4, beta-1,3, beta-1,4, and/or beta-1,6 bonds as the main linkages. Images PMID:370

  7. Inhibition of Peptidoglycan, Ribonucleic Acid, and Protein Synthesis in Tolerant Strains of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mychajlonka, Myron; McDowell, Thomas D.; Shockman, Gerald D.

    1980-01-01

    Exposure of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans strains FA-1 and GS-5 to various concentrations of benzylpenicillin (Pen G) resulted in inhibition of turbidity increases at low concentrations (0.02 to 0.04 μg/ml). However, in contrast to some other streptococcal species, growth inhibition was not accompanied by cellular lysis or by a rapid loss of viability. In both strains, synthesis of insoluble cell wall peptidoglycan was very sensitive to Pen G inhibition and responded in a dose-dependent manner to concentrations of about 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml for strains GS-5 and FA-1, respectively. Higher Pen G concentrations failed to inhibit further either growth or insoluble peptidoglycan assembly. Somewhat surprisingly, Pen G also inhibited both ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein syntheses, each in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis, inhibition of RNA and protein syntheses by Pen G was less rapid and less extensive. Maximum amounts of radiolabeled Pen G were specifically bound to intact cells upon exposure to about 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml of Pen G for strains GS-5 and FA-1, respectively, concentrations consistent with those that resulted in maximum or near-maximum inhibitions of the synthesis of cellular peptidoglycan, RNA, and protein. Five polypeptide bands that had a very high affinity for [14C]Pen G were detected in a crude cell envelope preparation of strain FA-1. After exposure of cultures of strain FA-1 to the effects of saturating concentrations of the drug for up to 3 h, addition of penicillinase was followed by recovery of growth after a lag. The length of the lag before regrowth depended on both Pen G concentration and time of exposure. On the basis of these and other observations, it is proposed that the secondary inhibitions of cellular RNA or protein synthesis, or both, are involved in the tolerance of these organisms to lysis and killing by Pen G and other inhibitors of insoluble peptidoglycan assembly

  8. Biosynthesis and Transport of the Lantibiotic Mutacin 1140 Produced by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that is cleaved to yield the active antibacterial peptide. Significant advancements in molecular tools that promote the study of lantibiotic biosynthesis can be used in Streptococcus mutans. Herein, we further our understanding of leader peptide sequence and core peptide structural requirements for the biosynthesis and transport of the lantibiotic mutacin 1140. Our study on mutacin 1140 biosynthesis shows a dedicated secondary cleavage site within the leader peptide and the dependency of transport on core peptide posttranslational modifications (PTMs). The secondary cleavage site on the leader peptide is found at the −9 position, and secondary cleavage occurs before the core peptide is transported out of the cell. The coordinated cleavage at the −9 position was absent in a lanT deletion strain, suggesting that the core peptide interaction with the LanT transporter enables uniform cleavage at the −9 position. Following transport, the LanP protease was found to be tolerant to a wide variety of amino acid substitutions at the primary leader peptide cleavage site, with the exception of arginine at the −1 position. Several leader and core peptide mutations produced core peptide variants that had intermediate stages of PTM enzyme modifications, supporting the concept that PTM enzyme modifications, secondary cleavage, and transport are occurring in a highly coordinated fashion. IMPORTANCE Mutacin 1140 belongs to the class I lantibiotic family of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs). The biosynthesis of mutacin 1140 is a highly efficient process which does not lead to a discernible level of production of partially modified core peptide variants. The products isolated from an extensive mutagenesis study on the leader and core peptides of mutacin 1140 show that the posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on the core

  9. Co-induction of beta-galactosidase and the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system in Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, I R; Lo, G C

    1978-01-01

    The addition of lactose, galactose, or isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) to glucose-grown cells of Streptococcus salivarius 25975 resulted in the co-induction of both the lactose-P-enolpyruvate phosphotransferase system (lactose-PTS) and beta-galactosidase, with the latter the predominant metabolic system. With various strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis 10556, on the other hand, the lactose-PTS was the major metabolic pathway with beta-galactosidase induced either to low or negligible levels. In all cases, induction of the lactose-PTS resulted in the concomitant induction of 6-P-beta-galactosidase. The induction by lactose of both the lactose-PTS and beta-galactosidase in all strains was repressed by glucose and other catabolites, notably, fructose. Induction of beta-galactosidase in S. salivarius 25975 by IPTG was, however, relatively resistant to glucose repression. Induction experiments with IPTG and lactose suggested that a cellular metabolite of lactose metabolism was a repressor of enzyme activity. Exogenous cAMP was shown to reverse the transient repression by glucose of beta-galactosidase induction in cells of S. salivarius 25975 receiving lactose, provided the cells were grown with small amounts of toluene to overcome the permeability barrier to this nucleotide, cAMP, was however, unable to overcome the permanent repression of beta-galactosidase activity to a significant extent under these conditions. PMID:214423

  10. Proteome Analysis Identifies the Dpr Protein of Streptococcus mutans as an Important Factor in the Presence of Early Streptococcal Colonizers of Tooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Niki, Mamiko; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yasunaga, Ai; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Oral streptococci are primary colonizers of tooth surfaces and Streptococcus mutans is the principal causative agent of dental caries in humans. A number of proteins are involved in the formation of monospecies biofilms by S. mutans. This study analyzed the protein expression profiles of S. mutans biofilms formed in the presence or absence of S. gordonii, a pioneer colonizer of the tooth surface, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). After identifying S. mutans proteins by Mass spectrometric analysis, their expression in the presence of S. gordonii was analyzed. S. mutans was inoculated with or without S. gordonii DL1. The two species were compartmentalized using 0.2-μl Anopore membranes. The biofilms on polystyrene plates were harvested, and the solubilized proteins were separated by 2-DE. When S. mutans biofilms were formed in the presence of S. gordonii, the peroxide resistance protein Dpr of the former showed 4.3-fold increased expression compared to biofilms that developed in the absence of the pioneer colonizer. In addition, we performed a competition assay using S. mutans antioxidant protein mutants together with S. gordonii and other initial colonizers. Growth of the dpr-knockout S. mutans mutant was significantly inhibited by S. gordonii, as well as by S. sanguinis. Furthermore, a cell viability assay revealed that the viability of the dpr-defective mutant was significantly attenuated compared to the wild-type strain when co-cultured with S. gordonii. Therefore, these results suggest that Dpr might be one of the essential proteins for S. mutans survival on teeth in the presence of early colonizing oral streptococci. PMID:25816242

  11. Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces oris modulates early biofilm development on denture material.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Nobbs, Angela H; Ricomini-Filho, Antônio Pedro; Jenkinson, Howard F; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. oris on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. oris were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces. PMID:26755532

  12. Regulated proteolysis of the alternative sigma factor SigX in Streptococcus mutans: implication in the escape from competence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SigX (σX), the alternative sigma factor of Streptococcus mutans, is the key regulator for transcriptional activation of late competence genes essential for taking up exogenous DNA. Recent studies reveal that adaptor protein MecA and the protease ClpC act as negative regulators of competence by a mechanism that involves MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX by the ClpC in S. mutans. However, the molecular detail how MecA and ClpC negatively regulate competence in this species remains to be determined. Here, we provide evidence that adaptor protein MecA targets SigX for degradation by the protease complex ClpC/ClpP when S. mutans is grown in a complex medium. Results By analyzing the cellular levels of SigX, we demonstrate that the synthesis of SigX is transiently induced by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), but the SigX is rapidly degraded during the escape from competence. A deletion of MecA, ClpC or ClpP results in the cellular accumulation of SigX and a prolonged competence state, while an overexpression of MecA enhances proteolysis of SigX and accelerates the escape from competence. In vitro protein-protein interaction assays confirm that MecA interacts with SigX via its N-terminal domain (NTD1–82) and with ClpC via its C-terminal domain (CTD123–240). Such an interaction mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex, triggering the ATP-dependent degradation of SigX in the presence of ClpP. A deletion of the N-terminal or C-terminal domain of MecA abolishes its binding to SigX or ClpC. We have also found that MecA-regulated proteolysis of SigX appears to be ineffective when S. mutans is grown in a chemically defined medium (CDM), suggesting the possibility that an unknown mechanism may be involved in negative regulation of MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX under this condition. Conclusion Adaptor protein MecA in S. mutans plays a crucial role in recognizing and targeting SigX for degradation by the protease ClpC/ClpP. Thus, Mec

  13. Identification of monoclonal antibody-binding domains within antigen P1 of Streptococcus mutans and cross-reactivity with related surface antigens of oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, L J; Piacentini, D A; Crowley, P J; Bleiweis, A S

    1991-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for P1, the major protein surface antigen of Streptococcus mutans serotype c, were characterized by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis and by radioimmunoassay using whole bacterial cells. The approximate binding domains of the MAbs were determined by using full-length and truncated P1 polypeptides. The accessibility of these binding sites on the surfaces of intact bacteria was determined by radioimmunoassay. The ability of each MAb to cross-react with related proteins from strains of S. mutans serotypes e and f, S. sanguis, and S. sobrinus serotype g is also reported. Images PMID:1937801

  14. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a novel type of Mutanase from Paenibacillus sp. strain RM1: identification of its mutan-binding domain, essential for degradation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shimotsuura, Isao; Kigawa, Hiromitsu; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Nakashima, Syozi

