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Sample records for albicans yeast cells

  1. Dectin-1 mediates in vitro phagocytosis of Candida albicans yeast cells by retinal microglia.

    PubMed

    Maneu, Victoria; Yáñez, Alberto; Murciano, Celia; Molina, Andrés; Gil, María Luisa; Gozalbo, Daniel

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the expression of TLR2 and Dectin-1 in retinal microglia and their involvement in Candida albicans phagocytosis using a cytometric approach. The expression of both receptors has been demonstrated in CD11b(+) retinal cells. Phagocytosis of pHrodo-labelled C. albicans yeasts by microglial CD11b(+) cells of C57BL/6 mice was inhibited both by the Dectin-1 antagonist laminarin and anti-Dectin-1 antibodies, whereas phagocytosis of yeasts by retinal microglia of TLR2 KO mice was unaffected. These data indicate that phagocytosis of C. albicans yeasts by retinal microglia is mediated by Dectin-1, whereas TLR2 does not play a significant role in this process.

  2. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chaillot, Julien; Cook, Michael A.; Corbeil, Jacques; Sellam, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host. PMID:28040776

  3. Filamentation protects Candida albicans from amphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

    PubMed

    Laprade, David J; Brown, Melissa S; McCarthy, Morgan L; Ritch, James J; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2016-07-01

    The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the most significant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct cell types: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from one cell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed cell death is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C. albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin B and caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence that suggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: Filamentous C. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- and caspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts. Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by a protective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1.

  4. Filamentation protects Candida albicans from amphotericin B-induced programmed cell death via a mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1

    PubMed Central

    Laprade, David J.; Brown, Melissa S.; McCarthy, Morgan L.; Ritch, James J.; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Candida albicans is one of the most significant fungal pathogens worldwide. It proliferates in two distinct cell types: blastopores and filaments. Only cells that are able to transform from one cell type into the other are virulent in mouse disease models. Programmed cell death is a controlled form of cell suicide that occurs when C. albicans cells are exposed to fungicidal drugs like amphotericin B and caspofungin, and to other stressful conditions. We now provide evidence that suggests that programmed cell death is cell-type specific in yeast: Filamentous C. albicans cells are more resistant to amphotericin B- and caspofungin-induced programmed cell death than their blastospore counterparts. Finally, our genetic data suggests that this phenomenon is mediated by a protective mechanism involving the yeast metacaspase, MCA1. PMID:27683660

  5. [Demonstration of β-1,2 mannan structures expressed on the cell wall of Candida albicans yeast form but not on the hyphal form by using monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Aydın, Cevahir; Ataoğlu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus that may be observed as both commensal and opportunistic pathogen in humans. As one of the major components of Candida cell wall structure, mannan plays an important role in the fungus-host cell interaction and in virulence. The ability to switch from yeast to hypha form of microorganism is crutial in the development of C.albicans infections. Hyphal form has different antigenic properties compared to yeast form and structural changes occur in the yeast cell wall during transition from yeast to hypha form. Although there are several factors associated with this transition process, sufficient information is not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of configuration in mannan structure found in C.albicans cell wall by using monoclonal antibodies. C.albicans (NIHA 207) serotype A strains were used as test strains throughout the study, together with Salmonella choleraesuis 211 and Salmonella infantis as controls with similar cell wall structures to that of C.albicans. Cultures were maintained on YPD-agar medium by incubating at 28°C for yeast forms, and on YPD-broth medium in a shaking incubator at 37°C for 3-4 hours for the growth of hyphal forms. Cells were harvested in the exponential phase, and after being washed, the mannan content from C.albicans were extracted from pellet by heating in 20 mM sodium citrate buffer for 90 minutes at 125°C. Hybridoma technique was used for the production of monoclonal antibodies. After immunizing the Balb/C mice with antigen, the splenocytes were harvested and fusion was performed between spleen cells and F0 myeloma cells. The clones grown in HAT medium were screened for the presence of antibody producing hybrid cells by ELISA method. The antibody isotypes were determined by using a commercial kit (Pierce Biotechnology, ABD). The culture supernatants which contained monoclonal antibodies were collected and purified according to the ammonium sulphate method

  6. N-Acetylglucosamine-Induced Cell Death in Candida albicans and Its Implications for Adaptive Mechanisms of Nutrient Sensing in Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Du, Han; Guan, Guobo; Li, Xiaoling; Gulati, Megha; Tao, Li; Cao, Chengjun; Johnson, Alexander D.; Nobile, Clarissa J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Single-celled organisms have different strategies to sense and utilize nutrients in their ever-changing environments. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a common member of the human microbiota, especially that of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. An important question concerns how C. albicans gained a competitive advantage over other microbes to become a successful commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Here, we report that C. albicans uses N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), an abundant carbon source present in the GI tract, as a signal for nutrient availability. When placed in water, C. albicans cells normally enter the G0 phase and remain viable for weeks. However, they quickly lose viability when cultured in water containing only GlcNAc. We term this phenomenon GlcNAc-induced cell death (GICD). GlcNAc triggers the upregulation of ribosomal biogenesis genes, alterations of mitochondrial metabolism, and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by rapid cell death via both apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms. Multiple pathways, including the conserved cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling and GlcNAc catabolic pathways, are involved in GICD. GlcNAc acts as a signaling molecule to regulate multiple cellular programs in a coordinated manner and therefore maximizes the efficiency of nutrient use. This adaptive behavior allows C. albicans’ more efficient colonization of the gut. PMID:26350972

  7. Mechanism of iron uptake by the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, A.

    1986-01-01

    C. albicans requires iron for growth and phenotypic development. When deprived of iron, mycelium and bud formation was suppressed. Survival of the organism was also reduced under iron-limiting conditions. The combination of elevated temperature and iron-deprivation further reduced phenotypic development and survival of the yeast. The combination of elevated temperature and iron starvation resulted in a decrease in both the growth rate and siderophore production. However, with time, the cells were able to show partial recovery in the growth rate which occurred concomitantly with an increase in siderophore production. In order for siderophores to be utilized, ferri-siderophore receptors must be produced. The receptor was shown to be located in the plasma membrane of the yeast. Scatchard analysis of the binding of ferri-siderophores to plasma membrane receptors showed an increase in receptor affinity and number of binding sites in iron-starved cells when compared to control cells. Autoradiograms of the /sup 58/Fe-siderophore-protein complex following SDS-PAGE separation of candidal proteins revealed the presence of a ferri-siderophore receptor of approximately 10,000 daltons. C. albicans strains which lacked the ability to synthesize phenolate siderophore maintained a phenolate receptor and bound candidal phenolate siderophore better than non-candidal phenolate siderophores.

  8. Isolation and characterization of yeast monomorphic mutants of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Elorza, M V; Sentandreu, R; Ruiz-Herrera, J

    1994-01-01

    A method was devised for the isolation of yeast monomorphic (LEV) mutants of Candida albicans. By this procedure, about 20 stable yeast-like mutants were isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. The growth rate of the mutants in different carbon sources, both fermentable and not, was indistinguishable from that of the parental strain, but they were unable to grow as mycelial forms after application of any of the common effective inducers, i.e., heat shock, pH alterations, proline addition, or use of GlcNAc as the carbon source. Studies performed with one selected strain demonstrated that it had severe alterations in the chemical composition of the cell wall, mainly in the levels of chitin and glucans, and in specific mannoproteins, some of them recognizable by specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. It is suggested that these structural alterations hinder the construction of a normal hyphal wall. Images PMID:8157600

  9. Candida albicans Yeast and Germ Tube Forms Interfere Differently with Human Monocyte Differentiation into Dendritic Cells: a Novel Dimorphism-Dependent Mechanism To Escape the Host's Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Torosantucci, Antonella; Romagnoli, Giulia; Chiani, Paola; Stringaro, Annarita; Crateri, Pasqualina; Mariotti, Sabrina; Teloni, Raffaela; Arancia, Giuseppe; Cassone, Antonio; Nisini, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to convert from the yeast (Y) form to mycelial forms through germ tube (GT) formation is considered a key feature of the transition of the organism from commensalism to virulence. We show here that human monocytes cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 (IL-4) after phagocytosis of Y forms did not differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs); they retained CD14, did not acquire CD1a, and were unable to express the maturation markers CD83 and CCR7. Moreover, they did not produce IL-12p70 but secreted IL-10. In addition, they spontaneously expressed high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-8 mRNA transcripts and were able to induce proliferation of alloreactive memory but not naïve T lymphocytes. Conversely, monocytes that had phagocytosed GT forms differentiated into mature CD83+ and CCR7+ DCs; however, there was no up-regulation of CD40, CD80, and major histocompatibility complex class II, irrespective of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. In addition, these cells were unable to produce IL-12 even after LPS stimulation, but they were not functionally exhausted, as shown by their capacity to express TNF-α and IL-8 mRNA transcripts. These cells were able to prime naïve T cells but not to induce their functional polarization into effector cells. These data indicate that phagocytosis of Y and GT forms has profound and distinct effects on the differentiation pathway of monocytes. Thus, the differentiation of human monocytes into DCs appears to be tunable and exploitable by C. albicans to elude immune surveillance. PMID:14742527

  10. Antigenicity of cell wall mannans of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) strain cells cultured at high temperature in yeast extract-containing sabouraud liquid medium.

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Y; Goto, K; Nemoto, S; Akashi, M; Sugawara, C; Hanzawa, M; Kawamata, M; Takahata, T; Shibata, N; Kobayashi, H; Suzuki, S

    1996-01-01

    Cultivation of Candida albicans NIH B-792 (serotype B) at high temperature (37 degrees C) for 48 h in yeast extract-containing Sabouraud liquid medium (YSLM) provided the following findings in comparison with the findings obtained after incubation at 27 degrees C. Growth of the blastoconidia of this strain was decreased, with a dry weight of 9%, and the cells were deficient in cytokinesis. The cells did not undergo agglutination with serum factor 5 from a commercially available serum factor kit (Candida Check). Mannan (B-37-M) obtained from the cells cultured at 37 degrees C had partially lost its reactivity against serum factor 4 and lost most of its reactivity against serum factor 5 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in contrast to that (B-27-M) at 27 degrees C. Both cells and mannan prepared by cultivation first at 37 degrees C and then at 27 degrees C entirely recovered their reactivities with serum factors 4 and 5. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis also revealed that B-37-M had lost a beta-1,2-linked mannopyranose unit and retained a phosphate group. Similar changes were observed in the three other serotype B strains used in the study. The beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides longer than mannotetraose were not included among the products released from B-37-M by mild acid treatment. The results of the inhibition ELISA with a series of beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides from biose to octaose (M2 to M8, respectively) showed that the reactivity against serum factor 4 was inhibited most strongly by the oligosaccharides M4 to M8 and that the reactivity against serum factor 5 was inhibited completely by relatively longer oligosaccharides, M5 to M8, indicating their participation as the antigenic factor 5 epitopes. PMID:8705679

  11. [The effect of sodium azide on the thermotolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Rikhvanov, E G; Varakina, N N; Rusaleva, T M; Rachenko, E I; Voĭnikov, V K

    2002-01-01

    The addition of sodium azide (a mitochondrial inhibitor) at a concentration of 0.15 mM to glucosegrown Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Candida albicans cells before exposing them to heat shock increased cell survival. At higher concentrations of azide, its protective effect on glucose-grown cells decreased. Furthermore, azide, even at low concentrations, diminished the thermotolerance of galactose-grown yeast cells. It is suggested that azide exerts a protective effect on the thermotolerance of yeast cells when their energy requirements are met by the fermentation of glucose. However, when cells obtain energy through respiratory metabolism, the azide inhibition of mitochondria enhances damage inflicted on the cells by heat shock.

  12. Nanoscale effects of caspofungin against two yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Formosa, C; Schiavone, M; Martin-Yken, H; François, J M; Duval, R E; Dague, E

    2013-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans are model yeasts for biotechnology and human health, respectively. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the effects of caspofungin, an antifungal drug used in hospitals, on these two species. Our nanoscale investigation revealed similar, but also different, behaviors of the two yeasts in response to treatment with the drug. While administration of caspofungin induced deep cell wall remodeling in both yeast species, as evidenced by a dramatic increase in chitin and decrease in β-glucan content, changes in cell wall composition were more pronounced with C. albicans cells. Notably, the increase of chitin was proportional to the increase in the caspofungin dose. In addition, the Young modulus of the cell was three times lower for C. albicans cells than for S. cerevisiae cells and increased proportionally with the increase of chitin, suggesting differences in the molecular organization of the cell wall between the two yeast species. Also, at a low dose of caspofungin (i.e., 0.5× MIC), the cell surface of C. albicans exhibited a morphology that was reminiscent of cells expressing adhesion proteins. Interestingly, this morphology was lost at high doses of the drug (i.e., 4× MIC). However, the treatment of S. cerevisiae cells with high doses of caspofungin resulted in impairment of cytokinesis. Altogether, the use of AFM for investigating the effects of antifungal drugs is relevant in nanomedicine, as it should help in understanding their mechanisms of action on fungal cells, as well as unraveling unexpected effects on cell division and fungal adhesion.

  13. Modulation of Candida albicans attachment to human epithelial cells by bacteria and carbohydrates.

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, A; Davis, C P; Cohen, M S; Warren, M M

    1983-01-01

    The effects of carbohydrates (mannose and dextrose). Escherichia coli 07KL. and Klebsiella pneumoniae on Candida albicans attachment to epithelial cells was studied. Dextrose had no effect on yeast attachment to epithelial cells. Conversely, mannose significantly decreased both yeast and piliated bacterial attachment (E. coli 07KL, heavily piliated K. pneumoniae) whereas having no effect on nonpiliated K. pneumoniae attachment to epithelial cells. The number of yeasts attaching to epithelial cells was enhanced by preincubation of epithelial cells with piliated strains of bacteria, whereas preincubation with nonpiliated strains of bacteria had no effect on yeast attachment. Scanning electron microscopy showed that piliated bacteria and yeasts were juxtaposed on the epithelial cell surface. These data suggest that certain piliated strains of bacteria can enhance C. albicans attachment to epithelial cells and that type 1 pili of bacteria can be a factor in the enhanced attachment of C. albicans to epithelial cells. Images PMID:6132878

  14. Unusually large telomeric repeats in the yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    McEachern, M J; Hicks, J B

    1993-01-01

    We have identified sequences at the telomeres of the yeast Candida albicans and have found that they are composed of tandem copies of a 23-bp sequence. Through the cloning of native telomeric ends and the characterization and cloning of a "healed" end, we demonstrate that these repeated sequences are sufficient to function as a telomere. All copies of the 23-bp repeat that have been sequenced from a number of C. albicans strains are identical. In contrast, adjacent subtelomeric sequences are variable both between strains and within the WO-1 strain. In the WO-1 strain, the lengths of the telomeres are dependent upon growth temperature and are substantially longer at higher temperatures. Telomere growth is accompanied by increases in the number of the 23-bp repeats present on the telomeric fragments. These results suggest that either telomerase-maintained telomeres can be more complex in structure than was previously imagined or that Candida telomeres are maintained via a telomerase-independent mechanism. Images PMID:8417351

  15. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  16. The evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has reprogrammed the regulation of carbon assimilation in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sandai, Doblin; Yin, Zhikang; Selway, Laura; Stead, David; Walker, Janet; Leach, Michelle D; Bohovych, Iryna; Ene, Iuliana V; Kastora, Stavroula; Budge, Susan; Munro, Carol A; Odds, Frank C; Gow, Neil A R; Brown, Alistair J P

    2012-12-11

    Microbes must assimilate carbon to grow and colonize their niches. Transcript profiling has suggested that Candida albicans, a major pathogen of humans, regulates its carbon assimilation in an analogous fashion to the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, repressing metabolic pathways required for the use of alterative nonpreferred carbon sources when sugars are available. However, we show that there is significant dislocation between the proteome and transcriptome in C. albicans. Glucose triggers the degradation of the ICL1 and PCK1 transcripts in C. albicans, yet isocitrate lyase (Icl1) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck1) are stable and are retained. Indeed, numerous enzymes required for the assimilation of carboxylic and fatty acids are not degraded in response to glucose. However, when expressed in C. albicans, S. cerevisiae Icl1 (ScIcl1) is subjected to glucose-accelerated degradation, indicating that like S. cerevisiae, this pathogen has the molecular apparatus required to execute ubiquitin-dependent catabolite inactivation. C. albicans Icl1 (CaIcl1) lacks analogous ubiquitination sites and is stable under these conditions, but the addition of a ubiquitination site programs glucose-accelerated degradation of CaIcl1. Also, catabolite inactivation is slowed in C. albicans ubi4 cells. Ubiquitination sites are present in gluconeogenic and glyoxylate cycle enzymes from S. cerevisiae but absent from their C. albicans homologues. We conclude that evolutionary rewiring of ubiquitination targets has meant that following glucose exposure, C. albicans retains key metabolic functions, allowing it to continue to assimilate alternative carbon sources. This metabolic flexibility may be critical during infection, facilitating the rapid colonization of dynamic host niches containing complex arrays of nutrients. IMPORTANCE Pathogenic microbes must assimilate a range of carbon sources to grow and colonize their hosts. Current views about carbon assimilation in the

  17. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers. PMID:25302312

  18. Cigarette smoke-exposed Candida albicans increased chitin production and modulated human fibroblast cell responses.

    PubMed

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers.

  19. A Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a Candida albicans Cell Wall Mannoprotein Exerts Three Anti-C. albicans Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moragues, María D.; Omaetxebarria, Miren J.; Elguezabal, Natalia; Sevilla, María J.; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José

    2003-01-01

    Antibodies are believed to play a role in the protection against Candida albicans infections by a number of mechanisms, including the inhibition of adhesion or germ tube formation, opsonization, neutralization of virulence-related enzymes, and direct candidacidal activity. Although some of these biological activities have been demonstrated individually in monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), it is not clear if all these anti-C. albicans activities can be displayed by a single antibody. In this report, we characterized a monoclonal antibody raised against the main target of salivary secretory immunoglobulin A in the cell wall of C. albicans, which exerts three anti-C. albicans activities: (i) inhibition of adherence to HEp-2 cells, (ii) inhibition of germination, and (iii) direct candidacidal activity. MAb C7 reacted with a proteinic epitope from a mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa predominantly expressed on the C. albicans germ tube cell wall surface as well as with a number of antigens from Candida lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Scedosporium prolificans. MAb C7 caused a 31.1% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to HEp-2 monolayers and a 55.3% inhibition in the adhesion of C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells, produced a 38.5% decrease in the filamentation of C. albicans, and exhibited a potent fungicidal effect against C. albicans, C. lusitaniae, Cryptococcus neoformans, A. fumigatus, and S. prolificans, showing reductions in fungal growth ranging from 34.2 to 88.7%. The fungicidal activity showed by MAb C7 seems to be related to that reported by antibodies mimicking the activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala, since one of these MAbs also reacted with the C. albicans mannoprotein with a molecular mass of >200 kDa. Results presented in this study support the concept of a family of microbicidal antibodies that could be useful in the treatment of a wide range of microbial infections when used

  20. In vitro studies of a new antifungal triazole, D0870, against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, and other pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Peng, T; Galgiani, J N

    1993-10-01

    We investigated the effects of various assay conditions on the activity of D0870 against seven species of fungi in the broth macrodilution testing procedure proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that endpoint definition, starting inoculum size, medium composition, type of buffer, and length of incubation, but not pH or temperature, had significant effects on results. Increasing the inoculum from 10(2) to 10(5) yeast cells/ml raised the MICs for all isolates up to > 75,000 fold. This effect was greatest when endpoints corresponded to a 90% reduction in visually determined turbidity (MIC90), was less prominent with an 80% inhibition visual endpoint (MIC80), and was nearly absent with a 50% endpoint measured by a spectrophotometer (IC1/2). Differences due to medium composition were attributable to antibiotic medium 3 with RPMI and yeast nitrogen base media performing nearly identically. Under standardized conditions as specified in NCCLS document M27-P (Reference Method for Broth Dilution Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of Yeasts; Proposed Standard, 1992), 79 strains (5 to 25 strains for each species) demonstrated median MIC80s of 0.0037 and 0.0075 microgram/ml for Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, respectively. In contrast, Candida krusei and Torulopsis glabrata had a median MIC80 of 1.0 microgram/ml. Our studies indicate that the pathogenic yeasts C. albicans and C. neoformans are more susceptible to D0870 than other pathogenic yeasts.

  1. Species-specific activation of Cu/Zn SOD by its CCS copper chaperone in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Julie E.; Li, Cissy X; Odeh, Hana M.; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast of important public health relevance. Virulence of C. albicans requires a copper and zinc containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1), but the biology of C. albicans SOD1 is poorly understood. To this end, C. albicans SOD1 activation was examined in baker’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a eukaryotic expression system proven fruitful for the study of Cu/Zn SODs from invertebrates, plants and mammals. In spite of the 80% similarity between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans SOD1 molecules, C. albicans SOD1 is not active in S. cerevisiae. The SOD1 appears incapable of productive interactions with the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS1) of baker’s yeast. C. albicans SOD1 contains a proline at position 144 predicted to dictate dependence on CCS1. By mutating this proline, C. albicans SOD1 gained activity in baker’s yeast and this activity was independent of CCS1. We identified a putative CCS1 gene in C. albicans and created heterozygous and homozygous gene deletions at this locus. Loss of CCS1 resulted in loss of SOD1 activity, consistent with its role as a copper chaperone. C. albicans CCS1 also restored activity to C. albicans SOD1 expressed in baker’s yeast. C. albicans CCS1 is well adapted for activating its partner SOD1 from C. albicans, but not SOD1 from S. cerevisiae. In spite of the high degree of homology between the SOD1 and CCS1 molecules in these two fungal species, there exists a specie-specific barrier in CCS-SOD interactions which may reflect the vastly different lifestyles of the pathogenic versus non-infectious yeast. PMID:24043471

  2. Direct electric current modifies important cellular aspects and ultrastructure features of Candida albicans yeasts: Influence of doses and polarities.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Gleyce Moreno; Dos Santos, Eldio Gonçalves; Capella, Francielle Neves Carvalho; Homsani, Fortune; de Pointis Marçal, Carina; Dos Santos Valle, Roberta; de Araújo Abi-Chacra, Érika; Braga-Silva, Lys Adriana; de Oliveira Sales, Marcelo Henrique; da Silva Neto, Inácio Domingos; da Veiga, Venicio Feo; Dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Holandino, Carla

    2017-02-01

    Available treatments against human fungal pathogens present high levels of resistance, motivating the development of new antifungal therapies. In this context, the present work aimed to analyze direct electric current (DC) antifungal action, using an in vitro apparatus equipped with platinum electrodes. Candida albicans yeast cells were submitted to three distinct conditions of DC treatment (anodic flow-AF; electroionic flow-EIF; and cathodic flow-CF), as well as different charges, ranging from 0.03 to 2.40 C. Our results indicated C. albicans presented distinct sensibility depending on the DC intensity and polarity applied. Both the colony-forming unit assay and the cytometry flow with propidium iodide indicated a drastic reduction on cellular viability after AF treatment with 0.15 C, while CF- and EIF-treated cells stayed alive when DC doses were increased up to 2.40 C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed important ultrastructural alterations in AF-treated yeasts, including cell structure disorganization, ruptures in plasmatic membrane, and cytoplasmic rarefaction. This work emphasizes the importance of physical parameters (polarity and doses) in cellular damage, and brings new evidence for using electrotherapy to treat C. albicans pathology process. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:95-108, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Candida parapsilosis Protects Premature Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Invasion and Damage by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gonia, Sara; Archambault, Linda; Shevik, Margaret; Altendahl, Marie; Fellows, Emily; Bliss, Joseph M.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida is a leading cause of late-onset sepsis in premature infants and is thought to invade the host via immature or damaged epithelial barriers. We previously showed that the hyphal form of Candida albicans invades and causes damage to premature intestinal epithelial cells (pIECs), whereas the non-hyphal Candida parapsilosis, also a fungal pathogen of neonates, has less invasion and damage abilities. In this study, we investigated the potential for C. parapsilosis to modulate pathogenic interactions of C. albicans with the premature intestine. While a mixed infection with two fungal pathogens may be expected to result in additive or synergistic damage to pIECs, we instead found that C. parapsilosis was able to protect pIECs from invasion and damage by C. albicans. C. albicans-induced pIEC damage was reduced to a similar extent by multiple different C. parapsilosis strains, but strains differed in their ability to inhibit C. albicans invasion of pIECs, with the inhibitory activity correlating with their adhesiveness for C. albicans and epithelial cells. C. parapsilosis cell-free culture fractions were also able to significantly reduce C. albicans adhesion and damage to pIECs. Furthermore, coadministration of C. parapsilosis cell-free fractions with C. albicans was associated with decreased infection and mortality in zebrafish. These results indicate that C. parapsilosis is able to reduce invasion, damage, and virulence functions of C. albicans. Additionally, the results with cellular and cell-free fractions of yeast cultures suggest that inhibition of pathogenic interactions between C. albicans and host cells by C. parapsilosis occurs via secreted molecules as well as by physical contact with the C. parapsilosis cell surface. We propose that non-invasive commensals can be used to inhibit virulence features of pathogens and deserve further study as a non-pharmacological strategy to protect the fragile epithelial barriers of premature infants. PMID:28382297

  4. Heterogeneous distribution of Candida albicans cell-surface antigens demonstrated with an Als1-specific monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David A.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an abundance of data describing expression of genes in the Candida albicans ALS (agglutinin-like sequence) gene family, little is known about the production of Als proteins on individual cells, their spatial localization or stability. Als proteins are most commonly discussed with respect to function in adhesion of C. albicans to host and abiotic surfaces. Development of a mAb specific for Als1, one of the eight large glycoproteins encoded by the ALS family, provided the opportunity to detect Als1 during growth of yeast and hyphae, both in vitro and in vivo, and to demonstrate the utility of the mAb in blocking C. albicans adhesion to host cells. Although most C. albicans yeast cells in a saturated culture are Als1-negative by indirect immunofluorescence, Als1 is detected on the surface of nearly all cells shortly after transfer into fresh growth medium. Als1 covers the yeast cell surface, with the exception of bud scars. Daughters of the inoculum cells, and sometimes granddaughters, also have detectable Als1, but Als1 is not detectable on cells from subsequent generations. On germ tubes and hyphae, most Als1 is localized proximal to the mother yeast. Once deposited on yeasts or hyphae, Als1 persists long after the culture has reached saturation. Growth stage-dependent production of Als1, coupled with its persistence on the cell surface, results in a heterogeneous population of cells within a C. albicans culture. Anti-Als1 immunolabelling patterns vary depending on the source of the C. albicans cells, with obvious differences between cells recovered from culture and those from a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Results from this work highlight the temporal parallels for ALS1 expression and Als1 production in yeasts and germ tubes, the specialized spatial localization and persistence of Als1 on the C. albicans cell surface, and the differences in Als1 localization that occur in vitro and in vivo. PMID:20705663

  5. A Comparison of Two Yeast MnSODs: Mitochondrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus Cytosolic Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng Y.; Cabelli D.; Stich, T.A.; Barnese, K.; Gralla, E.B.; Cascio, D.; Britt, R.D.; Valentine, J.S.

    2011-12-28

    Human MnSOD is significantly more product-inhibited than bacterial MnSODs at high concentrations of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}). This behavior limits the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced at high [O{sub 2}{sup -}]; its desirability can be explained by the multiple roles of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in mammalian cells, particularly its role in signaling. To investigate the mechanism of product inhibition in MnSOD, two yeast MnSODs, one from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria (ScMnSOD) and the other from Candida albicans cytosol (CaMnSODc), were isolated and characterized. ScMnSOD and CaMnSODc are similar in catalytic kinetics, spectroscopy, and redox chemistry, and they both rest predominantly in the reduced state (unlike most other MnSODs). At high [O{sub 2}{sup -}], the dismutation efficiencies of the yeast MnSODs surpass those of human and bacterial MnSODs, due to very low level of product inhibition. Optical and parallel-mode electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra suggest the presence of two Mn{sup 3+} species in yeast Mn{sup 3+}SODs, including the well-characterized 5-coordinate Mn{sup 3+} species and a 6-coordinate L-Mn{sup 3+} species with hydroxide as the putative sixth ligand (L). The first and second coordination spheres of ScMnSOD are more similar to bacterial than to human MnSOD. Gln154, an H-bond donor to the Mn-coordinated solvent molecule, is slightly further away from Mn in yeast MnSODs, which may result in their unusual resting state. Mechanistically, the high efficiency of yeast MnSODs could be ascribed to putative translocation of an outer-sphere solvent molecule, which could destabilize the inhibited complex and enhance proton transfer from protein to peroxide. Our studies on yeast MnSODs indicate the unique nature of human MnSOD in that it predominantly undergoes the inhibited pathway at high [O{sub 2}{sup -}].

  6. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F

    2015-07-20

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity.

  7. The structure and retrotransposition mechanism of LTR-retrotransposons in the asexual yeast Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lulu; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Jingchen; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuanying; Yan, Tianhua; Cao, Yongbing

    2014-08-15

    Retrotransposons constitute a major part of the genome in a number of eukaryotes. Long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons are one type of the retrotransposons. Candida albicans have 34 distinct LTR-retrotransposon families. They respectively belong to the Ty1/copia and Ty3/gypsy groups which have been extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LTR-retrotransposons carry two LTRs flanking a long internal protein-coding domain, open reading frames. LTR-retrotransposons use RNA as intermediate to synthesize double-stranded DNA copies. In this article, we describe the structure feature, retrotransposition mechanism and the influence on organism diversity of LTR retrotransposons in C. albicans. We also discuss the relationship between pathogenicity and LTR retrotransposons in C. albicans.

  8. Adherence of Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis to epithelial cells correlates with fungal cell surface carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Lima-Neto, Reginaldo G; Beltrão, Eduardo I C; Oliveira, Patrícia C; Neves, Rejane P

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have described the adherence of Candida albicans to epithelial cells but little is known about Candida parapsilosis adhesion and its role in host cell surface recognition. This study was designed to evaluate the correlation between the adherence of 20 C. albicans and 12 C. parapsilosis strains to human buccal epithelial cells and the expression of fungal cell surface carbohydrates using lectin histochemistry. Adherence assays were carried out by incubating epithelial cells in yeast suspensions (10(7) cells ml(-1) ) and peroxidase conjugated lectins (Con A, WGA, UEA I and PNA at 25 μg ml(-1) ) were used for lectin histochemistry. The results showed that adherence was overall greater for C. albicans than for C. parapsilosis (P < 0.01) and that the individual strain differences correlated with a high content of cell surface α-l-fucose residues as indicated by the UEA I staining pattern. Based on the saccharide specificity of the lectins used, these results suggest that l-fucose residues on cell surface glycoconjugates may represent recognition molecules for interactions between the yeast strain studied and the host (r = 0.6985, P = 0.0045). In addition, our results indicated the presence of α-d-glucose/α-d-mannose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine/N-acetylneuraminic acid and D-galactose/N-acetyl-D-galactosamine in fungal cell wall.

  9. Epithelial Cell Innate Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, J.R.; Moyes, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of treatments and diseases such as AIDS resulting in increasing numbers of patients with suppressed immune systems, fungal diseases are an escalating problem. Candida albicans is the most common of these fungal pathogens, causing infections in many of these patients. It is therefore important to understand how immunity to this fungus is regulated and how it might be manipulated. Although work has been done to identify the receptors, fungal moieties, and responses involved in anti-Candida immunity, most studies have investigated interactions with myeloid or lymphoid cells. Given that the first site of contact of C. albicans with its host is the mucosal epithelial surface, recent studies have begun to focus on interactions of C. albicans with this site. The results are startling yet in retrospect obvious, indicating that epithelial cells play an important role in these interactions, initiating responses and even providing a level of protection. These findings have obvious implications, not just for fungal pathogens, but also for identifying how host organisms can distinguish between commensal and pathogenic microbes. This review highlights some of these recent findings and discusses their importance in the wider context of infection and immunity. PMID:21441481

  10. Role of the RAM Network in Cell Polarity and Hyphal Morphogenesis in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunkyoung; Cheon, Seon Ah; Lee, Kyung Eun; Lee, So-Yeon; Lee, Byung-Kyu; Oh, Doo-Byung; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2008-01-01

    RAM (regulation of Ace2p transcription factor and polarized morphogenesis) is a conserved signaling network that regulates polarized morphogenesis in yeast, worms, flies, and humans. To investigate the role of the RAM network in cell polarity and hyphal morphogenesis of Candida albicans, each of the C. albicans RAM genes (CaCBK1, CaMOB2, CaKIC1, CaPAG1, CaHYM1, and CaSOG2) was deleted. All C. albicans RAM mutants exhibited hypersensitivity to cell-wall- or membrane-perturbing agents, exhibiting cell-separation defects, a multinucleate phenotype and loss of cell polarity. Yeast two-hybrid and in vivo functional analyses of CaCbk1p and its activator, CaMob2p, the key factors in the RAM network, demonstrated that the direct interaction between the SMA domain of CaCbk1p and the Mob1/phocein domain of CaMob2p was necessary for hyphal growth of C. albicans. Genome-wide transcription profiling of a Camob2 mutant suggested that the RAM network played a role in serum- and antifungal azoles–induced activation of ergosterol biosynthesis genes, especially those involved in the late steps of ergosterol biosynthesis, and might be associated, at least indirectly, with the Tup1p-Nrg1p pathway. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the RAM network is critically required for hyphal growth as well as normal vegetative growth in C. albicans. PMID:18843050

  11. Phytosphingosine kills Candida albicans by disrupting its cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Veerman, Enno C I; Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van't Hof, Wim; Nazmi, Kamran; van Marle, Jan; Amerongen, Arie V Nieuw

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of action of phytosphingosine (PHS), a member of the sphingosine family which has candidacidal activity when added externally, was investigated. Previously, it has been reported that the fungicidal activity of PHS is based on the induction of caspase-independent apoptosis. In contrast, we found that addition of PHS causes a direct permeabilization of the plasma membrane of yeast, highlighted by the influx of the membrane probe propidium iodide, and the efflux of small molecules (i.e., adenine nucleotides) as well as large cellular constituents such as proteins. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed that PHS treatment causes severe damage of the plasma membrane of the cell, which seems to have lost its integrity completely. We also found that PHS reverts the azide-induced insensitivity to histatin 5 (Hst5) of Candida albicans. In a previous study, we had found that the decreased sensitivity to Hst5 of energy-depleted cells is due to rigidification of the plasma membrane, which could be reverted by the membrane fluidizer benzyl alcohol. In line with the increased membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural damage, this reversal of the azide-induced insensitivity by PHS also points to a direct interaction between PHS and the cytoplasmic membrane of C. albicans.

  12. Nanoscopic cell-wall architecture of an immunogenic ligand in Candida albicans during antifungal drug treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia; Wester, Michael J.; Graus, Matthew S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Neumann, Aaron K.

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans is composed largely of polysaccharides. Here we focus on β-glucan, an immunogenic cell-wall polysaccharide whose surface exposure is often restricted, or “masked,” from immune recognition by Dectin-1 on dendritic cells (DCs) and other innate immune cells. Previous research suggested that the physical presentation geometry of β-glucan might determine whether it can be recognized by Dectin-1. We used direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to explore the fine structure of β-glucan exposed on C. albicans cell walls before and after treatment with the antimycotic drug caspofungin, which alters glucan exposure. Most surface-accessible glucan on C. albicans yeast and hyphae is limited to isolated Dectin-1–binding sites. Caspofungin-induced unmasking caused approximately fourfold to sevenfold increase in total glucan exposure, accompanied by increased phagocytosis efficiency of DCs for unmasked yeasts. Nanoscopic imaging of caspofungin-unmasked C. albicans cell walls revealed that the increase in glucan exposure is due to increased density of glucan exposures and increased multiglucan exposure sizes. These findings reveal that glucan exhibits significant nanostructure, which is a previously unknown physical component of the host–Candida interaction that might change during antifungal chemotherapy and affect innate immune activation. PMID:26792838

  13. Identification of a cell death pathway in Candida albicans during the response to pheromone.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Schaefer, Dana; Sherwood, Racquel Kim; Jones, Stephen K; Bennett, Richard J

    2010-11-01

    Mating in hemiascomycete yeasts involves the secretion of pheromones that induce sexual differentiation in cells of the opposite mating type. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have revealed that a subpopulation of cells experiences cell death during exposure to pheromone. In this work, we tested whether the phenomenon of pheromone-induced death (PID) also occurs in the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. Mating in C. albicans is uniquely regulated by white-opaque phenotypic switching; both cell types respond to pheromone, but only opaque cells undergo the morphological transition and cell conjugation. We show that approximately 20% of opaque cells, but not white cells, of laboratory strain SC5314 experience pheromone-induced death. Furthermore, analysis of mutant strains revealed that PID was significantly reduced in strains lacking Fig1 or Fus1 transmembrane proteins that are induced during the mating process and, we now show, are necessary for efficient mating in C. albicans. The level of PID was also Ca(2+) dependent, as chelation of Ca(2+) ions increased cell death to almost 50% of the population. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae PID, pheromone-induced killing of C. albicans cells was largely independent of signaling via the Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin, even when combined with the loss of Cmk1 and Cmk2 proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that levels of PID vary widely between clinical isolates of C. albicans, with some strains experiencing close to 70% cell death. We discuss these findings in light of the role of prodeath and prosurvival pathways operating in yeast cells undergoing the morphological response to pheromone.

  14. The Absence of N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine Causes Attenuation of Virulence of Candida albicans upon Interaction with Vaginal Epithelial Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Manczinger, Máté; Bocsik, Alexandra; Kocsis, Gabriella F; Vörös, Andrea; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Ördögh, Lilla; Kondorosi, Éva; Marton, Annamária; Vízler, Csaba; Tubak, Vilmos; Deli, Mária; Kemény, Lajos; Nagy, István; Lakatos, Lóránt

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the molecular events underlying vulvovaginal candidiasis, we established an in vitro system. Immortalized vaginal epithelial cells were infected with live, yeast form C. albicans and C. albicans cultured in the same medium without vaginal epithelial cells were used as control. In both cases a yeast to hyphae transition was robustly induced. Whole transcriptome sequencing was used to identify specific gene expression changes in C. albicans. Numerous genes leading to a yeast to hyphae transition and hyphae specific genes were upregulated in the control hyphae and the hyphae in response to vaginal epithelial cells. Strikingly, the GlcNAc pathway was exclusively triggered by vaginal epithelial cells. Functional analysis in our in vitro system revealed that the GlcNAc biosynthesis is involved in the adherence to, and the ability to kill, vaginal epithelial cells in vitro, thus indicating the key role for this pathway in the virulence of C. albicans upon vulvovaginal candidiasis.

