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Sample records for albicans streptococcus mutans

  1. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shiyu; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers.

  2. Nicotine Enhances Interspecies Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Ren, Biao; He, Jinzhi; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are common microorganisms in the human oral cavity. The synergistic relationship between these two species has been deeply explored in many studies. In the present study, the effect of alkaloid nicotine on the interspecies between S. mutans and C. albicans is explored. We developed a dual-species biofilm model and studied biofilm biomass, biofilm structure, synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and expression of glucosyltransferases (Gtfs). Biofilm formation and bacterial and fungal cell numbers in dual-species biofilms increased in the presence of nicotine. More C. albicans cells were present in the dual-species biofilms in the nicotine-treated groups as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The synthesis of EPS was increased by 1 mg/ml of nicotine as detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The result of qRT-PCR showed gtfs expression was upregulated when 1 mg/ml of nicotine was used. We speculate that nicotine promoted the growth of S. mutans, and more S. mutans cells attracted more C. albicans cells due to the interaction between two species. Since S. mutans and C. albicans are putative pathogens for dental caries, the enhancement of the synergistic relationship by nicotine may contribute to caries development in smokers. PMID:28280743

  3. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  4. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model.

  5. Candida albicans stimulates Streptococcus mutans microcolony development via cross-kingdom biofilm-derived metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongyeop; Sengupta, Arjun; Niepa, Tagbo H. R.; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Weljie, Aalim; Freitas-Blanco, Veronica S.; Murata, Ramiro M.; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Lee, Daeyeon; Koo, Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is frequently detected with heavy infection of Streptococcus mutans in plaque-biofilms from children affected with early-childhood caries, a prevalent and costly oral disease. The presence of C. albicans enhances S. mutans growth within biofilms, yet the chemical interactions associated with bacterial accumulation remain unclear. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate how microbial products from this cross-kingdom association modulate S. mutans build-up in biofilms. Our data revealed that bacterial-fungal derived conditioned medium (BF-CM) significantly increased the growth of S. mutans and altered biofilm 3D-architecture in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in enlarged and densely packed bacterial cell-clusters (microcolonies). Intriguingly, BF-CM induced S. mutans gtfBC expression (responsible for Gtf exoenzymes production), enhancing Gtf activity essential for microcolony development. Using a recently developed nanoculture system, the data demonstrated simultaneous microcolony growth and gtfB activation in situ by BF-CM. Further metabolites/chromatographic analyses of BF-CM revealed elevated amounts of formate and the presence of Candida-derived farnesol, which is commonly known to exhibit antibacterial activity. Unexpectedly, at the levels detected (25–50 μM), farnesol enhanced S. mutans-biofilm cell growth, microcolony development, and Gtf activity akin to BF-CM bioactivity. Altogether, the data provide new insights on how extracellular microbial products from cross-kingdom interactions stimulate the accumulation of a bacterial pathogen within biofilms. PMID:28134351

  6. Symbiotic Relationship between Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Synergizes Virulence of Plaque Biofilms In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Falsetta, Megan L.; Klein, Marlise I.; Colonne, Punsiri M.; Scott-Anne, Kathleen; Gregoire, Stacy; Pai, Chia-Hua; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Watson, Gene; Krysan, Damian J.; Bowen, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is often cited as the main bacterial pathogen in dental caries, particularly in early-childhood caries (ECC). S. mutans may not act alone; Candida albicans cells are frequently detected along with heavy infection by S. mutans in plaque biofilms from ECC-affected children. It remains to be elucidated whether this association is involved in the enhancement of biofilm virulence. We showed that the ability of these organisms together to form biofilms is enhanced in vitro and in vivo. The presence of C. albicans augments the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS), such that cospecies biofilms accrue more biomass and harbor more viable S. mutans cells than single-species biofilms. The resulting 3-dimensional biofilm architecture displays sizeable S. mutans microcolonies surrounded by fungal cells, which are enmeshed in a dense EPS-rich matrix. Using a rodent model, we explored the implications of this cross-kingdom interaction for the pathogenesis of dental caries. Coinfected animals displayed higher levels of infection and microbial carriage within plaque biofilms than animals infected with either species alone. Furthermore, coinfection synergistically enhanced biofilm virulence, leading to aggressive onset of the disease with rampant carious lesions. Our in vitro data also revealed that glucosyltransferase-derived EPS is a key mediator of cospecies biofilm development and that coexistence with C. albicans induces the expression of virulence genes in S. mutans (e.g., gtfB, fabM). We also found that Candida-derived β1,3-glucans contribute to the EPS matrix structure, while fungal mannan and β-glucan provide sites for GtfB binding and activity. Altogether, we demonstrate a novel mutualistic bacterium-fungus relationship that occurs at a clinically relevant site to amplify the severity of a ubiquitous infectious disease. PMID:24566629

  7. Polymicrobial biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain and medium dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Alnuaimi, Ali D; Dashper, Stuart; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Oral biofilms comprise of extracellular polysaccharides and polymicrobial microorganisms. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polymicrobial interactions of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans on biofilm formation with the hypotheses that biofilm biomass and metabolic activity are both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent. To study monospecific biofilms, C. albicans, A. naeslundii, and S. mutans were inoculated into artificial saliva medium (ASM) and RPMI-1640 in separate vials, whereas to study polymicrobial biofilm formation, the inoculum containing microorganisms was prepared in the same vial prior inoculation into a 96-well plate followed by 72 hours incubation. Finally, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were measured using crystal violet and XTT assays, respectively. Our results showed variability of monospecies and polymicrobial biofilm biomass between C. albicans strains and growth medium. Based on cut-offs, out of 32, seven RPMI-grown biofilms had high biofilm biomass (HBB), whereas, in ASM-grown biofilms, 14 out of 32 were HBB. Of the 32 biofilms grown in RPMI-1640, 21 were high metabolic activity (HMA), whereas in ASM, there was no biofilm had HMA. Significant differences were observed between ASM and RPMI-grown biofilms with respect to metabolic activity (P <01). In conclusion, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent.

  8. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms.

  9. Cross-feeding and interkingdom communication in dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sztajer, Helena; Szafranski, Szymon P; Tomasch, Jürgen; Reck, Michael; Nimtz, Manfred; Rohde, Manfred; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2014-11-01

    Polymicrobial biofilms are of large medical importance, but relatively little is known about the role of interspecies interactions for their physiology and virulence. Here, we studied two human pathogens co-occuring in the oral cavity, the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans and the caries-promoting bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Dual-species biofilms reached higher biomass and cell numbers than mono-species biofilms, and the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) by S. mutans was strongly suppressed, which was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and transcriptome analysis. To detect interkingdom communication, C. albicans was co-cultivated with a strain of S. mutans carrying a transcriptional fusion between a green fluorescent protein-encoding gene and the promoter for sigX, the alternative sigma factor of S. mutans, which is induced by quorum sensing signals. Strong induction of sigX was observed in dual-species biofilms, but not in single-species biofilms. Conditioned media from mixed biofilms but not from C. albicans or S. mutans cultivated alone activated sigX in the reporter strain. Deletion of comS encoding the synthesis of the sigX-inducing peptide precursor abolished this activity, whereas deletion of comC encoding the competence-stimulating peptide precursor had no effect. Transcriptome analysis of S. mutans confirmed induction of comS, sigX, bacteriocins and the downstream late competence genes, including fratricins, in dual-species biofilms. We show here for the first time the stimulation of the complete quorum sensing system of S. mutans by a species from another kingdom, namely the fungus C. albicans, resulting in fundamentally changed virulence properties of the caries pathogen.

  10. Biofilm formation by Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans in the presence of farnesol: a quantitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Renan Aparecido; Monteiro, Douglas Roberto; Arias, Laís Salomão; Fernandes, Gabriela Lopes; Delbem, Alberto Carlos Botazzo; Barbosa, Debora Barros

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the QS molecule farnesol on single and mixed species biofilms formed by Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. The anti-biofilm effect of farnesol was assessed through total biomass quantification, counting of colony forming units (CFUs) and evaluation of metabolic activity. Biofilms were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was observed that farnesol reduced the formation of single and mixed biofilms, with significant reductions of 37% to 90% and 64% to 96%, respectively, for total biomass and metabolic activity. Regarding cell viability, farnesol treatment promoted significant log reductions in the number of CFUs, ie 1.3-4.2 log10 and 0.67-5.32 log10, respectively, for single and mixed species biofilms. SEM images confirmed these results, showing decreases in the number of cells in all biofilms. In conclusion, these findings highlight the role of farnesol as an alternative agent with the potential to reduce the formation of pathogenic biofilms.

  11. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis.

  12. The Effect of Essential Oils and Bioactive Fractions on Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans Biofilms: A Confocal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Freires, Irlan Almeida; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Duarte, Marta Cristina Teixeira; Sartoratto, Adilson; Figueira, Glyn Mara; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2015-01-01

    The essential oils (EO) and bioactive fractions (BF) from Aloysia gratissima, Baccharis dracunculifolia, Coriandrum sativum, Cyperus articulatus, and Lippia sidoides were proven to have strong antimicrobial activity on planktonic microorganisms; however, little is known about their effects on the morphology or viability of oral biofilms. Previously, we determined the EO/fractions with the best antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida spp. In this report, we used a confocal analysis to investigate the effect of these EO and BF on the morphology of S. mutans biofilms (thickness, biovolume, and architecture) and on the metabolic viability of C. albicans biofilms. The analysis of intact treated S. mutans biofilms showed no statistical difference for thickness in all groups compared to the control. However, a significant reduction in the biovolume of extracellular polysaccharides and bacteria was observed for A. gratissima and L. sidoides groups, indicating that these BF disrupt biofilm integrity and may have created porosity in the biofilm. This phenomenon could potentially result in a weakened structure and affect biofilm dynamics. Finally, C. sativum EO drastically affected C. albicans viability when compared to the control. These results highlight the promising antimicrobial activity of these plant species and support future translational research on the treatment of dental caries and oral candidiasis. PMID:25821503

  13. Preparation and evaluation of antimicrobial activity of nanosystems for the control of oral pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pupe, Carolina Gonçalves; Villardi, Michele; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Rocha, Helvécio Vinícius Antunes; Maia, Lucianne Cople; de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2011-01-01

    Background Diseases that affect the buccal cavity are a public health concern nowadays. Chlorhexidine and nystatin are the most commonly used drugs for the control of buccal affections. In the search for more effective antimicrobials, nanotechnology can be successfully used to improve the physical chemical properties of drugs whilst avoiding the undesirable side effects associated with its use. Herein described are studies using nystatin and chlorhexidine with sodium montmorillonite (MMTNa), and chlorhexidine with β-cyclodextrin and two derivatives methyl-β-cyclodextrin and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin in the development of antimicrobial nanosystems. Methods The nanosystems were prepared by kneading and solubilization followed by freeze-drying technique. The nanosystems were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Nanosystem antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans strains was evaluated with inhibition halo analysis. Results The nanocarriers MMTNa and cyclodextrins showed good yields. XRPD, FTIR, and DSC analysis confirmed the proposed nanosystems formation and the suitability of the production methods. The nanosystems that showed best antimicrobial effect were chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes and CHX:MMTNa 60% cation exchange capacity – 24 hours. Conclusion The nanosystem formulations present higher stability for all chlorhexidine inclusion complexes compared with pure chlorhexidine. The nystatin nanosystems have the potential to mask the bitter taste, justifying subsequent in-vivo studies. For these reasons, further studies are being carried out to evaluate their application in professional formulations. PMID:22114490

  14. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  15. Efficacy of sodium hypochlorite and coconut soap used as disinfecting agents in the reduction of denture stomatitis, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Barnabé, W; de Mendonça Neto, T; Pimenta, F C; Pegoraro, L F; Scolaro, J M

    2004-05-01

    This study evaluated the reduction of denture stomatitis and the antimicrobial activity of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite opposed to Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans (SGM) when associated with brushing complete dentures with coconut soap. The mucosal characteristics were evaluated according to Newton's classification at baseline, after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap for 15 days in group 1 (nine patients). In the other group (19 patients) the analysis were made before and after cleansing the dentures with coconut soap and with disinfection in a soak solution of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite for 10 min during 15 days. Microbiological tests were used to isolate C. albicans and SGM. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the mucosal characteristics and Fisher test and McNemar test to compare C. albicans and SGM levels. Statistical analysis at the 95% confidence level (P < 0.05) showed that: (i) the association of coconut soap and 0.05% sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced clinical signs of denture stomatitis, (ii) C. albicans did not reduce in counts, (iii) SGM were reduced but not significantly and (iv) the association of coconut soap and 0.5% sodium hypochlorite was effective in controlling denture biofilm.

  16. Influence of sucrose on growth and sensitivity of Candida albicans alone and in combination with Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans to photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Tomé, Fernanda Malagutti; De Paula Ramos, Lucas; Freire, Fernanda; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; de Oliveira, Ingrid Christine Barbosa; Campos Junqueira, Juliana; Cardoso Jorge, Antonio Olavo; Dias de Oliveira, Luciane

    2017-04-07

    This study has evaluated the effects of photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using erythrosine as photosensitizer and green light-emitting diode (LED) on biofilms of Candida albicans alone and in combination with Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus mutans. We have also evaluated the effect of sucrose on biofilm formation and bacterial growth and sensitivity to PDI. Biofilms were formed in suspension of 10(6) cells/ml on plates before being grown in broth culture with and without sucrose and incubated for 48 h. Next, the treatment was applied using erythrosine at a concentration of 400 μM for 5 min and green LED (532 ± 10 nm) for 3 min on biofilms alone and in combination. The plates were washed and sonicated to disperse the biofilms, and serial dilutions were carried and aliquots seeded in Sabouraud agar before incubation for 48 h. Next, the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml; log10) were counted and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, P ≤ 0.05). Results show that S. mutans favors the growth of C. albicans in biofilms with sucrose, with treatment not being effective. However, when the biofilm was grown without sucrose, we found a reduction in biofilm formation and a significant decrease in the PDI treatment (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, both growth and sensitivity to PDI in biofilms of C. albicans are strongly influenced by bacterial combination, and the presence of sucrose affected directly the growth and sensitivity of the biofilm to PDI as sucrose is the substrate for construction of the exopolysaccharide matrix.

  17. Susceptibility of Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans biofilms to photodynamic inactivation: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Romeiro, Rogério Lima; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Machado, Ana Karina Silva; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate specific effects of photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using methylene blue as photosensitizer and low-power laser irradiation on the viability of single-, dual-, and three-species biofilms formed by C. albicans, S. aureus, and S. mutans. Biofilms were grown in acrylic discs immersed in sterile brain heart infusion broth (BHI) containing 5% sucrose, inoculated with microbial suspension (10(6) cells/ml) and incubated for 5 days. On the fifth day, the effects of the methylene blue (MB) photosensitizer at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml for 5 min and InGaAlP laser (660 nm) for 98 s, alone and conjugated were evaluated. Next, the discs were placed in tubes with sterile physiological solution [0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl)] and sonicated for to disperse the biofilms. Ten-fold serial dilutions were carried and aliquots seeded in selective agar, which were then incubated for 48 h. Then the numbers CFU/ml (log(10)) were counted and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on discs treated with PDI and control biofilms groups was performed. Significant decreases in the viability of all microorganisms were observed for biofilms exposed to PDI mediated by MB dye. Reductions (log(10)) of single-species biofilms were greater (2.32-3.29) than the association of biofilms (1.00-2.44). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs suggested that lethal photosensitization occurred predominantly in the outermost layers of the biofilms. The results showed that PDI mediated by MB dye, might be a useful approach for the control of oral biofilms.

  18. Horizontal transmission of streptococcus mutans in schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Ana M.; Liébana, Maria J.; Castillo, Francisca; Martín-Platero, Antonio; Liébana, José

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: The aim of this study was to analyze possible horizontal transmission patterns of S. mutans among 6-7-yr-old schoolchildren from the same class, identifying genotypes and their diversity and relationship with caries disease status. Study Design: Caries indexes and saliva mutans streptococci and lactobacilli counts were recorded in 42 schoolchildren. Mutans streptococci colonies were identified by means of biochemical tests and all S. mutans strains were genotyped by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction. A child was considered free of S. mutans when it could not be isolated in 3 samples at 1-week intervals. Results: S. mutans was isolated in 30 schoolchildren: 20 having one genotype and 10 two genotypes. Higher mutans streptococci and caries index values were found in those with two genotypes. Five genotypes were isolated in more than 1 schoolchild and one of these was isolated in 3 schoolchildren. Our results suggest that horizontal transmission may take place. Conclusion: Schoolchildren aged 6-7 yrs may be the source of mutual transmission of S. mutans. Key words:Streptococcus mutans, Horizontal transmission, AP-PCR, genotyping PMID:22143733

  19. Streptococcus mutans, Caries and Simulation Models

    PubMed Central

    Forssten, Sofia D.; Björklund, Marika; Ouwehand, Arthur C.

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries and dental plaque are among the most common diseases worldwide, and are caused by a mixture of microorganisms and food debris. Specific types of acid-producing bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans, colonize the dental surface and cause damage to the hard tooth structure in the presence of fermentable carbohydrates e.g., sucrose and fructose. This paper reviews the link between S. mutans and caries, as well as different simulation models that are available for studying caries. These models offer a valuable approach to study cariogenicity of different substrates as well as colonization of S. mutans. PMID:22254021

  20. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P; Williams, Matthew L; Nascimento, Marcelle M; Burne, Robert A

    2016-01-29

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)-ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens.

  1. A Highly Arginolytic Streptococcus Species That Potently Antagonizes Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xuelian; Palmer, Sara R.; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Richards, Vincent P.; Williams, Matthew L.; Nascimento, Marcelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of certain oral biofilm bacteria to moderate pH through arginine metabolism by the arginine deiminase system (ADS) is a deterrent to the development of dental caries. Here, we characterize a novel Streptococcus strain, designated strain A12, isolated from supragingival dental plaque of a caries-free individual. A12 not only expressed the ADS pathway at high levels under a variety of conditions but also effectively inhibited growth and two intercellular signaling pathways of the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. A12 produced copious amounts of H2O2 via the pyruvate oxidase enzyme that were sufficient to arrest the growth of S. mutans. A12 also produced a protease similar to challisin (Sgc) of Streptococcus gordonii that was able to block the competence-stimulating peptide (CSP)–ComDE signaling system, which is essential for bacteriocin production by S. mutans. Wild-type A12, but not an sgc mutant derivative, could protect the sensitive indicator strain Streptococcus sanguinis SK150 from killing by the bacteriocins of S. mutans. A12, but not S. gordonii, could also block the XIP (comX-inducing peptide) signaling pathway, which is the proximal regulator of genetic competence in S. mutans, but Sgc was not required for this activity. The complete genome sequence of A12 was determined, and phylogenomic analyses compared A12 to streptococcal reference genomes. A12 was most similar to Streptococcus australis and Streptococcus parasanguinis but sufficiently different that it may represent a new species. A12-like organisms may play crucial roles in the promotion of stable, health-associated oral biofilm communities by moderating plaque pH and interfering with the growth and virulence of caries pathogens. PMID:26826230

  2. Streptococcus mutans-induced nephritis in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Albini, B.; Nisengard, R. J.; Glurich, I.; Neiders, M. E.; Stinson, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Intravenous administration of disrupted Streptococcus mutans into rabbits over 23-76 weeks led to severe nephritis involving glomeruli, tubules, and interstitium. Light-microscopic observation of glomeruli documented diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis accompanied often (65%) by epithelial crescents. Electron-microscopic observation revealed humps in glomeruli of 70% of kidney specimens. In the glomeruli of some rabbits, extensive fibrin deposits and sclerosis were evident. Immunofluorescence showed linear, granular, often ribbonlike or patchy immune deposits encompassing, in order of decreasing frequency, C3, IgG, streptococcal antigen, IgA, and IgM. The histopathologic and immunohistologic features of the nephritis seen in rabbits given S mutans thus shows many features of Streptococcus-associated nephritides in man, in particular, the diffuse glomerular nephritis encountered in subacute bacterial endocarditis. Further, analysis of nephritis induced by administration of S mutans may have implications for the evaluation and purification of dental caries vaccines. Images Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:3976844

  3. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  4. Anticariogenic activity of some tropical medicinal plants against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Kwan; Shim, Jae-Seok; Chung, Jae-Youn

    2004-09-01

    The methanol extracts of five tropical plants, Baeckea frutescens, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Kaempferia pandurata, Physalis angulata and Quercus infectoria, exhibited potent antibacterial activity against the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. In particular, G. glabra, K. pandurata and P. angulata conferred fast killing bactericidal effect against S. mutans in 2 min at 50 microg/ml of extract concentration.

  5. Diversity of Streptococcus mutans strains in bacterial interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolan; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Ling, Junqi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2014-02-01

    Biofilms are matrix-enclosed microbial population adhere to each other and to surfaces. Compared to planktonic bacterial cells, biofilm cells show much higher levels of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to investigate Streptococcus mutans strain diversity in biofilm formation and chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance of single S. mutans and dual S. mutans-Enterococcus faecalis biofilms. Four clinical S. mutans strains (C180-2, C67-1, HG723 and UA159) formed 24-h biofilms with or without an E. faecalis strain. These biofilms were treated for 10 min with 0.025% CHX. Biofilm formation, CHX resistance and S.mutans-E. faecalis interactions were evaluated by biomass staining, resazurin metabolism, viable count and competition agar assays. The main finding is that the presence of E. faecalis generally reduced all dual-species biofilm formation, but the proportions of S. mutans in the dual-species biofilms as well as CHX resistance displayed a clear S. mutans strain dependence. In particular, decreased resistance against CHX was observed in dual S. mutans C67-1 biofilms, while increased resistance was found in dual S. mutans UA159 biofilms. In conclusion, the interaction of S. mutans with E. faecalis in biofilms varies between strains, which underlines the importance of studying strain diversity in inter-species virulence modulation and biofilm antimicrobial resistance.

  6. HIV Infection Affects Streptococcus mutans Levels, but Not Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, G.; Saxena, D.; Chen, Z.; Norman, R.G.; Phelan, J.A.; Laverty, M.; Fisch, G.S.; Corby, P.M.; Abrams, W.; Malamud, D.; Li, Y.

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical study that examines whether HIV infection affects Streptococcus mutans colonization in the oral cavity. Whole stimulated saliva samples were collected from 46 HIV-seropositive individuals and 69 HIV-seronegative control individuals. The level of S. mutans colonization was determined by conventional culture methods. The genotype of S. mutans was compared between 10 HIV-positive individuals before and after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 10 non-HIV-infected control individuals. The results were analyzed against viral load, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell counts, salivary flow rate, and caries status. We observed that S. mutans levels were higher in HIV-infected individuals than in the non-HIV-infected control individuals (p = 0.013). No significant differences in S. mutans genotypes were found between the two groups over the six-month study period, even after HAART. There was a bivariate linear relationship between S. mutans levels and CD8+ counts (r = 0.412; p = 0.007), but not between S. mutans levels and either CD4+ counts or viral load. Furthermore, compared with non-HIV-infected control individuals, HIV-infected individuals experienced lower salivary secretion (p = 0.009) and a positive trend toward more decayed tooth surfaces (p = 0.027). These findings suggest that HIV infection can have a significant effect on the level of S. mutans, but not genotypes. PMID:22821240

  7. Effect of a chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans in saliva.

    PubMed

    Piovano, Susana; Marcantoni, Mabel; Doño, Raquel; Bellagamba, Hebe

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of a thymol/chlorhexidine varnish at 1% on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) in saliva applied after teaching and evaluating an oral hygiene technique and dressing the cavities to reduce the bacterial load. Streptococcus mutans levels in saliva samples and dental status were evaluated in 38 girls between 6 and 13 years of age with high risk of caries. The girls were then trained and assessed in oral hygiene. On day seven, oral hygiene assessment was repeated and supragingival plaque control was performed. After 15 days (day 21) another culture was performed and the level of S. mutans in saliva samples was determined. Evaluation and reinforcement of the oral hygiene technique were repeated and the cavities were dressed to reduce the bacterial load. At 36 days from the onset of the experiment, culture S. mutans counts were performed; evaluation and reinforcement of the oral hygiene technique were undertaken and the girls were divided randomly into two groups: 1 The teeth of the experimental group were painted with a varnish containing 1% chlorhexidine and thymol. 2 The teeth of the control group were painted with a placebo varnish containing only thymol. After a further 15 days (day 51), another culture and S. mutans counts were performed. The results showed a gradual reduction in the S. mutans counts in saliva in each subsequent experimental period analyzed. Significant differences between the experimental group and the control group were recorded after treatment. It can be concluded that the levels of S. mutans decreased in each subsequent experimental period and that the application of a 1% chlorhexidine varnish elicited a significant reduction in S. mutans levels.

  8. Corrosion of dental alloys in artificial saliva with Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhui; Zheng, Yuanli; Zhong, Qun

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion resistance of CoCr and NiCr alloys in artificial saliva (AS) containing tryptic soy broth (Solution 1) and Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) species (Solution 2) was performed by electrochemical methods, including open circuit potential measurements, impedance spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The adherence of S. mutans to the NiCr and CoCr alloy surfaces immersed in Solution 2 for 24 h was verified by scanning electron microscopy, while the results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy confirmed the importance of biofilm formation for the corrosion process. The R(QR) equivalent circuit was successfully used to fit the data obtained for the AS mixture without S. mutans, while the R(Q(R(QR))) circuit was found to be more suitable for describing the biofilm properties after treatment with the AS containing S. mutans species. In addition, a negative shift of the open circuit potential with immersion time was observed for all samples regardless of the solution type. Both alloys exhibited higher charge transfer resistance after treatment with Solution 2, and lower corrosion current densities were detected for all samples in the presence of S. mutans. The obtained results suggest that the biofilm formation observed after 24 h of exposure to S. mutans bacteria might enhance the corrosion resistance of the studied samples by creating physical barriers that prevented oxygen interactions with the metal surfaces. PMID:28350880

  9. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  10. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries.

  11. Functional variation of the antigen I/II surface protein in Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Petersen, F C; Assev, S; van der Mei, H C; Busscher, H J; Scheie, A A

    2002-01-01

    Although Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus mutans are regarded as members of the commensal microflora of the body, S. intermedius is often associated with deep-seated purulent infections, whereas S. mutans is frequently associated with dental caries. In this study, we investigated the roles of the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II proteins in adhesion and modulation of cell surface characteristics. By using isogenic mutants, we show that the antigen I/II in S. mutans, but not in S. intermedius, was involved in adhesion to a salivary film under flowing conditions, as well as in binding to rat collagen type I. Binding to human fibronectin was a common function associated with the S. mutans and S. intermedius antigen I/II. Adhesion of S. mutans or S. intermedius to human collagen types I or IV was negligible. Hydrophobicity, as measured by water contact angles, and zeta potentials were unaltered in the S. intermedius mutant. The S. mutans isogenic mutants, on the other hand, exhibited more positive zeta potentials at physiological pH values than did the wild type. The results indicate common and species-specific roles for the antigen I/II in mediating the attachment of S. mutans and S. intermedius to host components and in determining cell surface properties.

  12. Effect of nicotine on cariogenic virulence of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyun; Huang, Ruijie; Zhou, Xuedong; Qiu, Wei; Xu, Xin; Gregory, Richard L

    2016-11-01

    Nicotine has well-documented effects on the growth and colonization of Streptococcus mutans. This study attempts to investigate the effects of nicotine on pathogenic factors of S. mutans, such as the effect on biofilm formation and viability, expression of pathogenic genes, and metabolites of S. mutans. The results demonstrated that addition of nicotine did not significantly influence the viability of S. mutans cells. The biofilms became increasingly compact as the concentrations of nicotine increased. The expression of virulence genes, such as ldh and phosphotransferase system (PTS)-associated genes, was upregulated, and nlmC was upregulated significantly, while ftf was downregulated. The lactate concentration of S. mutans grown in 1 mg/mL of nicotine was increased up to twofold over either biofilm or planktonic cells grown without nicotine. Changes in the metabolites involved in central carbon metabolism from sucrose indicated that most selected metabolites were detectable and influenced by increased concentrations of nicotine. This study demonstrated that nicotine can influence the pathogenicity of S. mutans and may lead to increased dental caries through the production of more lactate and the upregulation of virulence genes.

  13. Heart-reactive antibodies in rabbit anti-Streptococcus mutans sera fail to cross-react with Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Swartzwelder, F J; Barua, P K; Albini, B; Stinson, M W

    1988-02-01

    Immunization of rabbits with Streptococcus mutans antigens results in the production of serum antibodies that bind in vitro to human, rabbit, and monkey cardiac muscle. Antibodies to heart, however, have also been reported to occur at lower titers in the sera of unimmunized rabbits. In this study, the specificities of heart-reactive antibodies (HRA) in sera of unimmunized and S. mutans-immunized rabbits were compared using indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot, and Bio-Dot immunoassays. Both groups of sera gave striational indirect immunofluorescence-staining patterns on thin sections of native human and monkey cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses revealed that antibodies in normal sera bound 9 to 20 components of human, rabbit, and monkey heart. The major bands had Mr of 205,000, 160,000, 135,000, and 70,000. Several of the normal sera did not have antibody activity to S. mutans antigens, indicating that these HRA do not cross-react with these bacteria. Although immunization of rabbits with S. mutans caused increased titers of HRA (two to three doubling dilutions), Western blot assays using anti-S. mutans sera showed banding patterns qualitatively similar to those of normal sera on heart extracts. Antibodies to skeletal muscle myosin were detected in both serum groups. Of eighteen normal rabbit sera sixteen had antimyosin titers of 10 to 40, whereas all eighteen anti-S. mutans sera had titers of 10 to 160. Affinity-purified antimyosin antibodies isolated from anti-S. mutans serum did not bind to S. mutans components. Conversely, affinity-purified antibodies to S. mutans antigens did not bind to myosin or to other cardiac muscle components. Among these were antibodies to the 185-kDa cell wall protein (also known as B, I/II, IF, Spa A, and P1) previously believed to possess antigenic mimicry. HRA were removed from anti-S. mutans sera by absorption with S. mutans but this effect was not specific, because a non-cross-reactive internal standard antibody was also

  14. Essential oil of Curcuma longa inhibits Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoi; Chang, Byoung-Soo; Ra, Ji-Young; Moon, Hae-Dalma; Seo, Bo-Ra; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) has been used as a spice in foods and as an antimicrobial in Oriental medicine. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of an essential oil isolated from C. longa on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), which is an important bacterium in dental plaque and dental caries formation. First, the inhibitory effects of C. longa essential oil on the growth and acid production of S. mutans were tested. Next, the effect of C. longa essential oil on adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HAs) was investigated. C. longa essential oil inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mg/mL. The essential oil also exhibited significant inhibition of S. mutans adherence to S-HAs at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. The essential oil of C. longa inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. The components of C. longa essential oil were then analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the major components were α-turmerone (35.59%), germacrone (19.02%), α-zingiberene (8.74%), αr-turmerone (6.31%), trans-β-elemenone (5.65%), curlone (5.45%), and β-sesquiphellandrene (4.73%). These results suggest that C. longa may inhibit the cariogenic properties of S. mutans.

  15. Binding Force Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans–glucosyltransferase B to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, G.; Marsh, G.; Gao, L.; Waugh, R.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans cells are often detected with Streptococcus mutans in plaque biofilms from children affected with early childhood caries. The coadhesion between these 2 organisms appears to be largely mediated by the S. mutans–derived exoenzyme glucosyltransferase B (GtfB); GtfB readily binds to C. albicans cells in an active form, producing glucans locally that provide enhanced binding sites for S. mutans. However, knowledge is limited about the mechanisms by which the bacterial exoenzyme binds to and functions on the fungal surface to promote this unique cross-kingdom interaction. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to understand the strength and binding dynamics modulating GtfB–C. albicans adhesive interactions in situ. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with GtfB-functionalized atomic force microscopy tips demonstrated that the enzyme binds with remarkable strength to the C. albicans cell surface (~2 nN) and showed a low dissociation rate, suggesting a highly stable bond. Strikingly, the binding strength of GtfB to the C. albicans surface was ~2.5-fold higher and the binding stability, ~20 times higher, as compared with the enzyme adhesion to S. mutans. Furthermore, adhesion force maps showed an intriguing pattern of GtfB binding. GtfB adhered heterogeneously on the surface of C. albicans, showing a higher frequency of adhesion failure but large sections of remarkably strong binding forces, suggesting the presence of GtfB binding domains unevenly distributed on the fungal surface. In contrast, GtfB bound uniformly across the S. mutans cell surface with less adhesion failure and a narrower range of binding forces (vs. the C. albicans surface). The data provide the first insights into the mechanisms underlying the adhesive and mechanical properties governing GtfB interactions with C. albicans. The strong and highly stable GtfB binding to C. albicans could explain, at least in part, why this bacterially derived exoenzyme effectively modulates this

  16. Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Huang, Jun; Liu, Xiaodi; Peng, Lei; Guo, Lihong; Lv, Guohua; Chen, Wei; Feng, Kecheng; Yang, Si-ze

    2009-03-01

    A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O2 does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

  17. Treatment of Streptococcus mutans bacteria by a plasma needle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xianhui; Huang Jun; Lv Guohua; Liu Xiaodi; Peng Lei; Guo Lihong; Chen Wei; Feng Kecheng; Yang Size

    2009-03-15

    A dielectric barrier discharge plasma needle was realized at atmospheric pressure with a funnel-shaped nozzle. The preliminary characteristics of the plasma plume and its applications in the inactivation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), the most important microorganism causing dental caries, were presented in this paper. The temperature of the plasma plume does not reach higher than 315 K when the power is below 28 W. Oxygen was injected downstream in the plasma afterglow region through the powered steel tube. Its effect was studied via optical-emission spectroscopy, both in air and in agar. Results show that addition of 26 SCCM O{sub 2} does not affect the plume length significantly (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The inactivation of S. mutans is primarily attributed to ultraviolet light emission, O, OH, and He radicals.

  18. Genome sequence of Streptococcus mutans bacteriophage M102.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Jan R

    2007-10-01

    Bacteriophage M102 is a lytic phage specific for serotype c strains of Streptococcus mutans, a causative agent of dental caries. In this study, the complete genome sequence of M102 was determined. The genome is 31,147 bp in size and contains 41 ORFs. Most of the ORFs encoding putative phage structural proteins show similarity to those from bacteriophages from Streptococcus thermophilus. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the M102 genome contains an unusual lysis cassette, which encodes a holin and two lytic enzymes.

  19. Effects of Fluoride Varnish on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Badjatia, Rini G; Thanveer, K; Krishnan, Ajith CG

    2017-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effect of fluoride varnish on Streptococcus mutans count in saliva among 12-year-old school children. Materials and methods A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of fluoride varnish on S. mutans count in saliva among 12-year-old school children. A total of 42 school-going children attending schools in Vadodara district, Gujarat, India, were divided into two groups. Group I was treated with fluoride varnish and group II received no treatment. Assessment of S. mutans was carried out at baseline and 3 to 6 months postfluoride varnish application. Friedman analysis of variance test and post hoc test were applied to detect statistically significant differences between baseline, 3 to 6 months of fluoride varnish application, and also between groups I and II. Results The mean number of salivary S. mutans value found in case group at baseline, 3 to 6 months was 31.23 ± 1.119, 9.27 ± 0.852, and 9.39 ± 0.908 × 104 colony-forming unit CFU/mL respectively. The difference in S. mutans count from baseline to 3 to 6 months was highly statistically significant (p = 0.000), but the difference from 3 to 6 months was not statistically significant (p = 0.142). In control group, the mean S. mutans value found at baseline, 3 to 6 months was 30.63 ± 1.436, 31.23 ± 1.351, and 31.40 ± 1.374 × 104 CFU/mL respectively. The differences between these values were not statistically significant (p = 0.11). Conclusion Statistically significant reduction in S. mutans count in saliva was seen 3 to 6 months after fluoride varnish application. How to cite this article Badjatia S, Badjatia RG, Thanveer K, Krishnan ACG. Effects of Fluoride Varnish on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(1):62-66. PMID:28377658

  20. Influence of pH on inhibition of Streptococcus mutans by Streptococcus oligofermentans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chu, Lei; Wu, Fei; Guo, Lili; Li, Mengci; Wang, Yinghui; Wu, Ligeng

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus oligofermentans is a novel strain of oral streptococcus that can specifically inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans. The aims of this study were to assess the growth of S. oligofermentans and the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit growth of Streptococcus mutans at different pH values. Growth inhibition was investigated in vitro using an interspecies competition assay. The 4-aminoantipyine method was used to measure the initial production rate and the total yield of hydrogen peroxide in S. oligofermentans. S. oligofermentans grew best at pH 7.0 and showed the most pronounced inhibitory effect when it was inoculated earlier than S. mutans. In terms of the total yield and the initial production rate of hydrogen peroxide by S. oligofermentans, the effects of the different culture pH values were as follows: pH 7.0 > 6.5 > 6.0 > 7.5 > 5.5 = 8.0 (i.e. there was no significant difference between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0). Environmental pH and the sequence of inoculation significantly affected the ability of S. oligofermentans to inhibit the growth of S. mutans. The degree of inhibition may be attributed to the amount of hydrogen peroxide produced.

  1. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-01-01

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results represent the first description of a compound that targets Gtfs and that has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans. PMID:26482298

  2. Monofluorophosphate Blocks Internal Polysaccharide Synthesis in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Naleway, Conrad; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the leading cause of dental caries worldwide by accumulating a glycogen-like internal polysaccharide (IPS) that contributes to cariogenicity when sugars are in excess. Sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP) is an active anticariogenic compound in toothpastes. Herein, we show that MFP inhibits (with an I0.5 of 1.5 mM) the S. mutans ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27), which catalyzes the key step in IPS biosynthesis. Enzyme inhibition by MFP is similar to orthophosphate (Pi), except that the effect caused by MFP is not reverted by fructose-1,6-bisP, as occurs with Pi. Inhibition was correlated with a decrease in acidogenesis and IPS accumulation in S. mutans cells cultured with 2 mM sodium MFP. These effects were not mimicked by sodium fluoride. Considering that glycogen synthesis occurs by different pathways in mammals and bacteria, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase could be visualized as a molecular target for controlling S. mutans virulence. Our results strongly suggest that MFP is a suitable compound to affect such a target, inducing an anticariogenic effect primarily by inhibiting a key step in IPS synthesis. PMID:28125652

  3. β-Phosphoglucomutase contributes to aciduricity in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Andrew A; Faustoferri, Roberta C; Quivey, Robert G

    2014-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans encounters an array of sugar moieties within the oral cavity due to a varied human diet. One such sugar is β-d-glucose 1-phosphate (βDG1P), which must be converted to glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) before further metabolism to lactic acid. The conversion of βDG1P to G6P is mediated by β-phosphoglucomutase, which has not been previously observed in any oral streptococci, but has been extensively characterized and the gene designated pgmB in Lactococcus lactis. An orthologue was identified in S. mutans, SMU.1747c, and deletion of the gene resulted in the inability of the deletion strain to convert βDG1P to G6P, indicating that SMU.1747c is a β-phosphoglucomutase and should be designated pgmB. In this study, we sought to characterize how deletion of pgmB affected known virulence factors of S. mutans, specifically acid tolerance. The ΔpgmB strain showed a decreased ability to survive acid challenge. Additionally, the strain lacking β-phosphoglucomutase had a diminished glycolytic profile compared with the parental strain. Deletion of pgmB had a negative impact on the virulence of S. mutans in the Galleria mellonella (greater wax worm) animal model. Our results indicate that pgmB plays a role at the juncture of carbohydrate metabolism and virulence.

  4. Collagen-binding proteins of Streptococcus mutans and related streptococci.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Reyes, A; Miller, J H; Lemos, J A; Abranches, J

    2017-04-01

    The ability of Streptococcus mutans to interact with collagen through the expression of collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) bestows this oral pathogen with an alternative to the sucrose-dependent mechanism of colonization classically attributed to caries development. Based on the abundance and distribution of collagen throughout the human body, stringent adherence to this molecule grants S. mutans with the opportunity to establish infection at different host sites. Surface proteins, such as SpaP, WapA, Cnm and Cbm, have been shown to bind collagen in vitro, and it has been suggested that these molecules play a role in colonization of oral and extra-oral tissues. However, robust collagen binding is not achieved by all strains of S. mutans, particularly those that lack Cnm or Cbm. These observations merit careful dissection of the contribution from these different CBPs towards tissue colonization and virulence. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of mechanisms used by S. mutans and related streptococci to colonize collagenous tissues, and the possible contribution of CBPs to infections in different sites of the host.

  5. Caries experience and quantification of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in saliva of Sudanese schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Nurelhuda, Nazik M; Al-Haroni, M; Trovik, T A; Bakken, V

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are among the most commonly isolated bacterial species implicated as etiological agents of dental caries. Details of the composition of the oral microflora related to dental caries should aid in assessing the prevalence and risk of disease at an individual level. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence and relative amounts of S. mutans and S. sobrinus in the saliva samples obtained from schoolchildren in Khartoum State, the Sudan, and to study the association of the amounts of S. mutans and S. sobrinus with caries experience, socioeconomic status and sugar-sweetened snacks in this population. 140 samples, 30 of which were from individuals with caries experience, were examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) with specific oligonucleotide primers. The mean ratio of fold differences of S. mutans to S. sobrinus was 0.77 (SD 5.4) and 2.29 (SD 6.0) for samples obtained from caries-free and caries-active individuals, respectively. This suggested that the proportion of S. sobrinus was higher than S.mutans in the caries-active group when compared to the caries-free group. An association was found between children with caries-active lesions and the frequent consumption of sticky desserts and higher socioeconomic status. S. sobrinus seems to be associated with caries experience in the studied population. A proposal of caries screening programs designed to test for S. sobrinus in this population may be developed.

  6. Pyridine analogs inhibit the glucosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Thaniyavarn, S; Taylor, K G; Singh, S; Doyle, R J

    1982-01-01

    Soluble glucan synthesis catalyzed by dextransucrase preparations from Streptococcus mutans 6715 were inhibited by pyridoxal-5-phosphate and several other pyridine analogs, including pyridoxine, pyridoxamine, pyridoxamine-5-phosphate, pyridoxal, and 4-pyridoxic acid. Pyridine and pyridine-4-carboxaldehyde were not effective inhibitors of the enzyme. Kinetic analyses suggested that pyridoxal-5-phosphate is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dextransucrase. The inactivation was dependent on time, pyridoxal-5-phosphate concentration, and hydrogen ion concentration. Apparent Ki values were 4.9 mM at pH 7.0 and 4.2 mM at pH 5.5. Dextransucrase activity could be restored by dialysis to remove the inhibitors. Maximum inhibition was observed after a 120-min incubation of the enzyme with pyridoxal-5-phosphate. The pH optima for inhibition by pyridoxal-5-phosphate were 4 and 7. The sucrose-dependent adherence of S. mutans cells to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads was also inhibited by pyridoxal-5-phosphate but only marginally by the other pyridine anatogs. In addition, pyridoxal-5-phosphate markedly reduced the rate of acid production by intact S. mutans cells from sucrose or glucose substrates. Another pyridoxal-5-phosphate analog, 2-methyl-5-hydroxypyridine, was also effective in preventing the production of acid by S. mutans from sucrose or glucose. When S. mutans cells were preincubated with pyridoxal-5-phosphate or pyridine analogs, significant reductions in the rate of D-glucose uptake were observed. It is suggested that the inhibition of dextransucrase occurs because of a change iun enzyme conformation which results from the binding of the pyridine derivatives. The results suggest that pyridoxal-5-phosphate or structural analogs may ultimately be useful in reducing the incidence of dental caries. PMID:6215355

  7. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries. PMID:26114758

  8. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus mutans: Comparison of Serotype Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Little, Wayne A.; Thomson, Lynn A.; Bowen, William H.

    1979-01-01

    A total of 82 strains of Streptococcus mutans representing serotypes a through g were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, penicillin, methicillin, lincomycin, tetracycline, vancomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, neomycin, kanamycin, bacitracin, and polymyxin B. Strains included stock cultures and isolates from human and animal dental plaque. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by a broth-microdilution procedure. The major differences in antibiotic susceptibility observed among the serotypes resulted with antibiotics which act on the cell surface. Bacitracin was most active against serotype a strains and polymyxin B against serotype b strains. Serotypes a, d, and g were less susceptible than the other serotypes to methicillin. PMID:464571

  9. Proteases of an early colonizer can hinder Streptococcus mutans colonization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, B-Y; Deutch, A; Hong, J; Kuramitsu, H K

    2011-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary cariogen that produces several virulence factors that are modulated by a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) signaling system. In this study, we sought to determine if proteases produced by early dental plaque colonizers such as Streptococcus gordonii interfere with the subsequent colonization of S. mutans BM71 on the existing streptococcal biofilms. We demonstrated that S. mutans BM71 colonized much less efficiently in vitro on streptococcal biofilms than on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilms. Several oral streptococci, relative to A. naeslundii, produced proteases that inactivated the S. mutans CSP. We further demonstrated that cell protein extracts from S. gordonii, but not from A. naeslundii, interfered with S. mutans BM71 colonization. In addition, S. mutans BM71 colonized more efficiently on the sgc protease knockout mutant of S. gordonii than on the parent biofilms. In conclusion, proteases of early colonizers can interfere with subsequent colonization by S. mutans in vitro.

  10. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms. PMID:26347778

  11. In Vitro Effect of Zingiber officinale Extract on Growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Arash; Aghayan, Shabnam; Zaker, Saeed; Shakeri, Mahdieh; Entezari, Navid; Lawaf, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Tooth decay is an infectious disease of microbial origin. Considering the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance due to their overuse and also their side effects, medicinal plants are now considered for use against bacterial infections. This study aimed to assess the effects of different concentrations of Zingiber officinale extract on proliferation of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis in vitro. Materials and Methods. In this experimental study, serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in two sets of 10 test tubes for each bacterium (total of 20). Standard amounts of bacterial suspension were added; 100ƛ of each tube was cultured on prepared solid agar plates and incubated at 37°C for 24 hours. Serial dilutions of the extract were prepared in another 20 tubes and 100ƛ of each tube was added to blood agar culture medium while being prepared. The mixture was transferred to the plates. The bacteria were inoculated on plates and incubated as described. Results. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.02 mg/mL for S. mutans and 0.3 mg/mL for S. sanguinis. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 0.04 mg for S. mutans and 0.6 mg for S. sanguinis. Conclusion. Zingiber officinale extract has significant antibacterial activity against S. mutans and S. sanguinis cariogenic microorganisms.

  12. Generation of Diversity in Streptococcus mutans Genes Demonstrated by MLST

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thuy; Gilbert, Steven C.; Clark, Douglas; Ali, Farida; Fatturi Parolo, Clarissa C.; Maltz, Marisa; Russell, Roy R.; Holbrook, Peter; Wade, William G.; Beighton, David

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, consisting of serotypes c, e, f and k, is an oral aciduric organism associated with the initiation and progression of dental caries. A total of 135 independent Streptococcus mutans strains from caries-free and caries-active subjects isolated from various geographical locations were examined in two versions of an MLST scheme consisting of either 6 housekeeping genes [accC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase biotin carboxylase subunit), gki (glucokinase), lepA (GTP-binding protein), recP (transketolase), sodA (superoxide dismutase), and tyrS (tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase)] or the housekeeping genes supplemented with 2 extracellular putative virulence genes [gtfB (glucosyltransferase B) and spaP (surface protein antigen I/II)] to increase sequence type diversity. The number of alleles found varied between 20 (lepA) and 37 (spaP). Overall, 121 sequence types (STs) were defined using the housekeeping genes alone and 122 with all genes. However π, nucleotide diversity per site, was low for all loci being in the range 0.019–0.007. The virulence genes exhibited the greatest nucleotide diversity and the recombination/mutation ratio was 0.67 [95% confidence interval 0.3–1.15] compared to 8.3 [95% confidence interval 5.0–14.5] for the 6 concatenated housekeeping genes alone. The ML trees generated for individual MLST loci were significantly incongruent and not significantly different from random trees. Analysis using ClonalFrame indicated that the majority of isolates were singletons and no evidence for a clonal structure or evidence to support serotype c strains as the ancestral S. mutans strain was apparent. There was also no evidence of a geographical distribution of individual isolates or that particular isolate clusters were associated with caries. The overall low sequence diversity suggests that S. mutans is a newly emerged species which has not accumulated large numbers of mutations but those that have occurred have been shuffled as a consequence of intra

  13. Effect of topical anti-Streptococcus mutans IgY gel on quantity of S. mutans on rats' tooth surface.

    PubMed

    Bachtiar, Endang W; Afdhal, Anggraeni; Meidyawati, Ratna; Soejoedono, Retno D; Poerwaningsih, Erni

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of anti-Streptococcus mutans IgY gel on quantity of S. mutans on rats' tooth surface. Sprague Dawley rats were exposed intra-orally with S. mutans Xc and were fed a caries-inducing diet 2000. The 24 rats were divided into four groups: group A had their teeth coated with IgY gel; group B received sterilized water as a control; group C had their teeth coated with IgY gel starting on the 29(th) day; and group D had their teeth coated with a gel without IgY. Plaque samples were swabbed from the anterior teeth for S. mutans colony quantification, and saliva was collected to measure immunoreactivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that the quantity of S. mutans in rats treated with IgY gel showed significant difference compared with the controls. After coating with IgY anti-S. mutans gel, the mean immunoreactivity in rat saliva was higher than that of the no treatment group. In conclusion, topical application with anti-S. mutans IgY gel reduced the quantity of S. mutans on the tooth surface.

  14. Effects of Salts and Metal Oxides on Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Nagame, Seigo; Kambara, Masaki; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1994-10-01

    The effects of calcium salts and metal oxide powders on electrochemical, optical and biological properties of Streptococcus mutans have been studied as a novel method to determine the strain. Electrochemical signals of Streptococcus mutans show remarkable decrease in the presence of saturated calcium salts such as CaHPO4, Ca3(PO4)2, and Ca5(PO4)3OH depending on the strains of Streptococcus mutans: Ingbritt, NCTC-10449, or GS-5. The number of viable cells also decreases upon addition of these powders. The effects of metal oxides such as ZnO and BaTiO3 on the electrochemical characteristics and photoluminescence of Streptococcus mutans have also been studied.

  15. Sucrose substitutes affect the cariogenic potential of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Durso, S C; Vieira, L M; Cruz, J N S; Azevedo, C S; Rodrigues, P H; Simionato, M R L

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and contributes significantly to the virulence of dental plaque, especially in the presence of sucrose. To avoid the role of sucrose on the virulence factors of S. mutans, sugar substitutes are commonly consumed because they lead to lower or no production of acids and interfere with biofilm formation. This study aimed to investigate the contribution of sugar substitutes in the cariogenic potential of S. mutans biofilms. Thus, in the presence of sucrose, glucose, sucralose and sorbitol, the biofilm mass was quantified up to 96 h, the pH of the spent culture media was measured, the expression of biofilm-related genes was determined, and demineralization challenge experiments were conduct in enamel fragments. The presence of sugars or sugar substitutes profoundly affected the expression of spaP, gtfB, gtfC, gbpB, ftf, vicR and vicX in either biofilm or planktonic cells. The substitution of sucrose induced a down-regulation of most genes involved in sucrose-dependent colonization in biofilm cells. When the ratio between the expression of biofilm and planktonic cells was considered, most of those genes were down-regulated in biofilm cells in the presence of sugars and up-regulated in the presence of sugar substitutes. However, sucralose but not sorbitol fulfilled the purpose of reducing the cariogenic potential of the diet since it induced the biofilm formation with the lowest biomass, did not change the pH of the medium and led to the lowest lesion depth in the cariogenic challenge.

  16. Chamaecyparis obtusa Suppresses Virulence Genes in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Kang, Sun-Young; Park, Bog-Im; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Young-Rae; Hoe, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Ra, Ji-Young; An, So-Youn; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa) is known to have antimicrobial effects and has been used as a medicinal plant and in forest bathing. This study aimed to evaluate the anticariogenic activity of essential oil of C. obtusa on Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the most important bacterial causes of dental caries and dental biofilm formation. Essential oil from C. obtusa was extracted, and its effect on bacterial growth, acid production, and biofilm formation was evaluated. C. obtusa essential oil exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth over 0.025 mg/mL, with 99% inhibition at a concentration of 0.2 mg/mL. The bacterial biofilm formation and acid production were also significantly inhibited at the concentration greater than 0.025 mg/mL. The result of LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability Kit showed a concentration-dependent bactericidal effect on S. mutans and almost all bacteria were dead over 0.8 mg/mL. Real-time PCR analysis showed that gene expression of some virulence factors such as brpA, gbpB, gtfC, and gtfD was also inhibited. In GC and GC-MS analysis, the major components were found to be α-terpinene (40.60%), bornyl acetate (12.45%), α-pinene (11.38%), β-pinene (7.22%), β-phellandrene (3.45%), and α-terpinolene (3.40%). These results show that C. obtusa essential oil has anticariogenic effect on S. mutans. PMID:27293453

  17. Chamaecyparis obtusa Suppresses Virulence Genes in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Kang, Sun-Young; Park, Bog-Im; Kim, Young-Hoi; Lee, Young-Rae; Hoe, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Ra, Ji-Young; An, So-Youn; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa) is known to have antimicrobial effects and has been used as a medicinal plant and in forest bathing. This study aimed to evaluate the anticariogenic activity of essential oil of C. obtusa on Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the most important bacterial causes of dental caries and dental biofilm formation. Essential oil from C. obtusa was extracted, and its effect on bacterial growth, acid production, and biofilm formation was evaluated. C. obtusa essential oil exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth over 0.025 mg/mL, with 99% inhibition at a concentration of 0.2 mg/mL. The bacterial biofilm formation and acid production were also significantly inhibited at the concentration greater than 0.025 mg/mL. The result of LIVE/DEAD® BacLight™ Bacterial Viability Kit showed a concentration-dependent bactericidal effect on S. mutans and almost all bacteria were dead over 0.8 mg/mL. Real-time PCR analysis showed that gene expression of some virulence factors such as brpA, gbpB, gtfC, and gtfD was also inhibited. In GC and GC-MS analysis, the major components were found to be α-terpinene (40.60%), bornyl acetate (12.45%), α-pinene (11.38%), β-pinene (7.22%), β-phellandrene (3.45%), and α-terpinolene (3.40%). These results show that C. obtusa essential oil has anticariogenic effect on S. mutans.

  18. The influence of Brazilian plant extracts on Streptococcus mutans biofilm

    PubMed Central

    BARNABÉ, Michele; SARACENI, Cíntia Helena Coury; DUTRA-CORREA, Maristela; SUFFREDINI, Ivana Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen plant extracts obtained from plants from the Brazilian Amazon showed activity against planktonic Streptococcus mutans, an important bacterium involved in the first steps of biofilm formation and the subsequent initiation of several oral diseases. Objective Our goal was to verify whether plant extracts that showed activity against planktonic S. mutans could prevent the organization of or even disrupt a single-species biofilm made by the same bacteria. Material and Methods Plant extracts were tested on a single-bacteria biofilm prepared using the Zürich method. Each plant extract was tested at a concentration 5 times higher than its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Discs of hydroxyapatite were submersed overnight in brain-heart infusion broth enriched with saccharose 5%, which provided sufficient time for biofilm formation. The discs were then submersed in extract solutions for one minute, three times per day, for two subsequent days. The discs were then washed with saline three times, at ten seconds each, after each treatment. Supports were allowed to remain in the enriched medium for one additional night. At the end of the process, the bacteria were removed from the discs by vortexing and were counted. Results Only two of 19 plant extracts showed activity in the present assay: EB1779, obtained from Dioscorea altissima, and EB1673, obtained from Annona hypoglauca. Although the antibacterial activity of the plant extracts was first observed against planktonic S. mutans, influence over biofilm formation was not necessarily observed in the biofilm model. The present results motivate us to find new natural products to be used in dentistry. PMID:25466471

  19. Intracerebral hemorrhage and deep microbleeds associated with cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans; a hospital cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tonomura, Shuichi; Ihara, Masafumi; Kawano, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Tomotaka; Okuno, Yoshinori; Saito, Satoshi; Friedland, Robert P; Kuriyama, Nagato; Nomura, Ryota; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Toyoda, Kazunori; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2016-02-05

    Oral infectious diseases are epidemiologically associated with stroke. We previously showed that oral Streptococcus mutans with the cnm gene encoding a collagen-binding Cnm protein induced intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) experimentally and was also associated with cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in our population-based cohort study. We therefore investigated the roles of cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans in this single hospital-based, observational study that enrolled 100 acute stroke subjects. The cnm gene in Streptococcus mutans isolated from saliva was screened using PCR techniques and its collagen-binding activities examined. CMBs were evaluated on T2* gradient-recalled echo MRI. One subject withdrew informed consent and 99 subjects (63 males) were analyzed, consisting of 67 subjects with ischemic stroke, 5 with transient ischemic attack, and 27 with ICH. Eleven cases showed Streptococcus mutans strains positive for cnm. The presence of cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans was significantly associated with ICH [OR vs. ischemic stroke, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.17-19.1] and increased number of deep CMBs [median (IQR), 3 (2-9) vs. 0 (0-1), p = 0.0002]. In subjects positive for Streptococcus mutans, collagen binding activity was positively correlated with the number of deep CMBs (R(2) = 0.405; p < 0.0001). These results provide further evidence for the key role of oral health in stroke.

  20. Effects of Carbohydrate Source on Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Zachary D.; Son, Minjun; Rosa-Alberty, Ariana E.; Zeng, Lin; Ahn, Sang-Joon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The capacity to internalize and catabolize carbohydrates is essential for dental caries pathogens to persist and cause disease. The expression of many virulence-related attributes by Streptococcus mutans, an organism strongly associated with human dental caries, is influenced by the peptide signaling pathways that control genetic competence. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between the efficiency of competence signaling and carbohydrate source. A significant increase in the activity of the promoters for comX, comS, and comYA after exposure to competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) was observed in cells growing on fructose, maltose, sucrose, or trehalose as the primary carbohydrate source, compared to cells growing on glucose. However, only cells grown in the presence of trehalose or sucrose displayed a significant increase in transformation frequency. Notably, even low concentrations of these carbohydrates in the presence of excess glucose could enhance the expression of comX, encoding a sigma factor needed for competence, and the effects on competence were dependent on the cognate sugar:phosphotransferase permease for each carbohydrate. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusions, we observed that growth in fructose or trehalose resulted in a greater proportion of the population activating expression of comX and comS, encoding the precursor of comX-inducing peptide (XIP), after addition of CSP, than growth in glucose. Thus, the source of carbohydrate significantly impacts the stochastic behaviors that regulate subpopulation responses to CSP, which can induce competence in S. mutans. IMPORTANCE The signaling pathways that regulate development of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans are intimately intertwined with the pathogenic potential of the organism, impacting biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and expression of known virulence determinants. Induction of the gene for the master regulator of competence, ComX, by competence

  1. A novel gene involved in the survival of Streptococcus mutans under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Shibata, Yukie; Takeshita, Toru; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    A Streptococcus mutans mutant defective in aciduricity was constructed by random-insertion mutagenesis. Sequence analysis of the mutant revealed a mutation in gidA, which is known to be involved in tRNA modification in Streptococcus pyogenes. Complementation of gidA by S. pyogenes gidA recovered the acid tolerance of S. mutans. Although the gidA-inactivated S. pyogenes mutant exhibited significantly reduced expression of multiple extracellular virulence proteins, the S. mutans mutant did not. On the other hand, the gidA mutant of S. mutans showed reduced ability to withstand exposure to other stress conditions (high osmotic pressure, high temperature, and bacitracin stress) besides an acidic environment. In addition, loss of GidA decreased the capacity for glucose-dependent biofilm formation by over 50%. This study revealed that gidA plays critical roles in the survival of S. mutans under stress conditions, including lower pH.

  2. Mutan: A mixed linkage α-[(1,3)- and (1,6)]-d-glucan from Streptococcus mutans, that induces osteoclast differentiation and promotes alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jung Min; Han, Kook-Il; Jung, Eui-Gil; Kim, Yong Hyun; Patnaik, Bharat Bhusan; Yoon, Mi Sook; Chung, Sung Kyun; Kim, Wan Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2016-02-10

    Mutan is an extracellular polysaccharide of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) that consists of α-(1,3)-linked glucose residues in main chains and α-(1,6) bonds in side chains. In the present study, mutan was isolated from S. mutans, and its structural characteristics were determined using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The effects of mutan on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in RAW 264.7 cells were examined. Furthermore, microCT and morphometric analyses were used to determine the contribution of mutan to alveolar bone loss in the maxilla of a rat periodontitis model. Mutan increased (more than 2-fold) RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Mutan also enhanced the alveolar bone loss in the rat maxilla 2.3-fold. In mutan-treated rats, the bone mineral density, bone volume, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness decreased, whereas trabecular separation significantly increased. In addition, mutan and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced similar microarray profiles in RAW 264.7 cells. A total of 43 genes related to osteoclastogenesis were differentially expressed after either mutan or LPS treatment. Five-fold increases in the expression of several genes, including IL-1β, IL-1α, IL-6, and chemokine ligands, were observed in mutan-treated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest a molecular mechanism for the inflammation induced by S. mutans during the establishment of periodontal disease.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of 1042 strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus: comparison from 1985 to 1989.

    PubMed

    Liebana, J; Castillo, A; Peis, J; Baca, P; Piedrola, G

    1991-06-01

    A total of 1042 strains of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus isolated between 1985 and 1989 were tested to study the evolution of their sensitivity to penicillin, amoxycillin, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid, cefuroxime, tetracycline, erythromycin, spiramycin, acetyl spiramycin, lincomycin and clindamycin. The strains were taken from stock cultures and isolated from human saliva and dental plaque. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by an agar dilution method. Except for spiramycin and acetyl spiramycin, all the antibiotics inhibited 100% of the strains with concentrations less than or equal to 2 micrograms/ml. Microorganisms from both species underwent a slow progressive loss of sensitivity to all the antibiotics over a 5-year period of study, showing statistically significant results in most cases.