    2008-05-01

    A novel type of mutanase (termed mutanase RM1) was isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain RM1. The purified enzyme specifically hydrolyzed alpha-1,3-glucan (mutan) and effectively degraded biofilms formed by Streptococcus mutans, a major etiologic agent in the progression of dental caries, even following brief incubation. The nucleotide sequence of the gene for this protein contains a 3,873-bp open reading frame encoding 1,291 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 135 kDa. The protein contains two major domains, the N-terminal domain (277 residues) and the C-terminal domain (937 residues), separated by a characteristic sequence composed of proline and threonine repeats. The characterization of the recombinant proteins for each domain which were expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the N-terminal domain had strong mutan-binding activity but no mutanase activity whereas the C-terminal domain was responsible for mutanase activity but had mutan-binding activity significantly lower than that of the intact protein. Importantly, the biofilm-degrading activity observed with the intact protein was not exhibited by either domain alone or in combination with the other. Therefore, these results indicate that the structural integrity of mutanase RM1 containing the N-terminal mutan-binding domain is required for the biofilm-degrading activity. PMID:18326674

  15. Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel Type of Mutanase from Paenibacillus sp. Strain RM1: Identification of Its Mutan-Binding Domain, Essential for Degradation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms▿

    PubMed Central

    Shimotsuura, Isao; Kigawa, Hiromitsu; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Kuramitsu, Howard K.; Nakashima, Syozi

    2008-01-01

    A novel type of mutanase (termed mutanase RM1) was isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain RM1. The purified enzyme specifically hydrolyzed α-1,3-glucan (mutan) and effectively degraded biofilms formed by Streptococcus mutans, a major etiologic agent in the progression of dental caries, even following brief incubation. The nucleotide sequence of the gene for this protein contains a 3,873-bp open reading frame encoding 1,291 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 135 kDa. The protein contains two major domains, the N-terminal domain (277 residues) and the C-terminal domain (937 residues), separated by a characteristic sequence composed of proline and threonine repeats. The characterization of the recombinant proteins for each domain which were expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the N-terminal domain had strong mutan-binding activity but no mutanase activity whereas the C-terminal domain was responsible for mutanase activity but had mutan-binding activity significantly lower than that of the intact protein. Importantly, the biofilm-degrading activity observed with the intact protein was not exhibited by either domain alone or in combination with the other. Therefore, these results indicate that the structural integrity of mutanase RM1 containing the N-terminal mutan-binding domain is required for the biofilm-degrading activity. PMID:18326674

  16. Mechanism of Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Smooth Surfaces I. Roles of Insoluble Dextran-Levan Synthetase Enzymes and Cell Wall Polysaccharide Antigen in Plaque Formation

    PubMed Central

    Mukasa, Hidehiko; Slade, Hutton D.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanism of adherence of Streptococcus mutans to smooth glass surfaces has been studied. The results with both viable and heat-killed cells showed that the process required (i) the synthesis of a water-insoluble dextran-levan polymer by cell-bound enzymes and (ii) the participation of a binding site on the surface of the S. mutans cell. Synthesis of the polymer from sucrose in the presence of the cells was required for adherence, and indicates that an “active” form of the polymer was required. Polymer synthesized by cell-free S. mutans enzymes when added to S. mutans cells did not produce adherence. Purified antibody globulin, specific for the a-d site in the polysaccharide S. mutans group a antigen, completely inhibited adherence. Antibody to the second antigen present in the polysaccharide molecule, the a antigen, did not inhibit adherence. The evidence indicates that adherence did not require an antigenic binding site which might be common to all S. mutans strains. The orientation of the synthetase enzyme(s), antigenic binding site, and dextran-levan polymer on the cell surface is under study. Images PMID:4582634

  17. Comparing the efficacy of xylitol-containing and conventional chewing gums in reducing salivary counts of Streptococcus mutans: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Rosa; Afshari, Elahe; Ghanaat, Tahere; Aghazadeh, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Dental caries is among the most common chronic diseases in humans. Streptococcus mutans is generally responsible for most cases of dental caries. The present study sought to compare the effects of xylitol-containing and conventional chewing gums on salivary levels of S. mutans. Materials and Methods: This study adopted a crossover design. Two type of chewing gums (one containing 70% xylitol and approved by the Iranian Dental Association, and another containing sucrose) were purchased. The participants were 32 individuals aged 18–35 years whose oral hygiene was categorized as moderate or poor based on a caries risk assessment table. Salivary levels of S. mutans were measured at baseline, after the first and second phases of chewing gums, and after the washout period. The measurements were performed on blood agar and mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar (MSBA). Pairwise comparisons were then used to analyze the collected data. Results: Salivary levels of S. mutans in both groups were significantly higher during the two stages of chewing gum than in the washout period or baseline. Moreover, comparisons between the two types of gums suggested that chewing xylitol-containing gums led to greater reductions in S. mutans counts. This effect was more apparent in subjects with poor oral hygiene than in those with moderate oral hygiene. Conclusions: Xylitol-containing chewing gums are more effective than conventional gums in reducing salivary levels of S. mutans in individuals with poor–moderate oral hygiene. PMID:26942114

  18. Deletion of gtfC of Streptococcus mutans has no influence on the composition of a mixed-species in vitro biofilm model of supragingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Van Der Ploeg, Jan R; Guggenheim, Bernhard

    2004-10-01

    Glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans are thought to play an important role in bacterial adherence to the tooth surface. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of the deletion of the gtfC gene, which encodes a glucosyltransferase that catalyses primarily the formation of insoluble glucan (mutan), on colonization of S. mutans in a mixed-species biofilm model of supragingival plaque. A gtfC deletion mutant of S. mutans UA159 grew poorly in biofilms on a polystyrene surface in Todd-Hewitt medium containing sucrose, but biofilm formation in the semi-defined fluid universal medium (FUM) was not affected. The S. mutans gtfC mutant colonized with the same efficiency as the wild-type strain when grown together with five other species in a mixed-species biofilm on hydroxyapatite in a mixture of FUM and saliva with pulses of sucrose and showed the same ability to demineralize enamel in vitro. Colonization of mutant and wild-type strains was also equal in an association experiment in specific-pathogen-free rats. However, the gtfC mutant gave rise to more dentinal fissure lesions and smooth surface caries than the wild-type strain; this could be caused by a change in diffusion properties as a result of to the lack of mutan. PMID:15458503

  19. SO-LAAO, a novel L-amino acid oxidase that enables Streptococcus oligofermentans to outcompete Streptococcus mutans by generating H2O2 from peptone.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huichun; Chen, Wei; Shi, Wenyuan; Qi, Fengxia; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2008-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that Streptococcus oligofermentans suppressed the growth of Streptococcus mutans, the primary cariogenic pathogen, by producing hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) through lactate oxidase activity. In this study, we found that the lox mutant of S. oligofermentans regained the inhibition while growing on peptone-rich plates. Further studies demonstrated that the H(2)O(2) produced on peptone by S. oligofermentans was mainly derived from seven L-amino acids, i.e., L-aspartic acid, L-tryptophan, L-lysine, L-isoleucine, L-arginine, L-asparagine, and L-glutamine, indicating the possible existence of L-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) that can produce H(2)O(2) from L-amino acids. Through searching the S. oligofermentans genome for open reading frames with a conserved flavin adenine dinucleotide binding motif that exists in the known LAAOs, including those of snake venom, fungi, and bacteria, a putative LAAO gene, assigned as aao(So), was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, SO-LAAO, showed a molecular mass of 43 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and catalyzed H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids determined above, thus confirming its LAAO activity. The SO-LAAO identified in S. oligofermentans differed evidently from the known LAAOs in both substrate profile and sequence, suggesting that it could represent a novel LAAO. An aao(So) mutant of S. oligofermentans did lose H(2)O(2) formation from the seven L-amino acids, further verifying its function as an LAAO. Furthermore, the inhibition by S. oligofermentans of S. mutans in a peptone-rich mixed-species biofilm was greatly reduced for the aao(So) mutant, indicating the gene's importance in interspecies competition. PMID:18469105

  20. Construction and characterization of isogenic mutants of Streptococcus mutans deficient in major surface protein antigen P1 (I/II).

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S F; Progulske-Fox, A; Erdos, G W; Piacentini, D A; Ayakawa, G Y; Crowley, P J; Bleiweis, A S

    1989-01-01

    The gene (spaP) coding for the Streptococcus mutans major surface protein antigen P1 (or I/II) has been cloned into Escherichia coli (S. F. Lee, A. Progulske-Fox, and A. S. Bleiweis, Infect. Immun. 56:2114-2119, 1988). In the present study, this gene has been disrupted in vitro by insertional inactivation with pVA981, which carries a Tcr marker, and transformed into S. mutans NG8 (serotype c) by electroporation. Upon homologous recombination, the defective spaP was integrated into the genome as demonstrated by Southern hybridization analysis. One Tcr mutant, designated 834, selected by its nonreactivity with anti-P1 monoclonal antibodies, was found to lack the cell surface fuzzy layer which was clearly present on the parent cells. Analysis of extracellular fluids, sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized membranes, and cytoplasmic fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that 834 had protein profiles identical to the parent. However, a 185-kilodalton protein which reacts with anti-P1 antibodies was missing from the wall of 834, suggesting that spaP has been specifically inactivated. This mutant displayed levels of glucosyltransferase and fructosyltransferase activities similar to those of the parent. It was much less hydrophobic than the parent. S. mutans NG8 aggregated readily in the presence of clarified whole saliva or a high-molecular-weight salivary agglutinin. This strain also adhered to agglutinin-coated hydroxyapatite. The P1-negative mutants, however, did not display these two properties, suggesting that P1 may play a role in saliva-mediated aggregation and adherence. Images PMID:2807526