  15. Role of specific determinants in mannan of Candida albicans serotype A in adherence to human buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Y; Kuribayashi, T; Kagaya, K; Suzuki, M; Nakase, T; Fukazawa, Y

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans serotype A (C. albicans A) possesses a specific antigen, designated antigen 6, which resides in mannans on the cell surface. To determine the role of the mannan moiety of the C. albicans cell wall in adherence to buccal epithelial cells, we used antigen 6-deficient mutants which had been isolated by screening with an agglutinating monoclonal antibody against antigen 6 (MAb-6). 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of the purified mannans from the mutants showed a loss of the signals related to that beta-linkage of the side chains. Moreover, acetolyzed fragments of the mutant mannans showed a decreased amount of mannohexaose and mannopentaose. The mutant yeast cells exhibited significantly reduced ability to adhere both to exfoliated buccal epithelial cells and to a human buccal cell line. A number of strains of C. albicans A, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata, all of which bear antigen 6, showed significantly higher adherence to the cell line than did those of C. albicans serotype B, which lack antigen 6. The whole mannan from the C. albicans A parent inhibited the adherence of C. albicans A to epithelial cells dose dependently, whereas mannan from a mutant strains did not. Moreover, C. albicans A treated with MAb-6 or polyclonal factor 6 serum showed reduced adherence. A close correlation was found between adhesive ability and agglutinability with MAb-6 in the C. albicans A parent, the antigenic mutants, and their spontaneous revertants. These results suggest that so far as mannan adhesion is concerned, serotype A-specific determinants are largely involved in the mechanisms of adherence of C. albicans A to human buccal epithelial cells. PMID:1375200

  16. Terpenoids inhibit Candida albicans growth by affecting membrane integrity and arrest of cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Zore, Gajanan B; Thakre, Archana D; Jadhav, Sitaram; Karuppayil, S Mohan

    2011-10-15

    Anti-Candida potential of six terpenoids were evaluated in this study against various isolates of Candida albicans (n=39) and non-C. albicans (n=9) that are differentially susceptible to fluconazole. All the six terpenoids tested, showed excellent activity and were equally effective against isolates of Candida sps., tested in this study. Linalool and citral were the most effective ones, inhibiting all the isolates at ≤0.064% (v/v). Five among the six terpenoids tested were fungicidal. Time dependent kill curve assay showed that MFCs of linalool and eugenol were highly toxic to C. albicans, killing 99.9% inoculum within seven min of exposure, while that of citronellal, linalyl acetate and citral required 15min, 1h and 2h, respectively. FIC index values (Linalool - 0.140, benzyl benzoate - 0.156, eugenol - 0.265, citral - 0.281 and 0.312 for linalyl acetate and citronellal) and isobologram obtained by checker board assay showed that all the six terpenoids tested exhibit excellent synergistic activity with fluconazole against a fluconazole resistant strain of C. albicans. Terpenoids tested arrested C. albicans cells at different phases of the cell cycle i.e. linalool and LA at G1, citral and citronellal at S phase and benzyl benzoate at G2-M phase and induced apoptosis. Linalool, citral, citronellal and benzyl benzoate caused more than 50% inhibition of germ tube induction at 0.008%, while eugenol and LA required 0.032 and 0.016% (v/v) concentrations, respectively. MICs of all the terpenoids for the C. albicans growth were non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested exhibited excellent activity against C. albicans yeast and hyphal form growth at the concentrations that are non toxic to HeLa cells. Terpenoids tested in this study may find use in antifungal chemotherapy, not only as antifungal agents but also as synergistic agents along with conventional drugs like fluconazole.

  17. Comparative adherence of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to human buccal epithelial cells and extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rachael P C; Williams, David W; Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C; Sullivan, Derek J

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are very closely related pathogenic yeast species. Despite their close relationship, C. albicans is a far more successful colonizer and pathogen of humans. The purpose of this study was to determine if the disparity in the virulence of the two species is attributed to differences in their ability to adhere to human buccal epithelial cells (BECs) and/or extracellular matrix proteins. When grown overnight at 30°C in yeast extract peptone dextrose, genotype 1 C. dubliniensis isolates were found to be significantly more adherent to human BECs than C. albicans or C. dubliniensis genotypes 2-4 (P < 0.001). However, when the yeast cells were grown at 37°C, no significant difference between the adhesion of C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans to human BECs was observed, and C. dubliniensis genotype 1 and C. albicans adhered to BECs in significantly greater numbers than the other C. dubliniensis genotypes (P < 0.001). Using surface plasmon resonance analysis, C. dubliniensis isolates were found to adhere in significantly greater numbers than C. albicans to type I and IV collagen, fibronectin, laminin, vitronectin, and proline-rich peptides. These data suggest that C. albicans is not more adherent to epithelial cells or matrix proteins than C. dubliniensis and therefore other factors must contribute to the greater levels of virulence exhibited by C. albicans.

  18. Probiotic lactobacilli inhibit early stages of Candida albicans biofilm development by reducing their growth, cell adhesion, and filamentation.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Victor Haruo; Wang, Yi; Bandara, H M H N; Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus species on different phases of Candida albicans biofilm development. Quantification of biofilm growth and ultrastructural analyses were performed on C. albicans biofilms treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus acidophilus planktonic cell suspensions as well as their supernatants. Planktonic lactobacilli induced a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in the number of biofilm cells (25.5-61.8 %) depending on the probiotic strain and the biofilm phase. L. rhamnosus supernatants had no significant effect on the mature biofilm (p > 0.05), but significantly reduced the early stages of Candida biofilm formation (p < 0.01). Microscopic analyses revealed that L. rhamnosus suspensions reduced Candida hyphal differentiation, leading to a predominance of budding growth. All lactobacilli negatively impacted C. albicans yeast-to-hyphae differentiation and biofilm formation. The inhibitory effects of the probiotic Lactobacillus on C. albicans entailed both cell-cell interactions and secretion of exometabolites that may impact on pathogenic attributes associated with C. albicans colonization on host surfaces and yeast filamentation. This study clarifies, for the first time, the mechanics of how Lactobacillus species may antagonize C. albicans host colonization. Our data elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms that define the probiotic candicidal activity of lactobacilli, thus supporting their utility as an adjunctive therapeutic mode against mucosal candidal infections.

  19. Effect of monoclonal antibodies directed against Candida albicans cell wall antigens on the adhesion of the fungus to polystyrene.

    PubMed

    San Millan, R; Ezkurra, P A; Quindós, G; Robert, R; Senet, J M; Pontón, J

    1996-08-01

    The adhesion of Candida albicans to polystyrene and the effect of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) reactive with C. albicans cell wall surface antigens on this process was assessed in vitro with several C. albicans strains. In the absence of mAbs, adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene increased in parallel with germ-tube formation. However, the growth of the strains in the yeast phase at 25 degrees C or the use of an agerminative mutant inhibited adhesion to polystyrene. Serotype A and B strains showed similar kinetics of adhesion to polystyrene and no statistically significant differences in germination or adhesion were observed when strains from the two serotypes were compared. The three mAbs had different effects on both germination and adhesion of C. albicans. mAbs 3D9 showed no influence on either germination or adhesion to polystyrene in two C. albicans strains. mAb B9E decreased both adhesion (45.6%) and filamentation (52.6%), and mAb 21E6 decreased filamentation (34.0%) but enhanced adhesion by 23.3%. This enhancement was also observed with the agerminative mutant and it was dose-dependent. It was not related to the binding capacity of the MAb to polystyrene nor to an increase in cell surface hydrophobicity of the antibody-treated cells. In conclusion, both growth phases of C. albicans can adhere to polystyrene, although the conditions for this process seem to be different in each phase. The two types of adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene might have a role in the colonization of medical implants. The disparate effects shown by mAbs directed against cell wall mannoproteins of C. albicans on the adhesion of the fungus to polystyrene should be taken into consideration when designing strategies to block the adhesion of C. albicans to plastic materials with mAbs.

  20. High frame-rate resolution of cell division during Candida albicans filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Darren D.; Berman, Judith; Brand, Alexandra C.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal yeast, Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans and forms filaments called hyphae and pseudohyphae, in which cell division requires precise temporal and spatial control to produce mononuclear cell compartments. High-frame-rate live-cell imaging (1 frame/min) revealed that nuclear division did not occur across the septal plane. We detected the presence of nucleolar fragments that may be extrachromosomal molecules carrying the ribosomal RNA genes. Cells occasionally maintained multiple nucleoli, suggesting either polyploidy, multiple nuclei and/or aneuploidy of ChrR., while the migration pattern of sister nuclei differed between unbranched and branched hyphae. The presented movie challenges and extends previous concepts of C. albicans cell division. PMID:26854071

  1. High frame-rate resolution of cell division during Candida albicans filamentation.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Darren D; Berman, Judith; Brand, Alexandra C

    2016-03-01

    The commensal yeast, Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in humans and forms filaments called hyphae and pseudohyphae, in which cell division requires precise temporal and spatial control to produce mononuclear cell compartments. High-frame-rate live-cell imaging (1 frame/min) revealed that nuclear division did not occur across the septal plane. We detected the presence of nucleolar fragments that may be extrachromosomal molecules carrying the ribosomal RNA genes. Cells occasionally maintained multiple nucleoli, suggesting either polyploidy, multiple nuclei and/or aneuploidy of ChrR., while the migration pattern of sister nuclei differed between unbranched and branched hyphae. The presented movie challenges and extends previous concepts of C. albicans cell division.

  2. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-03

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity.

  3. Discrimination between Candida albicans and Other Pathogenic Species of the Genus Candida by Their Differential Sensitivities to Toxins of a Panel of Killer Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Buzzini, P.; Martini, A.

    2001-01-01

    The differential sensitivities to toxins produced by a short panel of four killer yeasts allowed discrimination between 91 strains of the yeast Candida albicans and 223 non-C. albicans Candida strains. One hundred percent of C. albicans isolates exhibited negative results to the toxin panel, while 100% of non-C. albicans cultures gave well-defined and reproducible positive results to at least one of the four killer toxins. Among C. albicans strains only 96 and 87% gave germ tube (GT)- and chlamydospore-positive results, respectively. In addition a few GT-false-positive strains were detected among non-C. albicans isolates. Susceptibility to the toxin panel is apparently expressed more consistently than either GT or chlamydospore production and may constitute a promising basis for a new simple and easy-to-use procedure for routine discrimination between the species C. albicans and other species of the genus Candida. PMID:11526179

  4. Yeast cell differentiation: Lessons from pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Palková, Zdena; Váchová, Libuše

    2016-09-01

    Yeasts, historically considered to be single-cell organisms, are able to activate different differentiation processes. Individual yeast cells can change their life-styles by processes of phenotypic switching such as the switch from yeast-shaped cells to filamentous cells (pseudohyphae or true hyphae) and the transition among opaque, white and gray cell-types. Yeasts can also create organized multicellular structures such as colonies and biofilms, and the latter are often observed as contaminants on surfaces in industry and medical care and are formed during infections of the human body. Multicellular structures are formed mostly of stationary-phase or slow-growing cells that diversify into specific cell subpopulations that have unique metabolic properties and can fulfill specific tasks. In addition to the development of multiple protective mechanisms, processes of metabolic reprogramming that reflect a changed environment help differentiated individual cells and/or community cell constituents to survive harmful environmental attacks and/or to escape the host immune system. This review aims to provide an overview of differentiation processes so far identified in individual yeast cells as well as in multicellular communities of yeast pathogens of the Candida and Cryptococcus spp. and the Candida albicans close relative, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Molecular mechanisms and extracellular signals potentially involved in differentiation processes are also briefly mentioned.

  5. Antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast: Candida albicans and Rhodotorula sp.

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Ahmed; Noureddine, Djebli; Saad, Aissat; Abdelmelek, Meslem; Abdelkader, Benhalima

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast i.e. Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Rhodotorula sp. Methods Four Algeria honeys of different botanical origin were analyzed to test antifungal effect against C. albicans, and Rhodotorula sp. Different concentrations (undiluted, 10%, 30%, 50% and 70% w/v) of honey were studied in vitro for their antifugal activity using C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. as fungal strains. Results The range of the diameter of zone of inhibition of various concentrations of tested honeys was (7–23 mm) for Rhodotorula sp., while C. albicans showed clearly resistance towards all concentrations used. The MICs of tested honey concentrations against C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. were (70.09–93.48)% and (4.90–99.70)% v/v, respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrates that, in vitro, these natural products have clearly an antifungal activity against Rhodotorula sp. and C. albicans. PMID:23569970

  6. Biotyping of Candida albicans and other fungi by yeast killer toxins sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Polonelli, Luciano; Conti, Stefania

    2009-01-01

    Intraspecific differentiation of pathogenic microorganisms is a major need in epidemiological studies concerning the source and spread of infections. This requirement is paramount for those etiologic agents of infectious diseases, which are mainly grouped into one species within the genus, such as Candida albicans. Ideally, laboratory methods for biotyping purposes should be sensitive, reproducible, easy, and economical to perform. In addition, the methods should be flexible in their application to taxonomically unrelated pathogens. We have shown that the toxins produced by a selected panel of killer yeasts, each characterized by a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity, may be used to discriminate strains belonging to the species of the genus Candida and to other species of eukaryotic and prokaryotic pathogenic microorganisms. The "yeast killer system," which may be sharply increased in sensitivity by addition of further standardized killer yeasts, has proven to be of value in the resolution of many cases of clinical and nosocomial fungal infections. Owing to its reliability, economy, and versatility, this phenotypic system can be used as an alternative biotyping method in laboratories lacking the financial and training resources necessary to perform more sophisticated and expensive molecular approaches.

  7. The plant defensin RsAFP2 induces cell wall stress, septin mislocalization and accumulation of ceramides in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Thevissen, Karin; de Mello Tavares, Patricia; Xu, Deming; Blankenship, Jill; Vandenbosch, Davy; Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Govaert, Gilmer; Bink, Anna; Rozental, Sonia; de Groot, Piet W.J.; Davis, Talya R.; Kumamoto, Carol A.; Vargas, Gabriele; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Coenye, Tom; Mitchell, Aaron; Roemer, Terry; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Cammue, Bruno P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The antifungal plant defensin RsAFP2 isolated from radish interacts with fungal glucosylceramides and induces apoptosis in Candida albicans. To further unravel the mechanism of RsAFP2 antifungal action and tolerance mechanisms, we screened a library of 2,868 heterozygous C. albicans deletion mutants and identified 30 RsAFP2-hypersensitive mutants. The most prominent group of RsAFP2 tolerance genes was involved in cell wall integrity and hyphal growth/septin ring formation. Consistent with these genetic data, we demonstrated that RsAFP2 interacts with the cell wall of C. albicans, which also contains glucosylceramides, and activates the cell wall integrity pathway. Moreover, we found that RsAFP2 induces mislocalization of septins and blocks the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. Increased ceramide levels have previously been shown to result in apoptosis and septin mislocalization. Therefore, ceramide levels in C. albicans membranes were analyzed following RsAFP2 treatment and, as expected, increased accumulation of phytoC24-ceramides in membranes of RsAFP2-treated C. albicans cells was detected. This is the first report on the interaction of a plant defensin with glucosylceramides in the fungal cell wall, causing cell wall stress, and on the effects of a defensin on septin localization and ceramide accumulation. PMID:22384976

  8. Effectiveness of magnetic fluid hyperthermia against Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Chudzik, Barbara; Miaskowski, Arkadiusz; Surowiec, Zbigniew; Czernel, Grzegorz; Duluk, Tomasz; Marczuk, Andrzej; Gagoś, Mariusz

    2016-12-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most frequently isolated fungal pathogens causing opportunistic infections in humans. Targeted magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) is a promising method in thermal therapy facilitating selective heating of pathogen cells like C. albicans. In the paper, we used meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and functionalised anti-C. albicans immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to investigate the potential of MFH in combating C. albicans cells in vitro. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy it was found that synthesised MNPs exhibited superparamagnetic phenomena. On the basis of calorimetric experiments, the maximum SAR (specific absorption rate) was found and a proper concentration of MNPs was established to control the temperature. MFH based on both DMSA-coated MNPs and functionalised anti-C. albicans IMNPs was more effective in combating C. albicans cells in vitro than thermostat hyperthermia. Especially promising results were obtained using functionalised IMNPs, which eradicated most of the pathogen colonies at the temperature of 43 °C.

  9. Evaluation of Albicans ID2 and Biggy agar for the isolation and direct identification of vaginal yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Ilkit, Macit; Hilmioglu, Suleyha; Tasbakan, Meltem; Aydemir, Sohret

    2007-06-01

    In this study, 250 vaginal samples from patients with vulvovaginal candidosis were inoculated onto two chromogenic media, Albicans ID(2) and Biggy agar, as well as onto Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar, yielding a total of 63 yeast (25.2 %) on all three media. These strains were identified as Candida glabrata in 20 (31.8 %) samples, Candida albicans in 15 samples (23.8 %), Candida tropicalis in 10 samples (15.9 %), Candida krusei in five samples (7.9 %), Candida kefyr in five samples (7.9 %), Candida dubliniensis in four samples (6.3 %), Candida parapsilosis in two samples (3.2 %) and Candida guilliermondii in two samples (3.2 %). Mixed fungal cultures and bacterial growth or filamentous fungi were not detected on any of the selected media. The sensitivity and specificity of the Albicans ID(2) and Biggy agar with regard to the identification of C. albicans were 80.0 and 64.6 %, and 86.7 and 56.3 %, respectively. This study showed these two chromogenic media to be as effective as Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar with respect to fungal detection. However, neither Albicans ID(2) nor Biggy agar was sufficient for reliable differentiation of yeasts to the species level.

  10. Cloning and characterization of ECE1, a gene expressed in association with cell elongation of the dimorphic pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Birse, C E; Irwin, M Y; Fonzi, W A; Sypherd, P S

    1993-01-01

    The gene ECE1 (extent of cell elongation 1) was isolated by differential hybridization screening of a Candida albicans cDNA library by using probes derived from populations of yeast cells or hyphae. Expression of this gene was not detected when C. albicans grew as a budding yeast cell but was observed within 30 min after cells had been induced to form hyphae. In all strains tested, regardless of the induction signal, ECE1 expression correlated with the extent of cell elongation. The genomic version of ECE1 was cloned and sequenced. The deduced 271-amino-acid polypeptide consisted of eight tandem repeats of a degenerate 34-amino-acid sequence which contained no discernible homology with other known sequences. An ECE1 null mutant displayed no morphological alterations, which demonstrated that ECE1 is not essential for cell elongation or hypha formation despite the strict morphological association of its expression. Images PMID:8359888

  11. Importance of the Candida albicans cell wall during commensalism and infection.

    PubMed

    Gow, Neil A R; Hube, Bernhard

    2012-08-01

    An imbalance of the normal microbial flora, breakage of epithelial barriers or dysfunction of the immune system favour the transition of the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans from a commensal to a pathogen. C. albicans has evolved to be adapted as a commensal on mucosal surfaces. As a commensal it has also acquired attributes, which are necessary to avoid or overcome the host defence mechanisms. The human host has also co-evolved to recognize and eliminate potential fungal invaders. Many of the fungal genes that have been the focus of this co-evolutionary process encode cell wall components. In this review, we will discuss the transition from commensalism to pathogenesis, the key players of the fungal cell surface that are important for this transition, the role of the morphology and the mechanisms of host recognition and response.

  12. Examination of the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans filamentous cells in an animal model of haematogenously disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ian A; Reinhard, Sara M; Lazzell, Anna L; Monteagudo, Carlos; Thomas, Derek P; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Saville, Stephen P

    2016-03-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is an increasingly common threat to human health. Candida albicans grows in several morphologies and mutant strains locked in yeast or filamentous forms have attenuated virulence in the murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Thus, the ability to change shape is important for virulence. The transcriptional repressors Nrg1p and Tup1p are required for normal regulation of C. albicans morphology. Strains lacking either NRG1 or TUP1 are constitutively pseudohyphal under yeast growth conditions, and display attenuated virulence in the disseminated model. To dissect the relative importance of hyphae and pseudohyphae during an infection, we used strains in which the morphological transition could be externally manipulated through controlled expression of NRG1 or TUP1. Remarkably, hyphal form inocula retain the capacity to cause disease. Whilst induction of a pseudohyphal morphology through depletion of TUP1 did result in attenuated virulence, this was not due to a defect in the ability to escape the bloodstream. Instead, we observed that pseudohyphal cells are cleared from tissues much more efficiently than either hyphal (virulent) or yeast form (avirulent) cells, indicating that different C. albicans morphologies have distinct interactions with host cells during an infection.

  13. Examination of the pathogenic potential of Candida albicans filamentous cells in an animal model of haematogenously disseminated candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Ian A.; Reinhard, Sara M.; Lazzell, Anna L.; Monteagudo, Carlos; Thomas, Derek P.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.; Saville, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is an increasingly common threat to human health. Candida albicans grows in several morphologies and mutant strains locked in yeast or filamentous forms have attenuated virulence in the murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Thus, the ability to change shape is important for virulence. The transcriptional repressors Nrg1p and Tup1p are required for normal regulation of C. albicans morphology. Strains lacking either NRG1 or TUP1 are constitutively pseudohyphal under yeast growth conditions, and display attenuated virulence in the disseminated model. To dissect the relative importance of hyphae and pseudohyphae during an infection, we used strains in which the morphological transition could be externally manipulated through controlled expression of NRG1 or TUP1. Remarkably, hyphal form inocula retain the capacity to cause disease. Whilst induction of a pseudohyphal morphology through depletion of TUP1 did result in attenuated virulence, this was not due to a defect in the ability to escape the bloodstream. Instead, we observed that pseudohyphal cells are cleared from tissues much more efficiently than either hyphal (virulent) or yeast form (avirulent) cells, indicating that different C. albicans morphologies have distinct interactions with host cells during an infection. PMID:26851404

  14. Inactivation of the Antifungal and Immunomodulatory Properties of Human Cathelicidin LL-37 by Aspartic Proteases Produced by the Pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bochenska, Oliwia; Zawrotniak, Marcin; Wolak, Natalia; Trebacz, Grzegorz; Gogol, Mariusz; Ostrowska, Dominika; Aoki, Wataru; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Constant cross talk between Candida albicans yeast cells and their human host determines the outcome of fungal colonization and, eventually, the progress of infectious disease (candidiasis). An effective weapon used by C. albicans to cope with the host defense system is the release of 10 distinct secreted aspartic proteases (SAPs). Here, we validate a hypothesis that neutrophils and epithelial cells use the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 to inactivate C. albicans at sites of candidal infection and that C. albicans uses SAPs to effectively degrade LL-37. LL-37 is cleaved into multiple products by SAP1 to -4, SAP8, and SAP9, and this proteolytic processing is correlated with the gradual decrease in the antifungal activity of LL-37. Moreover, a major intermediate of LL-37 cleavage—the LL-25 peptide—is antifungal but devoid of the immunomodulatory properties of LL-37. In contrast to LL-37, LL-25 did not affect the generation of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils upon treatment with phorbol esters. Stimulating neutrophils with LL-25 (rather than LL-37) significantly decreased calcium flux and interleukin-8 production, resulting in lower chemotactic activity of the peptide against neutrophils, which may decrease the recruitment of neutrophils to infection foci. LL-25 also lost the function of LL-37 as an inhibitor of neutrophil apoptosis, thereby reducing the life span of these defense cells. This study indicates that C. albicans can effectively use aspartic proteases to destroy the antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties of LL-37, thus enabling the pathogen to survive and propagate. PMID:25847962

  15. FTIR analysis of the metabolomic stress response induced by N-alkyltropinium bromide surfactants in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Corte, Laura; Tiecco, Matteo; Roscini, Luca; Germani, Raimondo; Cardinali, Gianluigi

    2014-04-01

    The activity of surfactants against fungal cells has been studied less than against bacteria, although the medical and industrial importance of the former is of paramount importance. In this paper the surfactant biocidal effect was measured in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans with a previously described FTIR bioassay which estimates the stress level as function of the FTIR spectra variation of the cells upon exposition to the chemicals. N-tetradecyltropinium bromide was chosen as stressing agent on the basis of previous preliminary study demonstrating its ability to kill prokaryotic and especially eukaryotic cells at concentration around or over the critical micellar concentration (c.m.c.). Here we show that this surfactant is able to inactivate S. cerevisiae cells at 0.4mM and C. albicans cells at 0.6mM after 1h exposition. FTIR analysis revealed that the surfactant induced metabolomics reactions of S. cerevisiae cells in the regions of amides (W2) and fatty acids (W1). In the same way C. albicans cells showed the maximum stress response in amides (W2) and mixed (W3) regions. Variations of the hydrophobic tail of this surfactant produced a reduced level of cell stress with both the 12C and 16C variants; although these two compounds were more effective in inducing cell mortality in S. cerevisiae but not in C. albicans. In conclusion, this paper has shown that, for this surfactant, the n-alkyl chain must vary between 12C and 16C and that the hydrophilic head size is not as critical as the tail length.

  16. Spaceflight enhances cell aggregation and random budding in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Crabbé, Aurélie; Nielsen-Preiss, Sheila M; Woolley, Christine M; Barrila, Jennifer; Buchanan, Kent; McCracken, James; Inglis, Diane O; Searles, Stephen C; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra A; Ott, C Mark; Wilson, James W; Pierson, Duane L; Stefanyshyn-Piper, Heidemarie M; Hyman, Linda E; Nickerson, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the first global transcriptional profiling and phenotypic characterization of the major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, grown in spaceflight conditions. Microarray analysis revealed that C. albicans subjected to short-term spaceflight culture differentially regulated 452 genes compared to synchronous ground controls, which represented 8.3% of the analyzed ORFs. Spaceflight-cultured C. albicans-induced genes involved in cell aggregation (similar to flocculation), which was validated by microscopic and flow cytometry analysis. We also observed enhanced random budding of spaceflight-cultured cells as opposed to bipolar budding patterns for ground samples, in accordance with the gene expression data. Furthermore, genes involved in antifungal agent and stress resistance were differentially regulated in spaceflight, including induction of ABC transporters and members of the major facilitator family, downregulation of ergosterol-encoding genes, and upregulation of genes involved in oxidative stress resistance. Finally, downregulation of genes involved in actin cytoskeleton was observed. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator Cap1 and over 30% of the Cap1 regulon was differentially expressed in spaceflight-cultured C. albicans. A potential role for Cap1 in the spaceflight response of C. albicans is suggested, as this regulator is involved in random budding, cell aggregation, and oxidative stress resistance; all related to observed spaceflight-associated changes of C. albicans. While culture of C. albicans in microgravity potentiates a global change in gene expression that could induce a virulence-related phenotype, no increased virulence in a murine intraperitoneal (i.p.) infection model was observed under the conditions of this study. Collectively, our data represent an important basis for the assessment of the risk that commensal flora could play during human spaceflight missions. Furthermore, since the low fluid

  17. Cell wall protection by the Candida albicans class I chitin synthases

    PubMed Central

    Preechasuth, Kanya; Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Peck, Scott C.; Brown, Alistair J.P.; Gow, Neil A.R.; Lenardon, Megan D.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans has four chitin synthases from three different enzyme classes which deposit chitin in the cell wall, including at the polarized tips of growing buds and hyphae, and sites of septation. The two class I enzymes, Chs2 and Chs8, are responsible for most of the measurable chitin synthase activity in vitro, but their precise biological functions in vivo remain obscure. In this work, detailed phenotypic analyses of a chs2Δchs8Δ mutant have shown that C. albicans class I chitin synthases promote cell integrity during early polarized growth in yeast and hyphal cells. This was supported by live cell imaging of YFP-tagged versions of the class I chitin synthases which revealed that Chs2-YFP was localized at sites of polarized growth. Furthermore, a unique and dynamic pattern of localization of the class I enzymes at septa of yeast and hyphae was revealed. Phosphorylation of Chs2 on the serine at position 222 was shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that is localized to sites of polarized growth and septation. Independently from this post-translational modification, specific cell wall stresses were also shown to regulate the amount of Chs2 that localizes to specific sites in cells, and this was linked to the ability of the class I enzymes to reinforce cell wall integrity during early polarized growth in the presence of these stresses. PMID:26257018

  18. Direct identification and recognition of yeast species from clinical material by using albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida plates.

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, C; Freydiere, A M; Gille, Y

    1996-01-01

    Two chromogenic media, Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates, were compared with a reference medium, Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar, and standard methods for the identification of yeast species. This study involved 951 clinical specimens. The detection rates for the two chromogenic media for polymicrobial specimens were 20% higher than that for the Sabouraud-chloramphenicol agar plates. The rates of identification of Candida albicans for Albicans ID and CHROMagar Candida agar plates were, respectively, 37.0 and 6.0% after 24 h of incubation and 93.6 and 92.2% after 72 h of incubation, with specificities of 99.8 and 100%. Furthermore, CHROMagar Candida plates identified 13 of 14 Candida tropicalis and 9 of 12 Candida krusei strains after 48 h of incubation. PMID:8789038

  19. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Fabienne; L’Ollivier, Coralie; Laue, Michael; Holland, Gudrun; Bonnin, Alain; Dalle, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ) formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin), we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. PMID:26933885

  20. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in specificities of the monoclonal antibodies was demonstrated by Ouchterlony double-diffusion tests with solubilized antigens and by variabilities in the reactivity of the agglutinins among yeast strains. The antigenic determinants were isolated by specific immunoprecipitation and protease digestion and characterized by methods including high-pressure liquid chromatography, gas-liquid chromatography, and mass spectroscopy with both chemical and electron ionization. These determinants both contain mannose and glucose. In the case of antigen H9, an additional carbohydrate was detected with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The location of antigens on individual cells was determined by indirect labeling of the determinants, first reacting cells with H9 or C6 followed by goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with 20-nm colloidal gold particles. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine cells. The antigens that were reactive with the monoclonal antibodies were associated with a flocculent surface layer. Expression of this layer and expression of the antigens is a dynamic process which is growth phase and strain dependent. The antigens were not expressed on very young cells and disappeared from the cell surface of most C. albicans strains with age. The use of monoclonal antibody to cell surface determinants may allow characterization of cell surface antigens of C. albicans and be helpful in establishing receptors which mediate adherence. Images PMID:3510174

  1. Nanoscale analysis of caspofungin-induced cell surface remodelling in Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Jackson, Desmond N.; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such a novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3-d-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodelling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the cells, which correlate with a decrease of the cell wall mechanical strength. Moreover, we find that the drug induces the massive exposure of the cell adhesion protein Als1 on the cell surface and leads to increased cell surface hydrophobicity, two features that trigger cell aggregation. This behaviour is not observed in yeast species lacking Als1, demonstrating the key role that the protein plays in determining the aggregation phenotype of C. albicans. The results show that AFM opens up new avenues for understanding the molecular bases of microbe-drug interactions and for developing new therapeutic agents.The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such a novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3-d-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodelling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the

  2. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  3. Yeasts isolated from Algerian infants's feces revealed a burden of Candida albicans species, non-albicans Candida species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Seddik, Hamza Ait; Ceugniez, Alexandre; Bendali, Farida; Cudennec, Benoit; Drider, Djamel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at showing the yeast diversity in feces of Algerian infants, aged between 1 and 24 months, hospitalized at Bejaia hospital (northeast side of the country). Thus, 20 colonies with yeast characteristics were isolated and identified using biochemical (ID32C Api system) and molecular (sequencing of ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) methods. Almost all colonies isolated (19 strains) were identified as Candida spp., with predominance of Candida albicans species, and one strain was identified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Screening of strains with inhibitory activities unveiled the potential of Candida parapsilosis P48L1 and Candida albicans P51L1 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. Further studies performed with these two Candida strains revealed their susceptibility to clinically used antifungal compounds and were then characterized for their cytotoxicity and hemolytic properties. On the other hand, Saccharomyces cerevisiae P9L1 isolated as well in this study was shown to be devoid of antagonism but resulted safe and overall usable as probiotic.

  4. Relationship between cell surface composition of Candida albicans and adherence to acrylic after growth on different carbon sources.

    PubMed Central

    McCourtie, J; Douglas, L J

    1981-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans to acrylic was measured in vitro after growth of the yeast to stationary phase in defined medium containing glucose, sucrose, galactose, fructose, or maltose as the carbon source. In each case, yeast adherence was proportional to the concentration of sugar in the growth medium, but equimolar concentrations of different sugars promoted adherence to different extents. In vitro adherence was further increased by the addition of divalent cations to assay mixtures but was inhibited when saliva-treated acrylic strips were used or when yeasts were suspended in mixed saliva during the assay. The rate of spheroplast formation of yeasts grown in media containing a 500 mM concentration of the different sugars correlated well with the relative adherence of the cells to acrylic. Galactose-grown yeasts were most resistant to spheroplast formation with Zymolyase-5000 and most adherent to acrylic, whereas fructose-grown organisms were least resistant to spheroplast formation and least adherent to acrylic. These results indicate that when grown to stationary phase in media containing high concentrations of certain sugars, C. albicans undergoes a change in cell surface composition which facilitates its adherence to acrylic surfaces. Electron microscopy of yeasts harvested from such media revealed the presence of an additional surface layer which may be responsible for this enhanced adherence. Images PMID:7019091

  5. Single-cell force spectroscopy of the medically important Staphylococcus epidermidis-Candida albicans interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Herman, Philippe; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Lipke, Peter N.; Kucharíková, Soňa; van Dijck, Patrick; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-10-01

    Despite the clinical importance of bacterial-fungal interactions, their molecular details are poorly understood. A hallmark of such medically important interspecies associations is the interaction between the two nosocomial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, which can lead to mixed biofilm-associated infections with enhanced antibiotic resistance. Here, we use single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) to quantify the forces engaged in bacterial-fungal co-adhesion, focusing on the poorly investigated S. epidermidis-C. albicans interaction. Force curves recorded between single bacterial and fungal germ tubes showed large adhesion forces (~5 nN) with extended rupture lengths (up to 500 nm). By contrast, bacteria poorly adhered to yeast cells, emphasizing the important role of the yeast-to-hyphae transition in mediating adhesion to bacterial cells. Analysis of mutant strains altered in cell wall composition allowed us to distinguish the main fungal components involved in adhesion, i.e. Als proteins and O-mannosylations. We suggest that the measured co-adhesion forces are involved in the formation of mixed biofilms, thus possibly as well in promoting polymicrobial infections. In the future, we anticipate that this SCFS platform will be used in nanomedicine to decipher the molecular mechanisms of a wide variety of pathogen-pathogen interactions and may help in designing novel anti-adhesion agents.

  6. Pre-exposure to yeast protects larvae of Galleria mellonella from a subsequent lethal infection by Candida albicans and is mediated by the increased expression of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bergin, David; Murphy, Lisa; Keenan, Joanne; Clynes, Martin; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2006-07-01

    Pre-exposure of the larvae of Galleria mellonella to Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae protects against a subsequent infection with 10(6) C. albicans cells. This protection can also be induced by exposing larvae to glucan or laminarin prior to the administration of the potentially lethal inoculum. Analysis of the genes coding for galiomicin, a defensin in G. mellonella, a cysteine-rich antifungal peptide gallerimycin, an iron-binding protein transferrin and an inducible metalloproteinase inhibitor (IMPI) from G. mellonella demonstrated increased expression, which is at its highest after 24 h of the initial inoculum. Examination of the expression of proteins in the insect haemolymph using 2D electrophoresis and MALDI TOF analysis revealed an increased expression of a number of proteins associated with the insect immune response to infection 24 h after the initial exposure. This study demonstrates that the larvae of G. mellonella can withstand a lethal inoculum of C. albicans if pre-exposed to a non-lethal dose of yeast or polysaccharide 24 h previously which is mediated by increased expression of a number of antimicrobial peptides and the appearance of a number of peptides in the challenged larvae.

  7. Tolerance to staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiated Th1 cell differentiation in mice infected with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Romani, L; Puccetti, P; Mencacci, A; Spaccapelo, R; Cenci, E; Tonnetti, L; Bistoni, F

    1994-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a bacterial superantigen that specifically activates T cells bearing V beta 8 T-cell receptor domains, which eventually leads to a long-lasting state of clonal anergy accompanied by selective cell death in the targeted CD4+ subset. Because the superantigen is known to promote Th1 cell differentiation in vitro, we have investigated the effect of SEB treatment on the course of Th2-associated progressive disease in mice infected systemically with Candida albicans. On the basis of the kinetics of SEB-induced changes in CD4+ cells and production in sera of interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, and gamma interferon, we obtained evidence that V beta 8+ cell anergy concomitant with infection abolished the early IL-4/IL-10 response of the host to the yeast, ultimately leading to a state of resistance characterized by gamma interferon secretion in vitro by antigen-specific CD4+ cells. In contrast, SEB administered near the time of challenge resulted in accelerated mortality. Significant resistance to infection was also afforded by exposure of mice to a retrovirally encoded endogenous superantigen. These data suggest that CD4+ V beta 8+ T cells play an important role in vivo in the initiation of a Th2 response to C. albicans and that suppression of their activity may alter the qualitative development of the T-cell response and the outcome of infection. PMID:7914883

  8. Nanoscale analysis of caspofungin-induced cell surface remodelling in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Jackson, Desmond N.; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of fungal pathogens that are resistant to the classic repertoire of antifungal drugs has increased the need for new therapeutic agents. A prominent example of such novel compound is caspofungin, known to alter cell wall biogenesis by inhibiting β-1,3 D-glucan synthesis. Although much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of action of caspofungin, little is known about its influence on the biophysical properties of the fungal cells. Here, we use atomic force microscopy to demonstrate that caspofungin induces major remodeling of the cell surface properties of Candida albicans. Caspofungin causes major morphological and structural alterations of the cells, which correlate with a decrease of the cell wall mechanical strength. Moreover, we find that the drug induces the massive exposure of the cell adhesion protein Als1 on the cell surface and leads to increased cell surface hydrophobicity, two features that trigger cell aggregation. This behaviour is not observed in yeast species lacking Als1, demonstrating the key role that the protein plays in determining the aggregation phenotype of C. albicans. The results show that AFM opens up new avenues for understanding the molecular bases of microbe-drug interactions and for developing new therapeutic agents. PMID:23262781

  9. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π–π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity. PMID:28120914

  10. Comparative molecular dynamics studies of heterozygous open reading frames of DNA polymerase eta (η) in pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, Suresh; Manohar, Kodavati; Acharya, Narottam; Dixit, Anshuman

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability in Candida albicans is believed to play a crucial role in fungal pathogenesis. DNA polymerases contribute significantly to stability of any genome. Although Candida Genome database predicts presence of S. cerevisiae DNA polymerase orthologs; functional and structural characterizations of Candida DNA polymerases are still unexplored. DNA polymerase eta (Polη) is unique as it promotes efficient bypass of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. Interestingly, C. albicans is heterozygous in carrying two Polη genes and the nucleotide substitutions were found only in the ORFs. As allelic differences often result in functional differences of the encoded proteins, comparative analyses of structural models and molecular dynamic simulations were performed to characterize these orthologs of DNA Polη. Overall structures of both the ORFs remain conserved except subtle differences in the palm and PAD domains. The complementation analysis showed that both the ORFs equally suppressed UV sensitivity of yeast rad30 deletion strain. Our study has predicted two novel molecular interactions, a highly conserved molecular tetrad of salt bridges and a series of π–π interactions spanning from thumb to PAD. This study suggests these ORFs as the homologues of yeast Polη, and due to its heterogeneity in C. albicans they may play a significant role in pathogenicity.