  4. Catechin-incorporated dental copolymers inhibit growth of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    MANKOVSKAIA, Alexandra; LÉVESQUE, Céline M.; PRAKKI, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the inhibitory growth activity of green tea catechin incorporated into dental resins compared to resins containing the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Material and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCg) and chlorhexidine (CHX) were determined according to the microdilution method. Resin discs (5 mm x 3 mm) were prepared from Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (R1) and Bis-GMA/CH3Bis-GMA (R2) comonomers (n=9) containing: a) no drug, b) EGCg, c) CHX. Two concentrations of each drug (0.5x MIC and 1x MIC) were incorporated into the resin discs. Samples were individually immersed in a bacterial culture and incubated for 24 h at 37º C under constant agitation. Cell viability was assessed by counting the number of colonies on replica agar plates. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Student t-tests (α=0.05). Results: Both resins containing EGCg and CHX showed a significant inhibition of bacterial growth at both concentrations tested (p<0.05). A significantly higher inhibition was observed in response to resins containing CHX at 0.5x MIC and 1x MIC, and EGCg at 1x MIC when compared to EGCg at 0.5x MIC. Also, EGCg at 0.5x MIC in R1 had a significantly higher growth inhibition than in R2. Conclusions: Both EGCg and CHX retained their antibacterial activity when incorporated into the resin matrix. EGCg at 1x MIC in R1 and R2 resins significantly reduced S. mutans survival at a level similar to CHX. The data generated from this study will provide advances in the field of bioactive dental materials with the potential of improving the lifespan of resin-based restorations. PMID:23739855

  5. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus colonization and caries experience in 3- and 5-year-old Thai children

    PubMed Central

    Saraithong, P.; Pattanaporn, K.; Chen, Z.; Khongkhunthian, S.; Laohapensang, P.; Chhun, N.; Pattanaporn, W.; Gaw, H. Y.; Li, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the colonization of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in supra-gingival plaque samples and to determine their correlation with the prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) in Thai children. Materials and methods A total of 344 Thai children, ages 3 and 5 years, were invited to participate in this study. Caries status of the children was examined. Supra-gingival plaque samples were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to evaluate DNA levels of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. Results Eighty-five percent of the children were colonized by S. mutans and 50.9 % of them were colonized by S. sobrinus. The prevalence of ECC was 43.8 % and 56.2 % among 3- and 5-year-old children, respectively, and was significantly associated with the presence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus. The severity of ECC was significantly correlated with increased DNA levels of the two bacteria. Children who were positive for S. mutans and S. sobrinus (Sm+/Sb+) were 8 times or 44 times more likely to experience ECC than children who were Sm−/Sb+or were Sm−/Sb−. Conclusions The study evidence further suggest that children colonized by both S. mutans and S. sobrinus are at the higher risk for ECC. Clinical relevance Molecular-based qPCR can be used to detect and quantify S. mutans and S. sobrinus colonization for epidemiological and clinical studies for ECC risk assessment. PMID:25753978

  6. Effect of cigarette smoke exposure on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zonuz, Ali Taghavi; Rahmati, Ali; Mortazavi, Hadi; Khashabi, Ehasn; Farahani, Ramin Mostofi Zadeh

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis. The standard strains of S. mutans (ATCC 25175) and S. sanguis (ATCC 10556) were cultured on blood agar and incubated for 48 hr in three main environments: atmospheric air, carbon dioxide, and cigarette smoke. Kent gold 1(nicotine: 0.1 mg, tar: 1 mg), Kent lights (nicotine: 0.8 mg, tar: 9 mg) and Bahman (nicotine: 1 mg, tar: 13 mg) were the brands used in the present study. Afterwards, digital photographs of the colonies were taken and the diameter of colonies was measured. Data were analyzed using Post Hoc and General Linear Model statistical tests. Cigarette smoke and carbon dioxide environments significantly increased the growth of S. mutans. However, high nicotine/tar content cigarette smoke (Bahman) had the greatest impact on S. mutans and S. sanguis. The mutans/sanguis ratio, which was 0.71 in atmospheric air, increased to 1.07 in the presence of carbon dioxide. Kent gold 1, Kent lights, and Bahman demonstrated a mutans/sanguis ratio of 1, 0.84, and 0.98 respectively. In conclusion, it seems that the growth of S. sanguis and S. mutans is accelerated in the vicinity of cigarette smoke.

  7. Lack of the Delta Subunit of RNA Polymerase Increases Virulence Related Traits of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoli; Sztajer, Helena; Buddruhs, Nora; Petersen, Jörn; Rohde, Manfred; Talay, Susanne R.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2011-01-01

    The delta subunit of the RNA polymerase, RpoE, maintains the transcriptional specificity in Gram-positive bacteria. Lack of RpoE results in massive changes in the transcriptome of the human dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. In this study, we analyzed traits of the ΔrpoE mutant which are important for biofilm formation and interaction with oral microorganisms and human cells and performed a global phenotypic analysis of its physiological functions. The ΔrpoE mutant showed higher self-aggregation compared to the wild type and coaggregated with other oral bacteria and Candida albicans. It formed a biofilm with a different matrix structure and an altered surface attachment. The amount of the cell surface antigens I/II SpaP and the glucosyltransferase GtfB was reduced. The ΔrpoE mutant displayed significantly stronger adhesion to human extracellular matrix components, especially to fibronectin, than the wild type. Its adhesion to human epithelial cells HEp-2 was reduced, probably due to the highly aggregated cell mass. The analysis of 1248 physiological traits using phenotype microarrays showed that the ΔrpoE mutant metabolized a wider spectrum of carbon sources than the wild type and had acquired resistance to antibiotics and inhibitory compounds with various modes of action. The reduced antigenicity, increased aggregation, adherence to fibronection, broader substrate spectrum and increased resistance to antibiotics of the ΔrpoE mutant reveal the physiological potential of S. mutans and show that some of its virulence related traits are increased. PMID:21625504

  8. Effect of Fluoride Varnish on Streptococcus mutans Count in Saliva of Caries Free Children Using Dentocult SM Strip Mutans Test: A Randomized Controlled Triple Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    A, Deepti; Jeevarathan, J; Muthu, MS; Prabhu V, Rathna; Chamundeswari

    2008-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to estimate the count of Streptococcus mutans in saliva of caries free children using Dentocult SM strip mutans and to evaluate the effect of fluoride varnish on the Streptococcus mutans count in saliva of these caries free children. Methods and material: Thirty caries free children were selected for the study based on the information obtained from a questionnaire prepared. They were randomly assigned into the control group and the study group consisting of ten and twenty children respectively. Samples of saliva were collected using the saliva strips from the Dentocult SM kit and after incubation the presence of the Streptococcus mutans was evaluated using the manufacturers’ chart. The study group was subjected to Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application after 24 hours following which the samples were collected again. Results: The average Streptococcus mutans count in primary dentition of caries free children was in the range of 104 to 105 colony forming units/ml. The average Streptococcus mutans count in primary dentition of caries free children after Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application was below 104 colony forming units/ml. Conclusion: Fluor Protector fluoride varnish application showed a statistically significant reduction in the Streptococcus mutans count in saliva of the caries free children in the study group. PMID:25206081

  9. Saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 associates with dental plaque and caries experience.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2007-01-01

    Colonization of enamel surfaces by Streptococcus mutans is thought to be initiated by the attachment of bacteria to a saliva-derived conditioning film (acquired pellicle). However, the clinical relevance of the contribution of saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in biofilm formation has not yet been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to correlate saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion with biofilm formation in humans. We correlated all measurements of salivary factors and dental plaque formation in 70 healthy subjects. Dental plaque development after thorough professional teeth cleaning correlated positively with S. mutans adhesion onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite pellets and the glycoprotein content of either parotid or whole saliva. Saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion and glycoprotein content were also positively correlated with each other in parotid and whole saliva. By contrast, neither salivary mutans streptococci, Lactobacillus nor Candida correlated with biofilm formation. Parotid saliva-mediated S. mutans adhesion was significantly higher in 12 caries-experienced (CE) subjects than in 9 caries-inexperienced (CI) subjects. Salivary S. mutans adhesion was significantly less (p < 0.01) in the CI group than in the CE group. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the initial S. mutans adhesion, modulated by salivary protein adsorption onto the enamel surface, as a possible correlate of susceptibility to dental plaque and caries.

  10. Antimicrobial Properties of Biofunctionalized Silver Nanoparticles on Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus mutans and Its Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Robles, Ángel Manuel; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Zavala-Alonso, Norma Verónica; Martinez-Martinez, Rita Elizabeth; Ruiz, Facundo; Lara-Castro, René Homero; Donohué-Cornejo, Alejandro; Reyes-López, Simón Yobanny; Espinosa-Cristóbal, León Francisco

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the principal pathogen involved in the formation of dental caries. Other systemic diseases have also been associated with specific S. mutans serotypes (c, e, f, and k). Silver nanoparticles (SNP) have been demonstrated to have good antibacterial effects against S. mutans; therefore, limited studies have evaluated the antimicrobial activity of biofunctionalized SNP on S. mutans serotypes. The purpose of this work was to prepare and characterize coated SNP using two different organic components and to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of SNP in clinical isolates of S. mutans strains and serotypes; (2) Methods: SNP with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or chitosan (CS) coatings were prepared and the physical, chemical and microbiological properties of SNP were evaluated; (3) Results: Both types of coated SNP showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans bacteria and serotypes. Better inhibition was associated with smaller particles and BSA coatings; however, no significant differences were found between the different serotypes, indicating a similar sensitivity to the coated SNP; (4) Conclusion: This study concludes that BSA and CS coated SNP had good antimicrobial activity against S. mutans strains and the four serotypes, and this study suggest the widespread use of SNP as an antimicrobial agent for the inhibition of S. mutans bacteria. PMID:28335264

  11. Antimicrobial Properties of Biofunctionalized Silver Nanoparticles on Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus mutans and Its Serotypes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Robles, Ángel Manuel; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Zavala-Alonso, Norma Verónica; Martinez-Martinez, Rita Elizabeth; Ruiz, Facundo; Lara-Castro, René Homero; Donohué-Cornejo, Alejandro; Reyes-López, Simón Yobanny; Espinosa-Cristóbal, León Francisco

    2016-07-22

    (1) Background: Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the principal pathogen involved in the formation of dental caries. Other systemic diseases have also been associated with specific S. mutans serotypes (c, e, f, and k). Silver nanoparticles (SNP) have been demonstrated to have good antibacterial effects against S. mutans; therefore, limited studies have evaluated the antimicrobial activity of biofunctionalized SNP on S. mutans serotypes. The purpose of this work was to prepare and characterize coated SNP using two different organic components and to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of SNP in clinical isolates of S. mutans strains and serotypes; (2) Methods: SNP with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or chitosan (CS) coatings were prepared and the physical, chemical and microbiological properties of SNP were evaluated; (3) Results: Both types of coated SNP showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans bacteria and serotypes. Better inhibition was associated with smaller particles and BSA coatings; however, no significant differences were found between the different serotypes, indicating a similar sensitivity to the coated SNP; (4) Conclusion: This study concludes that BSA and CS coated SNP had good antimicrobial activity against S. mutans strains and the four serotypes, and this study suggest the widespread use of SNP as an antimicrobial agent for the inhibition of S. mutans bacteria.

  12. Antibiofilm Activity of Chilean Propolis on Streptococcus mutans Is Influenced by the Year of Collection.

    PubMed

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Lillo, Alexis; Alvear, Marysol; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of propolis varies according to factors that could have an influence on its biological properties. Polyphenols from propolis have demonstrated an inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans growth. However, it is not known if different years of propolis collection may affect its activity. We aimed to elucidate if the year of collection of propolis influences its activity on Streptococcus mutans. Polyphenol-rich extracts were prepared from propolis collected in three different years, characterized by LC-MS and quantified the content of total polyphenols and flavonoids groups. Finally, was evaluated the antibacterial effect on Streptococcus mutans and the biofilm formation. Qualitative differences were observed in total polyphenols, flavones, and flavonols and the chemical composition between the extracts, affecting the strength of inhibition of biofilm formation but not the antimicrobial assays. In conclusion, chemical composition of propolis depends on the year of collection and influences the strength of the inhibition of biofilm formation.

  13. Antibiofilm Activity of Chilean Propolis on Streptococcus mutans Is Influenced by the Year of Collection

    PubMed Central

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Lillo, Alexis; Alvear, Marysol; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of propolis varies according to factors that could have an influence on its biological properties. Polyphenols from propolis have demonstrated an inhibitory effect on Streptococcus mutans growth. However, it is not known if different years of propolis collection may affect its activity. We aimed to elucidate if the year of collection of propolis influences its activity on Streptococcus mutans. Polyphenol-rich extracts were prepared from propolis collected in three different years, characterized by LC-MS and quantified the content of total polyphenols and flavonoids groups. Finally, was evaluated the antibacterial effect on Streptococcus mutans and the biofilm formation. Qualitative differences were observed in total polyphenols, flavones, and flavonols and the chemical composition between the extracts, affecting the strength of inhibition of biofilm formation but not the antimicrobial assays. In conclusion, chemical composition of propolis depends on the year of collection and influences the strength of the inhibition of biofilm formation. PMID:26247015

  14. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius adhesion to fibronectin films are oppositely influenced by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-10-07

    Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces is mediated by an interplay of specific and nonspecific interactions. Although nonspecific interactions are ubiquitously present, little is known about the physicochemical mechanisms of specific interactions. The aim of this paper is to determine the influence of ionic strength on the adhesion of two streptococcal strains to fibronectin films. Streptococcus mutans LT11 and Streptococcus intermedius NCTC11324 both possess antigen I/II with the ability to bind fibronectin from solution, but S. intermedius binds approximately 20x less fibronectin than does the S. mutans strain under identical conditions. Both strains as well as fibronectin films are negatively charged in low ionic strength phosphate buffered saline (PBS, 10x diluted), but bacteria appear uncharged in high ionic strength PBS. Physicochemical modeling on the basis of overall cell surface properties (cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potentials) demonstrates that both strains should favor adhesion to fibronectin films in a high ionic strength environment as compared to in a low ionic strength environment, where electrostatic repulsion between equally charged surfaces is dominant. Adhesion of S. intermedius to fibronectin films in a parallel plate flow chamber was completely in line with this modeling, while in addition atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated stronger adhesion forces upon retraction between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in high ionic strength PBS than in low ionic strength PBS. Thus, the dependence of the interaction on ionic strength is dominated by the overall negative charge on the interacting surfaces. Adhesion of S. mutans to fibronectin films, however, was completely at odds with theoretical modeling, and the strain adhered best in low ionic strength PBS. Moreover, AFM indicated weaker repulsive forces upon approach between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in low ionic strength PBS than in high ionic

  15. Assessment of Streptococcus mutans in healthy versus gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: A clinico-microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Sneha; Prabhu, Ashwin; Chaitra, K. R.; Desai, N. C.; Patil, Sudhir R.; Rajeev, Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and periodontal disease are most common oral diseases. Streptococcus mutans are considered to be the major pathogens in initiation of dental caries. Evidence shows that periodontal disease and caries share a number of contributory factors. Thus in view of these findings it would be worthwhile to examine whether Streptococcus mutans persist within the saliva and subgingival environment of the periodontitis patients and to determine whether there is any association between Streptococcus mutans colonization, pH of saliva and sub-gingival plaque pH in periodontal diseases before therapy. Methods: The study comprises of 75 subjects aged between 20-70 years, reporting to department of Periodontology, KLEs Institute of Dental Sciences, Bangalore. Subjects were divided into 3 groups of 25 each. Group 1 – Healthy controls, Group 2 – Gingivitis Group, 3 – Chronic periodontitis. Unstimulated saliva was collected in sterile container and immediately pH was evaluated. Subgingival plaque samples were collected from four deepest periodontal pockets in chronic periodontitis and from first molars in healthy subjects using 4 sterile paper points. In gingivitis subjects samples were collected from areas showing maximum signs of inflammation. All paper points and saliva samples were cultured on mitis salivarius agar culture media with bacitracin for quantification of the Streptococcus mutans colonies. Results: Increased colonization of Streptococcus mutans was seen in chronic periodontitis subjects both in saliva and sub-gingival plaque samples. There was also a positive correlation seen with the periodontal parameters. Conclusion: More severe forms of periodontal disease may create different ecological niches for the proliferation of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:27994423

  16. A Nuclease from Streptococcus mutans Facilitates Biofilm Dispersal and Escape from Killing by Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Sun, Luping; Liu, Wei; Guo, Lihong; Liu, Zhaohui; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and occasionally infective endocarditis, with the ability to form biofilms and disperse cells into distal sites to exacerbate and spread infection. In this study, we identified a nuclease (DeoC) as a S. mutans biofilm dispersal modulating factor through microarray analysis. In vitro assays revealed a dispersal defect of a deoC deletion mutant, and functional studies with purified protein were indicative of the biofilm dispersal activity of DeoC. Neutrophils are a key host response factor restraining bacterial spreading through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, we hypothesized that the dispersed S. mutans might utilize DeoC to degrade NETs and escape killing by the immune system. It was found that S. mutans induced NET formation upon contact with neutrophils, while the presence of NETs in turn enhanced the deoC expression of S. mutans. Fluorescence microscopy inspection showed that deoC deletion resulted in a decreased NET degradation ability of S. mutans and enhanced susceptibility to neutrophil killing. Data obtained from this study assigned two important roles for DeoC in S. mutans: contributing to the spread of infection through mediating biofilm dispersal, and facilitating the escape of S. mutans from neutrophil killing through NET degradation.

  17. Contribution of ClpP to stress tolerance and virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiang-Hua; Zhang, Jia-Qin; Song, Xiu-Yu; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Shi-Yang

    2014-11-01

    Abilities to tolerate environmental stresses and to form biofilms on teeth surface are key virulence attributes of Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of human dental caries. ClpP, the chief intracellular protease of S. mutans, along with ATPases degrades altered proteins that might be toxic for bacteria, and thus plays important roles in stress response. To further understand the roles of ClpP in stress response of S. mutans, a ClpP deficient strain was constructed and used for general stress tolerance, autolysis, mutacins production, and virulence assays. Here, we demonstrated that inactivation of ClpP in S. mutans resulted in a sensitive phenotype to several environmental stresses, including acid, cold, thermal, and oxidative stresses. The ClpP deficient strain displayed slow growth rates, poor growth yields, formation of long chains, increased clumping in broth, and reduced capacity to form biofilms in presence of glucose. Mutacins production and autolysis of S. mutans were also impaired by mutation of clpP. Animals study showed that clpP mutation increased virulence of S. mutans but not significant. However, enhanced abilities to survive lethal acid and to form biofilm in sucrose were observed in ClpP deficient strain. Our findings revealed a broad impact of ClpP on several virulence properties of S. mutans and highlighted the relevance of ClpP proteolysis with progression of diseases caused by S. mutans.

  18. New small-molecule inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase inhibit Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Nguyen, Thao; McMichael, Megan; Velu, Sadanandan E; Zou, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Wu, Hui

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major aetiological agent of dental caries. Formation of biofilms is a key virulence factor of S. mutans. Drugs that inhibit S. mutans biofilms may have therapeutic potential. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a critical role in regulating the metabolism of folate. DHFR inhibitors are thus potent drugs and have been explored as anticancer and antimicrobial agents. In this study, a library of analogues based on a DHFR inhibitor, trimetrexate (TMQ), an FDA-approved drug, was screened and three new analogues that selectively inhibited S. mutans were identified. The most potent inhibitor had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 454.0±10.2nM for the biofilm and 8.7±1.9nM for DHFR of S. mutans. In contrast, the IC50 of this compound for human DHFR was ca. 1000nM, a >100-fold decrease in its potency, demonstrating the high selectivity of the analogue. An analogue that exhibited the least potency for the S. mutans biofilm also had the lowest activity towards inhibiting S. mutans DHFR, further indicating that inhibition of biofilms is related to reduced DHFR activity. These data, along with docking of the most potent analogue to the modelled DHFR structure, suggested that the TMQ analogues indeed selectively inhibited S. mutans through targeting DHFR. These potent and selective small molecules are thus promising lead compounds to develop new effective therapeutics to prevent and treat dental caries.

  19. Binding of Streptococcus mutans antigens to heart and kidney basement membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, M W; Barua, P K; Bergey, E J; Nisengard, R J; Neiders, M E; Albini, B

    1984-01-01

    Using indirect immunofluorescence, alkali-extracted components of Streptococcus mutans were found to bind in vitro to capillary walls and sarcolemmal sheaths of monkey cardiac muscle and to glomerular and tubular basement membranes of monkey kidney. Adsorption of S. mutans components to tissue fragments was also detected by indirect radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting on nitrocellulose paper. Antibodies did not bind to untreated, control tissues in these experiments, proving that antigens shared by S. mutans and tissue components were not involved. Rabbit and monkey heart and kidney components bound S. mutans antigens of 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr. Monkey heart also bound molecules of 90,000 and 120,000 Mr. Rabbits immunized by intravenous injection of disrupted S. mutans cells developed severe nephritis that was characterized by the deposition of immunoglobulins, complement component C3, and S. mutans antigens in the glomeruli. Immunoglobulin G eluted from nephritic kidneys reacted in immunoblots with the 24,000, 35,000, and 65,000 Mr components of S. mutans extract, indicating that the antigens that bound to tissue in vitro also bound in vivo and reacted with antibodies in situ. Antibodies to other S. mutans antigens were not detected in the kidney eluate, although they were present in the serum of the same rabbit. Images PMID:6384042

  20. New small-molecule inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase inhibit Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Nguyen, Thao; McMichael, Megan; Velu, Sandanandan; Zou, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Wu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major aetiological agent of dental caries. Formation of biofilms is a key virulence factor of S. mutans. Drugs that inhibit S. mutans biofilms may have therapeutic potential. Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a critical role in regulating the metabolism of folate. DHFR inhibitors are thus potent drugs and have been explored as anticancer and antimicrobial agents. In this study, a library of analogues based on a DHFR inhibitor, trimetrexate (TMQ), an FDA-approved drug, was screened and three new analogues that selectively inhibited S. mutans were identified. The most potent inhibitor had a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 454.0 ± 10.2 nM for the biofilm and 8.7 ± 1.9 nM for DHFR of S. mutans. In contrast, the IC50 of this compound for human DHFR was ca. 1000 nM, a >100-fold decrease in its potency, demonstrating the high selectivity of the analogue. An analogue that exhibited the least potency for the S. mutans biofilm also had the lowest activity towards inhibiting S. mutans DHFR, further indicating that inhibition of biofilms is related to reduced DHFR activity. These data, along with docking of the potent analogue to the modelled DHFR structure, suggested that the TMQ analogues indeed selectively inhibited S. mutans through targeting DHFR. These potent and selective small molecules are thus promising lead compounds to develop new effective therapeutics to prevent and treat dental caries. PMID:26022931

  1. Saussurea lappa inhibits the growth, acid production, adhesion, and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Lee, Jun-Sup; Lee, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2007-05-04

    In the present study, inhibitory effects of the ethanol extract of Saussurea lappa (S. lappa) on the growth, acid production, adhesion, and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) were examined. The growth and acid production of Streptococcus mutans were inhibited by the presence of ethanol extract of Saussurea lappa (0.5-4 mg/ml) significantly. The ethanol extract of Saussurea lappa (0.25-4 mg/ml) also significantly lowered the adherence of Streptococcus mutans in a dose dependent manner. In water-insoluble glucan synthesis assay, 2-4 mg/ml of the ethanol extract of Saussurea lappa significantly inhibited the formation of water-insoluble glucan. These results suggest that Saussurea lappa may inhibit the caries-inducing properties of Streptococcus mutans. Further studies are necessary to clarify the active constituents of Saussurea lappa responsible for such biomolecular activities.

  2. Bidirectional signaling in the competence regulatory pathway of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Son, Minjun; Shields, Robert C; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Hagen, Stephen J

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans expresses comX (also known as sigX), which encodes a sigma factor that is required for development of genetic competence, in response to the peptide signals XIP and CSP and environmental factors. XIP (sigX inducing peptide) is derived from ComS and activates comX unimodally in chemically defined media via the ComRS system. CSP (competence stimulating peptide) activates comX bimodally in peptide-rich media through the ComDE two-component system. However, CSP-ComDE activation of comX is indirect and involves ComRS. Therefore, the bimodality of CSP-dependent activation of comX may arise from either ComRS or ComDE. Here we study, at the single-cell level, how genes in the CSP signaling pathway respond to CSP, XIP and media. Our data indicate that activation of comX stimulates expression of comE. In addition, activation of comE requires intact comR and comS genes. Therefore, not only does CSP-ComDE stimulate the ComRS pathway to activate comX expression, but ComRS activation of comX also stimulates expression of the CSP-ComDE pathway and its regulon. The results demonstrate the mutual interconnection of the signaling pathways that control bacteriocin expression (ComDE) and genetic competence (ComRS), both of which are linked to lytic and virulence behaviors.

  3. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus salivarius FruA▿

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Ayako; Furukawa, Soichi; Fujita, Shuhei; Mitobe, Jiro; Kawarai, Taketo; Narisawa, Naoki; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Makoto; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Kosono, Saori; Yoneda, Saori; Watanabe, Haruo; Morinaga, Yasushi; Uematsu, Hiroshi; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2011-01-01

    The oral microbial flora consists of many beneficial species of bacteria that are associated with a healthy condition and control the progression of oral disease. Cooperative interactions between oral streptococci and the pathogens play important roles in the development of dental biofilms in the oral cavity. To determine the roles of oral streptococci in multispecies biofilm development and the effects of the streptococci in biofilm formation, the active substances inhibiting Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation were purified from Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 9759 and HT9R culture supernatants using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis was performed, and the results were compared to databases. The S. salivarius HT9R genome sequence was determined and used to indentify candidate proteins for inhibition. The candidates inhibiting biofilms were identified as S. salivarius fructosyltransferase (FTF) and exo-beta-d-fructosidase (FruA). The activity of the inhibitors was elevated in the presence of sucrose, and the inhibitory effects were dependent on the sucrose concentration in the biofilm formation assay medium. Purified and commercial FruA from Aspergillus niger (31.6% identity and 59.6% similarity to the amino acid sequence of FruA from S. salivarius HT9R) completely inhibited S. mutans GS-5 biofilm formation on saliva-coated polystyrene and hydroxyapatite surfaces. Inhibition was induced by decreasing polysaccharide production, which is dependent on sucrose digestion rather than fructan digestion. The data indicate that S. salivarius produces large quantities of FruA and that FruA alone may play an important role in multispecies microbial interactions for sucrose-dependent biofilm formation in the oral cavity. PMID:21239559

  4. Effects of simulated microgravity on Streptococcus mutans physiology and biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Xu, Xin; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Wang, Renke; Jia, Wenxiang; Li, Yu-Qing

    2014-10-01

    Long-term spaceflights will eventually become an inevitable occurrence. Previous studies have indicated that oral infectious diseases, including dental caries, were more prevalent in astronauts due to the effect of microgravity. However, the impact of the space environment, especially the microgravity environment, on the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major caries-associated bacterium, is yet to be explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of simulated microgravity on the physiology and biofilm structure of S. mutans. We also explored the dual-species interaction between S. mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis under a simulated microgravity condition. Results indicated that the simulated microgravity condition can enhance the acid tolerance ability, modify the biofilm architecture and extracellular polysaccharide distribution of S. mutans, and increase the proportion of S. mutans within a dual-species biofilm, probably through the regulation of various gene expressions. We hypothesize that the enhanced competitiveness of S. mutans under simulated microgravity may cause a multispecies micro-ecological imbalance, which would result in the initiation of dental caries. Our current findings are consistent with previous studies, which revealed a higher astronaut-associated incidence of caries. Further research is required to explore the detailed mechanisms.

  5. The usefulness of biotyping in the determination of selected pathogenicity determinants in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Streptococcus mutans is known to be a primary etiological factor of dental caries, a widespread and growing disease in Polish children. Recognition of novel features determining the pathogenicity of this pathogen may contribute to understanding the mechanisms of bacterial infections. The goal of the study was to determine the activity of prephenate dehydrogenase (PHD) and to illuminate the role of the enzyme in S. mutans pathogenicity. The strains were biotyped based on STREPTOtest 24 biochemical identification tests and the usefulness of biotyping in the determination of S. mutans pathogenicity determinants was examined. Results Out of ninety strains isolated from children with deciduous teeth fifty three were classified as S. mutans species. PDH activity was higher (21.69 U/mg on average) in the experimental group compared to the control group (5.74 U/mg on average) (P <0.001). Moreover, it was demonstrated that biotype I, established basing on the biochemical characterization of the strain, was predominant (58.5%) in oral cavity streptococcosis. Its dominance was determined by higher PDH activity compared to biotypes II and III (P = 0.0019). Conclusions The usefulness of biotyping in the determination of Streptococcus mutans pathogenicity determinants was demonstrated. The obtained results allow for better differentiation of S. mutans species and thus may contribute to recognition of pathogenic bacteria transmission mechanisms and facilitate treatment. PMID:25096795

  6. Antibacterial activity of polyphenol components in oolong tea extract against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, H; Matsumoto, M; Tanaka, T; Maeda, M; Nakai, M; Hamada, S; Ooshima, T

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the antibacterial activity of oolong tea extract on oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, and to identify the response to its components. Antibacterial activity was found when the extract was added to S. mutans cells in chemically defined medium but not in complex broth media. Further, pretreatment with bovine serum albumin reduced the antibacterial activity. The extract showed antibacterial activity against all of the oral streptococci examined, with the highest activity against S. mutans MT8148R. This activity was found to originate from a monomeric polyphenol-rich fraction, and it was stronger than that of pure polyphenols. Moreover, some combinations of monomeric polyphenols showed the highest level of antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the antibacterial activity of oolong tea extract is caused by a synergistic effect of monomeric polyphenols, which can easily bind to proteins.

  7. A graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite film protects dental implant surfaces against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Shatavari; Khan, Shakir; Meena, Ramovatar; Singh, Braj R; Khan, Asad U

    2014-01-01

    Oral biofilms play a crucial role in the development of dental caries and other periodontal diseases. Streptococcus mutans is one of the primary etiological agents in dental caries. Implant systems are regularly employed to replace missing teeth. Oral biofilms accumulate on these implants and are the chief cause of dental implant failure. In the present study, the potential of graphene/zinc oxide nanocomposite (GZNC) against the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans was explored and the anti-biofilm behaviour of artificial acrylic teeth surfaces coated with GZNC was examined. Acrylic teeth are a good choice for implants as they are low cost, have low density and can resist fracture. Microscopic studies and anti-biofilm assays showed a significant reduction in biofilm in the presence GZNC. GZNC was also found to be nontoxic against HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney cell line). The results indicate the potential of GZNC as an effective coating agent for dental implants by efficiently inhibiting S. mutans biofilms.

  8. Therapeutic effect of llama derived VHH fragments against Streptococcus mutans on the development of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Carina; Hultberg, Anna; Marcotte, Harold; Hermans, Pim; Bezemer, Sandra; Frenken, Leon G J; Hammarström, Lennart

    2006-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the main cause of dental caries. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of variable regions of a llama heavy chain antibody fragments directed against S. mutans named S36-VHH (S for Streptococcus) alone or fused with glucose oxidase (GOx) from Aspergillus niger. Western blot analysis and ELISA revealed binding of the S36-VHH to the streptococcal antigen I/II adhesin molecule of S. mutans serotype C. In a rat-desalivated caries model, daily administration of S36-VHH significantly reduced the development of smooth surface caries. No additional therapeutic effect of GOx was observed. Our results suggest that llama VHH antibodies may be a potential benefit as prophylaxis against dental caries.

  9. The thioredoxin system in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans and the food-industry bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Marco, Salvatore; Rullo, Rosario; Albino, Antonella; Masullo, Mariorosario; De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Amato, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    The Streptococcus genus includes the pathogenic species Streptococcus mutans, the main responsible of dental caries, and the safe microorganism Streptococcus thermophilus, used for the manufacture of dairy products. These facultative anaerobes control the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and indeed, both S. mutans and S. thermophilus possess a cambialistic superoxide dismutase, the key enzyme for a preventive action against ROS. To evaluate the properties of a crucial mechanism for repairing ROS damages, the molecular and functional characterization of the thioredoxin system in these streptococci was investigated. The putative genes encoding its protein components in S. mutans and S. thermophilus were analysed and the corresponding recombinant proteins were purified. A single thioredoxin reductase was obtained from either S. mutans (SmTrxB) or S. thermophilus (StTrxB1), whereas two thioredoxins were prepared from either S. mutans (SmTrxA and SmTrxH1) or S. thermophilus (StTrxA1 and StTrxA2). Both SmTrxB and StTrxB1 reduced the synthetic substrate DTNB in the presence of NADPH, whereas only SmTrxA and StTrxA1 accelerated the insulin reduction in the presence of DTT. To reconstitute an in vitro streptococcal thioredoxin system, the combined activity of the thioredoxin components was tested through the insulin precipitation in the absence of DTT. The assay functions with a combination of SmTrxB or StTrxB1 with either SmTrxA or StTrxA1. These results suggest that the streptococcal members of the thioredoxin system display a direct functional interaction between them and that these protein components are interchangeable within the Streptococcus genus. In conclusion, our data prove the existence of a functioning thioredoxin system even in these microaerophiles.

  10. Streptococcus mutans infective endocarditis complicated by vertebral discitis following dental treatment without antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sujata; Bowler, Ian C J W; Bunch, Christopher; Prendergast, Bernard; Webster, Daniel P

    2010-10-01

    We report what we believe is the first reported case of Streptococcus mutans endocarditis complicated by vertebral discitis. The case is particularly interesting and topical as it occurred in a patient with pre-existing cardiac valvular disease who had recently had a dental procedure without antibiotic prophylaxis following a dramatic shift in the UK guidelines.

  11. Typing of Streptococcus mutans strains isolated from caries free and susceptible subjects by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Nabinejad, Abdolreza; Shirian, Hannaneh; Rosa, Edvaldo Antonio Ribeiro; Tahmourespour, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    This study was evaluated the clonal diversity of Streptococcus mutans in caries-free and caries-active subjects using MLEE. Strains from caries-free subjects were grouped in a single taxon. Unrooted dendrogram showed that different strains clustered in four different clades, also showed that more than one clonal type can be found in a same individual.

  12. Adhesion of Streptococcus mutans to various dental materials in a laminar flow chamber system.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Hahnel, Sebastian; Gröger, Gerhard; Mühlfriedel, Bastian; Bürgers, Ralf; Handel, Gerhard

    2008-07-01

    Newly developed dental materials have to be tested for their susceptibility to adhere bacteria causing caries and periodontitis. The objective of this study was to establish an in vitro laminar flow chamber assay for dental material evaluation with regard to the adhesion of oral bacteria. Test specimens of commonly used dental materials (ceramic (five brands of ceramics, n = 15/brand), composite (eight brands of composites, n = 15/brand), and alloy (two brands of alloys, n = 15/brand) specimens) were inserted in a laminar flow chamber system and rinsed with artificial saliva (2 h) and Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10,449 suspension (4 h) successively. The amount of adhered bacteria was quantified using a Resazurin reduction assay (Alamar Blue). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha = 0.05). Regarding adhesion of Streptococcus mutans, significant differences between the various material classes were found. Highest fluorescence values (ranging from 973 to 3145), correlating with high bacterial adhesion, were found on composite samples, and lowest values (173-272) were found on the alloys. Ceramic specimens showed an intermediate adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (fluorescence values from 532 to 1326). Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 adhered differently to the various classes of dental materials. The established laminar flow chamber device provides a suitable method for evaluating the adhesion of oral bacteria to dental material surfaces.

  13. Anticariogenic activity of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans (nutmeg) against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Chung, J Y; Choo, J H; Lee, M H; Hwang, J K

    2006-03-01

    The occurrence of dental caries is mainly associated with oral pathogens, especially cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. Preliminary antibacterial screening revealed that the extract of Myristica fragrans, widely cultivated for the spice and flavor of foods, possessed strong inhibitory activity against S. mutans. The anticariogenic compound was successfully isolated from the methanol extract of M. fragrans by repeated silica gel chromatography, and its structure was identified as macelignan by instrumental analysis using 1D-NMR, 2D-NMR and EI-MS. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of macelignan against S. mutans was 3.9 microg/ml, which was much lower than those of other natural anticariogenic agents such as 15.6 microg/ml of sanguinarine, 250 microg/ml of eucalyptol, 500 microg/ml of menthol and thymol, and 1000 microg/ml of methyl salicylate. Macelignan also possessed preferential activity against other oral microorganisms such as Streptococcus sobrinus, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei in the MIC range of 2-31.3 microg/ml. In particular, the bactericidal test showed that macelignan, at a concentration of 20 microg/ml, completely inactivated S. mutans in 1 min. The specific activity and fast-effectiveness of macelignan against oral bacteria strongly suggest that it could be employed as a natural antibacterial agent in functional foods or oral care products.

  14. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  15. Mucin can enhance growth, biofilm formation, and survival of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Mothey, Deepa; Buttaro, Bettina A; Piggot, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a member of the dental plaque and is the primary causative agent of dental caries. It can survive extended periods of starvation, which may occur in different niches within the oral cavity. We have found that mucin compensated for the absence of amino acids to promote exponential growth and biofilm formation of S. mutans in minimal medium supplemented with glucose and sucrose, respectively. Mucin extended survival in conditions where there was no net growth provided the operon encoding the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was intact. Mucin extended survival in conditions of amino acid sufficiency provided the tagatose pathway for galactose utilization was intact, suggesting that S. mutans can scavenge sufficient galactose from mucin to enhance survival, although not to serve as a primary carbon and energy source. The results suggest that mucin has a metabolic role in promoting survival of S. mutans.

  16. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of an herbal dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Yogesh Kumar; Bhatnagar, Maheep; Sharma, Kanika

    2008-01-01

    Antibacterial activity of a herbal dentifrice Arodent against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was evaluated using Colgate as standard. Both bacterial strains were isolated from the oral cavity on selective media and identified by standard methods. The antibacterial activity was assayed by cup-well method. The bacterial lawn of facultative anaerobe S. mutans was established between two layers of agar under microaerophilic conditions. Five and a half millimeters and 10 mm zones of inhibition were produced by Arodent against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic conditions. On the other hand, the standard dentifrice Colgate produced 5.83 mm and 10.17 mm zones of inhibition against S. mutans and L. acidophilus , respectively, under microaerophilic condition. The results suggest that Arodent is an effective antibacterial herbal dentifrice.

  17. Clonality and serotypes of Streptococcus mutans among children by multilocus sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Stephanie S.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A.; Childers, Noel K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) have demonstrated that Streptococcus mutans isolates are genetically diverse. Our laboratory previously demonstrated clonality of S. mutans using MLST but could not discount the possibility of sampling bias. In this study, the clonality of randomly selected S. mutans plaque isolates from African American children was examined using MLST. Serotype and presence of collagen-binding proteins (CBP) cnm/cbm were also assessed. One hundred S. mutans isolates were randomly selected for MLST analysis. Sequence analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were generated using START2 and MEGA. Thirty-four sequence types (ST) were identified of which 27 were unique to this population. Seventy-five percent of the isolates clustered into 16 clonal groups. Serotypes observed were c (n=84), e (n=3), and k (n=11). The prevalence of S. mutans isolates serotype k was notably high at 17.5%. All isolates were cnm/cbm negative. The clonality of S. mutans demonstrated in this study illustrates the importance of localized populations studies and are consistent with transmission. The prevalence of serotype k, a recently proposed systemic pathogen, observed in this study is higher than reported in most populations and is the first report of S. mutans serotype k in a US population. PMID:26443288

  18. Antiadhesion and antibiofilm activities of high molecular weight coffee components against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Monica; Papetti, Adele; Mascherpa, Dora; Schito, Anna Maria; Gazzani, Gabriella; Pruzzo, Carla; Daglia, Maria

    2010-11-24

    In previous studies we demonstrated that green and roasted coffee contains low molecular weight (LMW) compounds capable of inhibiting the ability of Streptococcus mutans, the major causative agent of human dental caries, to adhere to hydroxyapatite (HA) beads. This study addressed the ability of the whole high molecular weight coffee fraction (cHMW) and of its melanoidin and non-melanoidin components (GFC1-5), applied at concentrations that occur in coffee beverages, to (i) inhibit S. mutans growth; (ii) affect S. mutans sucrose-dependent adhesion to and detachment from saliva-coated HA beads (sHA); and (iii) inhibit biofilm development on microtiter plates. The results indicated that only cHMW is endowed with antimicrobial activity. The cHMW fraction and each of the five GFC components inhibited S. mutans adhesion, the strongest effect being exerted by cHMW (91%) and GFC1 (88%). S. mutans detachment from sHA was four times greater (∼20%) with cHMW and the GFC1 and GFC4 melanoidins than with controls. Finally, biofilm production by S. mutans was completely abolished by cHMW and was reduced by 20% by the melanoidin components GFC2 and GFC4 and by the non-melanoidin component GFC5 compared with controls. Altogether these findings show that coffee beverage contains both LMW compounds and HMW melanoidin and non-melanoidin components with a strong ability to interfere in vitro with the S. mutans traits relevant for cariogenesis.

  19. Isolation of a Novel Phage with Activity against Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dalmasso, Marion; de Haas, Eric; Neve, Horst; Strain, Ronan; Cousin, Fabien J.; Stockdale, Stephen R.; Ross, R. Paul; Hill, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the principal agents of caries formation mainly, because of its ability to form biofilms at the tooth surface. Bacteriophages (phages) are promising antimicrobial agents that could be used to prevent or treat caries formation by S. mutans. The aim of this study was to isolate new S. mutans phages and to characterize their antimicrobial properties. A new phage, ɸAPCM01, was isolated from a human saliva sample. Its genome was closely related to the only two other available S. mutans phage genomes, M102 and M102AD. ɸAPCM01 inhibited the growth of S. mutans strain DPC6143 within hours in broth and in artificial saliva at multiplicity of infections as low as 2.5x10-5. In the presence of phage ɸAPCM01 the metabolic activity of a S. mutans biofilm was reduced after 24 h of contact and did not increased again after 48 h, and the live cells in the biofilm decreased by at least 5 log cfu/ml. Despite its narrow host range, this newly isolated S. mutans phage exhibits promising antimicrobial properties. PMID:26398909

  20. Mode of Delivery and Its Influence on the Acquisition of Streptococcus mutans in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries pose distinct challenges when it comes to determining their microbial etymology. Streptococcus mutans play an important role in dental caries. The aim of the present study was to compare oral microbiota in infants delivered by these different routes. A study was conducted on 40 infants. Swab sample collection was done for the detection of S. mutans. Our study indicated no differences in oral microbiota in infants due to mode of delivery. Aim To assess whether infants born through cesarean section delivery or infants born through normal delivery influence the initial acquisition of S. mutans in infants. Settings and design The study was carried out on the premises of Bharati Hospital, Pune, wherein 40 infants (3-36 months) were enrolled for the study. Two groups were designed. Group I: Infants born with cesarean section delivery Group II: Infants born with normal section delivery Materials and methods Bacterial swab sampling was done in the participants for the detection of S. mutans. Colony-forming units on each plate were determined for the estimation of S. mutans level in oral cavity. Statistical analysis used Bar diagram analysis and chi-square test were performed to derive p-value. Results The p value derived at the end of the study was 0.52. Hence, analysis of data demonstrates no significant influence of cesarean section delivery and normal delivery on oral microbiota development in infants. Conclusion Initial acquisition of oral S. mutans in infants is not dependent on the mode of delivery. Key Messages Initial acquisition of S. mutans, Mode of delivery. How to cite this article Ubeja RG, Bhat C. Mode of Delivery and Its Influence on the Acquisition of Streptococcus mutans in Infants. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):326-329. PMID:28127164

  1. [Behavior of Streptococcus mutans under prolonged exposure to xylitol, without reculture].

    PubMed

    Almarza-Ortega, D; Gómez, M E; Del Villar, A; Esparza, D

    1994-06-01

    Previous studies carried out in our laboratory showed that Streptococcus mutans--a cariogenic oral bacteria--did not metabolize an anticariogenic sugar alcohol, xylitol, even after a 10-month adaptative period with monthly transfers to a fresh medium. Due to the potential risk to adaptation observed in bacterias, it was studied the behavior of Streptococcus mutans (Strain 1161, Ingbritt) exposed to the polyol during 7 months, without monthly transfers to a new medium. After 7 months the cells were monthly transferred to a fresh medium for 7 more months. The cells were maintained and grown in a Trypticase-soytone-base medium without dextrose which contained xylitol (0.25 g/100 mL) or no sugar added. The control was represented by cells of Streptococcus mutans growing in Trypticase- soytone-base medium containing dextrose (0.25 g/100 mL). The growth pattern in the presence of xylitol was similar to that obtained in the cultures without sugar added, but it was 63-78% lower when compared with the control. The final pH in the cultures with xylitol was around 6.0; in the control it was very low (4.69 +/- 0.12). When the cells maintained in xylitol were transferred to the medium containing dextrose, the growth pattern was similar to that of the control. Any cultures fermented xylitol; the pH of the fermentation medium remained around 6.00 when the xylitol was present. No uptake of 14C-xylitol was observed and the activity of the enzyme xylitol dehydrogenase could not be detected with the experimental procedure used. The present study confirmed the Streptococcus mutans inability to metabolize xylitol, even after a prolonged adaptative period in the sugar alcohol. Moreover, it demonstrated that xylitol could be considered an inert substance to Streptococcus mutans since the cells were viable in the presence of the xylitol, or in the medium without sugar added.

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Calotropis gigentica against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus: An in vitro comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Tandon, Sandeep; Aggarwal, Vishal; Bhat, Kishore G; Kappadi, Damodhar; Chandrashekhar, Pavitra; Dorwal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to evaluate in vitro antibacterial potential of ethanolic extract of Calotropis gigentica. Materials and Methods: The inhibitory effect of the ethanolic extract was tested against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli casei by using disc diffusion method. Results: Ethanolic extract of Calotropis gigentica showed 16 mm and 14 mm of minimum inhibition zone at 1.25% concentration for S. mutans and lactobacilli, respectively. Conclusion: Calotropis gigentica was found to effective against S. mutans and lactobacilli. PMID:26752839

  3. Comparing the cariogenic species Streptococcus sobrinus and S. mutans on whole genome level

    PubMed Central

    Conrads, Georg; de Soet, Johannes J.; Song, Lifu; Henne, Karsten; Sztajer, Helena; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Background Two closely related species of mutans streptococci, namely Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, are associated with dental caries in humans. Their acidogenic and aciduric capacity is directly associated with the cariogenic potential of these bacteria. To survive acidic and temporarily harsh conditions in the human oral cavity with hundreds of other microbial co-colonizers as competitors, both species have developed numerous mechanisms for adaptation. Objectives The recently published novel genome information for both species is used to elucidate genetic similarities but especially differences and to discuss the impact on cariogenicity of the corresponding phenotypic properties including adhesion, carbohydrate uptake and fermentation, acid tolerance, signaling by two component systems, competence, and oxidative stress resistance. Conclusions S. sobrinus can down-regulate the SpaA-mediated adherence to the pellicle. It has a smaller number of two-component signaling systems and bacteriocin-related genes than S. mutans, but all or even more immunity proteins. It lacks the central competence genes comC, comS, and comR. There are more genes coding for glucosyltransferases and a novel energy production pathway formed by lactate oxidase, which is not found in S. mutans. Both species show considerable differences in the regulation of fructan catabolism. However, both S. mutans and S. sobrinus share most of these traits and should therefore be considered as equally virulent with regard to dental caries. PMID:25475081

  4. Zoocin A and lauricidin in combination reduce Streptococcus mutans growth in a multispecies biofilm.

    PubMed

    Lester, K; Simmonds, R S

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent human infection. It is a multifactorial disease in which the microbial composition of dental plaque plays a major role in the development of clinical symptoms. The bacteria most often implicated in the development of caries are that group of streptococci referred to as the mutans streptococci, in particular Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. One approach to the prevention of caries is to reduce the numbers of mutans streptococci in plaque to a level insufficient to support demineralization of the tooth. In this study, zoocin A, a peptidoglycan hydrolase, combined with lauricidin, a cell membrane active lipid, was shown over a 72 h period to selectively suppress the growth of S. mutans in a triple species biofilm. Growth of the non-target species Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces viscosus was not inhibited. In treated systems the amount of extracellular polysaccharide matrix produced was much reduced as determined by use of fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated wheat germ agglutinin. The pH of treated biofilms remained above neutral as opposed to a value of 4.3 in untreated controls. We conclude that use of antimicrobial compounds that specifically target cariogenic bacteria should be further explored.

  5. Comparative genomic analyses of Streptococcus mutans provide insights into chromosomal shuffling and species-specific content

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus mutans is the major pathogen of dental caries, and it occasionally causes infective endocarditis. While the pathogenicity of this species is distinct from other human pathogenic streptococci, the species-specific evolution of the genus Streptococcus and its genomic diversity are poorly understood. Results We have sequenced the complete genome of S. mutans serotype c strain NN2025, and compared it with the genome of UA159. The NN2025 genome is composed of 2,013,587 bp, and the two strains show highly conserved core-genome. However, comparison of the two S. mutans strains showed a large genomic inversion across the replication axis producing an X-shaped symmetrical DNA dot plot. This phenomenon was also observed between other streptococcal species, indicating that streptococcal genetic rearrangements across the replication axis play an important role in Streptococcus genetic shuffling. We further confirmed the genomic diversity among 95 clinical isolates using long-PCR analysis. Genomic diversity in S. mutans appears to occur frequently between insertion sequence (IS) elements and transposons, and these diversity regions consist of restriction/modification systems, antimicrobial peptide synthesis systems, and transporters. S. mutans may preferentially reject the phage infection by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). In particular, the CRISPR-2 region, which is highly divergent between strains, in NN2025 has long repeated spacer sequences corresponding to the streptococcal phage genome. Conclusion These observations suggest that S. mutans strains evolve through chromosomal shuffling and that phage infection is not needed for gene acquisition. In contrast, S. pyogenes tolerates phage infection for acquisition of virulence determinants for niche adaptation. PMID:19656368

  6. Effect of LongZhang Gargle on Biofilm Formation and Acidogenicity of Streptococcus mutans In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yutao; Liu, Shiyu; He, Yuanli

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, with the ability of high-rate acid production and strong biofilm formation, is considered the predominant bacterial species in the pathogenesis of human dental caries. Natural products which may be bioactive against S. mutans have become a hot spot to researches to control dental caries. LongZhang Gargle, completely made from Chinese herbs, was investigated for its effects on acid production and biofilm formation by S. mutans in this study. The results showed an antimicrobial activity of LongZhang Gargle against S. mutans planktonic growth at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 16% and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 32%. Acid production was significantly inhibited at sub-MIC concentrations. Biofilm formation was also significantly disrupted, and 8% was the minimum concentration that resulted in at least 50% inhibition of biofilm formation (MBIC50). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed an effective disruption of LongZhang Gargle on S. mutans biofilm integrity. In addition, a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) suggested that the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis could be inhibited by LongZhang Gargle at a relatively low concentration. These findings suggest that LongZhang Gargle may be a promising natural anticariogenic agent in that it suppresses planktonic growth, acid production, and biofilm formation against S. mutans. PMID:27314029

  7. Effect of LongZhang Gargle on Biofilm Formation and Acidogenicity of Streptococcus mutans In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Liu, Shiyu; He, Yuanli; Chen, Zhu; Li, Mingyun

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, with the ability of high-rate acid production and strong biofilm formation, is considered the predominant bacterial species in the pathogenesis of human dental caries. Natural products which may be bioactive against S. mutans have become a hot spot to researches to control dental caries. LongZhang Gargle, completely made from Chinese herbs, was investigated for its effects on acid production and biofilm formation by S. mutans in this study. The results showed an antimicrobial activity of LongZhang Gargle against S. mutans planktonic growth at the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 16% and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 32%. Acid production was significantly inhibited at sub-MIC concentrations. Biofilm formation was also significantly disrupted, and 8% was the minimum concentration that resulted in at least 50% inhibition of biofilm formation (MBIC50). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed an effective disruption of LongZhang Gargle on S. mutans biofilm integrity. In addition, a confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) suggested that the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis could be inhibited by LongZhang Gargle at a relatively low concentration. These findings suggest that LongZhang Gargle may be a promising natural anticariogenic agent in that it suppresses planktonic growth, acid production, and biofilm formation against S. mutans.

  8. The collagen binding protein Cnm contributes to oral colonization and cariogenicity of Streptococcus mutans OMZ175.

    PubMed

    Miller, James H; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Scott-Anne, Kathy; Gregoire, Stacy; Watson, Gene E; Sampson, Edith; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Koo, Hyun; Bowen, William H; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the etiological agent of dental caries and one of the many bacterial species implicated in infective endocarditis. The expression of the collagen-binding protein Cnm by S. mutans has been associated with extraoral infections, but its relevance for dental caries has only been theorized to date. Due to the collagenous composition of dentinal and root tissues, we hypothesized that Cnm may facilitate the colonization of these surfaces, thereby enhancing the pathogenic potential of S. mutans in advancing carious lesions. As shown for extraoral endothelial cell lines, Cnm mediates the invasion of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts by S. mutans. In this study, we show that in the Cnm(+) native strain, OMZ175, Cnm mediates stringent adhesion to dentinal and root tissues as well as collagen-coated surfaces and promotes both cariogenicity and carriage in vivo. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments revealed that while Cnm is not universally required for S. mutans cariogenicity, it contributes to (i) the invasion of the oral epithelium, (ii) enhanced binding on collagenous surfaces, (iii) implantation of oral biofilms, and (IV) the severity of caries due to a native Cnm(+) isolate. Taken together, our findings reveal that Cnm is a colonization factor that contributes to the pathogenicity of certain S. mutans strains in their native habitat, the oral cavity.

  9. Nicotine promotes Streptococcus mutans extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, cell aggregation and overall lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, R; Li, M; Gregory, R L

    2015-08-01

    Several epidemiology studies have reported a positive relationship between smoking and dental caries. Nicotine, an alkaloid component of tobacco, has been demonstrated to stimulate biofilm formation and metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans, one of the most important pathogens of dental caries. The first aim of the present study was to explore the possible mechanisms leading to increased biofilm by nicotine treatment from three aspects, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) synthesis, glucosyltransferase (Gtf) synthesis and glucan-binding protein (Gbp) synthesis at the mRNA and protein levels. The second aim was to investigate how nicotine affects S. mutans virulence, particular in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Confocal laser scanning microscopy results demonstrated that both biofilm bacterial cell numbers and EPS were increased by nicotine. Gtf and GbpA protein expression of S. mutans planktonic cells were upregulated while GbpB protein expression of biofilm cells were downregulated by nicotine. The mRNA expression trends of those genes were mostly consistent with results on protein level but not statistically significant, and gtfD and gbpD of biofilm cells were inhibited. Nicotine was not directly involved in S. mutans LDH activity. However, since it increases the total number of bacterial cells in biofilm, the overall LDH activity of S. mutans biofilm is increased. In conclusion, nicotine stimulates S. mutans planktonic cell Gtf and Gbp expression. This leads to more planktonic cells attaching to the dental biofilm. Increased cell numbers within biofilm results in higher overall LDH activity. This contributes to caries development in smokers.

  10. Reduction of Streptococcus mutans adherence and dental biofilm formation by surface treatment with phosphorylated polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, Akira; Koudate, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Nakamura, Junji; Tokimitsu, Ichiro; Hase, Tadashi; Inoue, Takashi; Matsukubo, Takashi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2007-10-01

    Initial attachment of the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans onto dental enamel is largely promoted by the adsorption of specific salivary proteins on enamel surface. Some phosphorylated salivary proteins were found to reduce S. mutans adhesion by competitively inhibiting the adsorption of S. mutans-binding salivary glycoproteins to hydroxyapatite (HA). The aim of this study was to develop antiadherence compounds for preventing dental biofilm development. We synthesized phosphorylated polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives and examined the possibility of surface pretreatment with them for preventing S. mutans adhesion in vitro and dental biofilm formation in vivo. Pretreatment of the HA surface with methacryloyloxydecyl phosphate (MDP)-PEG prior to saliva incubation hydrophilized the surface and thereby reduced salivary protein adsorption and saliva-promoted bacterial attachment to HA. However, when MDP-PEG was added to the saliva-pretreated HA (S-HA) surface, its inhibitory effect on bacterial binding was completely diminished. S. mutans adhesion onto S-HA was successfully reduced by treatment of the surface with pyrophosphate (PP), which desorbs salivary components from S-HA. Treatment of S-HA surfaces with MDP-PEG plus PP completely inhibited saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion even when followed by additional saliva treatment. Finally, mouthwash with MDP-PEG plus PP prevented de novo biofilm development after thorough teeth cleaning in humans compared to either water or PP alone. We conclude that MDP-PEG plus PP has the potential for use as an antiadherence agent that prevents dental biofilm development.

  11. In vitro study of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on composite resin coated with three surface sealants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Although the coating of surface sealants to dental composite resin may potentially reduce bacterial adhesion, there seems to be little information regarding this issue. This preliminary in vitro study investigated the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on the dental composite resins coated with three commercial surface sealants. Materials and Methods Composite resin (Filtek Z250) discs (8 mm in diameter, 1 mm in thickness) were fabricated in a mold covered with a Mylar strip (control). In group PoGo, the surfaces were polished with PoGo. In groups PS, OG, and FP, the surfaces polished with PoGo were coated with the corresponding surface sealants (PermaSeal, PS; OptiGuard, OG; Fortify Plus, FP). The surfaces of the materials and S. mutans cells were characterized by various methods. S. mutans adhesion to the surfaces was quantitatively evaluated using flow cytometry (n = 9). Results Group OG achieved the lowest water contact angle among all groups tested (p < 0.001). The cell surface of S. mutans tested showed hydrophobic characteristics. Group PoGo exhibited the greatest bacterial adhesion among all groups tested (p < 0.001). The sealant-coated groups showed statistically similar (groups PS and FP, p > 0.05) or significantly lower (group OG, p < 0.001) bacterial adhesion when compared with the control group. Conclusions The application of the surface sealants significantly reduced S. mutans adhesion to the composite resin polished with the PoGo. PMID:28194363

  12. Capacity of a hydroxyapatite–lysozyme combination against Streptococcus mutans for the treatment of dentinal caries

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sérgio Luiz; da Rocha, Nathany Nunes; Peres, Mariane de Lourdes Hernandes Martins

    2016-01-01

    Background: One current strategy for the treatment of carious lesions is the use of biomaterials with antimicrobial activity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate a combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme for the treatment of dentinal caries by measuring Streptococcus mutans counts before carious tissue sealing, and 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment. Materials and Methods: Forty permanent third molars were selected, and flat dentin surfaces were prepared. The teeth were exposed to a cariogenic challenge with S. mutans. After challenge, the dentinal caries were collected from five specimens. The remaining specimens were treated with a mixture of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate and sealed with composite resin. S. mutans counts were obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after sealing. Statistical Analysis: The results were evaluated by descriptive statistics and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: a significant reduction in S. mutans (CFU/mL) was observed in dentinal lesions 1 month after treatment with hydroxyapatite/lysozyme in sodium laureth sulfate (P = 0.0254). Comparison of S. mutans counts obtained 24 h, 1 month, and 6 months after treatment revealed reductions only at the 1-month time point (P = 0.0318). Conclusions: the combination of hydroxyapatite and lysozyme may be an alternative for reducing the S. mutans burden in dentinal caries. PMID:27656068

  13. Antibacterial activity of Baccharis dracunculifolia in planktonic cultures and biofilms of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane A; Costa, Anna Carolina B Pereira; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane S; Rego, Marcos A; Jorge, Antonio Olavo C

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is an important cariogenic microorganism, and alternative methods for its elimination are required. Different concentrations of Baccharis dracunculifolia essential oil (EO) were tested to determine its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) in planktonic cultures, and this concentration was used in S. mutans biofilms. Additionally, we assessed the effect of a 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and saline solution in S. mutans biofilms. The biofilms were grown in discs of composite resin for 48h and exposed to B. dracunculifolia, CHX or saline solution for 5min. The viability of the biofilms was determined by counting the colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/ml) in agar, which was statistically significant (P<0.05). The MIC of the B. dracunculifolia EO to planktonic growth of S. mutans was 6%. In biofilms of S. mutans clinical isolates, B. dracunculifolia EO (6%) and CHX resulted in reductions of 53.3-91.1% and 79.1-96.6%, respectively. For the biofilm formed by the S. mutans reference strain, the reductions achieved with B. dracunculifolia EO and CHX were, respectively, 39.3% and 88.1%. It was concluded that B. dracunculifolia EO showed antibacterial activity and was able to control this oral microorganism, which otherwise causes dental caries.

  14. The effect of indigenous Neem Azadirachta indica [correction of (Adirachta indica)] mouth wash on Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli growth.

    PubMed

    Vanka, A; Tandon, S; Rao, S R; Udupa, N; Ramkumar, P

    2001-01-01

    Neem is one of the most widely researched tropical tree, with almost all it's parts being put for a variety of uses. In the present study, the antibacterial effect of Neem mouthwash against salivary levels of streptococcus mutans and lactobacillus has been tested over a period of 2 months. Also it's effect in reversing incipient carious lesions was assessed. While streptococcus mutans was inhibited by Neem mouthwashes, with or without alcohol as well as chlorhexidine, lactobacillus growth was inhibited by chlorhexidine alone. The initial data appears to prove it's effect in inhibiting S. mutans and reversing incipient carious lesions, longer term clinical trials are essential.

  15. Chitosan nanoparticles affect the acid tolerance response in adhered cells of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Neilands, J; Sutherland, D; Resin, A; Wejse, P L; Chávez de Paz, L E

    2011-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of chitosan nanoparticles on the acid tolerance response (ATR) of adhered Streptococcus mutans. An ATR was induced by exposing S. mutans to pH 5.5 for 2 h and confirmed by exposing the acid-adapted cells to pH 3.5 for 30 min, with the majority of cells appearing viable according to the LIVE/DEAD® technique. However, when chitosan nanoparticles were present during the exposure to pH 5.5, no ATR occurred as most cells appeared dead after the pH 3.5 shock. We conclude that the chitosan nanoparticles tested had the ability to hinder ATR induction in adhered S. mutans.

  16. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of Achyranthes aspera extract against Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Roma; Rai, Radhika; Yadav, Abhishek; Pahuja, Meetika; Solanki, Savita; Yadav, Himani

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries and periodontal diseases have historically been considered the most important global oral health burdens. Many chemicals and synthetic drugs have marked the side effects. Hence, there has been a paradigm shift from the use of modern drugs to the age-old herbs. Achyranthes aspera is one such important plant with various established pharmaceutical properties. The aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial activity of the A. aspera extract against Streptococcus mutans. Aqueous extract of A. aspera was prepared. Different concentrations of the root and stem extracts of A. aspera were transferred to the agar plates, which had been streaked with the bacterium S. mutans. The plates were incubated aerobically at 37°C for 24 h, and the zones of inhibition were measured using cup plate method. A. aspera extract showed statistically significant zones of inhibition. A. aspera showed marked antibacterial activity against S. mutans. PMID:27833895

  17. Distribution of Streptococcus mutans biotypes in five human populations.

    PubMed

    Keene, H J; Shklair, I L; Mickel, G J; Wirthlin, M R

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of S mutans biotypes in five geographically separated human populations was investigated. Samples of dental plaque were obtained from recruits at the US Naval Training Center in Orlando, Fl (N=49) in San Diego, Calif (N=25), and in Great Lakes, Ill (N=194), and from a sample of Hawaiian school children (N=55) and Saudi Arabian Navy personnel (N-217). Cultural and biochemical methods were used for the isolation and identification of the five different biotypes of S mutans which correlate with Bratthall's serotypes a through e. Geographic differences in S mutans biotype distribution were most apparent when the Saudi Arabian sample was compared to the other four groups. Single and multiple biotypes were observed in each group. Multiple biotypes occurred most frequently in the Saudi Arabians. Biotypes a and b were rarely observed; c was the most common in each of the populations; and d and e were more prevalent in the Saudi Arabians than in the other groups. Because of the multifactorial nature of dental caries, caution should be exercised in the interpretation of population differences in caries experience that seem to be associated with differences in S mutans-type distribution.