  1. Regulation of Bacteriocin Production and Cell Death by the VicRK Signaling System in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, D. B.; Cordova, M.; Ayala, E. A.; Chávez de Paz, L. E.; Singh, K.; Downey, J. S.; Svensäter, G.; Goodman, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    The VicRK two-component signaling system modulates biofilm formation, genetic competence, and stress tolerance in Streptococcus mutans. We show here that the VicRK modulates bacteriocin production and cell viability, in part by direct modulation of competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) production in S. mutans. Global transcriptome and real-time transcriptional analysis of the VicK-deficient mutant (SmuvicK) revealed significant modulation of several bacteriocin-related loci, including nlmAB, nlmC, and nlmD (P < 0.001), suggesting a role for the VicRK in producing mutacins IV, V, and VI. Bacteriocin overlay assays revealed an altered ability of the vic mutants to kill related species. Since a well-conserved VicR binding site (TGTWAH-N5-TGTWAH) was identified within the comC coding region, we confirmed VicR binding to this sequence using DNA footprinting. Overexpression of the vic operon caused growth-phase-dependent repression of comC, comDE, and comX. In the vic mutants, transcription of nlmC/cipB encoding mutacin V, previously linked to CSP-dependent cell lysis, as well as expression of its putative immunity factor encoded by immB, were significantly affected relative to the wild type (P < 0.05). In contrast to previous reports that proposed a hyper-resistant phenotype for the VicK mutant in cell viability, the release of extracellular genomic DNA was significantly enhanced in SmuvicK (P < 0.05), likely as a result of increased autolysis compared with the parent. The drastic influence of VicRK on cell viability was also demonstrated using vic mutant biofilms. Taken together, we have identified a novel regulatory link between the VicRK and ComDE systems to modulate bacteriocin production and cell viability of S. mutans. PMID:22228735

  2. Effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-producing property of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Deepak; Singh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-formation property of Streptococcus mutans. A total of 30 clinical isolates were identified as S. mutans and screened for biofilm formation using the microtiter plate method. The strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was used for identifying both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC). We subsequently used this concentration against each of the strong biofilm producer isolates at A 492 < 0.5 optical density (OD). Of the 30 isolates screened for biofilm formation, 18 isolates showed strong biofilm formation, 09 isolates showed moderate formation, and 03 isolates showed poor/nonbiofilm formation. The MIC of embelin for the strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was 0.55 ± 0.02, whereas that of piperine was 0.33 ± 0.02. The MBIC of embelin was 0.0620 ± 0.03, whereas that of piperine was 0.0407 ± 0.03, which was lower than that of embelin. At OD492 < 0.5, the MBIC of both compounds significantly inhibited biofilm formation of all the 18 strong biofilm-forming isolates. The results of this study demonstrate a significant antibiofilm effect of the natural compounds embelin and piperine, which can contribute towards the development of a database for novel drug candidates for treating oral infections caused by S. mutans. PMID:26870681

  3. Characterization of the sat Operon in Streptococcus mutans: Evidence for a Role of Ffh in Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Bas H. A.; van der Kraan, Marieke; Crowley, Paula J.; Hamilton, Ian R.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Bleiweis, Arnold S.

    2001-01-01

    An essential protein translocation pathway in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis involves the signal recognition particle (SRP), of which the 54-kDa homolog (Ffh) is an essential component. In a previous study, we found that a transposon insertion in the ylxM-ffh intergenic region of the designated secretion and acid tolerance (sat) operon of Streptococcus mutans resulted in an acid-sensitive phenotype. In the present study, we further characterized this genomic region in S. mutans after construction of bonafide sat operon mutants and confirmed the role of the SRP pathway in acid resistance. Northern blot and primer extension analyses identified an acid-inducible promoter upstream of ylxM that was responsible for upregulating the coordinate expression of all five genes of the sat operon when cells were grown at acid pH. Two constitutive promoters, one immediately upstream of satD and one just 3′ to the acid-inducible promoter, were also identified. Except for Ffh, the functions of the sat operon gene products are unknown. SatC, SatD, and SatE have no homology to proteins with known functions, although YlxM may function as a transcriptional regulator linked to genes encoding SRP pathway proteins. Nonpolar mutations created in each of the five genes of the sat locus resulted in viable mutants. Most striking, however, was the finding that a mutation in ffh did not result in loss of cell viability, as is the case in all other microbial species in which this pathway has been described. This mutant also lacked immunologically detectable Ffh and was severely affected in resistance to acid. Complementation of the mutation resulted in restoration of acid tolerance and reappearance of cytoplasmic Ffh. These data provide evidence that the SRP pathway plays an important role in acid tolerance in S. mutans. PMID:11274114

  4. Effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-producing property of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Deepak; Singh, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-formation property of Streptococcus mutans. A total of 30 clinical isolates were identified as S. mutans and screened for biofilm formation using the microtiter plate method. The strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was used for identifying both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC). We subsequently used this concentration against each of the strong biofilm producer isolates at A492 < 0.5 optical density (OD). Of the 30 isolates screened for biofilm formation, 18 isolates showed strong biofilm formation, 09 isolates showed moderate formation, and 03 isolates showed poor/nonbiofilm formation. The MIC of embelin for the strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was 0.55 ± 0.02, whereas that of piperine was 0.33 ± 0.02. The MBIC of embelin was 0.0620 ± 0.03, whereas that of piperine was 0.0407 ± 0.03, which was lower than that of embelin. At OD492 < 0.5, the MBIC of both compounds significantly inhibited biofilm formation of all the 18 strong biofilm-forming isolates. The results of this study demonstrate a significant antibiofilm effect of the natural compounds embelin and piperine, which can contribute towards the development of a database for novel drug candidates for treating oral infections caused by S. mutans. PMID:26870681

  5. Cell Death of Streptococcus mutans Induced by a Quorum-Sensing Peptide Occurs via a Conserved Streptococcal Autolysin

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a member of the human indigenous oral microbiome, produces a quorum-sensing peptide called the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) pheromone. We previously demonstrated that S. mutans expresses its CSP pheromone under specific stresses and responds to high levels of CSP by inducing cell death in a fraction of the bacterial population. Streptococci lack the classical SOS response, and the induction of the SigX regulon has been proposed to act as a general stress response in Gram-positive bacteria. We show here that inactivation of SigX abolished the CSP-induced cell death phenotype. Among SigX-regulated genes, SMU.836 (now named lytFSm), encoding a conserved streptococcal protein, is a functional peptidoglycan hydrolase involved in CSP-induced cell lysis. We also demonstrated that LytFSm is most likely a self-acting autolysin, since LytFSm produced by attacker cells cannot trigger CSP-induced lysis of LytFSm-deficient target cells present in the same environment. Electron microscopy revealed important morphological changes accompanying autolysis of CSP-induced wild-type cultures that were absent in the LytFSm-deficient mutant. The LytFSm promoter was activated in the physiological context of elevated concentrations of the CSP pheromone under stress conditions, such as exposure to heat, hydrogen peroxide, and acid. In a long-term survival assay, the viability of a mutant deficient in LytFSm autolysin was significantly lower than that observed for the wild-type strain. The results of this study suggest that cell death of S. mutans induced by its quorum-sensing CSP pheromone may represent a kind of altruistic act that provides a way for the species to survive environmental stresses at the expense of some of its cells. PMID:23104806

  6. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  7. In-vitro inhibition of glucosyltransferase from the dental plaque bacterium Streptococcus mutans by common beverages and food extracts.

    PubMed

    Kashket, S; Paolino, V J; Lewis, D A; van Houte, J

    1985-01-01

    Some fruit juices and beverages inhibit the glucosyltransferases of Streptococcus mutans. Inhibition by cocoa, coffee and tea was due partly to gelatin-precipitable tannins and partly to components that exhibited properties of monomeric polyphenols. Charcoal treatment removed all inhibitory activity. Catechin, a known constituent of these beverages, was an effective inhibitor of the enzymes. The effects of the fruit juices were attributable mainly to the inhibition of the glucosyltransferases by the endogenous fructose and glucose. The findings show that naturally-occurring constituents of foods can inhibit extracellular polysaccharide formation from sucrose. Such constituents may play a role in regulating dental plaque formation in vivo and, thereby, may have long-term effects on the development of dental caries. PMID:2938561

  8. Residual Structure of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm following Complete Disinfection Favors Secondary Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Re-Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion. PMID:25635770

  9. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  10. Isolation and characterization of the Streptococcus mutans gtfC gene, coding for synthesis of both soluble and insoluble glucans.

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, N; Kuramitsu, H K

    1988-01-01

    The intact gtfC gene from Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was isolated in Escherichia coli in plasmid vector pUC18. The glucosyltransferase activity expressed by the gene synthesized both low-molecular-weight water-soluble glucan and insoluble glucan in a primer-independent manner. Purification of the enzyme by procedures that minimize proteolytic digestion yielded a purified preparation with a molecular weight of 140,000. Insertional inactivation of the gtfC gene with a streptococcal erythromycin resistance gene fragment followed by transformation of strain GS-5 suggested that the gtfC gene product was required for sucrose-dependent colonization in vitro. In addition, evidence for the presence of a third gtf gene coding for soluble glucan synthesis was obtained following the construction of mutants containing deletions of both the gtfB and gtfC genes. Images PMID:2969375

  11. Sonochemical coatings of ZnO and CuO nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on teeth model.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Michal; Lellouche, Jonathan; Matalon, Shlomo; Gedanken, Aharon; Banin, Ehud

    2012-08-21

    Antibiotic resistance has prompted the search for new agents that can inhibit bacterial growth. We recently reported on the antibiofilm activities of nanosized ZnO and CuO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by using sonochemical irradiation. In this study, we examined the antibacterial activity of ZnO and CuO NPs in a powder form and also examined the antibiofilm behavior of teeth surfaces that were coated with ZnO and CuO NPs using sonochemistry. Free ZnO and CuO NPs inhibited biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans . Furthermore, by using the sonochemical procedure, we were able to coat teeth surfaces that inhibited bacterial colonization. PMID:22830392

  12. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  13. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  14. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities of sub fraction 18 of Melastoma malabathricum towards Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohazila M., H.; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob W., A.