  11. Galleria mellonella lysozyme induces apoptotic changes in Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Sowa-Jasiłek, Aneta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Stączek, Sylwia; Wydrych, Jerzy; Skrzypiec, Krzysztof; Mak, Paweł; Deryło, Kamil; Tchórzewski, Marek; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-12-01

    The greater wax moth Galleria mellonella has been increasingly used as a model host to determine Candida albicans virulence and efficacy of antifungal treatment. The G. mellonella lysozyme, similarly to its human counterpart, is a member of the c-type family of lysozymes that exhibits antibacterial and antifungal activity. However, in contrast to the relatively well explained bactericidal action, the mechanism of fungistatic and/or fungicidal activity of lysozymes is still not clear. In the present study we provide the direct evidences that the G. mellonella lysozyme binds to the protoplasts as well as to the intact C. albicans cells and decreases the survival rate of both these forms in a time-dependent manner. No enzymatic activity of the lysozyme towards typical chitinase and β-glucanase substrates was detected, indicating that hydrolysis of main fungal cell wall components is not responsible for anti-Candida activity of the lysozyme. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with tetraethylammonium, a potassium channel blocker, prevented them from the lysozyme action, suggesting that lysozyme acts by induction of programmed cell death. In fact, the C. albicans cells treated with the lysozyme exhibited typical apoptotic features, i.e. loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine exposure in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane, as well as chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation.

  12. Candida albicans RHO1 is required for cell viability in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan E; Csank, Csilla; Reyes, Guadalupe; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Berlin, Vivian

    2002-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho1p plays an important role in cell wall integrity by regulating beta-1,3-glucan synthase, Pkc1p and the actin cytoskeleton. To determine the physiological role of Rho1p in the dimorphic fungus Candida albicans, the major human fungal pathogen, we constructed mutants that conditionally express Rho1p from the glucose-repressible phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter (pPCK1). We examined the growth of these cells in a range of conditions. Depletion of Rho1p from yeast cells resulted in cell death, lysis, and aggregation. The Rho1p conditional mutant was inviable on 10% serum indicating that Rho1p was also required for hyphal viability. Furthermore, in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis, strains dependent on pPCK1-driven RHO1 expression failed to colonise the kidneys and establish disease, suggesting that the level of glucose in serum was sufficient to repress the pPCK1 and that Rho1p-depleted strains were inviable within the host. Therefore, Rho1p is essential for the viability of C. albicans in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  14. Gymnemic Acids Inhibit Hyphal Growth and Virulence in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d’Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  15. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine.

  16. Members of the Candida parapsilosis Complex and Candida albicans are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mata, Eine; Navarro-Arias, María J.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; López, Mercedes G.; Csonka, Katalin; Gacser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high morbility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human PBMCs than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNFα and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human PBMCs. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune recognition of the members of the C. parapsilosis complex is differential

  17. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25–45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets. PMID:28252014

  18. Revealing the sequence of interactions of PuroA peptide with Candida albicans cells by live-cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagaghi, Nadin; Bhave, Mrinal; Palombo, Enzo A.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2017-03-01

    To determine the mechanism(s) of action of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) it is desirable to provide details of their interaction kinetics with cellular, sub-cellular and molecular targets. The synthetic peptide, PuroA, displays potent antimicrobial activities which have been attributed to peptide-induced membrane destabilization, or intracellular mechanisms of action (DNA-binding) or both. We used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to directly monitor the localization and interaction kinetics of a FITC- PuroA peptide on single Candida albicans cells in real time. Our results reveal the sequence of events leading to cell death. Within 1 minute, FITC-PuroA was observed to interact with SYTO-labelled nucleic acids, resulting in a noticeable quenching in the fluorescence lifetime of the peptide label at the nucleus of yeast cells, and cell-cycle arrest. A propidium iodide (PI) influx assay confirmed that peptide translocation itself did not disrupt the cell membrane integrity; however, PI entry occurred 25–45 minutes later, which correlated with an increase in fractional fluorescence of pores and an overall loss of cell size. Our results clarify that membrane disruption appears to be the mechanism by which the C. albicans cells are killed and this occurs after FITC-PuroA translocation and binding to intracellular targets.

  19. Candida albicans mannoprotein influences the biological function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pietrella, Donatella; Bistoni, Giovanni; Corbucci, Cristina; Perito, Stefano; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2006-04-01

    Cell wall components of fungi involved in induction of host immune response are predominantly proteins and glycoproteins, the latter being mainly mannoproteins (MP). In this study we analyse the interaction of the MP from Candida albicans (MP65) with dendritic cells (DC) and demonstrate that MP65 stimulates DC and induces the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and the activation of IL-12 gene, with maximal value 6 h post treatment. MP65 induces DC maturation by increasing costimulatory molecules and decreasing CD14 and FcgammaR molecule expression. The latter effect is partly mediated by toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4, and the MyD88-dependent pathway is involved in the process. MP65 enables DC to activate T cell response, its protein core is essential for induction of T cell activation, while its glycosylated portion primarily promotes cytokine production. The mechanisms involved in induction of protective response against C. albicans could be mediated by the MP65 antigen, suggesting that MP65 may be a suitable candidate vaccine.

  20. Molecular Epidemiology of Candida albicans and Its Closely Related Yeasts Candida dubliniensis and Candida africana▿

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Orazio; Criseo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We performed a molecular study to determine the occurrence of Candida albicans, Candida africana, and Candida dubliniensis in different clinical samples. The study provides new insights into the epidemiology of candidiasis in hospitalized patients in three hospitals in southern Italy. It also reports the first detailed epidemiological data concerning the occurrence of C. africana in clinical samples. PMID:18987171

  1. The role of Bgl2p in the transition to filamentous cells during biofilm formation by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinyue; Zhang, Ruoyu; Takada, Ayako; Iwatani, Shun; Oka, Chiemi; Kitamoto, Toshitaka; Kajiwara, Susumu

    2017-02-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a transition from yeast cells to filamentous cells that is related to its pathogenicity. The complex multicellular processes involved in biofilm formation by this fungus also include this transition. In this work, we investigated the morphological role of the Bgl2 protein (Bgl2p) in the transition to filamentous cells during biofilm formation by C. albicans. Bgl2p has been identified as a β-1, 3-glucosyltransferase, and transcription of the CaBGL2 gene is upregulated during biofilm formation. We used scanning electron microscopy to observe the microstructure of a bgl2 null mutant during biofilm formation and found a delay in the transition to filamentous cells in the premature phase (24 hours) of biofilm formation. Deletion of the CaBGL2 gene led to a decrease in the expression of CPH2 and TEC1, which encode transcription factors required for the transition to the filamentous form. These findings indicate that Bgl2p plays a role in the transition to filamentous cells during biofilm formation by C. albicans.

  2. The role of pattern recognition receptors in the innate recognition of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan-Xin; Wang, Yan; Hu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a commensal microorganism in healthy individuals and a major fungal pathogen causing high mortality in immunocompromised patients. Yeast-hypha morphological transition is a well known virulence trait of C. albicans. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this review, we summarize the PRRs involved in the recognition of C. albicans in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and phagocytic cells separately. We figure out the differential recognition of yeasts and hyphae, the findings on PRR-deficient mice, and the discoveries on human PRR-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). PMID:25714264

  3. Miltefosine inhibits Candida albicans and non-albicans Candida spp. biofilms and impairs the dispersion of infectious cells.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa; Ishida, Kelly; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Rozental, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Candida spp. can adhere to and form biofilms over different surfaces, becoming less susceptible to antifungal treatment. Resistance of biofilms to antifungal agents is multifactorial and the extracellular matrix (ECM) appears to play an important role. Among the few available antifungals for treatment of candidaemia, only the lipid formulations of amphotericin B (AmB) and the echinocandins are effective against biofilms. Our group has previously demonstrated that miltefosine has an important effect against Candida albicans biofilms. Thus, the aim of this work was to expand the analyses of the in vitro antibiofilm activity of miltefosine to non-albicans Candida spp. Miltefosine had significant antifungal activity against planktonic cells and the development of biofilms of C. albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis and Candida glabrata. The activity profile in biofilms was superior to fluconazole and was similar to that of AmB and caspofungin. Biofilm-derived cells with their ECM extracted became as susceptible to miltefosine as planktonic cells, confirming the importance of the ECM in the biofilm resistant behaviour. Miltefosine also inhibited biofilm dispersion of cells at the same concentration needed to inhibit planktonic cell growth. The data obtained in this work reinforce the potent inhibitory activity of miltefosine on biofilms of the four most pathogenic Candida spp. and encourage further studies for the utilisation of this drug and/or structural analogues on biofilm-related infections.

  4. Paeonia lactiflora Inhibits Cell Wall Synthesis and Triggers Membrane Depolarization in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Younhee

    2017-02-28

    Fungal cell walls and cell membranes are the main targets of antifungals. In this study, we report on the antifungal activity of an ethanol extract from Paeonia lactiflora against Candida albicans, showing that the antifungal activity is associated with the synergistic actions of preventing cell wall synthesis, enabling membrane depolarization, and compromising permeability. First, it was shown that the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora was involved in damaging the integrity of cell walls in C. albicans. In isotonic media, cell bursts of C. albicans by the P. lactiflora ethanol extract could be restored, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the P. lactiflora ethanol extract against C. albicans cells increased 4-fold. In addition, synthesis of (1,3)-β-D-glucan polymer was inhibited by 87% and 83% following treatment of C. albicans microsomes with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract at their 1× MIC and 2× MIC, respectively. Second, the ethanol extract from P. lactiflora influenced the function of C. albicans cell membranes. C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract formed red aggregates by staining with a membrane-impermeable dye, propidium iodide. Membrane depolarization manifested as increased fluorescence intensity by staining P. lactiflora-treated C. albicans cells with a membrane-potential marker, DiBAC4(3) ((bis-1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol). Membrane permeability was assessed by crystal violet assay, and C. albicans cells treated with the P. lactiflora ethanol extract exhibited significant uptake of crystal violet in a concentration-dependent manner. The findings suggest that P. lactiflora ethanol extract is a viable and effective candidate for the development of new antifungal agents to treat Candida-associated diseases.

  5. Candida albicans stimulates cytokine production and leukocyte adhesion molecule expression by endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Filler, S G; Pfunder, A S; Spellberg, B J; Spellberg, J P; Edwards, J E

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cells have the potential to influence significantly the host immune response to blood-borne microbial pathogens, such as Candida albicans. We investigated the ability (of this organism to stimulate endothelial cell responses relevant to host defense in vitro. Infection with C. albicans induced endothelial cells to express mRNAs encoding E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and inducible cyclooxygenase (cox2). All three leukocyte adhesion molecule proteins were expressed on the surfaces of the endothelial cells after 8 h of exposure to C. albicans. An increase in secretion of all three cytokines was found after 12 h of infection. Cytochalasin D inhibited accumulation of the endothelial cell cytokine and leukocyte adhesion molecule mRNAs in response to C. albicans, suggesting that endothelial cell phagocytosis of the organism is required to induce this response. Live Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, a nongerminating strain of C. albicans, and killed C. albicans did not stimulate the expression of any of the cytokine or leukocyte adhesion molecule mRNAs. These findings indicate that a factor associated with live, germinating C. albicans is required for induction of endothelial cell mRNA expression. Furthermore, since endothelial cells phagocytize killed C. albicans, phagocytosis is likely necessary but not sufficient for this organism to stimulate mRNA accumulation. In conclusion, the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules by endothelial cells in response to C. albicans could enhance the host defense against this organism by contributing to the recruitment of activated leukocytes to sites of intravascular infection. PMID:8698486

  6. Ammonium assimilation by Candida albicans and other yeasts: evidence for activity of glutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Collings, A; Farnden, K J; Shepherd, M G

    1989-06-01

    Activities and properties of the ammonium assimilation enzymes NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were determined in batch and continuous cultures of Candida albicans. NADP+-dependent GDH activity showed allosteric kinetics, with an S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate of 7.5 mM and an apparent Km for ammonium of 5.0 mM. GOGAT activity was affected by the buffer used for extraction and assay, but in phosphate buffer, kinetics were hyperbolic, yielding Km values for glutamine of 750 microM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 65 microM. The enzymes GOGAT and NADP+-dependent GDH were also assayed in batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and three other pathogenic Candida spp.: Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Evidence is presented that GS/GOGAT is a major pathway for ammonium assimilation in Candida albicans and that this pathway is also significant in other Candida species.

  7. Training of yeast cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reijenga, Karin A; Bakker, Barbara M; van der Weijden, Coen C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2005-04-01

    In both industrial fermenters and in their natural habitats, microorganisms often experience an inhomogeneous and fluctuating environment. In this paper we mimicked one aspect of this nonideal behaviour by imposing a low and oscillating extracellular glucose concentration on nonoscillating suspensions of yeast cells. The extracellular dynamics changed the intracellular dynamics--which was monitored through NADH fluorescence--from steady to equally dynamic; the latter followed the extracellular dynamics at the frequency of glucose pulsing. Interestingly, the amplitude of the oscillation of the NADH fluorescence increased with time. This increase in amplitude was sensitive to inhibition of protein synthesis, and was due to a change in the cells rather than in the medium; the cell population was 'trained' to respond to the extracellular dynamics. To examine the mechanism behind this 'training', we subjected the cells to a low and constant extracellular glucose concentration. Seventy-five minutes of adaptation to a low and constant glucose concentration induced the same increase of the amplitude of the forced NADH oscillations as did the train of glucose pulses. Furthermore, 75 min of adaptation to a low (oscillating or continuous) glucose concentration decreased the K(M) of the glucose transporter from 26 mm to 3.5 mm. When subsequently the apparent K(M) was increased by addition of maltose, the amplitude of the forced oscillations dropped to its original value. This demonstrated that the increased affinity of glucose transport was essential for the training of the cells' dynamics.

  8. Silver nanoparticles induce apoptotic cell death in Candida albicans through the increase of hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-sok; Lee, Juneyoung; Hwang, Ji Hong; Kim, Keuk-Jun; Lee, Dong Gun

    2012-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been shown to be detrimental to fungal cells although the mechanism(s) of action have not been clearly established. In this study, we used Candida albicans cells to show that silver nanoparticles exert their antifungal effect through apoptosis. Many studies have shown that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species induces and regulates the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, hydroxyl radicals are considered an important component of cell death. Therefore, we assumed that hydroxyl radicals were related to apoptosis and the effect of thiourea as a hydroxyl radical scavenger was investigated. We measured the production of reactive oxygen species and investigated whether silver nanoparticles induced the accumulation of hydroxyl radicals. A reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential shown by flow cytometry analysis and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria were also verified. In addition, the apoptotic effects of silver nanoparticles were detected by fluorescence microscopy using other confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA and nuclear fragmentation, and the activation of metacaspases. Cells exposed to silver nanoparticles showed increased reactive oxygen species and hydroxyl radical production. All other phenomena of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptotic features also appeared. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles possess antifungal effects with apoptotic features and we suggest that the hydroxyl radicals generated by silver nanoparticles have a significant role in mitochondrial dysfunctional apoptosis.

  9. Modulation of Intestinal Inflammation by Yeasts and Cell Wall Extracts: Strain Dependence and Unexpected Anti-Inflammatory Role of Glucan Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Jawhara, Samir; Habib, Khalid; Maggiotto, François; Pignede, Georges; Vandekerckove, Pascal; Maes, Emmanuel; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Fontaine, Thierry; Guerardel, Yann; Poulain, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts and their glycan components can have a beneficial or adverse effect on intestinal inflammation. Previous research has shown that the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii (Sb) reduces intestinal inflammation and colonization by Candida albicans. The aim of this study was to identify dietary yeasts, which have comparable effects to the anti-C. albicans and anti-inflammatory properties of Sb and to assess the capabilities of yeast cell wall components to modulate intestinal inflammation. Mice received a single oral challenge of C. albicans and were then given 1.5% dextran-sulphate-sodium (DSS) for 2 weeks followed by a 3-day restitution period. S. cerevisiae strains (Sb, Sc1 to Sc4), as well as mannoprotein (MP) and β-glucan crude fractions prepared from Sc2 and highly purified β-glucans prepared from C. albicans were used in this curative model, starting 3 days after C. albicans challenge. Mice were assessed for the clinical, histological and inflammatory responses related to DSS administration. Strain Sc1-1 gave the same level of protection against C. albicans as Sb when assessed by mortality, clinical scores, colonization levels, reduction of TNFα and increase in IL-10 transcription. When Sc1-1 was compared with the other S. cerevisiae strains, the preparation process had a strong influence on biological activity. Interestingly, some S. cerevisiae strains dramatically increased mortality and clinical scores. Strain Sc4 and MP fraction favoured C. albicans colonization and inflammation, whereas β-glucan fraction was protective against both. Surprisingly, purified β-glucans from C. albicans had the same protective effect. Thus, some yeasts appear to be strong modulators of intestinal inflammation. These effects are dependent on the strain, species, preparation process and cell wall fraction. It was striking that β-glucan fractions or pure β-glucans from C. albicans displayed the most potent anti-inflammatory effect in the DSS model. PMID

  10. Monoclonal antibodies specific for Candida albicans Als3 that immunolabel fungal cells in vitro and in vivo and block adhesion to host surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, David A.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Zhao, Hongyuan; Hutchins, Jeff T.; Vernachio, John H.; Patti, Joseph M.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2009-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the Candida albicans cell-surface glycoprotein Als3 using the N-terminal domain of the protein as the immunogen. ELISA was used to demonstrate the specificity of the MAbs for the Als3 fragment, but not for the corresponding N-terminal domain fragments from other proteins in the Als family. The anti-Als3 MAbs immunolabeled the surface of germ tubes from a diverse collection of wild-type C. albicans isolates, but did not label yeast cells, an als3Δ/als3Δ deletion mutant strain, nor isolates of other Candida species associated with human disease. Als3 was visualized readily in fresh and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney tissue from a murine model of candidiasis. The anti-Als3 MAbs were also useful for immunogold electron microscopy and Western blotting. Both MAbs blocked C. albicans adhesion to vascular endothelial cells and buccal epithelial cells. These versatile MAbs are a valuable addition to the reagents available to study C. albicans cell surface dynamics and interaction of the fungus with host cells. PMID:19427882

  11. On the biochemical classification of yeast trehalases: Candida albicans contains two enzymes with mixed features of neutral and acid trehalase activities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; González-Párraga, Pilar; Esteban, Oscar; Laforet, Leslie; Valentín, Eulogio; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2009-05-22

    Two enzymes endowed with trehalase activity are present in Candida albicans. The cytosolic trehalase (Ntc1p), displayed high activity in exponential phase regardless of the carbon source (glucose, trehalose or glycerol). Ntc1p activity was similar in neutral (pH 7.1) or acid (pH 4.5) conditions, strongly inhibited by ATP, weakly stimulated by divalent cations (Ca(2+)or Mn(2+)) and unaffected in the presence of cyclic AMP. The Ntc1p activity decreased in stationary phase, except in glycerol-grown cultures, but the catalytic properties did not change. In turn, the cell wall-linked trehalase (Atc1p) showed elevated activity in resting cells or in cultures growing on trehalose or glycerol. Although Atc1p is subjected to glucose repression, exhaustion of glucose in itself did not increased the activity. Significant Atc1p values could also be measured at neutral or acid pH, but Atc1p was insensitive to ATP, cyclic AMP and divalent cations. These results are in direct contrast with the current classification of yeast trehalases based on their optimum pH. They are also relevant in the light of the proposed use of trehalase inhibitors for the treatment of candidiasis.

  12. Dimerization of aurein 1.2: effects in structure, antimicrobial activity and aggregation of Cândida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzón, E N; Sanches, P R S; Nogueira, L G; Bauab, T M; Cilli, E M

    2013-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a promising solution to face the antibiotic-resistant problem because they display little or no resistance effects. Dimeric analogues of select AMPs have shown pharmacotechnical advantages, making these molecules promising candidates for the development of novel antibiotic agents. Here, we evaluate the effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of the AMP aurein 1.2 (AU). AU and the C- and N-terminal dimers, (AU)2K and E(AU)2, respectively, were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis. Circular dichroism spectra indicated that E(AU)2 has a "coiled coil" structure in water while (AU)2K has an α-helix structure. In contrast, AU displayed typical spectra for disordered structures. In LPC micelles, all peptides acquired a high amount of α-helix structure. Hemolytic and vesicle permeabilization assays showed that AU has a concentration dependence activity, while this effect was less pronounced for dimeric versions, suggesting that dimerization may change the mechanism of action of AU. Notably, the antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeast decreased with dimerization. However, dimeric peptides promoted the aggregation of C. albicans. The ability to aggregate yeast cells makes dimeric versions of AU attractive candidates to inhibit the adhesion of C. albicans to biological targets and medical devices, preventing disease caused by this fungus.

  13. [Evaluation of a new chromogenic medium (Candida ID) for the isolation and presumptive identification of Candida albicans and other medically important yeasts].

    PubMed

    Quindós, G; Alonso-Vargas, R; Helou, S; Arechavala, A; Martín-Mazuelos, E; Negroni, R

    2001-03-01

    Candidiasis is a frequent human infection caused mainly by Candida albicans. However, other species are emerging as important pathogens, as Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei or Candida guilliermondii. Rapid identification of clinical isolates could facilitate diagnosis and treatment. Candida ID (bioMerieux, Spain) is a new medium for the isolation and presumptive identification of yeasts: C. albicans grows as blue colonies, and C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, Candida kefyr and Candida lusitaniae as pink ones. The utility of Candida ID was evaluated with more than 700 clinical isolates and type culture collection strains from different genera including Candida, Cryptococcus, Saccharomyces, and Rhodotorula. Presumptive identification was confirmed by germ tube test, microscopic morphology and chlamydoconidia production on corn meal agar and carbohydrate assimilation on API-ATB ID 32C or Vitek (bioMerieux). Growth on Candida ID was rapid (18-24 h) for most of the yeast strains tested. Sensitivity and specificity of identification of C. albicans was significantly high (>98%), since a very low number of isolates were found to be false negative or false positive. A better result was obtained for species growing as pink colonies (>99.5%). Detection of different species of medical important yeasts was easy with Candida ID, as perfectly distinct colors and textures of colonies were observed on this medium. Candida ID allowed the discrimination between C. glabrata (creamy and smooth) and C. krusei (rough and white) colonies. Other species showed different colony textures and colours, white being the predominant colour. Candida ID was very useful for the presumptive identification C. albicans isolates.

  14. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Zunino, S.; Hudig, D.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

  15. Analysis of cell wall extracts of Candida albicans by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Ponton, J; Jones, J M

    1986-01-01

    Cell walls of intact yeast- and mycelial-phase Candida albicans B311 were extracted with different compounds: dithiothreitol, dithiothreitol with protease, dithiothreitol with lyticase, and dithiothreitol with protease followed by beta-glucuronidase with chitinase. Extracts were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques. Dithiothreitol extracts contained the most satisfactory array of components for study. Analysis of these extracts demonstrated that the outer cell wall layers of Candida blastoconidia and germ tubes contained a complex array of polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and proteins. The proteins contributed to a latticework stabilized by covalent bonds that was important in determining the porosity of the outer cell wall layers. When equivalent weights were analyzed, mycelial-phase extract contained a more varied array of proteins than did yeast-phase extract. Only a portion of proteins in mycelial-phase extract elicited antibody responses in hyperimmunized rabbits or infected humans. A polysaccharide-rich, high-molecular-weight component (migrating at a position that would correspond to proteins having molecular weights of 235,000 to 250,000) and a protein component (molecular weight, 19,000) were readily demonstrable in the mycelial-phase extract but could not be identified in the yeast-phase extract. Images PMID:3527986

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans Initiation of HeLa 299 Cell-Associated Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Balbina J; Sigar, Ira M; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Halkyard, Scott

    2016-05-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), and type-2 (HSV-2), Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans co-habit the oral and genital mucosa, their interaction is poorly understood. We determined the effect HSV has on bacterial and/or fungal adherence, the initial step in biofilm formation. HeLa229 cells were infected with HSV-1 (KOS) gL86 or HSV-2 (KOS) 333gJ (-) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 50 and 10. S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and/or C. albicans (yeast forms or germ tube forms) were co-incubated for 30 min (37 °C; 5 % CO2; 5:1 organism: HeLa cell ratio; n = 16) with virus-infected HeLa cells or uninfected HeLa cell controls. Post-incubation, the monolayers were washed (3x; PBS), lysed (RIPA), and the lysate plated onto Fungisel and/or mannitol salts agar for standard colony count. The level of HeLa-associated S. aureus was significantly decreased (P < 0.05) for both HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells, as compared to virus-free HeLa cell controls (38 and 59 % of control, respectively). In contrast, HSV-1 and HSV-2 significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced HeLa cell association of C. albicans yeast forms and germ tube approximately two-fold, respectively. The effect of S. aureus on germ tube and yeast form adherence to HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells was specific for the Candida phenotype tested. Our study suggests that HSV, while antagonist towards S. aureus adherence enhances Candida adherence. Furthermore, the combination of the three pathogens results in S. aureus adherence that is either unaffected, or partially restored depending on both the herpes viral species and the fungal phenotype present.

  17. Lactobacillus crispatus Modulates Vaginal Epithelial Cell Innate Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiao-Xi; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Su-Xia; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis is caused by Candida albicans. The vaginal epithelium, as the first site of the initial stage of infection by pathogens, plays an important role in resisting genital tract infections. Moreover, lactobacilli are predominant members of the vaginal microbiota that help to maintain a normal vaginal microenvironment. Therefore, Lactobacillus crispatus was explored for its capacity to intervene in the immune response of vaginal epithelial cells VK2/E6E7 to C. albicans. Methods: We examined the interleukin-2 (IL-2), 4, 6, 8, and 17 produced by VK2/E6E7 cells infected with C. albicans and treated with L. crispatus in vitro. The capacity of L. crispatus to adhere to VK2/E6E7 and inhibit C. albicans growth was also tested by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and adhesion experiments. Results: Compared with group VK2/E6E7 with C. albicans, when treated with L. crispatus, the adhesion of C. albicans to VK2/E6E7 cells decreased significantly by 52.87 ± 1.22%, 47.03 ± 1.35%, and 42.20 ± 1.55% under competition, exclusion, and displacement conditions, respectively. SEM revealed that the invasion of C. albicans into VK2/E6E7 cells was caused by induced endocytosis and active penetration. L. crispatus could effectively protect the cells from the virulence of hyphae and spores of C. albicans and enhance the local immune function of the VK2/E6E7 cells. The concentrations of IL-2, 6, and 17 were upregulated significantly (P < 0.01) and that of IL-8 were downregulated significantly (P < 0.01) in infected VK2/E6E7 cells treated with L. crispatus. The concentration of IL-4 was similar to that of the group VK2/E6E7 with C. albicans (24.10 ± 0.97 vs. 23.12 ± 0.76 pg/ml, P = 0.221). Conclusions: L. crispatus can attenuate the virulence of C. albicans, modulate the secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and enhance the immune response of VK2/E6E7 cells in vitro. The vaginal mucosa has a potential function in the local immune responses against

  18. Functional Genomic Analysis of Candida albicans Adherence Reveals a Key Role for the Arp2/3 Complex in Cell Wall Remodelling and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ketela, Troy; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal biofilms are complex, structured communities that can form on surfaces such as catheters and other indwelling medical devices. Biofilms are of particular concern with Candida albicans, one of the leading opportunistic fungal pathogens of humans. C. albicans biofilms include yeast and filamentous cells that are surrounded by an extracellular matrix, and they are intrinsically resistant to antifungal drugs such that resolving biofilm infections often requires surgery to remove the contaminated device. C. albicans biofilms form through a regulated process of adhesion to surfaces, filamentation, maturation, and ultimately dispersion. To uncover new strategies to block the initial stages of biofilm formation, we utilized a functional genomic approach to identify genes that modulate C. albicans adherence. We screened a library of 1,481 double barcoded doxycycline-repressible conditional gene expression strains covering ~25% of the C. albicans genome. We identified five genes for which transcriptional repression impaired adherence, including: ARC18, PMT1, MNN9, SPT7, and orf19.831. The most severe adherence defect was observed upon transcriptional repression of ARC18, which encodes a member of the Arp2/3 complex that is involved in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis. Depletion of components of the Arp2/3 complex not only impaired adherence, but also caused reduced biofilm formation, increased cell surface hydrophobicity, and increased exposure of cell wall chitin and β-glucans. Reduced function of the Arp2/3 complex led to impaired cell wall integrity and activation of Rho1-mediated cell wall stress responses, thereby causing cell wall remodelling and reduced adherence. Thus, we identify important functional relationships between cell wall stress responses and a novel mechanism that controls adherence and biofilm formation, thereby illuminating novel strategies to cripple a leading fungal pathogen of humans. PMID:27870871

  19. Proteolytic activity and cytokine up-regulation by non-albicans Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ali; Pärnänen, Pirjo; Kari, Kirsti; Meurman, Jukka H

    2015-05-01

    Mouth is an important source of infections and oral infections such as Candida infections increase the risk of mortality. Our purpose was to investigate differences in proteolytic activity of non-albicans Candida albicans (non-albicans Candida) between clinical isolates and laboratory samples. The second aim was to assess the concentration of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α in saliva of patients with the non-albicans Candida and Candida-negative saliva samples. Clinical yeast samples from our laboratory were used for analyses. Candida strains were grown in YPG at 37 °C for 24 h in water bath with shaking. The activity of Candida proteinases of cell and cell-free fractions were analyzed by MDPF-gelatin zymography. The levels of IL-1β, IL-10, and TNF-α were measured from saliva with ELISA. The study showed differences in the proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. C. tropicalis had higher proteolytic activity when compared to the other strains. Significant difference was found in salivary IL-1β levels between the non-albicans Candida and control strains (P < 0.002). The present findings showed differences in proteolytic activity among the non-albicans Candida strains. The increased IL-1β concentration may be one of the host response components associated with non-albicans Candida infection.

  20. Influence of lactobacilli on the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans to fibers and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reid, G; Tieszer, C; Lam, D

    1995-09-01

    The ability of organisms to adhere to and form biofilms on fibrous materials is believed to be an important initiating step in the induction of several diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome. Using an in vitro assay, a moderately hydrophobic strain of Staphylococcus aureus (water contact angle 35 degrees) and a hydrophilic Candida albicans (shown by a hexadecane test) were highly adherent to commercial diaper fibers. The lumen side of the diaper was porous and the fibers were very hydrophobic (> 140 degrees), but the internal section was very hydrophilic (0 degrees), presumably for lus strains was present. Surfaces precoated with lactobacilli inhibited staphylococcal adhesion by 26-97%, and candida by 0-67%. When the lactobacilli were used to challenge adherent pathogens, there was 99% displacement of the S. aureus and up to 91% displacement of C. albicans. Hydrophobic L. acidophilus 76 (54 degrees) and T-13 (80 degrees) were the most effective of five Lactobacillus isolates tested at interference by precoating. The moderately hydrophilic L. casei var rhamnosus GR-1 (33 degrees) was the most effective at displacing the yeast. Experiments with uroepithelial cells also showed that the lactobacilli could significantly interfere with the adhesion of both pathogens to the cells. The results demonstrate the rapidity with which two pathogens adhered to fibers and epithelial cells, and raised the possibility that members of the normal female urogenital flora might interfere with infections caused by these organisms.

  1. Host Cell Invasion and Virulence Mediated by Candida albicans Ssa1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianing N.; Solis, Norma V.; Phan, Quynh T.; Bajwa, Jashanjot S.; Kashleva, Helena; Thompson, Angela; Liu, Yaoping; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Edgerton, Mira; Filler, Scott G.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans Ssa1 and Ssa2 are members of the HSP70 family of heat shock proteins that are expressed on the cell surface and function as receptors for antimicrobial peptides such as histatins. We investigated the role of Ssa1 and Ssa2 in mediating pathogenic host cell interactions and virulence. A C. albicans ssa1Δ/Δ mutant had attenuated virulence in murine models of disseminated and oropharyngeal candidiasis, whereas an ssa2Δ/Δ mutant did not. In vitro studies revealed that the ssa1Δ/Δ mutant caused markedly less damage to endothelial cells and oral epithelial cell lines. Also, the ssa1Δ/Δ mutant had defective binding to endothelial cell N-cadherin and epithelial cell E-cadherin, receptors that mediate host cell endocytosis of C. albicans. As a result, this mutant had impaired capacity to induce its own endocytosis by endothelial cells and oral epithelial cells. Latex beads coated with recombinant Ssa1 were avidly endocytosed by both endothelial cells and oral epithelial cells, demonstrating that Ssa1 is sufficient to induce host cell endocytosis. These results indicate that Ssa1 is a novel invasin that binds to host cell cadherins, induces host cell endocytosis, and is critical for C. albicans to cause maximal damage to host cells and induce disseminated and oropharyngeal disease. PMID:21085601

  2. Mitochondrial Sorting and Assembly Machinery Subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans: Insight into the Roles of Mitochondria in Fitness, Cell Wall Integrity, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yue; Jelicic, Branka; Pettolino, Filomena; Perry, Andrew; Lo, Tricia L.; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Bantun, Farkad; Beilharz, Traude H.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Lithgow, Trevor; Djordjevic, Julianne T.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that mitochondrial functions impinge on cell wall integrity, drug tolerance, and virulence of human fungal pathogens. However, the mechanistic aspects of these processes are poorly understood. We focused on the mitochondrial outer membrane SAM (Sorting and Assembly Machinery) complex subunit Sam37 in Candida albicans. Inactivation of SAM37 in C. albicans leads to a large reduction in fitness, a phenotype not conserved with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our data indicate that slow growth of the sam37ΔΔ mutant results from mitochondrial DNA loss, a new function for Sam37 in C. albicans, and from reduced activity of the essential SAM complex subunit Sam35. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was hypersensitive to drugs that target the cell wall and displayed altered cell wall structure, supporting a role for Sam37 in cell wall integrity in C. albicans. The sensitivity of the mutant to membrane-targeting antifungals was not significantly altered. The sam37ΔΔ mutant was avirulent in the mouse model, and bioinformatics showed that the fungal Sam37 proteins are distant from their animal counterparts and could thus represent potential drug targets. Our study provides the first direct evidence for a link between mitochondrial function and cell wall integrity in C. albicans and is further relevant for understanding mitochondrial function in fitness, antifungal drug tolerance, and virulence of this major pathogen. Beyond the relevance to fungal pathogenesis, this work also provides new insight into the mitochondrial and cellular roles of the SAM complex in fungi. PMID:22286093

  3. Growth inhibition of pathogenic bacteria and some yeasts by selected essential oils and survival of L. monocytogenes and C. albicans in apple-carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Irkin, Reyhan; Korukluoglu, Mihriban

    2009-04-01

    Food safety is a fundamental concern of both consumers and the food industry. The increasing incidence of foodborne diseases increases the demand of using antimicrobials in foods. Spices and plants are rich in essential oils and show inhibition activity against microorganisms, which are composed of many compounds. In this research, effects of garlic, bay, black pepper, origanum, orange, thyme, tea tree, mint, clove, and cumin essential oils on Listeria monocytogenes AUFE 39237, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Salmonella enteritidis ATCC 13076, Proteus mirabilis AUFE 43566, Bacillus cereus AUFE 81154, Saccharomyces uvarum UUFE 16732, Kloeckera apiculata UUFE 10628, Candida albicans ATCC 10231, Candida oleophila UUPP 94365, and Metschnikowia fructicola UUPP 23067 and effects of thyme oil at a concentration of 0.5% on L. monocytogenes and C. albicans in apple-carrot juice during +4 degrees C storage (first to fifth day) were investigated. Strong antibacterial and antifungal activities of some essential oils were found. Thyme, origanum, clove, and orange essential oils were the most inhibitory against bacteria and yeasts. Cumin, tea tree, and mint oils inhibited the yeasts actively. It is concluded that some essential oils could be used as potential biopreservatives capable of controlling foodborne pathogens and food spoilage yeasts.

  4. Yeast fuel cell: Application for desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardiana, Ummy; Innocent, Christophe; Cretin, Marc; Buchari, Buchari; Gandasasmita, Suryo

    2016-02-01

    Yeasts have been implicated in microbial fuel cells as biocatalysts because they are non-pathogenic organisms, easily handled and robust with a good tolerance in different environmental conditions. Here we investigated baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the oxidation of glucose. Yeast was used in the anolyte, to transfer electrons to the anode in the presence of methylene blue as mediator whereas K3Fe(CN)6 was used as an electron acceptor for the reduction reaction in the catholyte. Power production with biofuel cell was coupled with a desalination process. The maximum current density produced by the cell was 88 mA.m-2. In those conditions, it was found that concentration of salt was removed 64% from initial 0.6 M after 1-month operation. This result proves that yeast fuel cells can be used to remove salt through electrically driven membrane processes and demonstrated that could be applied for energy production and desalination. Further developments are in progress to improve power output to make yeast fuel cells applicable for water treatment.

  5. [Differentiation and characterization of yeasts pathogenic for humans (Candida albicans, Exophiala dermatitidis) and algae pathogenic for animals (Prototheca spp.) using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in comparison with conventional methods].