  18. The Antibacterial Effects of Apacaries Gel on Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Peerapattana, Jomjai; Ratanathongkam, Ariya; Nualkaew, Nartsajee; Chatchiwiwattana, Supaporn; Treesuwan, Panta

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: New approaches for chemomechanical caries removal require effective materials with antibacterial properties for removal of infected dentin. Apacaries gel is a newly developed material comprised polyphenol from mangosteen extracts and papain mixed in gel preparation. Aim: This study evaluated the antibacterial effects of Apacaries gel on Streptococcus mutans in vitro. Materials and methods: Mangosteen pericarp powder was extracted. The amount of phenolic compounds was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The time-kill kinetics were investigated. Mangosteen extract and papain were mixed with gel base to develop Apacaries gel. The inhibition zone of the Apacaries gel was determined using agar well diffusion methods. Results: The mangosteen pericarp extract, which contains α-mangostin, was active against S. mutans strain ATCC25175. The time-kill kinetics curve showed that applying 1 mg/ml of mangosteen extract can reduce S. mutans by 50% within approximately 5 seconds; after this reduction, the bacterial count rapidly dropped to 0 within 60 seconds. Using mangosteen extract and papain mixture gel preparation resulted in a larger inhibition zone than using the mangosteen extract gel or papain gel separately. Conclusion: Apacaries gel can effectively inhibit S. mutans strain ATCC25175. Apacaries is capable of S. mutans inhibition better than both mangosteen extract or papain separately. How to cite this article: Juntavee A, Peerapattana J, Ratanathongkam A, Nualkaew N, Chatchiwiwattana S, Treesuwan P. The Antibacterial Effects of Apacaries Gel on Streptococcus mutans: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):77-81. PMID:25356004

  19. Understanding the Streptococcus mutans Cid/Lrg System through CidB Function

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kelly C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Streptococcus mutans lrgAB and cidAB operons have been previously described as a potential model system to dissect the complexity of biofilm development and virulence of S. mutans. Herein, we have attempted to further characterize the Cid/Lrg system by focusing on CidB, which has been shown to be critical for the ability of S. mutans to survive and persist in a nonpreferred oxygen-enriched condition. We have found that the expression level of cidB is critical to oxidative stress tolerance of S. mutans, most likely by impacting lrg expression. Intriguingly, the impaired aerobic growth phenotype of the cidB mutant could be restored by the additional loss of either CidA or LrgA. Growth-dependent expression of cid and lrg was demonstrated to be tightly under the control of both CcpA and the VicKR two-component system (TCS), regulators known to play an essential role in controlling major catabolic pathways and cell envelope homeostasis, respectively. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis revealed that mutation of cidB resulted in global gene expression changes, comprising major domains of central metabolism and virulence processes, particularly in those involved with oxidative stress resistance. Loss of CidB also significantly changed the expression of genes related to genomic islands (GI) TnSmu1 and TnSmu2, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)-Cas system, and toxin-antitoxin (T/A) modules. Taken together, these data show that CidB impinges on the stress response, as well as the fundamental cellular physiology of S. mutans, and further suggest a potential link between Cid/Lrg-mediated cellular processes, S. mutans pathogenicity, and possible programmed growth arrest and cell death mechanisms. IMPORTANCE The ability of Streptococcus mutans to survive a variety of harmful or stressful conditions and to emerge as a numerically significant member of stable oral biofilm communities are essential elements for its persistence and

  20. Prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin against Streptococcus mutans bacteremia in lactoferrin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H; Velliyagounder, Kabilan

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental caries, which is often detected in transient bacteremia. Lactoferrin is a multifunctional glycoprotein showing antibacterial activities against several Streptococcus species. We reported here the prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin (hLF) in a lactoferrin knockout mouse (LFKO-/-) bacteremic model. The hLF treatment significantly cleared S. mutans from the blood and organs of bacteremic mice when compared to the non-hLF treated mice. Further, analysis of serum cytokines, spleen and liver cytokine mRNA levels revealed that hLF prophylaxis modulates their release differently when compared to the non-hLF treated group. C-reactive protein level (P = 0.003) also decreased following hLF prophylaxis in S. mutans induced bacteremic mice. Additional quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that hLF prophylaxis significantly decreased the expression level of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MPO and iNOS in spleen and liver. These results suggested that the hLF protects the host against S. mutans-induced experimental bacteremia.

  1. Isolation and biochemical characterization of mutacin VSM43 isolated from human oral Streptococcus mutans VSM43.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Samia; Rasool, Sheikh Ajaz

    2003-07-01

    Bacteriocins produced by mutans streptococci are known as mutacins. Streptococcus mutans VSM43 isolated from human clinical oral cavity was screened for the production of mutacin. It can inhibit the growth of other mutans streptococci, many other gram-positives and some gram-negative bacteria. Average size of the inhibitory zone ranged between 12-20mm. The inhibitory activity could not be related to organic acids, bacteriophages and hydrogen peroxide. Mutacin VSM43 was protease sensitive, remained active within a pH range of 2-8, and lost activity after heating at 100 degrees C for 30 min. Mutacin VSM43 was dialyzable through dialysis membrane (pore size 12,000 Da). A titre of 1280 arbitrary/activity units per ml (AU/mL) was shown against Staphylococcus aureus AB211. Lacuna frequency percentage (LF%) against Streptococcus mutans VSMD and Staphylococcus aureus AB211 was 37% and 49% respectively. We are convinced mutacin VSM43 may be a parallel candidate for use against dental caries.

  2. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future. PMID:24864137

  3. Susceptibility of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans to Antibacterial Effect from Mammea americana.

    PubMed

    Herrera Herrera, Alejandra; Franco Ospina, Luis; Fang, Luis; Díaz Caballero, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The development of periodontal disease and dental caries is influenced by several factors, such as microorganisms of bacterial biofilm or commensal bacteria in the mouth. These microorganisms trigger inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Currently, medicinal plants are treatment options for these oral diseases. Mammea americana extracts have reported antimicrobial effects against several microorganisms. Nevertheless, this effect is unknown against oral bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of M. americana extract against Porphyromonas gingivalis and Streptococcus mutans. For this, an experimental study was conducted. Ethanolic extract was obtained from seeds of M. americana (one oil phase and one ethanolic phase). The strains of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 and Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 were exposed to this extract to evaluate its antibacterial effect. Antibacterial activity was observed with the two phases of M. americana extract on P. gingivalis and S. mutans with lower MICs (minimum inhibitory concentration). Also, bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity was detected against S. mutans, depending on the concentration of the extract, while on M. americana extract presented only bacteriostatic activity against P. gingivalis. These findings provide important and promising information allowing for further exploration in the future.

  4. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  5. A Novel Gene Required for Rhamnose-Glucose Polysaccharide Synthesis in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Shibata, Yukie; Nakano, Yoshio; Tsuda, Hiromasa; Kido, Nobuo; Ohta, Michio; Koga, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Gene rgpG is required for biosynthesis of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP) in Streptococcus mutans. Its deduced amino acid sequence had similarity to WecA, which initiates syntheses of enterobacterial common antigen and some O antigens in Escherichia coli. Gene rgpG complemented a wecA mutation of E. coli, suggesting that rgpG may function similarly in RGP synthesis. PMID:10515952

  6. Effect of sodium fluoride, ampicillin, and chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm detachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ling, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Li-Jun; Ning, Yang

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of three clinically used antimicrobials on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm detachment under flow conditions. Sodium fluoride (NaF) and chlorhexidine at MIC levels promoted biofilm detachment and inhibited detachment when concentrations were higher than the MIC and reduced detached-cell viability only at high concentrations. Ampicillin at all concentrations tested inhibited detachment and reduced the percentage of viable biofilm-detached cells. All the three antimicrobial treatments reduced biofilm live/dead cell ratios.

  7. Anti-Biofilm Activity of a Self-Aggregating Peptide against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Juliana M.; Abraham, Nabil M.; Massaro, Jenna; Murphy, Kelsey; Smith-Carpenter, Jillian; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental cavities, in large part due to its ability to adhere to teeth and create a molecular scaffold of glucan polysaccharides on the tooth surface. Disrupting the architecture of S. mutans biofilms could help undermine the establishment of biofilm communities that cause cavities and tooth decay. Here we present a synthetic peptide P1, derived from a tick antifreeze protein, which significantly reduces S. mutans biofilm formation. Incubating cells with this peptide decreased biofilm biomass by approximately 75% in both a crystal violet microplate assay and an in vitro tooth model using saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs. Bacteria treated with peptide P1 formed irregular biofilms with disconnected aggregates of cells and exopolymeric matrix that readily detached from surfaces. Peptide P1 can bind directly to S. mutans cells but does not possess bactericidal activity. Anti-biofilm activity was correlated with peptide aggregation and β-sheet formation in solution, and alternative synthetic peptides of different lengths or charge distribution did not inhibit biofilms. This anti-biofilm peptide interferes with S. mutans biofilm formation and architecture, and may have future applications in preventing bacterial buildup on teeth. PMID:28392782

  8. Anti-Biofilm Activity of a Self-Aggregating Peptide against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Juliana M; Abraham, Nabil M; Massaro, Jenna; Murphy, Kelsey; Smith-Carpenter, Jillian; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental cavities, in large part due to its ability to adhere to teeth and create a molecular scaffold of glucan polysaccharides on the tooth surface. Disrupting the architecture of S. mutans biofilms could help undermine the establishment of biofilm communities that cause cavities and tooth decay. Here we present a synthetic peptide P1, derived from a tick antifreeze protein, which significantly reduces S. mutans biofilm formation. Incubating cells with this peptide decreased biofilm biomass by approximately 75% in both a crystal violet microplate assay and an in vitro tooth model using saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs. Bacteria treated with peptide P1 formed irregular biofilms with disconnected aggregates of cells and exopolymeric matrix that readily detached from surfaces. Peptide P1 can bind directly to S. mutans cells but does not possess bactericidal activity. Anti-biofilm activity was correlated with peptide aggregation and β-sheet formation in solution, and alternative synthetic peptides of different lengths or charge distribution did not inhibit biofilms. This anti-biofilm peptide interferes with S. mutans biofilm formation and architecture, and may have future applications in preventing bacterial buildup on teeth.

  9. Influence of Surface Properties on Adhesion Forces and Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pei; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhou, Jinglin; Jiang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia is becoming a prevalent material in dentistry. However, any foreign bodies inserted may provide new niches for the bacteria in oral cavity. The object of this study was to explore the effect of surface properties including surface roughness and hydrophobicity on the adhesion and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to zirconia. Atomic force microscopy was employed to determine the zirconia surface morphology and the adhesion forces between the S. mutans and zirconia. The results showed that the surface roughness was nanoscale and significantly different among tested groups (P < 0.05): Coarse (23.94 ± 2.52 nm) > Medium (17.00 ± 3.81 nm) > Fine (11.89 ± 1.68 nm). The contact angles of the Coarse group were the highest, followed by the Medium and the Fine groups. Increasing the surface roughness and hydrophobicity resulted in an increase of adhesion forces and early attachment (2 h and 4 h) of S. mutans on the zirconia but no influence on the further development of biofilm (6 h~24 h). Our findings suggest that the surface roughness in nanoscale and hydrophobicity of zirconia had influence on the S. mutans initial adhesion force and early attachment instead of whole stages of biofilm formation. PMID:27975061

  10. Regulation of oxidative response and extracellular polysaccharide synthesis by a diadenylate cyclase in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xingqun; Zheng, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Ren, Zhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Li, Yuqing

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) has been implicated in the control of many important bacterial activities. However, the function of this molecule in Streptococcus mutans, the primary aetiological agent of human dental caries, is unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a diadenylate cyclase, named CdaA, in S. mutans. Furthermore, we showed that in-frame deletion of the cdaA gene in S. mutans causes decreased c-di-AMP levels, increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and increased production of extracellular polysaccharides. Global gene expression profiling revealed that more than 200 genes were significantly upregulated or downregulated (> 2.0-fold) in the cdaA mutant. Interestingly, genes with increased or decreased expression were clustered in cellular polysaccharide biosynthetic processes and oxidoreductase activity respectively. Notably, the expression of several genomic islands, such as GTF-B/C, TnSmu, CRISPR1-Cas and CRISPR2-Cas, was found to be altered in the cdaA mutant, indicating a possible link between these genomic islands and c-di-AMP signalling. Collectively, the results reported here show that CdaA is an important global modulator in S. mutans and is required for optimal growth and environmental adaption. This report also paves the way to unveil further the roles of c-di-AMP signalling networks in the biology and pathogenicity of S. mutans.

  11. Calcium fluoride nanoparticles induced suppression of Streptococcus mutans biofilm: an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Shatavari; Khan, Shakir; Hasan, Sadaf; Khan, M Ehtisham; Misba, Lama; Khan, Asad U

    2016-02-01

    Biofilm formation on the tooth surface is the root cause of dental caries and periodontal diseases. Streptococcus mutans is known to produce biofilm which is one of the primary causes of dental caries. Acid production and acid tolerance along with exopolysaccharide (EPS) formation are major virulence factors of S. mutans biofilm. In the current study, calcium fluoride nanoparticles (CaF2-NPs) were evaluated for their effect on the biofilm forming ability of S. mutans in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro studies revealed 89 % and 90 % reduction in biofilm formation and EPS production, respectively. Moreover, acid production and acid tolerance abilities of S. mutans were also reduced considerably in the presence of CaF2-NPs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images were in accordance with the other results indicating inhibition of biofilm without affecting bacterial viability. The qRT-PCR gene expression analysis showed significant downregulation of various virulence genes (vicR, gtfC, ftf, spaP, comDE) associated with biofilm formation. Furthermore, CaF2-NPs were found to substantially decrease the caries in treated rat groups as compared to the untreated groups in in vivo studies. Scanning electron micrographs of rat's teeth further validated our results. These findings suggest that the CaF2-NPs may be used as a potential antibiofilm applicant against S. mutans and may be applied as a topical agent to reduce dental caries.

  12. Adherence inhibition of Streptococcus mutans on dental enamel surface using silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cristóbal, L F; Martínez-Castañón, G A; Téllez-Déctor, E J; Niño-Martínez, N; Zavala-Alonso, N V; Loyola-Rodríguez, J P

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the adherence capacity of Streptococcus mutans after being exposed to three different sizes of silver nanoparticles on healthy human dental enamel. Three different sizes of silver nanoparticles (9.3, 21.3 and 98 nm) were prepared, characterized and an adherence testing was performed to evaluate their anti-adherence activity on a reference strain of S. mutans on healthy dental enamel surfaces. Colony-Forming Unit count was made for adherence test and light microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to compare qualitative characteristics of S. mutans. 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups did not show differences between them but statistical differences were found when 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups were compared with 98 nm and negative control groups (p<0.05). Microscopy analysis shows a better inhibition of S. mutans adherence in 9.3 nm and 21.3 nm groups than the 98 nm group when compared with control group. Silver nanoparticles showed an adherence inhibition on S. mutans and the anti-adherence capacity was better when silver nanoparticles were smaller.

  13. Effects of aging on surface properties and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans on various fissure sealants.

    PubMed

    Bürgers, Ralf; Cariaga, Tashiana; Müller, Rainer; Rosentritt, Martin; Reischl, Udo; Handel, Gerhard; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the present study was the quantification of Streptococcus mutans adhesion on ten widely used pit and fissure sealant materials and the correlation of these findings to surface roughness (R(a)) and surface free energy (SFE). Additionally, changes in streptococcal adhesion and surface parameters after water immersion and artificial aging have been investigated. Circular specimens of ten fissure sealants (seven resin-based composites, two glass ionomers, and one compomer) were made and polished. Surface roughness was determined by perthometer and SFE by goniometer measurements. Sealant materials were incubated with S. mutans suspension (2.5 h, 37 degrees C), and adhering bacteria were quantified by using a biofluorescence assay in combination with an automated plate reader. Surface properties and S. mutans adhesion were measured prior to and after water immersion after 1 and 6 months and after additional thermocycling (5,000 cycles; 5 degrees C/55 degrees C). The tested sealants showed significant differences in S. mutans adhesion prior to and after the applied aging procedures. Aging resulted in slight increases (mostly <0.2 microm) in surface roughness, as well as in significant decreases in SFE and in significantly lower quantities of adhering bacteria. Ketac Bond and UltraSeal XT plus revealed the lowest adhesion potential after artificial aging. In general, the amount of adhering S. mutans was reduced after aging, which may be related to the decline in SFEs.

  14. Influence of Surface Properties on Adhesion Forces and Attachment of Streptococcus mutans to Zirconia In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pei; Wang, Chuanyong; Zhou, Jinglin; Jiang, Li; Xue, Jing; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Zirconia is becoming a prevalent material in dentistry. However, any foreign bodies inserted may provide new niches for the bacteria in oral cavity. The object of this study was to explore the effect of surface properties including surface roughness and hydrophobicity on the adhesion and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to zirconia. Atomic force microscopy was employed to determine the zirconia surface morphology and the adhesion forces between the S. mutans and zirconia. The results showed that the surface roughness was nanoscale and significantly different among tested groups (P < 0.05): Coarse (23.94 ± 2.52 nm) > Medium (17.00 ± 3.81 nm) > Fine (11.89 ± 1.68 nm). The contact angles of the Coarse group were the highest, followed by the Medium and the Fine groups. Increasing the surface roughness and hydrophobicity resulted in an increase of adhesion forces and early attachment (2 h and 4 h) of S. mutans on the zirconia but no influence on the further development of biofilm (6 h~24 h). Our findings suggest that the surface roughness in nanoscale and hydrophobicity of zirconia had influence on the S. mutans initial adhesion force and early attachment instead of whole stages of biofilm formation.

  15. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharide production, and virulence by an oxazole derivative.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lulu; Ren, Zhi; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Zou, Jing; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries, a biofilm-related oral disease, is a result of disruption of the microbial ecological balance in the oral environment. Streptococcus mutans, which is one of the primary cariogenic bacteria, produces glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) that synthesize extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). The EPSs, especially water-insoluble glucans, contribute to the formation of dental plaque, biofilm stability, and structural integrity, by allowing bacteria to adhere to tooth surfaces and supplying the bacteria with protection against noxious stimuli and other environmental attacks. The identification of novel alternatives that selectively inhibit cariogenic organisms without suppressing oral microbial residents is required. The goal of the current study is to investigate the influence of an oxazole derivative on S. mutans biofilm formation and the development of dental caries in rats, given that oxazole and its derivatives often exhibit extensive and pharmacologically important biological activities. Our data shows that one particular oxazole derivative, named 5H6, inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms and prevented synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides by antagonizing Gtfs in vitro, without affecting the growth of the bacteria. In addition, topical applications with the inhibitor resulted in diminished incidence and severity of both smooth and sulcal surface caries in vivo with a lower percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Our results showed that this oxazole derivative has the capacity to inhibit biofilm formation and cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oils against Streptococcus mutans and their Antiproliferative Effects

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; Furletti, Vivian Fernandes; Bersan, Salete Meyre Fernandes; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Góis; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; Sartoratto, Adilson; Rehder, Vera Lúcia Garcia; Figueira, Glyn Mara; Teixeira Duarte, Marta Cristina; Ikegaki, Masarahu; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of essential oils (EOs) against Streptococcus mutans biofilm by chemically characterizing their fractions responsible for biological and antiproliferative activity. Twenty EO were obtained by hydrodistillation and submitted to the antimicrobial assay (minimum inhibitory (MIC) and bactericidal (MBC) concentrations) against S. mutans UA159. Thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry were used for phytochemical analyses. EOs were selected according to predetermined criteria and fractionated using dry column; the resulting fractions were assessed by MIC and MBC, selected as active fractions, and evaluated against S. mutans biofilm. Biofilms formed were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Selected EOs and their selected active fractions were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against keratinocytes and seven human tumor cell lines. MIC and MBC values obtained for EO and their active fractions showed strong antimicrobial activity. Chemical analyses mainly showed the presence of terpenes. The selected active fractions inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation (P < 0.05) did not affect glycolytic pH drop and were inactive against keratinocytes, normal cell line. In conclusion, EO showed activity at low concentrations, and their selected active fractions were also effective against biofilm formed by S. mutans and human tumor cell lines. PMID:22685486

  17. Silver nanoparticles with antimicrobial activities against Streptococcus mutans and their cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, Mario Alberto; Boegli, Laura; James, Garth; Velasquillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Roberto; Martínez-Martínez, Rita-Elizabeth; Martínez-Castañón, Gabriel Alejandro; Martinez-Gutierrez, Fidel

    2015-10-01

    Microbial resistance represents a challenge for the scientific community to develop new bioactive compounds. The goal of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against a clinical isolate of Streptococcus mutans, antibiofilm activity against mature S. mutans biofilms and the compatibility with human fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs against the planktonic clinical isolate was size and concentration dependent, with smaller AgNPs having a lower minimum inhibitory concentration. A reduction of 2.3 log in the number of colony-forming units of S. mutans was observed when biofilms grown in a CDC reactor were exposed to 100 ppm of AgNPs of 9.5±1.1 nm. However, AgNPs at high concentrations (>10 ppm) showed a cytotoxic effect upon human dermal fibroblasts. AgNPs effectively inhibited the growth of a planktonic S. mutans clinical isolate and killed established S. mutans biofilms, which suggests that AgNPs could be used for prevention and treatment of dental caries. Further research and development are necessary to translate this technology into therapeutic and preventive strategies.

  18. Antibacterial Effect of Dental Adhesive Containing Dimethylaminododecyl Methacrylate on the Development of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Suping; Zhang, Keke; Zhou, Xuedong; Xu, Ning; Xu, Hockin H. K.; Weir, Michael D.; Ge, Yang; Wang, Shida; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Antibacterial bonding agents and composites containing dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) have been recently developed. The objectives of this study were to investigate the antibacterial effect of novel adhesives containing different mass fractions of DMADDM on Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm at different developmental stages. Different mass fractions of DMADDM were incorporated into adhesives and S. mutans biofilm at different developmetal stages were analyzed by MTT assays, lactic acid measurement, confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm extracellular matrix. Dentin microtensile strengths were also measured. Cured adhesives containing DMADDM could greatly reduce metabolic activity and lactic acid production during the development of S. mutans biofilms (p < 0.05). In earlier stages of biofilm development, there were no significant differences of inhibitory effects between the 2.5% DMADDM and 5% DMADDM group. However, after 72 h, the anti-biofilm effects of adhesives containing 5% DMADDM were significantly stronger than any other group. Incorporation of DMADDM into adhesive did not adversely affect dentin bond strength. In conclusion, adhesives containing DMADDM inhibited the growth, lactic acid production and EPS metabolism of S. mutans biofilm at different stages, with no adverse effect on its dentin adhesive bond strength. The bonding agents have the potential to control dental biofilms and combat tooth decay, and DMADDM is promising for use in a wide range of dental adhesive systems and restoratives. PMID:25046750

  19. Subinhibitory concentrations of triclosan promote Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and adherence to oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Grignon, Louis; Spolidorio, Denise Palomari; Grenier, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Triclosan is a general membrane-active agent with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that is commonly used in oral care products. In this study, we investigated the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of triclosan on the capacity of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans to form biofilm and adhere to oral epithelial cells. As quantified by crystal violet staining, biofilm formation by two reference strains of S. mutans was dose-dependently promoted, in the range of 2.2- to 6.2-fold, by 1/2 and 1/4 MIC of triclosan. Observations by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of a dense biofilm attached to the polystyrene surface. Growth of S. mutans in the presence of triclosan at sub-MICs also increased its capacity to adhere to a monolayer of gingival epithelial cells. The expression of several genes involved in adherence and biofilm formation in S. mutans was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR. It was found that sub-MICs of triclosan significantly increased the expression of comD, gtfC, and luxS, and to a lesser extent of gtfB and atlA genes. These findings stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of therapeutic triclosan since sub-MICs may promote colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans.

  20. Effect of citrus lemon oil on growth and adherence of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Xiangyu; Wang, Yuzhi; Chen, Feifei; Yu, Zhifen; Wang, Li; Chen, Shuanglu; Guo, Maoding

    2013-07-01

    In order to exploit novel anticaries agents, we investigated the effects of citrus lemon oil (CLO), a type of natural product, on growth and adherence of the primary oral cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). The growth inhibitory effect was explored with a micro-dilution assay. Adherence was analyzed by colony counts on the respective surfaces and the adherence inhibition rate (AIR). Real time-PCR was used to investigate the effects of CLO on transcription of glucosyltransferase (Gtf) encoding genes, gtfB, C and D. Neson-Somogyi method was used to measure the effects of CLO on Gtf activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration of CLO against S. mutans was 4.5 mg/ml. The CLO effectively reduced the adherence of S. mutans on glass surface (the AIR were from 98.3 to 100 %, P > 0.05) and saliva-coated enamel surface (the AIR were from 54.8 to 79.2 %, P < 0.05). CLO effectively reduced the activity of Gtf and the transcription of gtfs in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CLO can effectively inhibit the growth and the adherence to glass and saliva-coated enamel surfaces of S. mutans. It can also inhibit the transcription of gtfs, as well as the Gtf enzyme activity.

  1. Evaluation of biofilm removal activity of Quercus infectoria galls against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi-Sichani, Maryam; Karbasizadeh, Vajihe; Dokhaharani, Samaneh Chaharmiri

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dental caries is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases affecting humans of all ages. Streptococcus mutans has an important role in the development of dental caries by acid production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial and biofilm disinfective effects of the oak tree Quercus infectoria galls against S. mutans. Materials and Methods: The bacterial strain used in this study was S. mutans (ATCC: 35668). Two kinds of galls, Mazouj and Ghalghaf were examined. Galls were extracted by methanol, ethanol and acetone by Soxhlet apparatus, separately. Extracts were dissolved in sterile distilled water to a final concentration of 10.00, 5.00, 2.50, 1.25, 0.63, 0.31, and 0.16 mg/ml. Microdilution determined antibacterial activities. The biofilm removal activities of the extracts were examined using crystal violet-stained microtiter plate method. One-way ANOVA was used to compare biofilm formation in the presence or absence of the extracts. Results: The methanolic, ethanolic, and acetonic extracts of Q. infectoria galls showed the strong inhibitory effects on S. mutans (P < 0.05). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values for the Mazouj and Ghalghaf gall extracts against S. mutans were identical. The MIC values ranged from 160 μg/ml to 320 μg/ml, whereas the MBC values ranged from 320 μg/ml to 640 μg/ml. All extracts of Q. infectoria galls significantly (P < 0.05) reduced biofilm biomass of S. mutans at the concentrations higher than 9.8 μg/ml. Conclusion: Three different extracts of Q. infectoria galls were similar in their antibacterial activity against S. mutans. These extracts had the highest biofilm removal activities at 312.5 μg/ml concentration. The galls of Q. infectoria are potentially good sources of antibacterial and biofilm disinfection agent. PMID:26962315

  2. MecA Protein Acts as a Negative Regulator of Genetic Competence in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Liu, Tianlei; Gomez, Zubelda A.; Wahl, Astrid; Hols, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans develops competence for genetic transformation through a complex network that receives inputs from at least two signaling peptides, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) and sigX-inducing peptide (XIP). The key step of competence induction is the transcriptional activation of comX, which encodes an alternative sigma factor, SigX (σX), controlling the expression of late competence genes essential for DNA uptake and recombination. In this study, we provide evidence that MecA acts as a negative regulator in the posttranslational regulation of SigX in S. mutans. Using luxAB transcriptional reporter strains, we demonstrate that MecA represses the expression of late competence genes in S. mutans grown in a complex medium that is subpermissive for competence induction by CSP. The negative regulation of competence by MecA requires the presence of a functional SigX. Accordingly, inactivation of MecA results in a prolonged competence state of S. mutans under this condition. We have also found that the AAA+ protease ClpC displays a similar repressing effect on late competence genes, suggesting that both MecA and ClpC function coordinately to regulate competence in the same regulatory circuit in S. mutans. This suggestion is strongly supported by the results of bacterial two-hybrid assays, which demonstrate that MecA interacts with both SigX and ClpC, forming a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex. Western blot analysis also confirms that inactivation of MecA or ClpC results in the intracellular accumulation of the SigX in S. mutans. Together, our data support the notion that MecA mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex that sequesters SigX and thereby negatively regulates genetic competence in S. mutans. PMID:24039267

  3. Alanine racemase is essential for the growth and interspecies competitiveness of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuan; Qiu, Wei; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Shi-Da; Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Ji-Yao; Xu, Xin; Li, Ming-Yun

    2016-01-01

    D-alanine (D-Ala) is an essential amino acid that has a key role in bacterial cell wall synthesis. Alanine racemase (Alr) is a unique enzyme that interconverts L-alanine and D-alanine in most bacteria, making this enzyme a potential target for antimicrobial drug development. Streptococcus mutans is a major causative factor of dental caries. The factors involved in the survival, virulence and interspecies interactions of S. mutans could be exploited as potential targets for caries control. The current study aimed to investigate the physiological role of Alr in S. mutans. We constructed alr mutant strain of S. mutans and evaluated its phenotypic traits and interspecies competitiveness compared with the wild-type strain. We found that alr deletion was lethal to S. mutans. A minimal supplement of D-Ala (150 μg·mL−1) was required for the optimal growth of the alr mutant. The depletion of D-alanine in the growth medium resulted in cell wall perforation and cell lysis in the alr mutant strain. We also determined the compromised competitiveness of the alr mutant strain relative to the wild-type S. mutans against other oral streptococci (S. sanguinis or S. gordonii), demonstrated using either conditioned medium assays or dual-species fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis. Given the importance and necessity of alr to the growth and competitiveness of S. mutans, Alr may represent a promising target to modulate the cariogenicity of oral biofilms and to benefit the management of dental caries. PMID:27740612

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Peganum Harmala L. on Streptococcus mutans Compared to 0.2% Chlorhexidine

    PubMed Central

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Khosropanah, Hengameh; Dabiri, Shima

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Dental caries is one the most prevalent diseases that affects humans throughout their lives. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is recognized as the most important microorganism during tooth cariogenicity. Reducing this germ in oral cavity can reduce the rate of tooth decays in humans. Purpose The present study compared the antimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract of Peganum harmala L. seeds and 0.2% chlorhexidine on S. mutans. Materials and Method Agar diffusion technique and micro broth dilution method were employed to test the antimicrobial effects of these two agents on S. mutans. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of ethanolic extract of P. harmala was studied on Vero cells by MTT (thiazolyl blue tetrazolium dye) colorimetric method. The data were analyzed with descriptive methods. Results Concentrations of 50, 25, and 12.5 mg/mL of the extract made inhibition zones of bacterial growth around the wells; but, lower concentrations could not inhibit the growth of S. mutans. Besides, the antimicrobial effect of 0.2% chlorhexidine was more than 50 mg/mL of the extract. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract on S. mutans was 1.83±0.6 mg/mL and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 4.3±1 mg/mL. The MIC and MBC for 0.2% chlorhexidine were reported to be 0.19 mg/mL, and 0.78 mg/mL, respectively. The extract concentrations more than 0.5 mg/mL were toxic and caused more than 50% Vero cell death. Conclusion Despite the remarkable antimicrobial effects of high concentrations of P. harmala on S. mutans, high cell toxicity of this plant would restrict its in vivo therapeutic use. PMID:27602397

  5. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Competence and Bacteriocins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and mutans

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Erin; Federle, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans have both evolved complex quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the production of bacteriocins and the entry into the competent state, a requirement for natural transformation. Natural transformation provides bacteria with a mechanism to repair damaged genes or as a source of new advantageous traits. In S. pneumoniae, the competence pathway is controlled by the two-component signal transduction pathway ComCDE, which directly regulates SigX, the alternative sigma factor required for the initiation into competence. Over the past two decades, effectors of cellular killing (i.e., fratricides) have been recognized as important targets of the pneumococcal competence QS pathway. Recently, direct interactions between the ComCDE and the paralogous BlpRH pathway, regulating bacteriocin production, were identified, further strengthening the interconnections between these two QS systems. Interestingly, a similar theme is being revealed in S. mutans, the primary etiological agent of dental caries. This review compares the relationship between the bacteriocin and the competence QS pathways in both S. pneumoniae and S. mutans, and hopes to provide clues to regulatory pathways across the genus Streptococcus as a potential tool to efficiently investigate putative competence pathways in nontransformable streptococci. PMID:28067778

  6. Streptococcus mutans Protein Synthesis during Mixed-Species Biofilm Development by High-Throughput Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marlise I.; Xiao, Jin; Lu, Bingwen; Delahunty, Claire M.; Yates, John R.; Koo, Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms formed on tooth surfaces are comprised of mixed microbiota enmeshed in an extracellular matrix. Oral biofilms are constantly exposed to environmental changes, which influence the microbial composition, matrix formation and expression of virulence. Streptococcus mutans and sucrose are key modulators associated with the evolution of virulent-cariogenic biofilms. In this study, we used a high-throughput quantitative proteomics approach to examine how S. mutans produces relevant proteins that facilitate its establishment and optimal survival during mixed-species biofilms development induced by sucrose. Biofilms of S. mutans, alone or mixed with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus oralis, were initially formed onto saliva-coated hydroxyapatite surface under carbohydrate-limiting condition. Sucrose (1%, w/v) was then introduced to cause environmental changes, and to induce biofilm accumulation. Multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) approach detected up to 60% of proteins encoded by S. mutans within biofilms. Specific proteins associated with exopolysaccharide matrix assembly, metabolic and stress adaptation processes were highly abundant as the biofilm transit from earlier to later developmental stages following sucrose introduction. Our results indicate that S. mutans within a mixed-species biofilm community increases the expression of specific genes associated with glucan synthesis and remodeling (gtfBC, dexA) and glucan-binding (gbpB) during this transition (P<0.05). Furthermore, S. mutans up-regulates specific adaptation mechanisms to cope with acidic environments (F1F0-ATPase system, fatty acid biosynthesis, branched chain amino acids metabolism), and molecular chaperones (GroEL). Interestingly, the protein levels and gene expression are in general augmented when S. mutans form mixed-species biofilms (vs. single-species biofilms) demonstrating fundamental differences in the matrix assembly, survival and biofilm maintenance in the

  7. Amino Sugars Enhance the Competitiveness of Beneficial Commensals with Streptococcus mutans through Multiple Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Farivar, Tanaz; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biochemical and genetic aspects of the metabolism of the amino sugars N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and glucosamine (GlcN) by commensal oral streptococci and the effects of these sugars on interspecies competition with the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans were explored. Multiple S. mutans wild-type isolates displayed long lag phases when transferred from glucose-containing medium to medium with GlcNAc as the primary carbohydrate source, but commensal streptococci did not. Competition in liquid coculture or dual-species biofilms between S. mutans and Streptococcus gordonii showed that S. gordonii was particularly dominant when the primary carbohydrate was GlcN or GlcNAc. Transcriptional and enzymatic assays showed that the catabolic pathway for GlcNAc was less highly induced in S. mutans than in S. gordonii. Exposure to H2O2, which is produced by S. gordonii and antagonizes the growth of S. mutans, led to reduced mRNA levels of nagA and nagB in S. mutans. When the gene for the transcriptional regulatory NagR was deleted in S. gordonii, the strain produced constitutively high levels of nagA (GlcNAc-6-P deacetylase), nagB (GlcN-6-P deaminase), and glmS (GlcN-6-P synthase) mRNA. Similar to NagR of S. mutans (NagRSm), the S. gordonii NagR protein (NagRSg) could bind to consensus binding sites (dre) in the nagA, nagB, and glmS promoter regions of S. gordonii. Notably, NagRSg binding was inhibited by GlcN-6-P, but G-6-P had no effect, unlike for NagRSm. This study expands the understanding of amino sugar metabolism and NagR-dependent gene regulation in streptococci and highlights the potential for therapeutic applications of amino sugars to prevent dental caries. IMPORTANCE Amino sugars are abundant in the biosphere, so the relative efficiency of particular bacteria in a given microbiota to metabolize these sources of carbon and nitrogen might have a profound impact on the ecology of the community. Our investigation reveals that several oral commensal

  8. Influence of time, toothpaste and saliva in the retention of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes

    PubMed Central

    SCHMIDT, Julia Caroline; BUX, Miriam; FILIPUZZI-JENNY, Elisabeth; KULIK, Eva Maria; WALTIMO, Tuomas; WEIGER, Roland; WALTER, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The intraoral transmission of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic species seems to be facilitated by contaminated toothbrushes and other oral hygiene devices. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the in vitro retention and survival rate of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis on different toothbrushes. The impacts of human saliva and antimicrobial toothpaste on these parameters were further evaluated. Material and Methods Part I: Four toothbrushes (Colgate 360°, Curaprox CS5460 ultra soft, elmex InterX, Trisa Flexible Head3) were contaminated by S. mutans DSM 20523 or S. sanguinis DSM 20068 suspensions for three minutes. Bacteria were removed from the toothbrushes after either three minutes (T0) or 24 hours (T24) of dry storage and grown on Columbia blood agar plates for the quantification of colony-forming units (CFUs). Part II: The effects of saliva from a caries-active or a caries-inactive person and of toothpaste containing 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate were also tested. Results Part I: After three minutes of dry storage, approximately one percent of the bacteria were still detectable on the toothbrushes. After 24 hours, S. sanguinis exhibited a more pronounced decrease in viable cell numbers compared with S. mutans but the differences were not significant (Kruskal-Wallis test, p>0.05). Part II: The addition of human saliva from a caries-active or caries-inactive person slightly increased the retention of both streptococcal species at T0. The use of toothpaste had no influence on the amount of viable streptococci at T0, but it reduced the microbial load after 24 hours of storage. There were only slight nonsignificant differences (p>0.05) between the four toothbrushes. Conclusions In vitro bacterial retention and survival of S. sanguinis and S. mutans on different toothbrushes occurred. Within the limitations of this study, the use of human saliva or an antimicrobial toothpaste did not lead to significant differences in the

  9. Isolation and characterization of a 60-kilodalton salivary glycoprotein with agglutinating activity against strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Babu, J P; Beachey, E H; Hasty, D L; Simpson, W A

    1986-01-01

    A bacterial agglutinin specific for strains of Streptococcus mutans was isolated from human saliva. Physiochemical analyses showed the agglutinin to be a glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 60,000. The agglutinin aggregated four of the eight strains of Streptococcus mutans tested but did not aggregate the strains of Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis tested. Chemical modification of carbohydrate moieties of the agglutinin with sodium metaperiodate had no effect on aggregation, whereas modification of the polypeptide portion with trypsin abolished aggregating activity. A set of five murine hybridoma antibodies was employed to further analyze the agglutinin. Two carbohydrate-specific antibodies, directed against D-mannose and N-acetylgalactosamine moieties, respectively, failed to block agglutinin- or whole saliva-mediated aggregation of S. mutans cells. In contrast, two antibodies directed against pronase-sensitive antigenic sites blocked both agglutinin- and saliva-mediated aggregation of S. mutans cells. Western blot analysis with the agglutinin-specific hybridoma antibodies demonstrated the agglutinin in whole saliva and in artificial tooth pellicles formed on hydroxyapatite beads incubated with saliva. These results suggest that a 60-kilodalton glycoprotein of human saliva is a bacterial agglutinin with specificity for certain strains of S. mutans. They further suggest that aggregation is mediated by polypeptide rather than carbohydrate determinants of the glycoprotein. Images PMID:3002983

  10. Photo Inactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm by Violet-Blue light.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Grace F; Huang, Ruijie; MacPherson, Meoghan; Ferreira Zandona, Andrea G; Gregory, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    Among various preventive approaches, non-invasive phototherapy/photodynamic therapy is one of the methods used to control oral biofilm. Studies indicate that light at specific wavelengths has a potent antibacterial effect. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of violet-blue light at 380-440 nm to inhibit biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans or kill S. mutans. S. mutans UA159 biofilm cells were grown for 12-16 h in 96-well flat-bottom microtiter plates using tryptic soy broth (TSB) or TSB with 1 % sucrose (TSBS). Biofilm was irradiated with violet-blue light for 5 min. After exposure, plates were re-incubated at 37 °C for either 2 or 6 h to allow the bacteria to recover. A crystal violet biofilm assay was used to determine relative densities of the biofilm cells grown in TSB, but not in TSBS, exposed to violet-blue light. The results indicated a statistically significant (P < 0.05) decrease compared to the non-treated groups after the 2 or 6 h recovery period. Growth rates of planktonic and biofilm cells indicated a significant reduction in the growth rate of the violet-blue light-treated groups grown in TSB and TSBS. Biofilm viability assays confirmed a statistically significant difference between violet-blue light-treated and non-treated groups in TSB and TSBS. Visible violet-blue light of the electromagnetic spectrum has the ability to inhibit S. mutans growth and reduce the formation of S. mutans biofilm. This in vitro study demonstrated that violet-blue light has the capacity to inhibit S. mutans biofilm formation. Potential clinical applications of light therapy in the future remain bright in preventing the development and progression of dental caries.

  11. Influence of artificial ageing on surface properties and Streptococcus mutans adhesion to dental composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hahnel, Sebastian; Henrich, Anne; Rosentritt, Martin; Handel, Gerhard; Bürgers, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of artificial ageing on the surface properties and early Streptococcus mutans adhesion to current dental composites for the direct restoration of class II defects. Three hundred and thirty specimens each were prepared from five dental composites, and were randomly allotted to various artificial ageing protocols (storage in distilled water/ethanol/artificial saliva for 7/90/365 days; thermal cycling, 6,000 cycles 5/55 degrees C). Prior and after each treatment, surface roughness (R(a)) and hydrophobicity were determined, and S. mutans adhesion (ATCC 25175; 2.5 h, 37 degrees C) was simulated with and without prior exposition to human whole saliva (2 h, 37 degrees C). Adherence of S. mutans was determined fluorometrically. Means and standard deviations were calculated, and analyzed using three-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis (alpha = 0.05). For both R(a) and S. mutans adherence to uncoated and saliva-coated specimens, significant influences of the composite material, the ageing medium and the ageing duration have been observed; for surface hydrophobicity, significant influences of the composite material and the ageing duration were found. For uncoated specimens, significant increases in S. mutans adhesion were observed with prolonged artificial ageing, whereas significant decreases in S. mutans adhesion were found for the saliva-coated specimens. The data indicate influences of the artificial ageing method on surface parameters such as R(a) and hydrophobicity as well as microbial adhesion. The results underline the relevance of saliva coating on the outcome of studies simulating microbial adhesion, and highlight differences in the susceptibility of dental composites for the adhesion of oral bacteria.

  12. Role of the Streptococcus mutans CRISPR-Cas systems in immunity and cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Serbanescu, M A; Cordova, M; Krastel, K; Flick, R; Beloglazova, N; Latos, A; Yakunin, A F; Senadheera, D B; Cvitkovitch, D G

    2015-02-15

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive microbial immunity against invading viruses and plasmids. The cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans UA159 has two CRISPR-Cas systems: CRISPR1 (type II-A) and CRISPR2 (type I-C) with several spacers from both CRISPR cassettes matching sequences of phage M102 or genomic sequences of other S. mutans. The deletion of the cas genes of CRISPR1 (ΔC1S), CRISPR2 (ΔC2E), or both CRISPR1+2 (ΔC1SC2E) or the removal of spacers 2 and 3 (ΔCR1SP13E) in S. mutans UA159 did not affect phage sensitivity when challenged with virulent phage M102. Using plasmid transformation experiments, we demonstrated that the CRISPR1-Cas system inhibits transformation of S. mutans by the plasmids matching the spacers 2 and 3. Functional analysis of the cas deletion mutants revealed that in addition to a role in plasmid targeting, both CRISPR systems also contribute to the regulation of bacterial physiology in S. mutans. Compared to wild-type cells, the ΔC1S strain displayed diminished growth under cell membrane and oxidative stress, enhanced growth under low pH, and had reduced survival under heat shock and DNA-damaging conditions, whereas the ΔC2E strain exhibited increased sensitivity to heat shock. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the two-component signal transduction system VicR/K differentially modulates expression of cas genes within CRISPR-Cas systems, suggesting that VicR/K might coordinate the expression of two CRISPR-Cas systems. Collectively, we provide in vivo evidence that the type II-A CRISPR-Cas system of S. mutans may be targeted to manipulate its stress response and to influence the host to control the uptake and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

  13. Comparison of antibacterial efficacy of coconut oil and chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Peedikayil, Faizal C.; Remy, Vimal; John, Seena; Chandru, T. P.; Sreenivasan, Prathima; Bijapur, Gufran Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Streptococcus mutans is the most common organism causing dental caries. Various chemotherapeutic agents are available that help in treating the bacteria, with each having their own merits and demerits. Recent research has shown that coconut oil has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial action. Therefore, the present was conducted to determine the antibacterial efficacy of coconut oil and to compare it with chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: A total of fifty female children aged 8–12 years were included in the study. Twenty five children were randomly distributed to each group, i.e., the study group (coconut oil) and the control group (chlorhexidine). The participants were asked to routinely perform oil swishing with coconut oil and chlorhexidine and rinse every day in the morning after brushing for 2–3 minutes. S. mutans in saliva and plaque were determined using a chairside method, i.e., the Dentocult SM Strip Mutans test. Patients were instructed to continue oil swishing for 30 days. S. mutans. counts in plaque and saliva on day 1, day 15, and day 30 were recorded and the results were compared using Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test. Results: The results showed that there is a statistically significant decrease in S. mutans. count from coconut oil as well as chlorhexidine group from baseline to 30 days. The study also showed that in comparison of coconut oil and chlorhexidine there is no statistically significant change regarding the antibacterial efficacy. Conclusion: Coconut oil is as effective as chlorhexidine in the reduction of S. mutans. PMID:27891311

  14. The antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine digluconate against Streptococcus mutans biofilms follows sigmoidal patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Woo; Jung, Ji-Eun; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Jae-Gon; Yi, Ho-Keun; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) against mature Streptococcus mutans biofilms. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs and then treated with 0-20% CHX, once, three times, or five times (1 min per treatment) during the period of mature biofilm formation (beyond 46 h). After the treatments, the colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of the treated biofilms were determined. The pH values of the spent culture medium were also determined to investigate the change in pH resulting from the antibacterial activity of CHX. The relationships between the concentration of CHX and the CFU counts and the concentration of CHX and culture medium pH, relative to the number of treatments performed, were evaluated using a sigmoidal curve-fitting procedure. The changes in CFU counts and culture medium pH followed sigmoidal curves and were dependent on the concentration of CHX (R(2) = 0.99). The sigmoidal curves were left-shifted with increasing number of treatments. Furthermore, the culture-medium pH of the treated biofilms increased as their CFU counts decreased. The lowest CHX concentration to increase culture-medium pH above the critical pH also decreased as the number of treatments increased. These results may provide fundamental information for selecting the appropriate CHX concentrations to treat S. mutans biofilms.

  15. A new small molecule inhibits streptococcus mutans biofilms in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wenting; Fan, Mingwen; Wu, Hui; Melander, Christian; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study is to identify new small molecules that can inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilms by in-vitro and in-vivo model. Methods and Results We evaluated the effect of a small molecule 2-amino-imidazole/triazole conjugate (2-AI/T) on the formation of S. mutans biofilms by culturing in 96-well plates. Toxicity was assessed through cell culture and intragastrically administering to mice. The anti-biofilm and anti-caries effects were investigated in vivo. The inhibitive mechanism was detected by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (itraq) and RT-QPCR. In vitro and in vivo study revealed that 2-AI/T significantly inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans and is more so than inhibiting planktonic cells without toxicity. The ribosome and histidine metabolism pathways of S. mutans were significantly regulated by this compound. Conclusions These results suggest that the 2-AI/T conjugate is a potent inhibitor that can be potentially developed into a new drug to treat and prevent dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to use small molecule from marine natural products, to protect from dental cariesin vivo. It has potential broad range application in clinical caries prevention, or as a bioactive ingredient for food applications. PMID:26294263

  16. Regulation of Streptococcus mutans PTS Bio by the transcriptional repressor NigR.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, M; Iyer, V S; Sengupta, M; Ajdic, D

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is implicated in human dental caries, and the carbohydrate metabolism of this organism plays an important role in the formation of this disease. Carbohydrate transport and metabolism are essential for the survival of S. mutans in the oral cavity. It is known that a unique phosphoenolpyruvate-sugar phosphotransferase system PTS(B) (io) of S. mutans UA159 is expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms (Mol Oral Microbiol 28: 2013; 114). In this study we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of the operon (O(B) (io) ) encoding the PTS(B) (io) and showed that it was repressed by NigR, a LacI-like transcriptional regulator. Using electro-mobility shift assay, we described two operators to which NigR bound with different affinities. We also identified the transcriptional start site and showed that one of the operators overlaps with the promoter and presumably represses initiation of transcription. Mutational analyses revealed the key nucleotides in the operators required for high-affinity binding of NigR. PTS(B) (io) is expressed in S. mutans biofilms so understanding its regulation may provide improved strategies for caries treatment and prevention.

  17. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as “poor” sources of natural products. PMID:27869143

  18. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P; Chen, Yihua

    2016-11-21

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as "poor" sources of natural products.

  19. Papain gel containing methylene blue for simultaneous caries removal and antimicrobial photoinactivation against Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Silva, Zenildo Santos; Huang, Ying-Ying; de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; França, Cristiane Miranda; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patrícia Aparecida; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Santos Fernandes, Kristianne Porta; Deana, Alessandro; Lima Leal, Cintia Raquel; Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2016-09-19

    This study intended to evaluate the effects of a papain-gel with a red-light absorbing pigment (methylene blue - MB) to mediate photodynamic therapy (PDT) against Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The PapaMBlue was compared with free MB to generate reactive oxygen species using fluorescence probes (SOSG and HPF). PDT (660-nm light) was carried out against S. mutans biofilms grown on either plastic dishes or on collagen membrane and assayed by CFU, live-dead staining using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and H&E staining for collagen films. Cytotoxicity and subcellular localization was studied in human fibroblasts. Sponges of bioabsorbable type I collagen membrane were exposed to papain based gel, irradiated with laser and analyzed about their integrity by ATR-FTIR. The PapaMBlue produced higher amounts of singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals than free MB, possibly due to better disaggregation of the dye in solution. The PapaMBlue antimicrobial effects on biofilms proved to be capable of reducing the S. mutans. Both MTT and PrestoBlue assays showed higher cell viability and metabolism scores in fibroblasts treated with PapaMBlue and MB, possibly due to stimulation of mitochondrial activity and that collagen triple helix is unaffected. The PapaMBlue is equally effective as MB in destroying S. mutans biofilms growing on plastic or collagen without affecting fibroblasts.

  20. Apolar Bioactive Fraction of Melipona scutellaris Geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Galvão, Lívia Câmara de Carvalho; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bioactive nonpolar fraction of geopropolis on Streptococcus mutans biofilm. The ethanolic extract of Melipona scutellaris geopropolis was subjected to a liquid-liquid partition, thus obtaining the bioactive hexane fraction (HF) possessing antimicrobial activity. The effects of HF on S. mutans UA159 biofilms generated on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs were analyzed by inhibition of formation, killing assay, and glycolytic pH-drop assays. Furthermore, biofilms treated with vehicle control and HF were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HF at 250 μg/mL and 400 μg/mL caused 38% and 53% reduction in the biomass of biofilm, respectively, when compared to vehicle control (P < 0.05) subsequently observed at SEM images, and this reduction was noticed in the amounts of extracellular alkali-soluble glucans, intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides, and proteins. In addition, the S. mutans viability (killing assay) and acid production by glycolytic pH drop were not affected (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the bioactive HF of geopropolis was promising to control the S. mutans biofilm formation, without affecting the microbial population but interfering with its structure by reducing the biochemical content of biofilm matrix. PMID:23843868

  1. Papain gel containing methylene blue for simultaneous caries removal and antimicrobial photoinactivation against Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Silva Jr., Zenildo Santos; Huang, Ying-Ying; de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; França, Cristiane Miranda; Botta, Sergio Brossi; Ana, Patrícia Aparecida; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Santos Fernandes, Kristianne Porta; Deana, Alessandro; Lima Leal, Cintia Raquel; Prates, Renato Araujo; Hamblin, Michael R.; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2016-01-01

    This study intended to evaluate the effects of a papain-gel with a red-light absorbing pigment (methylene blue – MB) to mediate photodynamic therapy (PDT) against Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The PapaMBlue was compared with free MB to generate reactive oxygen species using fluorescence probes (SOSG and HPF). PDT (660-nm light) was carried out against S. mutans biofilms grown on either plastic dishes or on collagen membrane and assayed by CFU, live-dead staining using confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and H&E staining for collagen films. Cytotoxicity and subcellular localization was studied in human fibroblasts. Sponges of bioabsorbable type I collagen membrane were exposed to papain based gel, irradiated with laser and analyzed about their integrity by ATR-FTIR. The PapaMBlue produced higher amounts of singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radicals than free MB, possibly due to better disaggregation of the dye in solution. The PapaMBlue antimicrobial effects on biofilms proved to be capable of reducing the S. mutans. Both MTT and PrestoBlue assays showed higher cell viability and metabolism scores in fibroblasts treated with PapaMBlue and MB, possibly due to stimulation of mitochondrial activity and that collagen triple helix is unaffected. The PapaMBlue is equally effective as MB in destroying S. mutans biofilms growing on plastic or collagen without affecting fibroblasts. PMID:27641507

  2. Effect of sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish on Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Nurit; Redlich, Meir; Harari, Doron; Friedman, Michael; Steinberg, Doron

    2003-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish on orthodontic patients. Ten children, ages 10 to 16 years, participated. Bacterial levels of Streptococcus mutans and Actinomyces viscosus and total counts were evaluated in sputum samples. These counts were evaluated at 4 stages: before orthodontic treatment, at least 2 weeks after bonding of the brackets, 1 week after application of chlorhexidine varnish, and 3 weeks after application of chlorhexidine varnish. Increases in bacterial levels of S mutans and in the total bacterial count were detected after the brackets were bonded. One week after the sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish was applied, a significant decrease of total bacterial levels and S mutans was observed. This decrease persisted for 3 weeks after the first application. No significant change in A viscosus levels occurred during that period. The results provide additional evidence that sustained-release chlorhexidine varnish decreases S mutans levels in orthodontic patients with fixed appliances and therefore might be useful in preventing caries lesions.

  3. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (P<0.001). In addition, CBP-positive strains induced HDPF proliferation, which is a possible mechanism related to development of hyperplastic pulpitis. The distribution of S. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases.

  4. Effect of the antimicrobial peptide D-Nal-Pac-525 on the growth of Streptococcus mutans and its biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Cheng, Jya-Wei; Yu, Hui-Yuan; Xin, Yi; Tang, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2013-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiological agent of dental caries. The antimicrobial peptide D-Nal-Pac-525 was designed by replacing the tryptophans of the Trp-rich peptide Pac-525 with D-β-naphthyalanines. To assess the effect of D-Nal-Pac-525 on cariogenic bacteria, the activity of D-Nal-Pac-525 on the growth of S. mutans and its biofilm formation were examined. D-Nal- Pac-525 showed robust antimicrobial activity against S. mutans (minimum inhibitory concentration of 4 μg/ml). Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, it was shown that D-Nal-Pac-525 caused morphological changes and damaged the cell membrane of S. mutans. D-Nal-Pac-525 inhibited biofilm formation of S. mutans at 2 μg/ml. The results of this study suggest that D-Nal-Pac-525 has great potential for clinical application as a dental caries-preventing agent.

  5. Streptococcus mutans sortase A inhibitory metabolites from the flowers of Sophora japonica.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo-Young; Won, Tae Hyung; Ahn, Chan-Hong; Lee, So-Hyoung; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol; Shin, Jongheon; Oh, Ki-Bong

    2015-04-01

    A new maltol derivative (2) along with three known maltol derivative (1) and flavonol glycosides (3 and 4) were isolated from the dried flowers of Sophora japonica. Based upon the results of combined spectroscopic methods, the structure of new compound (2) was determined to be maltol-3-O-(4'-O-cis-p-coumaroyl-6'-O-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl))-β-glucopyranoside, an isomer of 1. These compounds strongly inhibited the action of sortase A (SrtA) from Streptococcus mutans, a primary etiologic agent of human dental caries. The onset and magnitude of inhibition of the saliva-induced aggregation in S. mutans treated with compound 2 (4×IC50) were comparable to the behavior of untreated srtA-deletion mutant.

  6. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.573, a putative sugar kinase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Lan-Fen; Yang, Cheng; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2008-01-01

    SMU.573 from S. mutans was expressed in E. coli and crystallized. The crystals belong to space group I4 and 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data were collected at an in-house chromium radiation source. SMU.573 from Streptococcus mutans is a structurally and functionally uncharacterized protein that was selected for structural biology studies. Native and SeMet-labelled proteins were expressed with an N-His tag in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the SeMet-labelled protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and a 2.5 Å resolution diffraction data set was collected using an in-house chromium radiation source. The crystals belong to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.53, c = 56.26 Å, α = β = γ = 90°.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of Streptococcus mutans dextran glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Saburi, Wataru; Hondoh, Hironori; Unno, Hideaki; Okuyama, Masayuki; Mori, Haruhide; Nakada, Toshitaka; Matsuura, Yoshiki; Kimura, Atsuo

    2007-09-01

    Dextran glucosidase from S. mutans was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution. Dextran glucosidase from Streptococcus mutans is an exo-hydrolase that acts on the nonreducing terminal α-1,6-glucosidic linkage of oligosaccharides and dextran with a high degree of transglucosylation. Based on amino-acid sequence similarity, this enzyme is classified into glycoside hydrolase family 13. Recombinant dextran glucosidase was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 72.72, b = 86.47, c = 104.30 Å. A native data set was collected to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal.

  8. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL(-1)). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them.

  9. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L.; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL−1). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them. PMID:24294257

  10. Strain-Dependent Recognition of a Unique Degradation Motif by ClpXP in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Biswanath; Tao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans, a dental pathogen, has a remarkable ability to cope with environmental stresses. Under stress conditions, cytoplasmic proteases play a major role in controlling the stability of regulatory proteins and preventing accumulation of damaged and misfolded proteins. ClpXP, a well-conserved cytoplasmic proteolytic system, is crucial in maintaining cellular homeostasis in bacteria. ClpX is primarily responsible for recognition of substrates and subsequent translocation of unfolded substrates into the ClpP proteolytic compartment for degradation. In Escherichia coli, ClpX recognizes distinct motifs present at the C-terminal end of target proteins. However, recognition sequences for ClpXP in other bacteria, including S. mutans, are not known. In this study, using two-dimensional (2D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) analysis, we have identified several putative substrates for S. mutans ClpXP. SsbA, which encodes a small DNA binding protein, is one such substrate that is degraded by ClpXP. By sequential deletions, we found that the last 3 C-terminal amino acids, LPF, are sufficient for ClpXP-mediated degradation. Addition of LPF at the C-terminal end of green fluorescent protein (GFP) rendered the protein completely degradable by ClpXP. Alterations of this tripeptide motif impeded ClpXP-mediated degradation. However, recognition of LPF by ClpXP is highly specific to some S. mutans strains (UA159, UA130, and N3209) since not all S. mutans strains recognize the motif. We speculate that an adaptor protein is involved in either substrate recognition or substrate degradation by ClpXP. Nevertheless, this is the first report of a unique recognition sequence for ClpXP in streptococci. IMPORTANCE Regulated proteolysis in bacteria is an important biological process that maintains protein homeostasis. ClpXP, an intracellular proteolytic complex, is the primary protease that is responsible for protein turnover. While the substrates for Clp

  11. Sugar Allocation to Metabolic Pathways is Tightly Regulated and Affects the Virulence of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria take up and metabolize sugar as a carbohydrate source for survival. Most bacteria can utilize many sugars, including glucose, sucrose, and galactose, as well as amino sugars, such as glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine. After entering the cytoplasm, the sugars are mainly allocated to the glycolysis pathway (energy production) and to various bacterial component biosynthesis pathways, including the cell wall, nucleic acids and amino acids. Sugars are also utilized to produce several virulence factors, such as capsule and lipoteichoic acid. Glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GlmS) and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (NagB) have crucial roles in sugar distribution to the glycolysis pathway and to cell wall biosynthesis. In Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic pathogen, the expression levels of glmS and nagB are coordinately regulated in response to the presence or absence of amino sugars. In addition, the disruption of this regulation affects the virulence of S. mutans. The expression of nagB and glmS is regulated by NagR in S. mutans, but the precise mechanism underlying glmS regulation is not clear. In Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, the mRNA of glmS has ribozyme activity and undergoes self-degradation at the mRNA level. However, there is no ribozyme activity region on glmS mRNA in S. mutans. In this review article, we summarize the sugar distribution, particularly the coordinated regulation of GlmS and NagB expression, and its relationship with the virulence of S. mutans. PMID:28036052

  12. Metabolic activity of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and gene expression during exposure to xylitol and sucrose.