    2014-09-01

    A study was carried out to isolate and identify the active compounds from Melastoma malabathricum stem bark that exhibit anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities against Streptococcus mutans. Purification of the active compounds from the stem bark extract was performed via silica gel chromatography to produce 12 fractions. Further fractionation of fraction 9 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) produced 21 sub fractions. All the sub fractions were subjected to thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography as preliminary screening to determine anti bacterial activity. TLC-bioautography showed that sub fraction 18 (SF18) demonstrated large inhibited zone against S. mutans. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to identify the active compounds in SF18. Fraction SF18 revealed 27 compounds such as hexanoic acid, 8-methyl-1-undecene, propanenitrile, and 1-decene. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were determined using crystal violet and glass surface assays respectively. The concentrations that produced 50% reduction in anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were 1.88 mg/ml and 3.75 mg/ml respectively.

  15. Bifidobacteria inhibit the growth of Porphyromonas gingivalis but not of Streptococcus mutans in an in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Jäsberg, Heli; Söderling, Eva; Endo, Akihito; Beighton, David; Haukioja, Anna

    2016-06-01

    There is growing interest in the use of probiotic bifidobacteria for enhancement of the therapy, and in the prevention, of oral microbial diseases. However, the results of clinical studies assessing the effects of bifidobacteria on the oral microbiota are controversial, and the mechanisms of actions of probiotics in the oral cavity remain largely unknown. In addition, very little is known about the role of commensal bifidobacteria in oral health. Our aim was to study the integration of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb12 and of oral Bifidobacterium dentium and Bifidobacterium longum isolates in supragingival and subgingival biofilm models and their effects on other bacteria in biofilms in vitro using two different in vitro biofilms and agar-overlay assays. All bifidobacteria integrated well into the subgingival biofilms composed of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Fusobacterium nucleatum and decreased significantly only the number of P. gingivalis in the biofilms. The integration of bifidobacteria into the supragingival biofilms containing Streptococcus mutans and A. naeslundii was less efficient, and bifidobacteria did not affect the number of S. mutans in biofilms. Therefore, our results suggest that bifidobacteria may have a positive effect on subgingival biofilm and thereby potential in enhancing gingival health; however, their effect on supragingival biofilm may be limited. PMID:27061393

  16. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm accumulation and development of dental caries in vivo by 7-epiclusianone and fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Ramiro M.; Branco-de-Almeida, Luciana S.; Franco, Eliane M.; Yatsuda, Regiane; dos Santos, Marcelo H.; de Alencar, Severino M.; Koo, Hyun; Rosalen, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    7-Epiclusianone (7-epi), a novel naturally occurring compound isolated from Rheedia brasiliensis, effectively inhibits the synthesis of exopolymers and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans. In the present study, the ability of 7-epi, alone or in combination with fluoride (F), to disrupt biofilm development and pathogenicity of S. mutans in vivo was examined using a rodent model of dental caries. Treatment (twice-daily, 60s exposure) with 7-epi, alone or in combination with 125 ppm F, resulted in biofilms with less biomass and fewer insoluble glucans than did those treated with vehicle-control, and they also displayed significant cariostatic effects in vivo (p < 0.05). The combination 7-epi + 125 ppm F was as effective as 250 ppm F (positive-control) in reducing the development of both smooth- and sulcal-caries. No histopathological alterations were observed in the animals after the experimental period. The data show that 7-epiclusianone is a novel and effective antibiofilm/anticaries agent, which may enhance the cariostatic properties of fluoride. PMID:20938851

  17. Comparative evaluation of a herbal mouthwash (Freshol) with chlorhexidine on plaque accumulation, gingival inflammation, and salivary Streptococcus mutans growth

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shivika; Pesapathy, Sudha; Joseph, Madonna; Tiwari, Prabhat K.; Chawla, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Plaque accumulation and oral microorganisms are the main predisposing factors to various orodental infections and targeting these, therefore, can prove to be an effective way of combating these diseases. Herbal extracts have been of particular interest these days owing to various side effects associated with conventional modes of treatment. Aims and Objectives: The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of a commercially available homeopathic mouthwash with chlorhexidine on plaque status, gingival status, and salivary Streptococcus mutans count. Materials and Methods: Total sample of 55 children, aged 8-14 years, were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (35) and Group B (20) were given 10 mL of test mouthwash “Freshol” and chlorhexidine respectively during phases 1 and 3 of the clinical trial which was of 10 days each. Phase 2 of 14 days in between was the washout period during which no mouthwash was given. Result: Freshol was found to be better than chlorhexidine in reducing the salivary mutans streptococci count and equieffective to chlorhexidine in altering plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion: Herbal alternatives can prove to be an effective and safe alternative to conventional modes of treatment. PMID:24478976

  18. Antiadhesive effect of green and roasted coffee on Streptococcus mutans' adhesive properties on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads.

    PubMed

    Daglia, M; Tarsi, R; Papetti, A; Grisoli, P; Dacarro, C; Pruzzo, C; Gazzani, Gabriella

    2002-02-27

    Green and roasted coffees of the two most used species, Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta, several commercial coffee samples, and known coffee components were analyzed for their ability to interfere with Streptococcus mutans' sucrose-independent adsorption to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) beads. All coffee solutions showed high antiadhesive properties. The inhibition of S. mutans' adsorption to HA beads was observed both when coffee was present in the adsorption mixture and when it was used to pretreat the beads, suggesting that coffee active molecules may adsorb to a host surface, preventing the tooth receptor from interacting with any bacterial adhesions. Among the known tested coffee components, trigonelline and nicotinic and chlorogenic acids have been shown to be very active. Dialysis separation of roasted coffee components also showed that a coffee component fraction with 1000 Da < MW < 3500 Da, commonly considered as low MW coffee melanoidins, may sensibly contribute to the roasted coffee's antiadhesive properties. The obtained results showed that all coffee solutions have antiadhesive properties, which are due to both naturally occurring and roasting-induced molecules. PMID:11853508

  19. Sulfonamide inhibition study of the β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; DeLuca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the oral pathogenic bacterium provoking dental caries formation, encodes for a β-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), SmuCA. This enzyme was cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with the major class of CA inhibitors, the primary sulfonamides. SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with a kcat of 4.2×10(5) s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7) M(-1)×s(-1), and is efficiently inhibited by most sulfonamides (KIs of 246 nM-13.5 μM). The best SmuCA inhibitors were bromosulfanilamide, deacetylated acetazolamide, 4-hydroxymethylbenzenesulfonamide, a pyrimidine-substituted sulfanilamide derivative, aminobenzolamide and compounds structurally similar to it, as well as acetazolamide, methazolamide, indisulam and valdecoxib. These compounds showed inhibition constants ranging between 246 and 468 nM. Identification of effective inhibitors of this enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action. PMID:25913199

  20. Effectiveness of probiotic, chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthwash against Streptococcus mutans – Randomized, single-blind, in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Jothika, Mohan; Vanajassun, P. Pranav; Someshwar, Battu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the short-term efficiency of probiotic, chlorhexidine, and fluoride mouthwashes on plaque Streptococcus mutans level at four periodic intervals. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blind, randomized control study in which each subject was tested with only one mouthwash regimen. Fifty-two healthy qualified adult patients were selected randomly for the study and were divided into the following groups: group 1- 10 ml of distilled water, group 2- 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash, group 3- 10 ml of 500 ppm F/400 ml sodium fluoride mouthwash, and group 4- 10 ml of probiotic mouthwash. Plaque samples were collected from the buccal surface of premolars and molars in the maxillary quadrant. Sampling procedure was carried out by a single examiner after 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days, respectively, after the use of the mouthwash. All the samples were subjected to microbiological analysis and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc test. Results: One-way ANOVA comparison among groups 2, 3, and 4 showed no statistical significance, whereas group 1 showed statistically significant difference when compared with groups 2, 3, and 4 at 7th, 14th, and 30th day. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, and probiotic mouthwashes reduce plaque S. mutans levels. Probiotic mouthwash is effective and equivalent to chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride mouthwashes. Thus, probiotic mouthwash can also be considered as an effective oral hygiene regimen. PMID:25984467