    PubMed

    Schmalreck, A F; Tränkle, P; Vanca, E; Blaschke-Hellmessen, R

    1998-01-01

    Due to the Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) of strain specific traits demonstrated to be a suitable and efficient method for diagnostic and epidemiological determinations for the yeasts Candida albicans, Exophiala dermatitidis and the chlorophylless algae of the genus Prototheca. FT-IR leads in a rapid and economical way to reproducible results according to the spectral differences of intact cells (IR-fingerprints). Different genera, species and sub-species respectively, different strains can be recognized and grouped into different clusters and subclusters. The FT-IR analysis of Candida albicans isolates (n = 150) of 22 newborns-at-risk of an intensive care unit showed, that 86% of the children were colonised with several (2-4) different strains in the oral cavities and faeces. Stationary cross-infections could definitely be determined. Exophiala dermatitidis isolates (n = 31), mostly isolated repetitively within a period of 3 years from sputa of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis could be characterized and grouped patient-specifically over the total sampling period. Of 6 from 8 patients (75%) their individual strains remain the same and could be tracked over the three years. Cross-infections during the stationary treatment could be clearly identified by FT-IR. The Prototheca isolate (n = 43) from live-stock and farm environment showed clear distinguishable clusters differentiating the species P. wickerhamii, P. zopfii and P. stagnora. In addition, the biotypes of P. zopfii could be distinguished, especially the subclusters of variants II and III. It could be demonstrated, that FT-IR is suitable for the routine identification and differentiation of yeasts and algae. However, in spite of the gain of knowledge by using FT-IR for the characterization of microorganisms, the conventional phenotyping and/or genetic analysis of yeast or algae strains cannot be replaced completely. For a final taxonomic classification a combination of conventional

  6. Preservation of frozen yeast cells by trehalose.

    PubMed

    Diniz-Mendes, L; Bernardes, E; de Araujo, P S; Panek, A D; Paschoalin, V M

    1999-12-05

    Two different methods commonly used to preserve intact yeast cells-freezing and freeze-drying-were compared. Different yeast cells submitted to these treatments were stored for 28 days and cell viability assessed during this period. Intact yeast cells showed to be less tolerant to freeze-drying than to freezing. The rate of survival for both treatments could be enhanced by exogenous trehalose (10%) added during freezing and freeze-drying treatments or by a combination of two procedures: a pre-exposure of cells to 40 degrees C for 60 min and addition of trehalose. A maximum survival level of 71.5 +/- 6.3% after freezing could be achieved at the end of a storage period of 28 days, whereas only 25.0 +/- 1.4% showed the ability to tolerate freeze-drying treatment, if both low-temperature treatments were preceded by a heat exposure and addition of trehalose to yeast cells. Increased survival ability was also obtained when the pre-exposure treatment of yeast cells was performed at 10 degrees C for 3 h and trehalose was added: these treatments enhanced cell survival following freezing from 20.5 +/- 7. 7% to 60.0 +/- 3.5%. Although both mild cold and heat shock treatments could enhance cell tolerance to low temperature, only the heat treatment was able to increase the accumulation of intracellular trehalose whereas, during cold shock exposure, the intracellular amount of trehalose remained unaltered. Intracellular trehalose levels seemed not to be the only factor contributing to cell tolerance against freezing and freeze-drying treatments; however, the protection that this sugar confers to cells can be exerted only if it is to be found on both sides of the plasma membrane.

  7. In vitro adherence of Candida albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Adriana Gadotti; KOMIYAMA, Edson Yukio; dos SANTOS, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; JORGE, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; BRIGHENTI, Fernanda Lourenção; KOGA-ITO, Cristiane Yumi

    2011-01-01

    Adherence is considered an extremely important virulence factor in yeast. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the adherence to epithelial cells of C. albicans isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis in comparison to healthy patients. Material and methods Candida albicans cells isolated from individuals with chronic periodontitis (n=25) and healthy controls (n=25) were included in this study. Suspensions of C. albicans (106 cells/mL) and epithelial cells (105 cells/mL) were mixed and incubated at 37ºC for 1 h. The number of yeasts adhered to 25 epithelial cells was counted. Results The number of C. albicans cells adhered to epithelial cells was statistically higher in the chronic periodontitis group than in the control group (Student's t-test, p=0.000). Conclusion The results of the present study suggest a higher Candida adherence of samples isolated from patients with chronic periodontitis. PMID:21710096

  8. Single-molecule analysis of the major glycopolymers of pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Sarazin, Aurore; Jouault, Thierry; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-05-01

    Most microbes are coated with carbohydrates that show remarkable structural variability and play a crucial role in mediating microbial-host interactions. Understanding the functions of cell wall glycoconjugates requires detailed knowledge of their molecular organization, diversity and heterogeneity. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) with tips bearing specific probes (lectins, antibodies) to analyze the major glycopolymers of pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeast cells at molecular resolution. We show that non-ubiquitous β-1,2-mannans are largely exposed on the surface of native cells from pathogenic Candida albicans and C. glabrata, the former species displaying the highest glycopolymer density and extensions. We also find that chitin, a major component of the inner layer of the yeast cell wall, is much more abundant in C. albicans. These differences in molecular properties, further supported by flow cytometry measurements, may play an important role in strengthening cell wall mechanics and immune interactions. This study demonstrates that single-molecule AFM, combined with immunological and fluorescence methods, is a powerful platform in fungal glycobiology for probing the density, distribution and extension of specific cell wall glycoconjugates. In nanomedicine, we anticipate that this new form of AFM-based nanoglycobiology will contribute to the development of sugar-based drugs, immunotherapeutics, vaccines and diagnostics.

  9. Whole Saliva has a Dual Role on the Adherence of Candida albicans to Polymethylmetacrylate.

    PubMed

    Elguezabal, N; Maza, J L; Dorronsoro, S; Pontón, J

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion of Candida albicans to acrylic of dental prostheses or to salivary macromolecules adsorbed on their surface is believed to be a critical event in the development of denture stomatitis. In previous studies our group has shown that adhesion of C. albicans germ tubes to polystyrene is decreased by saliva whereas C. albicans yeast cells adhesion to the same material is enhanced. The results presented in this study confirm this dual role played by whole saliva, since it decreased the adhesion of germ tubes but increased the adhesion of yeast cells to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). These effects mediated by whole saliva do not seem to be related to an inhibition of the germination of C. albicans, since similar levels of filamentation were observed in presence and absence of saliva. These results may give new insights into the conflicting role of saliva in the adhesion of C. albicans to acrylic resins of dental prostheses.

  10. Candida/Candida biofilms. First description of dual-species Candida albicans/C. rugosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos Henrique Gomes; Pires, Regina Helena; Cunha, Aline Oliveira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida Martins; Singulani, Junya de Lacorte; Abrão, Fariza; Moraes, Thais de; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-04-01

    Denture liners have physical properties that favour plaque accumulation and colonization by Candida species, irritating oral tissues and causing denture stomatitis. To isolate and determine the incidence of oral Candida species in dental prostheses, oral swabs were collected from the dental prostheses of 66 patients. All the strains were screened for their ability to form biofilms; both monospecies and dual-species combinations were tested. Candida albicans (63 %) was the most frequently isolated microorganism; Candida tropicalis (14 %), Candida glabrata (13 %), Candida rugosa (5 %), Candida parapsilosis (3 %), and Candida krusei (2 %) were also detected. The XTT assay showed that C. albicans SC5314 possessed a biofilm-forming ability significantly higher (p < 0.001) than non-albicans Candida strains, after 6 h 37 °C. The total C. albicans CFU from a dual-species biofilm was less than the total CFU of a monospecies C. albicans biofilm. In contrast to the profuse hyphae verified in monospecies C. albicans biofilms, micrographies showed that the C. albicans/non-albicans Candida biofilms consisted of sparse yeast forms and profuse budding yeast cells that generated a network. These results suggested that C. albicans and the tested Candida species could co-exist in biofilms displaying apparent antagonism. The study provide the first description of C. albicans/C. rugosa mixed biofilm.

  11. Phytosphingosine-1-phosphate is a signaling molecule involved in miconazole resistance in sessile Candida albicans cells.

    PubMed

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P A; Nelis, Hans J; Thevissen, Karin; Coenye, Tom

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells.

  12. Phytosphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Signaling Molecule Involved in Miconazole Resistance in Sessile Candida albicans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbosch, Davy; Bink, Anna; Govaert, Gilmer; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Nelis, Hans J.; Thevissen, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that 1% to 10% of sessile Candida albicans cells survive treatment with high doses of miconazole (a fungicidal imidazole). In the present study, we investigated the involvement of sphingolipid biosynthetic intermediates in this survival. We observed that the LCB4 gene, coding for the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine and phytosphingosine, is important in governing the miconazole resistance of sessile Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans cells. The addition of 10 nM phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PHS-1-P) drastically reduced the intracellular miconazole concentration and significantly increased the miconazole resistance of a hypersusceptible C. albicans heterozygous LCB4/lcb4 mutant, indicating a protective effect of PHS-1-P against miconazole-induced cell death in sessile cells. At this concentration of PHS-1-P, we did not observe any effect on the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane. The protective effect of PHS-1-P was not observed when the efflux pumps were inhibited or when tested in a mutant without functional efflux systems. Also, the addition of PHS-1-P during miconazole treatment increased the expression levels of genes coding for efflux pumps, leading to the hypothesis that PHS-1-P acts as a signaling molecule and enhances the efflux of miconazole in sessile C. albicans cells. PMID:22354293

  13. Antagonistic effect of Candida albicans and IFNγ on E-cadherin expression and production by human primary gingival epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Audoy, Julie; Chmielewski, Witold

    2012-11-01

    Caused mainly by Candida albicans, oropharyngeal candidiasis is the most common oral complication associated with HIV disease worldwide. Host defenses against C. albicans essentially fall into two categories: specific immune mechanisms and local oral mucosal epithelial cell defenses. Since oral mucosa is the first line of defense in the form of a physical barrier against C. albicans invasion, and since epithelial cells are involved in anti-Candida innate immunity through different cytokines, we wanted to determine whether C. albicans alters E-cadherin expression and production, and whether interferon-γ (INFγ), a TH1 cytokine, is involved in the anti-Candida defense. Using primary human gingival epithelial cells, we demonstrated that C. albicans significantly decreased E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production. This effect was basically obtained at later infective periods (24 and 48h). Interestingly, when IFNγ was added to C. albicans infected epithelial cell cultures, it prevented the side effect of C. albicans on E-cadherin mRNA expression and protein production and deposition. All together, these results suggested concomitant interactions between oral epithelial cells and IFNγ against C. albicans infection.

  14. Deletion of AIF1 but not of YCA1/MCA1 protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans cells from caspofungin-induced programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Christopher; Donaghey, Faith; Helming, Katherine; McCarthy, Morgan; Rogers, Stephen; Austriaco, Nicanor

    2014-01-01

    Caspofungin was the first member of a new class of antifungals called echinocandins to be approved by a drug regulatory authority. Like the other echinocandins, caspofungin blocks the synthesis of β(1,3)-D-glucan of the fungal cell wall by inhibiting the enzyme, β(1,3)-D-glucan synthase. Loss of β(1,3)-D-glucan leads to osmotic instability and cell death. However, the precise mechanism of cell death associated with the cytotoxicity of caspofungin was unclear. We now provide evidence that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells cultured in media containing caspofungin manifest the classical hallmarks of programmed cell death (PCD) in yeast, including the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the fragmentation of mitochondria, and the production of DNA strand breaks. Our data also suggests that deleting AIF1 but not YCA1/MCA1 protects S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans from caspofungin-induced cell death. This is not only the first time that AIF1 has been specifically tied to cell death in Candida but also the first time that caspofungin resistance has been linked to the cell death machinery in yeast.

  15. Modification of adherence to plastic and to human buccal cells of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by a subinhibitory concentration of itraconazole.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M T; Morales, J J; Lucio, L; Pérez-Giraldo, C; Hurtado, C; Gómez-García, A C

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antifungal agents can influence the adherence of Candida spp. to the host cell. In this study the adherence of Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Candida dubliniensis CECT 11455 to plastic and to human buccal epithelial cells was evaluated following pre-exposure to 0.5 x minimum inhibitory capacity (MIC) of itraconazole and compared with the corresponding cellular surface hydrophobicity. The yeasts were grown in Sabouraud broth or RPMI-1640 with itraconazole (0.5 x MIC) for 24-26 h at 37 degrees C and the drug was then removed. The adhesion capacity to plastic was studied by turbidimetry in a polystyrene microtiter plate. The adhesion of the yeast to buccal epithelial cells was determined using microscopy techniques. The cellular surface hydrophobicity levels were determined by the microbial adhesion hydrocarbons test. Pre-exposure to itraconazole decreased plastic adherence and cellular surface hydrophobicity in both species when grown in RPMI. When C. albicans was grown in Sabouraud broth, it was nonhydrophobic and did not adhere and therefore no change was detected with the antibiotic. Itraconazole increased adherence to buccal epithelial cells in both species and media studied, as compared to controls without antifungal agents. To study the effects of these antifungal agents on pathogenicity mechanisms, it will be necessary to standardize the methodology for evaluation to determine their in vivo therapeutic efficacy.

  16. Epithelial Cell Secretions from the Human Female Reproductive Tract Inhibit Sexually Transmitted Pathogens and Candida albicans but not Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Wira, CR; Ghosh, M; Smith, JM; Shen, L; Connor, RI; Sundstrom, P; Frechette, Gregory M.; Hill, EM; Fahey, JV

    2011-01-01

    Female reproductive tract (FRT) epithelial cells protect against potential pathogens and sexually transmitted infections. The purpose of this study was to determine if epithelial cells from the upper FRT secrete antimicrobials that inhibit reproductive tract pathogens which threaten women's health. Apical secretions from primary cultures of Fallopian tube, uterine, cervical and ectocervical epithelial cells were incubated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Candida albicans (yeast and hyphal forms), HIV-1, and Lactobacillus crispatus, prior to being tested for their ability to grow and/or infect target cells. Epithelial cell secretions from the upper FRT inhibit N. gonorrhoeae and both forms of Candida, as well as reduce HIV-1 (R5) infection of target cells. In contrast, none had an inhibitory effect on L. crispatus. Cytokines and chemokines analysis in uterine secretions revealed several molecules that could account for pathogen inhibition. These findings provide definitive evidence for the critical role of epithelial cells in protecting the FRT from infections, without comprising the beneficial presence of L. crispatus, which is part of the normal vaginal microflora of humans. PMID:21048705

  17. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  18. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  19. In vitro Effects of Lemongrass Extract on Candida albicans Biofilms, Human Cells Viability, and Denture Surface

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Petrus L. B.; Carvalho, Letícia T.; Paschoal, Marco A. B.; de Sousa, Eduardo M.; Moffa, Eduardo B.; da Silva, Marcos A. dos Santos; Tavarez, Rudys de Jesus Rodolfo; Gonçalves, Letícia M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether immersion of a denture surface in lemongrass extract (LGE) has effects on C. albicans biofilms, human cell viability and denture surface. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) were performed for LGE against C. albicans. For biofilm analysis, discs were fabricated using a denture acrylic resin with surface roughness standardization. C. albicans biofilms were developed on saliva-coated discs, and the effects of LGE at MIC, 5XMIC, and 10XMIC were investigated during biofilm formation and after biofilm maturation. Biofilms were investigated for cell counting, metabolic activity, and microscopic analysis. The cytotoxicity of different concentrations of LGE to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using MTT. The effects of LGE on acrylic resin were verified by measuring changes in roughness, color and flexural strength after 28 days of immersion. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by a Tukey test at a 5% significance level. The minimal concentration of LGE required to inhibit C. albicans growth was 0.625 mg/mL, while MFC was 2.5 mg/mL. The presence of LGE during biofilm development resulted in a reduction of cell counting (p < 0.05), which made the MIC sufficient to reduce approximately 90% of cells (p < 0.0001). The exposure of LGE after biofilm maturation also had a significant antifungal effect at all concentrations (p < 0.05). When compared to the control group, the exposure of PBMC to LGE at MIC resulted in similar viability (p > 0.05). There were no verified differences in color perception, roughness, or flexural strength after immersion in LGE at MIC compared to the control (p > 0.05). It could be concluded that immersion of the denture surface in LGE was effective in reducing C. albicans biofilms with no deleterious effects on acrylic properties at MIC. MIC was also an effective and safe concentration for use. PMID:27446818

  20. Molecular Analysis of the Candida albicans Homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MNN9, Required for Glycosylation of Cell Wall Mannoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Southard, Susan B.; Specht, Charles A.; Mishra, Chitra; Chen-Weiner, Joan; Robbins, Phillips W.

    1999-01-01

    The fungal cell wall has generated interest as a potential target for developing antifungal drugs, and the genes encoding glucan and chitin in fungal pathogens have been studied to this end. Mannoproteins, the third major component of the cell wall, contain mannose in either O- or N-glycosidic linkages. Here we describe the molecular analysis of the Candida albicans homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MNN9, a gene required for the synthesis of N-linked outer-chain mannan in yeast, and the phenotypes associated with its disruption. CaMNN9 has significant homology with S. cerevisiae MNN9, including a putative N-terminal transmembrane domain, and represents a member of a similar gene family in Candida. CaMNN9 resides on chromosome 3 and is expressed at similar levels in both yeast and hyphal cells. Disruption of both copies of CaMNN9 leads to phenotypic effects characteristic of cell wall defects including poor growth in liquid media and on solid media, formation of aggregates in liquid culture, osmotic sensitivity, aberrant hyphal formation, and increased sensitivity to lysis after treatment with β-1,3-glucanase. Like all members of the S. cerevisiae MNN9 gene family the Camnn9Δ strain is resistant to sodium orthovanadate and sensitive to hygromycin B. Analysis of cell wall-associated carbohydrates showed the Camnn9Δ strain to contain half the amount of mannan present in cell walls derived from the wild-type parent strain. Reverse transcription-PCR and Northern analysis of the expression of MNN9 gene family members CaVAN1 and CaANP1 in the Camnn9Δ strain showed that transcription of those genes is not affected in the absence of CaMNN9 transcription. Our results suggest that, while the role MNN9 plays in glycosylation in both Candida and Saccharomyces is conserved, loss of MNN9 function in C. albicans leads to phenotypes that are inconsistent with the pathogenicity of the organism and thus identify CaMnn9p as a potential drug target. PMID:10601199

  1. Comparison of the effect of rose bengal- and eosin Y-mediated photodynamic inactivation on planktonic cells and biofilms of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Freire, Fernanda; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Beltrame Junior, Milton; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2014-05-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic yeast that can cause oral candidosis through the formation of a biofilm, an important virulence factor that compromises the action of antifungal agents. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of rose bengal (RB)- and eosin Y (EY)-mediated photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using a green light-emitting diode (LED; 532 ± 10 nm) on planktonic cells and biofilms of C. albicans (ATCC 18804). Planktonic cultures were treated with photosensitizers at concentrations ranging from 0.78 to 400 μM, and biofilms were treated with 200 μM of photosensitizers. The number of colony-forming unit per milliliter (CFU/mL) was compared by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P ≤ 0.05). After treatment, one biofilm specimen of the control and PDI groups were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The photosensitizers (6.25, 25, 50, 200, and 400 μM of EY, and 6.25 μM of RB or higher) significantly reduced the number of CFU/mL in the PDI groups when compared to the control group. With respect to biofilm formation, RB- and EY-mediated PDI promoted reductions of 0.22 log10 and 0.45 log10, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the two photosensitizers reduced fungal structures. In conclusion, EY- and RB-mediated PDI using LED irradiation significantly reduced C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilms.

  2. Candida albicans Kinesin Kar3 Depends on a Cik1-Like Regulatory Partner Protein for Its Roles in Mating, Cell Morphogenesis, and Bipolar Spindle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Corey; Joshi, Monika; Delorme, Caroline; Davis, Darlene; Bennett, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen whose virulence is associated with its ability to transition from a budding yeast form to invasive hyphal filaments. The kinesin-14 family member CaKar3 is required for transition between these morphological states, as well as for mitotic progression and karyogamy. While kinesin-14 proteins are ubiquitous, CaKar3 homologs in hemiascomycete fungi are unique because they form heterodimers with noncatalytic kinesin-like proteins. Thus, CaKar3-based motors may represent a novel antifungal drug target. We have identified and examined the roles of a kinesin-like regulator of CaKar3. We show that orf19.306 (dubbed CaCIK1) encodes a protein that forms a heterodimer with CaKar3, localizes CaKar3 to spindle pole bodies, and can bind microtubules and influence CaKar3 mechanochemistry despite lacking an ATPase activity of its own. Similar to CaKar3 depletion, loss of CaCik1 results in cell cycle arrest, filamentation defects, and an inability to undergo karyogamy. Furthermore, an examination of the spindle structure in cells lacking either of these proteins shows that a large proportion have a monopolar spindle or two dissociated half-spindles, a phenotype unique to the C. albicans kinesin-14 homolog. These findings provide new insights into mitotic spindle structure and kinesin motor function in C. albicans and identify a potentially vulnerable target for antifungal drug development. PMID:26024903

  3. Dressed to impress: impact of environmental adaptation on the C andida albicans cell wall

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary C andida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans causing superficial mucosal infections and life‐threatening systemic disease. The fungal cell wall is the first point of contact between the invading pathogen and the host innate immune system. As a result, the polysaccharides that comprise the cell wall act as pathogen associated molecular patterns, which govern the host–pathogen interaction. The cell wall is dynamic and responsive to changes in the external environment. Therefore, the host environment plays a critical role in regulating the host–pathogen interaction through modulation of the fungal cell wall. This review focuses on how environmental adaptation modulates the cell wall structure and composition, and the subsequent impact this has on the innate immune recognition of C . albicans. PMID:25846717

  4. Cyclosporine A decreases the fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration of Candida albicans clinical isolates but not biofilm formation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wibawa, T; Nurrokhman; Baly, I; Daeli, P R; Kartasasmita, G; Wijayanti, N

    2015-03-01

    Among the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most abundant species in humans. One of the virulent factors of C. albicans is its ability to develop biofilm. Biofilm forming microbes are characterized by decreasing of its susceptibility to antibiotics and antifungal. The fungicidal effect of fluconazole may be enhanced by cyclosporine A in laboratory engineered C. albicans strains. The aim of this work is to analyze the synergistic effect of cyclosporine A with fluconazole in C. albicans clinical isolates and the effect of cycolsporine A alone in the biofilm formation. Six fluconazole resistant and six sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates were analyzed for its minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs), biofilm formation, and cell growths. A semi-quantitative XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5- sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] reduction assay was conducted to measure the biofilm formation. Cyclosporine A has synergistic effect with fluconazole that was shown by decreasing MICs of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. However, cyclosporine A alone did not influence the biofilm formation and cell growth of both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates. These results indicated that cyclosporine A might be a promising candidate of adjuvant therapy for fluconazole against both fluconazole resistant and sensitive C. albicans clinical isolates.

  5. A piglet model for studying Candida albicans colonization of the human oro-gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hoeflinger, Jennifer L; Coleman, David A; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Miller, Michael J; Hoyer, Lois L

    2014-08-01

    Pigs from a variety of sources were surveyed for oro-gastrointestinal (oro-GIT) carriage of Candida albicans. Candida albicans-positive animals were readily located, but we also identified C. albicans-free pigs. We hypothesized that pigs could be stably colonized with a C. albicans strain of choice, simply by feeding yeast cells. Piglets were farrowed routinely and remained with the sow for 4 days to acquire a normal microbiota. Piglets were then placed in an artificial rearing environment and fed sow milk replacer. Piglets were inoculated orally with one of three different C. albicans strains. Piglets were weighed daily, and culture swabs were collected to detect C. albicans orally, rectally and in the piglet's environment. Stable C. albicans colonization over the course of the study did not affect piglet growth. Necropsy revealed mucosally associated C. albicans throughout the oro-GIT with the highest abundance in the esophagus. Uninoculated control piglets remained C. albicans-negative. These data establish the piglet as a model to study C. albicans colonization of the human oro-GIT. Similarities between oro-GIT colonization in humans and pigs, as well as the ease of working with the piglet model, suggest its adaptability for use among investigators interested in understanding C. albicans-host commensal interactions.

  6. EGFR and HER2 receptor kinase signaling mediate epithelial cell invasion by Candida albicans during oropharyngeal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weidong; Phan, Quynh T.; Boontheung, Pinmanee; Solis, Norma V.; Loo, Joseph A.; Filler, Scott G.

    2012-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans is the major cause of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC). A key feature of this disease is fungal invasion of oral epithelial cells, a process that can occur by active penetration and fungal-induced endocytosis. Two invasins, Als3 and Ssa1, induce epithelial cell endocytosis of C. albicans, in part by binding to E-cadherin. However, inhibition of E-cadherin function only partially reduces C. albicans endocytosis, suggesting that there are additional epithelial cell receptors for this organism. Here, we show that the EGF receptor (EGFR) and HER2 function cooperatively to induce the endocytosis of C. albicans hyphae. EGFR and HER2 interact with C. albicans in an Als3- and Ssa1-dependent manner, and this interaction induces receptor autophosphorylation. Signaling through both EGFR and HER2 is required for maximal epithelial cell endocytosis of C. albicans in vitro. Importantly, oral infection with C. albicans stimulates the phosphorylation of EGFR and HER2 in the oral mucosa of mice, and treatment with a dual EGFR and HER2 kinase inhibitor significantly decreases this phosphorylation and reduces the severity of OPC. These results show the importance of EGFR and HER2 signaling in the pathogenesis of OPC and indicate the feasibility of treating candidal infections by targeting the host cell receptors with which the fungus interacts. PMID:22891338

  7. Initiation of phospholipomannan β-1,2 mannosylation involves Bmts with redundant activity, influences its cell wall location and regulates β-glucans homeostasis but is dispensable for Candida albicans systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Courjol, F; Mille, C; Hall, R A; Masset, A; Aijjou, R; Gow, N A R; Poulain, D; Jouault, T; Fradin, C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi synthesize glycosphingolipids, which have a crucial role in growth and viability. Glycosphingolipids also contribute to fungal-associated pathogenesis. The opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida albicans synthesizes phospholipomannan (PLM), which is a glycosphingolipid of the mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide family. Through its lipid and glycan moieties, PLM contributes to the initial recognition of the yeast, causing immune system disorder and persistent fungal disease through activation of host signaling pathways. The lipid moiety of PLM activates the deregulation signaling pathway involved in yeast phagocytosis whereas its glycan moiety, composed of β-1,2 mannosides (β-Mans), participates to inflammatory processes through a mechanism involving Galectin-3. Biosynthesis of PLM β-Mans involves two β-1,2 mannosyltransferases (Bmts) that initiate (Bmt5) and elongate (Bmt6) the glycan chains. After generation of double bmtsΔ mutants, we show that Bmt5 has redundant activity with Bmt2, which can replace Bmt5 in bmt5Δ mutant. We also report that PLM is located in the inner layer of the yeast cell wall. PLM seems to be not essential for systemic infection of the yeast. However, defect of PLM β-mannosylation increases resistance of C. albicans to inhibitors of β-glucans and chitin synthesis, highlighting a role of PLM in cell wall homeostasis.

  8. Evidence for presence in the cell wall of Candida albicans of a protein related to the hsp70 family.

    PubMed Central

    López-Ribot, J L; Alloush, H M; Masten, B J; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of several clones from a cDNA expression library from Candida albicans, one of which was associated with a constitutively expressed 70-kDa protein. The moiety was present in the beta-mercaptoethanol extracts of cell walls from both blastoconidia and germ tubes. The surface expression of this moiety was revealed by an indirect immunofluorescence assay using affinity-purified antibody to the fusion protein produced by the clone. The 0.68-kb cDNA insert was sequenced. A database search revealed extensive homology with the 70-kDa family of stress or heat shock proteins (hsps). The 77% homology with another C. albicans HSP70 sequence suggested that this fragment represented a second member of the HSP70 family in this organism. Homology ranging from 65 to 76% was observed with members of four subfamilies (SSA, SSB, SSC, and SSD) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP70 gene family. The nucleic acid sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of the open reading frame showed greatest homology with SSA1 and SSA2 sequences, and the gene corresponding to the cDNA clone was designated C. albicans SSA2. The relationship with the SSA family was supported by reactivity of the 70-kDa component with antibody recognizing the Ssa proteins of S. cerevisiae. The presence of an hsp70 in the cell wall was confirmed by two additional methods. Cell wall proteins were biotinylated with a non-membrane-permeable derivative to distinguish extracellular from cytosolic proteins. Biotinylated hsp70 was detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) among the biotinylated components affinity purified by chromatography on streptavidin, thereby establishing its presence in the cell wall. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the 70-kDa component was present at the cell surface as well as the outer surface of the plasma membrane and extended through the cell wall, occasionally appearing to reach the cell surface through channels. Northern (RNA) blot analysis

  9. Opaque cells signal white cells to form biofilms in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Karla J; Srikantha, Thyagarajan; Lockhart, Shawn R; Pujol, Claude; Soll, David R

    2006-01-01

    Upon homozygosis from a/α to a/a or α/α, Candida albicans must still switch from the ‘white' to ‘opaque' phenotype to mate. It was, therefore, surprising to discover that pheromone selectively upregulated mating-associated genes in mating-incompetent white cells without causing G1 arrest or shmoo formation. White cells, like opaque cells, possess pheromone receptors, although their distribution and redistribution upon pheromone treatment differ between the two cell types. In speculating about the possible role of the white cell pheromone response, it is hypothesized that in overlapping white a/a and α/α populations in nature, rare opaque cells, through the release of pheromone, signal majority white cells of opposite mating type to form a biofilm that facilitates mating. In support of this hypothesis, it is demonstrated that pheromone induces cohesiveness between white cells, minority opaque cells increase two-fold the thickness of majority white cell biofilms, and majority white cell biofilms facilitate minority opaque cell chemotropism. These results reveal a novel form of communication between switch phenotypes, analogous to the inductive events during embryogenesis in higher eukaryotes. PMID:16628217

  10. Conserved serine/threonine kinase encoded by CBK1 regulates expression of several hypha-associated transcripts and genes encoding cell wall proteins in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    McNemar, Mark D; Fonzi, William A

    2002-04-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, is reported to have several potential virulence factors. A potentially significant factor is the ability to undergo morphological transition from yeast to hypha. This alteration of form is accompanied by many changes within the cell, including alterations in gene expression and cell wall composition. We have isolated a gene that encodes a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that appears to be involved in the regulation of proteins associated with the cell wall. We have assigned the designation CBK1 (cell wall biosynthesis kinase 1) to this gene. Mutants lacking CBK1 form large aggregates of round cells under all growth conditions and lack the ability to undergo morphological differentiation. Additionally, these mutants show an altered pattern of expression of several transcripts encoding proteins associated with the cell wall. The results suggest that the kinase encoded by CBK1 plays a general role in the maintenance and alteration of the cell wall of C. albicans in all morphologies.

  11. Silver colloidal nanoparticles: antifungal effect against adhered cells and biofilms of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, D R; Gorup, L F; Silva, S; Negri, M; de Camargo, E R; Oliveira, R; Barbosa, D B; Henriques, M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applied to adhered cells (2 h) or biofilms (48 h) and after 24 h of contact their effect was assessed by enumeration of colony forming units (CFUs) and quantification of total biomass (by crystal violet staining). The MIC results showed that SN were fungicidal against all strains tested at very low concentrations (0.4-3.3 μg ml(-1)). Furthermore, SN were more effective in reducing biofilm biomass when applied to adhered cells (2 h) than to pre-formed biofilms (48 h), with the exception of C. glabrata ATCC, which in both cases showed a reduction ∼90%. Regarding cell viability, SN were highly effective on adhered C. glabrata and respective biofilms. On C. albicans the effect was not so evident but there was also a reduction in the number of viable biofilm cells. In summary, SN may have the potential to be an effective alternative to conventional antifungal agents for future therapies in Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  12. Mast cells phagocyte Candida albicans and produce nitric oxide by mechanisms involving TLR2 and Dectin-1.

    PubMed

    Pinke, Karen Henriette; Lima, Heliton Gustavo de; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Lara, Vanessa Soares

    2016-02-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is a fungus commonly found in the human mucosa, which may cause superficial and systemic infections, especially in immunosuppression. Until now, the main actors in the defense against this fungus are the epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells. However, mast cells are strategically located to play a first line of anti-Candida defense and it has appropriate mechanisms to do it. As with other cells, the recognition of C. albicans occurs meanly via TLR2 and Dectin-1. We assess the TLR2/Dectin-1 involvement in phagocytosis and production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mast cells challenged with C. albicans. Bone marrow-derived mast cells (MC) from wild type (Wt) or knockout (TLR2-/-) mice C57BL/6 were subjected to in vitro Dectin-1 blockade. After challenged with FITC-labeled C. albicans or zymosan, phagocytosis was analyzed by microscopy. The intracellular production of NO and ROS was measured by DAF-FM diacetate and CellROX Deep/Red Reagent kits. The nitrite formation and hydrogen peroxide release were analyzed by Griess reaction and Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide/Peroxidase Assay Kit. Wt/MC phagocytose C. albicans with production of intracellular NO, but not ROS. Moreover, increased levels of nitrite were also observed. The absence and/or blockade of TLR2/Dectin-1 caused significant decreased in C. albicans phagocytosis and NO production. Our results showed that mast cells are able to phagocytose and produce NO against C. albicans via TLR2/Dectin-1. Therefore, mast cells could be important during the course of Candida infection and as a therapeutic target.

  13. Role of Retrograde Trafficking in Stress Response, Host Cell Interactions, and Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaoping; Solis, Norma V.; Heilmann, Clemens J.; Phan, Quynh T.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Klis, Frans M.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the vacuolar protein sorting complexes Vps51/52/53/54 and Vps15/30/34/38 are essential for efficient endosome-to-Golgi complex retrograde transport. Here we investigated the function of Vps15 and Vps51, representative members of these complexes, in the stress resistance, host cell interactions, and virulence of Candida albicans. We found that C. albicans vps15Δ/Δ and vps51Δ/Δ mutants had abnormal vacuolar morphology, impaired retrograde protein trafficking, and dramatically increased susceptibility to a variety of stressors. These mutants also had reduced capacity to invade and damage oral epithelial cells in vitro and attenuated virulence in the mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Proteomic analysis of the cell wall of the vps51Δ/Δ mutant revealed increased levels of the Crh11 and Utr2 transglycosylases, which are targets of the calcineurin signaling pathway. The transcript levels of the calcineurin pathway members CHR11, UTR2, CRZ1, CNA1, and CNA2 were elevated in the vps15Δ/Δ and vps51Δ/Δ mutants. Furthermore, these strains were highly sensitive to the calcineurin-specific inhibitor FK506. Also, deletion of CHR11 and UTR2 further increased the stress susceptibility of these mutants. In contrast, overexpression of CRH11 and UTR2 partially rescued their defects in stress resistance, but not host cell interactions. Therefore, intact retrograde trafficking in C. albicans is essential for stress resistance, host cell interactions, and virulence. Aberrant retrograde trafficking stimulates the calcineurin signaling pathway, leading to the increased expression of Chr11 and Utr2, which enables C. albicans to withstand environmental stress. PMID:24363364

  14. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  15. Sequential Dysfunction and Progressive Depletion of Candida albicans-Specific CD4 T Cell Response in HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengliang; Fan, Xiuzhen; Auclair, Sarah; Ferguson, Monique; Sun, Jiaren; Soong, Lynn; Hou, Wei; Redfield, Robert R.; Birx, Deborah L.; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Michael, Nelson L.; Hu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Loss of immune control over opportunistic infections can occur at different stages of HIV-1 (HIV) disease, among which mucosal candidiasis caused by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans (C. albicans) is one of the early and common manifestations in HIV-infected human subjects. The underlying immunological basis is not well defined. We have previously shown that compared to cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 cells, C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells are highly permissive to HIV in vitro. Here, based on an antiretroviral treatment (ART) naïve HIV infection cohort (RV21), we investigated longitudinally the impact of HIV on C. albicans- and CMV-specific CD4 T-cell immunity in vivo. We found a sequential dysfunction and preferential depletion for C. albicans-specific CD4 T cell response during progressive HIV infection. Compared to Th1 (IFN-γ, MIP-1β) functional subsets, the Th17 functional subsets (IL-17, IL-22) of C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more permissive to HIV in vitro and impaired earlier in HIV-infected subjects. Infection history analysis showed that C. albicans-specific CD4 T cells were more susceptible to HIV in vivo, harboring modestly but significantly higher levels of HIV DNA, than CMV-specific CD4 T cells. Longitudinal analysis of HIV-infected individuals with ongoing CD4 depletion demonstrated that C. albicans-specific CD4 T-cell response was preferentially and progressively depleted. Taken together, these data suggest a potential mechanism for earlier loss of immune control over mucosal candidiasis in HIV-infected patients and provide new insights into pathogen-specific immune failure in AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:27280548

  16. Mechanisms of Contact-Mediated Killing of Yeast Cells on Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Davide; Krans, Travis; Santo, Christophe Espírito; Elowsky, Christian G.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cell's genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC2(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated. PMID:21097600

  17. Binding of Candida albicans to Human CEACAM1 and CEACAM6 Modulates the Inflammatory Response of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mario M.; Schäfer, Miriam R.; Clauder, Ann-Katrin; Feer, Sabina; Heyl, Kerstin A.; Stock, Magdalena; Klassert, Tilman E.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Singer, Bernhard B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa, including the gastrointestinal tract, as a commensal. In immunocompromised patients, C. albicans can breach the intestinal epithelial barrier and cause fatal invasive infections. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1; CD66a), CEACAM5 (CEA), and CEACAM6 (CD66c) are immunomodulatory receptors expressed on human mucosa and are recruited by bacterial and viral pathogens. Here we show for the first time that a fungal pathogen (i.e., C. albicans) also binds directly to the extracellular domain of human CEACAM1, CEACAM3, CEACAM5, and CEACAM6. Binding was specific for human CEACAMs and mediated by the N-terminal IgV-like domain. In enterocytic C2BBe1 cells, C. albicans caused a transient tyrosine phosphorylation of CEACAM1 and induced higher expression of membrane-bound CEACAM1 and soluble CEACAM6. Lack of the CEACAM1 receptor after short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown abolished CXCL8 (interleukin-8) secretion by C2BBe1 cells in response to C. albicans. In CEACAM1-competent cells, the addition of recombinant soluble CEACAM6 reduced the C. albicans-induced CXCL8 secretion. PMID:28292985

  18. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  19. Resveratrol lacks antifungal activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Collado-González, Mar; Guirao-Abad, José P; Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2012-06-01

    The putative candicidal activity of resveratrol is currently a matter of controversy. Here, the antifungal activity as well as the antioxidant response of resveratrol against Candida albicans, have been tested in a set of strains with a well-established genetic background At the doses usually employed in antifungal tests (10-40 μg/ml), resveratrol has no effect on the exponential growth of the C. albicans CAI.4 strain, a tenfold increase (400 μg/ml) was required in order to record a certain degree of cell killing, which was negligible in comparison with the strong antifungal effect caused by the addition of amphotericin B (5 μg/ml). An identical pattern was recorded in the prototrophic strains of C. albicans SC5314 and RM-100, whereas the oxidative sensitive trehalose-deficient mutant (tps1/tps1 strain) was totally refractory to the presence of resveratrol. In turn, the serum-induced yeast-to-hypha transition remained unaffected upon addition of different concentrations of resveratrol. Determination of endogenous trehalose and catalase activity, two antioxidant markers in C. albicans; revealed no significant changes in their basal contents induced by resveratrol. Collectively, our results seem to dismiss a main antifungal role as well as the therapeutic application of resveratrol against the infections caused by C. albicans.