    PubMed

    Decker, Eva-Maria; Klein, Christian; Schwindt, Dimitri; von Ohle, Christiane

    2014-12-01

    The objective of the study was to analyse Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown under different dietary conditions by using multifaceted methodological approaches to gain deeper insight into the cariogenic impact of carbohydrates. S. mutans biofilms were generated during a period of 24 h in the following media: Schaedler broth as a control medium containing endogenous glucose, Schaedler broth with an additional 5% sucrose, and Schaedler broth supplemented with 1% xylitol. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)-based analyses of the microbial vitality, respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride, CTC) and production of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) were performed separately in the inner, middle and outer biofilm layers. In addition to the microbiological sample testing, the glucose/sucrose consumption of the biofilm bacteria was quantified, and the expression of glucosyltransferases and other biofilm-associated genes was investigated. Xylitol exposure did not inhibit the viability of S. mutans biofilms, as monitored by the following experimental parameters: culture growth, vitality, CTC activity and EPS production. However, xylitol exposure caused a difference in gene expression compared to the control. GtfC was upregulated only in the presence of xylitol. Under xylitol exposure, gtfB was upregulated by a factor of 6, while under sucrose exposure, it was upregulated by a factor of three. Compared with glucose and xylitol, sucrose increased cell vitality in all biofilm layers. In all nutrient media, the intrinsic glucose was almost completely consumed by the cells of the S. mutans biofilm within 24 h. After 24 h of biofilm formation, the multiparametric measurements showed that xylitol in the presence of glucose caused predominantly genotypic differences but did not induce metabolic differences compared to the control. Thus, the availability of dietary carbohydrates in either a pure or combined form seems to affect the

  13. Assessment of two multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes available for Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Stephanie S.; Whiddon, Jennifer; Cheon, Kyounga; Moser, Stephen A.; Childers, Noel K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Two multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) schemes are currently available for Streptococcus mutans. The first, introduced by Nakano et al. in 2007, consists of 8 conserved housekeeping genes. The second, introduced in 2010 by Do et al., includes 6 housekeeping genes and 2 putative virulence genes. The purpose of the current study was to compare the two MLST schemes for use in validating repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) genotypes. Design Thirty-three S. mutans isolates, representing the 11 most commonly occurring rep-PCR genotype groups, were selected for MLST. MLST was performed with SYBR Green™ PCR with published primers for both MLST schemes. Amplicons were purified, sequenced, and data checked against the www.PubMLST.org database for allelic and sequence type (ST) assignment. Discriminatory power, congruence, and convenience criteria were evaluated. Concatenated sequences for each scheme were analyzed using MEGA to generate phylogenetic trees using minimum evolution with bootstrap. Results No significant difference in discriminatory power was observed between the two MLST schemes for S. mutans. Clonal clusters were consistent for both schemes. Overall, MLST demonstrated marginally greater discriminatory power than rep-PCR; however all methods were found to be congruent. New alleles and ST are reported for each scheme and added to the PubMLST database. Conclusions Clonality, supported by both methods and rep-PCR, indicates S. mutans genotypes are shared between unrelated subjects. Both Nakano and Do schemes demonstrates similar genotype discrimination for S. mutans isolates suggesting each are well designed and may be used to verify rep-PCR genotypes. PMID:26439181

  14. Hydrophilicity of dentin bonding systems influences in vitro Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Cadenaro, Milena; Gagliani, Massimo; Ferraroni, Monica; Tay, Franklin; Pashley, David; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate in vitro Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) biofilm formation on the surface of five light-curing experimental dental bonding systems (DBS) with increasing hydrophilicity. The null hypothesis tested was that resin chemical composition and hydrophilicity does not affect S. mutans biofilm formation. Methods Five light-curing versions of experimental resin blends with increasing hydrophilicity were investigated (R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5). R1 and R2 contained ethoxylated BisGMA/TEGDMA or BisGMA/TEGDMA, respectively, and were very hydrophobic, were representative of pit-and-fissure bonding agents. R3 was representative of a typical two-step etch- and-rinse adhesive, while R4 and R5 were very hydrophilic resins analogous to self-etching adhesives. Twenty-eight disks were prepared for each resin blend. After a 24 h-incubation at 37 °C, a multilayer monospecific biofilm of S. mutans was obtained on the surface of each disk. The adherent biomass was determined using the MTT assay and evaluated morphologically with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results R2 and R3 surfaces showed the highest biofilm formation while R1 and R4 showed a similar intermediate biofilm formation. R5 was more hydrophilic and acidic and was significantly less colonized than all the other resins. A significant quadratic relationship between biofilm formation and hydrophilicity of the resin blends was found. CLSM and SEM evaluation confirmed MTT assay results. Conclusions The null hypothesis was rejected since S. mutans biofilm formation was influenced by hydrophilicity, surface acidity and chemical composition of the experimental resins. Further studies using a bioreactor are needed to confirm the results and clarify the role of the single factors. PMID:24954666

  15. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Lippo V.J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. Materials and Methods. Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37°C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results. Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). Conclusions. Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion than

  16. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans to Fiber-Reinforced Filling Composite and Conventional Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Lippo V J; Garoushi, Sufyan; Tanner, Johanna; Vallittu, Pekka K; Söderling, Eva

    2009-12-04

    OBJECTIVES.: The aim was to investigate the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to a short glass fibers reinforced semi-IPN polymer matrix composite resin. The effect of surface roughness on adhesion was also studied. For comparison, different commercial restorative materials were also evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS.: Experimental composite FC resin was prepared by mixing 22.5 wt% of short E-glass fibers, 22.5 wt% of IPN-resin and 55 wt% of silane treated silica fillers using high speed mixing machine. Three direct composite resins (Z250, Grandio and Nulite), resin-modified glass ionomers (Fuji II LC), amalgam (ANA 2000), fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) (everStick and Ribbond), and pre-fabricated ceramic filling insert (Cerana class 1) were tested in this study. Enamel and dentin were used as controls. The specimens (n=3/group) with or without saliva were incubated in a suspension of S. mutans allowing initial adhesion to occur. For the enumeration of cells on the disc surfaces as colony forming units (CFU) the vials with the microbe samples were thoroughly Vortex-treated and after serial dilutions grown anaerobically for 2 days at +37 degrees C on Mitis salivarius agars (Difco) containing bacitracin. Bacterial adhesion was also evaluated by using scanning electron microscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) of the materials was also determined using a surface profilometer. All results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS.: Composite FC resin and other commercial restorative materials showed similar adhesion of S. mutans, while adhesion to dentin and enamel was significantly higher (p<0.05). Surface roughness had no effect on bacterial adhesion. Saliva coating significantly decreased the adhesion for all materials (p<0.05). Composite FC resin had a significantly higher Ra value than control groups (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS.: Short fiber-reinforced composite with semi-IPN polymer matrix revealed similar S. mutans adhesion

  17. Core-Gene-Encoded Peptide Regulating Virulence-Associated Traits in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, high-coverage genome sequence of 57 isolates of Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiological agent of human dental caries, was completed. The SMU.1147 gene, encoding a 61-amino-acid (61-aa) peptide, was present in all sequenced strains of S. mutans but absent in all bacteria in current databases. Reverse transcription-PCR revealed that SMU.1147 is cotranscribed with scnK and scnR, which encode the histidine kinase and response regulator, respectively, of a two-component system (TCS). The C terminus of the SMU.1147 gene product was tagged with a FLAG epitope and shown to be expressed in S. mutans by Western blotting with an anti-FLAG antibody. A nonpolar mutant of SMU.1147 formed less biofilm in glucose-containing medium and grew slower than did the wild-type strain under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, at low pH, or in the presence of H2O2. Mutation of SMU.1147 dramatically reduced genetic competence and expression of comX and comY, compared to S. mutans UA159. The competence defect of the SMU.1147 mutant could not be overcome by addition of sigX-inducing peptide (XIP) in defined medium or by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) in complex medium. Complementation with SMU.1147 on a plasmid restored all phenotypes. Interestingly, mutants lacking either one of the TCS components and a mutant lacking all three genes behaved like the wild-type strain for all phenotypes mentioned above, but all mutant strains grew slower than UA159 in medium supplemented with 0.3 M NaCl. Thus, the SMU.1147-encoded peptide affects virulence-related traits and dominantly controls quorum-sensing pathways for development of genetic competence in S. mutans. PMID:23603743

  18. investigating acid production by Streptococcus mutans with a surface-displayed pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lihong; Hu, Wei; He, Xuesong; Lux, Renate; McLean, Jeff; Shi, Wenyuan

    2013-01-01

    Acidogenicity and aciduricity are the main virulence factors of the cavity-causing bacterium Streptococcus mutans. Monitoring at the individual cell level the temporal and spatial distribution of acid produced by this important oral pathogen is central for our understanding of these key virulence factors especially when S. mutans resides in multi-species microbial communities. In this study, we explored the application of pH-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (pHluorins) to investigate these important features. Ecliptic pHluorin was functionally displayed on the cell surface of S. mutans as a fusion protein with SpaP. The resulting strain (O87) was used to monitor temporal and spatial pH changes in the microenvironment of S. mutans cells under both planktonic and biofilm conditions. Using strain O87, we revealed a rapid pH drop in the microenviroment of S. mutans microcolonies prior to the decrease in the macro-environment pH following sucrose fermentation. Meanwhile, a non-uniform pH distribution was observed within S. mutans biofilms, reflecting differences in microbial metabolic activity. Furthermore, strain O87 was successfully used to monitor the S. mutans acid production profiles within dual- and multispecies oral biofilms. Based on these findings, the ecliptic pHluorin allows us to investigate in vivo and in situ acid production and distribution by the cariogenic species S. mutans.

  19. Evaluation of changes in Streptococcus mutans colonies in microflora of the Indian population with fixed orthodontics appliances

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Chandresh; Maurya, Raj Kumar; Singh, Vinod; Tijare, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Orthodontic therapy has oral ecological changes causing increased numbers of mutans streptococci in saliva and plaque. The purpose of this study was to estimate counts and colonization pattern of Streptococcus mutans after application of fixed orthodontic appliances. Materials and Methods: Plaque samples of randomly selected sixty patients were collected before placement of orthodontic appliances from buccal and labial aspects of the anterior teeth and four first molars and readings were recorded as T0. After placement of appliances (0.22 MBT preadjusted Gemini), i.e., 2nd and 3rd month, the plaque samples were collected again from same site and readings were recorded as T1 and T2, respectively. Counts of S. mutans in these patients were determined by using DM Strips (Orion Diagnostic, Espoo, Finland). Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to find out significant differences between different time interval for Dentocult score for S. mutans in orthodontic patients (P < 0.001). Results: Prior to the treatment, 46 patients (76%) showed mild and 14 patients (24%) showed moderate colonization of S. mutans. After treatment, the severity of colonization increased showing fifty patients (84%) moderate and six patients (10%) showing severe colonization of S. mutans at T1, which further increased in severity at T2 with 54 patients (90%) showing severe colonization with S. mutans. Conclusion: Results showed that fixed orthodontic appliance increases colonization of S. mutans during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27605987

  20. Lectin-Like Constituents of Foods Which React with Components of Serum, Saliva, and Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, R. J.; Dankers, I.

    1981-01-01

    Hot and cold aqueous extracts were prepared from 22 commonly ingested fruits, vegetables, and seeds. When tested by agar diffusion, extracts from 13 and 10 of the foods formed precipitin bands with samples of normal rabbit serum and human saliva, respectively; extracts from four of the foods also reacted with antigen extracts of strains of Streptococcus mutans. When added to rabbit antiserum, extracts from 18 of 21 foods tested inhibited reactivity with antigen extracts derived from S. mutans MT3. Extracts from 16 foods agglutinated whole S. mutans cells, whereas those from 10 foods agglutinated human erythrocytes of blood types A and B. The lectin-like activities of extracts which reacted with human saliva were studied further. Pretreatment of saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (S-HA) beads with extracts of bananas, coconuts, carrots, alfalfa, and sunflower seeds markedly reduced the subsequent adsorption of S. mutans MT3. Pretreatment of S-HA with banana extract also strongly inhibited adsorption of S. mutans H12 and S. sanguis C1, but it had little effect on attachment of Actinomyces naeslundii L13 or A. viscosus LY7. Absorption experiments indicated that the component(s) in banana extract responsible for inhibiting streptococcal adsorption to S-HA was identical to that which bound to human erythrocytes. The banana hemagglutinin exhibited highest activity between pH 7 and 8, and it was inhibited by high concentrations of glucosamine, galactosamine, and, to a lesser extent, mannosamine. Other sugars tested had no effect. The selective bacterial adsorption-inhibiting effect noted for banana extract was also observed in studies with purified lectins. Thus, pretreating S-HA with wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A inhibited adsorption of S. mutans MT3 cells, whereas peanut agglutinin, Ulex agglutinin, Dolichos agglutinin, and soybean agglutinin had little effect; none of these lectins affected attachment of A. viscosus LY7. Collectively, the observations suggest that

  1. Efficacy of Four Fluoride Mouth Rinses on Streptococcus mutans in High Caries Risk Children – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhupathiraju, Prameela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries has been traditionally described as a multifactorial disease that involves the interaction of various factors like host, agent, substrate and time. Landmark studies have established the fact that Mutans Streptococci are the primary etiologic agents of dental caries. The prevention of dental caries by fluoride supplements in various vehicles, such as water and toothpaste, constitutes one of the most successful prevention measures. Aim The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical efficacy of four fluoride mouth rinses on Streptococcus mutans in high caries risk children and also to check the efficacy of the ingredient Triclosan which is present in two of the four mouth rinses. Materials and Methods The study is double blinded, consisting of 1000 children in age group 6-14yrs who were screened from residential schools. Of the total, 200 children were categorized as high caries risk group based on caries risk assessment tool form given by American Association of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) guidelines 2011. Prior to the study, salivary samples were collected and sent for microbial analysis to estimate Streptococcus mutans counts. Out of 200 salivary samples, 132 showed 106CFU of Streptococcus mutans and these children were included in the study. The 132 children from each group received the assigned mouth wash for 14 consecutive days. On 15th day the salivary samples were collected and sent for microbial analysis and the obtained results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results All the mouth washes showed a significant reduction in Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans. Among the four groups Group D (S flo) showed greater percentage reduction of Streptococcus mutans followed by Group A (Act), B (Kidodent) and C (Zerocary). There was no stastically significance reduction of Streptococcus mutans among the Triclosan containing and non containing groups. Conclusion The mean pre rinse CFU was significantly

  2. Mutacins from Streptococcus mutans UA159 Are Active against Multiple Streptococcal Species ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Shahnoor; Biswas, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans UA159, whose genome is completely sequenced, produces two nonlantibiotic mutacins, mutacin IV (encoded by nlmAB) and mutacin V (encoded by nlmC). In this study, we investigated the contribution of nlmA and nlmB to mutacin IV activity and demonstrated by performing genetic studies as well as by using semipurified molecules that, in contrast to a previous report, both of these genes are required for optimum mutacin IV activity. We also showed that mutacin IV is active against multiple Streptococcus species. In contrast, mutacin V displayed a narrower inhibitory range than mutacin IV. Our results suggest that mutacin IV and mutacin V may act synergistically to inhibit various organisms. PMID:21296932

  3. Regulation of the intracellular free iron pool by Dpr provides oxygen tolerance to Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Fukui, Kôichi; Koujin, Naoko; Ohya, Hiroaki; Kimura, Kazuhiko; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2004-09-01

    Dpr is an iron-binding protein required for oxygen tolerance in Streptococcus mutans. We previously proposed that Dpr could confer oxygen tolerance to the bacterium by sequestering intracellular free iron ions that catalyze generation of highly toxic radicals (Y. Yamamoto, M. Higuchi, L. B. Poole, and Y. Kamio, J. Bacteriol. 182:3740-3747, 2000; Y. Yamamoto, L. B. Poole, R. R. Hantgan, and Y. Kamio, J. Bacteriol. 184:2931-2939, 2002). Here, we examined the intracellular free iron status of wild-type (WT) and dpr mutant strains of S. mutans, before and after exposure to air, by using electron spin resonance spectrometry. Under anaerobic conditions, free iron ion concentrations of WT and dpr strains were 225.9 +/- 2.6 and 333.0 +/- 61.3 microM, respectively. Exposure of WT cells to air for 1 h induced Dpr expression and reduced intracellular free iron ion concentrations to 22.5 +/- 5.3 microM; under these conditions, dpr mutant cells maintained intracellular iron concentration at 230.3 +/- 28.8 microM. A decrease in cell viability and genomic DNA degradation was observed in the dpr mutant exposed to air. These data indicate that regulation of the intracellular free iron pool by Dpr is required for oxygen tolerance in S. mutans.

  4. Death and survival in Streptococcus mutans: differing outcomes of a quorum-sensing signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent; Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are considered "social" organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones) in a process called quorum-sensing (QS). These signaling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, QS is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial QS could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (cavities). In S. mutans, its CSP QS signaling peptide does not act as a classical QS signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induce the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signaling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial "suicide" and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same QS signaling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes.

  5. Composition Analysis and Inhibitory Effect of Sterculia lychnophora against Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Park, Bok-Im; Hwang, Eun-Hee; You, Yong-Ouk

    2016-01-01

    Pangdahai is a traditional Chinese drug, specifically described in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia as the seeds of Sterculia lychnophora Hance. Here, we separated S. lychnophora husk and kernel, analyzed the nutrient contents, and investigated the inhibitory effects of S. lychnophora ethanol extracts on cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans, important bacteria in dental caries and plaque formation. Ethanol extracts of S. lychnophora showed dose-dependent antibacterial activity against S. mutans with significant inhibition at concentrations higher than 0.01 mg/mL compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Furthermore, biofilm formation was decreased by S. lychnophora at concentrations > 0.03 mg/mL, while bacterial viability was decreased dose-dependently at high concentrations (0.04, 0.08, 0.16, and 0.32 mg/mL). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanol extract revealed a strong presence of alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides while the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, and organic acids was low. The S. lychnophora husk had higher moisture and ash content than the kernel, while the protein and fat content of the husk were lower (p < 0.05) than those of the kernel. These results indicate that S. lychnophora may have antibacterial effects against S. mutans, which are likely related to the alkaloid, phenolics, glycosides, and peptides, the major components of S. lychnophora. PMID:27190540

  6. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  8. Microfluidic study of environmental control of genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Minjun; Ghoreishilangroudi, Seyedehdelaram; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert; Hagen, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus mutans has the ability to enter a transient state of genetic competence in which it can integrate exogenous DNA. It regulates the competent state in response to several environmental inputs that include two quorum sensing peptides (CSP and XIP) as well as pH and other variables. However the interplay of these variables in regulating the competent state is poorly understood. We are using microfluidics to isolate and control environmental inputs and examine how the competence regulatory circuit responds at the single cell level. Our studies reveal that the pH of the growth environment plays a critical role in determining how cells respond to the quorum sensing signals: The response to both peptides is sharply tuned to a narrow window of near-neutral pH. Within this optimal pH range, a population responds unimodally to a XIP stimulus, and bimodally to CSP; outside this range the response to both signals is suppressed. Because a growing S. mutans culture acidifies its medium, our findings suggest that the passage of the pH through the sensitivity window transiently activates the competence circuit. In this way a sharply tuned environmental response gives S. mutans fine control over the duration of its competent state. This work is supported by the NIH under NIDCR awards R01 DE023339.

  9. Shear stress tolerance of Streptococcus mutans aggregates determined by microfluidic funnel device (μFFD).

    PubMed

    Shumi, Wahhida; Kim, So Hyun; Lim, Jeesun; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Han, Hwataik; Park, Sungsu

    2013-05-01

    Dental caries are initiated by the attachment of Streptococcus mutans aggregates to the surface of teeth. Bacterial adhesion to the interproximal space, the space between adjacent teeth, has not been investigated due to the lack of devices that mimic the space. Herein, we describe a method for determining the effect of shear stress and sucrose on the attachment of S. mutans aggregates to the interproximal space using microfluidic funnel device (μFFD). Using μFFD, the shear stress tolerance of sucrose-independent and sucrose-dependent S. mutans aggregates (larger than 50 μm in diameter) trapped in the funnel was tested against various flow rates of saliva solution (5 to 50 μl/min). Sucrose-independent aggregates were completely removed from the funnel walls at a low flow rate (10 μl/min) within 7 min., while sucrose-dependent aggregates were removed from the walls only at higher flow rates (25 and 50 μl/min) within several minutes. These results suggest that sucrose-dependent aggregates are more tolerant of shear stress than sucrose-independent aggregates, and are more likely to remain in the region with the smallest shear stress in the teeth.

  10. Influence of blue light on Streptococcus mutans re-organization in biofilm.

    PubMed

    Chebath-Taub, Daniella; Steinberg, Doron; Featherstone, John D B; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2012-11-05

    Our aim was to examine the viability and structure of new biofilm formed by Streptococcus mutans that was previously exposed to blue light. S. mutans bacteria were grown to form a mature biofilm, that was exposed to blue light (wavelengths, 400-500 nm) for 1-10 min (equivalent to 68-680 J/cm(2)). Biofilm was dispersed by sonication, and then the suspended bacteria were grown to re-organize as a new biofilm. Biofilm formation after 2, 4, and 6 h, was examined by viable counts and by confocal laser scanning microscopy using live/dead bacterial staining. A significant decrease in bacterial viability was found in the 6h biofilms formed by bacteria that had been previously exposed to blue light for 7 or 10 min. Confocal microscopy images showed a decrease in the live/dead bacterial ratio after 3-10 min of light exposures. Dead bacteria were mainly at the outer layers of the biofilm. Exposure of S. mutans in biofilm to blue light affected the re-formation of a new biofilm, showing an increase in the amount of dead bacteria. This phenomenon suggests that blue light has a delayed antibacterial effect, although it does not interfere with bacterial capability to reform an initial biofilm.

  11. Use of traditional Indian plants in the inhibition of caries-causing bacteria--Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jain, I; Jain, P; Bisht, D; Sharma, A; Srivastava, B; Gupta, N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to comparatively evaluate the antibacterial activity of six Indian plant extracts and 0.2% chlorhexidine against clinical strains of Streptococcus mutans, which were isolated from the plaque samples of 45 pediatric patients. Six plant extracts were prepared in three different forms, namely aqueous extracts, organic solvent-based extracts and crude (raw) extracts. The antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done by agar well diffusion method. Antimicrobial activity of the extracts was determined by measuring the mean zones of inhibition (mm) produced against the bacterial isolates. Results showed that crude garlic extract exhibited greater antibacterial activity than chlorhexidine. Aqueous extract of amla and organic solvent-based extract of ginger showed the maximum antibacterial activity against S. mutans, whereas aqueous extract of tulsi and organic solvent based extract of amla showed the minimum antibacterial activity. This study suggests that plant extracts like garlic in crude form, amla as aqueous infusion and ginger as alcoholic tincture have potential for the control of S. mutans. These extracts can be used as an alternative remedy for dental caries prevention or in the form of mouthwash, which is safe and economical.

  12. In vitro comparison of antimicrobial activity of aqueous decoction of Coriandrum sativum, and Dentol Drop with chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Moradian, Hamid; Bazargani, Abdollah; Rafiee, Azade; Nazarialam, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Dental caries is still remained as a major health problem. This problem has created a new interest to search for new antimicrobial agents from various sources including medicinal plants. Since limited data is available so far regarding the antibacterial effect of Coriandrum sativum seed and Dentol Drop against Streptococcus mutans, this study aims to assess this activity. Materials and Methods This experimental study was conducted in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. In vitro comparison of antimicrobial activity of aqueous decoction of Coriandrum sativum seed and Dentol drop with chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans was evaluated using disk diffusion and broth microdilution assays. Positive and negative controls were considered. The data was statistically analyzed by applying Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey post-hoc test to compare the groups using SPSS software (version 17). Results Dentol drop showed a remarkable antibacterial activity, in comparison with chlorhexidine, against S. mutans in the disk diffusion (p value = 0.005), and broth microdilution assays (p value = 0.0001). Based on the results of this study, Coriandrum sativum seed did not posses any antibacterial property. Conclusion Coriandrum sativum seed showed no anti-Streptococcus mutans activity. Dentol drop exhibited a remarkable antibacterial activity against S. mutans when tested in vitro. Dentol drop can be further studied as a preventive measure for dental caries. PMID:24475330

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of the Oral Pathogen Streptococcus mutans in Response to Competence Signaling Peptide XIP

    PubMed Central

    Wenderska, Iwona B.; Latos, Andrew; Pruitt, Benjamin; Palmer, Sara; Spatafora, Grace

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans, competence development is regulated by the ComRS signaling system comprised of the ComR regulator and the ComS prepeptide to the competence signaling peptide XIP (ComX-inducing peptide). Aside from competence development, XIP signaling has been demonstrated to regulate cell lysis, and recently, the expression of bacteriocins, small antimicrobial peptides used by bacteria to inhibit closely related species. Our study further explores the effect of XIP signaling on the S. mutans transcriptome. RNA sequencing revealed that XIP induction resulted in a global change in gene expression that was consistent with a stress response. An increase in several membrane-bound regulators, including HdrRM and BrsRM, involved in bacteriocin production, and the VicRKX system, involved in acid tolerance and biofilm formation, was observed. Furthermore, global changes in gene expression corresponded to changes observed during the stringent response to amino acid starvation. Effects were also observed on genes involved in sugar transport and carbon catabolite repression and included the levQRST and levDEFG operons. Finally, our work identified a novel heat shock-responsive intergenic region, encoding a small RNA, with a potential role in competence shutoff. IMPORTANCE Genetic competence provides bacteria with an opportunity to increase genetic diversity or acquire novel traits conferring a survival advantage. In the cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans, DNA transformation is regulated by the competence stimulating peptide XIP (ComX-inducing peptide). The present study utilizes high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to provide a greater understanding of how global gene expression patterns change in response to XIP. Overall, our work demonstrates that in S. mutans, XIP signaling induces a response that resembles the stringent response to amino acid starvation. We further identify a novel heat shock-responsive intergenic region with a

  14. Suppression of salivary Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli by topical caries preventive agents.

    PubMed

    Juric, H; Dukic, W; Jankovic, B; Karlovic, Z; Pavelic, B

    2003-12-01

    Reduction of cariogenic bacteria, especially salivary Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli is a valuable clinical procedure that in many ways alleviates implementation of targeted caries preventive procedures in the entire population. The aim of this study was to investigate the caries preventive values of certain preventive procedures in in vivo conditions. Four groups of subjects, each with 18 children aged from 4-5 and 10-12 years (n = 72) were treated with different caries preventive agent (aminfluoride solution, Proxyt paste, chewing gum containing xylitol and fluoride and chlorhexidine solution). During a period of two months five control measurements for number of salivary Streptococcus mutans (SM) and lactobacilli (LB) were performed. At the end of the study the best result in the reduction of the bacteria was achieved by the application of Proxyt paste and daily use of chewing gum (p < 0.001). In patients treated with this preventive procedure the number of SM was reduced by 1 class and LB to < 10(4) CFU/ml saliva after two months of study. The results obtained indicate that professional teeth cleaning and use of chewing gum with xylitol and fluorides on daily basis can be very effective protocol for cariogenic bacteria reduction and in the individual caries prevention.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of Six Indian Plant Extracts against Streptococcus Mutans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pankaj; Bisht, Dakshina; Sharma, Alosha; Srivastava, Binita; Gupta, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To assess the antimicrobial efficacy of six plant extracts of Indian origin often used as traditional medicine against standard strains of Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of six plant extracts was determined by the agar well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the crude (raw), Organic solvent based, aqueous extracts was determined by the agar well diffusion method. Results: Out of all the six extracts evaluated, organic solvent based and aqueous extracts of all the extracts were found to have variable antimicrobial activities against the oral pathogen. The crude extract of Garlic was the most effective against Streptococcus mutans with the highest zone of inhibition (24.62 mm) followed by the aqueous extract of Amla (19.47mm) and organic solvent based extract of Ginger (18.76 mm). Conclusion: Despite of the fact that the extracts were not pure compounds and antimicrobial results were obtained. This recommends the potency of these extracts. The figment of the derivation of antimicrobial compounds from plants seems lucrative as it will lead to the development of a phytomedicine to act against microbes. PMID:25859526

  16. Effects of Green Tea on Streptococcus mutans Counts- A Randomised Control Trail

    PubMed Central

    R, Srinivas; B, Vikram Simha; Y, Sandhya Sree; T, Chandra Shekar; P, Siva Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mouth rinses have been in use from time immemorial as a supplement for routine oral hygiene. There are many number of mouth rinses currently available in the market in which many of them possess certain drawback, which has necessitated the search for alternate mouth rinses. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of rinsing with green tea in comparison with chlorhexidine and plain water on Streptococcus mutans count. Setting and Design: A short term, single blinded, cross over randomised control clinical trial. Materials and Methods: Study includes a total of 30 subjects aged 20 to 25 years divided into three groups that is green tea group, chlorhexidine group, and plain water group. A baseline plaque samples were collected and under supervision of examiner all the subjects rinsed with 10 ml of respective solutions for one minute. Plaque samples were collected at five minutes after rinsing. All the 30 subjects were exposed to all the three rinses with a wash out period of seven days between the interventions. All the samples were sent to microbial analysis. Results: Wilcoxon matched pair test and Mann-Whitney U test showed that both chlorhexidine and green tea significantly reduced Streptococcus mutans colony counts compared to plain water. Conclusion: The results of present study indicate that green tea mouth rinse proved to be equally effective compared to chlorhexidine which is considered as gold standard. This may also be a valuable public health intervention as it is economical and has multiple health benefits. PMID:25584303

  17. Physiological properties of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm-detached cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ling, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Christine D

    2013-03-01

    Biofilm detachment is a physiologically regulated process that facilitates the release of cells to colonize new sites and cause infections. Streptococcus mutans is one of the major inhabitants of cariogenic dental plaque biofilm. This study tested the hypothesis that S. mutans biofilm-detached cells exhibit distinct physiological properties compared with their sessile and planktonic counterparts. Biofilm-detached cells showed a longer generation time of 2.85 h compared with planktonic cells (2.06 h), but had higher phosphotransferase activity for sucrose and mannose (P < 0.05). Compared with planktonic cells, they showed higher chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance and fourfold more adherent (P < 0.05). Increased mutacin IV production in biofilm-detached cells was noted by a larger inhibition zone against Streptococcus gordonii (31.07 ± 1.62 mm vs. 25.2 ± 1.74 mm by planktonic cells; P < 0.05). The expressions of genes associated with biofilm formation (gtfC and comDE) and mutacin (nlmA) were higher compared with planktonic cells (P < 0.05). In many properties, biofilm-detached cells shared similarity with sessile cells except for a higher phosphotransferase activity for sucrose, glucose, and mannose, increased resistance to CHX, and elevated expression of gtfC-, comDE-, and acidurity-related gene aptD (P < 0.05). Based on data obtained, the S. mutans biofilm-detached cells are partially distinct in various physiological properties compared with their planktonic and sessile counterparts.

  18. Triethylene Glycol Up-Regulates Virulence-Associated Genes and Proteins in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghinejad, Lida; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.; Siqueira, Walter L.; Santerre, J. Paul; Finer, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) is a diluent monomer used pervasively in dental composite resins. Through hydrolytic degradation of the composites in the oral cavity it yields a hydrophilic biodegradation product, triethylene glycol (TEG), which has been shown to promote the growth of Streptococcus mutans, a dominant cariogenic bacterium. Previously it was shown that TEG up-regulated gtfB, an important gene contributing to polysaccharide synthesis function in biofilms. However, molecular mechanisms related to TEG’s effect on bacterial function remained poorly understood. In the present study, S. mutans UA159 was incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of TEG at pH 5.5 and 7.0. Quantitative real-time PCR, proteomics analysis, and glucosyltransferase enzyme (GTF) activity measurements were employed to identify the bacterial phenotypic response to TEG. A S. mutans vicK isogenic mutant (SMΔvicK1) and its associated complemented strain (SMΔvicK1C), an important regulatory gene for biofilm-associated genes, were used to determine if this signaling pathway was involved in modulation of the S. mutans virulence-associated genes. Extracted proteins from S. mutans biofilms grown in the presence and absence of TEG were subjected to mass spectrometry for protein identification, characterization and quantification. TEG up-regulated gtfB/C, gbpB, comC, comD and comE more significantly in biofilms at cariogenic pH (5.5) and defined concentrations. Differential response of the vicK knock-out (SMΔvicK1) and complemented strains (SMΔvicK1C) implicated this signalling pathway in TEG-modulated cellular responses. TEG resulted in increased GTF enzyme activity, responsible for synthesizing insoluble glucans involved in the formation of cariogenic biofilms. As well, TEG increased protein abundance related to biofilm formation, carbohydrate transport, acid tolerance, and stress-response. Proteomics data was consistent with gene expression findings for the

  19. The Effects of Chlorhexidine and Persica Mouthwashes on Colonization of Streptococcus mutans on Fixed Orthodontics O-rings

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Fereshteh; Danesh Ardakani, Mohammad; Zandi, Hengameh; Heidarzadeh, Hamed; Moshafi, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Fixed orthodontic appliances predispose patients to dental caries. Use of mouthrinses has been introduced as the effective way for reducing dental plaque accumulation. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Persica mouthwash and Chlorhexidine (CHX) on colonization of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on fixed orthodontic O-rings. Materials and Method Thirty patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and proper oral hygiene were randomly provided by CHX and Persica and trained to use these mouthwashes according to the manufacturer’s instruction. Sampling was carried out right before and 4 weeks after mouthrinsing treatment. The mean amounts of S. mutans colonies in these groups were compared. Results Comparison of S. mutans colonization within each group revealed both mouthrinses to be efficient. However, this difference was found to be significant only in CHX group. Conclusion Persica cannot be a good alternative mouthwash and patients on orthodontic treatment are still recommended to use CHX. PMID:25759859

  20. A Novel PTS of Streptococcus mutans is Responsible for Transport of Carbohydrates with α-1,3 linkage

    PubMed Central

    Ajdic, Dragana; Chen, Zhiyun

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The most common type of carbohydrate-transport system in Streptococcus mutans is the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). We previously showed that fourteen PTSs exist in S. mutans UA159 (Ajdic et al., 2002). Several studies have shown that microorganisms growing in biofilms express different genes as compared to their planktonic counterparts. In this study, we showed that one PTS of S. mutans was expressed in sucrose-grown biofilms. Furthermore, the same PTS was also responsible for the transport and metabolism of disaccharide nigerose (3-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-D-glucose). Additionally, the results indicate that the studied PTS might be involved in the transport and metabolism of carbohydrates synthesized by glucosyltransferase B (GtfB) and glucosyltransferase C (GtfC) of S. mutans. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows PTS transport of a disaccharide (and possibly extracellular oligosaccharides) with α-1,3 linkage. PMID:23193985

  1. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates.

  2. Escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans is governed by the bacterial population density.

    PubMed

    Dufour, D; Villemin, C; Perry, J A; Lévesque, C M

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer through natural DNA transformation is an important evolutionary mechanism among bacteria. Transformation requires that the bacteria are physiologically competent to take and incorporate free DNA directly from the environment. Although natural genetic transformation is a remarkable feature of many naturally competent bacteria, the process is energetically expensive for the cells. Consequently, a tight control of the competence state is necessary. The objective of the present work was to help decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating the escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans, the principal etiological agent responsible for tooth decay in humans. Our results showed that the cessation of competence in S. mutans was abrupt, and did not involve the accumulation of a competence inhibitor nor the depletion of a competence activator in the extracellular environment. The competence state was repressed at high cell population density via concomitant repression of sigX gene encoding the master regulator of the competence regulon. Co-culture experiments performed with oral and non-oral bacteria showed that S. mutans assesses its own population density and also the microbial density of its surroundings to regulate its competence escape. Interestingly, neither the intra-species and extra-species quorum-sensing systems nor the other 13 two-component regulatory systems identified in S. mutans were involved in the cell-density-dependent escape of the competence state. Altogether, our results suggest a complex mechanism regulating the competence shut-off involving cell-density-dependent repression of sigX through an as yet undefined system, and possibly SigX protein stability.

  3. Sustained effects of blue light on Streptococcus mutans in regrown biofilm.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Berneron, Julie; Steinberg, Doron; Featherstone, John D B; Feuerstein, Osnat

    2016-04-01

    In prior studies, exposure of Streptococcus mutans in biofilm to blue light using high fluences of up to 680 J/cm(2) did not interfere with bacterial capability to reform an initial biofilm; however, a delayed antibacterial effect was observed. Our aim was to determine the sustained effecttts of blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light on the pathogenicity of the newly formed biofilm. S. mutans were grown to form biofilm that was exposed to blue light (wavelengths, 460-480 nm) for 1, 3, and 7 min (equivalent to 37, 112, and 262 J/cm(2), respectively). Then, bacteria were suspended and allowed to regrow into new biofilms. The regrown biofilms were assessed for bacterial quantification by optical density (OD) measurement and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), bacterial viability and extracellular polysaccharide production by fluorescent staining using confocal scanning laser microscopy, acid production by bacteria (acidogenicity), and bacterial survival at low pH (aciduricity) using qPCR. Bacterial growth in the regrown biofilms was increased when samples were previously exposed to light; however, under the confocal microscopy, a higher proportion of dead bacteria and a reduction in polysaccharide production were observed. The acidogenicity from the regrown biofilm was lowered as fluences of light increased. The aciduricity of the regrown biofilm was decreased, meaning less growth of bacteria into biofilm in low pH with increasing fluences. Blue light has sustained effects on S. mutans bacteria grown into new biofilm. Although bacterial growth in biofilm increased, bacterial viability and virulence characteristics were impaired. The cariogenic potential over time of S. mutans previously exposed to blue light when grown on tooth surfaces is yet to be determined.

  4. Effect of gallium on growth of Streptococcus mutans NCTC 10449 and dental tissues.

    PubMed

    Valappil, S P; Owens, G J; Miles, E J; Farmer, N L; Cooper, L; Miller, G; Clowes, R; Lynch, R J M; Higham, S M

    2014-01-01

    Gallium-doped phosphate-based glasses (Ga-PBG) were assessed for their impact on Streptococcus mutans and dental mineralisation, firstly by disc diffusion assays followed by biofilms grown on nitrocellulose filter membrane (NFM) and constant-depth film fermentor (CDFF). Short-time exposure (10 min) effects of Ga-PBG on S. mutans biofilm were compared with that of 0.2% chlorhexidine. The effects of Ga-PBG on bovine enamel (which was investigated under pH-cycling condition) and dentine were analysed using transverse microradiography (TMR), profilometry and inductively coupled plasma optical-emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The disc diffusion assays showed inhibition zones of 24.5 ± 0.5 mm for Ga-PBG compared with controls (C-PBG). Ga-PBG showed statistically significant growth inhibition of S. mutans biofilms on NFM (p = 0.001) and CDFF (p < 0.046) compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) and C-PBG. The CDFF assay revealed a maximum of 2.11 log colony-forming unit (CFU) reduction at 48 h, but short-time exposure effects were comparable with that of 0.2% chlorhexidine only on older biofilms (maximum of 0.59 vs. 0.69 log CFU reduction at 120 h). TMR analyses of the enamel revealed non-significant mineral loss (p = 0.37) only in the case of Ga-PBG samples compared with controls including sodium fluoride. ICP-OES analyses indicated transient gallium adsorption into dentine by calcium displacement. The results confirmed that gallium inhibited S. mutans growth and appears to have the potential to protect the enamel surface under conditions representative of the oral environment. Further work is needed to establish whether it has an application in daily oral hygiene procedures to prevent or reduce caries.

  5. Identification of ssDNA aptamers specific to clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans strains with different cariogenicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Liu, Jiaojiao; Su, Donghua; Hu, Danyang; Hou, Shuai; Hu, Tongnan; Yang, Jiyong; Luo, Yanping; Xi, Qing; Chu, Bingfeng; Wang, Chenglong

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive facultative anaerobic bacterium, is considered to be a major etiological factor for dental caries. In this study, plaques from dental enamel surfaces of caries-active and caries-free individuals were obtained and cultivated for S. mutans isolation. Morphology examination, biochemical characterization, and polymerase chain reaction were performed to identify S. mutans The cariogenicity of S. mutans strains isolated from clinical specimens was evaluated by testing the acidogenicity, aciduricity, extracellular polysaccharide production, and adhesion ability of the bacteria. Finally, subtractive SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technology targeting whole intact cells was used to screen for ssDNA aptamers specific to the strains with high cariogenicity. After nine rounds of subtractive SELEX, sufficient pool enrichment was achieved as shown by radioactive isotope analysis. The enriched pool was cloned and sequenced randomly, followed by MEME online and RNA structure software analysis of the sequences. Results from the flow cytometry indicated that aptamers H1, H16, H4, L1, L10, and H19 could discriminate highly cariogenic S. mutans strains from poorly cariogenic strains. Among these, Aptamer H19 had the strongest binding capacity with cariogenic S. mutans strains with a dissociation constant of 69.45 ± 38.53 nM. In conclusion, ssDNA aptamers specific to highly cariogenic clinical S. mutans strains were successfully obtained. These ssDNA aptamers might be used for the early diagnosis and treatment of dental caries.

  6. Divalent cations enhance fluoride binding to Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis cells and subsequently inhibit bacterial acid production.

    PubMed

    Domon-Tawaraya, H; Nakajo, K; Washio, J; Ashizawa, T; Ichino, T; Sugawara, H; Fukumoto, S; Takahashi, N

    2013-01-01

    One preventive effect of topical fluoride application is derived from the fact that fluoride can inhibit bacterial acid production. Furthermore, divalent cations such as Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) increase the binding of fluoride to bacterial cells. These findings suggest that exposure of oral bacteria to fluoride in the presence of divalent cations increases fluoride binding to bacterial cells and subsequently enhances fluoride-induced inhibition of bacterial acid production. This study investigated the effects of fluoride exposure (0-20,000 ppm F) in the presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) prior to glucose challenge on pH fall ability by bacterial sugar fermentation, as well as fluoride binding to bacterial cells by exposure to fluoride, and fluoride release from bacterial cells during bacterial sugar fermentation, using caries-related bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguinis. The pH fall by both streptococci was inhibited by exposure to over 250 ppm F in the presence of Ca(2+) (p < 0.01), whereas in the presence of Mg(2+), the pH fall by S. mutans and S. sanguinis was inhibited after exposure to over 250 and 950 ppm F, respectively (p < 0.05). The amounts of fluoride binding to and released from streptococcal cells increased with the concentration of fluoride the cells were exposed to in the presence of Mg(2+), but were high enough even after 250 ppm F exposure in the presence of Ca(2+). The enhanced inhibition of acid production in the presence of divalent cations is probably due to the improved efficiency of fluoride binding to bacterial cells being improved via these divalent cations.

  7. Contribution of the Collagen-Binding Proteins of Streptococcus mutans to Bacterial Colonization of Inflamed Dental Pulp

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Ryota; Ogaya, Yuko; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of dental caries. Collagen-binding proteins (CBPs) (approximately 120 kDa), termed Cnm and Cbm, are regarded as important cell surface antigens related to the adherence of S. mutans to collagenous tissue. Furthermore, CBP-positive S. mutans strains are associated with various systemic diseases involving bacteremia, such as infective endocarditis. Endodontic infection is considered to be an important cause of bacteremia, but little is known regarding the presence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissue. In the present study, the distribution and virulence of S. mutans in dental pulp tissues were investigated by focusing on CBPs. Adhesion and invasion properties of various S. mutans strains were analyzed using human dental pulp fibroblasts (HDPFs). CBP-positive strains had a significantly higher rate of adhesion to HDPFs compared with CBP-defective isogenic mutant strains (P<0.001). In addition, CBP-positive strains induced HDPF proliferation, which is a possible mechanism related to development of hyperplastic pulpitis. The distribution of S. mutans strains isolated from infected root canal specimens was then analyzed by PCR. We found that approximately 50% of the root canal specimens were positive for S. mutans. Approximately 20% of these strains were Cnm-positive, while no Cbm-positive strains were isolated. The Cnm-positive strains isolated from the specimens showed adhesion to HDPFs. Our results suggest that CBP-positive S. mutans strains exhibit high colonization in dental pulp. This could be a possible virulence factor for various systemic diseases. PMID:27442266

  8. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mogen, Austin B; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  9. Modulation of Biofilm Exopolysaccharides by the Streptococcus mutans vicX Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Yang, Yingming; Mao, Mengying; Li, Hong; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Yin, Jiaxin; Hu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The cariogenic pathogen Streptococcus mutans effectively utilizes dietary sucrose for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide, which act as a scaffold for its biofilm, thus contributing to its pathogenicity, environmental stress tolerance, and antimicrobial resistance. The two-component system VicRK of S. mutans regulates a group of virulence genes that are associated with biofilm matrix synthesis. Knockout of vicX affects biofilm formation, oxidative stress tolerance, and transformation of S. mutans. However, little is known regarding the vicX-modulated structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharides underlying the biofilm formation and the phenotypes of the vicX mutants. Here, we identified the role of vicX in the structural characteristics of the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm physiology. The vicX mutant (SmuvicX) biofilms seemingly exhibited “desertification” with architecturally impaired exopolysaccharide-enmeshed cell clusters, compared with the UA159 strain (S. mutans wild type strain). Concomitantly, SmuvicX showed a decrease in water-insoluble glucan (WIG) synthesis and in WIG/water-soluble glucan (WSG) ratio. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed that the WIG isolated from the SmuvicX biofilms had a much lower molecular weight compared with the UA159 strain indicating differences in polysaccharide chain lengths. A monosaccharide composition analysis demonstrated the importance of the vicX gene in the glucose metabolism. We performed metabolite profiling via 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which showed that several chemical shifts were absent in both WSG and WIG of SmuvicX biofilms compared with the UA159 strain. Thus, the modulation of structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide by vicX provides new insights into the interaction between the exopolysaccharide structure, gene functions, and cariogenicity. Our results suggest that vicX gene modulates the structural characteristics of exopolysaccharide associated with

  10. Pluronics-Formulated Farnesol Promotes Efficient Killing and Demonstrates Novel Interactions with Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Mogen, Austin B.; Chen, Fu; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Wang, Dong; Rice, Kelly C.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary causative agent of dental caries, one of the most prevalent diseases in the United States. Previously published studies have shown that Pluronic-based tooth-binding micelles carrying hydrophobic antimicrobials are extremely effective at inhibiting S. mutans biofilm growth on hydroxyapatite (HA). Interestingly, these studies also demonstrated that non-binding micelles (NBM) carrying antimicrobial also had an inhibitory effect, leading to the hypothesis that the Pluronic micelles themselves may interact with the biofilm. To explore this potential interaction, three different S. mutans strains were each grown as biofilm in tissue culture plates, either untreated or supplemented with NBM alone (P85), NBM containing farnesol (P85F), or farnesol alone (F). In each tested S. mutans strain, biomass was significantly decreased (SNK test, p < 0.05) in the P85F and F biofilms relative to untreated biofilms. Furthermore, the P85F biofilms formed large towers containing dead cells that were not observed in the other treatment conditions. Tower formation appeared to be specific to formulated farnesol, as this phenomenon was not observed in S. mutans biofilms grown with NBM containing triclosan. Parallel CFU/ml determinations revealed that biofilm growth in the presence of P85F resulted in a 3-log reduction in viability, whereas F decreased viability by less than 1-log. Wild-type biofilms grown in the absence of sucrose or gtfBC mutant biofilms grown in the presence of sucrose did not form towers. However, increased cell killing with P85F was still observed, suggesting that cell killing is independent of tower formation. Finally, repeated treatment of pre-formed biofilms with P85F was able to elicit a 2-log reduction in viability, whereas parallel treatment with F alone only reduced viability by 0.5-log. Collectively, these results suggest that Pluronics-formulated farnesol induces alterations in biofilm architecture, presumably via interaction

  11. α-Mangostin disrupts the development of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and facilitates its mechanical removal.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong Thi Mai; Falsetta, Megan L; Hwang, Geelsu; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Koo, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    α-Mangostin (αMG) has been reported to be an effective antimicrobial agent against planktonic cells of Streptococcus mutans, a biofilm-forming and acid-producing cariogenic organism. However, its anti-biofilm activity remains to be determined. We examined whether αMG, a xanthone purified from Garcinia mangostana L grown in Vietnam, disrupts the development, acidogenicity, and/or the mechanical stability of S. mutans biofilms. Treatment regimens simulating those experienced clinically (twice-daily, 60 s exposure each) were used to assess the bioactivity of αMG using a saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (sHA) biofilm model. Topical applications of early-formed biofilms with αMG (150 µM) effectively reduced further biomass accumulation and disrupted the 3D architecture of S. mutans biofilms. Biofilms treated with αMG had lower amounts of extracellular insoluble and intracellular iodophilic polysaccharides (30-45%) than those treated with vehicle control (P<0.05), while the number of viable bacterial counts was unaffected. Furthermore, αMG treatments significantly compromised the mechanical stability of the biofilm, facilitating its removal from the sHA surface when subjected to a constant shear stress of 0.809 N/m2 (>3-fold biofilm detachment from sHA vs. vehicle-treated biofilms; P<0.05). Moreover, acid production by S. mutans biofilms was disrupted following αMG treatments (vs. vehicle-control, P<0.05). The activity of enzymes associated with glucan synthesis, acid production, and acid tolerance (glucosyltransferases B and C, phosphotransferase-PTS system, and F1F0-ATPase) were significantly inhibited by αMG. The expression of manL, encoding a key component of the mannose PTS, and gtfB were slightly repressed by αMG treatment (P<0.05), while the expression of atpD (encoding F-ATPase) and gtfC genes was unaffected. Hence, this study reveals that brief exposures to αMG can disrupt the development and structural integrity of S. mutans biofilms, at least in part

  12. Trk2 Potassium Transport System in Streptococcus mutans and Its Role in Potassium Homeostasis, Biofilm Formation, and Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Binepal, Gursonika; Gill, Kamal; Crowley, Paula; Cordova, Martha; Brady, L. Jeannine; Senadheera, Dilani B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potassium (K+) is the most abundant cation in the fluids of dental biofilm. The biochemical and biophysical functions of K+ and a variety of K+ transport systems have been studied for most pathogenic bacteria but not for oral pathogens. In this study, we establish the modes of K+ acquisition in Streptococcus mutans and the importance of K+ homeostasis for its virulence attributes. The S. mutans genome harbors four putative K+ transport systems that included two Trk-like transporters (designated Trk1 and Trk2), one glutamate/K+ cotransporter (GlnQHMP), and a channel-like K+ transport system (Kch). Mutants lacking Trk2 had significantly impaired growth, acidogenicity, aciduricity, and biofilm formation. [K+] less than 5 mM eliminated biofilm formation in S. mutans. The functionality of the Trk2 system was confirmed by complementing an Escherichia coli TK2420 mutant strain, which resulted in significant K+ accumulation, improved growth, and survival under stress. Taken together, these results suggest that Trk2 is the main facet of the K+-dependent cellular response of S. mutans to environment stresses. IMPORTANCE Biofilm formation and stress tolerance are important virulence properties of caries-causing Streptococcus mutans. To limit these properties of this bacterium, it is imperative to understand its survival mechanisms. Potassium is the most abundant cation in dental plaque, the natural environment of S. mutans. K+ is known to function in stress tolerance, and bacteria have specialized mechanisms for its uptake. However, there are no reports to identify or characterize specific K+ transporters in S. mutans. We identified the most important system for K+ homeostasis and its role in the biofilm formation, stress tolerance, and growth. We also show the requirement of environmental K+ for the activity of biofilm-forming enzymes, which explains why such high levels of K+ would favor biofilm formation. PMID:26811321

  13. Oral Cnm-positive Streptococcus Mutans Expressing Collagen Binding Activity is a Risk Factor for Cerebral Microbleeds and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Isao; Kuriyama, Nagato; Miyatani, Fumitaro; Nomura, Ryota; Naka, Shuhei; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Ihara, Masafumi; Iwai, Komei; Matsui, Daisuke; Ozaki, Etsuko; Koyama, Teruhide; Nishigaki, Masaru; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Tamura, Aiko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Akazawa, Kentaro; Takada, Akihiro; Takeda, Kazuo; Yamada, Kei; Nakagawa, Masanori; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Kanamura, Narisato; Friedland, Robert P.; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are an important risk factor for stroke and dementia. We have shown that the collagen binding surface Cnm protein expressed on cnm-positive Streptococcus mutans is involved in the development of CMBs. However, whether the collagen binding activity of cnm-positive S. mutans is related to the nature of the CMBs or to cognitive impairment is unclear. Two-hundred seventy nine community residents (70.0 years) were examined for the presence or absence of cnm-positive S. mutans in the saliva by PCR and collagen binding activity, CMBs, and cognitive function were evaluated. Cnm-positive S. mutans was detected more often among subjects with CMBs (p < 0.01) than those without. The risk of CMBs was significantly higher (odds ratio = 14.3) in the group with S. mutans expressing collagen binding activity, as compared to the group without that finding. Deep CMBs were more frequent (67%) and cognitive function was lower among subjects with cnm-positive S. mutans expressing collagen binding activity. This work supports the role of oral health in stroke and dementia and proposes a molecular mechanism for the interaction. PMID:27934941

  14. Polyphenol-Rich Extract from Propolis Reduces the Expression and Activity of Streptococcus mutans Glucosyltransferases at Subinhibitory Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Alvear, Marysol; Zambrano, Tomás; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Tooth decay is an infectious disease, whose main causative agent identified is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Diverse treatments have been used to eradicate this microorganism, including propolis. To date, it has been shown that polyphenols from Chilean propolis inhibit S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unclear. In the present study, we assessed the effect of Chilean propolis on the expression and activity of the glycosyltransferases enzymes and their related genes. Polyphenol-rich extract from propolis inhibited gene expression of glycosyltransferases (GtfB, GtfC, and GtfD) and their related regulatory genes, for example, VicK, VicR, and CcpA. Moreover, the treatment inhibited glucosyltransferases activity measured by the formation of sucrose-derived glucans. Additionally, an inhibitory effect was observed in the expression of SpaP involved in sucrose-independent virulence of S. mutans. In summary, our results suggest that Chilean propolis has a dose-dependent effect on the inhibition of genes involved in S. mutans virulence and adherence through the inhibition of glucosyltransferases, showing an anticariogenic potential of polyphenols from propolis beyond S. mutans growth inhibition.

  15. Anti-biofilm and bactericidal effects of magnolia bark-derived magnolol and honokiol on Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Yuuki; Domon, Hisanori; Oda, Masataka; Takenaka, Shoji; Kubo, Miwa; Fukuyama, Yoshiyasu; Okiji, Takashi; Terao, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries affects people of all ages and is a worldwide health concern. Streptococcus mutans is a major cariogenic bacterium because of its ability to form biofilm and induce an acidic environment. In this study, the antibacterial activities of magnolol and honokiol, the main constituents of the bark of magnolia plants, toward planktonic cell and biofilm of S. mutans were examined and compared with those of chlorhexidine. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of magnolol, honokiol and chlorhexidine for S. mutans were 10, 10 and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, each agent showed bactericidal activity against S. mutans planktonic cells and inhibited biofilm formation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Magnolol (50 µg/mL) had greater bactericidal activity against S. mutans biofilm than honokiol (50 µg/mL) and chlorhexidine (500 µg/mL) at 5 min after exposure, while all showed scant activity against biofilm at 30 s. Furthermore; chlorhexidine (0.5-500 µg/mL) exhibited high cellular toxicity for the gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22 at 1 hr, whereas magnolol (50 µg/mL) and honokiol (50 µg/mL) did not. Thus; it was found that magnolol has antimicrobial activities against planktonic and biofilm cells of S. mutans. Magnolol may be a candidate for prevention and management of dental caries.

  16. Identification and expression of small non-coding RNA, L10-Leader, in different growth phases of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Li; Xia, Wei; Li, Shaohua; Li, Wuju; Liu, Jiaojiao; Ding, Hongmei; Li, Jie; Li, Hui; Chen, Ying; Su, Xueting; Wang, Wei; Sun, Li; Wang, Chenglong; Shao, Ningsheng; Chu, Bingfeng

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the major cariogenic bacteria in the oral environment. Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of bacterial growth, stress tolerance, and virulence. In this study, we experimentally verified the existence of sRNA, L10-Leader, in S. mutans for the first time. Our results show that the expression level of L10-Leader was growth-phase dependent in S. mutans and varied among different clinical strains of S. mutans. The level of L10-Leader in S. mutans UA159 was closely related to the pH value, but not to the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in culture medium. We predicted target mRNAs of L10-Leader bioinformatically and found that some of these mRNAs were related to growth and stress response. Five predicted mRNA targets were selected and detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and we found that the expression levels of these mRNAs were closely related to the level of L10-Leader at different growth phases of the bacteria. Our results indicate that L10-Leader may play an important role in the regulation of responses in S. mutans, especially during its growth phase and acid adaption response.

  17. The well-coordinated linkage between acidogenicity and aciduricity via insoluble glucans on the surface of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lihong; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Lux, Renate; He, Xuesong; Shi, Wenyuan

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is considered the principal cariogenic bacterium for dental caries. Despite the recognition of their importance for cariogenesis, the possible coordination among S. mutans’ main virulence factors, including glucan production, acidogenicity and aciduricity, has been less well studied. In the present study, using S. mutans strains with surface-displayed pH-sensitive pHluorin, we revealed sucrose availability- and Gtf functionality-dependent proton accumulation on S. mutans surface. Consistent with this, using a pH-sensitive dye, we demonstrated that both in vivo cell-produced and in vitro enzymatically synthesized insoluble glucans displayed proton-concentrating ability. Global transcriptomics revealed proton accumulation triggers the up-regulation of genes encoding functions involved in acid tolerance response in a glucan-dependent manner. Our data suggested that this proton enrichment around S. mutans could pre-condition the bacterium for acid-stress. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found S. mutans strains defective in glucan production were more acid sensitive. Our study revealed for the first time that insoluble glucans is likely an essential factor linking acidogenicity with aciduricity. The coordination of these key virulence factors could provide new insights on how S. mutans may have become a major cariogenic pathogen. PMID:26657939

  18. Combinatorial Effects of Aromatic 1,3-Disubstituted Ureas and Fluoride on In vitro Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Balamurugan, P.; Uma Maheswari, C.; Anitha, A.; Princy, S. Adline

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries occur as a result of disequilibrium between acid producing pathogenic bacteria and alkali generating commensal bacteria within a dental biofilm (dental plaque). Streptococcus mutans has been reported as a primary cariogenic pathogen associated with dental caries. Emergence of multidrug resistant as well as fluoride resistant strains of S. mutans due to over use of various antibiotics are a rising problem and prompted the researchers worldwide to search for alternative therapies. In this perspective, the present study was aimed to screen selective inhibitors against ComA, a bacteriocin associated ABC transporter, involved in the quorum sensing of S. mutans. In light of our present in silico findings, 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives which had better affinity to ComA were chemically synthesized in the present study for in vitro evaluation of S. mutans biofilm inhibition. The results revealed that 1,3-disubstituted urea derivatives showed good biofilm inhibition. In addition, synthesized compounds exhibited potent synergy with a very low concentration of fluoride (31.25–62.5 ppm) in inhibiting the biofilm formation of S. mutans without affecting the bacterial growth. Further, the results were supported by confocal laser scanning microscopy. On the whole, from our experimental results we conclude that the combinatorial application of fluoride and disubstituted ureas has a potential synergistic effect which has a promising approach in combating multidrug resistant and fluoride resistant S. mutans in dental caries management. PMID:27375583

  19. Antibody specificity and antigen characterization of rat monoclonal antibodies against Streptococcus mutans cell wall-associated protein antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Ackermans, F; Klein, J P; Cormont, F; Bazin, H; Ogier, J A; Frank, R M; Vreven, J

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Streptococcus mutans OMZ175 (serotype f) cell wall-associated antigens (wall-extracted antigens [WEA]) were derived from the fusion of Lou C plasmocytoma rat cells (IR 983 F) and spleen cells from Wistar R inbred rats immunized with WEA. Four cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against a component of S. mutans WEA have been established. All four monoclonal antibodies reacted only with two antigens of WEA from S. mutans OMZ175 by Western blotting and immunoprecipitation techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and competitive ELISA. Western blot analysis of WEA showed that the four monoclonal antibodies recognized two related cell wall-associated proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000 and 76,000. Immunoprecipitation of whole cells with the monoclonal antibodies confirmed the surface localization of the two antigens. The ELISA and competitive ELISA were used to analyze the distribution of the epitopes on seven S. mutans serotypes. All S. mutans serotypes were found to express the recognized epitopes; however, different reactivity patterns could be distinguished among the various strains tested, and the four monoclonal antibodies reacted only weakly with S. mutans serotypes d and g. Images PMID:2410364

  20. Polyphenol-Rich Extract from Propolis Reduces the Expression and Activity of Streptococcus mutans Glucosyltransferases at Subinhibitory Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Veloz, Jorge Jesús; Saavedra, Nicolás; Alvear, Marysol; Zambrano, Tomás; Barrientos, Leticia; Salazar, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    Tooth decay is an infectious disease, whose main causative agent identified is Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Diverse treatments have been used to eradicate this microorganism, including propolis. To date, it has been shown that polyphenols from Chilean propolis inhibit S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unclear. In the present study, we assessed the effect of Chilean propolis on the expression and activity of the glycosyltransferases enzymes and their related genes. Polyphenol-rich extract from propolis inhibited gene expression of glycosyltransferases (GtfB, GtfC, and GtfD) and their related regulatory genes, for example, VicK, VicR, and CcpA. Moreover, the treatment inhibited glucosyltransferases activity measured by the formation of sucrose-derived glucans. Additionally, an inhibitory effect was observed in the expression of SpaP involved in sucrose-independent virulence of S. mutans. In summary, our results suggest that Chilean propolis has a dose-dependent effect on the inhibition of genes involved in S. mutans virulence and adherence through the inhibition of glucosyltransferases, showing an anticariogenic potential of polyphenols from propolis beyond S. mutans growth inhibition. PMID:27110563

  1. An in vitro synergetic evaluation of the use of nisin and sodium fluoride or chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Zhou, Lin; Jiang, Wenkai; Kuang, Rong; Li, Jie; Tao, Rui; Ni, Longxing

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the synergetic action between nisin and sodium fluoride or chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans, a primary cariogenic pathogen. In the antibacterial assay, a synergetic effect on S. mutans was found between nisin and sodium fluoride, but there was no interaction between nisin and chlorhexidine by the checkerboard, the fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) and the fractional bactericidal concentration (FBC) tests. S. mutans survival rates showed a significant decline after treatment with a combination of nisin and sodium fluoride in a time-kill study. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the damage to S. mutans with the combined nisin and sodium fluoride treatment was the most severe among all of the different single and combined antimicrobial treatments. Furthermore, in the antibiofilm test, nisin in combination with sodium fluoride produced a stronger bactericidal effect on a S. mutans biofilm for 4 h and 16 h compared with sodium fluoride alone by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Nisin in combination with sodium fluoride exerted a high bactericidal effect on S. mutans and thereby has the potential to be used as an effective drug combination to prevent dental caries.

  2. Mechanism of killing of streptococcus mutans by light-activated drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Tracy; Wilson, Michael; Pearson, G. J.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cariogenic bacteria can be killed when exposed to low power laser light in the presence of a photosensitizing agent. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans can be killed by toluidine blue O and helium neon laser light. To determine whether membrane damage occurred, suspensions of sensitized S. mutans were exposed to a 7.3 mW HeNe laser for 30 mins and samples removed every 5 mins. Survivors were enumerated by viable counting on tryptone soya agar plates and cell free filtrates were assayed for phosphate and (beta) -galactosidase. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by assaying for malondialdehyde, a by- product of lipid peroxidation. The role of oxygen and reactive oxygen species was studied by exposing sensitized bacteria to laser light (1) under different atmospheric conditions, (2) in the presence of deuterium oxide, and (3) in the presence of inhibitors of reactive oxygen species. Following exposure of sensitizede S. mutans to 13.2 J of HeNe laser light, 2.6 nmoles of phosphate and 228 nmoles of (beta) -galactosidase were detected in the cell free filtrates. Ten micrometers oles of malondialdehyde were also detected. When the sensitized bacteria were exposed to laser light under anaerobic conditions there was no significant decrease in the viable count compared to a 60% kill in the presence of oxygen. In the presence of D2O there was a 15-fold increase in the numbers of bacteria killed. O.1 M methionine and 0.5 M sodium azide each afforded 98% protection from lethal photosensitization. These results imply that lethal photosensitization results from membrane damage due to lipid peroxidation and that reactive oxygen species are mediators of this process.

  3. The dlt genes play a role in antimicrobial tolerance of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Martin; Rybtke, Morten; Givskov, Michael; Høiby, Niels; Twetman, Svante; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Microbial biofilms are tolerant to antibiotic treatment and therefore cause problematic infections. Knowledge about the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance will aid the development of antibiofilm drugs. Screening of a Streptococcus mutans transposon mutant library for genes that are important for biofilm-associated antimicrobial tolerance provided evidence that the dlt genes play a role in the tolerance of S. mutans biofilms towards gentamicin. The minimum bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBC-B) for a dltA transposon mutant was eight-fold lower than that of the wild-type. The minimum bactericidal concentration for planktonic cells (MBC-P) was only slightly reduced, indicating that the mechanism involved in the observed antimicrobial tolerance has a predominant role specifically in biofilms. Experiments with a knockout dltA mutant and complemented strain confirmed that the dlt genes in S. mutans play a role in biofilm-associated tolerance to gentamicin. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analyses of biofilms grown on glass slides showed that the dltA mutant produced roughly the same amount of biofilm as the wild-type, indicating that the reduced antimicrobial tolerance of the dltA mutant is not due to a defect in biofilm formation. The products of the dlt genes have been shown to mediate alanylation of teichoic acids, and in accordance the dltA mutant showed a more negatively charged surface than the wild-type, which likely is an important factor in the reduced tolerance of the dltA mutant biofilms towards the positively charged gentamicin.

  4. Regulation of competence and gene expression in Streptococcus mutans by the RcrR transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An intimate linkage between the regulation of biofilm formation, stress tolerance and genetic competence exists in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. The rcrRPQ genes encode ABC exporters (RcrPQ) and a MarR-family transcriptional repressor of the rcr operon (RcrR) play a dominant role in regulation of the development of genetic competence and connect competence with stress tolerance and (p)ppGpp production in S. mutans. Here we identify the target for efficient RcrR binding in the rcr promoter region using purified recombinant RcrR (rRcrR) protein in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and show that DNA fragments carrying mutations in the binding region were not bound as efficiently by rRcrR in vitro. Mutations in the RcrR binding site impacted expression from the rcrR promoter in vivo and elicited changes in transformation efficiency, competence gene expression, and growth inhibition by competence stimulating peptide; even when the changes in rcrRPQ transcription were minor. An additional mechanistic linkage of RcrR with competence and (p)ppGpp metabolism was identified by showing that the rRcrR protein could bind to the promoter regions of comX, comYA and relP, although the binding was not as efficient as to the rcrRPQ promoter under the conditions tested. Thus, tightly controlled autogenous regulation of the rcrRPQ operon by RcrR binding to specific target sites is essential for cellular homeostasis, and RcrR contributes to the integration of genetic competence, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and acid and oxidative stress tolerance in S. mutans through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:25146832

  5. Structural studies of the serotype-f polysaccharide antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ175.

    PubMed Central

    Linzer, R; Reddy, M S; Levine, M J

    1987-01-01

    The serotype f antigen of Streptococcus mutans has been described as a rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide associated with the bacterial cell wall. In this study, the structure of serotype f polysaccharide was examined by analyses of the methylated derivatives of the antigen and the periodate-oxidized antigen. Methylated derivatives were characterized with a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. The polysaccharide appeared to have a backbone of alternating 1,3- and 1,2,3-linked rhamnose units. Branching occurred at the 3-position of the 1,2,3-linked rhamnose. Side chains were composed of terminal alpha-linked glucose units. A small proportion of longer side chains containing 1,2- and 1,6-linked glucose units were noted in some preparations; however, these determinants were not reactive with serotype f antisera. PMID:2824381

  6. The Antimicrobial Effect of Silver Ion Impregnation into Endodontic Sealer against Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kreth, J.; Kim, D.; Nguyen, M.; Hsiao, G.; Mito, R.; Kang, M.K.; Chugal, N.; Shi, W.