  1. Characterization of a Glutamate Transporter Operon, glnQHMP, in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Acid Tolerance▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Krastel, Kirsten; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Mair, Richard; Downey, Jennifer S.; Goodman, Steven D.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate contributes to the acid tolerance response (ATR) of many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, but its role in the ATR of the oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans is unknown. This study describes the discovery and characterization of a glutamate transporter operon designated glnQHMP (Smu.1519 to Smu.1522) and investigates its potential role in acid tolerance. Deletion of glnQHMP resulted in a 95% reduction in transport of radiolabeled glutamate compared to the wild-type UA159 strain. The addition of glutamate to metabolizing UA159 cells resulted in an increased production of acidic end products, whereas the glnQHMP mutant produced less lactic acid than UA159, suggesting a link between glutamate metabolism and acid production and possible acid tolerance. To investigate this possibility, we conducted a microarray analysis with glutamate and under pH 5.5 and pH 7.5 conditions which showed that expression of the glnQHMP operon was downregulated by both glutamate and mild acid. We also measured the growth kinetics of UA159 and its glnQHMP-negative derivative at pH 5.5 and found that the mutant doubled at a much slower rate than the parent strain but survived at pH 3.5 significantly better than the wild type. Taken together, these findings support the involvement of the glutamate transporter operon glnQHMP in the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:20023025

  2. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm accumulation and development of dental caries in vivo by 7-epiclusianone and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Murata, Ramiro M; Branco-de-Almeida, Luciana S; Franco, Eliane M; Yatsuda, Regiane; dos Santos, Marcelo H; de Alencar, Severino M; Koo, Hyun; Rosalen, Pedro L

    2010-10-01

    7-Epiclusianone (7-epi), a novel naturally occurring compound isolated from Rheedia brasiliensis, effectively inhibits the synthesis of exopolymers and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans. In the present study, the ability of 7-epi, alone or in combination with fluoride (F), to disrupt biofilm development and pathogenicity of S. mutans in vivo was examined using a rodent model of dental caries. Treatment (twice-daily, 60s exposure) with 7-epi, alone or in combination with 125 ppm F, resulted in biofilms with less biomass and fewer insoluble glucans than did those treated with vehicle-control, and they also displayed significant cariostatic effects in vivo (p < 0.05). The combination 7-epi + 125 ppm F was as effective as 250 ppm F (positive-control) in reducing the development of both smooth- and sulcal-caries. No histopathological alterations were observed in the animals after the experimental period. The data show that 7-epiclusianone is a novel and effective antibiofilm/anticaries agent, which may enhance the cariostatic properties of fluoride. PMID:20938851

  3. Novel Antibiofilm Chemotherapy Targets Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans To Modulate Virulence Expression In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falsetta, Megan L.; Klein, Marlise I.; Lemos, José A.; Silva, Bruno B.; Agidi, Senyo; Scott-Anne, Kathy K.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride is the mainstay of dental caries prevention, and yet current applications offer incomplete protection and may not effectively address the infectious character of the disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of a novel combination therapy (CT; 2 mM myricetin, 4 mM tt-farnesol, 250 ppm of fluoride) that supplements fluoride with naturally occurring, food-derived, antibiofilm compounds. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice daily for ≤60 s) were used both in vitro over a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite biofilm model and in vivo with a rodent model of dental caries. The effectiveness of CT was evaluated based on the incidence and severity of carious lesions (compared to fluoride or vehicle control). We found that CT was superior to fluoride (positive control, P < 0.05); topical applications dramatically reduced caries development in Sprague-Dawley rats, all without altering the Streptococcus mutans or total populations within the plaque. We subsequently identified the underlying mechanisms through which applications of CT modulate biofilm virulence. CT targets expression of key Streptococcus mutans genes during biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. These are associated with exopolysaccharide matrix synthesis (gtfB) and the ability to tolerate exogenous stress (e.g., sloA), which are essential for cariogenic biofilm assembly. We also identified a unique gene (SMU.940) that was severely repressed and may represent a potentially novel target; its inactivation disrupted exopolysaccharide accumulation and matrix development. Altogether, CT may be clinically more effective than current anticaries modalities, targeting expression of bacterial virulence associated with pathogenesis of the disease. These observations may have relevance for development of enhanced therapies against other biofilm-dependent infections. PMID:22985885

  4. Novel antibiofilm chemotherapy targets exopolysaccharide synthesis and stress tolerance in Streptococcus mutans to modulate virulence expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Falsetta, Megan L; Klein, Marlise I; Lemos, José A; Silva, Bruno B; Agidi, Senyo; Scott-Anne, Kathy K; Koo, Hyun

    2012-12-01

    Fluoride is the mainstay of dental caries prevention, and yet current applications offer incomplete protection and may not effectively address the infectious character of the disease. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of a novel combination therapy (CT; 2 mM myricetin, 4 mM tt-farnesol, 250 ppm of fluoride) that supplements fluoride with naturally occurring, food-derived, antibiofilm compounds. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice daily for ≤60 s) were used both in vitro over a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite biofilm model and in vivo with a rodent model of dental caries. The effectiveness of CT was evaluated based on the incidence and severity of carious lesions (compared to fluoride or vehicle control). We found that CT was superior to fluoride (positive control, P < 0.05); topical applications dramatically reduced caries development in Sprague-Dawley rats, all without altering the Streptococcus mutans or total populations within the plaque. We subsequently identified the underlying mechanisms through which applications of CT modulate biofilm virulence. CT targets expression of key Streptococcus mutans genes during biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. These are associated with exopolysaccharide matrix synthesis (gtfB) and the ability to tolerate exogenous stress (e.g., sloA), which are essential for cariogenic biofilm assembly. We also identified a unique gene (SMU.940) that was severely repressed and may represent a potentially novel target; its inactivation disrupted exopolysaccharide accumulation and matrix development. Altogether, CT may be clinically more effective than current anticaries modalities, targeting expression of bacterial virulence associated with pathogenesis of the disease. These observations may have relevance for development of enhanced therapies against other biofilm-dependent infections. PMID:22985885

  5. Glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin agar, an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar for enumeration of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J M; Börjesson, A C; Laskowski, L; Kurasz, A B; Testa, M

    1984-01-01

    An agar medium for selective recovery and enumeration of Streptococcus mutans was developed as an alternative to mitis salivarius-bacitracin (MSB) agar. Combinations of dyes, antibiotics, and tellurite were added to a nonselective medium which, because of its sucrose content, allowed easy recognition of S. mutans colonies. Candle jar incubation for 2 days, by comparison with anaerobic incubation, reduced background flora but did not diminish S. mutans recoveries from clinical samples. Quantitative comparisons were made of the simultaneous recoveries of a number of authentic S. mutans serotype representatives and fresh clinical isolates, using various glucose-sucrose-potassium tellurite-bacitracin (GSTB) formulations and mitis salivarius, MSB, and blood agars. Mitis salivarius counts were not detectably different from blood counts, but counts on MSB were distinctly lower. A formulation of the new medium containing 5% glucose 5% sucrose, 0.001% potassium tellurite, 0.3 U of bacitracin per ml (hence GSTB), and 2% agar gave recoveries nearly equal to those on mitis salivarius agar and much greater than those on MSB. The medium yielded readily recognized S. mutans colonies and facilitated detection of intracellular polysaccharide formers upon flooding with I2 reagent. Freshly isolated serotype c, E, and f colonies could often be distinguished from serotype d and g colonies, a distinction made reliable by testing for intracellular polysaccharide. A study of 300 salivary samples revealed GSTB to give significantly higher recoveries than MSB. About 72% of all samples were substantially underestimated for S. mutans with MSB, and 6.7% of samples were falsely negative for S. mutans with MSB. Recovery of background flora on GSTB was as low or lower than on MSB, and both types of agar could be stored for at least 9 weeks without notable change of selectivity. Thus, GSTB agar appears to be simple and reliable to use and requires no anaerobic incubation. Caution is voiced about

  6. Optimization of antibacterial activity by Gold-Thread (Coptidis Rhizoma Franch) against Streptococcus mutans using evolutionary operation-factorial design technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ung-Kyu; Kim, Mi-Hyang; Lee, Nan-Hee

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to find the optimum extraction condition of Gold-Thread for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using The evolutionary operation-factorial design technique. Higher antibacterial activity was achieved in a higher extraction temperature (R2 = -0.79) and in a longer extraction time (R2 = -0.71). Antibacterial activity was not affected by differentiation of the ethanol concentration in the extraction solvent (R2 = -0.12). The maximum antibacterial activity of clove against S. mutans determined by the EVOP-factorial technique was obtained at 80 degrees C extraction temperature, 26 h extraction time, and 50% ethanol concentration. The population of S. mutans decreased from 6.110 logCFU/ml in the initial set to 4.125 logCFU/ml in the third set. PMID:18092475

  7. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cariogenic Bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans, and Periodontal Diseases Actinomyces naeslundii and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Baca-Castañón, Magda Lorena; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica; Alcázar-Pizaña, Andrea Guadalupe; Grondin, Yohann; Coronado-Mendoza, Anahí; Sánchez-Najera, Rosa Isela; Cárdenas-Estrada, Eloy; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Escamilla-García, Erandi

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well known for their beneficial effects on human health in the intestine and immune system; however, there are few studies on the impact they can generate in oral health. The aim of this study was to test and compare in vitro antimicrobial activity of L. reuteri on pathogenic bacteria involved in the formation of dental caries: S. mutans, S. gordonii, and periodontal disease: A. naeslundii and T. forsythia. Also, we determined the growth kinetics of each bacterium involved in this study. Before determining the antimicrobial action of L. reuteri on cariogenic bacteria and periodontal disease, the behavior and cell development time of each pathogenic bacterium were studied. Once the conditions for good cell growth of each of selected pathogens were established according to their metabolic requirements, maximum exponential growth was determined, this being the reference point for analyzing the development or inhibition by LAB using the Kirby Bauer method. Chlorhexidine 0.12% was positive control. L. reuteri was shown to have an inhibitory effect against S. mutans, followed by T. forsythia and S. gordonii, and a less significant effect against A. naeslundii. Regarding the effect shown by L. reuteri on the two major pathogens, we consider its potential use as a possible functional food in the prevention or treatment of oral diseases. PMID:25422124