  20. Th17 cells confer long term adaptive immunity to oral mucosal Candida albicans infections

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Huppler, Anna R.; Peterson, Alanna C.; Khader, Shabaana A.; McKenna, Kyle C.; Gaffen, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic infection caused by Candida albicans. Despite its prevalence, little is known about C. albicans-specific immunity in the oral mucosa. Vaccines against Candida generate both Th1 and Th17 responses, and considerable evidence implicates IL-17 in immunity to OPC. However, IL-17 is also produced by innate immune cells that are remarkably similar to Th17 cells, expressing the same markers and localizing to similar mucosal sites. To date, the relative contribution(s) of Th1, Th17 and innate IL-17-producing cells in OPC have not been clearly defined. Here, we sought to determine the nature and function of adaptive T cell responses to OPC, using a new recall infection model. Mice subjected to infection and re-challenge with Candida mounted a robust and stable antigen specific IL-17 response in CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells. There was little evidence for Th1 or Th1/Th17 responses. The Th17 response promoted accelerated fungal clearance, and Th17 cells could confer protection in Rag1−/− mice upon adoptive transfer. Surprisingly, CD4 deficiency did not cause OPC, but was instead associated with compensatory IL-17 production by Tc17 and CD4-CD8-CD3+ cells. Therefore, classic CD4+Th17 cells protect from OPC, but can be compensated by other IL-17-producing cells in CD4-deficient hosts. PMID:23250275

  1. Candida albicans Ecm33p Is Important for Normal Cell Wall Architecture and Interactions with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Lopez, Raquel; Park, Hyunsook; Myers, Carter L.; Gil, Concha; Filler, Scott G.

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans ECM33 encodes a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked cell wall protein that is important for cell wall integrity. It is also critical for normal virulence in the mouse model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To identify potential mechanisms through which Ecm33p contributes to virulence, we investigated the interactions of C. albicans ecm33Δ mutants with endothelial cells and the FaDu oral epithelial cell line in vitro. The growth rate of blastospores of strains containing either one or no intact copies of ECM33 was 50% slower than that of strains containing two intact copies of ECM33. However, all strains germinated at the same rate, forming similar-length hyphae on endothelial cells and oral epithelial cells. Strains containing either one or no intact copies of ECM33 had modestly reduced adherence to both types of host cells, and a markedly reduced capacity to invade and damage these cells. Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing C. albicans ECM33 did not adhere to or invade epithelial cells, suggesting that Ecm33p by itself does not act as an adhesin or invasin. Examination of ecm33Δ mutants by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the cell wall of these strains had an abnormally electron-dense outer mannoprotein layer, which may represent a compensatory response to reduced cell wall integrity. The hyphae of these mutants also had aberrant surface localization of the adhesin Als1p. Collectively, these results suggest that Ecm33p is required for normal cell wall architecture as well as normal function and expression of cell surface proteins in C. albicans. PMID:16400176

  2. Highly Dynamic and Specific Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate, Septin, and Cell Wall Integrity Pathway Responses Correlate with Caspofungin Activity against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Badrane, Hassan; Nguyen, M Hong; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2016-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] activates the yeast cell wall integrity pathway. Candida albicans exposure to caspofungin results in the rapid redistribution of PI(4,5)P2 and septins to plasma membrane foci and subsequent fungicidal effects. We studied C. albicans PI(4,5)P2 and septin dynamics and protein kinase C (PKC)-Mkc1 cell wall integrity pathway activation following exposure to caspofungin and other drugs. PI(4,5)P2 and septins were visualized by live imaging of C. albicans cells coexpressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and red fluorescent protein-Cdc10p, respectively. PI(4,5)P2 was also visualized in GFP-PH domain-expressing C. albicans mkc1 mutants. Mkc1p phosphorylation was measured as a marker of PKC-Mkc1 pathway activation. Fungicidal activity was assessed using 20-h time-kill assays. Caspofungin immediately induced PI(4,5)P2 and Cdc10p colocalization to aberrant foci, a process that was highly dynamic over 3 h. PI(4,5)P2 levels increased in a dose-response manner at caspofungin concentrations of ≤4× MIC and progressively decreased at concentrations of ≥8× MIC. Caspofungin exposure resulted in broad-based mother-daughter bud necks and arrested septum-like structures, in which PI(4,5)P2 and Cdc10 colocalized. PKC-Mkc1 pathway activation was maximal within 10 min, peaked in response to caspofungin at 4× MIC, and declined at higher concentrations. The caspofungin-induced PI(4,5)P2 redistribution remained apparent in mkc1 mutants. Caspofungin exerted dose-dependent killing and paradoxical effects at ≤4× and ≥8× MIC, respectively. Fluconazole, amphotericin B, calcofluor white, and H2O2 did not impact the PI(4,5)P2 or Cdc10p distribution like caspofungin did. Caspofungin exerts rapid PI(4,5)P2-septin and PKC-Mkc1 responses that correlate with the extent of C. albicans killing, and the responses are not induced by other antifungal agents. PI(4,5)P2-septin regulation is crucial in early

  3. Effect of salivary secretory IgA on the adhesion of Candida albicans to polystyrene.

    PubMed

    San Millán, R; Elguezabal, N; Regúlez, P; Moragues, M D; Quindós, G; Pontón, J

    2000-09-01

    Attachment of Candida albicans to plastic materials of dental prostheses or to salivary macromolecules adsorbed on their surface is believed to be a critical event in the development of denture stomatitis. In an earlier study, it was shown that adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene, a model system to study the adhesion of C. albicans to plastic materials, can be partially inhibited with an mAb directed against cell wall polysaccharides of C. albicans. In the present study, the role of whole saliva in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene has been investigated, and three mAbs directed against epitopes of cell wall mannoproteins have been used to mimic the inhibitory effect observed with salivary secretory IgA (sIgA) on the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. In the absence of whole saliva, adherence of C. albicans 3153 increased with germination. However, the presence of whole saliva enhanced the adhesion to polystyrene of C. albicans 3153 yeast cells but decreased the adhesion of germinated cells. The enhancement of adhesion of yeast cells to polystyrene mediated by saliva was confirmed with an agerminative mutant of C. albicans 3153. The inhibition of the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 germ tubes to polystyrene was due to the salivary sIgA since sIgA-depleted saliva enhanced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene. The inhibitory effect mediated by sIgA was not related to the inhibition of germination but to the blockage of adhesins expressed on the cell wall surface of the germ tubes. The three mAbs studied reduced the adhesion of C. albicans 3153 to polystyrene at levels equivalent to those for purified sIgA. The highest reduction in the adhesion was obtained with the IgA mAb N3B. The best results were obtained when the three mAbs were combined. The results suggest that whole saliva plays a different role in the adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene depending on the morphological phase of C. albicans. These results may give new insights into the

  4. Yeast cells can access distinct quiescent states.

    PubMed

    Klosinska, Maja M; Crutchfield, Christopher A; Bradley, Patrick H; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Broach, James R

    2011-02-15

    We conducted a phenotypic, transcriptional, metabolic, and genetic analysis of quiescence in yeast induced by starvation of prototrophic cells for one of three essential nutrients (glucose, nitrogen, or phosphate) and compared those results with those obtained with cells growing slowly due to nutrient limitation. These studies address two related questions: (1) Is quiescence a state distinct from any attained during mitotic growth, and (2) does the nature of quiescence differ depending on the means by which it is induced? We found that either limitation or starvation for any of the three nutrients elicits all of the physiological properties associated with quiescence, such as enhanced cell wall integrity and resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, the starvations result in a common transcriptional program, which is in large part a direct extrapolation of the changes that occur during slow growth. In contrast, the metabolic changes that occur upon starvation and the genetic requirements for surviving starvation differ significantly depending on the nutrient for which the cell is starved. The genes needed by cells to survive starvation do not overlap the genes that are induced upon starvation. We conclude that cells do not access a unique and discrete G(0) state, but rather are programmed, when nutrients are scarce, to prepare for a range of possible future stressors. Moreover, these survival strategies are not unique to quiescence, but are engaged by the cell in proportion to nutrient scarcity.

  5. The pathogen Candida albicans hijacks pyroptosis for escape from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James E; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-03-25

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. IMPORTANCE Upon phagocytosis by macrophages, Candida albicans can transition to the hyphal form, which causes macrophage death and enables fungal escape. The current model is that the highly polarized growth of hyphae results in macrophage piercing. This model is challenged by recent

  6. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains.

  7. Candida albicans-induced agglutinin and immunoglobulin E responses in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Winterrowd, G E; Cutler, J E

    1983-01-01

    Mice varied in their ability to make detectable antibody responses to cell surface determinants of Candida albicans depending upon the antigen preparation and the immunization schedule used. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) appeared to be the major class of antibody responsible for the C. albicans-agglutinating activity of the immune sera. Various inbred strains of mice injected with a ribosomal fraction from C. albicans produced a low titer (average, 4 to 8) of yeast cell agglutinins and a higher titer (64 to 512) of IgE antibodies detected by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats. The two kinds of antibodies appeared to be specific for different antigens because the agglutinin, but not IgE, could be removed by absorbing the serum with a polysaccharide from the cell wall of C. albicans, but the polysaccharide did not provoke the PCA reaction. C. albicans-specific IgE antibodies showed cross-reactivity (PCA) with ribosomal antigens from a strain of C. albicans and C. tropicalis, but PCA reactions could not be elicited with similar antigen preparations from other yeast species. IgE responses were also detected in over 20% of the mice infected intravenously or intraperitoneally with live C. albicans. PMID:6190755

  8. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  9. Selective inhibition of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterol synthesis in Candida albicans by terconazole, a new triazole antimycotic.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, D M; Tolman, E L; Tobia, A J; Rosenthale, M E; McGuire, J L; Vanden Bossche, H; Janssen, P A

    1988-03-01

    Terconazole, a new broad spectrum antimycotic triazole derivative, has been shown to have potent activity against Candida albicans in vitro and to be effective in animal models of yeast infections. The present study explored a possible mechanism of anticandidal activity of terconazole. The compound inhibited production of 14 alpha-desmethyl sterols (e.g. ergosterol) in C. albicans at concentrations (IC50 = 3-6 x 10(-9) M) lower than those inhibiting the in-vitro growth of the yeast. There was concomitant accumulation of methylated sterols, (e.g. lanosterol), which are considered detrimental to normal yeast cell membrane function. Terconazole stimulated incorporation of 14C-acetate into triglycerides, but had no other effect on C. albicans lipid metabolism. At concentrations greater than or equal to 10(-6)M terconazole inhibited the oxidation of 14C-acetate into 14CO2 in C. albicans although the mechanism for this effect remains unclear. These data indicate that terconazole is a specific inhibitor of yeast C-14 desmethyl sterol production in C. albicans. Furthermore, terconazole reduced cytochrome P-450 levels in yeast microsomes at concentrations 10,000-fold below those at which it showed effects on rabbit liver microsomes. These data indicate a species specificity for the biochemical actions of terconazole. The C-14 alpha-desmethylase system in yeast cell membranes is cytochrome P-450 associated. Thus, terconazole, was a potent inhibitor of C-14 desmethyl sterol synthesis. This effect could contribute to the anticandidal activity of the drug.

  10. Phenotypic Profiling Reveals that Candida albicans Opaque Cells Represent a Metabolically Specialized Cell State Compared to Default White Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Iuliana V.; Lohse, Matthew B.; Vladu, Adrian V.; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The white-opaque switch is a bistable, epigenetic transition affecting multiple traits in Candida albicans including mating, immunogenicity, and niche specificity. To compare how the two cell states respond to external cues, we examined the fitness, phenotypic switching, and filamentation properties of white cells and opaque cells under 1,440 different conditions at 25°C and 37°C. We demonstrate that white and opaque cells display striking differences in their integration of metabolic and thermal cues, so that the two states exhibit optimal fitness under distinct conditions. White cells were fitter than opaque cells under a wide range of environmental conditions, including growth at various pHs and in the presence of chemical stresses or antifungal drugs. This difference was exacerbated at 37°C, consistent with white cells being the default state of C. albicans in the mammalian host. In contrast, opaque cells showed greater fitness than white cells under select nutritional conditions, including growth on diverse peptides at 25°C. We further demonstrate that filamentation is significantly rewired between the two states, with white and opaque cells undergoing filamentous growth in response to distinct external cues. Genetic analysis was used to identify signaling pathways impacting the white-opaque transition both in vitro and in a murine model of commensal colonization, and three sugar sensing pathways are revealed as regulators of the switch. Together, these findings establish that white and opaque cells are programmed for differential integration of metabolic and thermal cues and that opaque cells represent a more metabolically specialized cell state than the default white state. PMID:27879329

  11. Candida albicans ISW2 Regulates Chlamydospore Suspensor Cell Formation and Virulence In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Disseminated Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of chlamydospores by Candida albicans was an established medical diagnostic test to confirm candidiasis before the molecular era. However, the functional role and pathological relevance of this in vitro morphological transition to pathogenesis in vivo remain unclear. We compared the physical properties of in vitro-induced chlamydospores with those of large C. albicans cells purified by density gradient centrifugation from Candida-infected mouse kidneys. The morphological and physical properties of these cells in kidneys of mice infected intravenously with wild type C. albicans confirmed that chlamydospores can form in infected kidneys. A previously reported chlamydospore-null Δisw2/Δisw2 mutant was used to investigate its role in virulence and chlamydospore induction. Virulence of the Δisw2/Δisw2 mutant strain was reduced 3.4-fold compared to wild type C. albicans or the ISW2 reconstituted strain. Altered host inflammatory reactions to the null mutant further indicate that ISW2 is a virulence factor in C. albicans. ISW2 deletion abolished chlamydospore formation within infected mouse kidneys, whereas the reconstituted strain restored chlamydospore formation in kidneys. Under chlamydospore inducing conditions in vitro, deletion of ISW2 significantly delayed chlamydospore formation, and those late induced chlamydospores lacked associated suspensor cells while attaching laterally to hyphae via novel spore-hypha septa. Our findings establish the induction of chlamydospores by C. albicans during mouse kidney colonization. Our results indicate that ISW2 is not strictly required for chlamydospores formation but is necessary for suspensor cell formation. The importance of ISW2 in chlamydospore morphogenesis and virulence may lead to additional insights into morphological differentiation and pathogenesis of C. albicans in the host microenvironment. PMID:27727302

  12. High-throughput screening of improved protease inhibitors using a yeast cell surface display system and a yeast cell chip.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Yoshino, Yuichi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Tsunetomo, Keiji; Koyo, Hirotaka; Kamiya, Shinji; Kawata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Protease-targeted inhibitors have been promising pharmaceuticals. Here, we combined a yeast cell surface display system with a yeast cell chip for the high-throughput screening of protease inhibitors, and succeeded in improving the activity of a protease inhibitor.

  13. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  14. Ubiquitin-like epitopes associated with Candida albicans cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, P; Lopez-Ribot, J L; Gozalbo, D; Cervera, A; Martinez, J P; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning of a Candida albicans polyubiquitin gene and the presence of ubiquitin in the cell wall of this fungus. The polyubiquitin cDNA clone was isolated because of its reactivity with antibodies generated against the candidal 37-kDa laminin-binding protein. In the present study, we have further investigated the relationship between ubiquitin and cell wall components displaying receptor-like activities, including the 37-kDa laminin receptor, the 58-kDa fibrinogen-binding mannoprotein, and the candidal C3d receptor. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and immunoblot experiments with antibodies against ubiquitin and the individually purified receptor-like molecules confirmed that these cell surface components are ubiquitinated. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polyclonal antisera to each receptor reacted with ubiquitin, thus demonstrating that the purified receptor preparations used as immunogens contained ubiquitin-like epitopes. It is proposed that ubiquitin may play a role in modulating the activity of these receptors and in the interaction of C. albicans cells with host structures. PMID:8926122

  15. Assembly of the Yeast Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Enrico; Farkas, Vladimir; Kosík, Ondrej; Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier; McPhie, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires mechanisms by which a preexisting linkage is broken for each new one made, to allow for the absence of free energy sources outside the plasma membrane. Previous work showed that Crh1p and Crh2p, putative transglycosylases, are required for the linkage of chitin to β(1–3)glucose branches of β(1–6)glucan in the cell wall of budding yeast. To explore the linking reaction in vivo and in vitro, we used fluorescent sulforhodamine-linked laminari-oligosaccharides as artificial chitin acceptors. In vivo, fluorescence was detected in bud scars and at a lower level in the cell contour, both being dependent on the CRH genes. The linking reaction was also shown in digitonin-permeabilized cells, with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as the substrate for nascent chitin production. Both the nucleotide and the Crh proteins were required here. A gas1 mutant that overexpresses Crh1p showed very high fluorescence both in intact and permeabilized cells. In the latter, fluorescence was still incorporated in patches in the absence of UDP-GlcNAc. Isolated cell walls of this strain, when incubated with sulforhodamine-oligosaccharide, also showed Crhp-dependent fluorescence in patches, which were identified as bud scars. In all three systems, binding of the fluorescent material to chitin was verified by chitinase digestion. Moreover, the cell wall reaction was inhibited by chitooligosaccharides. These results demonstrate that the Crh proteins act by transferring chitin chains to β(1–6)glucan, with a newly observed high activity in the bud scar. The importance of transglycosylation for cell wall assembly is thus firmly established. PMID:18694928

  16. The Pathogen Candida albicans Hijacks Pyroptosis for Escape from Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. PMID:24667705

  17. Exploring ecological modelling to investigate factors governing the colonization success in nosocomial environment of Candida albicans and other pathogenic yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Corte, Laura; Roscini, Luca; Colabella, Claudia; Tascini, Carlo; Leonildi, Alessandro; Sozio, Emanuela; Menichetti, Francesco; Merelli, Maria; Scarparo, Claudio; Meyer, Wieland; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Bassetti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Two hundred seventy seven strains from eleven opportunistic species of the genus Candida, isolated from two Italian hospitals, were identified and analyzed for their ability to form biofilm in laboratory conditions. The majority of Candida albicans strains formed biofilm while among the NCAC species there were different level of biofilm forming ability, in accordance with the current literature. The relation between the variables considered, i.e. the departments and the hospitals or the species and their ability to form biofilm, was tested with the assessment of the probability associated to each combination. Species and biofilm forming ability appeared to be distributed almost randomly, although some combinations suggest a potential preference of some species or of biofilm forming strains for specific wards. On the contrary, the relation between biofilm formation and species isolation frequency was highly significant (R2 around 0.98). Interestingly, the regression analyses carried out on the data of the two hospitals separately were rather different and the analysis on the data merged together gave a much lower correlation. These findings suggest that, harsh environments shape the composition of microbial species significantly and that each environment should be considered per se to avoid less significant statistical treatments. PMID:27246511

  18. Acid production by oral strains of Candida albicans and lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Klinke, T; Kneist, S; de Soet, J J; Kuhlisch, E; Mauersberger, S; Forster, A; Klimm, W

    2009-01-01

    Both Candida albicans and lactobacilli are common colonizers of carious lesions in children and adolescents. The purpose of this study is to compare the velocity of acid production between C. albicans and several Lactobacillus species at different pH levels and concentrations of glucose. Washed, pure resting-cell suspensions were obtained by culturing a total of 28 oral isolates comprising the species C. albicans, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus paracasei paracasei, Lactobacillus paracasei tolerans and Lactobacillus delbrueckii lactis. Acid production from glucose was determined at a constant pH of 7.0, 5.5, 5.0 and 4.0 by repeated titrations with NaOH in an automated pH-stat system. Acid formation rates of yeast and lactobacilli proved to be similar at both neutral and low pH, while in a moderately acidic environment C. albicans produced less acid than the lactobacilli. Ion chromatographic analysis of the cell-free medium after titration revealed pyruvate to be the predominant organic acid anion secreted by C. albicans. The proportion of organic acids to overall acid production by the yeast was below 10% at neutral conditions, in contrast to 42-66% at pH 4.0. Compared to lactobacilli, yeast required a concentration of glucose that was about 50 times higher to allow acid production at half the maximum speed. Considering the clinical data in the literature about the frequency and proportions of microorganisms present in early childhood caries lesions, the contribution of oral lactobacilli as well as C. albicans to overall microbial acid formation appears to be important.

  19. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  20. Uniform Yeast Cell Assembly Based on Microfluidic Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong; Marquez, Samantha M.

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel microgel templated Yeastosome (Yeast- Celloidosome ) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-gel interfaces. To organize living cells onto the surface of the gel particles, strong positive charges were first introduced via LbL (layer by layer) polyelectrolyte decoration on monodisperse agarose microgel templates fabricated with a microfluidic flow focusing device. Native yeasts, bearing negative surface charges can then be driven electrostatically to form a monolayer shell around the gel core. Surface coverage/packing density of the yeast biofilm on varying microgel-to-yeast size ratio assemblies is evaluated with optical microscopy. Mechanical properties of the corresponding shells are characterized with buckling or collapse behavior during drying-hydrating cycle. We demonstrate the capability to fabricate narrow size distribution Yeastosome with a soft hydrogel core. The combination of microfluidic fabrication with cell assembly offers excellent control over inner core properties and could enable further hierarchy bio-structures.

  1. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  2. β-1,2-Mannosyltransferases 1 and 3 Participate in Yeast and Hyphae O- and N-Linked Mannosylation and Alter Candida albicans Fitness During Infection.

    PubMed

    Courjol, Flavie; Jouault, Thierry; Mille, Céline; Hall, Rebecca; Maes, Emmanuel; Sendid, Boualem; Mallet, Jean Maurice; Guerardel, Yann; Gow, Neil A R; Poulain, Daniel; Fradin, Chantal

    2015-09-01

    β-1,2-mannosylation of Candida albicans glycoconjugates has been investigated through the identification of enzymes involved in the addition of β-1,2-oligomannosides (β-Mans) to phosphopeptidomannan and phospholipomannan. β-1,2-oligomannosides are supposed to have virulence properties that they confer to these glycoconjugates. In a previous study, we showed that cell wall mannoproteins (CWMPs) harbor β-Mans in their O-mannosides; therefore, we analyzed their biosynthesis and impact on virulence. In this study, we demonstrate that O-mannans are heterogeneous and that α-mannosylated O-mannosides, which are biosynthesized by Mnt1 and Mnt2 α-1,2-mannosyltransferases, can be modified with β-Mans but only at the nonreducing end of α-1,2-mannotriose. β-1,2-mannosylation of this O-mannotriose depends on growth conditions, and it involves 2 β-1,2-mannosyltransferases, Bmt1 and Bmt3. These Bmts are essential for β-1,2-mannosylation of CWMPs and expression of β-Mans on germ tubes. A bmt1Δ mutant and a mutant expressing no β-Mans unexpectedly disseminated more in BALB/c mice, whereas they had neither attenuated nor enhanced virulence in C57BL/6 mice. In galectin (Gal)3 knockout mice, the reference strain was more virulent than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the β-Mans innate receptor Gal3 is involved in C. albicans fitness during infection.

  3. CdTe/CdS-MPA quantum dots as fluorescent probes to label yeast cells: synthesis, characterization and conjugation with Concanavalin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka T.; Santos, Camila C.; Benetti, Endi; Tenório, Denise P. L. A.; Cabral Filho, Paulo E.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S.; Prates, Renato A.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2012-03-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent human opportunistic pathogenic fungus and one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. In fact, diagnosis of invasive candidiasis presents unique problems. The aim of this work was to evaluate, by fluorescence image analysis, cellular labeling of C. albicans with CdTe/CdS quantum dots conjugated or not to concanavalin A (ConA). Yeast cells were incubated with CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QD) stabilized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) (emission peak at 530 nm) for 1 hour. In the overall study we observed no morphological alterations. The fluorescence microscopic analysis of the yeast cells showed that the non-functionalized QDs do not label C. albicans cells, while for the QD conjugated to ConA the cells showed a fluorescence profile indicating that the membrane was preferentially marked. This profile was expected since Concanavalin A is a protein that binds specifically to terminal carbohydrate residues at the membrane cell surface. The results suggest that the QD-labeled Candida cells represent a promising tool to open new possibilities for a precise evaluation of fungal infections in pathological conditions.

  4. Candida albicans VPS11 is required for vacuole biogenesis and germ tube formation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Glen E; Cashmore, Annette; Sturtevant, Joy

    2003-06-01

    The Candida albicans vacuole has previously been observed to undergo rapid expansion during the emergence of a germ tube from a yeast cell, to occupy the majority of the parent yeast cell. Furthermore, the yeast-to-hypha switch has been implicated in the virulence of this organism. The class C vps (vacuolar protein sorting) mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are defective in multiple protein delivery pathways to the vacuole and prevacuole compartment. In this study C. albicans homologues of the S. cerevisiae class C VPS genes have been identified. Deletion of a C. albicans VPS11 homologue resulted in a number of phenotypes that closely resemble those of the class C vps mutants of S. cerevisiae, including the absence of a vacuolar compartment. The C. albicans vps11Delta mutant also had much-reduced secreted lipase and aspartyl protease activities. Furthermore, vps11Delta strains were defective in yeast-hypha morphogenesis. Upon serum induction of filamentous growth, mutants showed delayed emergence of germ tubes, had a reduced apical extension rate compared to those of control strains, and were unable to form mature hyphae. These results suggest that Vps11p-mediated trafficking steps are necessary to support the rapid emergence and extension of the germ tube from the parent yeast cell.

  5. Candida albicans Induces Metabolic Reprogramming in Human NK Cells and Responds to Perforin with a Zinc Depletion Response.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Daniela; Voigt, Jessica; Bouzani, Maria; Löffler, Jürgen; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Martin, Ronny; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK) cells are directly involved in the response to fungal infections. Perforin has been identified as the major effector molecule acting against many fungal pathogens. While several studies have shown that perforin mediated fungicidal effects can contribute to fungal clearance, neither the activation of NK cells by fungal pathogens nor the effects of perforin on fungal cells are well-understood. In a dual approach, we have studied the global gene expression pattern of primary and cytokine activated NK cells after co-incubation with Candida albicans and the transcriptomic adaptation of C. albicans to perforin exposure. NK cells responded to the fungal pathogen with an up-regulation of genes involved in immune signaling and release of cytokines. Furthermore, we observed a pronounced increase of genes involved in glycolysis and glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose impaired C. albicans induced NK cell activation. This strongly indicates that metabolic adaptation is a major part of the NK cell response to C. albicans infections. In the fungal pathogen, perforin induced a strong up-regulation of several fungal genes involved in the zinc depletion response, such as PRA1 and ZRT1. These data suggest that fungal zinc homeostasis is linked to the reaction to perforin secreted by NK cells. However, deletion mutants in PRA1 and ZRT1 did not show altered susceptibility to perforin.

  6. Candida albicans Induces Metabolic Reprogramming in Human NK Cells and Responds to Perforin with a Zinc Depletion Response

    PubMed Central

    Hellwig, Daniela; Voigt, Jessica; Bouzani, Maria; Löffler, Jürgen; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Martin, Ronny; Kurzai, Oliver; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK) cells are directly involved in the response to fungal infections. Perforin has been identified as the major effector molecule acting against many fungal pathogens. While several studies have shown that perforin mediated fungicidal effects can contribute to fungal clearance, neither the activation of NK cells by fungal pathogens nor the effects of perforin on fungal cells are well-understood. In a dual approach, we have studied the global gene expression pattern of primary and cytokine activated NK cells after co-incubation with Candida albicans and the transcriptomic adaptation of C. albicans to perforin exposure. NK cells responded to the fungal pathogen with an up-regulation of genes involved in immune signaling and release of cytokines. Furthermore, we observed a pronounced increase of genes involved in glycolysis and glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose impaired C. albicans induced NK cell activation. This strongly indicates that metabolic adaptation is a major part of the NK cell response to C. albicans infections. In the fungal pathogen, perforin induced a strong up-regulation of several fungal genes involved in the zinc depletion response, such as PRA1 and ZRT1. These data suggest that fungal zinc homeostasis is linked to the reaction to perforin secreted by NK cells. However, deletion mutants in PRA1 and ZRT1 did not show altered susceptibility to perforin. PMID:27242763

  7. Arachidonic acid affects biofilm formation and PGE2 level in Candida albicans and non-albicans species in presence of subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole and terbinafine.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Ali, Shakir; Shukla, Praveen K

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans utilizes arachidonic acid (AA) released during the course of infection (Candidiasis) from phospholipids of infected host cell membranes and synthesizes extracellular prostaglandin(s) which play an important role in hyphae formation and host cell damage. C. albicans biofilms secrete significantly more prostaglandin(s) and evidence suggests that Candida biofilms have dramatically reduced susceptibility to majority of antifungal drugs. AA influences the saturation level of lipids and fluidity of yeast cell membranes. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AA alone or in combination with antifungal agents on biofilm formation and production of prostaglandin (PGE2) in C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. albicans amphotericin B resistant strain (AmBR). Maximum biofilm formation was found to be in the case of C. albicans compared to C. non-albicans species. However, among the non-albicans species C. tropicalis exhibited highest biofilm formation. Treatment with AA in combination with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole and terbinafine separately exhibited significant (p<0.05) reduction in biofilm formation against C. glabrata, C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis and AmBR as compared to their individual effect. Further, these two antifungal agents in combination with AA caused an increase in production of prostaglandin from fungal cell itself which was significant (p<0.05) in case of all the strains tested.

  8. Gold Nanoparticle-Photosensitizer Conjugate Based Photodynamic Inactivation of Biofilm Producing Cells: Potential for Treatment of C. albicans Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Mohd. Asif; Tufail, Saba; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Owais, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been found to be effective in inhibiting biofilm producing organisms. We investigated the photodynamic effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated photosensitizers against Candida albicans biofilm. We also examined the photodynamic efficacy of photosensitizer (PS) conjugated GNPs (GNP-PS) to treat skin and oral C. albicans infection in BALB/c mice. Methods The biomimetically synthesized GNPs were conjugated to photosensitizers viz. methylene blue (MB) or toluidine blue O (TB). The conjugation of PSs with GNPs was characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugates against C. albicans biofilm was demonstrated by XTT assay and microscopic studies. The therapeutic efficacy of the combination of the GNP conjugates against cutaneous C. albicans infection was examined in mouse model by enumerating residual fungal burden and histopathological studies. Results The GNP-PS conjugate based PDT was found to effectively kill both C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilm populating hyphal forms. The mixture of GNPs conjugated to two different PSs significantly depleted the hyphal C. albicans burden against superficial skin and oral C. albicans infection in mice. Conclusion The GNP-PS conjugate combination exhibits synergism in photodynamic inactivation of C. albicans. The GNP conjugate based PDT can be employed effectively in treatment of cutaneous C. albicans infections in model animals. The antibiofilm potential of PDT therapy can also be exploited in depletion of C. albicans on medical appliances such as implants and catheters etc. PMID:26148012

  9. Hyphal formation of Candida albicans is controlled by electron transfer system

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Toshihiko . E-mail: twatanab@tohoku-pharm.ac.jp; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2006-09-15

    Most Candida albicans cells cultured in RPMI1640 medium at 37 deg. C grow in hyphal form in aerobic conditions, but they grow in yeast form in anaerobic conditions. The hyphal growth of C. albicans was inhibited in glucose-deficient conditions. Malonic acid, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, enhanced the yeast proliferation of C. albicans, indicating that the hyphal-formation signal was derived from the glycolysis system and the signal was transmitted to the electron transfer system via the citric acid cycle. Thenoyl trifluoro acetone (TTFA), an inhibitor of the signal transmission between complex II and Co Q, significantly inhibited the hyphal growth of C. albicans. Antimycin, KCN, and oligomycin, inhibitors of complex III, IV, and V, respectively, did not inhibit the hyphal growth of C. albicans. The production of mRNAs for the hyphal formation signal was completely inhibited in anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the electron transfer system functions upstream of the RAS1 signal pathway and activates the expression of the hyphal formation signal. Since the electron transfer system is inactivated in anaerobic conditions, C. albicans grew in yeast form in this condition.

  10. Electron Microscopy of Young Candida albicans Chlamydospores

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sara E.; Spurlock, Ben O.; Michaels, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    One- to three-day-old cultures of Candida albicans bearing chlamydospores were grown and harvested by a special technique, free of agar, and prepared for ultramicrotomy and electron microscopy. These young chlamydospores exhibited a subcellular structure similar to that of the yeast phase, e.g., cytoplasmic membrane, ribosomes, and mitochondria. Other structural characteristics unique to chlamydospores were a very thick, layered cell wall, the outer layer of which was continuous with the outer layer of the suspensor cell wall and was covered by hair-like projections; membrane bound organelles; and large lipoid inclusions. Only young chlamydospores less than 3 to 4 days old exhibited these ultrastructural characteristics. Images PMID:4368664

  11. Transformations of inorganic mercury by Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yannai, S.; Berdicevsky, I.; Duek, L. )

    1991-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans were incubated with 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 {mu}g of Hg (as HgCl{sub 2}) per ml of Nelson's medium in the presence of trace amounts of oxygen at 28{degree}C for 12 days. Two control media were used, one without added Hg and one without yeast inoculum. Yeast cell growth was estimated after 1, 2, 3, and 8 days of incubation. The contents of organomercury in the system and of elemental mercury released from the media and collected in traps were determined at the end of the experiments. The results were as follows: (1) C. albicans was the more mercury-resistant species, but both yeast species failed to grown in the media containing 0.75 {mu}g of Hg per ml.; (2) The amounts of organomercury produced by the two species were proportional to the amount of HgCl{sub 2} added to the medium. In all cases C. albicans produced considerably larger amounts of methylmercury than S. cerevisiae; (3) The amounts of elemental Hg produced were inversely proportional to the HgCl{sub 2} level added in the case of S. cerevisiae but were all similar in the case of C. albicans;and (4) Neither organomercury nor elemental Hg was produced in any of the control media.

  12. Stabilization and encapsulation of photosensitive resveratrol within yeast cell.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guorong; Rao, Liqun; Yu, Huazhong; Xiang, Hua; Yang, Hua; Ji, Runa

    2008-02-12

    The photosensitive resveratrol was successfully encapsulated in yeast cells for the first time, as characterized by FT-IR spectra, fluorescence and confocal micrographs of the yeast cells, resveratrol and microcapsules. The release characteristic of the obtained yeast-encapsulated resveratrol in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated, and its storage stability as a powder was investigated at 25 degrees C/75% relative humidity (RH), 25 degrees C/90% RH and 60 degrees C under the laboratory fluorescent lighting conditions (ca. 300 lx) or in the dark. Also, the scavenging capacity of yeast-encapsulated resveratrol on DPPH radical was compared with that of non-encapsulated resveratrol. It could be demonstrated clearly that no chemical changes occurred during the encapsulation. Besides, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity increased after the encapsulation. In addition, the yeast-encapsulated resveratrol exhibited good stability, and its bioavailability was enhanced as a result of increased solubility of resveratrol and sustained releasing.

  13. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production.

  14. Yeast cell-based analysis of human lactate dehydrogenase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Lulu Ahmed; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Gao, Xiao-Dong; Nakanishi, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    Human lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) has attracted attention as a potential target for cancer therapy and contraception. In this study, we reconstituted human lactic acid fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with the goal of constructing a yeast cell-based LDH assay system. pdc null mutant yeast (mutated in the endogenous pyruvate decarboxylase genes) are unable to perform alcoholic fermentation; when grown in the presence of an electron transport chain inhibitor, pdc null strains exhibit a growth defect. We found that introduction of the human gene encoding LDHA complemented the pdc growth defect; this complementation depended on LDHA catalytic activity. Similarly, introduction of the human LDHC complemented the pdc growth defect, even though LDHC did not generate lactate at the levels seen with LDHA. In contrast, the human LDHB did not complement the yeast pdc null mutant, although LDHB did generate lactate in yeast cells. Expression of LDHB as a red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusion yielded blebs in yeast, whereas LDHA-RFP and LDHC-RFP fusion proteins exhibited cytosolic distribution. Thus, LDHB exhibits several unique features when expressed in yeast cells. Because yeast cells are amenable to genetic analysis and cell-based high-throughput screening, our pdc/LDH strains are expected to be of use for versatile analyses of human LDH.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum alpha-glycosidases of Candida albicans are required for N glycosylation, cell wall integrity, and normal host-fungus interaction.

    PubMed

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Bates, Steven; Netea, Mihai G; Díaz-Jiménez, Diana F; López-Romero, Everardo; Zinker, Samuel; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Brown, Alistair J P; Odds, Frank C; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Gow, Neil A R

    2007-12-01

    The cell surface of Candida albicans is enriched in highly glycosylated mannoproteins that are involved in the interaction with the host tissues. N glycosylation is a posttranslational modification that is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) N-glycan is processed by alpha-glucosidases I and II and alpha1,2-mannosidase to generate Man(8)GlcNAc(2). This N-oligosaccharide is then elaborated in the Golgi to form N-glycans with highly branched outer chains rich in mannose. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CWH41, ROT2, and MNS1 encode for alpha-glucosidase I, alpha-glucosidase II catalytic subunit, and alpha1,2-mannosidase, respectively. We disrupted the C. albicans CWH41, ROT2, and MNS1 homologs to determine the importance of N-oligosaccharide processing on the N-glycan outer-chain elongation and the host-fungus interaction. Yeast cells of Cacwh41Delta, Carot2Delta, and Camns1Delta null mutants tended to aggregate, displayed reduced growth rates, had a lower content of cell wall phosphomannan and other changes in cell wall composition, underglycosylated beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase, and had a constitutively activated PKC-Mkc1 cell wall integrity pathway. They were also attenuated in virulence in a murine model of systemic infection and stimulated an altered pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine profile from human monocytes. Therefore, N-oligosaccharide processing by ER glycosidases is required for cell wall integrity and for host-fungus interactions.