    2008-01-01

    Pulpal and periradicular diseases are primarily caused by bacterial invasion of the root canal system as a result of caries progression. The presence of residual bacteria at the time of root canal completion (obturation) is associated with significantly higher rate of treatment failure. Re-infection of obturated root canals can be potentially prevented by enhancing the antibacterial activities of root canal obturation materials. We evaluated, in an in vitro model, the antimicrobial efficacy of silver ions added to a common endodontic sealer. For that purpose we performed growth inhibition studies and bacterial viability tests. We measured the zone of inhibition, optical density and performed confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results show that the silver ions enhance the antimicrobial activity of the root canal sealer against Streptococcus mutans. This study approach may hold promise for studying other biologically based therapies and therefore increasing the success rate of routine orthograde root canal treatment. PMID:19088878

  7. Biochemical characterisation of a glycogen branching enzyme from Streptococcus mutans: Enzymatic modification of starch.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Joo; Ryu, Soo-In; Bae, Hyun-Ah; Huong, Nguyen Thi; Lee, Soo-Bok

    2008-10-15

    A gene encoding a putative glycogen branching enzyme (SmGBE) in Streptococcus mutans was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The biochemical properties of the purified enzyme were examined relative to its branching specificity for amylose and starch. The activity of the approximately 75kDa enzyme was optimal at pH 5.0, and stable up to 40°C. The enzyme predominantly transferred short maltooligosyl chains with a degree of polymerization (dp) of 6 and 7 throughout the branching process for amylose. When incubated with rice starch, the enzyme modified its optimal branch chain-length from dp 12 to 6 with large reductions in the longer chains, and simultaneously increased its branching points. The results indicate that SmGBE can make a modified starch with much shorter branches and a more branched structure than to native starch. In addition, starch retrogradation due to low temperature storage was significantly retarded along with the enzyme reaction.

  8. Who will win the race in childrens' oral cavities? Streptococcus mutans or beneficial lactic acid bacteria?

    PubMed

    Güngör, Ö E; Kırzıoğlu, Z; Dinçer, E; Kıvanç, M

    2013-09-01

    Adhesion to oral soft and hard tissue is crucial for bacterial colonisation in the mouth. The aim of this work was to select strains of oral lactic acid bacteria that could be used as probiotics for oral health. To this end, the adhesive properties of some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Seventeen lactic acid bacteria including two Streptococcus mutans strains were isolated from the oral cavity of healthy children, while other strains were isolated from fermented meat products. The bacterial strains were applied to teeth surfaces covered with saliva or without saliva. A significant diversity in adhesion capacity to teeth surfaces among the lactic acid bacteria was observed. Lactic acid bacteria isolated from the oral cavity adhered the best to teeth surfaces covered with saliva, whereas lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented meat samples adhered the best to tooth surface without saliva. All strains of lactic acid bacteria were able to reduce the number of S. mutans cells, in particular on saliva-coated tooth surface. Therefore, they might have potential as probiotics for the oral cavity.

  9. Disinfection of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qing; Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Xu, Yuanxi; Sun, Hongmin; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the argon plasma treatment effect on disinfecting dental biofilm by using an atmospheric pressure plasma brush. Streptococcus mutans biofilms were developed for 3 days on the surfaces of hydroxyapatite (HA) discs, which were used to simulate human tooth enamel. After plasma treatment, cell viability in the S. mutans biofilms was characterized by using 3-(4,5-dimethylazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Compared with the untreated control group, about 90% bacterial reduction in the biofilms was observed after 1 min plasma treatment. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicated severe cell damages occurred on the top surface of the plasma treated biofilms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that plasma treatment was effective as deep as 20 µm into the biofilms. When combined with antibiotic treatment using 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution, the plasma treatment became more effective and over 96% bacterial reduction was observed with 1 min plasma treatment.

  10. Role of the luxS gene in initial biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyan; Liang, Jingping; Tang, Zisheng; Ma, Rui; Peng, Huasong; Huang, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate with each other by secreting chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs). Among Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, AI-2 synthesized by the LuxS enzyme is widespread. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of QS luxS gene on initial biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans. The bacterial cell surface properties, including cell hydrophobicity (bacterial adherence to hydrocarbons) and aggregation, which are important for initial adherence during biofilm development, were investigated. The biofilm adhesion assay was evaluated by the MTT method. The structures of the 5-hour biofilms were observed by using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and QS-related gene expressions were investigated by real-time PCR. The luxS mutant strain exhibited higher biofilm adherence and aggregation, but lower hydrophobicity than the wild-type strain. The confocal laser scanning microscopy images revealed that the wild-type strain tended to form smaller aggregates with uniform distribution, whereas the luxS mutant strain aggregated into distinct clusters easily discernible in the generated biofilm. Most of the genes examined were downregulated in the biofilms formed by the luxS mutant strain, except the gtfB gene. QS luxS gene can affect the initial biofilm formation by S. mutans.

  11. Effect of penicillin on fatty acid synthesis and excretion in Streptococcus mutans BHT

    SciTech Connect

    Brissette, J.L.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1985-03-01

    Treatment of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans BHT with growth-inhibitory concentrations (0.2 microgram/ml) of benzylpenicillin stimulates the incorporation of (2-/sup 14/C) acetate into lipids excreted by the cells by as much as 69-fold, but does not change the amount of /sup 14/C incorporated into intracellular lipids. At this concentration of penicillin cellular lysis does not occur. The radioactive label is incorporated exclusively into the fatty acid moieties of the glycerolipids. During a 4-hr incubation in the presence of penicillin, the extracellular fatty acid ester concentration increases 1.5 fold, even though there is no growth or cellular lysis. An indication of the relative rate of fatty acid synthesis was most readily obtained by placing S. mutans BHT in a buffer containing /sup 14/C-acetate. Under these nongrowing conditions free fatty acids are the only lipids labeled, a factor which simplifies the assay. The addition of glycerol to the buffer causes all of the nonesterified fatty acids to be incorporated into glycerolipid. The cells excrete much of the lipid whether glycerol is present or not. Addition of penicillin to the nongrowth supporting buffer system does not stimulate the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-acetate into fatty acids.

  12. Pyrano-isoflavans from Glycyrrhiza uralensis with antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Villinski, Jacquelyn R; Bergeron, Chantal; Cannistra, Joseph C; Gloer, James B; Coleman, Christina M; Ferreira, Daneel; Azelmat, Jabrane; Grenier, Daniel; Gafner, Stefan

    2014-03-28

    Continuing investigation of fractions from a supercritical fluid extract of Chinese licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) roots has led to the isolation of 12 phenolic compounds, of which seven were described previously from this extract. In addition to these seven metabolites, four known components, 1-methoxyerythrabyssin II (4), 6,8-diprenylgenistein, gancaonin G (5), and isoglycyrol (6), and one new isoflavan, licorisoflavan C (7), were characterized from this material for the first time. Treatment of licoricidin (1) with palladium chloride afforded larger amounts of 7 and also yielded two new isoflavans, licorisoflavan D (8), which was subsequently detected in the licorice extract, and licorisoflavan E (9). Compounds 1-9 were evaluated for their antibacterial activities against the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and the periodontopathogenic Porphyromonas gingivalis. Licoricidin (1), licorisoflavan A (2), and 7-9 showed antibacterial activity against P. gingivalis (MICs of 1.56-12.5 μg/mL). The most potent activity against S. mutans was obtained with 7 (MIC of 6.25 μg/mL), followed by 1 and 9 (MIC of 12.5 μg/mL). This study provides further evidence for the therapeutic potential of licorice extracts for the treatment and prevention of oral infections.

  13. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans polysaccharide synthesis by molecules targeting glycosyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhi; Chen, Lulu; Li, Jiyao; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase (Gtf) is one of the crucial virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological pathogen of dental caries. All the available evidence indicates that extracellular polysaccharide, particularly glucans produced by S. mutans Gtfs, contribute to the cariogenicity of dental biofilms. Therefore, inhibition of Gtf activity and the consequential polysaccharide synthesis may impair the virulence of cariogenic biofilms, which could be an alternative strategy to prevent the biofilm-related disease. Up to now, many Gtf inhibitors have been recognized in natural products, which remain the major and largely unexplored source of Gtf inhibitors. These include catechin-based polyphenols, flavonoids, proanthocyanidin oligomers, polymeric polyphenols, and some other plant-derived compounds. Metal ions, oxidizing agents, and some other synthetic compounds represent another source of Gtf inhibitors, with some novel molecules either discovered by structure-based virtual screening or synthesized based on key structures of known inhibitors as templates. Antibodies that inhibit one or more Gtfs have also been developed as topical agents. Although many agents have been shown to possess potent inhibitory activity against glucan synthesis by Gtfs, bacterial cell adherence, and caries development in animal models, much research remains to be performed to find out their mechanism of action, biological safety, cariostatic efficacies, and overall influence on the entire oral community. As a strategy to inhibit the virulence of cariogenic microbes rather than eradicate them from the microbial community, Gtf inhibition represents an approach of great potential to prevent dental caries. PMID:27105419

  14. Origins of heterogeneity in Streptococcus mutans competence: interpreting an environment-sensitive signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Stephen J.; Son, Minjun

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on chemical signaling and environmental cues to regulate disease-causing behavior in complex microenvironments. The human pathogen Streptococcus mutans employs a particularly complex signaling and sensing scheme to regulate genetic competence and other virulence behaviors in the oral biofilms it inhabits. Individual S. mutans cells make the decision to enter the competent state by integrating chemical and physical cues received from their microenvironment along with endogenously produced peptide signals. Studies at the single-cell level, using microfluidics to control the extracellular environment, provide physical insight into how the cells process these inputs to generate complex and often heterogeneous outputs. Fine changes in environmental stimuli can dramatically alter the behavior of the competence circuit. Small shifts in pH can switch the quorum sensing response on or off, while peptide-rich media appear to switch the output from a unimodal to a bimodal behavior. Therefore, depending on environmental cues, the quorum sensing circuitry can either synchronize virulence across the population, or initiate and amplify heterogeneity in that behavior. Much of this complex behavior can be understood within the framework of a quorum sensing system that can operate both as an intercellular signaling mechanism and intracellularly as a noisy bimodal switch.

  15. Evaluation of Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Dental Caries in Children with Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Behjatolmolook; Abolfathi, Ghazale; Mahmoudi, Eftekhar; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. In the presence of certain systemic diseases, oral microflora may aggravate the condition of the disease. Microbial population in the oral cavity especially with heart disease can increase the risk of bacterial endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of oral Streptococcus mutansand the rate of caries in children suffering from heart disease. Materials and methods. In this cross-sectional research, 66 children with congenital or acquired heart disease and 50 healthy children were selected. Children were orally examined and decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was recorded for each subject. Saliva samples were taken from all subjects, and cultured on a special laboratory media and another specific media for S. mutans (sorbitoll +manitol). Bacterial counts were recorded, and for statistical analysis, chi square, Pearson’s, and Exact Fisher tests were performed using SPSS 16 software. Results. The rate of S. mutans in children with congenital heart disease was significantly higher than the rates in childrenwith acquired heart disease and healthy control subjects. The mean DMFT in children with acquired heart disease who tookpenicillin as prophylaxis monthly was significantly lower than the other groups. Conclusion. The results revealed lower oral bacteria counts and comparatively lower caries rates in children with heart diseases, probably because of an effect of the regular prophylactic antibiotic regimen. PMID:26236437

  16. Betulin inhibits cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans by targeting vicRK and gtf genes.

    PubMed

    Viszwapriya, Dharmaprakash; Subramenium, Ganapathy Ashwinkumar; Radhika, Solai; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a multivirulent pathogen is considered the primary etiological agent in dental caries. Development of antibiotic resistance in the pathogen has created a need for novel antagonistic agents which can control the virulence of the organism and reduce resistance development. The present study demonstrates the in vitro anti-virulence potential of betulin (lup-20(29)-ene-3β,28-diol), an abundantly available plant triterpenoid against S. mutans UA159. Betulin exhibited significant dose dependent antibiofilm activity without affecting bacterial viability. At 240 µg/ml (biofilm inhibitory concentration), betulin inhibited biofilm formation and adherence to smooth glass surfaces by 93 and 71 % respectively. It reduced water insoluble glucan synthesis by 89 %, in conjunction with down regulation of gtfBC genes. Microscopic analysis confirmed the disruption in biofilm architecture and decreased exopolysaccharide production. Acidogenicity and aciduricity, key virulence factors responsible for carious lesions, were also notably affected. The induced auto-aggregation of cells upon treatment could be due to the down regulation of vicK. Results of gene expression analysis demonstrated significant down-regulation of virulence genes upon betulin treatment. Furthermore, the nontoxic effect of betulin on peripheral blood mononuclear cells even after 72 h treatment makes it a strong candidate for assessing its suitability to be used as a therapeutic agent.

  17. Anti-Streptococcus mutans property of a chitosan: Containing resin sealant

    PubMed Central

    Rajabnia, Ramazan; Ghasempour, Maryam; Gharekhani, Samane; Gholamhoseinnia, Sepide; Soroorhomayoon, Sepide

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the inhibitory effect of chitosan-containing sealants against Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The antibacterial activity of the resin sealant was evaluated by direct contact test following the addition of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 wt% chitosan. At 3, 6, 9, 24 and 48 h, 1 and 3 months, 10 μl of the microbial suspension in contact with resin sealant was cultured to count the number of colonies. Data were analyzed by one-way one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA, and Scheffe test. Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration of chitosan against S. mutans was 2 wt%. At 3 h, bacterial count in the presence of 2–5 wt% chitosan was significantly lower than that at 0 and 1 wt% (P < 0.05). However, this difference in bacterial count between 2 and 3 wt% chitosan and between 4 and 5 wt% chitosan was not significant. At 6 h, the difference in bacterial count between 3 and 4 wt% chitosan was not significant, whereas the remaining groups were significantly different in terms of bacterial count at this time (P < 0.05). At the remaining time points, significant differences were found between 2 wt% chitosan and higher concentrations (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Sealants containing 2–5 wt% chitosan show an antimicrobial property that is intensified by increasing the concentration of chitosan. PMID:27011933

  18. The VicRK system of Streptococcus mutans responds to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Deng, D M; Liu, M J; ten Cate, J M; Crielaard, W

    2007-07-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, virulence and cariogenicity may be modulated via the two-component regulatory system VicRK. Environmental signals, sensed by VicK, inducing this modulation are still unclear, however, and were investigated in the present study. We found that VicRK displays homology with protein-domains that, in other bacteria, are involved in redox-sensing. After constructing a VicRK-promoter GFP-reporter strain, we showed increased fluorescence intensity under oxidative stress. Potential interference of alternative signals and experimental conditions on GFP expression was excluded by the use of negative and positive control strains. Finally, we constructed a clean vicK knockout mutant, which proved to be more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than the wild-type. In conclusion, this study showed that the VicRK system responds to and protects against oxidative stress. As a result, a link between oxidative/redox stress and the cariogenic nature of S. mutans can be hypothesized.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of LuxS-deficient Streptococcus mutans grown in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wen, Z T; Nguyen, A H; Bitoun, J P; Abranches, J; Baker, H V; Burne, R A

    2011-02-01

    We previously reported that LuxS in Streptococcus mutans is involved in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. In this study, flowcells and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to further examine the effects of LuxS-deficiency on biofilm formation. Similar to the wild-type strain (UA159), a strain deficient in LuxS (TW26D) bound efficiently to the flowcells and formed microcolonies 4 h after inoculation. Unlike UA159, which accumulated and formed compact, evenly distributed biofilms after 28 h, TW26D showed only loose, sporadic, thin biofilms. DNA microarray analysis revealed alterations in transcription of more than 60 genes in TW26D biofilms by at least 1.5-fold (P < 0.001). Among the upregulated genes were those for sugar-specific enzymes II of the phosphotransferase (PTS) system and the atp operon, which codes for the proton-pumping F-ATPase. Of the downregulated genes, several encode proteins with putative functions in DNA repair. Mutation of selected genes caused severe defects in the ability of the mutants to tolerate low pH and oxidative stress. These results provide additional proof that LuxS-deficiency causes global alterations in the expression of genes central to biofilm formation and virulence of S. mutans, including those involved in energy metabolism, DNA repair and stress tolerance.

  20. Development of a PCR Method for Rapid Identification of New Streptococcus mutans Serotype k Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Ryota; Shimizu, Noriko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    In a previous study, we isolated and characterized a new serotype k of Streptococcus mutans from human blood and oral cavities. Analysis of the genes involved in biosynthesis of the serotype-specific polysaccharide of serotype k strains revealed that the serotype k-specific nucleotide alignment was commonly present in the 5′ region of the rgpF gene (350 bp from the initial sequence) compared to the reference strains, and then a method for rapid identification of serotype k strains was developed by use of PCR with primers designed on the basis of the sequence of the variable region. PCR assays with primers specific for amplification of serotype k strains showed a negative reaction with serotype c, e, and f strains and a positive reaction with serotype k strains, with the sensitivity for identification of the serotype k strains shown to range from 5 to 50 cells. Next, the frequency of positive reactions for serotype k-specific primers was surveyed with DNA taken from saliva samples from 200 subjects (2 to 18 years of age), and 10 of those showed a positive reaction, which was higher than the frequency in our previous survey with a serological method. In addition, all saliva samples from subjects with serotype k strains in our previous study were shown to be positive with the serotype k-specific primers. These results indicate that this new PCR method is effective for identification of subjects with S. mutans serotype k. PMID:15528675

  1. Zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles inhibit Streptococcus mutans growth and formation of biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Delgadillo, Rene; Velasco-Arias, Donaji; Diaz, David; Arevalo-Niño, Katiushka; Garza-Enriquez, Marianela; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam A; Cabral-Romero, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Despite continuous efforts, the increasing prevalence of resistance among pathogenic bacteria to common antibiotics has become one of the most significant concerns in modern medicine. Nanostructured materials are used in many fields, including biological sciences and medicine. While some bismuth derivatives has been used in medicine to treat vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, and stomach pain, the biocidal activity of zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles has not yet been studied. The objective of this investigation was to analyze the antimicrobial activity of bismuth nanoparticles against oral bacteria and their antibiofilm capabilities. Results Our results showed that stable colloidal bismuth nanoparticles had 69% antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans growth and achieved complete inhibition of biofilm formation. These results are similar to those obtained with chlorhexidine, the most commonly used oral antiseptic agent. The minimal inhibitory concentration of bismuth nanoparticles that interfered with S. mutans growth was 0.5 mM. Conclusion These results suggest that zerovalent bismuth nanoparticles could be an interesting antimicrobial agent to be incorporated into an oral antiseptic preparation. PMID:22619547

  2. The impact of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on Streptococcus mutans in an artificial biofilm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Martin; Kirfel, Gregor; Krause, Felix; Berthold, Michael; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Braun, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the impact of laser induced antimicrobial photodynamic therapy on the viability of Streptococcus mutans cells employing an aritificial biofilm model. Employing sterile chambered coverglasses, a salivary pellicle layer formation was induced in 19 chambers. Streptococcus mutans cells were inoculated in a sterile culture medium. Using a live/dead bacterial viability kit, bacteria with intact cell membranes stain fluorescent green. Test chambers containing each the pellicle layer and 0.5 ml of the bacterial culture were analyzed using a confocal laser scan microscope within a layer of 10 μm at intervals of 1 μm from the pellicle layer. A photosensitizer was added to the test chambers and irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength: 660 nm, output power: 100 mW, Helbo) for 2 min each. Comparing the baseline fluorescence (median: 13.8 [U], min: 3.7, max: 26.2) with the values after adding the photosensitizer (median: 3.7, min: 1.1, max: 9), a dilution caused decrease of fluorescence could be observed (p<0.05). After irradiation of the samples with a diode laser, an additional 48 percent decrease of fluorescence became evident (median: 2.2, min: 0.4, max: 3.4) (p<0.05). Comparing the samples with added photosensitizer but without laser irradiation at different times, no decrease of fluorescence could be measured (p>0.05). The present study indicates that antimicrobial photodynamic therapy can reduce living bacteria within a layer of 10 μm in an artificial biofilm model. Further studies have to evaluate the maximum biofilm thickness that still allows a toxic effect on microorganisms.

  3. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E. A.; Huq, N. Laila; Reynolds, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge. PMID:27589264

  4. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Reduces Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Development on Glass Ionomer Cement and Disrupts Established Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dashper, Stuart G; Catmull, Deanne V; Liu, Sze-Wei; Myroforidis, Helen; Zalizniak, Ilya; Palamara, Joseph E A; Huq, N Laila; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are dental restorative materials that are suitable for modification to help prevent dental plaque (biofilm) formation. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of incorporating casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) into a GIC on the colonisation and establishment of Streptococcus mutans biofilms and the effects of aqueous CPP-ACP on established S mutans biofilms. S. mutans biofilms were either established in flow cells before a single ten min exposure to 1% w/v CPP-ACP treatment or cultured in static wells or flow cells with either GIC or GIC containing 3% w/w CPP-ACP as the substratum. The biofilms were then visualised using confocal laser scanning microscopy after BacLight LIVE/DEAD staining. A significant decrease in biovolume and average thickness of S. mutans biofilms was observed in both static and flow cell assays when 3% CPP-ACP was incorporated into the GIC substratum. A single ten min treatment with aqueous 1% CPP-ACP resulted in a 58% decrease in biofilm biomass and thickness of established S. mutans biofilms grown in a flow cell. The treatment also significantly altered the structure of these biofilms compared with controls. The incorporation of 3% CPP-ACP into GIC significantly reduced S. mutans biofilm development indicating another potential anticariogenic mechanism of this material. Additionally aqueous CPP-ACP disrupted established S. mutans biofilms. The use of CPP-ACP containing GIC combined with regular CPP-ACP treatment may lower S. mutans challenge.

  5. Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiles of Streptococcus mutans UA159 Map Core Streptococcal Competence Genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, R; Rukke, H V; Høvik, H; Åmdal, H A; Chen, T; Morrison, D A; Petersen, F C

    2016-01-01

    In Streptococcus mutans, an oral colonizer associated with dental caries, development of competence for natural genetic transformation is triggered by either of two types of peptide pheromones, competence-stimulating peptides (CSPs) (18 amino acids [aa]) or SigX-inducing peptides (XIPs) (7 aa). Competence induced by CSP is a late response to the pheromone that requires the response regulator ComE and the XIP-encoding gene comS. XIP binds to ComR to allow expression of the alternative sigma factor SigX and the effector genes it controls. While these regulatory links are established, the precise set of effectors controlled by each regulator is poorly defined. To improve the definition of all three regulons, we used a high-resolution tiling array to map global changes in gene expression in the early and late phases of the CSP response. The early phase of the CSP response was limited to increased gene expression at four loci associated with bacteriocin production and immunity. In the late phase, upregulated regions expanded to a total of 29 loci, including comS and genes required for DNA uptake and recombination. The results indicate that the entire late response to CSP depends on the expression of comS and that the immediate transcriptional response to CSP, mediated by ComE, is restricted to just four bacteriocin-related loci. Comparison of the new data with published transcriptome data permitted the identification of all of the operons in each regulon: 4 for ComE, 2 for ComR, and 21 for SigX. Finally, a core set of 27 panstreptococcal competence genes was identified within the SigX regulon by comparison of transcriptome data from diverse streptococcal species. IMPORTANCES. mutans has the hard surfaces of the oral cavity as its natural habitat, where it depends on its ability to form biofilms in order to survive. The comprehensive identification of S. mutans regulons activated in response to peptide pheromones provides an important basis for understanding how S. mutans

  6. Comprehensive Transcriptome Profiles of Streptococcus mutans UA159 Map Core Streptococcal Competence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, R.; Rukke, H. V.; Høvik, H.; Åmdal, H. A.; Chen, T.; Morrison, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In Streptococcus mutans, an oral colonizer associated with dental caries, development of competence for natural genetic transformation is triggered by either of two types of peptide pheromones, competence-stimulating peptides (CSPs) (18 amino acids [aa]) or SigX-inducing peptides (XIPs) (7 aa). Competence induced by CSP is a late response to the pheromone that requires the response regulator ComE and the XIP-encoding gene comS. XIP binds to ComR to allow expression of the alternative sigma factor SigX and the effector genes it controls. While these regulatory links are established, the precise set of effectors controlled by each regulator is poorly defined. To improve the definition of all three regulons, we used a high-resolution tiling array to map global changes in gene expression in the early and late phases of the CSP response. The early phase of the CSP response was limited to increased gene expression at four loci associated with bacteriocin production and immunity. In the late phase, upregulated regions expanded to a total of 29 loci, including comS and genes required for DNA uptake and recombination. The results indicate that the entire late response to CSP depends on the expression of comS and that the immediate transcriptional response to CSP, mediated by ComE, is restricted to just four bacteriocin-related loci. Comparison of the new data with published transcriptome data permitted the identification of all of the operons in each regulon: 4 for ComE, 2 for ComR, and 21 for SigX. Finally, a core set of 27 panstreptococcal competence genes was identified within the SigX regulon by comparison of transcriptome data from diverse streptococcal species. IMPORTANCE S. mutans has the hard surfaces of the oral cavity as its natural habitat, where it depends on its ability to form biofilms in order to survive. The comprehensive identification of S. mutans regulons activated in response to peptide pheromones provides an important basis for

  7. [Quantitative evaluation of Streptococcus mutans and Candida species and salivary factors in the oral cavity of patient undergoing radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Spolidorio, D M; Spolidorio, L C; Barbeiro, R H; Höfling, J F; Bernardo, W L; Pavan, S

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the microorganisms Streptococcus mutans and Candida sp in the oral cavity of patients with oropharynx carcinoma, before, during and after radiotherapy, and to correlate the results with salivary factors such as pH, buffer capacity (CT) and flow rate (FS). Saliva samples were collected, diluted and inoculated in SB-20 agar and in Sabouraud agar, for Streptococcus mutans and Candida sp, respectively. Previously to dilution, the concentrated saliva was analyzed, and the salivary factors were determined. After the growth of colonies, the number of microorganisms was determined in CFU/ml. The analysis of the results allowed to conclude that the salivary factors are related to the presence of microorganisms, and that the number of CFU/ml increased as salivary flow rate decreased. The effects of radiation compromised salivary homeostasis and favored the increase of infection by yeasts and bacteria.

  8. Deactivation of Streptococcus mutans Biofilms on a Tooth Surface Using He Dielectric Barrier Discharge at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imola, Molnar; Judit, Papp; Alpar, Simon; Sorin, Dan Anghel

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the low temperature atmospheric helium dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) on the Streptococcus mutans biofilms formed on tooth surface. Pig jaws were also treated by plasma to detect if there is any harmful effect on the gingiva. The plasma was characterized by using optical emission spectroscopy. Experimental data indicated that the discharge is very effective in deactivating Streptococcus mutans biofilms. It can destroy them with an average decimal reduction time (D-time) of 19 s and about 98% of them were killed after a treatment time of 30 s. According to the survival curve kinetic an overall 32 s treatment time would be necessary to perform a complete sterilization. The experimental results presented in this study indicated that the helium dielectric barrier discharge, in plan-parallel electrode configuration, could be a very effective tool for deactivation of oral bacteria and might be a promising technique in various dental clinical applications.

  9. Genotypic Diversity and Virulence Traits of Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Carious Dentin after Partial Caries Removal and Sealing

    PubMed Central

    Damé-Teixeira, Nailê; Arthur, Rodrigo Alex; Parolo, Clarissa Cavalcanti Fatturi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the genotypic diversity and virulence traits of Streptococcus mutans isolated from carious dentin before and after partial dentin caries removal (PDR) and sealing. Carious dentin samples were obtained three months before and after the PDR and cavity sealing. Up to seven isolates of each morphological type of S. mutans were selected and strain identity was confirmed using gtfB primer. Genotyping was performed by arbitrary primer-PCR (AP-PCR). Acidogenesis and acidurance of the genotypes were evaluated as virulence traits. A paired t-test and a Wilcoxon test were used to compare the virulence of genotypes. A total of 48 representative S. mutans isolates were genotyped (31 before and 17 after the sealing). At least one of the genotypes found before the sealing was also found on dentin after the sealing. The number of genotypes found before the sealing ranged from 2 to 3 and after the sealing from 1 to 2 genotypes. No difference was observed in the acidogenesis and acidurance between genotypes isolated before and after the sealing. In conclusion, genotypic diversity of S. mutans decreased after the PDR and sealing, but the virulence traits of S. mutans remained unchangeable. PMID:24578618

  10. Contributions of Streptococcus mutans Cnm and PA antigens to aggravation of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Shuhei; Hatakeyama, Rina; Takashima, Yukiko; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Nomura, Ryota; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, can cause infective endocarditis after invading the bloodstream. Recently, intravenous administration of specific S. mutans strains was shown to aggravate non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in a mouse model fed a high-fat diet. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this aggravation in a NASH mouse model by focusing on the S. mutans cell surface collagen-binding protein (Cnm) and the 190-kDa protein antigen (PA). Mice that were intravenously administered a S. mutans strain with a defect in Cnm (TW871CND) or PA (TW871PD) did not show clinical or histopathological signs of NASH aggravation, in contrast to those administered the parent strain TW871. The immunochemical analyses demonstrated higher levels of interferon-γ and metallothionein expression in the TW871 group than in the TW871CND and TW871PD groups. Analysis of bacterial affinity to cultured hepatic cells in the presence of unsaturated fatty acids revealed that the incorporation rate of TW871 was significantly higher than those of TW871CND and TW871PD. Together, our results suggest that Cnm and PA are important cell surface proteins for the NASH aggravation caused by S. mutans adhesion and affinity for hepatic cells. PMID:27833139

  11. Effect of Traditionally Used Neem and Babool Chewing Stick (Datun) on Streptococcus Mutans: An In–Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, Bharat; Parkar, Sujal M; Hongal, Sudheer; K, Thanveer; CG, Ajithkrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There are various plants, which are used as chewing sticks in different parts of the world. Several studies have been reported on the antimicrobial effects of chewing sticks on oral bacteria. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of traditionally used neem and babool chewing sticks (datun) extracts on Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: The present invitro study was conducted to assess effectiveness of 5%, 10%, and 50% neem and babool extract on Streptococcus mutans. The ditch plate method was used to test the antimicrobial activity. Ditches were prepared on blood agar plates with the help of punch having 6mm diameter. The plates were left for 1h at room temperature and then incubated at 37°C for 48h and examined for zone of inhibition. Results: There was no zone of inhibition observed with 5% babool and neem aqueous extract. There was significant difference in mean diameter of zone of inhibition of 10% neem and babool extract (p-value 0.001 < 0.05). Similarly the mean difference in 50% neem and babool extract was found to be significant (p-value < 0.001). Conclusion: Both neem and babool extracts had antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, while antimicrobial activity was significantly higher in neem aqueous extract than babool aqueous extract. PMID:25177629

  12. The Effect of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy with Radachlorin and Toluidine Blue on Streptococcus Mutans: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, S.; Fekrazad, R.; Ayremlou, S.; Taheri, S.; Zangeneh, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Dental caries and periodontal diseases are caused by infection of teeth and supporting tissues due to complex aggregate of bacteria known as biofilm, firstly colonized by streptococci. The main purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of toluidine blue O (TBO) and Radachlorin® in combination with a diode laser on the viability of Streptococcus mutans. Materials and Methods: Bacterial suspensions of Streptococcus mutans were exposed to either 0.1% TBO associated with (20 mW, 633 nm diode laser, continuous mode, 150 s) or 0.1% Radachlorin® and laser irradiation (100 mW, 662 nm diode laser, continuous mode, 120 s). Those in control groups were subjected to laser irradiation alone or TBO/Radachlorin® alone or received neither TBO/Radachlorin® nor laser exposure. The suspensions were then spread over specific agar plates and incubated aerobically at 37°C. Finally, the bactericidal effects were evaluated based on colony formation. Results: Potential bacterial cell killing was only observed following photosensitization with TBO and 3 j/cm2 laser exposure (p<0.05), whereas Radachlorin® showed significant reduction in dark condition compared to laser exposure (p<0.05). Conclusion: TBO-mediated photodynamic therapy seems to be more efficient than Radachlorin® in significantly reducing the viability of Streptococcus mutans in vitro. PMID:21998808

  13. Effect of anti-biofilm glass–ionomer cement on Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su-Ping; Ge, Yang; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Xu, Hockin HK; Weir, Michael D; Zhang, Ke-Ke; Wang, Hao-Hao; Hannig, Matthias; Rupf, Stefan; Li, Qian; Cheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Dental restorative materials with antimicrobial properties can inhibit bacterial colonization, which may result in a reduction of caries at tooth-filling interaction zones. This study aimed to develop antibacterial glass–ionomer cements (GIC) containing a quaternary ammonium monomer (dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate, DMADDM), and to investigate their effect on material performance and antibacterial properties. Different mass fractions (0, 1.1% and 2.2%) of DMADDM were incorporated into the GIC. The flexure strength, surface charge density, surface roughness and fluoride release were tested. A Streptococcus mutans biofilm model was used. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) staining was used to analyze the inhibitory effect of DMADDM on the biofilm matrix. In addition, biofilm metabolic activity, lactic acid metabolism and the expression of glucosyltransferase genes gtfB, gtfC and gtfD were measured. GIC containing 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM had flexural strengths matching those of the commercial control (P>0.1). DMADDM was able to increase the surface charge density but reduced surface roughness (P<0.05). The incorporation of 1.1% and 2.2% DMADDM elevated the release of fluoride by the GIC in the first 2 days (P<0.05). The novel DMADDM-modified GIC significantly reduced biofilm metabolic activity (P<0.05) and decreased lactic acid production (P<0.05). The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) results showed that the expression of gtfB, gtfC and gtfD decreased when mass fractions of DMADDM increased (P<0.05). EPS staining showed that both the bacteria and EPS in biofilm decreased in the DMADDM groups. The incorporation of DMADDM could modify the properties of GIC to influence the development of S. mutans biofilms. In this study, we investigated the interface properties of antibacterial materials for the first time. GIC containing DMADDM can improve material performance and antibacterial properties and may contribute to the better management of secondary caries. PMID

  14. Functional profiling in Streptococcus mutans: construction and examination of a genomic collection of gene deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Quivey, R G; Grayhack, E J; Faustoferri, R C; Hubbard, C J; Baldeck, J D; Wolf, A S; MacGilvray, M E; Rosalen, P L; Scott-Anne, K; Santiago, B; Gopal, S; Payne, J; Marquis, R E

    2015-12-01

    A collection of tagged deletion mutant strains was created in Streptococcus mutans UA159 to facilitate investigation of the aciduric capability of this oral pathogen. Gene-specific barcoded deletions were attempted in 1432 open reading frames (representing 73% of the genome), and resulted in the isolation of 1112 strains (56% coverage) carrying deletions in distinct non-essential genes. As S. mutans virulence is predicated upon the ability of the organism to survive an acidic pH environment, form biofilms on tooth surfaces, and out-compete other oral microflora, we assayed individual mutant strains for the relative fitness of the deletion strain, compared with the parent strain, under acidic and oxidative stress conditions, as well as for their ability to form biofilms in glucose- or sucrose-containing medium. Our studies revealed a total of 51 deletion strains with defects in both aciduricity and biofilm formation. We have also identified 49 strains whose gene deletion confers sensitivity to oxidative damage and deficiencies in biofilm formation. We demonstrate the ability to examine competitive fitness of mutant organisms using the barcode tags incorporated into each deletion strain to examine the representation of a particular strain in a population. Co-cultures of deletion strains were grown either in vitro in a chemostat to steady-state values of pH 7 and pH 5 or in vivo in an animal model for oral infection. Taken together, these data represent a mechanism for assessing the virulence capacity of this pathogenic microorganism and a resource for identifying future targets for drug intervention to promote healthy oral microflora.

  15. Genetics and Physiology of Acetate Metabolism by the Pta-Ack Pathway of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Nam; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    In the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans, phosphotransacetylase (Pta) catalyzes the conversion of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) to acetyl phosphate (AcP), which can be converted to acetate by acetate kinase (Ack), with the concomitant generation of ATP. A ΔackA mutant displayed enhanced accumulation of AcP under aerobic conditions, whereas little or no AcP was observed in the Δpta or Δpta ΔackA mutant. The Δpta and Δpta ΔackA mutants also had diminished ATP pools compared to the size of the ATP pool for the parental or ΔackA strain. Surprisingly, when exposed to oxidative stress, the Δpta ΔackA strain appeared to regain the capacity to produce AcP, with a concurrent increase in the size of the ATP pool compared to that for the parental strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants exhibited enhanced (p)ppGpp accumulation, whereas the strain lacking Pta produced less (p)ppGpp than the wild-type strain. The ΔackA and Δpta ΔackA mutants displayed global changes in gene expression, as assessed by microarrays. All strains lacking Pta, which had defects in AcP production under aerobic conditions, were impaired in their abilities to form biofilms when glucose was the growth carbohydrate. Collectively, these data demonstrate the complex regulation of the Pta-Ack pathway and critical roles for these enzymes in processes that appear to be essential for the persistence and pathogenesis of S. mutans.

  16. Transcriptional profile of glucose-shocked and acid-adapted strains of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Baker, J L; Abranches, J; Faustoferri, R C; Hubbard, C J; Lemos, J A; Courtney, M A; Quivey, R

    2015-12-01

    The aciduricity of Streptococcus mutans is an important virulence factor of the organism, required to both out-compete commensal oral microorganisms and cause dental caries. In this study, we monitored transcriptional changes that occurred as a continuous culture of either an acid-tolerant strain (UA159) or an acid-sensitive strain (fabM::Erm) moved from steady-state growth at neutral pH, experienced glucose-shock and acidification of the culture, and transitioned to steady-state growth at low pH. Hence, the timing of elements of the acid tolerance response (ATR) could be observed and categorized as acute vs. adaptive ATR mechanisms. Modulation of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis, DNA/protein repair mechanisms, reactive oxygen species metabolizers and phosphoenolpyruvate:phosphotransferase systems occurred in the initial acute phase, immediately following glucose-shock, while upregulation of F1 F0 -ATPase did not occur until the adaptive phase, after steady-state growth had been re-established. In addition to the archetypal ATR pathways mentioned above, glucose-shock led to differential expression of genes suggesting a re-routing of resources away from the synthesis of fatty acids and proteins, and towards synthesis of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids. These adjustments were largely transient, as upon establishment of steady-state growth at acidic pH, transcripts returned to basal expression levels. During growth at steady-state pH 7, fabM::Erm had a transcriptional profile analogous to that of UA159 during glucose-shock, indicating that even during growth in rich media at neutral pH, the cells were stressed. These results, coupled with a recently established collection of deletion strains, provide a starting point for elucidation of the acid tolerance response in S. mutans.

  17. Membrane Composition Changes and Physiological Adaptation by Streptococcus mutans Signal Recognition Particle Pathway Mutants▿

    PubMed Central

    Hasona, Adnan; Zuobi-Hasona, Kheir; Crowley, Paula J.; Abranches, Jacqueline; Ruelf, Michael A.; Bleiweis, Arnold S.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we presented evidence that the oral cariogenic species Streptococcus mutans remains viable but physiologically impaired and sensitive to environmental stress when genes encoding the minimal conserved bacterial signal recognition particle (SRP) elements are inactivated. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of isolated membrane fractions from strain UA159 and three mutants (Δffh, ΔscRNA, and ΔftsY) grown at pH 7.0 or pH 5.0 allowed us to obtain insight into the adaptation process and the identities of potential SRP substrates. Mutant membrane preparations contained increased amounts of the chaperones DnaK and GroES and ClpP protease but decreased amounts of transcription- and translation-related proteins, the β subunit of ATPase, HPr, and several metabolic and glycolytic enzymes. Therefore, the acid sensitivity of SRP mutants might be caused in part by diminished ATPase activity, as well as the absence of an efficient mechanism for supplying ATP quickly at the site of proton elimination. Decreased amounts of LuxS were also observed in all mutant membranes. To further define physiological changes that occur upon disruption of the SRP pathway, we studied global gene expression in S. mutans UA159 (parent strain) and AH333 (Δffh mutant) using microarray analysis. Transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of 81 genes, including genes encoding chaperones, proteases, cell envelope biosynthetic enzymes, and DNA repair and replication enzymes, and down-regulation of 35 genes, including genes concerned with competence, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes involved in amino acid and protein biosynthesis. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis of eight selected genes confirmed the microarray data. Consistent with a demonstrated defect in competence and the suggested impairment of LuxS-dependent quorum sensing, biofilm formation was significantly decreased in each SRP mutant. PMID:17085548

  18. Transcriptional profile of glucose-shocked and acid-adapted strains of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J.L.; Abranches, J.; Faustoferri, R.C.; Hubbard, C.J.; Lemos, J.A.; Courtney, M.A.; Quivey, R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aciduricity of Streptococcus mutans is an important virulence factor of the organism, required to both out-compete commensal oral microorganisms and cause dental caries. In this study, we monitored transcriptional changes that occurred as a continuous culture of either an acid-tolerant strain (UA159) or an acid-sensitive strain (fabM::Erm) moved from steady-state growth at neutral pH, experienced glucose-shock and acidification of the culture, and transitioned to steady-state growth at low pH. Thus, the timing of elements of the acid tolerance response (ATR) could be observed and categorized as acute vs. adaptive ATR mechanisms. Modulation of BCAA biosynthesis, DNA/protein repair mechanisms, ROS metabolizers, and PTS occurred in the initial acute phase, immediately following glucose-shock, while up-regulation of F1F0-ATPase did not occur until the adaptive phase, after steady-state growth had been re-established. In addition to the archetypal ATR pathways mentioned above, glucose-shock led to differential expression of genes suggesting a re-routing of resources away from synthesis of fatty acids and proteins, and towards synthesis of purines, pyrimidines and amino acids. These adjustments were largely transient, as upon establishment of steady-state growth at acidic pH, transcripts returned to basal expression levels. During growth at steady-state pH 7, fabM::Erm had a transcriptional profile analogous to that of UA159 during glucose-shock, indicating that even during growth in rich media at neutral pH, the cells were stressed. These results, coupled with a recently established collection of deletion strains (Quivey et al., 2015), provide a starting point for elucidation of the acid tolerance response in S. mutans. PMID:26042838

  19. Modification of the Streptococcus mutans transcriptome by LrgAB and environmental stressors

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kelly C.; Turner, Matthew E.; Carney, O’neshia V.; Gu, Tongjun

    2017-01-01

    The Streptococcus mutans Cid/Lrg system is central to the physiology of this cariogenic organism, affecting oxidative stress resistance, biofilm formation and competence. Previous transcriptome analyses of lytS (responsible for the regulation of lrgAB expression) and cidB mutants have revealed pleiotropic effects on carbohydrate metabolism and stress resistance genes. In this study, it was found that an lrgAB mutant, previously shown to have diminished aerobic and oxidative stress growth, was also much more growth impaired in the presence of heat and vancomycin stresses, relative to wild-type, lrgA and lrgB mutants. To obtain a more holistic picture of LrgAB and its involvement in stress resistance, RNA sequencing and bioinformatics analyses were used to assess the transcriptional response of wild-type and isogenic lrgAB mutants under anaerobic (control) and stress-inducing culture conditions (aerobic, heat and vancomycin). Hierarchical clustering and principal components analyses of all differentially expressed genes revealed that the most distinct gene expression profiles between S. mutans UA159 and lrgAB mutant occurred during aerobic and high-temperature growth. Similar to previous studies of a cidB mutant, lrgAB stress transcriptomes were characterized by a variety of gene expression changes related to genomic islands, CRISPR-C as systems, ABC transporters, competence, bacteriocins, glucosyltransferases, protein translation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, carbohydrate metabolism/storage and transport. Notably, expression of lrgAB was upregulated in the wild-type strain under all three stress conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that mutation of lrgAB alters the transcriptional response to stress, and further support the idea that the Cid/Lrg system acts to promote cell homeostasis in the face of environmental stress. PMID:28348880

  20. Action of selected agents on the accumulation of /sup 18/F by Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Yotis, W.W.; Zeb, M.; Brennan, P.C.; Kirchner, F.R.; Glendenin, L.E.; Wu-Yuan, C.D.

    1983-01-01

    The action of certain substances known to induce cellular alterations, or encountered in the oral cavity, on the accumulation of /sup 18/F by Streptococcus mutans GS-5 has been investigated. A 62-67% inhibition in the number of /sup 18/F atoms bound per mg dry weight of cells could be induced by a 15 min pretreatment with 2.7 x 10/sup -4/ M cetyltrimethylammoniumbromide, 1 x 10/sup -1/ M acetic anhydride, or 7 x 10/sup -2/ M HCl. Plate counts indicated that alteration of the cellular composition rather than viability was responsible for this diminution in /sup 18/F accumulation. Prior exposure for 15 min of this organism to 1 M HCHO or 0.1 M NaOH did not alter /sup 18/F accumulation. Of the common salts encountered in the oral cavity, CaCl/sub 2/ enhanced /sup 18/F binding. Pretreatment of the assay cells for 15-160 min with 0.1 mg/ml of trypsin, pronase, protease, ..cap alpha..-glucosidase, dextranase, or lactoferrin had no significant effect on the accumulation of /sup 18/. However, pre-exposure of cells for 60 min to 1-10 mg/ml of either amylase or lipase induced a 40-67% inhibition in the binding of /sup 18/F, while lysozyme enhanced the binding of /sup 18/F by the cells. It would appear then that the binding of /sup 18/F by S. mutans may be altered by certain substances encountered in the oral cavity. 17 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  1. Growth of Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms Alters Peptide Signaling at the Sub-population Level

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Robert C.; Burne, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans activates multiple cellular processes in response to the formation of a complex between comX-inducing peptide (XIP) and the ComR transcriptional regulator. Bulk phase and microfluidic experiments previously revealed that ComR-dependent activation of comX is altered by pH and by carbohydrate source. Biofilm formation is a major factor in bacterial survival and virulence in the oral cavity. Here, we sought to determine the response of S. mutans biofilm cells to XIP during different stages of biofilm maturation. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we showed that exogenous addition of XIP to early biofilms resulted in robust comX activation. However, as the biofilms matured, increasing amounts of XIP were required to activate comX expression. Single-cell analysis demonstrated that the entire population was responding to XIP with activation of comX in early biofilms, but only a sub-population was responding in mature biofilms. The sub-population response of mature biofilms was retained when the cells were dispersed and then treated with XIP. The proportion and intensity of the bi-modal response of mature biofilm cells was altered in mutants lacking the Type II toxins MazF and RelE, or in a strain lacking the (p)ppGpp synthase/hydrolase RelA. Thus, competence signaling is markedly altered in cells growing in mature biofilms, and pathways that control cell death and growth/survival decisions modulate activation of comX expression in these sessile populations. PMID:27471495

  2. Evaluation and Comparison of the Antibacterial Activity against Streptococcus mutans of Grape Seed Extract at Different Concentrations with Chlorhexidine Gluconate: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Bhavna; Vyas, Soham M; Shah, Nupur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus mutans has been implicated as primary microorganisms which cause dental caries in humans. There has been an increased interest in the therapeutic properties of some medicinal plants and natural compounds which have demonstrated antibacterial activities. Grape is one of the plants of this group which contains tannin and polyphenolic compound. Aim To evaluate and compare antibacterial activity of grape seed extract at different concentrations with chlorhexidine gluconate against S. mutans. Materials and methods Grape seeds were extracted with ethanol/water ratio of 70:30 volume/volume. The extracts were filtered through Whatman No. 1 filter paper until it becomes colorless. Streptococcus mutans strains were taken. To check the antimicrobial properties of grape seed extract at different concentration and chlorhexidine gluconate, they were added to S. mutans strain and incubated for 48 hours than colony-forming units/mL were checked. Results Grape seed extract at higher concentration were found to be more potent against S. mutans. Chlorhexidine gluconate was found to have most potent antibacterial action compared to all different concentrations of grape seed extract. Conclusion Grape seed extract as a natural antimicrobial compound has inhibitory effect against S. mutans. How to cite this article Swadas M, Dave B, Vyas SM, Shah N. Evaluation and Comparison of the Antibacterial Activity against Streptococcus mutans of Grape Seed Extract at Different Concentrations with Chlorhexidine Gluconate: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):181-185. PMID:27843246

  3. Isolation and characterization of unsaturated fatty acid auxotrophs of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Altabe, Silvia; Lopez, Paloma; de Mendoza, Diego

    2007-11-01

    Unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis is essential for the maintenance of membrane structure and function in many groups of anaerobic bacteria. Like Escherichia coli, the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae produces straight-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids. In E. coli UFA synthesis requires the action of two gene products, the essential isomerase/dehydratase encoded by fabA and an elongation condensing enzyme encoded by fabB. S. pneumoniae lacks both genes and instead employs a single enzyme with only an isomerase function encoded by the fabM gene. In this paper we report the construction and characterization of an S. pneumoniae 708 fabM mutant. This mutant failed to grow in complex medium, and the defect was overcome by addition of UFAs to the growth medium. S. pneumoniae fabM mutants did not produce detectable levels of monounsaturated fatty acids as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analysis of the radiolabeled phospholipids. We also demonstrate that a fabM null mutant of the cariogenic organism Streptococcus mutants is a UFA auxotroph, indicating that FabM is the only enzyme involved in the control of membrane fluidity in streptococci. Finally we report that the fabN gene of Enterococcus faecalis, coding for a dehydratase/isomerase, complements the growth of S. pneumoniae fabM mutants. Taken together, these results suggest that FabM is a potential target for chemotherapeutic agents against streptococci and that S. pneumoniae UFA auxotrophs could help identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in UFA biosynthesis.

  4. Oral colonization by Streptococcus mutans and caries development is reduced upon deletion of carbonic anhydrase VI expression in saliva.

    PubMed

    Culp, David J; Robinson, Bently; Parkkila, Seppo; Pan, Pei-Wen; Cash, Melanie N; Truong, Helen N; Hussey, Thomas W; Gullett, Sarah L

    2011-12-01

    Carbonic anhydrase VI (CA VI), encoded by type A transcripts of the gene Car6, is a secretory product of salivary glands and is found in the enamel pellicle. Because higher caries prevalence is associated with lower salivary concentrations of CA VI in humans, we tested whether CA VI protects enamel surfaces from caries induced by Streptococcus mutans, using Car6(-/-) mice, in which salivary CA VI expression is absent. We detected aberrant Car6 type A transcripts in Car6(-/-) mice, likely targets for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Expression of the intracellular stress-induced isoform of CA VI encoded by type B transcripts was restricted to parotid and submandibular glands of wild type mice. The salivary function of Car6(-/-) mice was normal as assessed by the histology and protein/glycoprotein profiles of glands, salivary flow rates and protein/glycoprotein compositions of saliva. Surprisingly, total smooth surface caries and sulcal caries in Car6(-/-) mice were more than 6-fold and 2-fold lower than in wild type mice after infection with S. mutans strain UA159. Recoveries of S. mutans and total microbiota from molars were also lower in Car6(-/-) mice. To explore possible mechanisms for increased caries susceptibility, we found no differences in S. mutans adherence to salivary pellicles, in vitro. Interestingly, higher levels of Lactobacillus murinus and an unidentified Streptococcus species were cultivated from the oral microbiota of Car6(-/-) mice. Collective results suggest salivary CA VI may promote caries by modulating the oral microbiota to favor S. mutans colonization and/or by the enzymatic production of acid within plaque.

  5. Effect of Herbal and Fluoride Mouth Rinses on Streptococcus mutans and Dental Caries among 12–15-Year-Old School Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy Panchmal, Ganesh; Kumar, Vijaya; Jodalli, Praveen S.; Sonde, Laxminarayan

    2017-01-01

    To assess and compare the effect of herbal and fluoride mouth rinses on Streptococcus mutans count and glucan synthesis by Streptococcus mutans and dental caries, a parallel group placebo controlled randomized trial was conducted among 240 schoolchildren (12–15 years old). Participants were randomly divided and allocated into Group I (0.2% fluoride group), Group II (herbal group), and Group III (placebo group). All received 10 ml of respective mouth rinses every fortnight for a period of one year. Intergroup and intragroup comparison were done for Streptococcus mutans count and glucan synthesis by Streptococcus mutans and dental caries. Streptococcus mutans count showed a statistically significant difference between Group I and Group III (p = 0.035) and also between Group II and Group III (p = 0.039). Glucan concentration levels showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.024) between Group II and Group III at 12th month. Mean DMF scores showed no statistical difference between the three groups (p = 0.139). No difference in the level of significance was seen in the intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis. The present study showed that both herbal and fluoride mouth rinses, when used fortnightly, were equally effective and could be recommended for use in school-based health education program to control dental caries. Trial registration number is CTRI/2015/08/006070. PMID:28352285

  6. The Redox-Sensing Regulator Rex Modulates Central Carbon Metabolism, Stress Tolerance Response and Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Bitoun, Jacob P.; Liao, Sumei; Yao, Xin; Xie, Gary G.; Wen, Zezhang T.

    2012-01-01

    The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD+. Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD+ level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD+ level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology. PMID:23028612

  7. Adhesion of Streptococcus Mutans to Glass Ionomer, BisCem Cement and Enamel: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jalalian, Ezzatollah; Ahmadpour, Sogol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Considering the adhesion of some microorganisms such as Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) to restorative materials and the unrecognized consequences of this phenomenon, and due to the controversies in this regard, it is important to discover the materials to which the lowest adhesion of S. mutans occurs. The objective of this study was to assess the level of adhesion of S. mutans to glass ionomer (GI), BisCem Cement and enamel. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro experimental study, 12 specimens including five GI blocks (GC America Inc., Alsip, IL, USA), five BisCem blocks (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL, USA) and two enamel blocks were exposed to a bacterial suspension (1×106 mg/mL). After incubation for one hour at 37°C, the swab samples were taken and cultured in blood agar. The S. mutans colonies were counted by unaided vision after 48 hours of incubation. The results were analyzed using ANOVA followed by the Tukey’s test. Results: The number of colonies attributed to enamel, GI, and BisCem blocks was 24±2, 24.2±2.7 and 14.8±1.7 colonies/mm2, respectively. There was no difference between enamel and GI in terms of adhesion of S. mutans (P=0.08 and P>0.001, respectively); however, the difference between these two and BisCem was statistically significant (P= 0.00075 and P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, BisCem cement is superior to GI for the cementation of indirect restorations. PMID:27148379

  8. Antibacterial activities of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) against planktonic and biofilm growing Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengjun; Dong, Jiachen; Xia, Yiru; Shu, Rong

    2017-03-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential antibacterial activities of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) against planktonic and biofilm modes of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The effects on planktonic growth and biofilm metabolic activity were evaluated by growth curve determination and MTT assay, respectively. Then, colony forming unit (CFU) counting, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and real-time PCR were performed to further investigate the actions of DHA and EPA on exponential phase-S. mutans. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to detect the influences on mature biofilms. The MICs of DHA and EPA against S. mutans were 100 μM and 50 μM, respectively; the MBC of both compounds was 100 μM. In the presence of 12.5 μM-100 μM DHA or EPA, the planktonic growth and biofilm metabolic activity were reduced in varying degrees. For exponential-phase S. mutans, the viable counts, the bacterial membranes and the biofilm-associated gene expression were damaged by 100 μM DHA or EPA treatment. For 1-day-old biofilms, the thickness was decreased and the proportion of membrane-damaged bacteria was increased in the presence of 100 μM DHA or EPA. These results indicated that, DHA and EPA possessed antibacterial activities against planktonic and biofilm growing S. mutans.

  9. The redox-sensing regulator Rex modulates central carbon metabolism, stress tolerance response and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, Jacob P; Liao, Sumei; Yao, Xin; Xie, Gary G; Wen, Zezhang T

    2012-01-01

    The Rex repressor has been implicated in regulation of central carbon and energy metabolism in gram-positive bacteria. We have previously shown that Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, alters its transcriptome upon Rex-deficiency and renders S. mutans to have increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, aberrations in glucan production, and poor biofilm formation. In this study, we showed that rex in S. mutans is co-transcribed as an operon with downstream guaA, encoding a putative glutamine amidotransferase. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant Rex bound promoters of target genes avidly and specifically, including those down-regulated in response to Rex-deficiency, and that the ability of recombinant Rex to bind to selected promoters was modulated by NADH and NAD(+). Results suggest that Rex in S. mutans can function as an activator in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+) level, although the exact binding site for activator Rex remains unclear. Consistent with a role in oxidative stress tolerance, hydrogen peroxide challenge assays showed that the Rex-deficient mutant, TW239, and the Rex/GuaA double mutant, JB314, were more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide killing than the wildtype, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB314 displayed major defects in biofilm formation, with a decrease of more than 50-fold in biomass after 48-hours. Collectively, these results further suggest that Rex in S. mutans regulates fermentation pathways, oxidative stress tolerance, and biofilm formation in response to intracellular NADH/NAD(+) level. Current effort is being directed to further investigation of the role of GuaA in S. mutans cellular physiology.

  10. The serotype-specific glucose side chain of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharides is essential for adsorption of bacteriophage M102 to Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; van der Ploeg, Jan R

    2009-05-01

    Bacteriophage M102 is a virulent siphophage that propagates in some serotype c Streptococcus mutans strains, but not in S. mutans of serotype e, f or k. The serotype of S. mutans is determined by the glucose side chain of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide (RGP). Because the first step in the bacteriophage infection process is adsorption of the phage, it was investigated whether the serotype specificity of phage M102 was determined by adsorption. M102 adsorbed to all tested serotype c strains, but not to strains of different serotypes. Streptococcus mutans serotype c mutants defective in the synthesis of the glucose side chain of RGP failed to adsorb phage M102. These results suggest that the glucose side chain of RGP acts as a receptor for phage M102.

  11. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity. PMID:27293967

  12. Influence of the Culture Medium in Dose-Response Effect of the Chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans Biofilms.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Vanessa Salvadego; Ccahuana-Vásquez, Renzo Alberto; Tedesco, Alcides Fabiano; Lyra, Luzia; Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Schreiber, Angélica Zaninelli

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of culture medium on dose-response effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm and validate the use of the cation-adjusted-Müller-Hinton broth (MH) for the evaluation of antibacterial activity. Ultrafiltered Tryptone-Yeast Extract Broth (UTYEB) was compared against MH and MH with blood supplementation (MHS). For each medium, six groups (n = 4) were assessed: two negative control groups (baseline 48 and 120 h) and four experimental groups (0.0001, 0.001, 0.012, and 0.12% CHX). S. mutans biofilm grew on glass slides of each media containing 1% sucrose. After 48 h of growth, biofilms of baseline 48 h were collected and the other groups were treated for 1 min, twice a day, for 3 days, with their respective treatments. The media were changed daily and pH was measured. After 120 h, biofilms were collected and dry weight and viable microorganisms were determined. Results showed CHX dose-response effect being observed in all media for all the variables. However, MH and MHS showed higher sensitivity than UTYEB (p < 0.05). We can conclude that the culture medium does influence dose-response effect of CHX on Streptococcus mutans biofilm and that MH can be used for antibacterial activity.

  13. Behavior of NiTi in the presence of oral bacteria: corrosion by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Bahije, Loubna; Benyahia, Hicham; El Hamzaoui, Sakina; Ebn Touhami, Mohamed; Bengueddour, Rachid; Rerhrhaye, Wiam; Abdallaoui, Faïza; Zaoui, Fatima

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behavior of nickel titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires in a solution containing Streptococcus mutans oral bacteria. In this article, we explain our choice of bacterial species before describing the culture process in artificial saliva and the precautions needed to prevent contamination by other bacteria. The electrochemical behavior of the alloy (NiTi) was analyzed electrochemically in Ringer sterile artificial saliva and in artificial saliva enriched with a sterile broth and modified by addition of bacteria. The electrochemical procedures chosen for this study were: free corrosion potential, potentiodynamic curves and impedance spectroscopy. In this way, we were able to show that the free corrosion potential of the NiTi in the Ringer solution increases with time and then stabilizes, thus passivating the alloy. We also demonstrated that colonization of the metal surface by bacteria triggered a drop in the free corrosion potential. The electrochemical impedance findings revealed no significant difference in NiTi behavior between the two media. Finally, we observed a slight difference between the two corrosion currents in favor of the bacteria-enriched solution, in which the NiTi underwent greater corrosion. These findings demonstrate the impact of acidogenic bacteria on corrosion behavior of the NiTi wires investigated. However, further research is required, notably incorporating longer immersion times in the two media.

  14. Decreased oral colonization of Streptococcus mutans during aging of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Van Houte, J; Upeslacis, V N; Edelstein, S

    1977-04-01

    The colonization by streptomycin-resistant Streptococcus mutans strains of the teeth of conventional and ex-germfree Sprague-Dawley rats of various ages fed either a high-sucrose or a high-glucose diet was studied. Bacterial colonization occurred with increasingly greater difficulty as the rats became older. This was observed in studies of the implantation of the test organism after oral inoculation with different cell numbers as well as its transmission between infected and uninfected rats. With rat fed sucrose diet, the effect of age could not be demonstrated until they were age 3 months or older; the results from rats fed a glucose diet suggest that changes may already have occurred early after weaning. Changes in susceptibility to colonization during aging manifested themselves as a decrease in the proportions of rats which became infected as well as lower population levels in infected rats. The possible mechanism(s) involved as well as the possible significance of the findings was discussed.

  15. Antimicrobial Effects of Dental Luting Glass Ionomer Cements on Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Altenburger, Markus; Spitzmüller, Bettina; Anderson, Annette; Hellwig, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To reduce secondary caries, glass ionomer luting cements are often used for cementing of indirect restorations. This is because of their well-known antimicrobial potential through the release of fluoride ions. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of five dental luting cements which were based on glass ionomer cement technology. Methods. Five different glass ionomer based luting cements were tested for their antimicrobial effects on Streptococcus mutans in two different experimental setups: (i) determination of colony-forming units (CFUs) in a plate-counting assay; (ii) live/dead staining (LDS) and fluorescence microscopy. All experiments were conducted with or without prior treatment of the materials using sterilized human saliva. Antimicrobial effects were evaluated for adherent and planktonic bacteria. Bovine enamel slabs (BES) were used as negative control. BES covered with 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) served as positive control. Results. Each of the tested materials significantly reduced the number of initially adhered CFUs; this reduction was even more pronounced after prior incubation in saliva. Antimicrobial effects on adherent bacteria were confirmed by live-dead staining. Conclusion. All five luting cements showed an antimicrobial potential which was increased by prior incubation with human saliva, suggesting an enhanced effect in vivo. PMID:24795539

  16. Time effect and aliquot concentration in Streptococcus mutans elimination by plasma needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Alcantara, E.; López-Callejas, R.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; Lagunas-Bernabé, S.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Barocio, S. R.; Muñoz-Castro, A. E.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.; de la Piedad-Beneitez, A.

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric plasma needle systems are being intensively studied with a view to potential applications in medicine. The aim of this in vitro study is the improved elimination of Streptococcus Mutants (S. mutans) bacteria. A 5 ml volume of Luria-Bertani culture medium has been inoculated with a test bacterial population and incubated during 24 hours, followed by ten dilutions producing aliquots at 20, 50 and 100 micro l per dilution. Each aliquot is deposited on a paper filter and then exposed to a 2 W RF room pressure helium plasma needle discharge at a 1.5 l.p.m. rate for 1, 3, 5 or 7 minutes. Each sample paper is placed in a test tube, again containing Luria-Bertani fluid, in order to develop a new bacterium colony after a 24h incubation period. The plasma needle lethality has been evaluated from absorbance studies by means of a 6305 Jeway spectrophotometer at a 600 nm wavelength, indicating a clear correlation with exposure time. These studies validate the high disinfection efficacy of the plasma needle.