  8. Antimicrobial and anti-adherence activity of various combinations of coffee-chicory solutions on Streptococcus mutans: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rama; Reddy, Vamsi Krishna L; Prashant, GM; Ojha, Vivek; Kumar, Naveen PG

    2014-01-01

    Context: Several studies have demonstrated the activity of natural plants on the dental biofilm and caries development. But few studies on the antimicrobial activity of coffee-based solutions were found in the literature. Further there was no study available to check the antimicrobial effect of coffee solutions with different percentages of chicory in it. Aims: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different combinations of coffee-chicory solutions and their anti-adherence effect on Streptococcus mutans to glass surface. Materials and Methods: Test solutions were prepared. For antimicrobial activity testing, tubes containing test solution and culture medium were inoculated with a suspension of S. mutans followed by plating on Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) agar. S. mutans adherence to glass in presence of the different test solutions was also tested. The number of adhered bacteria (CFU/mL) was determined by plating method. Statistical Analysis: Statistical significance was measured using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. P value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Pure chicory had shown significantly less bacterial count compared to all other groups. Groups IV and V had shown significant reduction in bacterial counts over the period of 4 hrs. Regarding anti-adherence effect, group I-IV had shown significantly less adherence of bacteria to glass surface. Conclusions: Chicory exerted antibacterial effect against S. mutans while coffee reduced significantly the adherence of S. mutans to the glass surface. PMID:25328299

  9. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds. PMID:25973155

  10. A 40-kilodalton cell wall protein-coding sequence upstream of the sr gene of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 (serotype f).

    PubMed Central

    Ogier, J A; Schöller, M; Lepoivre, Y; Gangloff, S; M'Zoughi, R; Klein, J P

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans surface proteins may be important in immunization against dental caries. We report the existence of an open reading frame of 1,005 bp that lies 1,162 bases upstream of the S. mutans OMZ175 sr gene and that encodes a cell wall-associated protein. This open reading frame codes for 335 amino acid residues. The first 18-amino acid region is predominantly hydrophobic and resembles a signal peptide, and the hydrophobic C-terminal region may function as an anchor to the bacterial cell wall. On the basis of the predicted antigenic determinants of the deduced amino acid sequence, a 16-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to the middle hydrophilic coiled region was synthesized. Antibodies raised against this synthetic peptide reacted with a protein with an apparent Mr of 40,000 that was identified by Western immunoblotting in a cell wall extract from S. mutans OMZ175. The high reactivity in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the antibodies with whole S. mutans OMZ175 cells showed that this protein was located on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, the antipeptide immunoglobulin G recognized an identical determinant on the cell surface of other members of the S. mutans group. However, the function of this protein is not yet known. Images PMID:2019433

  11. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds. PMID:25973155

  12. Evaluation of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentration of nano-silver base inorganic anti-microbial agent (Novaron®) against streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Goda; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We attempted to find the possibility of determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration needed for nano-silver base inorganic anti-microbial agent (Novaron® AG 300, AG 1100) against Streptococcus mutans in vitro using broth dilution assay. Materials and Methods: An ampoule of freeze-dried S. mutans NCTC reference strain was revived, and the colony-forming units (CFU) were calculated. The MIC and MBC was determined by broth dilution assay using different concentrations of Novaron® AG 300 and Novaron® AG 1100 against 1 × 105 CFU/ml of S. mutans. Results: The MIC and MBC of Novaron® AG 300 and Novaron® AG 1100 against S. mutans were found to be 40 μg/ml. Conclusions: Novaron® has anti-bacterial effect against S. mutans. Further studies are needed to explore the applicability of these silver-supported anti- microbial agents in clinical dentistry. PMID:23293483

  13. Comparison of Contamination of Low-Frictional Elastomeric Rings with That of Conventional Elastomeric Rings by Streptococcus mutans - An In-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Mogra, Subraya; Shetty, V. Surendra; Shetty, Siddarth; Jose, Nidhin Philip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of brackets and ligatures has been shown to be related to an increase in gingival inflammation and increased risk of decalcification. The various measures were taken to reduce the plaque accumulation and also lot of efforts were made by manufacturers that reduced the binding friction between the ligature rings and arch wire that facilitated easy sliding of the tooth through the wire. The low frictional ligatures rings manufactured by different manufacturers presumed to attract fewer bacteria due to greater reduction in surface roughness. Our study aimed to evaluate whether the low frictional elastomeric rings accumulate fewer bacteria than conventional ligature rings. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (15 males and 15 females) who underwent fixed appliance therapy were selected. The study was done using split-mouth design. In each volunteer, synergy low frictional elastomeric rings were tied to brackets bonded to the maxillary premolar on the right side and mandibular premolar on the left side. Conventional elastomeric rings that served as control group were tied to the contralateral teeth, with the same design. Samples were collected after four weeks (28 days) and cultured for bacteria Streptococcus mutans. Results: There was no statistical difference between Streptococcus mutans count in low frictional elastomeric rings with that of conventional rings. Conclusion: We concluded that adherence of Streptococcus mutans is similar in both synergy low frictional elastomeric rings and conventional clear elastomeric rings and thus the manufacturer’s claim of minimal bacterial adherence was discarded. PMID:26023638

  14. Inhibition of ecological emergence of mutans streptococci naturally transmitted between rats and consequent caries inhibition by Streptococcus salivarius TOVE-R infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, J M; Kurasz, A B; Clive, J

    1985-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus salivarius strain TOVE-R to inhibit the ecological emergence of virulent representatives of the most prevalent human mutans streptococci on the teeth of specific pathogen-free Osborne-Mendel rats was studied. Rats which were infected by TOVE-R, or either S. mutans 10449S or S. sobrinus 6715-13WT, or uninfected were transiently co-caged so as to allow natural fecal transfer of organisms due to coprophagy. The infectants were differentially recovered from swabs of the teeth over the time course of the experiments and from sonified teeth at termination. Data were expressed on both relative (percentage) and absolute (CFU) bases. Initial oral colonization of rats by TOVE-R inhibited the ecological emergence of fecally transmitted S. mutans 10449S and S. sobrinus 6715-13WT. There was a generally inverse relationship between the percentages and absolute numbers of TOVE-R and the mutans streptococci on the teeth, which strongly suggested their competition for tooth sites. Absolute numbers of total recoverable flora from the teeth upon sonification were correlated with caries scores, thus suggesting that total recoverable flora counts substantially reflect cavitation status. TOVE-R itself induced no apparent caries activity and its transmission to rats already infected by 10449S or its colonization of rats before 10449S infection inhibition caries induction by this S. mutans strain; similar anticaries effects were not statistically significant for TOVE-R against 6715-13WT in these experiments. These data on the inhibition of the ecological emergence of the mutans streptococci supplement the already reported ability of TOVE-R to preempt initial colonization of teeth and partially displace the colonization of teeth by the mutans streptococci. PMID:4008050

  15. An In Vitro Study on the Effect of Free Amino Acids Alone or in Combination with Nisin on Biofilms as well as on Planktonic Bacteria of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Junqi; Jian, Yutao; Huang, Lijia; Deng, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Free D-amino acids (D-AAs) are one of the most striking features of the peptidoglycan composition in bacteria and play a key role in regulating and disassembling bacterial biofilms. Previous studies have indicated that the antimicrobial peptide nisin can inhibit the growth of the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans. The present study investigated the effect of free amino acids either alone or in combination with nisin on biofilm and on planktonic S. mutans bacteria. The results of the MIC and MBC analyses showed that D-cysteine (Cys), D- or L-aspartic acid (Asp), and D- or L-glutamic acid (Glu) significantly improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans and that the mixture of D-Cys, D-Asp, and D-Glu (3D-AAs) and the mixture of L-Cys, L-Asp, and L-Glu (3L-AAs) at a concentration of 40 mM can prevent S. mutans growth. Crystal violet staining showed that the D- or L-enantiomers of Cys, Asp, and Glu at a concentration of 40 mM can inhibit the formation of S. mutans biofilms, and their mixture generated a stronger inhibition than the components alone. Furthermore, the mixture of the three D-AAs or L-AAs may improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans biofilms. This study underscores the potential of free amino acids for the enhancement of the antibacterial activity of nisin and the inhibition of the cariogenic bacteria S. mutans and biofilms. PMID:24936873

  16. An in vitro study on the effect of free amino acids alone or in combination with nisin on biofilms as well as on planktonic bacteria of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhang, Luodan; Ling, Junqi; Jian, Yutao; Huang, Lijia; Deng, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Free D-amino acids (D-AAs) are one of the most striking features of the peptidoglycan composition in bacteria and play a key role in regulating and disassembling bacterial biofilms. Previous studies have indicated that the antimicrobial peptide nisin can inhibit the growth of the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans. The present study investigated the effect of free amino acids either alone or in combination with nisin on biofilm and on planktonic S. mutans bacteria. The results of the MIC and MBC analyses showed that D-cysteine (Cys), D- or L-aspartic acid (Asp), and D- or L-glutamic acid (Glu) significantly improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans and that the mixture of D-Cys, D-Asp, and D-Glu (3D-AAs) and the mixture of L-Cys, L-Asp, and L-Glu (3L-AAs) at a concentration of 40 mM can prevent S. mutans growth. Crystal violet staining showed that the D- or L-enantiomers of Cys, Asp, and Glu at a concentration of 40 mM can inhibit the formation of S. mutans biofilms, and their mixture generated a stronger inhibition than the components alone. Furthermore, the mixture of the three D-AAs or L-AAs may improve the antibacterial activity of nisin against S. mutans biofilms. This study underscores the potential of free amino acids for the enhancement of the antibacterial activity of nisin and the inhibition of the cariogenic bacteria S. mutans and biofilms. PMID:24936873