  16. The actin-related protein Sac1 is required for morphogenesis and cell wall integrity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Yu, Qilin; Jia, Chang; Wang, Yuzhou; Xiao, Chenpeng; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Wang, Lei; Li, Mingchun

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a common pathogenic fungus and has aroused widespread attention recently. Actin cytoskeleton, an important player in polarized growth, protein secretion and organization of cell shape, displays irreplaceable role in hyphal development and cell integrity. In this study, we demonstrated a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sac1, in C. albicans. It is a potential PIP phosphatase with Sac domain which is related to actin organization, hyphal development, biofilm formation and cell wall integrity. Deletion of SAC1 did not lead to insitiol-auxotroph phenotype in C. albicans, but this gene rescued the growth defect of S. cerevisiae sac1Δ in the insitiol-free medium. Hyphal induction further revealed the deficiency of sac1Δ/Δ in hyphal development and biofilm formation. Fluorescence observation and real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis suggested both actin and the hyphal cell wall protein Hwp1 were overexpressed and mislocated in this mutant. Furthermore, cell wall integrity (CWI) was largely affected by deletion of SAC1, due to the hypersensitivity to cell wall stress, changed content and distribution of chitin in the mutant. As a result, the virulence of sac1Δ/Δ was seriously attenuated. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Sac1, as a potential PIP phosphatase, is essential for actin organization, hyphal development, CWI and pathogenicity in C. albicans.

  17. Polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly (Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid) and graphene oxide nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory and apoptotic responses in Candida albicans-infected vaginal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R Doug; Johnson, Shemedia J; Danielsen, Zhixia Yan; Lim, Jin-Hee; Mudalige, Thilak; Linder, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Mucous-penetrating nanoparticles consisting of poly lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) could improve targeting of microbicidal drugs for sexually transmitted diseases by intravaginal inoculation. Nanoparticles can induce inflammatory responses, which may exacerbate the inflammation that occurs in the vaginal tracts of women with yeast infections. This study evaluated the effects of these drug-delivery nanoparticles on VK2(E6/E7) vaginal epithelial cell proinflammatory responses to Candida albicans yeast infections. Vaginal epithelial cell monolayers were infected with C. albicans and exposed to 100 μg/ml 49.5 nm PLGA-PEG nanospheres or 20 μg/ml 1.1 x 500 nm PEG-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PEG) sheets. The cells were assessed for changes in mRNA and protein expression of inflammation-related genes by RT-qPCR and physiological markers of cell stress using high content analysis and flow cytometry. C. albicans exposure suppressed apoptotic gene expression, but induced oxidative stress in the cells. The nanomaterials induced cytotoxicity and programmed cell death responses alone and with C. albicans. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles induced mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes and induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, increased BAX/BCL2 ratios, and chromatin condensation indicative of apoptosis. They also induced autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and DNA damage. They caused the cells to excrete inflammatory recruitment molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), interleukin-1α (IL1A), interleukin-1β (IL1B), calprotectin (S100A8), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). GO-PEG nanoparticles induced expression of necrosis-related genes and cytotoxicity. They reduced autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic gene expression responses. The results show that stealth nanoparticle drug-delivery vehicles may cause intracellular damage to vaginal epithelial cells by several mechanisms and that their use

  18. Polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly (Lactic Acid-co-Glycolic Acid) and graphene oxide nanoparticles induce pro-inflammatory and apoptotic responses in Candida albicans-infected vaginal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Shemedia J.; Danielsen, Zhixia Yan; Lim, Jin-Hee; Mudalige, Thilak; Linder, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Mucous-penetrating nanoparticles consisting of poly lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) could improve targeting of microbicidal drugs for sexually transmitted diseases by intravaginal inoculation. Nanoparticles can induce inflammatory responses, which may exacerbate the inflammation that occurs in the vaginal tracts of women with yeast infections. This study evaluated the effects of these drug-delivery nanoparticles on VK2(E6/E7) vaginal epithelial cell proinflammatory responses to Candida albicans yeast infections. Vaginal epithelial cell monolayers were infected with C. albicans and exposed to 100 μg/ml 49.5 nm PLGA-PEG nanospheres or 20 μg/ml 1.1 x 500 nm PEG-functionalized graphene oxide (GO-PEG) sheets. The cells were assessed for changes in mRNA and protein expression of inflammation-related genes by RT-qPCR and physiological markers of cell stress using high content analysis and flow cytometry. C. albicans exposure suppressed apoptotic gene expression, but induced oxidative stress in the cells. The nanomaterials induced cytotoxicity and programmed cell death responses alone and with C. albicans. PLGA-PEG nanoparticles induced mRNA expression of apoptosis-related genes and induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, increased BAX/BCL2 ratios, and chromatin condensation indicative of apoptosis. They also induced autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and DNA damage. They caused the cells to excrete inflammatory recruitment molecules chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), interleukin-1α (IL1A), interleukin-1β (IL1B), calprotectin (S100A8), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). GO-PEG nanoparticles induced expression of necrosis-related genes and cytotoxicity. They reduced autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptotic gene expression responses. The results show that stealth nanoparticle drug-delivery vehicles may cause intracellular damage to vaginal epithelial cells by several mechanisms and that their use

  19. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  20. Evidence for the presence of collagenous domains in Candida albicans cell surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sepúlveda, P; Murgui, A; López-Ribot, J L; Casanova, M; Timoneda, J; Martínez, J P

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit polyclonal antibodies (PAbs) directed towards the amino-terminal cysteine-rich 7S domain (PAb anti-7S), the major internal collagenous domain (PAb anti-type IV), and the C-terminal noncollagenous region (PAb anti-NC1) of the type IV collagen molecule were probed by indirect immunofluorescence against Candida albicans blastoconidia and germinated blastoconidia. Most nongerminating cells and mother blastoconidia from which germ tubes originated showed strong fluorescence when PAb anti-7S was used, whereas with PAb anti-type IV, fluorescence was found almost exclusively on the surface of filamentous forms. A patched fluorescent pattern rather than a homogenous confluent fluorescence was observed in all cases. No fluorescent cells were observed with PAb anti-NC1. By Western immunoblotting, PAb anti-type IV cross-reacted primarily with a polypeptide of 37 kDa present in wall extracts obtained from intact cells of both growth forms by treatment with beta-mercaptoethanol, whereas PAb anti-7S recognized a major 58-kDa antigen also present in both extracts, along with some other high-molecular-mass (> 106-kDa) polydisperse species present only in the material released from blastoconidia with beta-mercaptoethanol. No reactive bands were observed when PAb anti-NC1 was used as a probe in Western immunoblotting experiments. The sensitivities or resistances to collagenase digestion of the different polypeptides that cross-reacted with PAbs anti-type IV and anti-7S suggest the existence of cell wall components in C. albicans that contain epitopes that mimic the collagenous domains of the type IV collagen molecule. PMID:7768595

  1. Deletion of a Yci1 Domain Protein of Candida albicans Allows Homothallic Mating in MTL Heterozygous Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Gadoury, Christine; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the ancestral fungus was mating competent and homothallic. However, many mating-competent fungi were initially classified as asexual because their mating capacity was hidden behind layers of regulation. For efficient in vitro mating, the essentially obligate diploid ascomycete pathogen Candida albicans has to change its mating type locus from heterozygous MTLa/α to homozygous MTLa/a or MTLα/α and then undergo an environmentally controlled epigenetic switch to the mating-competent opaque form. These requirements greatly reduce the potential for C. albicans mating. Deletion of the Yci1 domain gene OFR1 bypasses the need for C. albicans cells to change the mating type locus from heterozygous to homozygous prior to switching to the opaque form and mating and allows homothallic mating of MTL heterozygous strains. This bypass is carbon source dependent and does not occur when cells are grown on glucose. Transcriptional profiling of ofr1 mutant cells shows that in addition to regulating cell type and mating circuitry, Ofr1 is needed for proper regulation of histone and chitin biosynthesis gene expression. It appears that OFR1 is a key regulator in C. albicans and functions in part to maintain the cryptic mating phenotype of the pathogen. PMID:27118591

  2. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  3. Rapid and Accurate Identification of Candida albicans Isolates by Use of PNA FISHFlow▿

    PubMed Central

    Trnovsky, Jan; Merz, William; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Wu, Fann; Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Stender, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We developed the simple, rapid (1 h), and accurate PNA FISHFlow method for the identification of Candida albicans. The method exploits unique in solution in situ hybridization conditions under which the cells are simultaneously fixed and hybridized. This method facilitates the accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates using two scoring techniques: flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. PMID:18287325

  4. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains.

  5. Septin Function in Candida albicans MorphogenesisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Warenda, Amy J.; Konopka, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The septin proteins function in the formation of septa, mating projections, and spores in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as in cell division and other processes in animal cells. Candida albicans septins were examined in this study for their roles in morphogenesis of this multimorphic, opportunistically pathogenic fungus, which can range from round budding yeast to elongated hyphae. C. albicans green fluorescent protein labeled septin proteins localized to a tight ring at the bud and pseudohyphae necks and as a more diffuse array in emerging germ tubes of hyphae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the C. albicans homologs of the S. cerevisiae CDC3 and CDC12 septins are essential for viability. In contrast, the C. albicans cdc10Δ and cdc11Δ mutants were viable but displayed conditional defects in cytokinesis, localization of cell wall chitin, and bud morphology. The mutant phenotypes were not identical, however, indicating that these septins carry out distinct functions. The viable septin mutants could be stimulated to undergo hyphal morphogenesis but formed hyphae with abnormal curvature, and they differed from wild type in the selection of sites for subsequent rounds of hyphal formation. The cdc11Δ mutants were also defective for invasive growth when embedded in agar. These results further extend the known roles of the septins by demonstrating that they are essential for the proper morphogenesis of C. albicans during both budding and filamentous growth. PMID:12181342

  6. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779) encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p), a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5), and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus. PMID:21575184

  7. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Ceramide triggers metacaspase-independent mitochondrial cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Reisenbichler, Angela; Heimbucher, Petra; Bauer, Maria A; Braun, Ralf J; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph; Büttner, Sabrina; Eisenberg, Tobias; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2011-11-15

    The activation of ceramide-generating enzymes, the blockade of ceramide degradation, or the addition of ceramide analogues can trigger apoptosis or necrosis in human cancer cells. Moreover, endogenous ceramide plays a decisive role in the killing of neoplastic cells by conventional anticancer chemotherapeutics. Here, we explored the possibility that membrane-permeable C2-ceramide might kill budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells under fermentative conditions, where they exhibit rapid proliferation and a Warburg-like metabolism that is reminiscent of cancer cells. C2-ceramide efficiently induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and this effect was not influenced by deletion of the sole yeast metacaspase. However, C2-ceramide largely failed to cause ROS hypergeneration and cell death upon deletion of the mitochondrial genome. Thus, mitochondrial function is strictly required for C2-ceramide-induced yeast lethality. Accordingly, mitochondria from C2-ceramide-treated yeast cells exhibited major morphological alterations including organelle fragmentation and aggregation. Altogether, our results point to a pivotal role of mitochondria in ceramide-induced yeast cell death.

  9. Ocimum sanctum essential oil inhibits virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amber; Ahmad, Aijaz; Xess, Immaculata; Khan, Luqman A; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2014-03-15

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen which causes disease mainly in immunocompromised patients. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes is essential for virulence of C. albicans and so is the capacity of these cells to undergo transition from yeast to mycelial form of growth. Ocimum sanctum is cultivated worldwide for its essential oil which exhibits medicinal properties. This work evaluates the anti-virulence activity of O. sanctum essential oil (OSEO) on 22 strains of C. albicans (including a standard strain ATCC 90028) isolated from both HIV positive and HIV negative patients. Candida isolates were exposed to sub-MICs of OSEO. In vitro secretion of proteinases and phospholipases was evaluated by plate assay containing BSA and egg yolk respectively. Morphological transition from yeast to filamentous form was monitored microscopically in LSM. For genetic analysis, respective genes associated with morphological transition (HWP1), proteinase (SAP1) and phospholipase (PLB2) were also investigated by Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR). Results were analyzed using Student's t-test. OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and had a significant inhibitory effect on extracellular secretion of proteinases and phospholipases. Expression profile of respective selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by qRT-PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, SAP1 and PLB2 genes in cells treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of OSEO. This work suggests that OSEO inhibits morphological transition in C. albicans and decreases the secretion of hydrolytic enzymes involved in the early stage of infection as well as down regulates the associated genes. Further studies will assess the clinical application of OSEO and its constituents in the treatment of fungal infections.

  10. A novel assay of biofilm antifungal activity reveals that amphotericin B and caspofungin lyse Candida albicans cells in biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiDone, Louis; Oga, Duana; Krysan, Damian J

    2011-08-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to form drug-resistant biofilms is an important factor in its contribution to human disease. Assays to identify and characterize molecules with activity against fungal biofilms are crucial for the development of drugs with improved anti-biofilm activity. Here we report the application of an adenylate kinase (AK)-based cytotoxicity assay of fungal cell lysis to the characterization of agents active against C. albicans biofilms. We have developed three protocols for the AK assay. The first measures AK activity in the supernatants of biofilms treated with antifungal drugs and can be performed in parallel with a standard 2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-caboxanilide-based biofilm susceptibility assay; a second, more sensitive protocol measures the AK activity present within the biofilm matrix; and a third procedure allows the direct visualization of lytic activity toward biofilms formed on catheter material. Amphotericin B and caspofungin, the two most effective anti-biofilm drugs currently used to treat fungal infections, both directly lyse planktonic C. albicans cells in vitro, leading to the release of AK into the culture medium. These studies serve to validate the AK-based lysis assay as a useful addition to the methods for the characterization of antifungal agents active toward biofilms and provide insights into the mode of action of amphotericin B and caspofungin against C. albicans biofilms.

  11. Candida albicans-induced inflammatory response in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Künkel, W; Bulling, L; Fünfstück, C; Knöll, B; Vennewald, I; Hipler, U-C

    2004-06-01

    Candida albicans strains 3153a, ATCC 48867, CBS 2730, DSM 70014, and Vir 13 were cultivated and sterile C. albicans filtrates were produced. The interaction of soluble Candida factors of these infiltrates with human HaCaT keratinocytes was assayed in vitro. The following parameters were analyzed: cell proliferation, protein synthesis, nuclear matrix protein (NMP) 41 release, cytokine release (IL-1beta, soluble IL-2 receptor, IL-6, and IL-8), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cell counts at 1, 12, and 24 h were significantly lower for C. albicans strains CBS 2730 and VIR 13 (P < 0.05). There was no significant change for the remaining strains. Neither the protein synthesis nor the NMP-41 release was significantly affected. IL-6 and IL-8 were stimulated by C. albicans filtrates to different amounts with higher levels in strains of low virulence. There was no effect on the other cytokines. The production of ROS by HaCaT keratinocytes was suppressed. The induction of an inflammatory keratinocyte response by soluble C. albicans factors may play a role among the host-yeast interactions.

  12. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  13. Mode of Action of the Polyene Antibiotic Candicidin: Binding Factors in the Wall of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. M.; Kliger, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    The polyene antibiotic candicidin produces a rapid efflux of K+ ions from a suspension of Candida albicans. Onset of K+ leakage depends on the culture age, stationary-phase yeasts leaking K+ more slowly than exponential-phase yeasts. The time taken for potassium leakage to begin represents the time taken by the antibiotic to cross the cell wall and produce membrane damage. It was shown that there were factors in the cell wall of C. albicans that increased their total binding capacity and their affinity for candicidin during growth. An attempt was made to relate changes in the lipid content of the yeast cell with the increased time taken to produce membrane damage. PMID:773298

  14. A novel role of the ferric reductase Cfl1 in cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and invasion to host cells in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Qian, Kefan; Chen, Yulu; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Iron acquisition is an important factor for pathogen-host interaction and also a significant element for the pathogenicity of this organism. Ferric reductases, which convert ferric iron into ferrous iron, are important components of the high-affinity iron uptake system. Sequence analyses have identified at least 17 putative ferric reductase genes in C. albicans genome. CFL1 was the first ferric reductase identified in C. albicans. However, little is known about its roles in C. albicans physiology and pathogenicity. In this study, we found that disruption of CFL1 led to hypersensitivity to chemical and physical cell wall stresses, activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, abnormal cell wall composition, and enhanced secretion, indicating a defect in CWI in this mutant. Moreover, this mutant showed abnormal mitochondrial activity and morphology, suggesting a link between ferric reductases and mitochondrial function. In addition, this mutant displayed decreased ability of adhesion to both the polystyrene microplates and buccal epithelial cells and invasion of host epithelial cells. These findings revealed a novel role of C. albicans Cfl1 in maintenance of CWI, mitochondrial function, and interaction between this pathogen and the host.

  15. Ash1 Protein, an Asymmetrically Localized Transcriptional Regulator, Controls Filamentous Growth and Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Diane O.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2002-01-01

    In response to a number of distinct environmental conditions, the fungal pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a morphological transition from a round, yeast form to a series of elongated, filamentous forms. This transition is believed to be critical for virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Here we describe the characterization of C. albicans ASH1, a gene that encodes an asymmetrically localized transcriptional regulatory protein involved in this response. We show that C. albicans ash1 mutants are defective in responding to some filament-inducing conditions. We also show that Ash1p is preferentially localized to daughter cell nuclei in the budding-yeast form of C. albicans cell growth and to the hyphal tip cells in growing filaments. Thus, Ash1p “marks” newly formed cells and presumably directs a specialized transcriptional program in these cells. Finally, we show that ASH1 is required for full virulence of C. albicans in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. PMID:12446785

  16. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    PubMed

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  17. Biomimetic Yeast Cell Typing-Application of QCMs.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Karin; Polreichová, Miroslava; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Dickert, Franz L

    2009-01-01

    Artificial antibodies represent a key factor in the generation of sensing systems for the selective detection of bioanalytes of variable sizes. With biomimetic surfaces, the important model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and several of its growth stages may be detected. Quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) with 10 MHz fundamental frequency and coated with polymers imprinted with synchronized yeast cells are presented, which are able to detect duplex cells with high selectivity. Furthermore, a multichannel quartz crystal microbalance (MQCM) was designed and optimized for the measurement in liquids. This one-chip system based on four-electrode geometry allows the simultaneous detection of four analytes and, thus, provides a monitoring system for biotechnology and process control. For further standardization of the method, synthetic stamps containing plastic yeast cells in different growth stages were produced and utilized for imprinting. Mass-sensitive measurements with such MIPs resulted in the same sensor characteristics as obtained for those imprinted with native yeast cells.

  18. Analysis of the Secretomes of Paracoccidioides Mycelia and Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Simone Schneider; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Parente, Juliana Alves; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioides, a complex of several phylogenetic species, is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. The ability of pathogenic fungi to develop a multifaceted response to the wide variety of stressors found in the host environment is important for virulence and pathogenesis. Extracellular proteins represent key mediators of the host-parasite interaction. To analyze the expression profile of the proteins secreted by Paracoccidioides, Pb01 mycelia and yeast cells, we used a proteomics approach combining two-dimensional electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS). From three biological replicates, 356 and 388 spots were detected, in mycelium and yeast cell secretomes, respectively. In this study, 160 non-redundant proteins/isoforms were indentified, including 30 and 24 proteins preferentially secreted in mycelia and yeast cells, respectively. In silico analyses revealed that 65% of the identified proteins/isoforms were secreted primarily via non-conventional pathways. We also investigated the influence of protein export inhibition in the phagocytosis of Paracoccidioides by macrophages. The addition of Brefeldin A to the culture medium significantly decreased the production of secreted proteins by both Paracoccidioides and internalized yeast cells by macrophages. In contrast, the addition of concentrated culture supernatant to the co-cultivation significantly increased the number of internalized yeast cells by macrophages. Importantly, the proteins detected in the fungal secretome were also identified within macrophages. These results indicate that Paracoccidioides extracellular proteins are important for the fungal interaction with the host. PMID:23272246

  19. Biocavity laser spectroscopy of genetically altered yeast cells and isolated yeast mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Copeland, R. Guild; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    We report an analysis of 2 yeast cell mutants using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The two yeast strains differed only by the presence or absence of mitochondrial DNA. Strain 104 is a wild-type (ρ +) strain of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strain 110 was derived from strain 104 by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Removal of mtDNA causes strain 110 to grow as a "petite" (ρ -), named because it forms small colonies (of fewer cells because it grows more slowly) on agar plates supplemented with a variety of different carbon sources. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack the normal respiratory chain complexes I, III, IV, and V. Complex II is preserved because its subunits are encoded by genes located in nuclear DNA. The frequency distributions of the peak shifts produced by wild-type and petite cells and mitochondria show striking differences in the symmetry and patterns of the distributions. Wild-type ρ + cells (104) and mitochondria produced nearly symmetric, Gaussian distributions. The ρ - cells (110) and mitochondria showed striking asymmetry and skew that appeared to follow a Poisson distribution.

  20. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  1. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system. PMID:25590793

  2. Looking into Candida albicans infection, host response, and antifungal strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, a commonly encountered fungal pathogen, causes diseases varying from superficial mucosal complaints to life-threatening systemic disorders. Among the virulence traits of C. albicans, yeast-to-hypha transition is most widely acknowledged. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), and defence against C. albicans infection is provided by an exquisite interplay between the innate and adaptive arms of the host immune system.

  3. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  4. Gamma radiation effects on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Camila Maria de Souza; Martins, Estefânia Mara do Nascimento; de Resende, Maria Aparecida; de Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro

    2011-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission to man can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats. In this study, the gamma radiation effects on yeast of S. schenckii were analyzed with a view of developing a radioattenuated vaccine for veterinary use. The cultures were irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. The reproductive capacity was measured by the ability of cells to form colonies. No colonies could be recovered above 8.0 kGy, using inocula up to 10(7) cells. Nevertheless, yeast cells irradiated with 7.0 kGy already were unable to produce infection in immunosuppressed mice. Evaluation by the FungaLight™ Kit (Invitrogen) indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. At 7.0 kGy, protein synthesis, estimated by the incorporation of [L-(35)S] methionine, continues at levels slightly lower than the controls, but a significant decrease was observed at 9.0 kGy. The DNA of 7.0 kGy irradiated cells, analyzed by electrophoresis in agarose gel, was degraded. Cytoplasmic vacuolation was the main change verified in these cells by transmission electron microscopy. The dose of 7.0 kGy was considered satisfactory for yeast attenuation since irradiated cells were unable to produce infection but retained viability, metabolic activity, and morphology.

  5. The price of independence: cell separation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Santos, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal of cell division is to give rise to two viable independent daughter cells. A tight spatial and temporal regulation between chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensures the viability of the daughter cells. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, commonly known as fission yeast, has become a leading model organism for studying essential and conserved mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell division process. Like many other eukaryotic cells it divides by binary fission and the cleavage furrow undergoes ingression due to the contraction of an actomyosin ring. In contrast to mammalian cells, yeasts as cell-walled organisms, also need to form a division septum made of cell wall material to complete the process of cytokinesis. The division septum is deposited behind the constricting ring and it will constitute the new ends of the daughter cells. Cell separation also involves cell wall degradation and this process should be precisely regulated to avoid cell lysis. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the whole cytokinesis process in fission yeast, from the positioning and assembly of the contractile ring to the final step of cell separation, and the problems generated when these processes are not precise.

  6. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-02

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  7. Singularity in polarization: rewiring yeast cells to make two buds.

    PubMed

    Howell, Audrey S; Savage, Natasha S; Johnson, Sam A; Bose, Indrani; Wagner, Allison W; Zyla, Trevin R; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Goryachev, Andrew B; Lew, Daniel J

    2009-11-13

    For budding yeast to ensure formation of only one bud, cells must polarize toward one, and only one, site. Polarity establishment involves the Rho family GTPase Cdc42, which concentrates at polarization sites via a positive feedback loop. To assess whether singularity is linked to the specific Cdc42 feedback loop, we disabled the yeast cell's endogenous amplification mechanism and synthetically rewired the cells to employ a different positive feedback loop. Rewired cells violated singularity, occasionally making two buds. Even cells that made only one bud sometimes initiated two clusters of Cdc42, but then one cluster became dominant. Mathematical modeling indicated that, given sufficient time, competition between clusters would promote singularity. In rewired cells, competition occurred slowly and sometimes failed to develop a single "winning" cluster before budding. Slowing competition in normal cells also allowed occasional formation of two buds, suggesting that singularity is enforced by rapid competition between Cdc42 clusters.

  8. Nonlinear Dielectric Properties of Yeast Cells Cultured in Different Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawanishi, Gomon; Fukuda, Naoki; Muraji, Masafumi

    The harmonics of the electric current through yeast suspensions, the nonlinear dielectric properties of yeast cells, have particular patterns according to the biological activity of the cells and the measurement of these patterns is a technique for determining the activity of living cells. The concentration of glucose and oxygen in yeast culture medium influences the manifestation of fermentation or respiration of yeast cells. Measurements were made with yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultured aerobically and anaerobically in sufficient glucose concentration, aerobic fermentation and anaerobic fermentation, and aerobically in limited glucose concentration, respiration. The results showed that the harmonics were barely apparent for yeast cells in aerobic fermentation and respiratory; however, cells in the anaerobic fermentation displayed substantial third and fifth harmonics. We can say that environmental condition affects the yeast cells' nonlinear properties, from another viewpoint, the measurements of the nonlinear properties are available to determine the activity of yeast cells adjusted to the conditions of their cultivation.

  9. Functional characterization of the PP2C phosphatase CaPtc2p in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinrong; Zhao, Jingwen; Li, Jing; Zhang, Lilin; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-09-01

    Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C) are monomeric enzymes and their activities require the presence of magnesium or manganese ion. There are seven PP2C-like genes in Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that CaPtc2p is a PP2C phosphatase. Surprisingly, in addition to the cytoplasmic localization, CaPtc2p is partially associated with mitochondria in yeast-form and filamentous cells of C. albicans. Expression of CaPTC2 is developmentally regulated during the serum-induced filamentation. Deletion of CaPTC2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to SDS and azole antifungals, as well as the DNA methylation agent methylmethane sulphonate and the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. Therefore, CaPtc2p might fulfil multiple functions, including the regulation of mitochondrial physiology and checkpoint recovery from DNA damage in C. albicans cells.

  10. Yeast and cancer cells - common principles in lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Natter, Klaus; Kohlwein, Sepp D

    2013-02-01

    One of the paradigms in cancer pathogenesis is the requirement of a cell to undergo transformation from respiration to aerobic glycolysis - the Warburg effect - to become malignant. The demands of a rapidly proliferating cell for carbon metabolites for the synthesis of biomass, energy and redox equivalents, are fundamentally different from the requirements of a differentiated, quiescent cell, but it remains open whether this metabolic switch is a cause or a consequence of malignant transformation. One of the major requirements is the synthesis of lipids for membrane formation to allow for cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and cytokinesis. Enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were indeed found to play a major role in cancer cell proliferation, and most of these enzymes are conserved in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most notably, cancer cell physiology and metabolic fluxes are very similar to those in the fermenting and rapidly proliferating yeast. Both types of cells display highly active pathways for the synthesis of fatty acids and their incorporation into complex lipids, and imbalances in synthesis or turnover of lipids affect growth and viability of both yeast and cancer cells. Thus, understanding lipid metabolism in S. cerevisiae during cell cycle progression and cell proliferation may complement recent efforts to understand the importance and fundamental regulatory mechanisms of these pathways in cancer.

  11. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commensal bacteria, with keratin dispersed in the intercellular spaces. Neutrophils migrate through the oral mucosa and form nests within the biofilm mass. The cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan is exposed during mucosal biofilm growth and is more uniformly present on the surface of biofilm organisms invading the oral mucosa. We conclude that C. albicans forms complex mucosal biofilms consisting of both commensal bacterial flora and host components. These discoveries are important since they can prompt a shift of focus for current research in investigating the role of Candida-bacterial interactions in the pathogenesis of mucosal infections as well as the role of β-glucan mediated signaling in the host response. PMID:19956771

  12. Programmed Cell Death Initiation and Execution in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death (PCD) was initially described in metazoans as a genetically controlled process leading to intracellular breakdown and engulfment by a neighboring cell . This process was distinguished from other forms of cell death like necrosis by maintenance of plasma membrane integrity prior to engulfment and the well-defined genetic system controlling this process. Apoptosis was originally described as a mechanism to reshape tissues during development. Given this context, the assumption was made that this process would not be found in simpler eukaryotes such as budding yeast. Although basic components of the apoptotic pathway were identified in yeast, initial observations suggested that it was devoid of prosurvival and prodeath regulatory proteins identified in mammalian cells. However, as apoptosis became extensively linked to the elimination of damaged cells, key PCD regulatory proteins were identified in yeast that play similar roles in mammals. This review highlights recent discoveries that have permitted information regarding PCD regulation in yeast to now inform experiments in animals. PMID:26272996

  13. Phenotypic characterization of mononuclear cells and class II antigen expression in angular cheilitis infected by Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Jonsson, R

    1989-04-01

    In the present study we characterized the phenotypes of infiltrating mononuclear cells in angular cheilitis lesions to further explore the pathogenesis of this disorder. Frozen sections from lesions infected by Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis utilizing monoclonal antibodies directed to subsets of T-lymphocytes, B-lymphocytes, and macrophages. In addition, the expression of Class II antigens (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR), the interleukin 2- and transferrin-receptors was studied on resident and infiltrating cells. An intense infiltration of T-lymphocytes was accompanied by expression of Class II antigens on the epidermal keratinocytes in lesion infected by Candida albicans. The Staphylococcus aureus infected lesions displayed a diffuse infiltration of T-lymphocytes but virtually no expression of Class II antigen by epidermal keratinocytes. These observations suggest that the cell-mediated arm of the immune system is involved in the inflammatory reaction of lesions infected by Candida albicans. In addition, the present study confirms that epidermal expression of Class II antigens is closely related to the type and magnitude of the infiltrating T-lymphocyte. Finally, these findings indicate that the type of inflammatory reaction in angular cheilitis is primarily dependent on the isolated microorganism, although the clinical pictures of the disorder are virtually identical.

  14. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  15. Effect of Chitosan and Sodium Alginate on the adherence of autochthonous C. Albicans to oral epithelial cells (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Barembaum, Silvina; Virga, Carolina; Bojanich, Alejandra; Cornejo, Lila; Calamari, Silvia; Pontón, José; Dorronsoro, Susana

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Heavy Molecular Weight Chitosan (HMWCh) and Sodium Alginate (NaAl) on fungal adherence. C albicans was identified and isolated from non-stimulated saliva extracted from male and female healthy adults. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for each of the biopolymers. MIC values were 0.25 % (W/V) for HMWCh and 0.10 % (W/V) for NaAl. Fungal cell hydrophobicity was evaluated against xylene in the presence of HMWCh. Statistically significant differences between the control (without HMWCh) and the different HMWCh concentrations in fungal suspension were observed (P< 0.05). The fact that HMWCh and NaAl impaired fungal adherence to buccal epithelial cells (BEC) as compared to control revealed that polymers inhibit Candida albicans adherence to BEC (HMWCh and NaAl: P= 0.00001), NaAl being more effective than HMWCh (P = 0.00001). HMWCh dettached and aggregated C. albicans, including the fungi and BEC in the mesh. NaAl inhibited adherence, aggregated and entrapped the fungi in the mesh, excluding BEC. We may conclude that both biopolymers are effective. However, NaAl is a stronger inhibitor of adherence. Thus, in combination or alone, these biopolymers could be used in the treatment of oral candidosis.

  16. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other. PMID:27077831

  17. A Predictive Model for Yeast Cell Polarization in Pheromone Gradients.

    PubMed

    Muller, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu; Calvez, Vincent; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gonçalves-Sá, Joana; Guo, Chin-Lin; Jiang, Xingyu; Murray, Andrew; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Budding yeast cells exist in two mating types, a and α, which use peptide pheromones to communicate with each other during mating. Mating depends on the ability of cells to polarize up pheromone gradients, but cells also respond to spatially uniform fields of pheromone by polarizing along a single axis. We used quantitative measurements of the response of a cells to α-factor to produce a predictive model of yeast polarization towards a pheromone gradient. We found that cells make a sharp transition between budding cycles and mating induced polarization and that they detect pheromone gradients accurately only over a narrow range of pheromone concentrations corresponding to this transition. We fit all the parameters of the mathematical model by using quantitative data on spontaneous polarization in uniform pheromone concentration. Once these parameters have been computed, and without any further fit, our model quantitatively predicts the yeast cell response to pheromone gradient providing an important step toward understanding how cells communicate with each other.

  18. Spt3 plays opposite roles in filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and is required for C. albicans virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Laprade, Lisa; Boyartchuk, Victor L; Dietrich, William F; Winston, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Spt3 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for the normal transcription of many genes in vivo. Past studies have shown that Spt3 is required for both mating and sporulation, two events that initiate when cells are at G(1)/START. We now show that Spt3 is needed for two other events that begin at G(1)/START, diploid filamentous growth and haploid invasive growth. In addition, Spt3 is required for normal expression of FLO11, a gene required for filamentous growth, although this defect is not the sole cause of the spt3Delta/spt3Delta filamentous growth defect. To extend our studies of Spt3's role in filamentous growth to the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, we have identified the C. albicans SPT3 gene and have studied its role in C. albicans filamentous growth and virulence. Surprisingly, C. albicans spt3Delta/spt3Delta mutants are hyperfilamentous, the opposite phenotype observed for S. cerevisiae spt3Delta/spt3Delta mutants. Furthermore, C. albicans spt3Delta/spt3Delta mutants are avirulent in mice. These experiments demonstrate that Spt3 plays important but opposite roles in filamentous growth in S. cerevisiae and C. albicans. PMID:12072450

  19. IQGAP Family Members in Yeast, Dictyostelium, and Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Katie B.

    2012-01-01

    IQGAPs are a family of scaffolding proteins with multiple domains, named for the IQ motifs and GTPase activating protein (GAP) related domains. Despite their GAP homology, IQGAP proteins act as effectors for GTP-bound GTPases of the Ras superfamily and do not stimulate GTP hydrolysis. IQGAPs are found in eukaryotic cells from yeast to human, and localize to actin-containing structures such as lamellipodia, membrane ruffles, cell-cell adhesions, phagocytic cups, and the actomyosin ring formed during cytokinesis. Mammalian IQGAPs also act as scaffolds for signaling pathways. IQGAPs perform their myriad functions through association with a large number of proteins including filamentous actin (F-actin), GTPases, calcium-binding proteins, microtubule binding proteins, kinases, and receptors. The focus of this paper is on recent studies describing new binding partners, mechanisms of regulation, and biochemical and physiological functions of IQGAPs in yeast, amoeba, and mammalian cells. PMID:22505937

  20. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    PubMed Central

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Baiano, Antonietta; De Gianni, Antonio; Sinigaglia, Milena; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments were conducted using Nero di Troia red wine contaminated with 2 μg/L OTA and supplemented with yeast biomass (20 g/L). The samples were analyzed periodically to assess mycotoxin concentration, chromatic characteristics, and total anthocyanins over 84 days of aging. Yeast cell walls revealed the highest OTA-adsorption in comparison to thermally-inactivated cells (50% vs. 43% toxin reduction), whilst no significant differences were found for the amount of adsorbed anthocyanins in OTA-contaminated and control wines. OTA and anthocyanins adsorption were not competitive phenomena. Unfortunately, the addition of yeast cells to wine could cause color loss; therefore, yeast selection should also focus on this trait to select the best strain. PMID:26516913

  1. Blood group antigen expression is involved in C. albicans interaction with buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Everest-Dass, Arun V; Kolarich, Daniel; Pascovici, Dana; Packer, Nicolle H

    2017-02-01

    Human blood group polymorphisms are known to be determined by the expression of A, B or H antigens and the Lewis antigens. Protection against microbial infections has been associated with inheritance of polymorphisms in genes encoding and regulating the expression of ABH and Lewis antigens in bodily secretions and epithelial tissue surfaces, subsequently resulting in the presentation of different glycosylated terminal antigens on the cell surface. We investigated the role of blood group antigens in diversifying the glycosylation of buccal epithelial cells (BEC) that line the oral cavity. Specifically, we characterized and statistically evaluated the expression of histo-blood group (A, B, O) antigens on N-and O-linked glycans from BEC membrane proteins of various individuals that represented different blood group type and secretor status using a porous graphitic carbon liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PGC-LC-ESI-MS) based glycomics approach. From these BEC membrane proteins a total of 77 N-glycan and 96 O-glycan structures were structurally characterized from 19 individuals and relatively quantitated. The N-glycans from the secretor individuals did not express any A/B blood group determinants, but contained several terminal H-antigens. Apart from the non-secretors, the N-glycan profiles of BEC from all blood groups displayed similar glycan types, while varying in their relative intensities between individuals. However, multivariate analysis of the O-glycans from individuals displayed segregation patterns clearly associated with their blood group type and secretor status. In adhesion assays the oral pathogen Candida albicans showed a significantly higher interaction to blood group O type BECs relative to other blood groups.

  2. Fungal-specific subunits of the Candida albicans mitochondrial complex I drive diverse cell functions including cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    She, Xiaodong; Khamooshi, Kasra; Gao, Yin; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Yuxia; Calderone, Richard; Fonzi, William; Liu, Weida; Li, Dongmei

    2015-09-01

    Our published research has focused on the role of Goa1p, an apparent regulator of the Candida albicans mitochondrial complex I (CI). Lack of Goa1p affects optimum cell growth, CI activity and virulence. Eukaryotic CI is composed of a core of 14 alpha-proteobacterial subunit proteins and a variable number of supernumerary subunit proteins. Of the latter group of proteins, one (NUZM) is fungal specific and the other (NUXM) is found in fungi, algae and plants, but is not a mammalian CI subunit protein. We have established that NUXM is orf19.6607 and NUZM is orf19.287 in C. albicans. Herein, we validate both subunit proteins as NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases (NUO) and annotate their gene functions. To accomplish these objectives, we compared null mutants of each with wild type (WT) and gene-reconstituted strains. Genetic mutants of genes NUO1 (orf19.6607) and NUO2 (orf19.287), not surprisingly, each had reduced oxygen consumption, decreased mitochondrial redox potential, decreased CI activity, increased reactive oxidant species (ROS) and decreased chronological ageing in vitro. Loss of either gene results in disassembly of CI. Transcriptional profiling of both mutants indicated significant down-regulation of genes of carbon metabolism, as well as up-regulation of mitochondrial-associated gene families that may occur to compensate for the loss of CI activity. Profiling of both mutants also demonstrated a loss of cell wall β-mannosylation but not in a conserved CI subunit (ndh51Δ). The profiling data may indicate specific functions driven by the enzymatic activity of Nuo1p and Nuo2p. Of importance, each mutant is also avirulent in a murine blood-borne, invasive model of candidiasis associated with their reduced colonization of tissues. Based on their fungal specificity and roles in virulence, we suggest both as drug targets for antifungal drug discovery.