  17. A Phenotypic microarray analysis of Streptococcus mutans liaS mutant

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaqin; Biswas, Indranil

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a bioflim-forming gram-positive bacterium that resides in the human oral cavity, is considered to be the primary etiological agent of human dental caries. A cell-envelope stress sensing histidine kinase, LiaS, is considered to be important for expression of virulence factors such as glucan-binding protein C and mutacin production. In this communication, a liaS mutant was subjected to phenotypic microarray (PM) analysis of about 2000 phenotypes that includes utilization of various carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, and sulfur sources; osmolytes; metabolic inhibitors; and susceptibility to toxic compounds, including several types of antibiotics. Compared to the parental strain UA159, the liaS mutant strain (IBS148) was more tolerant to various inhibitors that target protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, and cell-wall biosynthesis. Some of the key findings of the PM analysis were confirmed in independent growth studies and by using antibiotic discs and E-test strips for susceptibility testing. PMID:19118347

  18. Resin-modified glass ionomer cements: fluoride release and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth.

    PubMed

    Friedl, K H; Schmalz, G; Hiller, K A; Shams, M

    1997-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to measure the fluoride release of 1 glass ionomer cement, 1 cermet, 3 resin-modified glass ionomer cements and 1 compomer, and to determine the influence of each material on bacterial growth. Test specimens were eluted in saline for 180 days. Every 2 days, the specimens were transferred into fresh saline and the fluoride content of the solution was measured. Furthermore, 48-h, 14-d, 90-d, and 180-d eluates were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans and bacterial growth was recorded nephelometrically. Fluoride release dropped significantly over time for each material with values between 6.2 (Ketac-Silver) and 29.3 (Photac-Fil) ppm after 48 h to values between 0.6 (Ketac-Silver) and 1.7 (Ketac-Fil, Vitremer) ppm after 180 days. Each material reduced bacterial growth at each time of examination, but the effect decreased significantly over time with a maximum growth of 71.7% (Ketac-Fil) to 85.6% (Ketac-Silver) after 48 h and 94.7 (Vitremer) to 99.0% (Ketac-Silver) after 180 days (growth control = 100%). Both Ketac-Silver and Dyract showed a significantly lower inhibiting effect on bacterial growth than the other materials. The tested materials showed a good correlation between fluoride release and influence on bacterial growth. However, both effects dropped dramatically over the 180-days period.

  19. Inhibition of Gallic Acid on the Growth and Biofilm Formation of Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Li, Jing; Li, Ji; Tang, Ruihua; Liu, Liu; Shi, Junling; Huang, Qingsheng; Yang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    New strategies for biofilm inhibition are becoming highly necessary because of the concerns to synthetic additives. As gallic acid (GA) is a hydrolysated natural product of tannin in Chinese gall, this research studied the effects of GA on the growth and biofilm formation of bacteria (Escherichia coli [Gram-negative] and Streptococcus mutans [Gram-positive]) under different conditions, such as nutrient levels, temperatures (25 and 37 °C) and incubation times (24 and 48 h). The minimum antimicrobial concentration of GA against the two pathogenic organisms was determined as 8 mg/mL. GA significantly affected the growth curves of both test strains at 25 and 37 °C. The nutrient level, temperature, and treatment time influenced the inhibition activity of GA on both growth and biofim formation of tested pathogens. The inhibition effect of GA on biofilm could be due to other factors in addition to the antibacterial effect. Overall, GA was most effective against cultures incubated at 37 °C for 24 h and at 25 °C for 48 h in various concentrations of nutrients and in vegetable wash waters, which indicated the potential of GA as emergent sources of biofilm control products.

  20. Assessment of cervical demineralization induced by Streptococcus mutans using swept-source optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Hiroki; Shimada, Yasushi; Matin, Khairul; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sadr, Alireza; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Exposed root surfaces due to gingival recession are subject to biofilm stagnation that can result in caries formation. Cervical enamel and dentin demineralization induced by a cariogenic biofilm was evaluated using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The cementoenamel junction (CEJ) sections of extracted human teeth were subjected to demineralization for 1, 2, or 3 weeks. A suspension of Streptococcus mutans was applied to form a cariogenic biofilm using an oral biofilm reactor. After incubation, demineralization was observed by SS-OCT. For the analysis of SS-OCT signal, the value of the area under the curve (AUC) of the signal profile was measured. Statistical analyses were performed with 95% level of confidence. Cervical demineralization was displayed as a bright zone in SS-OCT. The demineralization depth of dentin was significantly deeper than that of enamel (p<0.05). Enamel near the CEJ demonstrated a significant increase of AUC over the other enamel region after the demineralization. The gaps along the dentinoenamel junction were additionally observed in SS-OCT. SS-OCT was capable of monitoring the cervical demineralization induced by a cariogenic biofilm and is considered to be a promising modality for the diagnosis of cervical demineralization. PMID:27014718

  1. [[Streptococcus mutans Acquisition and Dental Caries Development in First-Born Children].

    PubMed

    Noce, Erica; Rubira, Cassia Maria Fischer; da Silva Rosa, Odila Pereira; da Silva, Salete Moura Bonifácio; Bretz, Walter Antonio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the moment of streptococcus mutans (SM) acquisition, caries development and their associate variables along 23 months, in first-born children of low socioeconomic status families, starting at 7 months of age. METHOD: The sample was chosen based on highly SM-colonized mothers, including all members of 14 families living in the same houses. The study included 14 mothers, 14 fathers and 14 first-borns and 8 relatives (mostly grandparents). Initial clinical examinations and radiographs determined the caries indices and periodontal conditions of the adults. SM count in all adults was made in the first 2 visits. The children were examined for SM count, number of teeth and number of carious lesions, in 4 visits. RESULTS: SM prevalence was high in the adults, being absent in only one of the parents. SM was found in 1, 2, 3 and 10 children in the first, second, third and fourth visits. Dental caries was detected in only 3 children in the last visit (at 30 months), who presented significantly higher SM scores than the children without caries in the same visit. CONCLUSION: A low income social condition and mothers highly colonized by SM do not mean necessarily early SM colonization and high caries activity in children with oral homecare. Caries development is significantly associated with high SM scores in the children.

  2. Simple observation of Streptococcus mutans biofilm by scanning electron microscopy using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Asahi, Yoko; Miura, Jiro; Tsuda, Tetsuya; Kuwabata, Susumu; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko; Noiri, Yuichiro; Sakata, Takao; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako

    2015-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been successfully used to image biofilms because of its high resolution and magnification. However, conventional SEM requires dehydration and metal coating of biological samples before observation, and because biofilms consist mainly of water, sample dehydration may influence the biofilm structure. When coated with an ionic liquid, which is a kind of salt that exists in the liquid state at room temperature, biological samples for SEM observation do not require dehydration or metal coating because ionic liquids do not evaporate under vacuum conditions and are electrically conductive. This study investigates the ability of ionic liquids to allow SEM observation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms compared with conventional coating methods. Two hydrophilic and two hydrophobic ionic liquids, all of which are electronic conductors, are used. Compared with samples prepared by the conventional method, the ionic-liquid-treated samples do not exhibit a fibrous extracellular matrix structure and cracking on the biofilm surface. The hydrophilic ionic liquids give clearer images of the biofilm structure than those of the hydrophobic ionic liquids. This study finds that ionic liquids are useful for allowing the observation of biofilms by SEM without preparation by dehydration and metal coating.

  3. Inhibitory Effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia on the Virulence Properties of the Oral Pathogens Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Owotade, Foluso John

    2013-01-01

    Aim. This study investigated the effect of Dodonaea viscosa var. angustifolia (DVA) on the virulence properties of cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis implicated in periodontal diseases. Methods. S. mutans was cultured in tryptone broth containing a crude leaf extract of DVA for 16 hours, and the pH was measured after 10, 12, 14, and 16 h. Biofilms of S. mutans were grown on glass slides for 48 hours and exposed to plant extract for 30 minutes; the adherent cells were reincubated and the pH was measured at various time intervals. Minimum bactericidal concentration of the extracts against the four periodontal pathogens was determined. The effect of the subinhibitory concentration of plant extract on the production of proteinases by P. gingivalis was also evaluated. Results. DVA had no effect on acid production by S. mutans biofilms; however, it significantly inhibited acid production in planktonic cells. Periodontal pathogens were completely eliminated at low concentrations ranging from 0.09 to 0.02 mg/mL of crude plant extracts. At subinhibitory concentrations, DVA significantly reduced Arg-gingipain (24%) and Lys-gingipain (53%) production by P. gingivalis (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions. These results suggest that DVA has the potential to be used to control oral infections including dental caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:24223061

  4. Nanoscale characterization of effect of L-arginine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm adhesion by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shivani; Lavender, Stacey; Woo, JungReem; Guo, Lihong; Shi, Wenyuan; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya; Gimzewski, James K

    2014-07-01

    A major aetiological factor of dental caries is the pathology of the dental plaque biofilms. The amino acid L-arginine (Arg) is found naturally in saliva as a free molecule or as a part of salivary peptides and proteins. Plaque bacteria metabolize Arg to produce alkali and neutralize glycolytic acids, promoting a less cariogenous oral microbiome. Here, we explored an alternative and complementary mechanism of action of Arg using atomic force microscopy. The nanomechanical properties of Streptococcus mutans biofilm extracellular matrix were characterized under physiological buffer conditions. We report the effect of Arg on the adhesive behaviour and structural properties of extracellular polysaccharides in S. mutans biofilms. High-resolution imaging of biofilm surfaces can reveal additional structural information on bacterial cells embedded within the surrounding extracellular matrix. A dense extracellular matrix was observed in biofilms without Arg compared to those grown in the presence of Arg. S. mutans biofilms grown in the presence of Arg could influence the production and/or composition of extracellular membrane glucans and thereby affect their adhesion properties. Our results suggest that the presence of Arg in the oral cavity could influence the adhesion properties of S. mutans to the tooth surface.

  5. Atomic force microscopy study of the structure function relationships of the biofilm-forming bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Kreth, Jens; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Fengxia; Pelling, Andrew E.; Shi, Wenyuan; Gimzewski, James K.

    2006-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has garnered much interest in recent years for its ability to probe the structure, function and cellular nanomechanics inherent to specific biological cells. In particular, we have used AFM to probe the important structure-function relationships of the bacterium Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans is the primary aetiological agent in human dental caries (tooth decay), and is of medical importance due to the virulence properties of these cells in biofilm initiation and formation, leading to increased tolerance to antibiotics. We have used AFM to characterize the unique surface structures of distinct mutants of S. mutans. These mutations are located in specific genes that encode surface proteins, thus using AFM we have resolved characteristic surface features for mutant strains compared to the wild type. Ultimately, our characterization of surface morphology has shown distinct differences in the local properties displayed by various S. mutans strains on the nanoscale, which is imperative for understanding the collective properties of these cells in biofilm formation.

  6. Plausible Drug Targets in the Streptococcus mutans Quorum Sensing Pathways to Combat Dental Biofilms and Associated Risks.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Rajesh, Shrinidhi; Princy, S Adline

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram positive facultative anaerobe, is one among the approximately seven hundred bacterial species to exist in human buccal cavity and cause dental caries. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density dependent communication process that respond to the inter/intra-species signals and elicit responses to show behavioral changes in the bacteria to an aggressive forms. In accordance to this phenomenon, the S. mutans also harbors a Competing Stimulating Peptide (CSP)-mediated quorum sensing, ComCDE (Two-component regulatory system) to regulate several virulence-associated traits that includes the formation of the oral biofilm (dental plaque), genetic competence and acidogenicity. The QS-mediated response of S. mutans adherence on tooth surface (dental plaque) imparts antibiotic resistance to the bacterium and further progresses to lead a chronic state, known as periodontitis. In recent years, the oral streptococci, S. mutans are not only recognized for its cariogenic potential but also well known to worsen the infective endocarditis due to its inherent ability to colonize and form biofilm on heart valves. The review significantly appreciate the increasing complexity of the CSP-mediated quorum-sensing pathway with a special emphasis to identify the plausible drug targets within the system for the development of anti-quorum drugs to control biofilm formation and associated risks.

  7. An iron-binding protein, Dpr, from Streptococcus mutans prevents iron-dependent hydroxyl radical formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuji; Poole, Leslie B; Hantgan, Roy R; Kamio, Yoshiyuki

    2002-06-01

    The dpr gene is an antioxidant gene which was isolated from the Streptococcus mutans chromosome by its ability to complement an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli, and it was proven to play an indispensable role in oxygen tolerance in S. mutans. Here, we purified the 20-kDa dpr gene product, Dpr, from a crude extract of S. mutans as an iron-binding protein and found that Dpr formed a spherical oligomer about 9 nm in diameter. Molecular weight determinations of Dpr in solution by analytical ultracentrifugation and light-scattering analyses gave values of 223,000 to 292,000, consistent with a subunit composition of 11.5 to 15 subunits per molecule. The purified Dpr contained iron and zinc atoms and had an ability to incorporate up to 480 iron and 11.2 zinc atoms per molecule. Unlike E. coli Dps and two other members of the Dps family, Dpr was unable to bind DNA. One hundred nanomolar Dpr prevented by more than 90% the formation of hydroxyl radical generated by 10 microM iron(II) salt in vitro. The data shown in this study indicate that Dpr may act as a ferritin-like iron-binding protein in S. mutans and may allow this catalase- and heme-peroxidase-deficient bacterium to grow under air by limiting the iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction.

  8. Presence of Streptococcus mutans strains harbouring the cnm gene correlates with dental caries status and IgA nephropathy conditions

    PubMed Central

    Misaki, Taro; Naka, Shuhei; Hatakeyama, Rina; Fukunaga, Akiko; Nomura, Ryota; Isozaki, Taisuke; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen of human dental caries. Strains harbouring the cnm gene, which encodes Cnm, a collagen-binding protein, contribute to the development of several systemic diseases. In this study, we analysed S. mutans strains isolated from the oral cavity of immunoglobulin (Ig)A nephropathy (IgAN) patients to determine potential relationships between cnm and caries status as well as IgAN conditions. Saliva specimens were collected from 109 IgAN patients and the cnm status of isolated S. mutans strains was determined using PCR. In addition, the dental caries status (decayed, missing or filled teeth [DMFT] index) in patients who agreed to dental consultation (n = 49) was evaluated. The DMFT index and urinary protein levels in the cnm-positive group were significantly higher than those in the cnm-negative group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the urinary protein levels in the high DMFT (≥15) group were significantly higher than those in the low DMFT (<15) group (p < 0.05). Our results show that isolation of cnm-positive S. mutans strains from the oral cavity may be associated with urinary protein levels in IgAN patients, especially those with a high dental caries status. PMID:27811984

  9. The copYAZ Operon Functions in Copper Efflux, Biofilm Formation, Genetic Transformation, and Stress Tolerance in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Lévesque, Céline M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In bacteria, copper homeostasis is closely monitored to ensure proper cellular functions while avoiding cell damage. Most Gram-positive bacteria utilize the copYABZ operon for copper homeostasis, where copA and copB encode copper-transporting P-type ATPases, whereas copY and copZ regulate the expression of the cop operon. Streptococcus mutans is a biofilm-forming oral pathogen that harbors a putative copper-transporting copYAZ operon. Here, we characterized the role of copYAZ operon in the physiology of S. mutans and delineated the mechanisms of copper-induced toxicity in this bacterium. We observed that copper induced toxicity in S. mutans cells by generating oxidative stress and disrupting their membrane potential. Deletion of the copYAZ operon in S. mutans strain UA159 resulted in reduced cell viability under copper, acid, and oxidative stress relative to the viability of the wild type under these conditions. Furthermore, the ability of S. mutans to form biofilms and develop genetic competence was impaired under copper stress. Briefly, copper stress significantly reduced cell adherence and total biofilm biomass, concomitantly repressing the transcription of the gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, gbpB, and gbpC genes, whose products have roles in maintaining the structural and/or functional integrity of the S. mutans biofilm. Furthermore, supplementation with copper or loss of copYAZ resulted in significant reductions in transformability and in the transcription of competence-associated genes. Copper transport assays revealed that the ΔcopYAZ strain accrued significantly large amounts of intracellular copper compared with the amount of copper accumulation in the wild-type strain, thereby demonstrating a role for CopYAZ in the copper efflux of S. mutans. The complementation of the CopYAZ system restored copper expulsion, membrane potential, and stress tolerance in the copYAZ-null mutant. Taking these results collectively, we have established the function of the S. mutans

  10. Role of Aqueous Extract of Morinda Citrifolia (Indian Noni) Ripe Fruits in Inhibiting Dental Caries-Causing Streptococcus Mutans and Streptococcus Mitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumarasamy, Barani; Manipal, Sunayana; Duraisamy, Prabu; Ahmed, Adil; Mohanaganesh, SP; Jeevika, C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Use of alternative medicine to control oral streptococci is a new topic worthy of further investigation. This study aimed to elucidate the dose-dependent anti-bacterial activity of crude aqueous extract of ripe Morinda citrifolia L. (Family: Rubiaceae) fruits against oral streptococci i.e. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis, that cause dental caries in humans. Methods: Fresh ripe M. citrifolia fruits (750g) were ground in an electronic blender with sterile water (500ml). The crude aqueous extract was lyophilized to yield a brown colored powder. Various concentrations (1000-100μg/ ml) of the extract were tested for its antibacterial activity (Kirby and Bauer method) against whole cells of S. mutans and S. mitis. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by micro-dilution method, using serially diluted (2 folds) fruit extract, according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Results: Crude aqueous extract (1000μg/ ml) of ripe M. citrifolia fruits effectively inhibited the growth of S. mutans (19±0.5 mm) and S. mitis (18.6±0.3 mm) compared to the streptomycin control (21.6±0.3 mm). The growth inhibition was clearly evident with “nil” bacteriostasis, even after 48 hours of incubation at 37°C. The MIC of the extract for S. mutans and S. mitis was 125 μg and 62.5 μg, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggest that phytochemicals naturally synthesized by M. citrifolia have an inhibitory effect on oral streptococci. Furthermore, purification and molecular characterization of the “bioactive principle” would enable us to formulate a sustainable oral hygiene product. PMID:25628701

  11. Crystal structure of histone-like protein from Streptococcus mutans refined to 1.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Pierce; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Battaile, Kevin; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-04-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) in prokaryotes play an important architectural role in DNA bending, supercoiling and DNA compaction. In addition to architectural roles, some NAPs also play regulatory roles in DNA replication and repair, and act as global transcriptional regulators in many bacteria. Bacteria encode multiple NAPs and some of them are even essential for survival. Streptococcus mutans, a dental pathogen, encodes one such essential NAP called histone-like protein (HLP). Here, the three-dimensional structure of S. mutans HLP has been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The HLP structure is a dimer and shares a high degree of similarity with other bacterial NAPs, including HU. Since HLPs are essential for the survival of pathogenic streptococci, this structure determination is potentially beneficial for future drug development against these pathogens.

  12. Crystal structure of histone-like protein from Streptococcus mutans refined to 1.9 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Pierce; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Battaile, Kevin; Biswas, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) in prokaryotes play an important architectural role in DNA bending, supercoiling and DNA compaction. In addition to architectural roles, some NAPs also play regulatory roles in DNA replication and repair, and act as global transcriptional regulators in many bacteria. Bacteria encode multiple NAPs and some of them are even essential for survival. Streptococcus mutans, a dental pathogen, encodes one such essential NAP called histone-like protein (HLP). Here, the three-dimensional structure of S. mutans HLP has been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The HLP structure is a dimer and shares a high degree of similarity with other bacterial NAPs, including HU. Since HLPs are essential for the survival of pathogenic streptococci, this structure determination is potentially beneficial for future drug development against these pathogens. PMID:27050257

  13. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the methionine synthase (MetE) from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Tian-Min; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Lan-Fen; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2006-10-01

    Methionine synthase (MetE) from S. mutans was expressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. The Streptococcus mutans metE gene encodes methionine synthase (MetE), which catalyzes the direct transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine in the last step of methionine synthesis. metE was cloned into pET28a and the gene product was expressed at high levels in the Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). MetE was purified to homogeneity using Ni{sup 2+}-chelating chromatography followed by size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals of the protein were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution. The crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.85, b = 99.48, c = 77.88 Å, β = 94.55°.

  14. Effect of aqueous and alcoholic Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) extracts against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in comparison to chlorhexidine: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ajagannanavar, Sunil Lingaraj; Shamarao, Supreetha; Battur, Hemant; Tikare, Shreyas; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz Abdullah; Al Sayed, Mohammed Sayed Al Esawy

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stevia (S. rebaudiana) a herb which has medicinal value and was used in ancient times as a remedy for a great diversity of ailments and sweetener. Leaves of Stevia contain a high concentration of Stevioside and Rebaudioside which are supposed to be sweetening agents. Aim: To compare the efficacy of aqueous and alcoholic S. rebaudiana extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus in comparison to chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: In the first part of the study, various concentrations of aqueous and ethanolic Stevia extract were prepared in the laboratory of Pharmacy College. It was then subjected to microbiological assay to determine its zone of inhibition using Agar disk diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) using serial broth dilution method against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus. Chlorhexidine was used as a positive control. One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Tukey post hoc for group wise comparisons. Results: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of aqueous and ethnolic Stevia extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus were 25% and 12.5% respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the aqueous and alcoholic Stevia extracts against Streptococcus mutans at 48 hours were 22.8 mm and 26.7 mm respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the aqueous and alcoholic Stevia extracts against Lactobacillus acidophilus at 48 hours were 14.4 mm and 15.1 mm respectively. Mean zone of inhibition of the chlorhexidine against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus at 48 hours was 20.5 and 13.2 respectively. Conclusion: The inhibitory effect shown by alcoholic Stevia extract against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus was superior when compared with that of aqueous form and was inferior when compared with Chlorhexidine. PMID:25558451

  15. Streptococcus mutans SMU.623c codes for a functional, metal-dependent polysaccharide deacetylase that modulates interactions with salivary agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong Mei; Urch, Jonathan E; ten Cate, Jacob M; Rao, Vincenzo A; van Aalten, Daan M F; Crielaard, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The genome sequence of the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans predicts the presence of two putative polysaccharide deacetylases. The first, designated PgdA in this paper, shows homology to the catalytic domains of peptidoglycan deacetylases from Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes, which are both thought to be involved in the bacterial defense mechanism against human mucosal lysozyme and are part of the CAZY family 4 carbohydrate esterases. S. mutans cells in which the pgdA gene was deleted displayed a different colony texture and a slightly increased cell surface hydrophobicity and yet did not become hypersensitive to lysozyme as shown previously for S. pneumoniae. To understand this apparent lack of activity, the high-resolution X-ray structure of S. mutans PgdA was determined; it showed the typical carbohydrate esterase 4 fold, with metal bound in a His-His-Asp triad. Analysis of the protein surface showed that an extended groove lined with aromatic residues is orientated toward the active-site residues. The protein exhibited metal-dependent de-N-acetylase activity toward a hexamer of N-acetylglucosamine. No activity was observed toward shorter chitooligosaccharides or a synthetic peptidoglycan tetrasaccharide. In agreement with the lysozyme data this would suggest that S. mutans PgdA does not act on peptidoglycan but on an as-yet-unidentified polysaccharide within the bacterial cell surface. Strikingly, the pgdA-knockout strain showed a significant increase in aggregation/agglutination by salivary agglutinin, in agreement with this gene acting as a deacetylase of a cell surface glycan.

  16. Evaluation of the antibacterial effects of aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of Aloysia Citriodora (Lemon verbena) on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee, Faranak; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Shahandeh, Zahra; Sadighian, Farhnaz; Khodadadi, Effat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Aloysia citriodora plant from the family of Verbenaceae has many uses in traditional medicine. The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of A. citriodora on Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus, which cause tooth decay. Methods This 2016 study was performed on standardized strains of S. mutans PTCC1683 and S. sobrinus PTCC1601 and clinical isolates. Twenty clinical samples were obtained from the dental caries of children admitted to the pediatric ward at the Faculty of Dentistry of Babol University of Medical Sciences (Babol, Iran). The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of A. citriodora leaves were prepared in several concentrations ranging from 625–20,000 μg/ml. These concentrations of the extracts were applied to the bacteria by disk diffusion, agar well diffusion, and macrotube dilution. The antibacterial effects of amoxicillin and chlorhexidine digluconate 0.2% (CHX) were also carried out. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 18 software using independent-samples t-test. Results Streptococcus spp. was successfully isolated from nine out of 20 (45%) specimens. Of the 9 positive samples cultured, 8 (88.8%) were S. mutans and 1 was S. sobrinus (11.2%). No inhibitory zone was observed around the disks and wells containing all concentrations of A. citriodora extracts. The minimum concentrations for inhibition of growth (MIC) resulted in turbidity in all tubes and were negative except for the control tubes. Inhibition zones were observed for amoxicillin and CHX disks (p < 0.001). Conclusion This study found that all studied bacteria were resistant to both types of the extracts; therefore, they are not a suggested replacement for chemical agents in mouthwash. It also shown that CHX is less effective than amoxicillin. PMID:28163849

  17. Interactions of the Metalloregulatory Protein SloR from Streptococcus mutans with Its Metal Ion Effectors and DNA Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Corbett, John; Cornacchione, Louis; Daly, William; Galan, Diego; Wysota, Michael; Tivnan, Patrick; Collins, Justin; Nye, Dillon; Levitz, Talya; Breyer, Wendy A.; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus mutans is the causative agent of dental caries, a significant concern for human health, and therefore an attractive target for therapeutics development. Previous work in our laboratory has identified a homodimeric, manganese-dependent repressor protein, SloR, as an important regulator of cariogenesis and has used site-directed mutagenesis to map functions to specific regions of the protein. Here we extend those studies to better understand the structural interaction between SloR and its operator and its effector metal ions. The results of DNase I assays indicate that SloR protects a 42-bp region of DNA that overlaps the sloABC promoter on the S. mutans UA159 chromosome, while electrophoretic mobility shift and solution binding assays indicate that each of two SloR dimers binds to this region. Real-time semiquantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time semi-qRT-PCR) experiments were used to determine the individual base pairs that contribute to SloR-DNA binding specificity. Solution studies indicate that Mn2+ is better than Zn2+ at specifically activating SloR to bind DNA, and yet the 2.8-Å resolved crystal structure of SloR bound to Zn2+ provides insight into the means by which selective activation by Mn2+ may be achieved and into how SloR may form specific interactions with its operator. Taken together, these experimental observations are significant because they can inform rational drug design aimed at alleviating and/or preventing S. mutans-induced caries formation. IMPORTANCE This report focuses on investigating the SloR protein as a regulator of essential metal ion transport and virulence gene expression in the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans and on revealing the details of SloR binding to its metal ion effectors and binding to DNA that together facilitate this expression. We used molecular and biochemical approaches to characterize the interaction of SloR with Mn2+ and with its SloR recognition element to gain a clearer picture

  18. Comparison of oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis patients with non-diabetic dialysis patients and healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Roozbeh-Shahroodi, Jamshid; Pooladi, Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Zamani, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is associated with higher rates of caries, on the other hand some studies have shown that renal failure can be protective against dental caries. Objectives: In this study we compared oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis and non-diabetic dialysis patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: During November 2014 to January 2014, 85 people that referred to our medical care center entered the study. The sample included 30 diabetic dialysis, 28 non-diabetic dialysis patients and 27 healthy people. Oral saliva samples were obtained from their tongue and oral floor for microbiological examination. Patients’ data were compared before and after dialysis. Results: The amount of Lactobacillus and S. mutans did not show a significant difference between the three groups (P=0.092 and P=0.966 for S. mutans and lactobacillus, respectively). A positive and meaningful correlation was seen between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and the amount of S. mutans in the diabetic dialysis group (P=0.023; r=0.413). A meaningful and positive correlation was also seen between the amount of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after dialysis and the amount of oral S. mutans in the non-diabetic dialysis group (P=0.03; r=0.403). Conclusion: Despite the differences in the prevalence of caries that have been reported between renal failure patients and diabetic patients, we did not find any significant difference between diabetic dialysis, non-diabetic dialysis patients and the healthy population, regarding their amount of oral cariogenic bacteria. PMID:27689112

  19. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

  20. Effect of an alcoholic diet on dental caries and on Streptococcus of the mutans group. Study in rats.

    PubMed

    Kantorski, Karla Zanini; de Souza, Daniela Martins; Yujra, Verônica Quispe; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; da Rocha, Rosilene Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an alcohol diet on Streptococcus of the mutans group and on dental caries in the oral cavity of rats. Forty animals were divided into 3 groups according to the following liquid diets: 20% ethanol solution (Alcohol Group, AG), 27% sucrose solution (Isocaloric Group, IG), and water (Control Group, CG). After 56 days, samples were collected and plated on Mitis Salivarius Bacitracin agar to assess the number of colony forming units (CFU/mL) of Streptococcus of the mutans group. The animals were sacrificed and the jaws were removed in order to assess the occurrence of dental caries on the smooth and occlusal surfaces using stereomicroscopy. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test. The average numbers of CFU/mL (10(3)) were: 8.17 (AG), 9.78 (IG), and 5.63 (CG). There was no significant difference among the groups for the occurrence of occlusal caries. Regarding smooth surface caries, in the upper jaw, the caries number in the IG (1.58) was similar to that in the AG (2.06) and in the CG (1.14), and the number of caries in the AG was higher than in the CG; in the lower jaw there was significant difference among the 3 groups: AG (1.14), IG (2.00) and CG (0.43). The diets with the alcohol and sucrose solutions presented a tendency of increasing the colonization by Streptococcus of the mutans group and of increasing the occurrence of smooth surface dental caries in rat molars when compared to the control diet.

  1. Crystal structure of the Apo form of D-Alanine:D-Alanine ligase (DDl) from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongzhi; Xu, Hongyan; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2010-08-01

    D-Alanine:D-Alanine ligase (DDl) catalyzes the formation of D-Alanine:D-Alanine dipeptide and is an essential enzyme in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis.. This enzyme does not have a human ortholog, making it an attractive target for developing new antibiotic drugs. We determined the crystal structure at 2.23 A resolution of DDl from Streptococcus mutans (SmDDl), the principal aetiological agent of human dental caries. This structure reveals that SmDDl is a dimer and has a disordered omega-loop region.

  2. Genes Involved in Cell Wall Localization and Side Chain Formation of Rhamnose-Glucose Polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsukioka, Yuichi; Tomihisa, Kiyotaka; Nakano, Yoshio; Koga, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involved in polysaccharide export, whereas RgpE may be a transferase of side chain glucose. PMID:9791140

  3. Genes involved in cell wall localization and side chain formation of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Y; Tsukioka, Y; Tomihisa, K; Nakano, Y; Koga, T

    1998-11-01

    We identified in Streptococcus mutans six new genes (rgpA through rgpF), whose disruption results in a loss of serotype-specific antigenicity, specified by the glucose side chains of rhamnose-glucose polysaccharide from the cell wall. Rhamnose and glucose content of the cell wall decreased drastically in all these disruption mutants, except that in the rgpE mutant only the glucose content decreased. RgpC and RgpD are homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporter components and may be involved in polysaccharide export, whereas RgpE may be a transferase of side chain glucose.

  4. Cloning of a Streptococcus mutans glucosyltransferase gene coding for insoluble glucan synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, H; Shiroza, T; Hayakawa, M; Sato, S; Kuramitsu, H K

    1986-01-01

    The gtfB gene coding for a glucosyltransferase (GTF) activity of Streptococcus mutans GS-5 was isolated on a 15.4-kilobase DNA fragment by using a lambda L47.1 gene library. The activity was catalyzed by gene products of 150 and 145 kilodaltons which reacted with antibodies directed against both soluble and insoluble glucan-synthesizing GTFs. The enzyme present in crude Escherichia coli extracts synthesized both soluble and insoluble glucans. The enzyme was partially purified from lysates of the lambda DS-76 clone and synthesized both types of glucans in a primer-independent fashion. In addition, the purified enzyme exhibited a pI of approximately 5.0. Southern blot analysis indicated that the cloned GTF gene represented a contiguous nucleotide sequence on the strain GS-5 chromosome. Furthermore, evidence for the existence of a distinct gene sharing partial homology with gtfB was also obtained. The gtfB gene was subcloned into plasmid pACYC184 into E. coli and exhibited GTF activity when carried on GS-5 inserts as small as 5 kilobases. The approximate location of the GTF promoter and the direction of gene transcription were also determined. The cloned enzyme was not secreted through the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, since most of the activity was found in the cytoplasm and, in lesser amounts, associated with the cytoplasmic membrane. The gtfB gene was insertionally inactivated by introducing a gene fragment coding for erythromycin resistance into the GTF coding region. After transformation of strain GS-5 with the altered gene, transformants defective in insoluble glucan synthesis were identified. These results indicate that the gtfB gene codes for a GTF involved in insoluble glucan synthesis in strain GS-5. Images PMID:3017865

  5. Identification and Functional Analysis of Genome Mutations in a Fluoride-Resistant Streptococcus mutans Strain

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance. PMID:25856576

  6. Contribution of glucan-binding protein A to firm and stable biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Matsumi, Y; Fujita, K; Takashima, Y; Yanagida, K; Morikawa, Y; Matsumoto-Nakano, M

    2015-06-01

    Glucan-binding proteins (Gbps) of Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen of dental caries, mediate the binding of glucans synthesized from sucrose by the action of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) encoded by gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD. Several stress proteins, including DnaK and GroEL encoded by dnaK and groEL, are related to environmental stress tolerance. The contribution of Gbp expression to biofilm formation was analyzed by focusing on the expression levels of genes encoding GTFs and stress proteins. Biofilm-forming assays were performed using GbpA-, GbpB-, and GbpC-deficient mutant strains and the parental strain MT8148. The expression levels of gtfB, gtfC, gtfD, dnaK, and groEL were evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Furthermore, the structure of biofilms formed by these Gbp-deficient mutant strains was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Biofilm-forming assay findings demonstrated that the amount formed by the GbpA-deficient mutant strain (AD1) was nearly the same as that by the parental strain, while the GbpB- and GbpC-deficient mutant strains produced lower amounts than MT8148. Furthermore, RT-qPCR assay results showed that the expressions of gtfB, dnaK, and groEL in AD1 were elevated compared with MT8148. CLSM also revealed that the structure of biofilm formed by AD1 was prominently different compared with that formed by the parental strain. These results suggest that a defect in GbpA influences the expression of genes controlling biofilm formation, indicating its importance as a protein for firm and stable biofilm formation.

  7. Development of Competence for Genetic Transformation of Streptococcus mutans in a Chemically Defined Medium

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Kunal; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Federle, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans develops competence for genetic transformation in response to regulatory circuits that sense at least two peptide pheromones. One peptide, known as CSP, is sensed by a two-component signal transduction system through a membrane receptor, ComD. The other, derived from the primary translation product ComS, is thought to be sensed by an intracellular receptor, ComR, after uptake by oligopeptide permease. To allow study of this process in a medium that does not itself contain peptides, development of competence was examined in the chemically defined medium (CDM) described by van de Rijn and Kessler (Infect. Immun. 27:444, 1980). We confirmed a previous report that in this medium comS mutants of strain UA159 respond to a synthetic peptide comprising the seven C-terminal residues of ComS (ComS11-17) by increasing expression of the alternative sigma factor SigX, which in turn allows expression of competence effector genes. This response provided the basis for a bioassay for the ComS pheromone in the 100 to 1,000 nM range. It was further observed that comS+ (but not comS mutant) cultures developed a high level of competence in the late log and transition phases of growth in this CDM without the introduction of any synthetic stimulatory peptide. This endogenous competence development was accompanied by extracellular release of one or more signals that complemented a comS mutation at levels equivalent to 1 μM synthetic ComS11-17. PMID:22609913

  8. Growth phase and pH influence peptide signaling for competence development in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qiang; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Kaspar, Justin; Zhou, Xuedong; Burne, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The development of competence by the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans is mediated primarily through the alternative sigma factor ComX (SigX), which is under the control of multiple regulatory systems and activates the expression of genes involved in DNA uptake and recombination. Here we report that the induction of competence and competence gene expression by XIP (sigX-inducing peptide) and CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) is dependent on the growth phase and that environmental pH has a potent effect on the responses to XIP. A dramatic decline in comX and comS expression was observed in mid- and late-exponential-phase cells. XIP-mediated competence development and responses to XIP were optimal around a neutral pH, although mid-exponential-phase cells remained refractory to XIP treatment, and acidified late-exponential-phase cultures were resistant to killing by high concentrations of XIP. Changes in the expression of the genes for the oligopeptide permease (opp), which appears to be responsible for the internalization of XIP, could not entirely account for the behaviors observed. Interestingly, comS and comX expression was highly induced in response to endogenously overproduced XIP or ComS in mid-exponential-phase cells. In contrast to the effects of pH on XIP, competence induction and responses to CSP in complex medium were not affected by pH, although a decreased response to CSP in cells that had exited early-exponential phase was observed. Collectively, these results indicate that competence development may be highly sensitive to microenvironments within oral biofilms and that XIP and CSP signaling in biofilms could be spatially and temporally heterogeneous.

  9. Identification and functional analysis of genome mutations in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying; Chen, Jianwei; Brandt, Bernd Willem; Zhu, Yuanfang; Li, Jiyao; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    It is known that fluoride-resistant microorganisms are different from fluoride-sensitive ones in growth, adherence and metabolic activity. It was hypothesized that these phenotypic differences were due to stable genotypic changes in the fluoride-resistant strains. However, until now, no studies have reported these genotypic changes. The aim of this study is to identify such changes in a fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain (C180-2FR) using whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing and to examine the potential function of the identified mutations by comparing gene expression between the fluoride-sensitive (C180-2) and C180-2FR strains. We performed 50 bp paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing for both strains. Through extensive bioinformatic analysis, we were able to identify 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genome of C180-2FR, which were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Expression of the genes containing or in proximity to the SNPs in C180-2 and C180-2FR was then quantified by real-time PCR. A gene cluster containing genes coding for fluoride antiporters was up-regulated 10-fold in C180-2FR when compared to that in C180-2, independent of growth phase. Two SNPs are located in this gene cluster, one in its promoter region and the other in its protein-coding region. In addition, one gene, which codes for a putative glycerol uptake facilitator protein, was found to be down-regulated by 60% in C180-2FR at an early growth phase. The promoter region of this gene contained a SNP. No difference in expression was found for the other SNP-containing genes. In summary, using WGS sequencing, we were able to uncover genetic changes in the genome of a fluoride-resistant strain. These findings can provide new insights into the mechanism of microbial fluoride resistance.

  10. Factors Regulating Cell Wall Thickening and Intracellular Iodophilic Polysaccharide Storage in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, S. J.; Daneo-Moore, L.; Shockman, G. D.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of a series of different antibiotics on the synthesis and accumulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), protein, cell wall peptidoglycan (PG), and intracellular iodophilic polysaccharide (IPS) in Streptococcus mutans FA-1 were examined. d-Cycloserine, penicillin G, or vancomycin treatment resulted in rapid inhibitions of PG synthesis and a consequent decrease in the relative amount of lysine found in PG fractions. Decreases in culture turbidity, an indicator of gross cellular lysis, were not observed. Secondary inhibitions of the rates and extent of syntheses of DNA, RNA, and protein were observed. With all three inhibitors of PG synthesis, IPS synthesis continued for varying time intervals but, at most, resulted in only relatively small and transient increases in cellular IPS content. Chloramphenicol inhibited protein synthesis but permitted continued synthesis of RNA and PG. After 6 h, the cells contained 42% of their [3H] lysine in the PG fraction compared with 25% in exponential-phase cells, a good indication of thickened cell walls. In the presence of chloramphenicol, cellular IPS content increased about 2.5-fold during the first 45 min and then decreased to a level (13%) at 6 h very similar to that of exponential-phase cells (about 10%). Rifampin inhibition of RNA (and, consequently, also protein) synthesis resulted in accumulation of cellular PG and IPS. After 6 h, IPS accounted for 38% of the cellular dry weight, and the cells contained 43% of their lysine in PG. Thus, rifampin-inhibited cells appear to have both thickened walls and a high IPS content. The correlation between inhibition of RNA synthesis and IPS accumulation was confirmed by exposing cultures to rifampin for 60 min and then removing the drug, thus permitting the cells to regrow. Upon removal of rifampin and resumption of RNA synthesis, cellular IPS content rapidly decreased to the level expected for exponentialphase cells. PMID:892902

  11. Extracellular Identification of a Processed Type II ComR/ComS Pheromone of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rabia; Rukke, Håkon V.; Ricomini Filho, Antonio Pedro; Fimland, Gunnar; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Thiede, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) and the sigX-inducing peptide (XIP) are known to induce Streptococcus mutans competence for genetic transformation. For both pheromones, direct identification of the native peptides has not been accomplished. The fact that extracellular XIP activity was recently observed in a chemically defined medium devoid of peptides, as mentioned in an accompanying paper (K. Desai, L. Mashburn-Warren, M. J. Federle, and D. A. Morrison, J. Bacteriol. 194:3774–3780, 2012), provided ideal conditions for native XIP identification. To search for the XIP identity, culture supernatants were filtered to select for peptides of less than 3 kDa, followed by C18 extraction. One peptide, not detected in the supernatant of a comS deletion mutant, was identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) fragmentation as identical to the ComS C-terminal sequence GLDWWSL. ComS processing did not require Eep, a peptidase involved in processing or import of bacterial small hydrophobic peptides, since eep deletion had no inhibitory effect on XIP production or on synthetic XIP response. We investigated whether extracellular CSP was also produced. A reporter assay for CSP activity detection, as well as MS analysis of supernatants, revealed that CSP was not present at detectable levels. In addition, a mutant with deletion of the CSP-encoding gene comC produced endogenous XIP levels similar to those of a nondeletion mutant. The results indicate that XIP pheromone production is a natural phenomenon that may occur in the absence of natural CSP pheromone activity and that the heptapeptide GLDWWSL is an extracellular processed form of ComS, possibly the active XIP pheromone. This is the first report of direct identification of a ComR/ComS pheromone. PMID:22609914

  12. Peptidoglycan Loss During Hen Egg White Lysozyme-Inorganic Salt Lysis of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Hannah; Pollock, Jerry J.; Iacono, Vincent J.; Wong, William; Shockman, Gerald D.

    1981-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans BHT was grown in Todd-Hewitt dialysate medium containing N-acetyl[14C]glucosamine for 6 to 11 generations. After treatment with cold and hot trichloroacetic acid and trypsin, 52 to 65% of the radioactivity remained present in insoluble peptidoglycan-containing residues. Hen egg white lysozyme or mutanolysin treatment of the peptidoglycan residues resulted in the release of 80 and 97%, respectively, of the 14C label to the supernatant fraction. Hydrochloric acid hydrolysates of such supernatants showed that essentially all of the radioactivity present in insoluble peptidoglycan fractions was present in compounds that comigrated on paper chromatography with glucosamine (∼60%) or muramic acid (∼30%). Treatment of whole cells with low and high concentrations of lysozyme alone resulted in losses of 45 and 70% of the insoluble peptidoglycan, respectively, yet release of deoxyribonucleic acid from cells was not detected. Sequential addition of appropriate concentrations of selected inorganic salts after lysozyme treatment did result in the liberation of deoxyribonucleic acid. Deoxyribonucleic acid release was correlated with a further release of peptidoglycan from the insoluble fraction. However, the total amount of peptidoglycan lost effected by the low concentration of lysozyme and NaSCN (lysis) was significantly less than the amount of peptidoglycan hydrolyzed by high concentrations of lysozyme alone (no lysis), suggesting that the overall amount of peptidoglycan lost did not correlate well with cellular lysis. The total amount of insoluble peptidoglycan lost at the highest salt concentrations tested was found to be greater than could be accounted for by lysozyme-sensitive linkages of the peptidoglycan, possibly implicating autolysins. The results obtained suggested that hydrolysis of peptidoglycan bonds in topologically localized, but strategically important, sites was a more significant factor in the sequence that results in loss of cellular

  13. Multiple exposures to chlorhexidine and xylitol: adhesion and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Adriana; Drake, David R

    2006-06-01

    Growing evidence from clinical studies suggests that mothers using xylitol gums or lozenges have decreased levels of Streptococcus mutans (SM) and do not transmit these cariogenic bacteria as readily to their children. To begin to determine mechanisms for these clinical findings and to explore potential synergism of antimicrobial combinations, we studied the effect of multiple exposures of chlorhexidine (CHX) combined with copper gluconate (CG) or zinc gluconate (ZG) followed by xylitol (XYL) on the ability of SM to adhere and form biofilms. Cell suspensions of SM were exposed two times to CHX; CG; CHX plus CG; ZG; and CHX plus ZG, and then four times to XYL. Control cells were exposed six times to water or XYL or received no treatment. For biofilm assessment, glass slides were inoculated with treated cells, and numbers of bacteria were enumerated after 48 hours of incubation. To assess the ability of SM to adhere, microtiter plate wells coated with primary S. sanguinis biofilms grown in sucrose were inoculated with treated SM, and adhesion was determined. Cells exposed to CHX-XYL combinations exhibited significant but transient inhibition of growth. The multiple-exposure regimen groups showed significant decreases in the ability of SM to form biofilms (P < 0.05). However, the CHX-XYL group exhibited a much greater effect than the other treatment groups (P < 0.001). Adhesion studies revealed that none of the multiple-exposure regimens had a significant effect on adhesion of SM to primary biofilms of S. sanguinis. We concluded that significant inhibition of SM growth and subsequent inability to grow as biofilms in the presence of sucrose occurs after a staggered exposure regimen to CHX initially and then to XYL. This may help explain the clinical data showing the decreased levels of SM in mothers treated with CHX and XYL.

  14. Distribution of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in Dental Plaque of Indian Pre-School Children Using PCR and SB-20M Agar Medium

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Sachdev, Vinod; Chopra, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases affecting the oral cavity. Among the oral bacteria, mutans streptococci have been implicated as major cariogenic bacteria as they can produce high levels of dental caries causing substances such as lactic acid and extracellular polysaccharides. Aim The aim of the study was to detect the presence of Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus in dental plaque by using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method, quantification of these micro-organisms using Modified Sucrose-Bacitracin (SB-20M) agar medium and to correlate their presence in Caries Active (CA) and Caries Free (CF) pre-school children. Materials and Methods Sixty-eight pre-school children, in the age group of 3-5 years were divided equally into 34 CA and 34 CF children. Dental plaque samples were obtained for detection of these microorganisms by PCR method and quantification was done using SB-20M culture medium. The data was analyzed using statistical software SPSS version 16. For statistical analysis, the frequencies and means of Colony Forming Units (CFU) were used with CI = 95%. For bivariate analysis, Fisher exact test was used at 5% level of significance. The comparison of mean of number of CFU of S. mutans and S. sobrinus was made by Mann Whitney U test and Spearman’s Rho test at 1% level of significance was used for correlation between dmft and CFU in CA group. Results The results showed that S. sobrinus was significantly higher in CA group as compared to CF group whereas S. mutans showed no significant difference. On quantification of these micro-organisms, S. sobrinus was present in significantly higher numbers in CA group as compared to CF group. On correlating the CFU/ml of the micro-organisms with the dmft index, both the micro-organisms showed a positive correlation. Conclusion We conclude that S. mutans and S. sobrinus were detected in higher numbers in CA children as compared to CF children. PCR is a sensitive

  15. Ion release from copper phosphate cement and influence on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jennifer; Blackwell, Alison

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a black copper cement (BCC), an established restorative material (a conventional glass ionomer cement) and two temporary restorative materials (a zinc phosphate and a zinc polycarboxylate cement) on the growth of Streptococcus mutans in vitro, and to correlate bacterial growth with ion release from each material. Test specimens were eluted in either 0.1 M lactic acid, pH 4, or 0.1 M sodium chloride, pH 7. At 2 days, 7 days, 28 days and 6 months, eluates were inoculated with S. mutans and bacterial growth was recorded. Metal ion (Cu(2+), Zn(2+ )and Mg(2+)) and fluoride release were measured. At most immersion times, the different materials had a statistically significant inhibitory effect on bacterial growth compared to the respective control, at both pH levels. The inhibitory effect decreased with time and in most cases was associated with high levels of ion release at the beginning of the experimental period, followed by significantly lower levels. For BCC, there were statistically significant relationships between the median rates of growth of S. mutans in the presence of BCC eluates and the median values for release of copper and zinc, although not magnesium. Of the different materials, BCC demonstrated greatest antibacterial activity.

  16. Cloning, characterization and anion inhibition study of a β-class carbonic anhydrase from the caries producing pathogen Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Dedeoglu, Nurcan; De Luca, Viviana; Isik, Semra; Yildirim, Hatice; Kockar, Feray; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2015-07-01

    The oral pathogenic bacterium involved in human dental caries formation Streptococcus mutans, encodes for two carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) one belonging to the α- and the other one to the β-class. This last enzyme (SmuCA) has been cloned, characterized and investigated for its inhibition profile with a major class of CA inhibitors, the inorganic anions. Here we show that SmuCA has a good catalytic activity for the CO2 hydration reaction, with kcat 4.2×10(5)s(-1) and kcat/Km of 5.8×10(7)M(-1)×s(-1), being inhibited by cyanate, carbonate, stannate, divannadate and diethyldithiocarbamate in the submillimolar range (KIs of 0.30-0.64mM) and more efficiently by sulfamide, sulfamate, phenylboronic acid and phenylarsonic acid (KIs of 15-46μM). The anion inhibition profile of the S. mutans enzyme is very different from other α- and β-CAs investigated earlier. Identification of effective inhibitors of this new enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the role of S. mutans CAs in dental caries formation, and eventually the development of pharmacological agents with a new mechanism of antibacterial action.

  17. SMU.746-SMU.747, a putative membrane permease complex, is involved in aciduricity, acidogenesis, and biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Król, Jaroslaw E; Biswas, Saswati; King, Clay; Biswas, Indranil

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries induced by Streptococcus mutans is one of the most prevalent chronic infectious diseases worldwide. The pathogenicity of S. mutans relies on the bacterium's ability to colonize tooth surfaces and survive a strongly acidic environment. We performed an ISS1 transposon mutagenesis to screen for acid-sensitive mutants of S. mutans and identified an SMU.746-SMU.747 gene cluster that is needed for aciduricity. SMU.746 and SMU.747 appear to be organized in an operon and encode a putative membrane-associated permease. SMU.746- and SMU.747-deficient mutants showed a reduced ability to grow in acidified medium. However, the short-term or long-term acid survival capacity and F1F0 ATPase activity remained unaffected in the mutants. Furthermore, deletion of both genes did not change cell membrane permeability and the oxidative and heat stress responses. Growth was severely affected even with slight acidification of the defined medium (pH 6.5). The ability of the mutant strain to acidify the defined medium during growth in the presence of glucose and sucrose was significantly reduced, although the glycolysis rate was only slightly affected. Surprisingly, deletion of the SMU.746-SMU.747 genes triggered increased biofilm formation in low-pH medium. The observed effects were more striking in a chemically defined medium. We speculate that the SMU.746-SMU.747 complex is responsible for amino acid transport, and we discuss its possible role in colonization and survival in the oral environment.

  18. [Comparative study of the adherence test and the Petry plaque count test of Streptococcus mutans in saliva].

    PubMed

    Pivel, L; Angulo, M; Zinemanas, E

    1990-12-01

    The Streptococcus mutans counts--added to lactobacili depicting test--are an useful instrument in cariology when determining the risk groups. In studies concerning a large number of patients the S. Mutans count in saliva test are the most accesible. Nevertheless, they are very expensive and also complicate to carry out. Simplified techniques which depict S. Mutans on the basis of adherence tests have been perfected. The most suitable from them, taking into account our working conditions, is the Matsukubo test. We deemed it interesting to correlate this test and the Gold medium count. The study has been carried out with three different populations using both techniques at the same time. As per the correlation indices obtained we conclude that the Matsukubo technique and the count have a significant correlation between them. Due to its low cost, the simplicity of its realization, as well as its easy reading it can be effectively used as a primary procedure when studying populations large in number. Through this method selection will be made of the patients to be studied applying more precise microbiological techniques.

  19. The effects of surface roughness of composite resin on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of saliva.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Song, C W; Jung, J H; Ahn, S J; Ferracane, J L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of surface roughness of resin composite on biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans in the presence of saliva. To provide uniform surface roughness on composites, disks were prepared by curing composite against 400-grit silicon carbide paper (SR400), 800-grit silicon carbide paper (SR800), or a glass slide (SRGlass). The surface roughness was examined using confocal laser microscopy. For biofilm formation, S. mutans was grown for 24 hours with each disk in a biofilm medium with either glucose or sucrose in the presence of fluid-phase or surface-adsorbed saliva. The adherent bacteria were quantified via enumeration of the total viable counts of bacteria. Biofilms were examined using scanning electron microscopy. This study showed that SR400 had deeper and larger, but fewer depressions than SR800. Compared to SRGlass and SR800, biofilm formation was significantly increased on SR400. In addition, the differences in the effect of surface roughness on the amount of biofilm formation were not significantly influenced by either the presence of saliva or the carbohydrate source. Considering that similar differences in surface roughness were observed between SR400 and SR800 and between SR800 and SRGlass, this study suggests that surface topography (size and depth of depressions) may play a more important role than surface roughness in biofilm formation of S. mutans .

  20. Transcriptional Repressor Rex Is Involved in Regulation of Oxidative Stress Response and Biofilm Formation by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Bitoun, Jacob P.; Nguyen, Anne H.; Fan, Yuwei; Burne, Robert A.; Wen, Zezhang T.

    2011-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Rex has been implicated in regulation of energy metabolism and fermentative growth in response to redox potential. Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of human dental caries, possesses a gene that encodes a protein with high similarity to members of the Rex family of proteins. In this study, we showed that Rex-deficiency compromised the ability of S. mutans to cope with oxidative stress and to form biofilms. The Rex-deficient mutant also accumulated less biofilm after 3-days than the wild-type strain, especially when grown in sucrose-containing medium, but produced more extracellular glucans than the parental strain. Rex-deficiency caused substantial alterations in gene transcription, including those involved in heterofermentative metabolism, NAD+ regeneration and oxidative stress. Among the up-regulated genes was gtfC, which encodes glucosyltransferase C, an enzyme primarily responsible for synthesis of water-insoluble glucans. These results reveal that Rex plays an important role in oxidative stress responses and biofilm formation by S. mutans. PMID:21521360

  1. Sucrose- and Fructose-Specific Effects on the Transcriptome of Streptococcus mutans, as Determined by RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2015-10-16

    Recent genome-scale studies have begun to establish the scope and magnitude of the impacts of carbohydrate source and availability on the regulation of gene expression in bacteria. The effects of sugars on gene expression are particularly profound in a group of lactic acid bacteria that rely almost entirely on their saccharolytic activities for energy production and growth. For Streptococcus mutans, the major etiologic agent of human dental caries, sucrose is the carbohydrate that contributes in the most significant manner to establishment, persistence, and virulence of the organism. However, because this organism produces multiple extracellular sucrolytic enzymes that can release hexoses from sucrose, it has not been possible to study the specific effects of sucrose transport and metabolism on gene expression in the absence of carbohydrates that by themselves can elicit catabolite repression and induce expression of multiple genes. By employing RNA deep-sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology and mutants that lacked particular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, we compared the transcriptomes of S. mutans bacteria growing on glucose, fructose, or sucrose as the sole carbohydrate source. The results provide a variety of new insights into the impact of sucrose transport and metabolism by S. mutans, including the likely expulsion of fructose after sucrose internalization and hydrolysis, and identify a set of genes that are differentially regulated by sucrose versus fructose. The findings significantly enhance our understanding of the genetics and physiology of this cariogenic pathogen.

  2. The adaptive response of Streptococcus mutans towards oral care products: involvement of the ClpP serine protease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dong Mei; ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2007-10-01

    In the oral cavity a balanced physiological response is essential for Streptococcus mutans to survive various types of external challenges. In this study we examined the role of the ClpP serine protease in the response of S. mutans towards sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, hydrogen peroxide, and chlorhexidine. By constructing a clpP promoter-green fluorescent protein reporter strain, we showed increased fluorescence intensities under all types of stress, indicating a need for ClpP under all these challenges. We constructed a clpP knockout mutant, which proved to be more sensitive to all the challenges than the wild-type strain. This knockout strain also displayed a reduced growth rate, hyperaggregation, and increased biofilm formation. Furthermore, an increased resistance to toxic levels of hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine after pre-incubation with sublethal levels of the corresponding compounds was found in the wild-type strain but not in the knockout mutant. In conclusion, ClpP is involved in the general stress response of S. mutans and assists the bacteria to resist killing through adaptation.

  3. Action of silver nanoparticles towards biological systems: cytotoxicity evaluation using hen's egg test and inhibition of Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Freire, Priscila L L; Stamford, Thayza C M; Albuquerque, Allan J R; Sampaio, Fabio C; Cavalcante, Horacinna M M; Macedo, Rui O; Galembeck, André; Flores, Miguel A P; Rosenblatt, Aronita

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of four silver nanoparticle (AgNP) colloids and their ability to inhibit Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel. The cytotoxicity of AgNPs was evaluated based on signs of vascular change on the chorioallantoic membrane using the hen's egg test (HET-CAM). Bactericidal properties and inhibition of S. mutans biofilm formation were determined using a parallel-flow cell system and a dichromatic fluorescent stain. The percentage of viable cells was calculated from regression data generated from a viability standard. AgNP colloids proved to be non-irritating, as they were unable to promote vasoconstriction, haemorrhage or coagulation. AgNP colloids inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation on dental enamel, and cell viability measured by fluorescence was 0% for samples S1, S2, S3 and S4 and 36.5% for the positive control (diluted 30% silver diamine fluoride). AgNPs are new products with a low production cost because they have a lower concentration of silver, with low toxicity and an effective bactericidal effect against a cariogenic oral bacterium. Moreover, they do not promote colour change in dental enamel, which is an aesthetic advantage compared with traditional silver products.

  4. The effect of pomegranate mouthrinse on Streptococcus mutans count and salivary pH: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Dilshad; Dilshad, Bahija; Farhan, Mohammed; Ali, Arshiya; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Herbal mouthwashes have been considered to be a more advantageous option to their chemical counterparts, for a long-time. The use of pomegranate fruit dates from ancient times and reports of its therapeutic abilities have echoed throughout the ages. To evaluate the effect on the salivary pH and the Streptococcus mutans count in healthy subjects before and after pomegranate mouthrinse. Fifty healthy patients were randomly divided into two groups of 25 subjects each. Group A was treated with 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthrinse; while Group B was treated with pomegranate peel extract (PPE) mouthrinse and the saliva samples were collected at three different intervals: Prerinse, after 10 min, and 60 min. The salivary pH was measured using a digital pH meter and the S. mutans count was determined by the commercial system Dentocult SM. The statistical analyses used in this study are Mann–Whitney U-test and t-test. PPE mouthrinse had an inhibitory effect on S. mutans count in adults. There was also an increase in the salivary pH after 10 min of the mouthrinse. PPE mouthrinse may be considered as a potential anticariogenic mouthrinse. PMID:26955605

  5. The efficacy of chlorhexidine gel in reduction of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species in patients treated with radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, J.B.; McBride, B.C.; Stevenson-Moore, P.; Merilees, H.; Spinelli, J. )

    1991-02-01

    Xerostomia may develop in patients with cancer who receive radiotherapy that includes the salivary glands in the field. These patients are at high risk of rampant dental caries. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus species have been associated with dental caries. Quantitative counts of these organisms demonstrated high caries risk due to streptococci in 66% and due to lactobacilli in 100% of patients studied. Use of chlorhexidine rinse was shown to reduce S. mutans counts 1.1 logs and lactobacilli 1.1 logs. The use of chlorhexidine gel resulted in a reduction of S. mutans 1.2 logs and lactobacilli 2.2 logs. In the subjects using the rinse, caries risk due to streptococci was reduced to low levels in 44% and due to lactobacilli in only one subject, with reduction to moderate risk in one third and no change in risk in the remaining patients. The use of chlorhexidine gel was found to reduce the caries risk associated with streptococci to low levels in all patients, and the risk associated with lactobacilli to low and moderate risk in two thirds of patients.

  6. Chitosan incorporated in a total-etch adhesive system: antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Marcelo Figueiredo; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of an experimental adhesive system containing chitosan (0.2% and 0.5%) against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei. Twenty-four extracted human third molars were used, and 4 cavities were prepared in each tooth. The teeth were contaminated with either S mutans (n = 12 teeth, 48 cavities) or L casei (n = 12 teeth, 48 cavities) microorganisms. One cavity in each tooth received 1 of the following treatments: negative control (no treatment [NC]), positive control (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB]), an experimental adhesive containing chitosan 0.2% (CHI2), or an experimental adhesive containing chitosan 0.5% (CHI5). After sealing of the cavities and an incubation period, dentin scrapings were collected from each cavity for microbiological evaluation. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests revealed no statistically significant differences among the SB, CHI2, and CHI5 groups (P > 0.05), but all 3 differed significantly from the NC group (P ≤ 0.05). The concentrations of chitosan did not influence the antimicrobial effect against S mutans and L casei, presenting a similar effect to that of a conventional 2-step adhesive system.

  7. Effects of low-level laser therapy combined with toluidine blue on polysaccharides and biofilm of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Farias, S S; Nemezio, M A; Corona, S A M; Aires, C P; Borsatto, M C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a low-level laser therapy in combination with toluidine blue on polysaccharides and biofilm of Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans biofilms were formed on acrylic resin blocks. These biofilms were exposed eight times/day to 10 % sucrose, and two times/day, they were subjected to one of the following treatments: G1, 0.9 % NaCl as a negative control; G2, 0.12 % chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) as a positive antibacterial control; and G3 and G4 antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) combined with toluidine blue using dosages of 320 and 640 J/cm(2), respectively. The experiment was performed in triplicate. The biofilm formed on each block was collected for determination of the viable bacteria and concentration of insoluble extracellular polysaccharides (IEPS) and intracellular polysaccharides (IPS). CHX and aPDT treatments were able to inhibit bacterial growth in comparison with negative control (p < 0.05). The aPDT treatment reduced the number of viable bacteria formed in the S. mutans biofilm, in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). The concentration of IEPS and IPS in the biofilms formed in presence of aPDT did not differ each other or in comparison to CHX (p > 0.05). The results suggest that low-level laser therapy presents effects on biofilm bacteria viability and in polysaccharides concentration.