  17. Low and high molecular weight chitosans interactions with Streptococcus mutans: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Virga, C; Landa, C; Beltramo, D; Ausar, F; Dorronsoro, S T

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the in vitro capacity of high and low molecular weight chitosans (HMWCh and LMWCh) to inhibit the adherence of strains of S. mutans obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC,25175) to artificial saliva-coated hydroxiapatite beads. The effect of these biopolymers was assessed in terms of pH, ionic force, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and antibacterial activity. The results show that HMWCh is modified by a rise in pH (7.0) and ionic strength. The induced conformational changes lead to the formation of rigid meshes capable of aggregating and entrapping S. mutans. This process is associated to the properties of HMWCh. LMWCh gave rise to smaller aggregates that exhibited a comparatively reduced interaction capacity. The MIC for HMWCh was 0.5 g% and evidenced the bacteriostatic action of the aggregates. We conclude that HMWCh would exert an inhibitory effect on the process of specific adsorption of S. mutans to saliva-coated hydroxiapatite beads. PMID:15500183

  18. Immunization of Macaca fascicularis (Macaca irus) monkeys with Streptococcus mutans: specificity of antibody responses in saliva.

    PubMed

    Emmings, F G; Evans, R T; Genco, R J

    1976-04-01

    M fascicularis monkeys were immunized subcutaneously in the vicinity of the major salivary glands and by retrograde infusion into the parotid duct, with a vaccine containing Formalin-killed S mutans strain 6715 cells and culture-fluid antigens. Indirect immunofluorescent staining was used to titrate and classify antibodies. Subcutaneous immunization induced only a serum response, whereas intraductal infusion stimulated both an IgA antibody response in the parotid fluid and a serum response. Immunized and nonimmunized control groups were orally infected with S mutans strain 6715. The establishment in dental plaque was quantitated by recovery of the infecting organism on selective media and by immunofluorescent staining of plaque smears taken from individual tooth surfaces. The establishment of S mutans strain 6715 was noticeably inhibited in immune monkeys. Immunofluorescent assays for antibody also showed that serum and parotid fluid containing serum IgA antibodies cross reacted with other d serotype and a serotype strains but not representative b and c strains. Immune and control groups were then orally infected with S mutans strain GS-5, a c serotype strain, and no inhibition in establishment was detected of the non-cross-reacting type c organism in the immune group. A latter series of booster immunizations via the intraductal route resulted in a significant decrease in parotid fluid flow. Histological investigations showed inflammatory cell infiltration and replacement of epithelium by connective tissue in the glands from immunized monkeys. A separate group of monkeys, younger than the first, was immunized with the same vaccine via the duct only. In this group, immunizations were given at shorter intervals, but the immunization response was similar to that observed in the first group. The investigations reviewed here and new experiments reported show that immunization of monkeys with S mutan strain 6715 via the parotid duct elicited a reproducible IgA antibody

  19. Seryl-phosphorylated HPr regulates CcpA-independent carbon catabolite repression in conjunction with PTS permeases in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2010-03-01

    Carbohydrate catabolite repression (CCR) in Streptococcus mutans can be independent of catabolite control protein A (CcpA) and requires specific components of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar:phosphotransferase system (PTS) permeases. Here, the effects of various ptsH (HPr) and hprK (HPr kinase/phosphatase) mutations on growth and CCR were evaluated. An hprKV265F mutation, which enhanced Ser46 phosphorylation of HPr, inhibited growth on multiple PTS sugars. A ptsHS46A mutation reversed the effects of hprKV265F in most cases. A strain carrying a ptsHS46D mutation, which mimics HPr(Ser-P), presented with more severe growth defects than the hprKV265F mutant. The hprKV265F mutant enhanced CCR of the fruA and levD operons, a phenotype reversible by the ptsHS46A mutation. The effects of the hprKV265F mutation on fruA and levD expression were independent of CcpA, but dependent on ManL (IIAB(Man)) and, to a lesser extent, on FruI (IIABC(Fru)), in a carbohydrate-specific fashion. Expression of the Bacillus subtilis ptsG gene in the manL mutant did not restore CCR of the lev or fru operons. The hprKV265F mutation inhibited growth on cellobiose and lactose, but only the transcription of the cel operon was decreased. Thus, in S. mutans, serine-phosphorylated HPr functions in concert with particular PTS permeases to prioritize carbohydrate utilization by modulating sugar transport and transcription of catabolic operons. PMID:20487301

  20. Effects of mushroom and chicory extracts on the shape, physiology and proteome of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is an infectious disease which results from the acidic demineralisation of the tooth enamel and dentine as a consequence of the dental plaque (a microbial biofilm) accumulation. Research showed that several foods contain some components with antibacterial and antiplaque activity. Previous studies indicated antimicrobial and antiplaque activities in a low-molecular-mass (LMM) fraction of extracts from either an edible mushroom (Lentinus edodes) or from Italian red chicory (Cichorium intybus). Methods We have evaluated the antimicrobial mode of action of these fractions on Streptococcus mutans, the etiological agent of human dental caries. The effects on shape, macromolecular syntheses and cell proteome were analysed. Results The best antimicrobial activity has been displayed by the LMM mushroom extract with a bacteriostatic effect. At the MIC of both extracts DNA synthesis was the main macromolecular synthesis inhibited, RNA synthesis was less inhibited than that of DNA and protein synthesis was inhibited only by roughly 50%. The partial inhibition of protein synthesis is compatible with the observed significant increase in cell mass. The increase in these parameters is linked to the morphological alteration with transition from cocci of the untreated control to elongated cells. Interestingly, these modifications were also observed at sub-MIC concentrations. Finally, membrane and cytosol proteome analysis was conducted under LMM mushroom extract treatment in comparison with untreated S. mutans cells. Significant changes were observed for 31 membrane proteins and 20 of the cytosol fractions. The possible role of the changed proteins is discussed. Conclusions This report has shown an antibiotic-like mode of action of mushroom and chicory extracts as demonstrated by induced morphogenetic effects and inhibition of specific macromolecular synthesis. This feature as well as the safe use of this extract as result of its natural origin render the

  1. Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of Sucrose-Metabolizing Pathways in Streptococcus mutans Reveals Novel Roles for the Sucrose Phosphotransferase System Permease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose is perhaps the most efficient carbohydrate for the promotion of dental caries in humans, and the primary caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes multiple enzymes involved in the metabolism of this disaccharide. Here, we engineered a series of mutants lacking individual or combinations of sucrolytic pathways to understand the control of sucrose catabolism and to determine whether as-yet-undisclosed pathways for sucrose utilization were present in S. mutans. Growth phenotypes indicated that gtfBCD (encoding glucan exopolysaccharide synthases), ftf (encoding the fructan exopolysaccharide synthase), and the scrAB pathway (sugar-phosphotransferase system [PTS] permease and sucrose-6-PO4 hydrolase) constitute the majority of the sucrose-catabolizing activity; however, mutations in any one of these genes alone did not affect planktonic growth on sucrose. The multiple-sugar metabolism pathway (msm) contributed minimally to growth on sucrose. Notably, a mutant lacking gtfBC, which cannot produce water-insoluble glucan, displayed improved planktonic growth on sucrose. Meanwhile, loss of scrA led to growth stimulation on fructooligosaccharides, due in large part to increased expression of the fruAB (fructanase) operon. Using the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system as a model for carbohydrate-dependent gene expression in strains lacking extracellular sucrases, a PlevD-cat (EIIALev) reporter was activated by pulsing with sucrose. Interestingly, ScrA was required for activation of levD expression by sucrose through components of the LevQRST complex, but not for activation by the cognate LevQRST sugars fructose or mannose. Sucrose-dependent catabolite repression was also evident in strains containing an intact sucrose PTS. Collectively, these results reveal a novel regulatory circuitry for the control of sucrose catabolism, with a central role for ScrA. PMID:23222725

  2. Identification of a Supramolecular Functional Architecture of Streptococcus mutans Adhesin P1 on the Bacterial Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Kyle P.; Sullan, Ruby May A.; Crowley, Paula J.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Tang, Wenxing; Besingi, Richard; Dufrene, Yves F.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    P1 (antigen I/II) is a sucrose-independent adhesin of Streptococcus mutans whose functional architecture on the cell surface is not fully understood. S. mutans cells subjected to mechanical extraction were significantly diminished in adherence to immobilized salivary agglutinin but remained immunoreactive and were readily aggregated by fluid-phase salivary agglutinin. Bacterial adherence was restored by incubation of postextracted cells with P1 fragments that contain each of the two known adhesive domains. In contrast to untreated cells, glutaraldehyde-treated bacteria gained reactivity with anti-C-terminal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), whereas epitopes recognized by mAbs against other portions of the molecule were masked. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the ability of apical and C-terminal fragments of P1 to interact. Binding of several different anti-P1 mAbs to unfixed cells triggered release of a C-terminal fragment from the bacterial surface, suggesting a novel mechanism of action of certain adherence-inhibiting antibodies. We also used atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy with tips bearing various mAbs to elucidate the spatial organization and orientation of P1 on living bacteria. The similar rupture lengths detected using mAbs against the head and C-terminal regions, which are widely separated in the tertiary structure, suggest a higher order architecture in which these domains are in close proximity on the cell surface. Taken together, our results suggest a supramolecular organization in which additional P1 polypeptides, including the C-terminal segment originally identified as antigen II, associate with covalently attached P1 to form the functional adhesive layer. PMID:25666624