  3. Fungal-specific subunits of the Candida albicans mitochondrial complex I drive diverse cell functions including cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    She, Xiaodong; Khamooshi, Kasra; Gao, Yin; Shen, Yongnian; Lv, Yuxia; Calderone, Richard; Fonzi, William; Liu, Weida; Li, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Our published research has focused upon the role of Goa1p, an apparent regulator of the Candida albicans mitochondrial complex I (CI). Lack of Goa1p effects optimum cell growth, CI activity, and virulence. Eukaryotic CI is composed of a core of 14 alpha-proteobacterial subunit proteins and a variable number of supernumerary subunit proteins. Of the latter group of proteins, one (NUZM) is fungal-specific, and a second (NUXM) is found in fungi, algae and plants but is not a mammalian CI subunit protein. We have established that NUXM is orf19.6607 and NUZM is orf19.287 in C. albicans. Herein, we validate both subunit proteins as NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductases (NUO) and annotate their gene functions. To accomplish these objectives, we compared null mutants of each with WT and gene-reconstituted strains. Genetic mutants of genes NUO1 (19.6607) and NUO2 (19.287), not surprisingly, each had reduced oxygen consumption, decreased mitochondrial redox potential, decreased CI activity, increased reactive oxidant species (ROS), and a decrease in chronological aging in vitro. Loss of either gene results in a disassembly of CI. Transcriptional profiling of both mutants indicated significant down regulation of genes of carbon metabolism, as well as upregulation of mitochondrial-associated gene families which may occur to compensate for the loss of CI activity. Profiling of both mutants also demonstrated a loss of cell wall β-mannosylation but not in a conserved CI subunit (ndh51Δ). The profiling data may indicate specific functions driven by the enzymatic activity of Nuo1p and Nuo2p. Of importance, each mutant is also avirulent in a murine blood-borne, invasive model of candidiasis associated with their reduced colonization of tissues. Based upon their fungal-specificity and roles in virulence, we suggest both as drug targets for antifungal drug discovery. PMID:25801605

  4. Influence of Bacterial Presence on Biofilm Formation of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Jung; Han, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Joo Young; Choi, Sun Ju

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that is commonly found in human microflora. Biofilm formation (BF) is known as a major virulence factor of C. albicans. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial presence on biofilm formation of C. albicans. Materials and Methods The BF of Candida was investigated when it was co-cultured with C. albicans (C. albicans 53, a yeast with a low BF ability, and C. albicans 163, a yeast with high BF ability) and bacteria. BF was assessed with XTT reduction assay. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine the structure of the biofilm, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify and quantify hyphae-associated genes. Results Co-culturing with two different types of bacteria increased the BF value. Co-culturing with C. albicans 53 and 163 also increased the BF value compared to the value that was obtained when the C. albicans was cultured individually. However, co-culturing with bacteria decreased the BF value of C. albicans, and the BF of C. albicans 163 was markedly inhibited. The expression of adherence and morphology transition related genes were significantly inhibited by co-culturing with live bacteria. Conclusion Bacteria have a negative effect on the formation of biofilm by C. albicans. This mechanism is the result of the suppression of genes associated with the hyphae transition of C. albicans, and bacteria particles physically affected the biofilm architecture and biofilm formation. PMID:24532517

  5. In vitro expression of Candida albicans alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in acetaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bakri, M M; Rich, A M; Cannon, R D; Holmes, A R

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol consumption is a risk factor for oral cancer, possibly via its conversion to acetaldehyde, a known carcinogen. The oral commensal yeast Candida albicans may be one of the agents responsible for this conversion intra-orally. The alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) family of enzymes are involved in acetaldehyde metabolism in yeast but, for C. albicans it is not known which family member is responsible for the conversion of ethanol to acetaldehyde. In this study we determined the expression of mRNAs from three C. albicans Adh genes (CaADH1, CaADH2 and CaCDH3) for cells grown in different culture media at different growth phases by Northern blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. CaADH1 was constitutively expressed under all growth conditions but there was differential expression of CaADH2. CaADH3 expression was not detected. To investigate whether CaAdh1p or CaAdh2p can contribute to alcohol catabolism in C. albicans, each gene from the reference strain C. albicans SC5314 was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell extracts from an CaAdh1p-expressing S. cerevisiae recombinant, but not an CaAdh2p-expressing recombinant, or an empty vector control strain, possessed ethanol-utilizing Adh activity above endogenous S. cerevisiae activity. Furthermore, expression of C. albicans Adh1p in a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain in which the endogenous ScADH2 gene (known to convert ethanol to acetaldehyde in this yeast) had been deleted, conferred an NAD-dependent ethanol-utilizing, and so acetaldehyde-producing, Adh activity. We conclude that CaAdh1p is the enzyme responsible for ethanol use under in vitro growth conditions, and may contribute to the intra-oral production of acetaldehyde.

  6. [Changes in the dielectric properties of water in yeast cells during their death].

    PubMed

    Romanov, A N

    2009-01-01

    The dielectric properties of living and dead unicellular microorganisms (yeast) were studied in the microwave range, and the general regularities and differences were revealed. The effect of temperature on the dielectric properties of yeast cells has been studied. The dielectric parameters of water fractions contained in yeast cells were estimated using the refraction model.

  7. The Sur7 Protein Regulates Plasma Membrane Organization and Prevents Intracellular Cell Wall Growth in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Francisco J.; Douglas, Lois M.; Rosebrock, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The Candida albicans plasma membrane plays important roles in cell growth and as a target for antifungal drugs. Analysis of Ca-Sur7 showed that this four transmembrane domain protein localized to stable punctate patches, similar to the plasma membrane subdomains known as eisosomes or MCC that were discovered in S. cerevisiae. The localization of Ca-Sur7 depended on sphingolipid synthesis. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, a C. albicans sur7Δ mutant displayed defects in endocytosis and morphogenesis. Septins and actin were mislocalized, and cell wall synthesis was very abnormal, including long projections of cell wall into the cytoplasm. Several phenotypes of the sur7Δ mutant are similar to the effects of inhibiting β-glucan synthase, suggesting that the abnormal cell wall synthesis is related to activation of chitin synthase activity seen under stress conditions. These results expand the roles of eisosomes by demonstrating that Sur7 is needed for proper plasma membrane organization and cell wall synthesis. A conserved Cys motif in the first extracellular loop of fungal Sur7 proteins is similar to a characteristic motif of the claudin proteins that form tight junctions in animal cells, suggesting a common role for these tetraspanning membrane proteins in forming specialized plasma membrane domains. PMID:18799621

  8. SLipid-induced cell dysfunction and cell death: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Kohlwein, Sepp D; Petschnigg, Julia

    2007-12-01

    The 2001 Nobel Prize in Medicine, awarded to two yeast researchers for contributions to understanding the eukaryotic cell cycle, spotlighted yeast as an experimental model system in biomedical research. Major discoveries of molecular processes underlying lipid and biomembrane biogenesis were first made in yeast: secretory pathways, vesicle and membrane fusion, and the unfolded protein response. The discovery of programmed cell death that is conserved at multiple levels (quite intriguing for a unicellular organism), and energy metabolism controlled by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinases, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways, and the target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway (originally discovered in yeast)-all refer to functional and structural similarities with mammalian cells beyond the mere metabolic level. This article reviews recently uncovered aspects of fatty acid-associated malfunctions and lipotoxicity in yeast that may aid in understanding the molecular basis of lipid-associated disorders in mammals.

  9. Construction of a large synthetic human Fab antibody library on yeast cell surface by optimized yeast mating.

    PubMed

    Baek, Du-San; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-03-28

    Yeast surface-displayed antibody libraries provide an efficient and quantitative screening resource for given antigens, but suffer from typically modest library sizes owing to low yeast transformation efficiency. Yeast mating is an attractive method for overcoming the limit of yeast transformation to construct a large, combinatorial antibody library, but the optimal conditions have not been reported. Here, we report a large synthetic human Fab (antigen binding fragment) yeast surface-displayed library generated by stepwise optimization of yeast mating conditions. We first constructed HC (heavy chain) and LC (light chain) libraries, where all of the six CDRs (complementarity-determining regions) of the variable domains were diversified mimicking the human germline antibody repertoires by degenerate codons, onto single frameworks of VH3-23 and Vkappa1-16 germline sequences, in two haploid cells of opposite mating types. Yeast mating conditions were optimized in the order of cell density, media pH, and cell growth phase, yielding a mating efficiency of ~58% between the two haploid cells carrying HC and LC libraries. We constructed two combinatorial Fab libraries with CDR-H3 of 9 or 11 residues in length with colony diversities of more than 10(9) by one round of yeast mating between the two haploid HC and LC libraries, with modest diversity sizes of ~10(7). The synthetic human Fab yeast-displayed libraries exhibited relative amino acid compositions in each position of the six CDRs that were very similar to those of the designed repertoires, suggesting that they are a promising source for human Fab antibody screening.

  10. Involvement of T-cell immunoregulation by ochnaflavone in therapeutic effect on fungal arthritis due to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jue-Hee

    2011-07-01

    Arthritis due to pathogenic fungi is a serious disease causing rapid destruction of the joint. In the pathogenesis of arthritis, T lymphocytes are considered to be one of the major immune cells. In present study, we examined the T cell immunoregulatory effect by ochnaflavone (Och), a biflavonoid, on arthritis caused by Candida albicans that is the most commonly associated with fungal arthritis. To examine the effects of ochnaflavonon Candida albicans-caused septic arthritis, an emulsified mixture of C. albicans cell wall and complete Freund's adjuvant (CACW/CFA) was injected into BALB/c mice via hind footpad route on days -3, -2, and -1. On Day 0, Och at 1 or 2 mg/dose/time was intratraperitoneally given to mice with the swollen footpad every other day for 3 times. The footpad-edema was measured for 20 days. Results revealed that Och reduced the edema at all dose levels and furthermore, there was app. 45% reduction of the edema in animals given 2 mg-dose at the peak of septic arthritis (p < 0.05). This anti-arthritic effect was accompanied by the diminishing of the DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) activity against the CACW and by the provoking of the dominant T helper 2 (Th2) type cytokines production (IL-4 and Il-10), which appeared to result in a suppression of T helper 1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2). Besides the T cell immunoregulatory activity, Och inhibited T cells activation as evidenced by the IL-2 reduction from PMA/ionomycin-stimulated Jurkat cell line and in addition, the compound killed macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). However, Och caused no hemolysis (p < 0.05). These data implicate that Och, which has anti-arthritic activity based on the Th2 dominance as well as macrophage removal, can be safely administered into the blood circulation for treatment of the arthritis caused by C. albicans. Thus, it can be concluded that Och would be an ideal immunologically evaluated agent for treating of Candida arthritis.

  11. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  12. Interaction of Candida albicans cell wall Als3 protein with Streptococcus gordonii SspB adhesin promotes development of mixed-species communities.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Richard J; Nobbs, Angela H; Vickerman, M Margaret; Barbour, Michele E; Jenkinson, Howard F

    2010-11-01

    Candida albicans colonizes human mucosa and prosthetic surfaces associated with artificial joints, catheters, and dentures. In the oral cavity, C. albicans coexists with numerous bacterial species, and evidence suggests that bacteria may modulate fungal growth and biofilm formation. Streptococcus gordonii is found on most oral cavity surfaces and interacts with C. albicans to promote hyphal and biofilm formation. In this study, we investigated the role of the hyphal-wall protein Als3p in interactions of C. albicans with S. gordonii. Utilizing an ALS3 deletion mutant strain, it was shown that cells were not affected in initial adherence to the salivary pellicle or in hyphal formation in the planktonic phase. However, the Als3(-) mutant was unable to form biofilms on the salivary pellicle or deposited S. gordonii DL1 wild-type cells, and after initial adherence, als3Δ/als3Δ (ΔALS3) cells became detached concomitant with hyphal formation. In coaggregation assays, S. gordonii cells attached to, and accumulated around, hyphae formed by C. albicans wild-type cells. However, streptococci failed to attach to hyphae produced by the ΔALS3 mutant. Saccharomyces cerevisiae S150-2B cells expressing Als3p, but not control cells, supported binding of S. gordonii DL1. However, S. gordonii Δ(sspA sspB) cells deficient in production of the surface protein adhesins SspA and SspB showed >50% reduced levels of binding to S. cerevisiae expressing Als3p. Lactococcus lactis cells expressing SspB bound avidly to S. cerevisiae expressing Als3p, but not to S150-2B wild-type cells. These results show that recognition of C. albicans by S. gordonii involves Als3 protein-SspB protein interaction, defining a novel mechanism in fungal-bacterial communication.

  13. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  14. Oral-resident natural Th17 cells and γδ T cells control opportunistic Candida albicans infections.

    PubMed

    Conti, Heather R; Peterson, Alanna C; Brane, Lucas; Huppler, Anna R; Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Whibley, Natasha; Garg, Abhishek V; Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R; Gibson, Gregory A; Mamo, Anna J; Osborne, Lisa C; Bishu, Shrinivas; Ghilardi, Nico; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Watkins, Simon C; Artis, David; McGeachy, Mandy J; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2014-09-22

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic fungal infection caused by Candida albicans. OPC is frequent in HIV/AIDS, implicating adaptive immunity. Mice are naive to Candida, yet IL-17 is induced within 24 h of infection, and susceptibility is strongly dependent on IL-17R signaling. We sought to identify the source of IL-17 during the early innate response to candidiasis. We show that innate responses to Candida require an intact TCR, as SCID, IL-7Rα(-/-), and Rag1(-/-) mice were susceptible to OPC, and blockade of TCR signaling by cyclosporine induced susceptibility. Using fate-tracking IL-17 reporter mice, we found that IL-17 is produced within 1-2 d by tongue-resident populations of γδ T cells and CD3(+)CD4(+)CD44(hi)TCRβ(+)CCR6(+) natural Th17 (nTh17) cells, but not by TCR-deficient innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) or NK cells. These cells function redundantly, as TCR-β(-/-) and TCR-δ(-/-) mice were both resistant to OPC. Whereas γδ T cells were previously shown to produce IL-17 during dermal candidiasis and are known to mediate host defense at mucosal surfaces, nTh17 cells are poorly understood. The oral nTh17 population expanded rapidly after OPC, exhibited high TCR-β clonal diversity, and was absent in Rag1(-/-), IL-7Rα(-/-), and germ-free mice. These findings indicate that nTh17 and γδ T cells, but not ILCs, are key mucosal sentinels that control oral pathogens.

  15. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  16. Genomic identification of potential targets unique to Candida albicans for the discovery of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Himanshu; Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Khan, Feroz

    2014-01-01

    Despite of modern antifungal therapy, the mortality rates of invasive infection with human fungal pathogen Candida albicans are up to 40%. Studies suggest that drug resistance in the three most common species of human fungal pathogens viz., C. albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus (causing mortality rate up to 90%) and Cryptococcus neoformans (causing mortality rate up to 70%) is due to mutations in the target enzymes or high expression of drug transporter genes. Drug resistance in human fungal pathogens has led to an imperative need for the identification of new targets unique to fungal pathogens. In the present study, we have used a comparative genomics approach to find out potential target proteins unique to C. albicans, an opportunistic fungus responsible for severe infection in immune-compromised human. Interestingly, many target proteins of existing antifungal agents showed orthologs in human cells. To identify unique proteins, we have compared proteome of C. albicans [SC5314] i.e., 14,633 total proteins retrieved from the RefSeq database of NCBI, USA with proteome of human and non-pathogenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that 4,568 proteins were identified unique to C. albicans as compared to those of human and later when these unique proteins were compared with S. cerevisiae proteome, finally 2,161 proteins were identified as unique proteins and after removing repeats total 1,618 unique proteins (42 functionally known, 1,566 hypothetical and 10 unknown) were selected as potential antifungal drug targets unique to C. albicans.

  17. Calcium modulation of doxorubicin cytotoxicity in yeast and human cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Thuy Trang; Lim, Ying Jun; Fan, Melanie Hui Min; Jackson, Rebecca A; Lim, Kim Kiat; Ang, Wee Han; Ban, Kenneth Hon Kim; Chen, Ee Sin

    2016-03-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its utility is limited by cellular resistance and off-target effects. To understand the molecular mechanisms regulating chemotherapeutic responses to doxorubicin, we previously carried out a genomewide search of doxorubicin-resistance genes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe fission yeast and showed that these genes are organized into networks that counteract doxorubicin cytotoxicity. Here, we describe the identification of a subgroup of doxorubicin-resistance genes that, when disrupted, leads to reduced tolerance to exogenous calcium. Unexpectedly, we observed a suppressive effect of calcium on doxorubicin cytotoxicity, where concurrent calcium and doxorubicin treatment resulted in significantly higher cell survival compared with cells treated with doxorubicin alone. Conversely, inhibitors of voltage-gated calcium channels enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity in the mutants. Consistent with these observations in fission yeast, calcium also suppressed doxorubicin cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. Further epistasis analyses in yeast showed that this suppression of doxorubicin toxicity by calcium was synergistically dependent on Rav1 and Vph2, two regulators of vacuolar-ATPase assembly; this suggests potential modulation of the calcium-doxorubicin interaction by fluctuating proton concentrations within the cellular environment. Thus, the modulatory effects of drugs or diet on calcium concentrations should be considered in doxorubicin treatment regimes.

  18. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  19. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-11-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  20. Killer system: a simple method for differentiating Candida albicans strains.

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, L; Archibusacci, C; Sestito, M; Morace, G

    1983-01-01

    The killer effect of 37 species of Candida, Cryptococcus, Hansenula, Pichia, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon on 100 Candida albicans isolates of human and animal origin was studied. All of the C. albicans cultures were sensitive to one or more killer yeasts. The factors affecting the killer phenomenon on C. albicans were investigated for realizing a simple system for the differentiation of the 100 C. albicans isolates. By using this system, it was possible to differentiate up to 512 isolates of C. albicans according to their susceptibility to the killer effect of nine selected killer yeasts. The use of this method as an epidemiological marker in the case of presumptive nosocomial infections due to C. albicans is also reported. Images PMID:6345575

  1. The Functions of Mediator in Candida albicans Support a Role in Shaping Species-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jelicic, Branka; Lo, Tricia L.; Beaurepaire, Cecile; Bantun, Farkad; Quenault, Tara; Boag, Peter R.; Ramm, Georg; Callaghan, Judy; Beilharz, Traude H.; Nantel, André; Peleg, Anton Y.; Traven, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The Mediator complex is an essential co-regulator of RNA polymerase II that is conserved throughout eukaryotes. Here we present the first study of Mediator in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We focused on the Middle domain subunit Med31, the Head domain subunit Med20, and Srb9/Med13 from the Kinase domain. The C. albicans Mediator shares some roles with model yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, such as functions in the response to certain stresses and the role of Med31 in the expression of genes regulated by the activator Ace2. The C. albicans Mediator also has additional roles in the transcription of genes associated with virulence, for example genes related to morphogenesis and gene families enriched in pathogens, such as the ALS adhesins. Consistently, Med31, Med20, and Srb9/Med13 contribute to key virulence attributes of C. albicans, filamentation, and biofilm formation; and ALS1 is a biologically relevant target of Med31 for development of biofilms. Furthermore, Med31 affects virulence of C. albicans in the worm infection model. We present evidence that the roles of Med31 and Srb9/Med13 in the expression of the genes encoding cell wall adhesins are different between S. cerevisiae and C. albicans: they are repressors of the FLO genes in S. cerevisiae and are activators of the ALS genes in C. albicans. This suggests that Mediator subunits regulate adhesion in a distinct manner between these two distantly related fungal species. PMID:22496666

  2. Unidirectional P-body transport during the yeast cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garmendia-Torres, Cecilia; Skupin, Alexander; Michael, Sean A; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kuwada, Nathan J; Falconnet, Didier; Cary, Gregory A; Hansen, Carl; Wiggins, Paul A; Dudley, Aimée M

    2014-01-01

    P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained "hovering" near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions.

  3. Unidirectional P-Body Transport during the Yeast Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Garmendia-Torres, Cecilia; Skupin, Alexander; Michael, Sean A.; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Kuwada, Nathan J.; Falconnet, Didier; Cary, Gregory A.; Hansen, Carl; Wiggins, Paul A.; Dudley, Aimée M.

    2014-01-01

    P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained “hovering” near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions. PMID:24918601

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is involved in toxicity of cell wall stress to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Zhang, Bing; Li, Jianrong; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Honggang; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    The cell wall is an important cell structure in both fungi and bacteria, and hence becomes a common antimicrobial target. The cell wall-perturbing agents disrupt synthesis and function of cell wall components, leading to cell wall stress and consequent cell death. However, little is known about the detailed mechanisms by which cell wall stress renders fungal cell death. In this study, we found that ROS scavengers drastically attenuated the antifungal effect of cell wall-perturbing agents to the model fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and these agents caused remarkable ROS accumulation and activation of oxidative stress response (OSR) in this fungus. Interestingly, cell wall stress did not cause mitochondrial dysfunction and elevation of mitochondrial superoxide levels. Furthermore, the iron chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl (BIP) and the hydroxyl radical scavengers could not attenuate cell wall stress-caused growth inhibition and ROS accumulation. However, cell wall stress up-regulated expression of unfold protein response (UPR) genes, enhanced protein secretion and promoted protein folding-related oxidation of Ero1, an important source of ROS production. These results indicated that oxidation of Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), rather than mitochondrial electron transport and Fenton reaction, contributed to cell wall stress-related ROS accumulation and consequent growth inhibition. Our findings uncover a novel link between cell wall integrity (CWI), ER function and ROS production in fungal cells, and shed novel light on development of strategies promoting the antifungal efficacy of cell wall-perturbing agents against fungal infections.

  5. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  6. Systematic identification of cell size regulators in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Soifer, Ilya; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Cell size is determined by a complex interplay between growth and division, involving multiple cellular pathways. To identify systematically processes affecting size control in G1 in budding yeast, we imaged and analyzed the cell cycle of millions of individual cells representing 591 mutants implicated in size control. Quantitative metric distinguished mutants affecting the mechanism of size control from the majority of mutants that have a perturbed size due to indirect effects modulating cell growth. Overall, we identified 17 negative and dozens positive size control regulators, with the negative regulators forming a small network centered on elements of mitotic exit network. Some elements of the translation machinery affected size control with a notable distinction between the deletions of parts of small and large ribosomal subunit: parts of small ribosomal subunit tended to regulate size control, while parts of the large subunit affected cell growth. Analysis of small cells revealed additional size control mechanism that functions in G2/M, complementing the primary size control in G1. Our study provides new insights about size control mechanisms in budding yeast. PMID:25411401

  7. [Export of an invertase by yeast cells (Candida utilis)].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, O V; Sabirzianova, T A; Celiakh, I O; Kalebina, T S; Kulaev, I S

    2014-01-01

    Export and accumulation of various forms of invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) in the cell wall and culture liquid of the yeast Candida utilis was investigated. It was found that the high-molecular-weight CW-form of invertase is present in the cell wall. This form is not exported into the culture liquid, and it is by a third more glycosylated than the previously described exported S-form. It was shown that one of the two liquid forms of invertase exported into the culture-the glycosylated S-form--is retained in the cell wall, while the other one--the nonglycosylated F-form--was not detected in the cell wall. Based on these results, as well as data on the distribution dynamics of the enzyme in the culture liquid and in the cell wall during different growth stages of a yeast culture, we suggested that the nonglycosylated form was exported into the culture liquid via the zone of abnormal cell wall permeability and the glycosylated forms of this enzyme (both exported and nonexported) did not use this pathway (the degree of N-glycosylation is an important factor determining the final localization of the enzyme).

  8. Actin and Septin Ultrastructures at the Budding Yeast Cell Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rodal, Avital A.; Kozubowski, Lukasz; Goode, Bruce L.; Drubin, David G.; Hartwig, John H.

    2005-01-01

    Budding yeast has been a powerful model organism for studies of the roles of actin in endocytosis and septins in cell division and in signaling. However, the depth of mechanistic understanding that can be obtained from such studies has been severely hindered by a lack of ultrastructural information about how actin and septins are organized at the cell cortex. To address this problem, we developed rapid-freeze and deep-etch techniques to image the yeast cell cortex in spheroplasted cells at high resolution. The cortical actin cytoskeleton assembles into conical or mound-like structures composed of short, cross-linked filaments. The Arp2/3 complex localizes near the apex of these structures, suggesting that actin patch assembly may be initiated from the apex. Mutants in cortical actin patch components with defined defects in endocytosis disrupted different stages of cortical actin patch assembly. Based on these results, we propose a model for actin function during endocytosis. In addition to actin structures, we found that septin-containing filaments assemble into two kinds of higher order structures at the cell cortex: rings and ordered gauzes. These images provide the first high-resolution views of septin organization in cells. PMID:15525671

  9. Anaerobic digestion of distillery spent wash: Influence of enzymatic pre-treatment of intact yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Mallick, P; Akunna, J C; Walker, G M

    2010-03-01

    The potential benefits of enzymatic digestion of intact yeast cells on anaerobic digestion of Scotch whisky distillery spent wash and pot ale were investigated. Various yeast cell wall hydrolytic enzymes were studied based on their effect on dissolution of cell wall glucan and mannoprotein. The synergistic activity of beta-glucanase and protease showed greater than 90% yeast cell digestion at 37 degrees C in 24h. The widely-used industrial enzyme papain showed 95% yeast cell digestion in spent wash at 1% enzyme concentration within 22h at 50 degrees C. Anaerobic digestion of pot ale residues containing intact yeast cells pre-treated with lytic enzymes showed COD reductions of 87%, compared with only 13% without enzymes. Similar results were observed with distillery spent wash centrate. The hydrolysis of intact yeast cells in distillery liquid residues was found to be a rate-limiting step in anaerobic treatment of such residues.

  10. Preparation of corncob grits as a carrier for immobilizing yeast cells for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Eun; Lee, Choon Geun; Kang, Do Hyung; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Jung, Kyung-Hwan

    2012-12-01

    In this study, DEAE-corncobs [delignified corncob grits derivatized with 2-(diethylamino)ethyl chloride hydrochloride (DEAE·HCl)] were prepared as a carrier to immobilize yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) for ethanol production. The immobilized yeast cell reactor produced ethanol under optimized DEAE·HCl derivatization and adsorption conditions between yeast cells and the DEAE-corncobs. When delignified corncob grit (3.0 g) was derivatized with 0.5M DEAE·HCl, the yeast cell suspension (OD600 = 3.0) was adsorbed at >90% of the initial cell OD600. This amount of adsorbed yeast cells was estimated to be 5.36 mg-dry cells/g-DEAE corncobs. The Qmax (the maximum cell adsorption by the carrier) of the DEAE-corncobs was estimated to be 25.1 (mg/g), based on a Languir model biosorption isotherm experiment. When we conducted a batch culture with medium recycling using the immobilized yeast cells, the yeast cells on DEAE-corncobs produced ethanol gradually, according to glucose consumption, without cells detaching from the DEAE-corncobs. We observed under electron microscopy that the yeast cells grew on the surface and in the holes of the DEAEcorncobs. In a future study, DEAE-corncobs and the immobilized yeast cell reactor system will contribute to bioethanol production from biomass hydrolysates.

  11. Candida albicans adhesin Als3p is dispensable for virulence in the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Ian A.; Reinhard, Sara M.; Miller, C. Lindsay; Murdoch, Craig; Thornhill, Martin H.; Lazzell, Anna L.; Monteagudo, Carlos; Thomas, Derek P.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of specific proteins, including Ece1p, Hwp1p and Als3p, distinguishes the Candida albicans hyphal cell wall from that of yeast-form cells. These proteins are thought to be important for the ability of C. albicans cells to adhere to living and non-living surfaces and for the cell-to-cell adhesion necessary for biofilm formation, and also to be pivotal in mediating C. albicans interactions with endothelial cells. Using an in vitro flow adhesion assay, we previously observed that yeast cells bind in greater numbers to human microvascular endothelial cells than do hyphal or pseudohyphal cells. This is consistent with previous observations that, in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis, cells locked in the yeast form can efficiently escape the bloodstream and invade host tissues. To more precisely explore the role of Als3p in adhesion and virulence, we deleted both copies of ALS3 in a wild-type C. albicans strain. In agreement with previous studies, our als3Δ null strain formed hyphae normally but was defective in biofilm formation. Whilst ALS3 was not expressed in our null strain, hypha-specific genes such as ECE1 and HWP1 were still induced appropriately. Both the yeast form and the hyphal form of the als3Δ strain adhered to microvascular endothelial cells to the same extent as a wild-type strain under conditions of flow, indicating that Als3p is not a significant mediator of the initial interaction between fungal cells and the endothelium. Finally, in a murine model of haematogenously disseminated candidiasis the mutant als3Δ remained as virulent as the wild-type parent strain. PMID:21436220

  12. Adherence of Candida albicans to silicone is promoted by the human salivary protein SPLUNC2/PSP/BPIFA2.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Rodrigues, E; van der Wielen, P; Lyons, K M; Haigh, B J; Wheeler, T T; Dawes, P J D; Cannon, R D

    2014-04-01

    Interactions between Candida albicans, saliva and saliva-coated oral surfaces are initial events in the colonization of the oral cavity by this commensal yeast, which can cause oral diseases such as candidiasis and denture stomatitis. Candida albicans also colonizes silicone voice prostheses, and the microbial biofilm formed can impair valve function, necessitating frequent prosthesis replacement. We have previously shown that saliva promoted binding of C. albicans cells to silicone in vitro, and that the selective binding of specific salivary proteins to voice prosthesis silicone mediated attachment of C. albicans cells. The C. albicans cells adhered to a polypeptide (or polypeptides) of ~36 kDa eluted from saliva-treated silicone. We show here that a protein of similar size was identified in replicate blots of the eluate from saliva-treated silicone when the blots were probed with antibodies to human SPLUNC2, a salivary protein with reported microbial agglutination properties. In addition, SPLUNC2 was depleted from saliva that had been incubated with silicone coupons. To determine whether SPLUNC2 is a yeast-binding protein, SPLUNC2 cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified recombinant His-tagged protein (SPLUNC2r) bound to silicone as demonstrated by immunoblot analysis of an eluate from SPLUNC2r-treated silicone coupons and (35) S-radiolabelled C. albicans cells adhered in a dose-dependent manner to SPLUNC2r-coated silicone. We conclude that SPLUNC2 binds to silicone and acts as a receptor for C. albicans adherence to, and subsequent colonization of, voice prosthesis silicone.

  13. Effects of interleukin-10 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell responses to Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A; Nong, S H; Golenbock, D T

    1996-01-01

    Deactivation of mononuclear phagocytes is critical to limit the inflammatory response but can be detrimental in the face of progressive infection. We compared the effects of the deactivating cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans. IL-10 effected dose-dependent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) release in PBMC stimulated by LPS and C. neoformans, with significant inhibition seen with 0.1 U/ml and greater than 90% inhibition noted with 10 U/ml. In contrast, even at doses as high as 100 U/ml, IL-10 inhibited TNF-alpha release in response to C. albicans by only 50%. IL-10 profoundly inhibited release of IL-1beta from PBMC stimulated by all three stimuli. TNF-alpha mRNA and release was inhibited even if IL-10 was added up to 8 h after cryptococcal stimulation. In contrast, inhibition of IL-1 beta mRNA was of lesser magnitude and occurred only when IL-10 was added within 2 h of cryptococcal stimulation. IL-10 inhibited translocation of NF-kappaB in response to LPS but not the fungal stimuli. All three stimuli induced IL-10 production in PBMC, although over 10-fold less IL-10 was released in response to C. neoformans compared with LPS and C. albicans. Thus, while IL-10 has deactivating effects on PBMC responses to all three stimuli, disparate stimulus- and response-specific patterns of deactivation are seen. Inhibition by IL-10 of proinflammatory cytokine release appears to occur at the level of gene transcription for TNF-alpha and both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally for IL-1beta. PMID:8641805

  14. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  15. Global Dynamical Properties of the Yeast Cell Cycle Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao

    2004-03-01

    The interactions between proteins, DNA, and RNA in living cells constitute molecular networks that govern various cellular functions. To investigate the global dynamical properties and stabilities of such networks, we studied the network regulating the cell division (cell cycle) of the budding yeast. With the use of both discrete (Boolean) and continuous (ODEs) dynamical models, it was demonstrated that the cell-cycle network is extremely stable and robust for its function. The biological stationary state--the G1 state--is a global attractor of the dynamics. The biological pathway--the cell-cycle sequence of protein states--is a globally attracting trajectory of the dynamics. These properties are largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. These results suggest that cellular regulatory networks are robustly designed for their functions.

  16. Paradoxical growth of Candida albicans in the presence of caspofungin is associated with multiple cell wall rearrangements and decreased virulence.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cristina; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, echinocandins have emerged as an important family of antifungal drugs because of their fungicidal activity against Candida spp. Echinocandins inhibit the enzyme β-1,3-d-glucan synthase, encoded by the FKS genes, and resistance to echinocandins is associated with mutations in this gene. In addition, echinocandin exposure can produce paradoxical growth, defined as the ability to grow at high antifungal concentrations but not at intermediate concentrations. In this work, we have demonstrated that paradoxical growth of Candida albicans in the presence of caspofungin is not due to antifungal degradation or instability. Media with high caspofungin concentrations recovered from wells where C. albicans showed paradoxical growth inhibited the growth of a Candida krusei reference strain. Cells exhibiting paradoxical growth at high caspofungin concentrations showed morphological changes such as enlarged size, abnormal septa, and absence of filamentation. Chitin content increased from the MIC to high caspofungin concentrations. Despite the high chitin levels, around 23% of cells died after treatment with caspofungin, indicating that chitin is required but not sufficient to protect the cells from the fungicidal effect of caspofungin. Moreover, we found that after paradoxical growth, β-1,3-glucan was exposed at the cell wall surface. Cells grown at high caspofungin concentrations had decreased virulence in the invertebrate host Galleria mellonella. Cells grown at high caspofungin concentrations also induced a proinflammatory response in murine macrophages compared to control cells. Our work highlights important aspects about fungal adaptation to caspofungin, and although this adaptation is associated with reduced virulence, the clinical implications remain to be elucidated.

  17. Candida albicans biofilms: building a heterogeneous, drug-tolerant environment.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Julie; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Fungi are able to form biofilms on medical implants, causing serious infections. A better understanding of fungal biofilm formation is necessary to develop tools for detection or prevention and to identify new antifungal strategies. This review explores recent advances in the characterization at the molecular level of fungal biofilms, especially those formed by the yeast Candida albicans: the identification of complex transcriptional networks that control their formation; the pivotal role of the extracellular matrix in biofilm antifungal tolerance; and the knowledge gained on the physiology of biofilm cells and heterogeneity within these communities. These findings may help develop new, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  18. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  19. Binary Interactions of Antagonistic Bacteria with Candida albicans Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benadé, Eliska; Stone, Wendy; Mouton, Marnel; Postma, Ferdinand; Wilsenach, Jac; Botha, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    We used both aerobic and anaerobic liquid co-cultures, prepared with Luria Bertani broth, to study the effect of bacteria on the survival of Candida albicans in the external environment, away from an animal host. The bacteria were represented by Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium, Enterobacter, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata and Serratia marcescens. Under aerobic conditions, the yeast's growth was inhibited in the presence of bacterial growth; however, under anaerobic conditions, yeast and bacterial growth in co-cultures was similar to that observed for pure cultures. Subsequent assays revealed that the majority of bacterial strains aerobically produced extracellular hydrolytic enzymes capable of yeast cell wall hydrolysis, including chitinases and mannan-degrading enzymes. In contrast, except for the A. hydrophila strain, these enzymes were not detected in anaerobic bacterial cultures, nor was the antimicrobial compound prodigiosin found in anaerobic cultures of S. marcescens. When we suspended C. albicans cells in crude extracellular enzyme preparations from K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens, we detected no negative effect on yeast viability. However, we found that these preparations enhance the toxicity of prodigiosin towards the yeast, especially in combination with mannan-degrading enzymes. Analyses of the chitin and mannan content of yeast cell walls revealed that less chitin was produced under anaerobic than aerobic conditions; however, the levels of mannan, known for its low permeability, remained the same. The latter phenomenon, as well as reduced production of the bacterial enzymes and prodigiosin, may contribute to anaerobic growth and survival of C. albicans in the presence of bacteria.

  20. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.E. Jr.; Rotrosen, D.; Fontaine, J.W.; Haudenschild, C.C.; Diamond, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of /sup 51/Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of /sup 51/Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers.

  1. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  2. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  3. Effects of Mentha suaveolens Essential Oil Alone or in Combination with Other Drugs in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Stringaro, Annarita; Vavala, Elisabetta; Pepi, Federico; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Garzoli, Stefania; Angiolella, Letizia

    2014-01-01

    Candidosis is the most important cause of fungal infections in humans. The yeast Candida albicans can form biofilms, and it is known that microbial biofilms play an important role in human diseases and are very difficult to treat. The prolonged treatment with drugs has often resulted in failure and resistance. Due to the emergence of multidrug resistance, alternatives to conventional antimicrobial therapy are needed. This study aims to analyse the effects induced by essential oil of Mentha suaveolens Ehrh (EOMS) on Candida albicans and its potential synergism when used in combination with conventional drugs. Morphological differences between control and EOMS treated yeast cells or biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM resp.,). In order to reveal the presence of cell cycle alterations, flow cytometry analysis was carried out as well. The synergic action of EOMS was studied with the checkerboard method, and the cellular damage induced by different treatments was analysed by TEM. The results obtained have demonstrated both the effects of EOMS on C. albicans yeast cells and biofilms and the synergism of EOMS when used in combination with conventional antifungal drugs as fluconazole (FLC) and micafungin (MCFG), and therefore we can hypothesize on its potential use in therapy. Further studies are necessary to know its mechanism of action. PMID:24719638

  4. Photodynamic Action Mechanism Mediated by Zinc(II) 2,9,16,23-Tetrakis[4-(N-methylpyridyloxy)]phthalocyanine in Candida albicans Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, María Albana; Alvarez, María Gabriela; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2015-01-01

    The photoreaction type I/type II pathways mediated by zinc(II) 2,9,16,23-tetrakis[4-(N-methylpyridyloxy)]phthalocyanine (ZnPPc(4+) ) was studied in Candida albicans cells. This photosensitizer was strongly bound to C. albicans cells at short times. After 30 min irradiation, 5 μM ZnPPc(4+) produced ~5 log decrease in cell viability. Different probes were used to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell suspensions (~10(6) CFU mL(-1) ). Singlet molecular oxygen, O2 ((1) Δg ), was observed by the reaction with 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA) and tetrasodium 2,2-(anthracene-9,10-diyl)bis(methylmalonate) (ABMM), whereas the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) method was used to sense superoxide anion radical (O2·-). Moreover, the effects produced by an anoxic atmosphere and cell suspensions in D2 O, as well as the addition of sodium azide and mannitol as ROS trapping were evaluated in the PDI of C. albicans. These investigation indicates that O2 ((1) Δg ) is generated in the cells, although a minor extension other radical species can also be involved in the PDI of C. albicans mediated by ZnPPc(4+) .