  8. Zinc Oxide Nanorods-Decorated Graphene Nanoplatelets: A Promising Antimicrobial Agent against the Cariogenic Bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zanni, Elena; Chandraiahgari, Chandrakanth Reddy; De Bellis, Giovanni; Montereali, Maria Rita; Armiento, Giovanna; Ballirano, Paolo; Polimeni, Antonella; Sarto, Maria Sabrina; Uccelletti, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are revolutionizing the field of medicine to improve the quality of life due to the myriad of applications stemming from their unique properties, including the antimicrobial activity against pathogens. In this study, the antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of a novel nanomaterial composed by zinc oxide nanorods-decorated graphene nanoplatelets (ZNGs) are investigated. ZNGs were produced by hydrothermal method and characterized through field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The antimicrobial activity of ZNGs was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans, the main bacteriological agent in the etiology of dental caries. Cell viability assay demonstrated that ZNGs exerted a strikingly high killing effect on S. mutans cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, FE-SEM analysis revealed relevant mechanical damages exerted by ZNGs at the cell surface of this dental pathogen rather than reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. In addition, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements showed negligible zinc dissolution, demonstrating that zinc ion release in the suspension is not associated with the high cell mortality rate. Finally, our data indicated that also S. mutans biofilm formation was affected by the presence of graphene-zinc oxide (ZnO) based material, as witnessed by the safranin staining and growth curve analysis. Therefore, ZNGs can be a remarkable nanobactericide against one of the main dental pathogens. The potential applications in dental care and therapy are very promising. PMID:28335307

  9. The antibacterial effect of sage extract (Salvia officinalis) mouthwash against Streptococcus mutans in dental plaque: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Beheshti-Rouy, Maryam; Azarsina, Mohadese; Rezaie-Soufi, Loghman; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Roshanaie, Ghodratollah; Komaki, Samira

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical effects of a mouthwash containing Sage (Salvia officinalis) extracts on Streptococcus mutans (SM) causing dental plaque in school-aged children. Material and Methods: A double blind clinical trial study was conducted in a dormitory on 70 girls aged 11–14 years having the same socioeconomic and oral hygiene conditions. These students were randomly divided into 2 groups; the first group (N=35) using Sage mouthwash, and the second group (N=35) using placebo mouthwash without active any ingredients. At the baseline, plaque samples obtained from the buccal surfaces of teeth were sent to laboratory to achieve SM colony count. These tests were reevaluated after 21 days of using the mouthwashes. Statistical data analysis was performed using t-student tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: Sage mouthwash significantly reduced the colony count (P=0.001). Average number of colonies in test group was 3900 per plaque sample at the baseline, and 300 after mouthwash application. In the control group, pre-test colony count was 4400 that was reduced to 4000; although this reduction wasn't significant. Conclusion: The Sage mouthwash effectively reduced the number of Streptococcus mutans in dental plaque. PMID:26668706

  10. Correlation of Streptococcus mutans count in Mother-child Pair of Working and Nonworking Mothers: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Mousumi; Singh, Darrel; Massod, Shahid S; Nganba, Khundrakpam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of Streptococcus mutans (MS) in mother-child pairs and to evaluate the correlation in the levels of salivary MS of working and nonworking mothers with that of their children and their associations with other related factors. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out among 100 mother-child pairs residing in New Multan Nagar Colony, New Delhi, India. A total of 50 children with their mothers were included in the working group and another 50 were included in the nonworking group. A questionnaire regarding the feeding habits, oral hygiene habits, daily intake of sugars of the children along with their weaning time was carried out. All mothers and children were clinically examined for recording decayed, extracted, and filled teeth (deft)/decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT), and whole unstimulated saliva was collected and cultured for MS in the laboratory. The data were collected and subjected to statistical analysis using chi-square, Spearman’s correlation, and logistic regression analysis. Results The prevalence of salivary MS in the children was 69%. A statistically significant correlation was found between the oral levels of MS in nonworking and working mother-child pairs. Regression analysis showed that those children who feed by bottle for more than 12 months, have daily sweet intake, have sugars in feeding bottle and have higher defts were more likely to have mutans score of 1 or 2. Conclusion The mother, working or nonworking, being the primary care provider is the major source of transmission of MS to their child irrespective of the amount of time spent with them. How to cite this article Sharma P, Goswami M, Singh D, Massod SS, Nganba K. Correlation of Streptococcus mutans count in Mother-child Pair of Working and Nonworking Mothers: A Cross-sectional Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):342-348. PMID:28127167

  11. Inhibited biofilm formation and improved antibacterial activity of a novel nanoemulsion against cariogenic Streptococcus mutans in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun Fei; Sun, Hong Wu; Gao, Rong; Liu, Kai Yun; Zhang, Hua Qi; Fu, Qi Huan; Qing, Sheng Li; Guo, Gang; Zou, Quan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a novel nanoemulsion loaded with poorly water-soluble chlorhexidine acetate (CNE) to improve its solubility, and specifically enhance the antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans in vitro and in vivo. In this study, a novel CNE nanoemulsion with an average size of 63.13 nm and zeta potential of −67.13 mV comprising 0.5% CNE, 19.2% Tween 80, 4.8% propylene glycol, and 6% isopropyl myristate was prepared by the phase inversion method. Important characteristics such as the content, size, zeta potential, and pH value of CNE did not change markedly, stored at room temperature for 1 year. Also, compared with chlorhexidine acetate water solution (CHX), the release profile results show that the CNE has visibly delayed releasing effect in both phosphate-buffered saline and artificial saliva solutions (P<0.005). The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of CHX for S. mutans (both 0.8 μg/mL) are both two times those of CNE (0.4 μg/mL). Besides, CNE of 0.8 μg/mL exhibited fast-acting bactericidal efficacy against S. mutans, causing 95.07% death within 5 minutes, compared to CHX (73.33%) (P<0.01). We observed that 5 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL CNE were both superior to CHX, significantly reducing oral S. mutans numbers and reducing the severity of carious lesions in Sprague Dawley rats (P<0.05), in an in vivo test. CNE treatment at a concentration of 0.2 μg/mL inhibited biofilm formation more effectively than CHX, as indicated by the crystal violet staining method, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The cell membrane of S. mutans was also severely disrupted by 0.2 μg/mL CNE, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. These results demonstrated that CNE greatly improved the solubility and antimicrobial activity of this agent against S. mutans both in vitro and in vivo. This novel nanoemulsion is a promising medicine for preventing and curing dental caries. PMID:25624759

  12. Inhibition of Major Virulence Pathways of Streptococcus mutans by Quercitrin and Deoxynojirimycin: A Synergistic Approach of Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Sadaf; Singh, Kunal; Danisuddin, Mohd; Verma, Praveen K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the synergistic effect of Quercitrin and Deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) together with their individual inhibitory effect against virulence pathways of Streptococcus mutans. Methodology MICs of both the compounds were determined by the microdilution method, followed by their in vitrosynergy using checkerboard and time kill assay. The nature of interaction was classified as synergistic on the basis of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) value of ≤0.5. Furthermore, the activity of Quercitrin and DNJ was evaluated individually and in combination against various cariogenic properties of S. mutans UA159 such as acidogenesis, aciduracity, glucan production, hydrophobicity, biofilm and adherence. Moreover, expression of virulent genes in S. mutans was analysed by quantitative RT- PCR (qRT-PCR) and inhibition of F1F0-ATPase, lactate dehydrogenase and enolase was also evaluated. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate structural obliteration of biofilm. Results The in vitro synergism between Quercitrin and DNJ was observed, with a FICI of 0.313. Their MIC values were found to be 64 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml respectively. The synergistic combination consistently showed best activity against all the virulence factors as compared to Quercitrin and DNJ individually. A reduction in glucan synthesis and biofilm formation was observed at different phases of growth. The qRT-PCR revealed significant downregulation of various virulent genes. Electron micrographs depicted the obliteration of biofilm as compared to control and the activity of cariogenic enzymes was also inhibited. Conclusions The whole study reflects a prospective role of Quercitrin and DNJ in combination as a potent anticariogenic agent against S. mutans. PMID:24622055

  13. Ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid isolated from Iostephane heterophylla as a promising antibacterial agent against Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Dulce M; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Rivero-Cruz, Blanca E; Bye, Robert A; Aguilar, María Isabel; Rivero-Cruz, J Fausto

    2012-04-01

    From the roots of Iostephane heterophylla, six known compounds, namely, ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid (1), the mixture of ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid (2) and ent-beyer-15-en-19-oic acid (3), xanthorrhizol (4), 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaurane (5) and 16α-hydroxy-ent-kaur-11-en-19-oic acid (6) were isolated using a bioassay-guided fractionation method. The known compounds (1-6) were identified by comparison of their spectroscopic data with reported values in the literature. In an attempt to increase the resultant antimicrobial activity of 1 and 4, a series of reactions was performed on ent-trachyloban-19-oic acid (1) and xanthorrhizol (4), to obtain derivatives 1a, 1b, and 4a-4d. All the isolated compounds (1-6) and the derivatives 1a, 1b, and 4a-4d were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against two oral pathogens, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with caries and periodontal disease, respectively. Compounds 1, 1b, 2+3, 4 and 4d inhibited the growth of S. mutans with concentrations ranging from 4.1 μg/mL to 70.5 μg/mL. No significant activity was found on P. gingivalis except for 4 with an MIC of 6.8 μg/mL. The ability of 1, 1b, 2+3, 4 and 4d to inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans was evaluated. It was found that 1, 1b, 4 and 4d interfered with the establishment of S. mutans biofilms, inhibiting their development at 32.5, 125.0, 14.1 and 24.4 μg/mL, respectively.

  14. Analysis of Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans under Acid Stress—A New Insight for Caries Research

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shanshan; Tao, Ye; Yu, Lixia; Zhuang, Peilin; Zhi, Qinghui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Huancai

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is the major clinical pathogen responsible for dental caries. Its acid tolerance has been identified as a significant virulence factor for its survival and cariogenicity in acidic conditions. Small RNAs (sRNAs) are recognized as key regulators of virulence and stress adaptation. Here, we constructed three libraries of sRNAs with small size exposed to acidic conditions for the first time, followed by verification using qRT-PCR. The levels of two sRNAs and target genes predicted to be bioinformatically related to acid tolerance were further evaluated under different acid stress conditions (pH 7.5, 6.5, 5.5, and 4.5) at three time points (0.5, 1, and 2 h). Meanwhile, bacterial growth characteristics and vitality were assessed. We obtained 1879 sRNAs with read counts of at least 100. One hundred and ten sRNAs were perfectly mapped to reported msRNAs in S. mutans. Ten out of 18 sRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. The survival of bacteria declined as the acid was increased from pH 7.5 to 4.5 at each time point. The bacteria can proliferate under each pH except pH 4.5 with time. The levels of sRNAs gradually decreased from pH 7.5 to 5.5, and slightly increased in pH 4.5; however, the expression levels of target mRNAs were up-regulated in acidic conditions than in pH 7.5. These results indicate that some sRNAs are specially induced at acid stress conditions, involving acid adaptation, and provide a new insight into exploring the complex acid tolerance for S. mutans. PMID:27649155

  15. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy on Streptococcus mutans using curcumin and toluidine blue activated by a novel LED device.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Marco Aurelio; Lin, Meng; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes; Duarte, Simone

    2015-02-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an antimicrobial approach that uses photosensitizers (PS) in combination with light sources at specific wavelengths aiming the production of reactive oxygen species. The long illumination time necessary to active PS is a challenge in PACT. Thus, this study investigated the antimicrobial effect of a novel single source of light-emitting diode (LED) light that covers the entire spectrum of visible light beyond interchangeable probes at high power intensity. Blue and red LED probes were used into different exposure times to active different concentrations of curcumin (C) and toluidine blue (T) on planktonic suspensions of Streptococcus mutans UA 159 (S. mutans). S. mutans were standardized and submitted to (1) PACT treatment at three concentrations of C and T exposure at three radiant exposures of a blue LED (BL) (C+BL+) and a red LED (RL) (T+RL+), (2) C (C+BL-) or T alone (T+RL-), (3) both LED lights (C-BL+ and T-RL+), and (4) neither PS nor LED illumination (control group: C-BL- and T-RL-). Aliquots of the suspensions were diluted and cultured on blood agar plates. The number of colony-forming units was calculated after 48 h. The groups submitted to PACT presented a lethal photokilling rate to all PS concentrations at tested dosimetries. The comparison to control group when PS and LED lights used alone demonstrated no decrease in the number of viable bacterial counts. The novel LED device in combination with curcumin and toluidine blue promoted an effective photoinactivation of S. mutans suspensions at ultrashort light illumination times.

  16. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries. PMID:27242713

  17. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    PubMed

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss.

  18. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Effectiveness and the Effect of Dosage and Frequency of Sugar-free Chewing Gums on Streptococcus mutans Count: An in vivo Microbiological Study.

    PubMed

    Marwaha, Mohita; Bhat, Manohar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of sugar-free chewing gums and also to assess the effect of dosage and frequency of intake of sugar-free gums on Streptococcus mutans count. Method : The sample consisted of 30 subjects, divided into two groups AI and AII. Each group consisted of 15 subjects. Group AI chewed two sugar-free chewing gum, twice daily for 20 minutes (Total four gums daily) and group AII chewed two sugar-free chewing gum, four times daily for 20 minutes (Total eight gums daily) and saliva sample was collected and agar plates were inoculated for Streptococcus mutans colony count. The study was carried for a week's time and saliva samples collected were baseline, day 1 morning and evening, day 4 evening, day 7 morning and evening. Results : After the gum was chewed, it was observed that the colony count started to reduce when compared with baseline in both the groups. The fall in Streptococcus mutans count was statistically highly significant with p < 0.001 in both the groups. When comparing between group AI (dosage 4 gums daily) and group AII (dosage 8 gums daily), the fall in Streptococcus mutans count for both the groups was not statistically significant with p > 0.05. It was concluded that there was reduction in the level of salivary Streptococcus mutans, but was not statistically significant by increasing the dosage and frequency of intake of sugar-free chewing gums. Therefore, we recommend that dosage of sugar-free chewing gums can be restricted to four gums instead of eight gums per day.

  19. Isolation and purification of Flavobacterium alpha-1,3-glucanase-hydrolyzing, insoluble, sticky glucan of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Ebisu, S; Kato, K; Kotani, S; Misaki, A

    1975-01-01

    Studies were made on the physical and chemical properties of polysaccharides synthesized by cell-free extracts of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus sp. and their susceptibilities to dextranases. Among the polysaccharides examined, insoluble glucans were rather resistant to available dextranase preparations, and the insoluble, sticky glucan produced by S. mutans OMZ 176, which could be important in formation of dental plaques, was the most resistant. By enrichment culture of soil specimens, using OMZ 176 glucans as the sole carbon source, an organism was isolated that produced colonies surrounded by a clear lytic zone on opaque agar plates containing the OMZ 176 glucan. The organism was identified as a strain of Flavobacterium and named the Ek-14 bacterium. EK-14 bacterium was grown in Trypticase soy broth, and an enzyme capable of hydrolyzing the OMZ 176 glucan was concentrated from the culture supernatant and purified by negative adsorption on a diethylaminoethyl-cellulose (DE-32) column and gradient elution chromatography with a carboxymethyl-cellulose (CM-32) column. The enzyme was a basic protein with an isoelectric point of pH 8.5 and molecular weight of 65,000. Its optimum pH was 6.3 and its optimal temperature was 42 C. The purified enzyme released 11% of the total glucose residues of the OMZ 176 glucan as reducing sugars and solubilized about half of the substrate glucan. The products were found to be isomaltose, nigerose, and nigerotriose, with some oligosaccharides. The purified enzyme split the alpha-1,3-glucan endolytically and was inactive toward glucans containing alpha-1,6, alpha-1,4, beta-1,3, beta-1,4, and/or beta-1,6 bonds as the main linkages. Images PMID:370

  20. Inhibition of Streptococcus mutans Growth and Biofilm Formation by Probiotics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schwendicke, Falk; Korte, Franziska; Dörfer, Christof E; Kneist, Susanne; Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim; Paris, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    To exert anticaries effects, probiotics are described to inhibit growth and biofilm formation of cariogenic bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans (SM). We screened 8 probiotics and assessed how SM growth or biofilm formation inhibition affects cariogenicity of probiotic-SM mixed-species biofilms in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by cocultivating probiotics and 2 SM strains (ATCC 20532/25175) on agar. Probiotics were either precultured before SM cultivation (exclusion), or SM precultured prior to probiotic cultivation (displacement). Inhibition of SM culture growth was assessed visually. Inhibition of SM biofilm formation on bovine enamel was assessed using a continuous-flow short-term biofilm model, again in exclusion or displacement mode. The cariogenicity of mixed-species biofilms of SM with the most promising growth and biofilm formation inhibiting probiotic strains was assessed using an artificial mouth model, and enamel mineral loss (ΔZ) was measured microradiographically. We found limited differences in SM growth inhibition in exclusion versus displacement mode, and in inhibition of SM 20532 versus 25175. Results were therefore pooled. Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 inhibited significantly more SM culture growth than most other probiotics. L. casei LC-11 inhibited SM biofilm formation similarly to other alternatives but showed the highest retention of probiotics in the biofilms (p < 0.05). Mineral loss from SM monospecies biofilms (ΔZ = 9,772, 25th/75th percentiles: 6,277/13,558 vol% × µm) was significantly lower than from mixed-species SM × LA-5 biofilms (ΔZ = 24,578, 25th/75th percentiles: 19,081/28,768 vol% × µm; p < 0.01) but significantly higher than from SM × LC-11 biofilms (ΔZ = 4,835, 25th/75th percentiles: 263/7,865 vol% × µm; p < 0.05). Probiotics inhibiting SM culture growth do not necessarily reduce the cariogenicity of SM-probiotic biofilms. Nevertheless, SM biofilm formation inhibition may be relevant in the reduction of

  1. Interactions between Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces oris, and Candida albicans in the development of multispecies oral microbial biofilms on salivary pellicle.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, I M G; Del Bel Cury, A A; Jenkinson, H F; Nobbs, A H

    2017-02-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is carried orally and causes a range of superficial infections that may become systemic. Oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque and on oral mucosa. The aims of this study were to determine the mechanisms by which S. oralis and A. oris interact with each other and with C. albicans in biofilm development. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy of biofilms labeled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Actinomyces oris and S. oralis formed robust dual-species biofilms, or three-species biofilms with C. albicans. The bacterial components tended to dominate the lower levels of the biofilms while C. albicans occupied the upper levels. Non-fimbriated A. oris was compromised in biofilm formation in the absence or presence of streptococci, but was incorporated into upper biofilm layers through binding to C. albicans. Biofilm growth and hyphal filament production by C. albicans was enhanced by S. oralis. It is suggested that the interkingdom biofilms are metabolically coordinated to house all three components, and this study demonstrates that adhesive interactions between them determine spatial distribution and biofilm architecture. The physical and chemical communication processes occurring in these communities potentially augment C. albicans persistence at multiple oral cavity sites.

  2. Characterization of salivary immunoglobulin A responses in children heavily exposed to the oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans: influence of specific antigen recognition in infection.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Ruchele D; Alves, Alessandra C; Napimoga, Marcelo H; Smith, Daniel J; Mattos-Graner, Renata O

    2005-09-01

    The initial infection of children by Streptococcus mutans, the main pathogen of dental caries, depends on the ability of S. mutans to adhere and accumulate on tooth surfaces. These processes involve the adhesin antigen I/II (AgI/II), glucosyltransferases (GTF) and glucan-binding protein B (GbpB), each a target for anticaries vaccines. The salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody responses to S. mutans antigens (Ags) were characterized in 21 pairs of 5- to 13-month-old children. Pairs were constructed with one early S. mutans-infected and one noninfected child matched by age, racial background, number of teeth, and salivary levels of IgA. Specific salivary IgA antibody response and S. mutans infection levels were then measured during a 1-year follow-up. Robust responses to S. mutans were detected from 6 months of age. Salivary IgA antibody to AgI/II and GTF was commonly detected in salivas of all 42 children. However, GbpB-specific IgA antibody was seldom detected in the subset of infected children (38.1% at baseline). In contrast, most of the subset of noninfected children (76.2%) showed GbpB-reactive IgA antibody during the same period. Frequencies of GbpB responses increased with age, but differences in intensities of GbpB-IgA antibody reactions were sustained between the subsets. At baseline, GbpB-reactive IgA antibody accounted for at least half of the total salivary IgA S. mutans-reactive antibody in 33.3 and 9.5% of noninfected and infected children, respectively. This study provides evidence that a robust natural response to S. mutans Ags can be achieved by 1 year of age and that IgA antibody specificities may be critical in modulating initial S. mutans infection.

  3. Interkingdom cooperation between Candida albicans, Streptococcus oralis and Actinomyces oris modulates early biofilm development on denture material.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Nobbs, Angela H; Ricomini-Filho, Antônio Pedro; Jenkinson, Howard F; Del Bel Cury, Altair A

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated stomatitis affects up to 60% of denture wearers, and Candida albicans remains the most commonly isolated fungal species. The oral bacteria Actinomyces oris and Streptococcus oralis are abundant in early dental plaque. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of S. oralis and A. oris on the development of C. albicans biofilms on denture material. Resin discs were coated with saliva and at early (1.5 h) or later (24 h) stages of biofilm development, cell numbers of each species were determined. Spatial distribution of microorganisms was visualized by confocal scanning laser microscopy of biofilms labelled by differential fluorescence or by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interkingdom interactions underpinning biofilm development were also evaluated planktonically utilizing fluorescence microscopy. Synergistic interactions between all three species occurred within biofilms and planktonically. Bacterial cells coaggregated with each other and adhered singly or in coaggregates to C. albicans hyphal filaments. Streptococcus oralis appeared to enhance hyphal filament production and C. albicans biovolume was increased 2-fold. Concomitantly, cell numbers of S. oralis and A. oris were enhanced by C. albicans. Thus, cooperative physical and metabolic processes occurring between these three microbial species intensify pathogenic plaque communities on denture surfaces.

  4. Regulated proteolysis of the alternative sigma factor SigX in Streptococcus mutans: implication in the escape from competence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SigX (σX), the alternative sigma factor of Streptococcus mutans, is the key regulator for transcriptional activation of late competence genes essential for taking up exogenous DNA. Recent studies reveal that adaptor protein MecA and the protease ClpC act as negative regulators of competence by a mechanism that involves MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX by the ClpC in S. mutans. However, the molecular detail how MecA and ClpC negatively regulate competence in this species remains to be determined. Here, we provide evidence that adaptor protein MecA targets SigX for degradation by the protease complex ClpC/ClpP when S. mutans is grown in a complex medium. Results By analyzing the cellular levels of SigX, we demonstrate that the synthesis of SigX is transiently induced by competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), but the SigX is rapidly degraded during the escape from competence. A deletion of MecA, ClpC or ClpP results in the cellular accumulation of SigX and a prolonged competence state, while an overexpression of MecA enhances proteolysis of SigX and accelerates the escape from competence. In vitro protein-protein interaction assays confirm that MecA interacts with SigX via its N-terminal domain (NTD1–82) and with ClpC via its C-terminal domain (CTD123–240). Such an interaction mediates the formation of a ternary SigX-MecA-ClpC complex, triggering the ATP-dependent degradation of SigX in the presence of ClpP. A deletion of the N-terminal or C-terminal domain of MecA abolishes its binding to SigX or ClpC. We have also found that MecA-regulated proteolysis of SigX appears to be ineffective when S. mutans is grown in a chemically defined medium (CDM), suggesting the possibility that an unknown mechanism may be involved in negative regulation of MecA-mediated proteolysis of SigX under this condition. Conclusion Adaptor protein MecA in S. mutans plays a crucial role in recognizing and targeting SigX for degradation by the protease ClpC/ClpP. Thus, Mec

  5. Comparing the efficacy of xylitol-containing and conventional chewing gums in reducing salivary counts of Streptococcus mutans: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Rosa; Afshari, Elahe; Ghanaat, Tahere; Aghazadeh, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Dental caries is among the most common chronic diseases in humans. Streptococcus mutans is generally responsible for most cases of dental caries. The present study sought to compare the effects of xylitol-containing and conventional chewing gums on salivary levels of S. mutans. Materials and Methods: This study adopted a crossover design. Two type of chewing gums (one containing 70% xylitol and approved by the Iranian Dental Association, and another containing sucrose) were purchased. The participants were 32 individuals aged 18–35 years whose oral hygiene was categorized as moderate or poor based on a caries risk assessment table. Salivary levels of S. mutans were measured at baseline, after the first and second phases of chewing gums, and after the washout period. The measurements were performed on blood agar and mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar (MSBA). Pairwise comparisons were then used to analyze the collected data. Results: Salivary levels of S. mutans in both groups were significantly higher during the two stages of chewing gum than in the washout period or baseline. Moreover, comparisons between the two types of gums suggested that chewing xylitol-containing gums led to greater reductions in S. mutans counts. This effect was more apparent in subjects with poor oral hygiene than in those with moderate oral hygiene. Conclusions: Xylitol-containing chewing gums are more effective than conventional gums in reducing salivary levels of S. mutans in individuals with poor–moderate oral hygiene. PMID:26942114

  6. Oral colonization of Streptococcus mutans in six-month-old predentate infants.

    PubMed

    Wan, A K; Seow, W K; Purdie, D M; Bird, P S; Walsh, L J; Tudehope, D I

    2001-12-01

    We hypothesize that S. mutans colonization occurs more frequently in pre-term children due to their relative immaturity. In this study of 172 predentate, six-month-old infants, we found that 50% of pre-term and 60% of full-term children harbored S. mutans. The colonization was confirmed by repeat sampling. Although there were minor differences, factors associated with S. mutans infection in pre-term and full-term infants were generally similar. In both groups, increased frequency of sugar was ranked the most important factor (p < 0.001), followed by breast-feeding (p < 0.001), and habits which allowed saliva transfer from mother to infant (p < 0.01). By contrast, non-colonization of S. mutans was associated with multiple courses of antibiotics (p < 0.001). Compared with pre-term children, there were higher percentages of full-term who had night feedings and consumed sugar during sleep times. Mothers with infected infants had S. mutans levels > 5 x 10(5) CFU/mL saliva (p < 0.001), poorer oral hygiene, more periodontal disease, and lower socio-economic status (p < 0.02) and snacked frequently (p < 0.001), compared with mothers with non-infected infants.

  7. Biochemical and molecular characterization of a novel type of Mutanase from Paenibacillus sp. strain RM1: identification of its mutan-binding domain, essential for degradation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Shimotsuura, Isao; Kigawa, Hiromitsu; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Kuramitsu, Howard K; Nakashima, Syozi

    2008-05-01

    A novel type of mutanase (termed mutanase RM1) was isolated from Paenibacillus sp. strain RM1. The purified enzyme specifically hydrolyzed alpha-1,3-glucan (mutan) and effectively degraded biofilms formed by Streptococcus mutans, a major etiologic agent in the progression of dental caries, even following brief incubation. The nucleotide sequence of the gene for this protein contains a 3,873-bp open reading frame encoding 1,291 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 135 kDa. The protein contains two major domains, the N-terminal domain (277 residues) and the C-terminal domain (937 residues), separated by a characteristic sequence composed of proline and threonine repeats. The characterization of the recombinant proteins for each domain which were expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the N-terminal domain had strong mutan-binding activity but no mutanase activity whereas the C-terminal domain was responsible for mutanase activity but had mutan-binding activity significantly lower than that of the intact protein. Importantly, the biofilm-degrading activity observed with the intact protein was not exhibited by either domain alone or in combination with the other. Therefore, these results indicate that the structural integrity of mutanase RM1 containing the N-terminal mutan-binding domain is required for the biofilm-degrading activity.

  8. Effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-producing property of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Deepak; Singh, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of the natural compounds embelin and piperine on the biofilm-formation property of Streptococcus mutans. A total of 30 clinical isolates were identified as S. mutans and screened for biofilm formation using the microtiter plate method. The strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was used for identifying both minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC). We subsequently used this concentration against each of the strong biofilm producer isolates at A492 < 0.5 optical density (OD). Of the 30 isolates screened for biofilm formation, 18 isolates showed strong biofilm formation, 09 isolates showed moderate formation, and 03 isolates showed poor/nonbiofilm formation. The MIC of embelin for the strongest biofilm producer (SM03) was 0.55 ± 0.02, whereas that of piperine was 0.33 ± 0.02. The MBIC of embelin was 0.0620 ± 0.03, whereas that of piperine was 0.0407 ± 0.03, which was lower than that of embelin. At OD492 < 0.5, the MBIC of both compounds significantly inhibited biofilm formation of all the 18 strong biofilm-forming isolates. The results of this study demonstrate a significant antibiofilm effect of the natural compounds embelin and piperine, which can contribute towards the development of a database for novel drug candidates for treating oral infections caused by S. mutans. PMID:26870681

  9. Glucose transport by a mutant of Streptococcus mutans unable to accumulate sugars via the phosphoenolpyruvate phosphotransferase system.

    PubMed Central

    Cvitkovitch, D G; Boyd, D A; Thevenot, T; Hamilton, I R

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans transports glucose via the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS). Earlier studies indicated that an alternate glucose transport system functions in this organism under conditions of high growth rates, low pH, or excess glucose. To identify this system, S. mutans BM71 was transformed with integration vector pDC-5 to generate a mutant, DC10, defective in the general PTS protein enzyme I (EI). This mutant expressed a defective EI that had been truncated by approximately 150 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus as revealed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with anti-EI antibody and Southern hybridizations with a fragment of the wild-type EI gene as a probe. Phosphotransfer assays utilizing 32P-PEP indicated that DC10 was incapable of phosphorylating HPr and EIIAMan, indicating a nonfunctional PTS. This was confirmed by the fact that DC10 was able to ferment glucose but not a variety of other PTS substrates and phosphorylated glucose with ATP and not PEP. Kinetic assays indicated that the non-PTS system exhibited an apparent Ks of 125 microM for glucose and a Vmax of 0.87 nmol mg (dry weight) of cells-1 min-1. Sugar competition experiments with DC10 indicated that the non-PTS transport system had high specificity for glucose since glucose transport was not significantly by a 100-fold molar excess of several competing sugar substrates, including 2-deoxyglucose and alpha-methylglucoside. These results demonstrate that S. mutans possesses a glucose transport system that can function independently of the PEP PTS. PMID:7730250

  10. In vitro antimicrobial activities of 1-methoxyficifolinol, licorisoflavan A, and 6,8-diprenylgenistein against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sug-Joon; Park, Soon-Nang; Lee, Young Ju; Cho, Eun-Jung; Lim, Yun Kyong; Li, Xue Min; Choi, Mi-Hwa; Seo, Young-Woo; Kook, Joong-Ki

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of purified single compounds from ethanol-extracted licorice root on Streptococcus mutans. The crude licorice root extract (CLE) was obtained from Glycyrrhiza uralensis, which was subjected to column chromatography to separate compounds. Purified compounds were identified by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. Antimicrobial activities of purified compounds from CLE were evaluated by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration and by performing time-kill kinetics. The inhibitory effects of the compounds on biofilm development were evaluated using crystal violet assay and confocal microscopy. Cell toxicity of substances to normal human gingival fibroblast (NHGF) cells was tested using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) was used in the control group. Three antimicrobial flavonoids, 1-methoxyficifolinol, licorisoflavan A, and 6,8-diprenylgenistein, were isolated from the CLE. We found that the three flavonoids and CHX had bactericidal effects on S. mutans UA159 at the concentration of ≥4 and ≥1 µg/ml, respectively. The purified compounds completely inhibited biofilm development of S. mutans UA159 at concentrations over 4 μg/ml, which was equivalent to 2 μg/ml of CHX. Confocal analysis showed that biofilms were sparsely scattered in the presence of over 4 μg/ml of the purified compounds. However, the three compounds purified from CLE showed less cytotoxic effects on NHGF cells than CHX at these biofilm-inhibitory concentrations. Our results suggest that purified flavonoids from CLE can be useful in developing oral hygiene products, such as gargling solutions and dentifrices for preventing dental caries.

  11. Effect of partially hydrolyzed soluble glucan produced by glucosyltrasferases of Streptococcus mutans on stimulating human T cell.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inwook; Jung, Changhwa; Han, Yeook; Lee, Eunjoo H

    2006-01-01

    Soluble glucan, which was obtained from action of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of Streptococcus mutans on sucrose, was partially hydrolyzed by acetic acid and examined for human T lymphoblast (MOLT-4) stimulating activity. Addition of the partially hydrolyzed glucan (15-60 microg/ml) stimulated human T cell (39-65%) in a dose dependant manner according to MTT assay. Production of interleukine-2 (IL-2) and interleukine-2 receptor (IL-2R) from T cell was increased by 44.5 and 25%, respectively, by addition of partially hydrolyzed glucan (15 microg/ml). These results indicate that stimulation of human T cells by hydrolyzed glucan is probably caused by its effects on stimulating gene expression of IL-2 and IL-2R of human T cell.

  12. Cariogenicity of isomaltulose (palatinose), sucrose and mixture of these sugars in rats infected with Streptococcus mutans E-49.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N; Topitsoglou, V; Takazoe, I; Frostell, G

    1985-01-01

    Each of three groups of Wistar rats, 19-20 animals per group, was fed an experimental diet containing either (1) isomaltulose 56%, (2) sucrose 56%, or (3) a mixture of isomaltulose and sucrose (17.5% + 38.5%). The animals were infected with Streptococcus mutans E-49 and one half of the animals was kept on the diet for 8 weeks and the other half for 14 weeks. Only sulcal caries was found in the isomaltulose animals after 8 weeks and 14 weeks. the group fed sucrose had high numbers of carious bucco-lingual, proximal and sulcal surfaces. The group fed the mixture of sucrose and isomaltulose had fewer lesions than the sucrose group on bucco-lingual surfaces after the 8 week experiment (P less than 0.01) and fewer bucco-lingual and proximal surfaces (P less than 0.01) after the 14 week experiment.

  13. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Tatsuya; Takenaka, Shoji; Wakamatsu, Rika; Sakaue, Yuuki; Narisawa, Naoki; Senpuku, Hidenobu; Ohshima, Hayato; Terao, Yutaka; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  14. Immunochemical properties of antigen-specific monkey T-cell suppressor factor induced with a Streptococcus mutans antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, J R; Zanders, E D; Kontiainen, S; Lehner, T

    1980-01-01

    Antigen-specific suppressor factor could be released from monkey suppressor T cells induced in vitro with a protein antigen isolated from the carcinogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans. The suppressor activity was due to the factor itself and not to carryover of free antigen. Characterization of the monkey factor revealed it to have a molecular weight of ca. 70,000, and to contain a constant region and determinants encoded by the major histocompatibility complex. The presence of immunoglobulin determinants could not be demonstrated. However, by virtue of its adsorption to specific antigen, an antigen-combining site was shown to be present. The possible regulatory role of streptococcal antigen-specific suppressor factor in protection against dental caries is discussed. PMID:6164645

  15. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility.

  16. Antibacterial effect of copper-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) against Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Chang, Bei; Zhang, Yumei; Ma, Zheng; Allaker, Robert P.; Ren, Ling; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms on dental implant material surfaces (titanium) may lead to the development of peri-implant diseases influencing the long term success of dental implants. In this study, a novel Cu-bearing titanium alloy (Ti-Cu) was designed and fabricated in order to efficiently kill bacteria and discourage formation of biofilms, and then inhibit bacterial infection and prevent implant failure, in comparison with pure Ti. Results from biofilm based gene expression studies, biofilm growth observation, bacterial viability measurements and morphological examination of bacteria, revealed antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities of Ti-Cu alloy against the oral specific bacterial species, Streptococcus mutans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Proliferation and adhesion assays with mesenchymal stem cells, and measurement of the mean daily amount of Cu ion release demonstrated Ti-Cu alloy to be biocompatible. In conclusion, Ti-Cu alloy is a promising dental implant material with antimicrobial/antibiofilm activities and acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:27457788

  17. Effectiveness of probiotic, chlorhexidine and fluoride mouthwash against Streptococcus mutans – Randomized, single-blind, in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Jothika, Mohan; Vanajassun, P. Pranav; Someshwar, Battu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the short-term efficiency of probiotic, chlorhexidine, and fluoride mouthwashes on plaque Streptococcus mutans level at four periodic intervals. Materials and Methods: This was a single-blind, randomized control study in which each subject was tested with only one mouthwash regimen. Fifty-two healthy qualified adult patients were selected randomly for the study and were divided into the following groups: group 1- 10 ml of distilled water, group 2- 10 ml of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouthwash, group 3- 10 ml of 500 ppm F/400 ml sodium fluoride mouthwash, and group 4- 10 ml of probiotic mouthwash. Plaque samples were collected from the buccal surface of premolars and molars in the maxillary quadrant. Sampling procedure was carried out by a single examiner after 7 days, 14 days, and 30 days, respectively, after the use of the mouthwash. All the samples were subjected to microbiological analysis and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc test. Results: One-way ANOVA comparison among groups 2, 3, and 4 showed no statistical significance, whereas group 1 showed statistically significant difference when compared with groups 2, 3, and 4 at 7th, 14th, and 30th day. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine, sodium fluoride, and probiotic mouthwashes reduce plaque S. mutans levels. Probiotic mouthwash is effective and equivalent to chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride mouthwashes. Thus, probiotic mouthwash can also be considered as an effective oral hygiene regimen. PMID:25984467

  18. Inhibitory activity of monoacylglycerols on biofilm formation in Aeromonas hydrophila, Streptococcus mutans, Xanthomonas oryzae, and Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Ham, Youngseok; Kim, Tae-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm provides a bacterial hiding place by forming a physical barrier and causing physiological changes in cells. The elimination of biofilm is the main goal of hygiene. Chemicals that are inhibitory to biofilm formation have been developed for use in food, personal hygiene products, and medical instruments. Monoacylglycerols are recognized as safe and are used in food as emulsifiers. In this study, the inhibitory activity of monoacylglycerols on bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated systematically with four bacterial strains, Aeromonas hydrophila, Streptococcus mutans, Xanthomonas oryzae, and Yersinia enterocolitica. Monoacylglycerols with two specific lengths of fatty acid moiety, monolaurin and monobehenin, were found to have strong inhibitory activity toward bacterial biofilm formation of S. mutans, X. oryzae, and Y. enterocolitica in a strain specific manner. First, this result suggested that biofilm formation was not inhibited by the detergent characteristics of monoacylglycerols. This suggestion was supported by the inhibitory action of monolaurin on biofilm development but not on the initial cell attachment of Y. enterocolitica in flow cytometric observation. Second, it was also suggested that two distinct response mechanisms to monoacylglycerols existed in bacteria. The existence of these two inhibitory response mechanisms was bacterial strain specific.

  19. Protein preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of SMU.961 protein from the caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xiong-Zhuo; Li, Lan-Fen; Su, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, XiaoJun; Liang, Yu-He

    2007-10-01

    The SMU.961 protein from S. mutans was crystallized and preliminary characterization of the crystals, which diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution, shows them to belong to space group C2. The smu.961 gene encodes a putative protein of 183 residues in Streptococcus mutans, a major pathogen in human dental caries. The gene was cloned into expression vector pET28a and expressed in a substantial quantity in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3) with a His tag at its N-terminus. The recombinant protein SMU.961 was purified to homogeneity in a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 2.9 Å resolution at beamline I911-3, MAX-II-lab, Sweden. The crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.62, b = 73.73, c = 184.73 Å, β = 98.82°.

  20. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities of sub fraction 18 of Melastoma malabathricum towards Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohazila M., H.; Nazlina, I.; Yaacob W., A.

    2014-09-01

    A study was carried out to isolate and identify the active compounds from Melastoma malabathricum stem bark that exhibit anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities against Streptococcus mutans. Purification of the active compounds from the stem bark extract was performed via silica gel chromatography to produce 12 fractions. Further fractionation of fraction 9 by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) produced 21 sub fractions. All the sub fractions were subjected to thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioautography as preliminary screening to determine anti bacterial activity. TLC-bioautography showed that sub fraction 18 (SF18) demonstrated large inhibited zone against S. mutans. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) was used to identify the active compounds in SF18. Fraction SF18 revealed 27 compounds such as hexanoic acid, 8-methyl-1-undecene, propanenitrile, and 1-decene. Anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were determined using crystal violet and glass surface assays respectively. The concentrations that produced 50% reduction in anti-biofilm and anti-adherence activities were 1.88 mg/ml and 3.75 mg/ml respectively.

  1. Effect of high-fructose corn syrup on Streptococcus mutans virulence gene expression and on tooth demineralization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Minmin; Kang, Qiongyi; Li, Tingting; Huang, Lili; Jiang, Yuntao; Xia, Wenwei

    2014-06-01

    High-fructose corn syrup-55 (HFCS-55) has been widely welcomed in recent years as a substitute for sucrose on the basis of its favourable properties and price. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of HFCS-55 on the expression of Streptococcus mutans UA159 virulence genes and on tooth demineralization. Real-time reverse-transcription PCR (real-time RT-PCR) and microhardness evaluations were performed to examine gene expression and enamel demineralization, respectively, after treatment with HFCS-55 and/or sucrose. Significant up-regulation of glucosyltransferase B (gtfB) by HFCS-55 was found. A mixture of HFCS-55 and sucrose could positively enhance expression of glucan-binding protein (gbp) genes. Regarding acidogenicity, expression of the lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene was unaffected by HFCS-55. A notable finding in this study was that 5% HFCS-55 significantly enhanced expression of the intracellular response gene of the two-component VicRK signal transduction system (vicR). Demineralization testing showed that the microhardness of teeth decreased by a greater extent in response to HFCS-55 than in response to sucrose. The results indicate that HFCS-55 can enhance S. mutans biofilm formation indirectly in the presence of sucrose and that HFCS-55 has a more acidogenic potential than does sucrose. Summing up the real-time PCR and demineralization results, HFCS-55 appears to be no less cariogenic than sucrose in vitro - at least, not under the conditions of our experiments.

  2. Comparative evaluation of a herbal mouthwash (Freshol) with chlorhexidine on plaque accumulation, gingival inflammation, and salivary Streptococcus mutans growth

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shivika; Pesapathy, Sudha; Joseph, Madonna; Tiwari, Prabhat K.; Chawla, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Plaque accumulation and oral microorganisms are the main predisposing factors to various orodental infections and targeting these, therefore, can prove to be an effective way of combating these diseases. Herbal extracts have been of particular interest these days owing to various side effects associated with conventional modes of treatment. Aims and Objectives: The present study was conducted to compare the efficacy of a commercially available homeopathic mouthwash with chlorhexidine on plaque status, gingival status, and salivary Streptococcus mutans count. Materials and Methods: Total sample of 55 children, aged 8-14 years, were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (35) and Group B (20) were given 10 mL of test mouthwash “Freshol” and chlorhexidine respectively during phases 1 and 3 of the clinical trial which was of 10 days each. Phase 2 of 14 days in between was the washout period during which no mouthwash was given. Result: Freshol was found to be better than chlorhexidine in reducing the salivary mutans streptococci count and equieffective to chlorhexidine in altering plaque and gingival scores. Conclusion: Herbal alternatives can prove to be an effective and safe alternative to conventional modes of treatment. PMID:24478976

  3. Role of sucrose in colonization of Streptococcus mutans in conventional Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Van Houte, J; Upeslacis, V N; Jordan, H V; Skobe, Z; Green, D B

    1976-01-01

    The role of sucrose in the colonization of S mutans strain 6715 in conventional Sprague-Dawley rats was studied. A diet with 56% sucrose favored the oral colonization of the test strain compared to diets with 56% glucose or fructose or to laboratory chow as determined by recoveries from extracted teeth ground in tissue grinders. S mutans strain 6715 cells became well established in all rats fed a high sucrose diet with cell inoculums ranging from 10(8) to the lowest effective dose of 10(5) CFU once orally administered; in rats on nonsucrose diets, inoculation with even the highest dose only infrequently resulted in the establishment of S mutans strain 6715. Sucrose- and glucose- grown cells appeared to behave similarly. Colonization of S mutans strain 6715 occurred in all rats fed diets with a sucrose content ranging from 56 to as low as 1%. The establishment of S mutans strain 6715 on the teeth of rats fed diets with a sucrose concentration of 0.1 or 0.01% was impaired and comparable to the diet containing 56% glucose. In rats fed a high glucose diet, uniform establishment and persistence of the test strain occurred after frequent inoculations with about 5 X 10(8) CFU. The colonization under these conditions appeared to be independent of the intestinal canal as a bacterial cell source. These data suggest the possibility that S mutans can establish itself in the human mouth in the absence of dietary sucrose. In rats fed a high glucose diet and inoculated with 10(7) CFU or less, the cells gradually disappeared from the teeth; in contrast, the test strain implanted well in rats fed the sucrose favors firmer attachment of initially weakly attached cells via in situ new glucan synthesis. S mutans strain 6715 also appeared to have some affinity for teeth in the absence of dietary sucrose that may be of ecological significance. Once firmly established in rats fed a high sucrose diet, S mutans strain 6715 maintained itself in high numbers on the teeth after a switch to a

  4. l-Arginine Modifies the Exopolysaccharide Matrix and Thwarts Streptococcus mutans Outgrowth within Mixed-Species Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    He, Jinzhi; Hwang, Geelsu; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Lizeng; Kilpatrick-Liverman, LaTonya; Santarpia, Peter; Zhou, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT l-Arginine, a ubiquitous amino acid in human saliva, serves as a substrate for alkali production by arginolytic bacteria. Recently, exogenous l-arginine has been shown to enhance the alkalinogenic potential of oral biofilm and destabilize its microbial community, which might help control dental caries. However, l-arginine exposure may inflict additional changes in the biofilm milieu when bacteria are growing under cariogenic conditions. Here, we investigated how exogenous l-arginine modulates biofilm development using a mixed-species model containing both cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans) and arginolytic (Streptococcus gordonii) bacteria in the presence of sucrose. We observed that 1.5% (wt/vol) l-arginine (also a clinically effective concentration) exposure suppressed the outgrowth of S. mutans, favored S. gordonii dominance, and maintained Actinomyces naeslundii growth within biofilms (versus vehicle control). In parallel, topical l-arginine treatments substantially reduced the amounts of insoluble exopolysaccharides (EPS) by >3-fold, which significantly altered the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the biofilm. Intriguingly, l-arginine repressed S. mutans genes associated with insoluble EPS (gtfB) and bacteriocin (SMU.150) production, while spxB expression (H2O2 production) by S. gordonii increased sharply during biofilm development, which resulted in higher H2O2 levels in arginine-treated biofilms. These modifications resulted in a markedly defective EPS matrix and areas devoid of any bacterial clusters (microcolonies) on the apatitic surface, while the in situ pH values at the biofilm-apatite interface were nearly one unit higher in arginine-treated biofilms (versus the vehicle control). Our data reveal new biological properties of l-arginine that impact biofilm matrix assembly and the dynamic microbial interactions associated with pathogenic biofilm development, indicating the multiaction potency of this promising biofilm disruptor. IMPORTANCE

  5. Antimicrobial Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Cariogenic Bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus mutans, and Periodontal Diseases Actinomyces naeslundii and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Baca-Castañón, Magda Lorena; De la Garza-Ramos, Myriam Angélica; Alcázar-Pizaña, Andrea Guadalupe; Grondin, Yohann; Coronado-Mendoza, Anahí; Sánchez-Najera, Rosa Isela; Cárdenas-Estrada, Eloy; Medina-De la Garza, Carlos Eduardo; Escamilla-García, Erandi

    2015-03-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are well known for their beneficial effects on human health in the intestine and immune system; however, there are few studies on the impact they can generate in oral health. The aim of this study was to test and compare in vitro antimicrobial activity of L. reuteri on pathogenic bacteria involved in the formation of dental caries: S. mutans, S. gordonii, and periodontal disease: A. naeslundii and T. forsythia. Also, we determined the growth kinetics of each bacterium involved in this study. Before determining the antimicrobial action of L. reuteri on cariogenic bacteria and periodontal disease, the behavior and cell development time of each pathogenic bacterium were studied. Once the conditions for good cell growth of each of selected pathogens were established according to their metabolic requirements, maximum exponential growth was determined, this being the reference point for analyzing the development or inhibition by LAB using the Kirby Bauer method. Chlorhexidine 0.12% was positive control. L. reuteri was shown to have an inhibitory effect against S. mutans, followed by T. forsythia and S. gordonii, and a less significant effect against A. naeslundii. Regarding the effect shown by L. reuteri on the two major pathogens, we consider its potential use as a possible functional food in the prevention or treatment of oral diseases.

  6. Human common salivary protein 1 (CSP-1) promotes binding of Streptococcus mutans to experimental salivary pellicle and glucans formed on hydroxyapatite surface.

    PubMed

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S; Hagen, Fred K; Delahunty, Claire M; Han, Xuemei; Shafi, Rubina; Hryhorenko, Jennifer; Gregoire, Stacy; Marquis, Robert E; Melvin, James E; Koo, Hyun; Yates, John R

    2010-12-03

    The saliva proteome includes host defense factors and specific bacterial-binding proteins that modulate microbial growth and colonization of the tooth surface in the oral cavity. A multidimensional mass spectrometry approach identified the major host-derived salivary proteins that interacted with Streptococcus mutans (strain UA159), the primary microorganism associated with the pathogenesis of dental caries. Two abundant host proteins were found to tightly bind to S. mutans cells, common salivary protein-1 (CSP-1) and deleted in malignant brain tumor 1 (DMBT1, also known as salivary agglutinin or gp340). In contrast to gp340, limited functional information is available on CSP-1. The sequence of CSP-1 shares 38.1% similarity with rat CSP-1. Recombinant CSP-1 (rCSP-1) protein did not cause aggregation of S. mutans cells and was devoid of any significant biocidal activity (2.5 to 10 μg/mL). However, S. mutans cells exposed to rCSP-1 (10 μg/mL) in saliva displayed enhanced adherence to experimental salivary pellicle and to glucans in the pellicle formed on hydroxyapatite surfaces. Thus, our data demonstrate that the host salivary protein CSP-1 binds to S. mutans cells and may influence the initial colonization of this pathogenic bacterium onto the tooth surface.

  7. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N; Crowley, Paula J; Brady, L Jeannine; Long, Joanna R

    2016-02-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  8. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Long, Joanna R.

    2016-01-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to 1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and 2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin. PMID:26837620

  9. Differences between single- and dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella parvula in growth, acidogenicity and susceptibility to chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Kara, Duygu; Luppens, Suzanne B I; Cate, Jacob M

    2006-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans, considered a primary pathogen in dental caries, thrives in dental plaque, which is a multispecies biofilm. Metabolic interactions between S. mutans and Veillonella parvula have been suggested. In this study we developed a biofilm model to quantify single-species (S. mutans or V. parvula) and dual-species (S. mutans and V. parvula) biofilm formation, and we identified the differences between the respective biofilms in terms of growth, acid formation, and response to chlorhexidine. Polystyrene 96-well microtiter plates were used for biofilm formation. These biofilms were exposed to various chlorhexidine concentrations (0.025-0.4 mg ml(-1)) and treatment conditions. Growth of the biofilms and the effects of chlorhexidine were evaluated by viable counts. Viability of the two species in all biofilm types was similar ( approximately 10(8) colony-forming units per well) after 72 h. Lactic acid accumulation of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower at 48 and 72 h than single-species biofilms of S. mutans. Dual-species biofilms were less susceptible to chlorhexidine than single-species biofilms when a neutralization step was included. These results indicate that bacteria in dual-species biofilms have different properties from bacteria in single-species biofilms.

  10. Effect of Fluoride, Chlorhexidine and Fluoride-chlorhexidine Mouthwashes on Salivary Streptococcus mutans Count and the Prevalence of Oral Side Effects.

    PubMed

    Sadat Sajadi, Fatemeh; Moradi, Mohammad; Pardakhty, Abbas; Yazdizadeh, Razieh; Madani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Streptococcus mutans is the main pathogenic agent involved in dental caries, and may be eliminated using mouthwashes. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of fluoride, chlorhexidine, and fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes on salivary S. mutans count after two weeks of use and determine the prevalence of their side effects on the oral mucosa. Materials and methods. In this clinical trial, 120 12-14 year-old students were selected and divided into three groups. Each group was given one of fluoride, chlorhexidine, or fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwashes. They were asked to use it twice a day for two weeks. Salivary samples were collected at baseline and after two weeks. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results. In all the study groups, there were statistically significant reductions in salivary S. mutans counts two weeks after using the mouthwashes (P < 0.05). In addition, fluoride-chlorhexidine mouthwash had a significant effect on the reduction of S. mutans count in comparison with fluoride alone. The prevalence of oral side effects in fluoride-chlorhexidine mouth-wash was more than 90%. Conclusion. Adding fluoride to chlorhexidine mouthwash can significantly decrease salivary S. mutans count after two weeks. Fluoride-chlorhexidine has the highest rate of oral side effects between the evaluated mouthwash compounds.

  11. Comparison of Contamination of Low-Frictional Elastomeric Rings with That of Conventional Elastomeric Rings by Streptococcus mutans - An In-vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Mogra, Subraya; Shetty, V. Surendra; Shetty, Siddarth; Jose, Nidhin Philip

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of brackets and ligatures has been shown to be related to an increase in gingival inflammation and increased risk of decalcification. The various measures were taken to reduce the plaque accumulation and also lot of efforts were made by manufacturers that reduced the binding friction between the ligature rings and arch wire that facilitated easy sliding of the tooth through the wire. The low frictional ligatures rings manufactured by different manufacturers presumed to attract fewer bacteria due to greater reduction in surface roughness. Our study aimed to evaluate whether the low frictional elastomeric rings accumulate fewer bacteria than conventional ligature rings. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (15 males and 15 females) who underwent fixed appliance therapy were selected. The study was done using split-mouth design. In each volunteer, synergy low frictional elastomeric rings were tied to brackets bonded to the maxillary premolar on the right side and mandibular premolar on the left side. Conventional elastomeric rings that served as control group were tied to the contralateral teeth, with the same design. Samples were collected after four weeks (28 days) and cultured for bacteria Streptococcus mutans. Results: There was no statistical difference between Streptococcus mutans count in low frictional elastomeric rings with that of conventional rings. Conclusion: We concluded that adherence of Streptococcus mutans is similar in both synergy low frictional elastomeric rings and conventional clear elastomeric rings and thus the manufacturer’s claim of minimal bacterial adherence was discarded. PMID:26023638

  12. Identification of a supramolecular functional architecture of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 on the bacterial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Heim, Kyle P; Sullan, Ruby May A; Crowley, Paula J; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Tang, Wenxing; Besingi, Richard; Dufrene, Yves F; Brady, L Jeannine

    2015-04-03

    P1 (antigen I/II) is a sucrose-independent adhesin of Streptococcus mutans whose functional architecture on the cell surface is not fully understood. S. mutans cells subjected to mechanical extraction were significantly diminished in adherence to immobilized salivary agglutinin but remained immunoreactive and were readily aggregated by fluid-phase salivary agglutinin. Bacterial adherence was restored by incubation of postextracted cells with P1 fragments that contain each of the two known adhesive domains. In contrast to untreated cells, glutaraldehyde-treated bacteria gained reactivity with anti-C-terminal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), whereas epitopes recognized by mAbs against other portions of the molecule were masked. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the ability of apical and C-terminal fragments of P1 to interact. Binding of several different anti-P1 mAbs to unfixed cells triggered release of a C-terminal fragment from the bacterial surface, suggesting a novel mechanism of action of certain adherence-inhibiting antibodies. We also used atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy with tips bearing various mAbs to elucidate the spatial organization and orientation of P1 on living bacteria. The similar rupture lengths detected using mAbs against the head and C-terminal regions, which are widely separated in the tertiary structure, suggest a higher order architecture in which these domains are in close proximity on the cell surface. Taken together, our results suggest a supramolecular organization in which additional P1 polypeptides, including the C-terminal segment originally identified as antigen II, associate with covalently attached P1 to form the functional adhesive layer.

  13. Cnm is a major virulence factor of invasive Streptococcus mutans and part of a conserved three-gene locus.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Reyes, A; Miller, J H; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Lemos, J A; Abranches, J

    2014-02-01

    Cnm, a collagen- and laminin-binding protein present in a subset of Streptococcus mutans strains, mediates binding to extracellular matrices (ECM), intracellular invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. Antibodies raised against Cnm were used to confirm expression and the cell surface localization of Cnm in the highly invasive OMZ175 strain. Sequence analysis identified two additional genes (cnaB and cbpA) encoding putative surface proteins immediately upstream of cnm. Inactivation of cnaB and cbpA in OMZ175, individually or in combination, did not decrease the ability of this highly invasive and virulent strain to bind to different ECM proteins, invade human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC), or kill G. mellonella. Similarly, expression of cnaB and cbpA in the cnm(-) strain UA159 revealed that these genes did not enhance Cnm-related phenotypes. However, integration of cnm in the chromosome of UA159 significantly increased its ability to bind to collagen and laminin, invade HCAEC, and kill G. mellonella. Moreover, the presence of antibodies against Cnm nearly abolished the ability of OMZ175 to bind to collagen and laminin and invade HCAEC, and significantly protected G. mellonella against OMZ175 infection. We concluded that neither CnaB nor CbpA is necessary for the expression of Cnm-related traits. We also provided definitive evidence that Cnm is an important virulence factor and a suitable target for the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat invasive S. mutans strains.

  14. Deficiency of BrpB causes major defects in cell division, stress responses and biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, Jacob P; Liao, Sumei; Xie, Gary G; Beatty, Wandy L; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary aetiological agent of dental caries, possesses an YjeE-like protein that is encoded by locus SMU.409, herein designated brpB. In this study, a BrpB-deficient mutant, JB409, and a double mutant deficient of BrpB and BrpA (a paralogue of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell wall-associated proteins), JB819, were constructed and characterized using function assays and microscopy analysis. Both JB409 and JB819 displayed extended lag phases and drastically slowed growth rates during growth in brain heart infusion medium as compared to the wild-type, UA159. Relative to UA159, JB409 and JB819 were more than 60- and 10-fold more susceptible to acid killing at pH 2.8, and more than 1 and 2 logs more susceptible to hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Complementation of the deficient mutants with a wild-type copy of the respective gene(s) partly restored the acid and oxidative stress responses to a level similar to the wild-type. As compared to UA159, biofilm formation by JB409 and JB819 was drastically reduced (P<0.001), especially during growth in medium containing sucrose. Under a scanning electron microscope, JB409 had significantly more giant cells with an elongated, rod-like morphology, and JB819 formed marble-like super cells with apparent defects in cell division. As revealed by transmission electron microscopy analysis, BrpB deficiency in both JB409 and JB819 resulted in the development of low electron density patches and formation of a loose nucleoid structure. Taken together, these results suggest that BrpB likely functions together with BrpA in regulating cell envelope biogenesis/homeostasis in Strep. mutans. Further studies are under way to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the BrpA- and BrpB-mediated regulation.

  15. The Delta Subunit of RNA Polymerase, RpoE, Is a Global Modulator of Streptococcus mutans Environmental Adaptation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoli; Tomasch, Jürgen; Sztajer, Helena; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2010-01-01

    The delta subunit of RNA polymerase, RpoE, is widespread in low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria and is thought to play a role in enhancing transcriptional specificity by blocking RNA polymerase binding at weak promoter sites and stimulating RNA synthesis by accelerating core enzyme recycling. Despite the well-studied biochemical properties of RpoE, a role for this protein in vivo has not been defined in depth. In this study, we show that inactivation of rpoE in the human dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans causes impaired growth and loss of important virulence traits, including biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and tolerance to environmental stresses. Complementation of the mutant with rpoE expressed in trans restored its phenotype to wild type. The luciferase fusion reporter showed that rpoE was highly transcribed throughout growth and that acid and hydrogen peroxide stresses repressed rpoE expression. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and ΔrpoE cells in the exponential and early stationary phase of growth, under acid and hydrogen peroxide stress and under both stresses combined, revealed that genes involved in histidine synthesis, malolactic fermentation, biofilm formation, and antibiotic resistance were downregulated in the ΔrpoE mutant under all conditions. Moreover, the loss of RpoE resulted in dramatic changes in transport and metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids. Interestingly, differential expression, mostly upregulation, of 330 noncoding regions was found. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that RpoE is an important global modulator of gene expression in S. mutans which is required for optimal growth and environmental adaptation. PMID:20675470

  16. Comprehensive Mutational Analysis of Sucrose-Metabolizing Pathways in Streptococcus mutans Reveals Novel Roles for the Sucrose Phosphotransferase System Permease

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose is perhaps the most efficient carbohydrate for the promotion of dental caries in humans, and the primary caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes multiple enzymes involved in the metabolism of this disaccharide. Here, we engineered a series of mutants lacking individual or combinations of sucrolytic pathways to understand the control of sucrose catabolism and to determine whether as-yet-undisclosed pathways for sucrose utilization were present in S. mutans. Growth phenotypes indicated that gtfBCD (encoding glucan exopolysaccharide synthases), ftf (encoding the fructan exopolysaccharide synthase), and the scrAB pathway (sugar-phosphotransferase system [PTS] permease and sucrose-6-PO4 hydrolase) constitute the majority of the sucrose-catabolizing activity; however, mutations in any one of these genes alone did not affect planktonic growth on sucrose. The multiple-sugar metabolism pathway (msm) contributed minimally to growth on sucrose. Notably, a mutant lacking gtfBC, which cannot produce water-insoluble glucan, displayed improved planktonic growth on sucrose. Meanwhile, loss of scrA led to growth stimulation on fructooligosaccharides, due in large part to increased expression of the fruAB (fructanase) operon. Using the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system as a model for carbohydrate-dependent gene expression in strains lacking extracellular sucrases, a PlevD-cat (EIIALev) reporter was activated by pulsing with sucrose. Interestingly, ScrA was required for activation of levD expression by sucrose through components of the LevQRST complex, but not for activation by the cognate LevQRST sugars fructose or mannose. Sucrose-dependent catabolite repression was also evident in strains containing an intact sucrose PTS. Collectively, these results reveal a novel regulatory circuitry for the control of sucrose catabolism, with a central role for ScrA. PMID:23222725

  17. Comprehensive mutational analysis of sucrose-metabolizing pathways in Streptococcus mutans reveals novel roles for the sucrose phosphotransferase system permease.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lin; Burne, Robert A

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose is perhaps the most efficient carbohydrate for the promotion of dental caries in humans, and the primary caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans encodes multiple enzymes involved in the metabolism of this disaccharide. Here, we engineered a series of mutants lacking individual or combinations of sucrolytic pathways to understand the control of sucrose catabolism and to determine whether as-yet-undisclosed pathways for sucrose utilization were present in S. mutans. Growth phenotypes indicated that gtfBCD (encoding glucan exopolysaccharide synthases), ftf (encoding the fructan exopolysaccharide synthase), and the scrAB pathway (sugar-phosphotransferase system [PTS] permease and sucrose-6-PO(4) hydrolase) constitute the majority of the sucrose-catabolizing activity; however, mutations in any one of these genes alone did not affect planktonic growth on sucrose. The multiple-sugar metabolism pathway (msm) contributed minimally to growth on sucrose. Notably, a mutant lacking gtfBC, which cannot produce water-insoluble glucan, displayed improved planktonic growth on sucrose. Meanwhile, loss of scrA led to growth stimulation on fructooligosaccharides, due in large part to increased expression of the fruAB (fructanase) operon. Using the LevQRST four-component signal transduction system as a model for carbohydrate-dependent gene expression in strains lacking extracellular sucrases, a PlevD-cat (EIIA(Lev)) reporter was activated by pulsing with sucrose. Interestingly, ScrA was required for activation of levD expression by sucrose through components of the LevQRST complex, but not for activation by the cognate LevQRST sugars fructose or mannose. Sucrose-dependent catabolite repression was also evident in strains containing an intact sucrose PTS. Collectively, these results reveal a novel regulatory circuitry for the control of sucrose catabolism, with a central role for ScrA.