  3. Evaluation of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans by Addition of Probiotics in the form of Curd in the Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Mantha, Somasundar; Murthi, Surekha; Sura, Himagiri; Kadaru, Pravallika; Jangra, Jogender Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when taken in adequate amounts provide a health benefit on the host. They have been used to improve gastrointestinal health, and their popularity has prompted increased interest for their role in the promotion of oral health also. The study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of diet alteration on oral microflora with the addition of probiotics in the form of curd in the diet. Materials and Methods: Sample pool included total 20 children, 15 in experimental group; who were given curd containing probiotic bacteria in their diet daily and 5 children in control group; who were contradicted of food containing probiotics. All the children were followed for over a period of 1-year. A pre and post quantitative analysis of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli were done in the saliva of both active and control groups, and caries score was recorded. Statistical analysis used: The data thus compiled were statistically evaluated using Chi-square test and Pearson correlation on SPSS software version 14. Results: In experimental group, 87% children showed decrease and 7% showed increase in S. mutans count (P = 0.83), whereas 67% showed increase and 7% decrease in Lactobacilli count (P = 0.002) after 1-year of follow-up. Conclusions: Probiotics are upcoming as an intriguing field in oral health. Efforts should be made to increase the knowledge of the general dental practitioners with this facet of oral disease therapy and promote the implementation of the concept of “food rather than medicine.” PMID:26229377

  4. The inhibitory effect of a fermented papaya preparation on growth, hydrophobicity, and acid production of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus: its implications in oral health improvement of diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Somanah, Jhoti; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Bahorun, Theeshan; Aruoma, Okezie I

    2013-01-01

    Fermented papaya preparation (FPP) is a “natural health product.” The high incidence of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, and oral microbial infection cases among patients with diabetes mellitus continues to prevail. The potential role of FPP against common oral microbiota (Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, and Lactobacillus acidophilus) isolated from the human oral cavity was investigated using in vitro simulation models of dental plaque and caries. FPP showed an inhibitory effect against the growth (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: −6.9%; S. mitis: −4.47%, P < 0.05), acid production (at 0.05 mg/mL: S. mutans: +6.38%; L. acidophilus: +2.25%), and hydrophobicity (at 50 mg/mL: S. mutans: 1.01%, P < 0.01; S. mitis: 7.66%, P < 0.05) of tested microbiota. The results of this study suggest that low doses of FPP may be a suitable complement to good oral hygiene practice for the effective prevention of dental caries, plaque, and gingivitis. The functional application of FPP as a constituent of a balanced diet and active lifestyle can make a positive contribution to the oral health status and well-being of patients with diabetes. PMID:24804050

  5. Streptococcus Mutans Photoinactivation by Combination of Short Exposure of a Broad-Spectrum Visible Light and Low Concentrations of Photosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Paschoal, Marco Aurelio; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Lin, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Investigate the photodynamic antimicrobial effect by the combination of a novel noncoherent broad spectrum visible light and low concentrations of curcumin and toluidine blue over suspensions of Streptococcus mutans. Background data: Long illumination times to activate photosensitizers (PS) and the use of high concentrations of these drugs in photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) are limitations of its application as an antimicrobial technology in dental practice. Materials and methods: Planktonic suspensions of S. mutans were standardized and submitted to PACT treatment at low concentrations of curcumin (C) (0.075; 0.75 and 7.5 μM) and toluidine blue (T) (0.25; 2.5 and 25 μM) exposed to 42 J/cm2 (12.2 sec; set power: 3.930 mW) of a white light (WL) (output wavelength range: 400–700 nm; beam diameter: 12 mm) (C+WL+ and T+WL+, PACT groups; incubation time, C: 60 sec; T: 5 min); isolated effect of both C (C+WL−) and T concentrations (T+WL−); effect of light source (C−WL+ and T−WL+) and suspensions neither submitted to PS nor to light-emitting diode (LED) illumination (control groups, C−WL− and T−WL−). Aliquots of each group were diluted and cultured on blood agar plates and the number of colony-forming units (CFU)/mL was recorded, transformed into log10 and analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test at a cutoff value at 0.05. Results: The groups submitted to PACT presented a bacterial reduction value of>5-log10 to both tested PS in comparison with control groups (p<0.05). PS or light source used alone demonstrated no antimicrobial effect on the number of viable bacterial counts. Conclusions: The combination of a novel noncoherent light at short illumination exposure time with low concentrations of studied PS achieved a lethal photoinactivation of S. mutans, and can be considered an effective antimicrobial in vitro approach for reducing the number of micro-organisms involved with the dental caries process. PMID

  6. Origin and function of the multiple extracellular glucosyltransferase species from cultures of a serotype c strain of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Asem, K G; Kenney, A C; Cole, J A

    1986-02-01

    Two methods were used to purify the bifunctional extracellular enzyme sucrose: (1-6)- and (1-3)-alpha-D-glucan-6-alpha-D-glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.5; dextransucrase) from continuous cultures of a serotype c strain of Streptococcus mutans. The first method, based on a previously published report, involved Sepharose 6B gel filtration and DEAE cellulose anion exchange chromatography. This resulted in a dextransucrase preparation with an apparent molecular mass of 162 kDa and a specific activity of 125 mg of glucan formed from sucrose h-1 (mg of protein)-1, at 37 degrees C. It was almost homogeneous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The ratio of carbohydrate to protein was 0.14 and the recovery was 14% relative to the total glucosyltransferase activity in the original culture fluid. In the subsequently preferred method, hydroxyapatite-Ultrogel was used to purify dextransucrase with a 24% yield. The specific activity, 197 mg of glucan formed h-1 (mg of protein)-1, was the highest yet reported and this preparation contained less than 0.5 glucose-equivalent per subunit of molecular mass 162 kDa. Dextransucrase is therefore not a glycoprotein. Exogenous dextran stimulated activity, but was not essential for activity. The purified protein slowly degraded to multiple lower molecular mass forms during storage at 4 degrees C and 87% of the activity was lost after 20 days. The molecular mass of the most prominent, active degradation product was 140 kDa, similar to that of one of the multiple forms of dextransucrase detected in other laboratories. Preparations in which either the 140-kDa or the 162-kDa species predominated catalyzed the synthesis of a water-soluble glucan with sucrose alone, but catalyzed that of an insoluble glucan with sucrose and a high concentration of either (NH4)2SO4 or polyethylene glycol. The water-insoluble glucan was shown to lack sequences of 1,3-alpha-linked glycosyl residues typical of the insoluble glucan

  7. YlxM is a newly identified accessory protein that influences the function of signal recognition particle pathway components in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew L; Crowley, Paula J; Hasona, Adnan; Brady, L Jeannine

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a cariogenic oral pathogen whose virulence is determined largely by its membrane composition. The signal recognition particle (SRP) protein-targeting pathway plays a pivotal role in membrane biogenesis. S. mutans SRP pathway mutants demonstrate growth defects, cannot contend with environmental stress, and exhibit multiple changes in membrane composition. This study sought to define a role for ylxM, which in S. mutans and numerous other bacteria resides directly upstream of the ffh gene, encoding a major functional element of the bacterial SRP. YlxM was observed as a produced protein in S. mutans. Its predicted helix-turn-helix motif suggested that it has a role as a transcriptional regulator of components within the SRP pathway; however, no evidence of transcriptional regulation was found. Instead, capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), affinity chromatography, and bio-layer interferometry (BLI) demonstrated that S. mutans YlxM interacts with the SRP components Ffh and small cytoplasmic RNA (scRNA) but not with the SRP receptor FtsY. In the absence of FtsY, YlxM increased the GTP hydrolysis activity of Ffh alone and in complex with scRNA. However, in the presence of FtsY, YlxM caused an overall diminution of net GTPase activity. Thus, YlxM appears to modulate GTP hydrolysis, a process necessary for proper recycling of SRP pathway components. The presence of YlxM conferred a significant competitive growth advantage under nonstress and acid stress conditions when wild-type and ylxM mutant strains were cultured together. Our results identify YlxM as a component of the S. mutans SRP and suggest a regulatory function affecting GTPase activity. PMID:24659773

  8. Effect of Aqueous and Alcoholic Licorice (Glycyrrhiza Glabra) Root Extract Against Streptococcus Mutans and Lactobacillus Acidophilus in Comparison to Chlorhexidine: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Battur, Hemant; Shamarao, Supreetha; Sivakumar, Vivek; Patil, Pavan Uday; Shanavas, P

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glycyrrhiza (licorice) an herb, which has medicinal value and was used in ancient times as a remedy for a great diversity of ailments and sweetener. Roots of Glycyrrhiza contain a high concentration of saponin and glycyrrhizin, which are supposed to be sweetening agents. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of aqueous and alcoholic licorice root extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in comparison to chlorhexidine (CHX). Materials and Methods: In the first part of the study, various concentrations of aqueous and ethanolic licorice extract were prepared in the laboratory of Pharmacy College. It was then subjected to microbiological assay to determine its zone of inhibition using agar disk diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using serial broth dilution method against S. mutans and L. acidophilus. CHX was used as a positive control. Results: MIC of aqueous and ethnolic licorice root extract against S. mutans and L. acidophilus were