  18. Effects of mushroom and chicory extracts on the shape, physiology and proteome of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental caries is an infectious disease which results from the acidic demineralisation of the tooth enamel and dentine as a consequence of the dental plaque (a microbial biofilm) accumulation. Research showed that several foods contain some components with antibacterial and antiplaque activity. Previous studies indicated antimicrobial and antiplaque activities in a low-molecular-mass (LMM) fraction of extracts from either an edible mushroom (Lentinus edodes) or from Italian red chicory (Cichorium intybus). Methods We have evaluated the antimicrobial mode of action of these fractions on Streptococcus mutans, the etiological agent of human dental caries. The effects on shape, macromolecular syntheses and cell proteome were analysed. Results The best antimicrobial activity has been displayed by the LMM mushroom extract with a bacteriostatic effect. At the MIC of both extracts DNA synthesis was the main macromolecular synthesis inhibited, RNA synthesis was less inhibited than that of DNA and protein synthesis was inhibited only by roughly 50%. The partial inhibition of protein synthesis is compatible with the observed significant increase in cell mass. The increase in these parameters is linked to the morphological alteration with transition from cocci of the untreated control to elongated cells. Interestingly, these modifications were also observed at sub-MIC concentrations. Finally, membrane and cytosol proteome analysis was conducted under LMM mushroom extract treatment in comparison with untreated S. mutans cells. Significant changes were observed for 31 membrane proteins and 20 of the cytosol fractions. The possible role of the changed proteins is discussed. Conclusions This report has shown an antibiotic-like mode of action of mushroom and chicory extracts as demonstrated by induced morphogenetic effects and inhibition of specific macromolecular synthesis. This feature as well as the safe use of this extract as result of its natural origin render the

  19. Evaluation of Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans by Addition of Probiotics in the form of Curd in the Diet

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Mantha, Somasundar; Murthi, Surekha; Sura, Himagiri; Kadaru, Pravallika; Jangra, Jogender Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when taken in adequate amounts provide a health benefit on the host. They have been used to improve gastrointestinal health, and their popularity has prompted increased interest for their role in the promotion of oral health also. The study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of diet alteration on oral microflora with the addition of probiotics in the form of curd in the diet. Materials and Methods: Sample pool included total 20 children, 15 in experimental group; who were given curd containing probiotic bacteria in their diet daily and 5 children in control group; who were contradicted of food containing probiotics. All the children were followed for over a period of 1-year. A pre and post quantitative analysis of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli were done in the saliva of both active and control groups, and caries score was recorded. Statistical analysis used: The data thus compiled were statistically evaluated using Chi-square test and Pearson correlation on SPSS software version 14. Results: In experimental group, 87% children showed decrease and 7% showed increase in S. mutans count (P = 0.83), whereas 67% showed increase and 7% decrease in Lactobacilli count (P = 0.002) after 1-year of follow-up. Conclusions: Probiotics are upcoming as an intriguing field in oral health. Efforts should be made to increase the knowledge of the general dental practitioners with this facet of oral disease therapy and promote the implementation of the concept of “food rather than medicine.” PMID:26229377

  20. Association between early childhood caries, streptococcus mutans level and genetic sensitivity levels to the bitter taste of, 6-N propylthiouracil among the children below 71 months of age

    PubMed Central

    Pidamale, Raghavendra; Sowmya, B; Thomas, Ann; Jose, Tony; Madhusudan, Kaikure Kushalappa; Prasad, Ganesh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Oral health is an integral component of pre-school health and well-being. Unfortunately, many children are afflicted with dental caries at an early age, even those as young as 12 months of age. The purpose of this study is to determine the association between Early Childhood Caries (ECC), Streptococcus mutans and genetic sensitivity levels to the bitter taste of, PROP among the children below 71 months of age. Materials and Methods: Total of 119 children belonging to the age group of 36 to 71 months of both sexes, were recruited from A. J. Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore (Karnataka). PROP sensitivity test was carried out to determine the inherent genetic ability to taste a bitter or sweet substance. One who tasted bitter as taster and one who was not able to differentiate/tasted like paper as non-tasters. Facial expression was observed during the tasting to support the verbal response. Estimation of S. mutans level and caries experience was recorded. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann’Whiteney-U Test and Kruskal value test. Results: In the total of 119 children, the mean DMFS was definitely higher in non-taster children compared to tasters and also had a high S. mutans level. Tasters had low ECC experience, low S. mutans level. The tasters had a mean DMFS value of 9.5120 (S.D. 7.0543) and non-tasters had a value of 7.7250 (S.D. 8.33147), which was statistically significant. Conclusion: Children who had higher level S. mutans had ECC and were non tasters. The PROP sensitivity test (filter paper test) proved to be a useful diagnostic tool in determining the genetic sensitivity levels of bitter taste. Age and low socio-economic status of pre-school children suggest a complex multifactorial relationship between S. mutans colonization, ECC and taste perception. PMID:23559950

  1. Disinfection of Streptococcus mutans Biofilm by a Non-Thermal Atmospheric Plasma Brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qing; Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Xu, Yuanxi; Sun, Hongmin; Hong, Liang; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the argon plasma treatment effect on disinfecting dental biofilm by using an atmospheric pressure plasma brush. S. mutans biofilms were developed for 3 days on the surfaces of hydroxyapatite discs, which were used to simulate human tooth enamel. After plasma treatment, cell viability in the S. mutans biofilms was characterized by using MTT assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Compared with the untreated control group, about 90% and 95% bacterial reduction in the biofilms was observed after 1 and 5 min plasma treatment, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy examination indicated severe cell damages occurred on the top surface of the plasma treated biofilms. CLSM showed that plasma treatment was effective as deep as 20 μm into the biofilms. When combined with 0.2% chlorhexidine digluconate solution, the plasma treatment became more effective and over 96% bacterial reduction was observed with 1 min plasma treatment. These results indicate that plasma treatment is effective and promising in dental biofilm disinfection.

  2. Efficacy of E. officinalis on the Cariogenic Properties of Streptococcus mutans: A Novel and Alternative Approach to Suppress Quorum-Sensing Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Sadaf; Singh, Kunal; Verma, Praveen K.; Khan, Asad U.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was focused on evaluating the potential of Emblica officinalis against cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans, a causative microorganism for caries. The effect of crude extract and ethanolic fraction from Emblica officinalis fruit was analysed against S. mutans. The sub-MIC concentrations of crude and ethanolic fraction of E. officinalis were evaluated for its cariogenic properties such as acid production, biofilm formation, cell-surface hydrophobicity, glucan production, sucrose-dependent and independent adherence. Its effect on biofilm architecture was also investigated with the help of confocal and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, expression of genes involved in biofilm formation was also studied by quantitative RT- PCR. This study showed 50% reduction in adherence at concentrations 156 µg/ and 312.5 µg/ml of crude extract and ethanolic fraction respectively. However, the biofilm was reduced to 50% in the presence of crude extract (39.04 µg/ml) and ethanolic fraction (78.08 µg/ml). Furthermore, effective reduction was observed in the glucan synthesis and cell surface hydrophobicity. The qRT-PCR revealed significant suppression of the genes involved in its virulence. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy clearly depicted the obliteration of biofilm structure with reference to control. Hence, this study reveals the potential of E. officinalis fruit extracts as an alternative and complementary medicine for dental caries by inhibiting the virulence factors of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:22792279

  3. In vivo repackaging of recombinant cosmid molecules for analyses of Salmonella typhimurium, Streptococcus mutans, and mycobacterial genomic libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, W R; Barrett, J F; Clark-Curtiss, J E; Curtiss, R

    1986-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 were constructed that permitted the amplification of in vitro-packaged recombinant cosmid-transducing particles by in vivo repackaging of recombinant cosmid molecules. Thermal induction of these thermoinducible, excision-defective lysogens containing recombinant cosmid molecules yielded high titers of packaged recombinant cosmids and low levels of PFU. These strains were used to amplify packaged recombinant cosmid libraries of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium vaccae, Salmonella typhimurium, and Streptococcus mutans DNA. Contiguous and noncontiguous libraries were compared for the successful identification of cloned genes. Construction of noncontiguous libraries allowed the dissociation of desired genes from genes that were deleterious to the survival of a cosmid recombinant and permitted selection for unlinked traits that resulted in a selected phenotype. In vivo repackaging of recombinant cosmids permitted amplification of the original in vitro-packaged collection of transducing particles, storage of cosmid libraries as phage lysates, facilitation of complementation screening, expression analysis of repackaged recombinant cosmids after UV-irradiated cells were infected, in situ enzyme or immunological screening, and facilitation of recovery of recombinant cosmid molecules containing transposon inserts. Images PMID:2937735

  4. Effects of probiotic drop containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Lactobacillus reuteri on salivary Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus levels

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Maryam Hajnorouzali; Akhlaghi, Najmeh; Talebian, Leila; Emami, Jaber; Keyhani, Siamak Etzad

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a probiotic drop containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium infantis, and Lactobacillus reuteri on salivary counts of Streptococcus mutans (SM) and Lactobacillus (LB) in children 3–6 years of age. Settings and Design: Sixty-one healthy children were randomly allocated into two parallel blocks in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial (IRCT2014120320202N1) from May to June 2015. Subjects and Methods: Finally 53 participants consumed five drops of placebo (n = 23) or probiotic (n = 30) every night for 2 weeks. Before intervention and 1 day after completion of the intervention, unstimulated salivary samples were collected, and microbiologic evaluations were carried out. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed with descriptive statistical methods Wilcoxon signed ranks, Mann–Whitney, and logistic regression. Results: SM level decreased significantly in probiotic group after intervention (P = 0.045), and there were significant differences in salivary SM counts after intervention between two groups (P = 0.04). In probiotic group, LB counts decreased significantly after intervention (P = 0.048); however, there were no significant differences between two groups (P = 0.216). Conclusions: Use of this probiotic drop decreased salivary counts of SM; however, LB counts did not change. In addition, use of the drop in children with higher salivary counts appeared to be more effective. PMID:27994413

  5. Antimicrobial capacity of Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice against Streptococcus mutans strains in toothbrushes: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    BERTOLINI, Patrícia Fernanda Roesler; BIONDI FILHO, Oswaldo; POMILIO, Arnaldo; PINHEIRO, Sérgio Luiz; de CARVALHO, Meghi Silva

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated in vitro the efficiency of Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice on reducing the contamination of toothbrush bristles by a standard strain of Streptococcus mutans (ATCC 25175; SM), after toothbrushing. Material and Methods Fifteen sterile toothbrushes were randomly divided into 5 toothbrushing groups: I (negative control): without dentifrice; II: with fluoridated dentifrice; III: with triclosan and gantrez dentifrice; IV (positive control): without dentifrice and irrigation with 10 mL of 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate; V: with Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice. In each group, 1 sterile bovine tooth was brushed for 1 min, where the toothbrush bristles were contaminated with 25 µL of SM. After toothbrushing, the bristles were stored in individual test tubes with 3 mL of BHI under anaerobiosis of 37ºC for 48 h. Then, they were seeded with sterile swab in triplicate in the Mitis salivarius - Bacitracin culture medium. The samples were kept under anaerobiosis of 37ºC for 48 h. Scores were used to count the number of colony forming units (cfu). The results were submitted to the Mann-Whitney statistical test at 5% significance level. Results There was statistically significant difference (p<0.05) for the reduction of bristle contamination comparing groups II, III, IV and V to group I. Conclusions It may be stated that after toothbrushing, the Aloe vera and propolis dentifrice reduced the contamination of toothbrush bristles by SM, without differentiation from the other chemical agents used. PMID:22437675

  6. Genetic Analysis of the Functions and Interactions of Components of the LevQRST Signal Transduction Complex of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lin; Das, Satarupa; Burne, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of the genes for a fructan hydrolase (fruA) and a fructose/mannose sugar:phosphotransferase permease (levDEFG) in Streptococcus mutans is activated by a four-component regulatory system consisting of a histidine kinase (LevS), a response regulator (LevR) and two carbohydrate-binding proteins (LevQT). The expression of the fruA and levD operons was at baseline in a levQ mutant and substantially decreased in a levT null mutant, with lower expression with the cognate inducers fructose or mannose, but slightly higher expression in glucose or galactose. A strain expressing levQ with two point mutations (E170A/F292S) did not require inducers to activate gene expression and displayed altered levD expression when growing on various carbohydrates, including cellobiose. Linker-scanning (LS) mutagenesis was used to generate three libraries of mutants of levQ, levS and levT that displayed various levels of altered substrate specificity and of fruA/levD gene expression. The data support that LevQ and LevT are intimately involved in the sensing of carbohydrate signals, and that LevQ appears to be required for the integrity of the signal transduction complex, apparently by interacting with the sensor kinase LevS. PMID:21364902

  7. Streptococcus mutans-induced secondary caries adjacent to glass ionomer cement, composite resin and amalgam restorations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gama-Teixeira, Adriana; Simionato, Maria Regina Lorenzeti; Elian, Silvia Nagib; Sobral, Maria Angela Pita; Luz, Maria Aparecida Alves de Cerqueira

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define, in vitro, the potential to inhibit secondary caries of restorative materials currently used in dental practice. Standard cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of fifty extracted human third molars. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups, each one restored with one of the following materials: glass ionomer cement (GIC); amalgam; light-cured composite resin; ion-releasing composite; and light-cured, fluoride-containing composite resin. The teeth were thermocycled, sterilized with gamma irradiation, exposed to a cariogenic challenge using a bacterial system using Streptococcus mutans, and then prepared for microscopic observation. The following parameters were measured in each lesion formed: extension, depth, and caries inhibition area. The outer lesions developed showed an intact surface layer and had a rectangular shape. Wall lesions were not observed inside the cavities. After Analysis of Variance and Component of Variance Models Analysis, it was observed that the GIC group had the smallest lesions and the greatest number of caries inhibition areas. The lesions developed around Amalgam and Ariston pHc restorations had an intermediate size and the largest lesions were observed around Z-100 and Heliomolar restorations. It may be concluded that the restorative materials GIC, amalgam and ion-releasing composites may reduce secondary caries formation.

  8. Microfluidic study of competence regulation in Streptococcus mutans: environmental inputs modulate bimodal and unimodal expression of comX

    PubMed Central

    Son, Minjun; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Guo, Qiang; Burne, Robert A.; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Streptococcus mutans regulates genetic competence through a complex network that receives inputs from a number of environmental stimuli, including two signaling peptides designated as CSP and XIP. The response of the downstream competence genes to these inputs shows evidence of stochasticity and bistability and has been difficult to interpret. We have used microfluidic, single-cell methods to study how combinations of extracellular signals shape the response of comX, an alternative sigma factor governing expression of the late competence genes. We find that the composition of the medium determines which extracellular signal (XIP or CSP) can elicit a response from comX and whether that response is unimodal or bimodal across a population of cells. In a chemically defined medium, exogenous CSP does not induce comX, whereas exogenous XIP elicits a comX response from all cells. In complex medium, exogenous XIP does not induce comX, whereas CSP elicits a bimodal comX response from the population. Interestingly, bimodal behavior required an intact copy of comS, which encodes the precursor of XIP. The comS-dependent capability for both unimodal and bimodal response suggests that a constituent – most likely peptides – of complex medium interacts with a positive feedback loop in the competence regulatory network. PMID:22845615

  9. Live-cell and super-resolution imaging reveal that the distribution of wall-associated protein A is correlated with the cell chain integrity of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Su, Q P; Xue, B; Shao, S; Zhu, Y; Xu, X; Wei, S; Sun, Y

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen responsible for dental caries. It has an outstanding ability to form biofilm, which is vital for virulence. Previous studies have shown that knockout of Wall-associated protein A (WapA) affects cell chain and biofilm formation of S. mutans. As a surface protein, the distribution of WapA remains unknown, but it is important to understand the mechanism underlying the function of WapA. This study applied the fluorescence protein mCherry as a reporter gene to characterize the dynamic distribution of WapA in S. mutans via time-lapse and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The results revealed interesting subcellular distribution patterns of WapA in single, dividing and long chains of S. mutans cells. It appears at the middle of the cell and moves to the poles as the cell grows and divides. In a cell chain, after each round of cell division, such dynamic relocation results in WapA distribution at the previous cell division sites, resulting in a pattern where WapA is located at the boundary of two adjacent cell pairs. This WapA distribution pattern corresponds to the breaking segmentation of wapA deletion cell chains. The dynamic relocation of WapA through the cell cycle increases our understanding of the mechanism of WapA in maintaining cell chain integrity and biofilm formation.

  10. Molecular analysis of the inhibitory effects of oolong tea polyphenols on glucan-binding domain of recombinant glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans MT8148.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Hamada, S; Ooshima, T

    2003-11-07

    An oolong tea polyphenol (OTF6) has been shown to possess a strong anti-glucosyltransferase (GTF) activity and inhibit experimental dental caries in rats infected with mutans streptococci. The effects of OTF6 on the functional domains of GTFs of Streptococcus mutans, an N-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), and a C-terminal glucan-binding domain (GBD), were examined. The maximum velocity of glucan synthesis by recombinant GTFB (rGTFB) and GTFD (rGTFD) became significantly slower in the presence of OTF6, however, Km values remained stable when compared in their absence. These results suggest that OTF6 reduces glucan synthesis by non-competitively inhibiting the GBD of S. mutans GTFB and GTFD. Further, the recombinant proteins of CAT (rCAT) and GBD (rGBD) were expressed using Escherichia coli, and purified by affinity column chromatography. rGBD but not rCAT was found to possess dextran-binding activity, which was shown to be inhibited by OTF6. These results indicate that OTF6, a polymeric polyphenol specific for oolong tea is able to reduce glucan synthesis by inhibiting the GBD of S. mutans GTFB.

  11. dpr and sod in Streptococcus mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H2O2.

    PubMed

    Fujishima, Kei; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oogai, Yuichi; Tokuda, Masayuki; Torii, Mitsuo; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Large numbers of bacteria coexist in the oral cavity. Streptococcus sanguinis, one of the major bacteria in dental plaque, produces hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), which interferes with the growth of other bacteria. Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, can coexist with S. sanguinis in dental plaque, but to do so, it needs a means of detoxifying the H(2)O(2) produced by S. sanguinis. In this study, we investigated the association of three oxidative stress factors, Dpr, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and AhpCF, with the resistance of S. sanguinis to H(2)O(2). The knockout of dpr and sod significantly increased susceptibility to H(2)O(2), while the knockout of ahpCF had no apparent effect on susceptibility. In particular, dpr inactivation resulted in hypersensitivity to H(2)O(2). Next, we sought to identify the factor(s) involved in the regulation of these oxidative stress genes and found that PerR negatively regulated dpr expression. The knockout of perR caused increased dpr expression levels, resulting in low-level susceptibility to H(2)O(2) compared with the wild type. Furthermore, we evaluated the roles of perR, dpr, and sod when S. mutans was cocultured with S. sanguinis. Culturing of the dpr or sod mutant with S. sanguinis showed a significant decrease in the S. mutans population ratio compared with the wild type, while the perR mutant increased the ratio. Our results suggest that dpr and sod in S. mutans are involved in coexistence with S. sanguinis, and PerR is associated with resistance to H(2)O(2) in regulating the expression of Dpr.

  12. Identification and characterization of SMU.244 encoding a putative undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase protein required for cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Naif; Tian, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Gaofeng; Upham, Jacqueline; Chen, Chao; Parcells, Madison; Li, Yung-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans in dental biofilms often faces life-threatening threats such as killing by antimicrobial molecules from competing species or from the host. The ability of S. mutans to cope with such threats is crucial for its survival and persistence in dental biofilms. By screening a transposon mutant library, we identified 11 transposon insertion mutants that were sensitive to bacitracin. Two of these mutants, XTn-01 and XTn-03, had an independent insertion in the same locus, SMU.244, which encoded a homologue of undecaprenyl pyrophosphate phosphatase (UppP). In this study, we describe the genetic and phenotypic characterization of SMU.244 in antibiotic resistance. The results revealed that deletion of SMU.244 results in a mutant (XTΔ244) that is highly sensitive to bacitracin, but confers more resistance to lactococcin G, a class IIb bacteriocin. Introduction of the intact SMU.244 into XTΔ244 in trans completely restores its resistance to bacitracin and the susceptibility to lactococcin G. The XTΔ244 was also defective in forming the WT biofilm, although its growth was not significantly affected. Using recombinant protein technology, we demonstrated that the SMU.244-encoded protein displays enzyme activity to catalyse dephosphorylation of the substrate. The lux transcriptional reporter assays showed that S. mutans maintains a moderate level of expression of SMU.244 in the absence of bacitracin, but bacitracin at sub-MICs can further induce its expression. We concluded that SMU.244 encodes an UppP protein that plays important roles in cell wall biosynthesis and bacitracin resistance in S. mutans. The results described here may further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which S. mutans copes with antibiotics such as bacitracin.

  13. Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm effect of Bac8c on major bacteria associated with dental caries and Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yonglin; Wang, Wei; Fan, Meng; Tong, Zhongchun; Kuang, Rong; Jiang, WenKai; Ni, Longxing

    2014-02-01

    Dental caries is a common oral bacterial infectious disease. Its prevention and treatment requires control of the causative pathogens within dental plaque, especially Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), one of the promising substitutes for conventional antibiotics, have been widely tested and used for controlling bacterial infections. The present study focuses on evaluating the potential of the novel AMPs cyclic bactenecin and its derivatives against bacteria associated with dental caries. The results indicate that Bac8c displayed highest activity against the bacteria tested, whereas both cyclic and linear bactenecin had weak antimicrobial activity. The cytotoxicity assay showed that Bac8c did not cause detectable toxicity at concentrations of 32-128μg/ml for 5min or 32-64μg/ml for 60min. S. mutans and Lactobacillus fermenti treated with Bac8c showed variable effects on bacterial structure via scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. There appeared to be a large amount of extracellular debris and obvious holes on the cell surface, as well as loss of cell wall and nucleoid condensation. The BioFlux system was employed to generate S. mutans biofilms under a controlled flow, which more closely resemble the formation process of natural biofilms. Bac8c remarkably reduced the viability of cells in biofilms formed in the BioFlux system. This phenomenon was further analyzed and verified by real-time PCR results of a significant suppression of the genes involved in S. mutans biofilm formation. Taken together, this study suggests that Bac8c has a potential clinical application in preventing and treating dental caries.

  14. Characterization of a Streptococcus mutans intergenic region containing a small toxic peptide and its cis-encoded antisense small RNA antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Stephanie; Lévesque, Céline M

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules consist of a pair of genes that encode two components: a protein toxin and an antitoxin, which may be in the form of either a labile protein or an antisense small RNA. Here we describe, to the best of our knowledge, the first functional chromosomal type I TA system in streptococci. Our model organism is the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans. Our results showed that the genome of S. mutans UA159 reference strain harbors a previously unannotated Fst-like toxin (Fst-Sm) and its cis-encoded small RNA antitoxin (srSm) converging towards the end of the toxin gene in IGR176, a small intergenic region of 318 nt. Fst-Sm is a small hydrophobic peptide of 32 amino acid residues with homology to the Fst toxin family. Transcripts of ∼200 nt and ∼70 nt specific to fst-Sm mRNA and srSm RNA, respectively, were detected by Northern blot analysis throughout S. mutans growth. The toxin mRNA was considerably more stable than its cognate antitoxin. The half-life of srSm RNA was determined to be ∼30 min, while fst-Sm mRNA had a half-life of ∼90 min. Both fst-Sm and srSm RNAs were transcribed across direct tandem repeats providing a region of complementarity for inhibition of toxin translation. Overproduction of Fst-Sm had a toxic effect on E. coli and S. mutans cells which can be neutralized by coexpression of srSm RNA. Deletion of fst-Sm/srSm locus or overexpression of Fst-Sm/srSm had no effect on S. mutans cell growth in liquid medium and no differences in the total biofilm biomass were noted. In contrast, mild-overproduction of Fst-Sm/srSm type I TA system decreases the levels of persister cells tolerant to bacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitors.

  15. A cross-sectional study of dental caries, intake of confectionery and foods rich in starch and sugars, and salivary counts of Streptococcus mutans in children in Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Closas, R; García-Closas, M; Serra-Majem, L

    1997-11-01

    In this cross-sectional study of 236 schoolchildren living in Manresa, Spain, we evaluated the association between prevalence of dental caries and frequency of consumption of various food groups, including sweetened baked goods and similar foods (rich in starch and sugars) and confectionery (rich in sugars but not starch), using a food-frequency questionnaire. Because Streptococcus mutans is associated with the cariogenicity of carbohydrates, we also evaluated the modification of these associations by salivary counts of this microorganism. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to measure the association between caries and tertiles of consumption. Sex, age, use of fluorides, tooth-brushing frequency, frequency of dental visits, socioeconomic status, and intake of other potentially cariogenic food groups were considered as potential confounders. We did not find a significant association between any of the food groups evaluated and caries prevalence. Failure to detect an association could have been due to the low prevalence of caries in our population (decayed, missing, or filled permanent teeth = 1.3 at age 10.6 y) or to underestimation of the association due to diet misclassification. In this population, the association between consumption of sweetened baked goods and caries appeared to be modified by the numbers of S. mutans [OR = 6.1 (95% CI: 1.6, 23.0) for low compared with high intake in children with moderate-to-high S. mutans counts and OR = 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1, 1.6) for low compared with high intake in children with low S. mutans counts]. These results suggest that a high intake of sweetened baked goods may be a determinant of caries prevalence in children with moderate-to-high salivary counts of S. mutans.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Fluoride Mouthrinse, Herbal Mouthrinse and Oil Pulling on the Caries Activity and Streptococcus mutans Count using Oratest and Dentocult SM Strip Mutans Kit

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Rana, Vivek; Chandna, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: As the technological level of healthcare increases, it is important not to lose sight of the basics of patient care. No matter how sophisticated dental techniques have become, preventive dentistry still remains the foundation for oral health. Therefore, antimicrobial mouthrinses are developed to provide an effective means of preventing colonization by micro-organisms. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial activity of oil pulling, herbal mouthrinses and fluoride mouthwash on the caries activity and S. mutans counts in the saliva of children, using Oratest and Dentocult SM kit. Design: Fifty-two healthy children between the age group of 6 to 12 years were selected for the study and divided into four groups based on the mouthrinse used as group 1: fluoride, group 2: herbal, group 3: oil pulling and group 4: control. The estimation of caries activity and S. mutans was done prior to and after the subjects were instructed to use the mouthrinse twice daily for a period of 2 weeks. Statistical analysis: The comparisons were made by applying paired ‘t’ test with the level of significance set at p < 0.05. Difference between more than two mean values was done by using ANOVA and Post hoc Bonferroni test was used for multiple comparisons. Results and conclusion: The efficacy of fluoride and herbal mouthrinses was found to be comparable while oil pulling did not provide any additional benefit to be used as an effective antimicrobial agent in reducing the bacterial colonization of an individual. How to cite this article: Jauhari D, Srivastava N, Rana V, Chandna P. Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Fluoride Mouthrinse, Herbal Mouthrinse and Oil Pulling on the Caries Activity and Streptococcus mutans Count using Oratest and Dentocult SM Strip Mutans Kit. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):114-118. PMID:26379378

  17. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of 4-hydroxy-o-phenylphenol and 3,6-diallyl-4-hydroxy-o-phenylphenol against a cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans OMZ 176.

    PubMed

    Bae, K H; Koo, S H; Seo, W J

    1991-03-01

    For the purpose of survey of the antibacterial activity against a cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans OMZ 176 with the introduction of hydroxyl and allyl groups to o-phenylphenol (Fig. 2, 1), 4-hydroxy-o-phenylphenol (2), and 3,6-diallyl-4-hydroxy-o-phenylphenol (4) were synthesized, successively. The synthesized compounds, 2 and 4 showed more potent antibacterial activity than the starting material, 1. The hydroxyl group was supposed to the essential element for the antibacterial activity and the introduction of allyl group to phenolic ring to be another element to increase the activity.

  18. Modification of Streptococcus mutans Cnm by PgfS contributes to adhesion, endothelial cell invasion, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Miller, James H; Simpson-Haidaris, Patricia J; Hagen, Fred K; Abranches, Jacqueline; Lemos, José A

    2014-08-01

    Expression of the surface protein Cnm has been directly implicated in the ability of certain strains of Streptococcus mutans to bind to collagen and to invade human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and in the killing of Galleria mellonella. Sequencing analysis of Cnm(+) strains revealed that cnm is located between the core genes SMU.2067 and SMU.2069. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis showed that cnm is cotranscribed with SMU.2067, encoding a putative glycosyltransferase referred to here as PgfS (protein glycosyltransferase of streptococci). Notably, Cnm contains a threonine-rich domain predicted to undergo O-linked glycosylation. The previously shown abnormal migration pattern of Cnm, the presence of the threonine-rich domain, and the molecular linkage of cnm with pgfS lead us to hypothesize that PgfS modifies Cnm. A ΔpgfS strain showed defects in several traits associated with Cnm expression, including collagen binding, HCAEC invasion, and killing of G. mellonella. Western blot analysis revealed that Cnm from the ΔpgfS mutant migrated at a lower molecular weight than that from the parent strain. In addition, Cnm produced by ΔpgfS was highly susceptible to proteinase K degradation, in contrast to the high-molecular-weight Cnm version found in the parent strain. Lectin-binding analyses confirmed the glycosylated nature of Cnm and strongly suggested the presence of N-acetylglucosamine residues attached to Cnm. Based on these findings, the phenotypes observed in ΔpgfS are most likely associated with defects in Cnm glycosylation that affects protein function, stability, or both. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Cnm is a glycoprotein and that posttranslational modification mediated by PgfS contributes to the virulence-associated phenotypes linked to Cnm.

  19. Effect of dextran and ammonium sulphate on the reaction catalysed by a glucosyltransferase complex from Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Newman, B M; White, P; Mohan, S B; Cole, J A

    1980-06-01

    The highly aggregated proteins precipitated by (NH4)2SO4 from the culture fluid of three strains of Streptococcus mutans gradually released less aggregated glucosyltransferase activities - dextransucrase and mutansucrase - which catalysed the synthesis of water-soluble and insoluble glucans from sucrose. Mutansucrase was eluted from a column of Sepharose 6B before dextransucrase. This activity was lost during subsequent dialysis and gel filtration, but there was a corresponding increase in dextransucrase activity which catalysed the formation of soluble glucan when incubated with sucrose alone, and insoluble glucan when incubated with sucrose and 1.55 M-(NH4)2SO4. Relative rates of synthesis of soluble and insoluble glucan in the presence of 1.55 M-(MH4)2SO4 were dependent upon the enzyme concentration: high concentrations favoured insoluble glucan synthesis. Insoluble glucans synthesized by mutansucrase or by dextransucrase in the presence of 1.55 M-(NH4)2SO4 were more sensitive to hydrolysis by mutanase than by dextranse, but soluble glucans were more extensively hydrolysed by dextranase than by mutanase. Partially purified dextransucrase sedimented through glycerol density gradients as a single symmetrical peak with an apparent molecular weight in the range 100000 to 110000. In the presence of 1.55 M-(NH4)2SO4, part of the activity sedimented rapidly as a high molecular weight aggregate. The results strongly suggest that soluble and insoluble glucans are synthesized by interconvertible forms of the same glucosyltransferase. The aggregated form, mutansucrase, preferentially catalyses (1 leads to 3)-alpha bond formation but dissociates during gel filtration to the dextransucrase form which catalyses (1 leads to 6)-alpha bond formation.

  20. Interaction of Streptococcus mutans YidC1 and YidC2 with translating and nontranslating ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zht Cheng; de Keyzer, Jeanine; Berrelkamp-Lahpor, Greetje A; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2013-10-01

    The YidC/OxaI/Alb3 family of membrane proteins is involved in the biogenesis of integral membrane proteins in bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. Gram-positive bacteria often contain multiple YidC paralogs that can be subdivided into two major classes, namely, YidC1 and YidC2. The Streptococcus mutans YidC1 and YidC2 proteins possess C-terminal tails that differ in charges (+9 and + 14) and lengths (33 and 61 amino acids). The longer YidC2 C terminus bears a resemblance to the C-terminal ribosome-binding domain of the mitochondrial OxaI protein and, in contrast to the shorter YidC1 C terminus, can mediate the interaction with mitochondrial ribosomes. These observations have led to the suggestion that YidC1 and YidC2 differ in their abilities to interact with ribosomes. However, the interaction with bacterial translating ribosomes has never been addressed. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli ribosomes are able to interact with both YidC1 and YidC2. The interaction is stimulated by the presence of a nascent membrane protein substrate and abolished upon deletion of the C-terminal tail, which also abrogates the YidC-dependent membrane insertion of subunit c of the F1F0-ATPase into the membrane. It is concluded that both YidC1 and YidC2 interact with ribosomes, suggesting that the modes of membrane insertion by these membrane insertases are similar.

  1. A novel double-tryptophan peptide pheromone is conserved in mutans and pyogenic Streptococci and Controls Competence in Streptococcus mutans via an Rgg regulator

    PubMed Central

    Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Morrison, Donald A.; Federle, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary All streptococcal genomes encode the alternative sigma factor SigX and 21 SigX-dependent proteins required for genetic transformation, yet no pyogenic streptococci are known to develop competence. Resolving this paradox may depend on understanding the regulation of sigX. We report the identification of a regulatory circuit linked to the sigX genes of both mutans and pyogenic streptococci that uses a novel small, double-tryptophan-containing competence-inducing peptide (CIP) pheromone. In both groups, the CIP gene, which we designate comS, and sigX have identical, noncanonical promoters consisting of 9-bp inverted repeats separated from a −10 hexamer by 19 bp. comS is adjacent to a gene encoding a putative transcription factor of the Rgg family and is regulated by its product, which we designate ComR. Deletion of comR or comS in S. mutans abolished transformability, as did deletion of the oligopeptide permease subunit oppD, suggesting that CIP is imported. Providing S. mutans with synthetic fragments of CIP revealed that seven C-terminal residues, including the WW motif, cause robust induction of both sigX and the competent state. We propose that this circuit is the proximal regulator of sigX in S. mutans, and we infer that it controls competence in a parallel way in all pyogenic streptococci. PMID:20969646

  2. Reduction of saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans MT8148 and dental biofilm development by tragacanth gum and yeast-derived phosphomannan.

    PubMed

    Shimotoyodome, A; Kobayashi, H; Nakamura, J; Tokimitsu, I; Hase, T; Inoue, T; Matsukubo, T; Takaesu, Y

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate materials which reduce saliva-promoted adhesion of Streptococcus mutans onto enamel surfaces, and their potential in preventing dental biofilm development. The effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) surface pretreatment with hydrophilic polysaccharides on saliva-promoted S. mutans adhesion in vitro and de novo dental biofilm deposition in vivo were examined. Saliva-promoted adhesion of S. mutans MT8148 was significantly reduced by pretreatment of the HA surface with tragacanth gum (TG) and yeast-derived phosphoglycans. Extracellular phosphomannan (PM) from Pichia capsulata NRRL Y-1842 and TG reduced biofilm development on lower incisors in plaque-susceptible rats when administered via drinking water at concentrations of 0.5% and 0.01%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of TG on de novo dental biofilm formation was also demonstrated when administered via mouthwash in humans. It is concluded that TG and yeast-derived PM have the potential for use as anti-adherent agents and are effective in reducing de novo dental biofilm formation.

  3. Chemical characterization of red wine grape (Vitis vinifera and Vitis interspecific hybrids) and pomace phenolic extracts and their biological activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Thimothe, Joanne; Bonsi, Illeme A; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Koo, Hyun

    2007-12-12

    Grapes are rich sources of potentially bioactive polyphenols. However, the phenolic content is variable depending on grape variety, and may be modified during vinification. In this study, we examined the chemical composition and biological activity of phenolic extracts prepared from several red wine grape varieties and their fermented byproduct of winemaking (pomace) on some of the virulence properties of Streptococcus mutans a well-known dental pathogen. Grape phenolic extracts were obtained from Vitis vinifera varieties Cabernet Franc and Pinot Noir and Vitis interspecific hybrid varieties Baco Noir and Noiret. The anthocyanins and flavan-3-ols content were highly variable depending on grape variety and type of extract (whole fruit vs fermented pomace). Nevertheless, all grape phenolic extracts remarkably inhibited glucosyltransferases B and C (70-85% inhibition) at concentrations as low as 62.5 microg/mL (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the glycolytic pH-drop by S. mutans cells was inhibited by the grape extracts without affecting the bacterial viability; an effect that can be attributed to partial inhibition of F-ATPase activity (30-65% inhibition at 125 microg/mL; P < 0.01). The biological activity of fermented pomace was either as effective as or significantly better than whole fruit grape extracts. The results showed that grape phenolic extracts, especially from pomace, are highly effective against specific virulence traits of S. mutans despite major differences in their phenolic content.

  4. Inhibitory effect of sorbitol on sugar metabolism of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and on acid production in dental plaque in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Abbe, S; Abbe, K; Takahashi, N; Tamazawa, Y; Yamada, T

    2001-04-01

    This study was conducted to find out whether sorbitol inhibits the sugar metabolism of Streptococcus mutans in vitro and the acid production in dental plaque in vivo. S. mutans NCIB 11723 was anaerobically grown in sorbitol-containing medium. The rate of acid production from sugars was estimated with a pH stat. The rate of acid production from glucose or sucrose was not changed at various concentrations of oxygen. By the addition of sorbitol to sugar, however, the acid production was decreased with increasing levels of oxygen. Intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio and (dihydroxyacetone-phosphate+glyceraldehyde-phosphate)/3-phosphoglycerate ratio were high whenever the acid production was inhibited by sorbitol. Sorbitol also inhibited the acid production in dental plaque in vivo. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD+ ratio during sorbitol metabolism through the inactivation of pyruvate formate-lyase by oxygen inhibited glyceraldehyde-phosphate dehydrogenase and then the acid production of S. mutans and the one in dental plaque.

  5. Comparative evaluation of 0.2% Chlorhexidine Mouthwash, Xylitol Chewing Gum, and Combination of 0.2% Chlorhexidine Mouthwash and Xylitol Chewing Gum on Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Biofilm Levels in 8- to 12-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Meena; Shrivastava, Vandana; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effect of combining 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) mouthwash with xylitol (XYL) chewing gum on Streptococcus mutans and biofilm levels among 8- to 12-year-old children. Materials and methods Sixty children aged 8 to 12 years were selected with moderate and high salivary S. mutans levels. They were divided into three groups of 20 children each: (1) XYL group where the subjects chewed XYL twice daily; (2) CHX where rinsing was done twice daily; and (3) combination of XYL and CHX group (XYL+CHX) where both the agents were used once daily. The S. mutans colony-forming units (CFUs) were counted by using the mitis salivarius agar plate at the beginning of the study and at 15 days, 1, 2, and 6 months from the start of the study. Results The XYL+CHX group showed the maximum reduction in both the biofilm and S. mutans scores throughout the study period. Conclusion The XYL+CHX combination reduced both the biofilm and S. mutans score significantly better than either XYL chewing gums or CHX mouthwash used alone. How to cite this article Syed M, Chopra R, Shrivastava V, Sachdev V. Comparative evaluation of 0.2% Chlorhexidine Mouthwash, Xylitol Chewing Gum, and Combination of 0.2% Chlorhexidine Mouthwash and Xylitol Chewing Gum on Salivary Streptococcus mutans and Biofilm Levels in 8- to 12-Year-Old Children. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):313-319. PMID:28127162

  6. A unique F-type H⁺-ATPase from Streptococcus mutans: an active H⁺ pump at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yuka; Nogami, Eri; Maeda, Masatomo; Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Iwamoto-Kihara, Atsuko

    2014-01-10

    We have shown previously that the Streptococcus mutans F-type H(+)-ATPase (F(O)F(1)) c subunit gene could complement Escherichia coli defective in the corresponding gene, particularly at acidic pH (Araki et al., (2013) [14]). In this study, the entire S. mutans F(O)F(1) was functionally assembled in the E. coli plasma membrane (SF(O)F(1)). Membrane SF(O)F(1) ATPase showed optimum activity at pH 7, essentially the same as that of the S. mutans, although the activity of E. coli F(O)F(1) (EF(O)F(1)) was optimum at pH≥9. The membranes showed detectable ATP-dependent H(+)-translocation at pH 5.5-6.5, but not at neutral conditions (pH≥7), consistent with the role of S. mutans F(O)F(1) to pump H(+) out of the acidic cytoplasm. A hybrid F(O)F(1), consisting of membrane-integrated F(O) and -peripheral F(1) sectors from S. mutans and E. coli (SF(O)EF(1)), respectively, essentially showed the same pH profile as that of EF(O)F(1) ATPase. However, ATP-driven H(+)-transport was similar to that by SF(O)F(1), with activity at acidic pH. Replacement of the conserved c subunit Glu53 in SF(O)F(1) abolished H(+)-transport at pH 6 or 7, suggesting its role in H(+) transport. Mutations in the SF(O)F(1) c subunit, Ser17Ala or Glu20Ile, changed the pH dependency of H(+)-transport, and the F(O) could transport H(+) at pH 7, as the membranes with EF(O)F(1). Ser17, Glu20, and their vicinity were suggested to be involved in H(+)-transport in S. mutans at acidic pH.

  7. Streptococcus mutans extracellular DNA is upregulated during growth in biofilms, actively released via membrane vesicles, and influenced by components of the protein secretion machinery.

    PubMed

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I; Heim, Kyle P; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L Jeannine; Wen, Zezhang T

    2014-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA.

  8. Psr is involved in regulation of glucan production, and double deficiency of BrpA and Psr is lethal in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, Jacob P; Liao, Sumei; McKey, Briggs A; Yao, Xin; Fan, Yuwei; Abranches, Jacqueline; Beatty, Wandy L; Wen, Zezhang T

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary causative agent of dental caries, contains two paralogues of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family proteins encoded by brpA and psr, respectively. Previous studies have shown that BrpA plays an important role in cell envelope biogenesis/homeostasis and affects stress responses and biofilm formation by Strep. mutans, traits critical to cariogenicity of this bacterium. In this study, a Psr-deficient mutant, TW251, was constructed. Characterization of TW251 showed that deficiency of Psr did not have any major impact on growth rate. However, when subjected to acid killing at pH 2.8, the survival rate of TW251 was decreased dramatically compared with the parent strain UA159. In addition, TW251 also displayed major defects in biofilm formation, especially during growth with sucrose. When compared to UA159, the biofilms of TW251 were mainly planar and devoid of extracellular glucans. Real-time-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that deficiency of Psr significantly decreased the expression of glucosyltransferase C, a protein known to play a major role in biofilm formation by Strep. mutans. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that deficiency of BrpA caused alterations in cell envelope and cell division, and the most significant defects were observed in TW314, a Psr-deficient and BrpA-down mutant. No such effects were observed with Psr mutant TW251 under similar conditions. These results suggest that while there are similarities in functions between BrpA and Psr, distinctive differences also exist between these two paralogues. Like Bacillus subtilis but different from Staphylococcus aureus, a functional BrpA or Psr is required for viability in Strep. mutans.

  9. Down-Regulation of Glycosyl Transferase Genes in Streptococcus Mutans by Punica Granatum L. Flower and Rhus Coriaria L. Fruit Water Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Vahid-Dastjerdi, Elahe; Monadi, Elham; Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Torshabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effects of Punica granatum L. flower and Rhus coriaria L. fruit water extracts on dental plaque accumulation by several bacteria, especially Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), on orthodontic wire by in-vitro assays. In this study, the anti-cariogenic properties of the extracts were evaluated by assessing their effects on expression of glycosyltransferase (gtf) genes, which are responsible for initial biofilm formation by S. mutans. In this study, the effect of herbal extracts on expression of gtfB, C (encoding enzymes that produce water-insoluble glucans) and D (encoding enzymes that produce water-soluble glucans) genes in S. mutans growing in planktonic state was evaluated quantitatively by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) of understudied herbal water extracts significantly suppressed gtfB, C and D gene expression by 85.3 ± 7.5%, 33.3 ± 6.4% and 25 ± 14%, respectively for Punica granatum L. extract and 73.4 ± 7.3%, 93.8 ± 2.7% and 59.3 ± 9.8%, respectively for Rhus coriaria L. extract compared to the non-treated control group (P < 0.05). Also, the real-rime PCR showed that the inhibitory effect of Rhus coriaria L. extract on gtfC and D was significantly greater (10.8 and 1.8 fold, respectively) than that of Punica granatum L. extract. These findings suggest that Punica granatum L. and especially Rhus coriaria L. maybe used as novel, natural antiplaque agents since they inhibit specific genes associated with bacterial biofilm formation without necessarily affecting the growth of oral bacteria. PMID:27642322

  10. In vitro Manganese-Dependent Cross-Talk between Streptococcus mutans VicK and GcrR: Implications for Overlapping Stress Response Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer S.; Mashburn-Warren, Lauren; Ayala, Eduardo A.; Senadheera, Dilani B.; Hendrickson, Whitney K.; McCall, Lathan W.; Sweet, Julie G.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.; Spatafora, Grace A.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major acidogenic component of the dental plaque biofilm, has a key role in caries etiology. Previously, we demonstrated that the VicRK two-component signal transduction system modulates biofilm formation, oxidative stress and acid tolerance responses in S. mutans. Using in vitro phosphorylation assays, here we demonstrate for the first time, that in addition to activating its cognate response regulator protein, the sensor kinase, VicK can transphosphorylate a non-cognate stress regulatory response regulator, GcrR, in the presence of manganese. Manganese is an important micronutrient that has been previously correlated with caries incidence, and which serves as an effector of SloR-mediated metalloregulation in S. mutans. Our findings supporting regulatory effects of manganese on the VicRK, GcrR and SloR, and the cross-regulatory networks formed by these components are more complex than previously appreciated. Using DNaseI footprinting we observed overlapping DNA binding specificities for VicR and GcrR in native promoters, consistent with these proteins being part of the same transcriptional regulon. Our results also support a role for SloR as a positive regulator of the vicRK two component signaling system, since its transcription was drastically reduced in a SloR-deficient mutant. These findings demonstrate the regulatory complexities observed with the S. mutans manganese-dependent response, which involves cross-talk between non-cognate signal transduction systems (VicRK and GcrR) to modulate stress response pathways. PMID:25536343

  11. Use of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 to interfere with biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyan; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yuejian; Liang, Jingping; Jiang, Yuntao; Ma, Rui; Tang, Zisheng; Huang, Zhengwei

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is recognised as a major aetiological agent of dental caries. One of its important virulence factors is its ability to form biofilms on tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 on biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain. The effects of furanone C-30 on biofilms of both strains formed on 96-well microtitre plates at 37 °C were determined by a colorimetric technique (MTT assay). Different concentrations of furanone C-30 (0.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/mL) and different time points of biofilm formation (4, 14 and 24 h) were investigated. The structures and thickness of the biofilms were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quorum sensing-related gene expression (ftf, smu630, brpA, gbpB, gtfB, vicR, comDE and relA) was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that synthetic furanone C-30 can inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain, although it does not affect the bacterial growth rate itself. The quantities of biofilm formed by both strains significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the biofilms became thinner and looser as revealed by CLSM with increasing concentrations of furanone C-30. Expression of the genes tested was downregulated in the biofilms by the addition of furanone C-30. These results revealed that synthetic furanone C-30 can effectively inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

  12. Heterologous expression of Streptococcus mutans Cnm in Lactococcus lactis promotes intracellular invasion, adhesion to human cardiac tissues and virulence.

    PubMed

    Freires, Irlan A; Avilés-Reyes, Alejandro; Kitten, Todd; Simpson-Haidaris, P J; Swartz, Michael; Knight, Peter A; Rosalen, Pedro L; Lemos, José A; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2017-01-02

    In S. mutans, the expression of the surface glycoprotein Cnm mediates binding to extracellular matrix proteins, endothelial cell invasion and virulence in the Galleria mellonella invertebrate model. To further characterize Cnm as a virulence factor, the cnm gene from S. mutans strain OMZ175 was expressed in the non-pathogenic Lactococcus lactis NZ9800 using a nisin-inducible system. Despite the absence of the machinery necessary for Cnm glycosylation, Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that Cnm was effectively expressed and translocated to the cell wall of L. lactis. Similar to S. mutans, expression of Cnm in L. lactis enabled robust binding to collagen and laminin, invasion of human coronary artery endothelial cells and increased virulence in G. mellonella. Using an ex vivo human heart tissue colonization model, we showed that Cnm-positive strains of either S. mutans or L. lactis outcompete their Cnm-negative counterparts for tissue colonization. Finally, Cnm expression facilitated L. lactis adhesion and colonization in a rabbit model of infective endocarditis. Collectively, our results provide unequivocal evidence that binding to extracellular matrices mediated by Cnm is an important virulence attribute of S. mutans and confirm the usefulness of the L. lactis heterologous system for further characterization of bacterial virulence factors.

  13. Comparative Genomics of Oral Isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico Genome Subtraction Does Not Reveal Accessory DNA Associated with Severe Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5 to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 bp to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  14. Comparative genomics of oral isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico genome subtraction does not reveal accessory DNA associated with severe early childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5% to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  15. Intermolecular forces and enthalpies in the adhesion of Streptococcus mutans and an antigen I/II-deficient mutant to laminin films.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; Petersen, Fernanda C; Scheie, Anne A; van der Mei, Henny C

    2007-04-01

    The antigen I/II family of surface proteins is expressed by most oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans, and mediates specific adhesion to, among other things, salivary films and extracellular matrix proteins. In this study we showed that antigen I/II-deficient S. mutans isogenic mutant IB03987 was nearly unable to adhere to laminin films under flow conditions due to a lack of specific interactions (0.8 x 10(6) and 1.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2) at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) compared with parent strain LT11 (21.8 x 10(6) and 26.1 x 10(6) cells cm(-2)). The adhesion of both the parent and mutant strains was slightly greater at pH 6.8 than at pH 5.8. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the parent strain experienced less repulsion when it approached a laminin film than the mutant experienced. Upon retraction, combined specific and nonspecific adhesion forces were stronger for the parent strain (up to -5.0 and -4.9 nN at pH 5.8 and 6.8, respectively) than for the mutant (up to -1.5 and -2.1 nN), which was able to interact only through nonspecific interactions. Enthalpy was released upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of the parent strain but not upon adsorption of laminin to the surface of IB03987. A comparison of the adhesion forces in AFM with the adhesion forces reported for specific ligand-receptor complexes resulted in the conclusion that the number of antigen I/II binding sites for laminin on S. mutans LT11 is on the order of 6 x 10(4) sites per organism and that the sites are probably arranged along exterior surface structures, as visualized here by immunoelectron microscopy.

  16. A unique open reading frame within the comX gene of Streptococcus mutans regulates genetic competence and oxidative stress tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kaspar, Justin; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Palmer, Sara R.; Choi, Sang Chul; Stanhope, Michael J.; Burne, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans displays complex regulation of genetic competence, with ComX controlling late competence gene transcription. The rcrRPQ operon has been shown to link oxidative stress tolerance, (p)ppGpp metabolism and competence in S. mutans. Importantly, an rcrR polar (ΔrcrR-P) mutant is hyper-transformable, but an rcrR non-polar (ΔrcrR-NP) mutant cannot be transformed. Transcriptome comparisons of the rcrR mutants using RNA-Seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed little expression in the 5′ region of comX in ΔrcrR-NP, but high level expression in the 3′ region. Northern blotting with comX probes revealed two distinct transcripts in the ΔrcrR-P and ΔrcrR-NP strains, and 5′ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends mapped the 5′ terminus of the shorter transcript to nt +140 of the comX structural gene, where a unique 69-aa open reading frame, termed XrpA, was encoded in a different reading frame than ComX. Two single-nucleotide substitution mutants (comX::T162C; comX::T210A) were introduced to disrupt XrpA without affecting the sequence of ComX. When the mutations were in the ΔrcrR-NP genetic background, ComX production and transformation were restored. Overexpression of xrpA led to impaired growth in aerobic conditions and decreased transformability. These results reveal an unprecedented mechanism for competence regulation and stress tolerance by a gene product encoded within the comX gene that appears unique to S. mutans. PMID:25620525

  17. Inhibitory efficacy of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium-Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) toward cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Shanmugaraj; Poornima, Balan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-05-01

    Since Streptococcus mutans is the principal etiologic agent causing dental caries, by encompassing an array of unique virulence traits, emerging treatment strategies that specifically target the virulence of this pathogen may be promising as alternative approaches compared to conventional antibiotic therapy. In this perspective, we investigated chloroform extract of cell-free culture supernatant from mangrove rhizosphere bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (MMS-50) in terms of anticariogenic properties of S. mutans, without suppressing its viability. Crude chloroform extract of MMS-50 was subjected to column and high performance liquid chromatographic techniques to obtain the active fraction (AF), and MMS-50 AF was used for all further assays. GC-MS and FT-IR were carried out to identify the major components present in MMS-50 AF. Comparative gene expression analysis of some biofilm-forming and virulence genes (vicR, comDE, gtfC, and gbpB) was done by real-time PCR. Cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) was found to be the chief compound in MMS-50 AF responsible for bioactivity. The minimum and maximum inhibitory concentrations of MMS-50 AF against S. mutans were found to be 100 and 250 μg/mL, respectively. Anti-virulence assays performed using below-sub-MIC levels of MMS-50 AF (30 μg/mL) resulted in significant reduction in adherence (68%), acid production, acid tolerance, glucan synthesis (32%), biofilm formation (53.5%) and cell surface hydrophobicity, all devoid of affecting its viability. The micrographs of CLSM and SEM further confirmed the antibiofilm and anti-virulence efficacies of MMS-50 AF. Expression data showed significant reduction in expression of all studied virulence genes. Thus, the current study unveils the anticariogenic potential of cyclo(L-leucyl-L-prolyl) from B. amyloliquefaciens, as well as its suitability as a novel and alternative anticariogenic agent against dental caries.

  18. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production.

    PubMed

    Crowley, P J; Brady, L J

    2016-02-01

    The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery to cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC, and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle pathway, were also evaluated for their effects on mutacin production and genetic competence.

  19. Experiences with the Streptococcus Mutans in Lakota Sioux (SMILeS) Study: Risk factors for Caries in American Indian Children 0–3 Years

    PubMed Central

    Drake, David; Dawson, Deborah; Kramer, Katherine; Schumacher, Amy; Warren, John; Marshall, Teresa; Starr, Delores; Phipps, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Severe Early Childhood Caries (S-ECC) is a terribly aggressive and devastating disease that is all too common in lower socio-economic children, but none more so that what is encountered in American Indian Tribes. Nationwide, approximately 27% of 2–5 year olds have decay while 62% percent of American Indian/Alaska Native children in the same age group have a history of decay (IHS 2010, NHANES 1999–2002). We have conducted a study of children from birth to 36 months of age on Pine Reservation to gain a better understanding of the variables that come into play in the development of this disease, from transmission and acquisition of Streptococcus mutans genotypes from mother to child to multiple dietary and behavioral components. This article describes how we established a direct partnership with the Tribe and the many opportunities and challenges we faced in performing this 5-year field study. PMID:27668133

  20. Potent inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the acid production and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of Streptococcus mutans GS5 in the presence of sucrose.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Daijo; Ogawa, Takaaki; Miyake, Minoru; Hasui, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Izumori, Ken; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    We examined and compared the inhibitory effects of D-tagatose on the growth, acid production, and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of GS5, a bacterial strain of Streptococcus mutans, with those of xylitol, D-psicose, L-psicose and L-tagatose. GS5 was cultured for 12h in a medium containing 10% (w/v) of xylitol, D-psicose, L-psicose, D-tagatose or L-tagatose, and the inhibitory effect of GS5 growth was assessed. Each sugar showed different inhibitory effects on GS5. Both D-tagatose and xylitol significantly inhibited the acid production and water-insoluble glucan synthesis of GS5 in the presence of 1% (w/v) sucrose. However, the inhibitory effect of acid production by D-tagatose was significantly stronger than that of xylitol in presence of sucrose.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of Streptococcus mutans chaperones and protein secretion machinery components on cell surface protein biogenesis, competence, and mutacin production

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    Summary The respective contributions of components of the protein translocation/maturation machinery on cell surface biogenesis in Streptococcus mutans are not fully understood. Here we used a genetic approach to characterize the effects of deletion of genes encoding the ribosome-associated chaperone RopA (Trigger Factor), the surface-localized foldase PrsA, and the membrane-localized chaperone insertases YidC1 and YidC2, both singly and in combination, on bacterial growth, chain length, self-aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity, autolysis, and antigenicity of surface proteins P1 (AgI/II, PAc), WapA, GbpC and GtfD. The single and double deletion mutants, as well as additional mutant strains lacking components of the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway, were also evaluated for effects on mutacin production and genetic competence. PMID:26386361

  2. The approximal bone height and intrabony defects in young adults, related to the salivary buffering capacity and counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Wikner, S; Söder, P O; Frithiof, L; Wouters, F

    1990-01-01

    Using a computerized technique the bone height and prevalence of approximal periodontal intrabony defects were assessed on posterior bite-wing radiographs from 151 young adults. The results were related to the buffering capacity and counts of Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli in whole stimulated saliva. The mean distance from the cement-enamel junction to the alveolar bone crest was greater in the high buffering group than in the low buffering group (p less than 0.05), and particularly in non-smokers (p less than 0.01). Intrabony defects were more common in the low buffering group (p less than 0.05) and in women (p less than 0.001).

  3. Real-time monitoring of the development and stability of biofilms of Streptococcus mutans using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Amy L; Rudd, Timothy R; Martin, David S; Fernig, David G; Edwards, Clive

    2007-10-31

    Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used for continuous in-situ monitoring of cell attachment and growth of Streptococcus mutans as biofilms. Cell attachment and proliferation were monitored within an overnight period of 20 h. Biofilms generated using a 'continuous flow' method had a greater mass and were more dissipative (more viscoelastic) than those established using an 'attach and flow' strategy. Cell numbers (as colony forming units, c.f.u.) in biofilms formed inside the QCM-D device after a 2-h attachment phase and during a 20-h growth period could be related to frequency (f) changes. The percentage surface coverage on the QCM-D crystals by bacteria was estimated using the surface analysis features of the atomic force microscope and image analysis software. Both mean percentage coverage and c.f.u increased after growth of S. mutans. The energy losses displayed by the increases in the dissipative factor (D) indicated an increase in 'softness' of the attached cells. The ratio of D/f was used to provide information of the way in which viscoelasticity changed per unit mass. Flow conditions over the cells on the surface appeared to be important in creating biofilms of a greater complexity and stability and the QCM-D enabled properties of cells during attachment and binding, proliferation and removal to be monitored continuously.

  4. Effects of combined oleic acid and fluoride at sub-MIC levels on EPS formation and viability of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jian-Na; Kim, Mi-A; Jung, Ji-Eun; Pandit, Santosh; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of fluoride, dental caries, a biofilm-related disease, remains an important health problem. This study investigated whether oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, can enhance the effect of fluoride on extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) formation by Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels, via microbiological and biochemical methods, confocal fluorescence microscopy, and real-time PCR. The combination of oleic acid with fluoride inhibited EPS formation more strongly than did fluoride or oleic acid alone. The superior inhibition of EPS formation was due to the combination of the inhibitory effects of oleic acid and fluoride against glucosyltransferases (GTFs) and GTF-related gene (gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD) expression, respectively. In addition, the combination of oleic acid with fluoride altered the bacterial biovolume of the biofilms without bactericidal activity. These results suggest that oleic acid may be useful for enhancing fluoride inhibition of EPS formation by S. mutans biofilms, without killing the bacterium.

  5. Sharply Tuned pH Response of Genetic Competence Regulation in Streptococcus mutans: a Microfluidic Study of the Environmental Sensitivity of comX

    PubMed Central

    Son, Minjun; Ghoreishi, Delaram; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans is a transient state that is regulated in response to multiple environmental inputs. These include extracellular pH and the concentrations of two secreted peptides, designated CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) and XIP (comX-inducing peptide). The role of environmental cues in regulating competence can be difficult to disentangle from the effects of the organism's physiological state and its chemical modification of its environment. We used microfluidics to control the extracellular environment and study the activation of the key competence gene comX. We find that the comX promoter (PcomX) responds to XIP or CSP only when the extracellular pH lies within a narrow window, about 1 pH unit wide, near pH 7. Within this pH range, CSP elicits a strong PcomX response from a subpopulation of cells, whereas outside this range the proportion of cells expressing comX declines sharply. Likewise, PcomX is most sensitive to XIP only within a narrow pH window. While previous work suggested that comX may become refractory to CSP or XIP stimulus as cells exit early exponential phase, our microfluidic data show that extracellular pH dominates in determining sensitivity to XIP and CSP. The data are most consistent with an effect of pH on the ComR/ComS system, which has direct control over transcription of comX in S. mutans. PMID:26070670

  6. Microstructural differences between single-species and dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella parvula, before and after exposure to chlorhexidine.

    PubMed

    Kara, Duygu; Luppens, Suzanne B I; van Marle, Jan; Ozok, Rifat; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2007-06-01

    Dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Veillonella parvula are less susceptible to antimicrobials than single-species biofilms of the same microorganisms. The microstructure of single and dual-species biofilms of S. mutans and/or V. parvula was visualized to find out whether the spatial arrangement of bacteria in biofilms is related to survival strategies against antimicrobials. Biofilms were grown in glass-bottomed 96-well microtiter plates and exposed to chlorhexidine at 48 h. Fluorescent probes were used for staining. The microstructure of biofilms was analyzed by confocal scanning laser microscopy at 48, 96, 192, and 264 h. Spatial arrangement analysis was performed using DAIME software for 48 h biofilms. A decrease in the viability and thickness in all types of biofilms was detected after chlorhexidine treatment in time. In untreated biofilms, clustering was observed. In chlorhexidine-treated single-species biofilms, bacteria were dispersed. However, the most prominent clustering was observed in chlorhexidine-treated dual-species biofilm bacteria, which had a higher survival rate compared with chlorhexidine-treated single-species biofilms. Bacteria in dual-species biofilms establish a specific spatial arrangement, forming clusters within distances below 1.2 microm as a survival strategy against antimicrobials while the same bacteria lack this defensive construction in a single-species biofilm.

  7. Serotype specific polymerase chain reaction identifies a higher prevalence of streptococcus mutans serotype k and e in a random group of children with dental caries from the Southern region of India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Arun Prasad; Austin, Ravi David

    2014-01-01

    Background: The development of dental caries has been associated with the oral prevalence of Streptococcus mutans. Four serotypes of S. mutans have been reported, namely serotype c, e, f, and k that are classified based on the composition and linkages of cell wall polysaccharides, response to physiological reactions, sero-specificity and 16s rRNA homology. Although the oral prevalence of S. mutans serotype c in Indian subjects with or without caries is known, the prevalence of the other three serotypes, e, f, and k are not known. Hence in this study, we have investigated the occurrence of the e, f, and k serotypes in children with or without caries within the age group of 6-12 years. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA isolated from whole saliva of caries active (CA) and caries free (CF) groups were first screened for the presence of S. mutans by strain specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Those samples that tested positive for the presence of S. mutans were further analyzed by serotype specific PCR to identify the prevalence of the serotypes. Results: Strain specific PCR indicated a higher prevalence of S. mutans in CA group (80%) relative to CF group (43%). Further analysis of the S. mutans positive samples in both groups indicated a higher prevalence of serotype k and e, followed by serotype f in CA group. Conclusion: The present data clearly establishes a novel S. mutans serotype prevalence hierarchy in children from this region, compared with those that have been reported elsewhere. Besides, the data are also clinically significant as the occurrence of serotype k has been associated with infective endocarditis. PMID:25191062

  8. Influence of methylene blue-mediated photodynamic therapy on the resistance to detachment of streptococcus mutans biofilms from titanium substrata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharab, Lina Y.

    In dental settings, as well as in other natural systems, plaque-forming microorganisms develop biofilms in which the microbes become protected via their own phenotypic changes and their polymeric exudates from disinfection by washes and antibiotics. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is variably effective against these microorganisms, depending on such factors as whether the bacteria are Gram positive or Gram negative, plaque age and thickness, and internal biofilm oxygen concentration. This investigation applied a novel combination of PDT and water-jet impingement techniques to Streptococcus mutans (ATCC strain 27351)-formed biofilms on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) starting with three different phases (ages) of the bacteria, to examine whether the detachment shear stress --as a signature for the work required for removal of the biofilms- would be affected by prior PDT treatment independently from microbial viability. Biofilms were grown with sucrose addition to Brain Heart Infusion media, producing visible thick films and nearly invisible thin films (within the same piece) having the same numbers of culturable microorganisms, the thicker films having greater susceptibility to detachment by water--jet impingement. Colony-forming-unit (CFU) counts routinely correlated well with results from a spectrophotometric Alamar Blue (AB) assay. Use of Methylene Blue (MB) as a photosensitizer (PS) for PDT of biofilms did not interfere with the AB assay, but did mask AB reduction spectral changes when employed with planktonic organisms. It was discovered in this work that PD-treated microbial biofilms, independently from starting or PS-influenced microorganism viability, were significantly (p<0.05) and differentially more easily delaminated and ultimately removed from their substrata biomaterials by the hydrodynamic forces of water-jet impingement. Control biofilms of varying thickness, not receiving PDT treatment, required between 144 and 228 dynes/cm2 of shear stress to

  9. Antimicrobial efficacy of Acacia nilotica, Murraya koenigii (L.) Sprengel, Eucalyptus hybrid, Psidium guajava extracts and