  5. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  6. Facile and quantitative electrochemical detection of yeast cell apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Qiulin; Xiong, Shiquan; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xin

    2014-03-01

    An electrochemical method based on square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was developed to detect the apoptosis of yeast cells conveniently and quantitatively through the high affinity between Cu2+ and phosphatidylserine (PS) translocated from the inner to the outer plasma membrane of the apoptotic cells. The combination of negatively charged PS and Cu2+ could decrease the electrochemical response of Cu2+ on the electrode. The results showed that the apoptotic rates of cells could be detected quantitatively through the variations of peak currents of Cu2+ by SWASV, and agreed well with those obtained through traditional flow cytometry detection. This work thus may provide a novel, simple, immediate and accurate detection method for cell apoptosis.

  7. The yeast cell-cycle network is robustly designed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangting; Long, Tao; Lu, Ying; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao

    2004-04-01

    The interactions between proteins, DNA, and RNA in living cells constitute molecular networks that govern various cellular functions. To investigate the global dynamical properties and stabilities of such networks, we studied the cell-cycle regulatory network of the budding yeast. With the use of a simple dynamical model, it was demonstrated that the cell-cycle network is extremely stable and robust for its function. The biological stationary state, the G1 state, is a global attractor of the dynamics. The biological pathway, the cell-cycle sequence of protein states, is a globally attracting trajectory of the dynamics. These properties are largely preserved with respect to small perturbations to the network. These results suggest that cellular regulatory networks are robustly designed for their functions.

  8. Antifungal Activity of Salvia miltiorrhiza Against Candida albicans Is Associated with the Alteration of Membrane Permeability and (1,3)-β-D-Glucan Synthase Activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung-Shick; Kim, Younhee

    2016-03-01

    Candidiasis has posed a serious health risk to immunocompromised patients owing to the increase in resistant yeasts, and Candida albicans is the prominent pathogen of fungal infections. Therefore, there is a critical need for the discovery and characterization of novel antifungals to treat infections caused by C. albicans. In the present study, we report on the antifungal activity of the ethanol extract from Salvia miltiorrhiza against C. albicans and the possible mode of action against C. albicans. The increase in the membrane permeability was evidenced by changes in diphenylhexatriene binding and release of both 260-nm-absorbing intracellular materials and protein. In addition, inhibition of cell wall synthesis was demonstrated by the enhanced minimal inhibitory concentration in the presence of sorbitol and reduced (1,3)-β-D-glucan synthase activity. The above evidence supports the notion that S. miltiorrhiza has antifungal activity against C. albicans by the synergistic activity of targeting the cell membrane and cell wall. These findings indicate that S. miltiorrhiza displays effective activity against C. albicans in vitro and merits further investigation to treat C. albicans-associated infections.

  9. SR-like RNA-binding protein Slr1 affects Candida albicans filamentation and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ariyachet, Chaiyaboot; Solis, Norma V; Liu, Yaoping; Prasadarao, Nemani V; Filler, Scott G; McBride, Anne E

    2013-04-01

    Candida albicans causes both mucosal and disseminated infections, and its capacity to grow as both yeast and hyphae is a key virulence factor. Hyphal formation is a type of polarized growth, and members of the SR (serine-arginine) family of RNA-binding proteins influence polarized growth of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Therefore, we investigated whether SR-like proteins affect filamentous growth and virulence of C. albicans. BLAST searches with S. cerevisiae SR-like protein Npl3 (ScNpl3) identified two C. albicans proteins: CaNpl3, an apparent ScNpl3 ortholog, and Slr1, another SR-like RNA-binding protein with no close S. cerevisiae ortholog. Whereas ScNpl3 was critical for growth, deletion of NPL3 in C. albicans resulted in few phenotypic changes. In contrast, the slr1Δ/Δ mutant had a reduced growth rate in vitro, decreased filamentation, and impaired capacity to damage epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. Mice infected intravenously with the slr1Δ/Δ mutant strain had significantly prolonged survival compared to that of mice infected with the wild-type or slr1Δ/Δ mutant complemented with SLR1 (slr1Δ/Δ+SLR1) strain, without a concomitant decrease in kidney fungal burden. Histopathology, however, revealed differential localization of slr1Δ/Δ hyphal and yeast morphologies within the kidney. Mice infected with slr1Δ/Δ cells also had an increased brain fungal burden, which correlated with increased invasion of brain, but not umbilical vein, endothelial cells in vitro. The enhanced brain endothelial cell invasion was likely due to the increased surface exposure of the Als3 adhesin on slr1Δ/Δ cells. Our results indicate that Slr1 is an SR-like protein that influences C. albicans growth, filamentation, host cell interactions, and virulence.

  10. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Pack, Chan-Gi; Terajima, Hideki; Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki; Kinjo, Masataka; Taguchi, Hideki

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  11. Photodynamic therapy with Pc 4 induces apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Lam, Minh; Jou, Paul C; Lattif, Ali A; Lee, Yoojin; Malbasa, Christi L; Mukherjee, Pranab K; Oleinick, Nancy L; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Cooper, Kevin D; Baron, Elma D

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of drug resistance necessitates the development of novel antifungal agents against infections caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens, such as Candida albicans. Elucidation of apoptosis in yeast-like fungi may provide a basis for future therapies. In mammalian cells, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been demonstrated to generate reactive oxygen species, leading to immediate oxidative modifications of biological molecules and resulting in apoptotic cell death. In this report, we assess the in vitro cytotoxicity and mechanism of PDT, using the photosensitizer Pc 4, in planktonic C. albicans. Confocal image analysis confirmed that Pc 4 localizes to cytosolic organelles, including mitochondria. A colony formation assay showed that 1.0 μM Pc 4 followed by light at 2.0 J cm(-2) reduced cell survival by 4 logs. XTT (2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide) assay revealed that Pc 4-PDT impaired fungal metabolic activity, which was confirmed using the FUN-1 (2-chloro-4-[2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene]-1-phenylquinolinium iodide) fluorescence probe. Furthermore, we observed changes in nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis, which were substantiated by increased externalization of phosphatidylserine and DNA fragmentation following Pc 4-PDT. These data indicate that Pc 4-PDT can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. Therefore, a better understanding of the process will be helpful, as PDT may become a useful treatment option for candidiasis.

  12. Photodynamic inactivation of Candida albicans by a tetracationic tentacle porphyrin and its analogue without intrinsic charges in presence of fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Ezequiel D; Mora, S Jimena; Alvarez, M Gabriela; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2016-03-01

    The photodynamic inactivation mediated by 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(3-N,N-dimethylaminopropoxy)phenyl]porphyrin (TAPP) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(3-N,N,N-trimethylaminepropoxy)phenyl]porphyrin (TAPP(4+)) were compared in Candida albicans cells. A strong binding affinity was found between these porphyrins and the yeast cells. Photosensitized inactivation of C. albicans increased with both photosensitizer concentration and irradiation time. After 30 min irradiation, a high photoinactivation (∼5 log) was found for C. albicans treated with 5 μM porphyrin. Also, the photoinactivation of yeast cells was still elevated after two washing steps. However, the photocytotoxicity decreases with an increase in the cell density from 10(6) to 10(8) cells/mL. The high photodynamic activity of these porphyrins was also established by growth delay experiments. This C. albicans strain was susceptible to fluconazole with a MIC of 1.0 μg/mL. The effect of photosensitization and the action of fluconazole were combined to eradicate C. albicans. After a PDI treatment with 1 μM porphyrin and 30 min irradiation, the value of MIC decreased to 0.25 μg/mL. In addition, a complete arrest in cell growth was found by combining both effects. TAPP was similarly effective to photoinactivate C. albicans than TAPP(4+). This porphyrin without intrinsic positive charges contains basic amino groups, which can be protonated at physiological pH. Moreover, an enhancement in the antifungal action was found using both therapies because lower doses of the agents were required to achieve cell death.

  13. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  14. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  15. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  16. A human in vitro granuloma model using heat killed Candida albicans cells immobilized on plastic culture wells.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, D E; Peters, J H; Gahr, M

    1997-06-01

    A new model for studying the initial events of granuloma formation in vitro is presented using heat killed Candida albicans immobilized on the surface of plastic culture wells. Human monocytes were induced to accumulate and to proliferate, forming multinucleated giant cells (MGC) and epitheloid cells within 4 days of culture. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6 were detected in culture supernatants. These monokines, and additionally macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), were also detected immunocytochemically. The granuloma formation was inhibited by Dexamethasone (Dex), Pentoxifylline (POF), or interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in a dose-dependent manner. Antibodies to M-CSF reduced the granuloma formation to a great extent with a striking reduction of monocyte proliferation. Using antibodies to TNF-alpha the authors found a complete inhibition of the granuloma including MGC formation and monocyte proliferation.

  17. Cell-wall composition and structure of yeast cells and conjugation tubes of Tremella mesenterica.

    PubMed

    Reid, I D; Bartnicki-Garcia, S

    1976-09-01

    Cell walls prepared from vegetative yeast cells and from hormone-induced conjugation tubes of the basidiomycete Tremella mesenterica had similar compositions. Evidence was found for 1,3-alpha-glucan (yeast 38%, tube 25%), 1,3-beta-1,6-beta-glucan (yeast 33%, tube 48%) and chitin (both less than 3%) in the walls. The walls also contained xylose (5 to 7%), mannose (6%), glucuronic acid (approx. 2%), and traces of galactose. Protein amounted to less than 2% of the wall weight. The cell capsule was very insoluble and could not be removed from the cell wall. The conjugation hormone did not appear to exert its effect on cell shape by causing gross changes in wall composition.

  18. Rapid identification of Candida albicans by using Albicans ID and fluoroplate agar plates.

    PubMed Central

    Rousselle, P; Freydiere, A M; Couillerot, P J; de Montclos, H; Gille, Y

    1994-01-01

    Two commercially available agar media, Albicans ID and Fluoroplate, that use a chromogenic or a fluorogenic substrate for the detection and identification of Candida albicans were evaluated. From 1,006 clinical samples containing 723 yeast strains, 352 C. albicans strains were detected with either of the two media. The sensitivity of each of the two media was 93.8% and the specificity was 98.6%, with five false-positive reactions for Candida tropicalis and no false-negative reactions. PMID:7883894

  19. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  20. Cell-cycle analyses using thymidine analogues in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Anda, Silje; Boye, Erik; Grallert, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Thymidine analogues are powerful tools when studying DNA synthesis including DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, these analogues have been reported to have severe effects on cell-cycle progression and growth, the very processes being investigated in most of these studies. Here, we have analyzed the effects of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) and 5-Chloro-2'-deoxyuridine (CldU) using fission yeast cells and optimized the labelling procedure. We find that both analogues affect the cell cycle, but that the effects can be mitigated by using the appropriate analogue, short pulses of labelling and low concentrations. In addition, we report sequential labelling of two consecutive S phases using EdU and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Furthermore, we show that detection of replicative DNA synthesis is much more sensitive than DNA-measurements by flow cytometry.

  1. Mixed biofilms formed by C. albicans and non-albicans species: a study of microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jéssica Diane dos; Piva, Elisabete; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Most Candida infections are related to microbial biofilms often formed by the association of different species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interactions between Candida albicans and non-albicans species in biofilms formed in vitro. The non-albicans species studied were:Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata and Candida krusei. Single and mixed biofilms (formed by clinical isolates of C. albicans and non-albicans species) were developed from standardized suspensions of each strain (10(7) cells/mL), on flat-bottom 96-well microtiter plates for 48 hour. These biofilms were analyzed by counting colony-forming units (CFU/mL) in Candida HiChrome agar and by determining cell viability, using the XTT 2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide colorimetric assay. The results for both the CFU/mL count and the XTT colorimetric assay showed that all the species studied were capable of forming high levels of in vitro biofilm. The number of CFU/mL and the metabolic activity of C. albicans were reduced in mixed biofilms with non-albicans species, as compared with a single C. albicans biofilm. Among the species tested, C. krusei exerted the highest inhibitory action against C. albicans. In conclusion, C. albicans established antagonistic interactions with non-albicans Candida species in mixed biofilms.

  2. [Prevalence of Candida albicans and Candida non-albicans in clinical samples during 1999-2001].

    PubMed

    Mujica, M T; Finquelievich, J L; Jewtuchowicz, V; Iovannitti, C A

    2004-01-01

    The importance of epidemiological monitoring of yeasts involved in pathologic processes is unquestionable due to the increase of these infections over the last decade, the changes observed in species causing candidiasis, and empirical antifungal treatment. At the Mycology Center, 1006 isolates from a wide range of clinical samples were studied during 1999-2001. Candida albicans (40.3%) was the most isolated species, although, the Candida no albicans species with 54.9% showed the major prevalence. In blood cultures Candida parapsilosis (34.9%), C. albicans (30.2%) and C. tropicalis (25.6%) were recovered most frequently while C. glabrata represented only 2.3%. C. albicans with 60%-80% was the predominant specie in mucosal surface. We also detected Candida mediastinistis, which alert us over the importance at this location. Urinary tract infections caused by yeasts were more frequent in hospitalized patients, being C. albicans (47.7%), the most commonly isolated, followed by C. glabrata (24.8%) and C. tropicalis (20.0%). In the candidal onychomycoses, C. parapsilosis (37.7%) outplaced C. albicans (22.0%). Fluconazole susceptibility studies of Candida species allowed us to conclude that the majority of C. albicans islolates are susceptible, and that the highest resistance averages were observed in C. glabrata (21.41%) and C. krusei (69.23%).

  3. Expression of firefly luciferase in Candida albicans and its use in the selection of stable transformants.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Timothy C; Nawotka, Kevin A; Purchio, Anthony F; Akin, Ali R; Francis, Kevin P; Contag, Pamela R

    2006-02-01

    The infectious yeast Candida albicans is a model organism for understanding the mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity. We describe the functional expression of the firefly luciferase gene, a reporter commonly used to tag genes in many other cellular systems. Due to a non-standard codon usage by this yeast, the CUG codons were first mutated to UUG to allow functional expression. When integrated into the chromosome of C. albicans with a strong constitutive promoter, cells bioluminesce when provided with luciferin substrate in their media. When fused to the inducible promoter from the HWP1 gene, expression and bioluminescence was only detected in cultures conditioning hyphal growth. We further used the luciferase gene as a selection to isolate transformed cell lines from clinical isolates of C. albicans, using a high-density screening strategy that purifies transformed colonies by virtue of light emission. This strategy requires no drug or auxotrophic selectable marker, and we were thus able to generate stable transformants of clinical isolates that are identical to the parental strain in all aspects tested, other than their bioluminescence. The firefly luciferase gene can, therefore, be used as a sensitive reporter to analyze gene function both in laboratory and clinical isolates of this medically important yeast.

  4. β-(1,3)-Glucan Unmasking in Some Candida albicans Mutants Correlates with Increases in Cell Wall Surface Roughness and Decreases in Cell Wall Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasim, Sahar; Allison, David P; Retterer, Scott T; Hopke, Alex; Wheeler, Robert T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Reynolds, Todd B

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common human fungal pathogens, causing a broad range of infections, including life-threatening systemic infections. The cell wall of C. albicans is the interface between the fungus and the innate immune system. The cell wall is composed of an outer layer enriched in mannosylated glycoproteins (mannan) and an inner layer enriched in β-(1,3)-glucan and chitin. Detection of C. albicans by Dectin-1, a C-type signaling lectin specific for β-(1,3)-glucan, is important for the innate immune system to recognize systemic fungal infections. Increased exposure of β-(1,3)-glucan to the immune system occurs when the mannan layer is altered or removed in a process called unmasking. Nanoscale changes to the cell wall during unmasking were explored in live cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two mutants, the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants, were selected as representatives that exhibit modest and strong unmasking, respectively. Comparisons of the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants to the wild type reveal morphological changes in their cell walls that correlate with decreases in cell wall elasticity. In addition, AFM tips functionalized with Dectin-1 revealed that the forces of binding of Dectin-1 to all of the strains were similar, but the frequency of binding was highest for the kre5Δ/Δ mutant, decreased for the cho1Δ/Δ mutant, and rare for the wild type. These data show that nanoscale changes in surface topology are correlated with increased Dectin-1 adhesion and decreased cell wall elasticity. AFM, using tips functionalized with immunologically relevant molecules, can map epitopes of the cell wall and increase our understanding of pathogen recognition by the immune system.

  5. The effect of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to heat-polymerized acrylic resin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Xerostomia can diminish the quality of life, leads to changes in normal chemical composition of saliva and oral microbiata, and increases the risk for opportunistic infections, such as Candida albicans. Various artificial salivas have been considered for patients with xerostomia. However, the knowledge on the antifungal and antiadhesive activity of artificial saliva substitutes is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate influence of two artificial salivas on the adhesion of Candida albicans to the polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two commercial artificial salivas (Saliva Orthana and Biotene Oral Balance Gel) were selected. 45 polymethylmethacrylate disc specimens were prepared and randomly allocated into 3 groups; Saliva Orthana, Biotene-Oral Balance gel and distilled water. Specimens were stored in the artificial saliva or in the sterile distilled water for 60 minutes at 37℃. Then they were exposed to yeast suspensions including Candida albicans. Yeast cells were counted using ×40 magnification under a light microscope and data were analysed. RESULTS Analysis of data indicated statistically significant difference in adhesion of Candida albicans among all experimental groups (P=.000). Findings indicated that Saliva Orthana had higher adhesion scores than the Biotene Oral Balance gel and distilled water (P<.05). CONCLUSION In comparison of Saliva Orthana, the use of Biotene Oral Balance Gel including lysozyme, lactoferrin and peroxidase may be an appropriate treatment method to prevent of adhesion of Candida albicans and related infections in patients with xerostomia. PMID:25932306

  6. Thiazolidinedione-8 Alters Symbiotic Relationship in C. albicans-S. mutans Dual Species Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Mark; Ginsburg, Isaac; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron

    2016-01-01

    The small molecule, thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8) was shown to impair biofilm formation of various microbial pathogens, including the fungus Candida albicans and Streptococcus mutans. Previously, we have evaluated the specific molecular mode of S-8 action against C. albicans biofilm-associated pathogenicity. In this study we investigated the influence of S-8 on dual species, C. albicans-S. mutans biofilm. We show that in the presence of S-8 a reduction of the co-species biofilm formation occurred with a major effect on C. albicans. Biofilm biomass and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production were significantly reduced by S-8. Moreover, the agent caused oxidative stress associated with a strong induction of reactive oxygen species and hydrogen peroxide uptake inhibition by a mixed biofilm. In addition, S-8 altered symbiotic relationship between these species by a complex mechanism. Streptococcal genes associated with quorum sensing (QS) (comDE and luxS), EPS production (gtfBCD and gbpB), as well as genes related to protection against oxidative stress (nox and sodA) were markedly upregulated by S-8. In contrast, fungal genes related to hyphae formation (hwp1), adhesion (als3), hydrophobicity (csh1), and oxidative stress response (sod1, sod2, and cat1) were downregulated in the presence of S-8. In addition, ywp1 gene associated with yeast form of C. albicans was induced by S-8, which is correlated with appearance of mostly yeast cells in S-8 treated dual species biofilms. We concluded that S-8 disturbs symbiotic balance between C. albicans and S. mutans in dual species biofilm. PMID:26904013

  7. Deletion of the Candida albicans PIR32 results in increased virulence, stress response, and upregulation of cell wall chitin deposition.

    PubMed

    Bahnan, Wael; Koussa, Joseph; Younes, Samer; Abi Rizk, Marybel; Khalil, Bassem; El Sitt, Sally; Hanna, Samer; El-Sibai, Mirvat; Khalaf, Roy A

    2012-08-01

    Candida albicans is a common opportunistic pathogen that causes a wide variety of diseases in a human immunocompromised host leading to death. In a pathogen, cell wall proteins are important for stability as well as for acting as antigenic determinants and virulence factors. Pir32 is a cell wall protein and member of the Pir protein family previously shown to be upregulated in response to macrophage contact and whose other member, Pir1, was found to be necessary for cell wall rigidity. The purpose of this study is to characterize Pir32 by generating a homozygous null strain and comparing the phenotype of the null with that of the wild-type parental strain as far as filamentation, virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, resistance to oxidative stress and cell wall disrupting agents, in addition to adhesion, biofilm capacities, and cell wall chitin content. Our mutant was shown to be hyperfilamentous, resistant to sodium dodecyl sulfate, hydrogen peroxide, sodium chloride, and more virulent in a mouse model when compared to the wild type. These results were unexpected, considering that most cell wall mutations weaken the wall and render it more susceptible to external stress factors and suggests the possibility of a cell surface compensatory mechanism. As such, we measured cell wall chitin deposition and found a twofold increase in the mutant, possibly explaining the above-observed phenotypes.

  8. Yeast Modulation of Human Dendritic Cell Cytokine Secretion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ida M.; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  9. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ida M; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Arneborg, Nils; Jespersen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs) appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications beyond the current

  10. Raman scattering evidence of hydrohalite formation on frozen yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Okotrub, K A; Surovtsev, N V

    2013-02-01

    We studied yeast cells in physiological solution during freezing by Raman microspectroscopy technique. The purpose was to find out the origin of a sharp peak near ∼3430cm(-1) in Raman spectrum of frozen mammalian cells, observed earlier (J. Dong et al., Biophys. J. 99 (2010) 2453), which presumably could be used as an indicator of intracellar ice appearance. We have shown that this line (actually doublet of 3408 and 3425cm(-1)) corresponds to Raman spectrum of hydrohalite (NaCl⋅2H(2)O), which is formed as the result of the eutectic crystallization of the liquid solution around the cells. We also show that the spatial distribution of hydrohalite in the sample significantly depends on the cooling rate. At lower cooling rate (1°C/min), products of eutectic crystallization form layer on the cell surface which thickness varies for different cells and can reach ∼1μm in thickness. At higher cooling rate (20°C/min), the hydrohalite distribution appears more homogeneous, in the sample, and the eutectic crystallization layer around the cells was estimated to be less than ∼20nm. These experimental results are consistent with scenarios predicted by the two-factor hypothesis for freezing induced cell injury. This work demonstrates a potential of Raman microspectroscopy to study peculiarities of the eutectic crystallization around single cells in vivo with the high spatial resolution.

  11. The effect of cinnamaldehyde on the growth and the morphology of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuuki; Hasumi, Yayoi; Abe, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Yayoi

    2013-03-01

    We examined the viability and morphology of Candida albicans under experimental conditions after treatment with varying concentrations of cinnamaldehyde, the major component of cassia (Cinnamomum cassia), using XTT assay, fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and thin-section electron microscopy. At 10 μg/ml level, cinnamaldehyde inhibited mycelial growth, but did not affect the growth of yeast cells, metabolic activity, cell shape, or the ultrastructure of the cells. At 40 μg/ml level, cinnamaldehyde showed fungicidal activity accompanied by alteration of the membrane and interior of Candida cells. These findings indicate that cinnamaldehyde has both fungistatic and fungicidal activities against C. albicans and affects the structure of the cells.

  12. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Pathogenicity and virulence of Candida dubliniensis: comparison with C. albicans.

    PubMed

    Vilela, M M S; Kamei, K; Sano, A; Tanaka, R; Uno, J; Takahashi, I; Ito, J; Yarita, K; Miyaji, M

    2002-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a newly described fungus that is frequently isolated from the oral cavities of HIV-positive patients. Although extensive studies have been performed on the phylogeny of C. dubliniensis, little is known about the pathogenic ecology of this yeast. Here we examined aspects related to C. dubliniensis in comparison with those of C. albicans. When injected intravenously into mice, C. dubliniensis had a higher survival rate than C. albicans. Histopathological analysis disclosed that C. dubliniensis remained mostly in the yeast form in the infected organs, whereas C. albicans changed into the mycelial form. The host inflammatory reaction was aggressive with C. dubliniensis infection and mild with C. albicans infection. Co-culture of the yeasts with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes disclosed that C. dubliniensis is more vulnerable to the fungicidal activity of leukocytes than C. albicans. C. dubliniensis was also more susceptible to the toxic effect of hydrogen peroxide. When cultured in vitro, C. dubliniensis grew more slowly than C. albicans, but the formation of germ tubes was faster. When the fungi were cultured in RPMI 1640, a fetal bovine serum supplement suppressed the growth of C. dubliniensis but enhanced that of C. albicans. These results clearly indicated that C. dubliniensis is less virulence than C. albicans.

  14. In vitro photodynamic inactivation effects of cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers on clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans planktonic cells and biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaona; Fang, Yanyan; Ye, Zulin; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: An increasing prevalence of Candida infections has emerged with the wide use of immune-suppressants and antibiotics. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) as a new approach to treat localized Candida infections is an emerging and promising field nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of photodynamic therapy using two new Cationic benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizers(P1 and P2) against strains of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans. Methods: Suspensions and biofilms of Candida species were incubated with P1 and P2 concentrations (0.25 50 μM) for 30 min followed by 532nm laser irradiation. For planktonic suspensions, viability of cells was assayed by CFU counting. For biofilms, the metabolic activity was evaluated by XTT. Results: In PDI of a planktonic culture of clinical fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans, P2 showed the higher efficacy. After incubation with 25 μM of P2 for 30 min and irradiation with 532nm laser (36 J cm-2), the viability of C. albicans planktonic cells decreased by 3.84 log10. For biofilm cells, a higher light dose of 75 mW cm-2 was necessary to achieve 97.71% metabolic activity reduction. Conclusions: The results of this investigation demonstrated that benzylidene cyclopentanone photosensitizer, P2, is an efficient photosensitizer to kill C. albicans. Moreover, single-species biofilms were less susceptible to PDT than their planktonic counterparts.

  15. Hydrothermal decomposition of yeast cells for production of proteins and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lamoolphak, Wiwat; Goto, Motonobu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Suphantharika, Manop; Muangnapoh, Chirakarn; Prommuag, Chattip; Shotipruk, Artiwan

    2006-10-11

    This study examines hydrothermal decomposition of Baker's yeast cells, used as a model for spent Brewer's yeast waste, into protein and amino acids. The reaction was carried out in a closed batch reactor at various temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C. The reaction products were separated into water-soluble and solid residue. The results demonstrated that the amount of yeast residue decreased with increasing hydrolysis temperature. After 20 min reaction in water at 250 degrees C, 78% of yeast was decomposed. The highest amount of protein produced was also obtained at this condition and was found to be 0.16 mg/mg dry yeast. The highest amount of amino acids (0.063 mg/mg dry yeast) was found at the lowest temperature tested after 15 min. The hydrolysis product obtained at 200 degrees C was tested as a nutrient source for yeast growth. The growth of yeast cells in the culture medium containing 2 w/v% of this product was comparable to that of the cells grown in the medium containing commercial yeast extract at the same concentration. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using subcritical water to potentially decompose proteinaceous waste such as spent Brewer's yeast while recovering more useful products.

  16. The human septin7 and the yeast CDC10 septin prevent Bax and copper mediated cell death in yeast.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Avital; Lapointe, Jason F; Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Jones, Natalie K; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of programmed cell death activate genetically encoded intracellular programs in a controlled manner, the most common form being apoptosis. Apoptosis is carried out through a cascade of caspase mediated proteolytic cleavages initiated by the oligomerization of Bax, a cardinal regulator of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Heterologous expression of Bax in yeast causes cell death that shares a number of similarities to processes that occur in mammalian apoptosis. A screen of a cardiac cDNA library for suppressors of Bax-mediated apoptosis identified human septin7, a protein that belongs to the septin superfamily of conserved GTP-binding proteins that share a conserved cdc/septin domain. Analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from the septin7 clone as well as the corresponding human septin7 gene revealed that a novel alternatively spliced transcript called septin7 variant4 (v4) was uncovered. Yeast cells overexpressing the human septin7 v4 cDNA were also capable of resisting copper-mediated cell death suggesting that it is not only a Bax suppressor but also an anti-apoptotic sequence. Analysis of septin7 function in a MCA1Δ yeast strain suggests that septin7 inhibits apoptosis in a caspase independent pathway. Overexpression of the yeast septin7 ortholog CDC10 also conferred resistance to the negative effects of copper as well as protecting cells from the overexpression of Bax. In contrast, septin7 was unable to prevent the increase in cell size associated with mutants lacking the endogenous yeast CDC10 gene. Taken together, our analysis suggests that anti-apoptosis is a novel yet evolutionarily conserved property of the septin7 sub-family of septins.

  17. Hydrolysis of whey lactose using CTAB-permeabilized yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manav B; Kumar, Harish

    2009-01-01

    Disposal of lactose in whey and whey permeates is one of the most significant problems with regard to economics and environmental impact faced by the dairy industries. The enzymatic hydrolysis of whey lactose to glucose and galactose by beta-galactosidase constitutes the basis of the most biotechnological processes currently developed to exploit the sugar content of whey. Keeping this in view, lactose hydrolysis in whey was performed using CTAB permeabilized Kluyveromyces marxianus cells. Permeabilization of K. marxianus cells in relation to beta-galactosidase activity was carried out using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) to avoid the problem of enzyme extraction. Different process parameters (biomass load, pH, temperature, and incubation time) were optimized to enhance the lactose hydrolysis in whey. Maximum hydrolysis (90.5%) of whey lactose was observed with 200 mg DW yeast biomass after 90 min of incubation period at optimum pH of 6.5 and temperature of 40 degrees C.

  18. Stochastic model of yeast cell-cycle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuping; Qian, Minping; Ouyang, Qi; Deng, Minghua; Li, Fangting; Tang, Chao

    2006-07-01

    Biological functions in living cells are controlled by protein interaction and genetic networks. These molecular networks should be dynamically stable against various fluctuations which are inevitable in the living world. In this paper, we propose and study a stochastic model for the network regulating the cell cycle of the budding yeast. The stochasticity in the model is controlled by a temperature-like parameter β. Our simulation results show that both the biological stationary state and the biological pathway are stable for a wide range of “temperature”. There is, however, a sharp transition-like behavior at βc, below which the dynamics are dominated by noise. We also define a pseudo energy landscape for the system in which the biological pathway can be seen as a deep valley.

  19. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization.

  20. A yeast screen system for aromatase inhibitors and ligands for androgen receptor: yeast cells transformed with aromatase and androgen receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Cruz, F D; Chen, S

    1999-01-01

    Endocrine disruptors are hormone mimics that modify hormonal action in humans and animals. It is thought that some endocrine disruptors modify estrogen and androgen action in humans and animals by suppressing aromatase activity. Aromatase cytochrome P450 is the key enzyme that converts C19 androgens to aromatic C18 estrogenic steroids. We have developed a novel aromatase inhibitor screening method that allows us to identify antiaromatase activity of various environmental chemicals. The screen was developed by coexpressing the human aromatase and the mouse androgen receptor in yeast cells, which carry the androgen-responsive ss-galactosidase reporter plasmid. Functional expression of aromatase in yeast has been demonstrated using the [3H]-water release assay with intact cells as well as with yeast microsomes. The aromatase activity could be blocked by known aromatase inhibitors such as aminoglutethimide (AG). Yeast-produced androgen receptors were able to transactivate a yeast basal promoter linked to an androgen-responsive element in response to androgens. The resultant triple yeast transformant responded to the treatment of testosterone, androstenedione, or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT). In the absence of the aromatase inhibitor AG, transcriptional activation was observed only for the nonaromatizable androgen 5 alpha-DHT. However, the two aromatizable androgens (testosterone and androstenedione) induced the reporter activity in the presence of AG. Using this yeast-based assay, we confirmed that two flavones, chrysin and alpha-naphtholflavone, are inhibitors of aromatase. Thus, this yeast system allows us to develop a high-throughput screening method, without using radioactive substrate, to identify aromatase inhibitors as well as new ligands (nonaromatizable androgen mimics) for the androgen receptors. In addition, this screening method also allows us to distinguish nonandrogenic aromatase inhibitors from inhibitors with androgenic activity. This yeast

  1. Biosynthesis of amorphous mesoporous aluminophosphates using yeast cells as templates

    SciTech Connect

    Sifontes, Ángela B.; González, Gema; Tovar, Leidy M.; Méndez, Franklin J.; Gomes, Maria E.; Cañizales, Edgar; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Villalobos, Hector; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Amorphous aluminophosphates can take place using yeast as template. ► A mesoporous material was obtained. ► The specific surface area after calcinations ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. -- Abstract: In this study aluminophosphates have been synthesized from aluminum isopropoxide and phosphoric acid solutions using yeast cells as template. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis; X-ray diffraction; Fourier transform infrared; N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms; scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and potentiometric titration with N-butylamine for determination of: thermal stability; crystalline structure; textural properties; morphology and surface acidity, respectively. The calcined powders consisted of an intimate mixture of amorphous and crystallized AlPO particles with sizes between 23 and 30 nm. The average pore size observed is 13–16 nm and the specific surface area after calcinations (at 650 °C) ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}.

  2. Effect of edible sesame oil on growth of clinical isolates of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Toshiko; Nishio, Junko; Okada, Shinobu

    2014-07-01

    Elderly individuals are at increased risk of oral thrush (oral candidiasis) due to decreased saliva secretion. Due to their antimicrobial properties, edible oils can be effective natural agents for oral care. The objective of the present study was to compare the effects of sesame oil, which is widely used for cooking in Asian countries, and two other edible oils on the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms of five clinical isolates of Candida albicans, a causative microorganism of oral thrush. We assessed the effect of each oil in concentrations of 0.078%, 0.156%, and 0.313% on growth of the mycelial forms of the clinical isolates over 24 hr using the crystal violet method. We also evaluated the effect of each oil on growth of the yeast forms by counting the number of viable yeast cells after culturing in the oils for 24 hr. Sesame oil inhibited the growth of both mycelial and yeast forms. Safflower and olive oil also inhibited the growth of both forms of C. albicans but to a lesser extent than sesame oil. The ability to inhibit the growth of the mycelial form correlated with sesame oil concentration. Roasting influenced growth inhibition ability and high-roasted sesame oil most effectively inhibited the yeast form. The growth inhibitory effect differed among the five isolates. We hypothesize that the sesamin and fatty acid components of sesame oil are involved in its antifungal activity.

  3. Increased expression of Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor, in isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ollert, M W; Wende, C; Görlich, M; McMullan-Vogel, C G; Borg-von Zepelin, M; Vogel, C W; Korting, H C

    1995-01-01

    The increased prevalence and the severity of oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients are attributed exclusively to the virus-induced immune deficiency of the host. The present study was aimed at answering the question of whether Candida albicans secretory proteinase, a putative virulence factor of the opportunistic C. albicans yeast, has any potential influence on the clinical manifestation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in HIV-positive patients. We measured the secretory proteinase activities of clinical C. albicans isolates from the oropharynges of either HIV-positive individuals (n = 100) or a control group (n = 122). The mean secretory proteinase activity of C. albicans isolates from the HIV-positive group (4,255 +/- 2,372 U/liter) was significantly higher compared with that of isolates from the control group (2,324 +/- 1,487 U/liter) (P < 0.05). The higher level of secretory proteinase activity in the culture supernatants of individual C. albicans isolates correlated with the increased level of proteinase expression on the cell surface, as revealed by cytofluorometry, and with higher levels of secretion of the immunodetectable protein, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). Proteinase activity within the population of C. albicans isolates from HIV-positive individuals was independent of the patient's clinical disease stage and the CD4+/CD8+ cell numbers. Furthermore, no correlation of the proteinase activities with the C. albicans serotype was found, although C. albicans serotype B was significantly more frequent in the HIV-positive group (40%) compared with that in the control group (12%). However, a positive correlation of proteinase activity to antifungal susceptibility was evident.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8567880

  4. Culture media profoundly affect Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis growth, adhesion and biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Weerasekera, Manjula M; Wijesinghe, Gayan K; Jayarathna, Thilini A; Gunasekara, Chinthika P; Fernando, Neluka; Kottegoda, Nilwala; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-01-01

    As there are sparse data on the impact of growth media on the phenomenon of biofilm development for Candida we evaluated the efficacy of three culture media on growth, adhesion and biofilm formation of two pathogenic yeasts, Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis. The planktonic phase yeast growth, either as monocultures or mixed cultures, in sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), yeast nitrogen base (YNB), and RPMI 1640 was compared, and adhesion as well as biofilm formation were monitored using MTT and crystal violet (CV) assays and scanning electron microscopy. Planktonic cells of C. albicans, C. tropicalis and their 1:1 co-culture showed maximal growth in SDB. C. albicans/C. tropicalis adhesion was significantly facilitated in RPMI 1640 although the YNB elicited the maximum growth for C. tropicalis. Similarly, the biofilm growth was uniformly higher for both species in RPMI 1640, and C. tropicalis was the slower biofilm former in all three media. Scanning electron microscopy images tended to confirm the results of MTT and CV assay. Taken together, our data indicate that researchers should pay heed to the choice of laboratory culture media when comparing relative planktonic/biofilm growth of Candida. There is also a need for standardisation of biofilm development media so as to facilitate cross comparisons between laboratories. PMID:27706381

  5. An Assessment of Growth Media Enrichment on Lipid Metabolome and the Concurrent Phenotypic Properties of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Jha, Jaykar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    A critical question among the researchers working on fungal lipid biology is whether the use of an enriched growth medium can affect the lipid composition of a cell and, therefore, contribute to the observed phenotypes. One presumption is that enriched medias, such as YPD (yeast extract, peptone and dextrose), are likely to contain lipids, which may homogenize with the yeast lipids and play a role in masking the actual differences in the observed phenotypes or lead to an altered phenotype altogether. To address this issue, we compared the lipids of Candida albicans, our fungus of interest, grown in YPD or in a defined media such as YNB (yeast nitrogen base). Mass spectrometry-based lipid analyses showed differences in the levels of phospholipids, including phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol, lyso-phospholipids; sphingolipids, such as mannosyldiinositolphosphorylceramide; and sterols, such as ergostatetraenol. Significant differences were observed in 70 lipid species between the cells grown in the two media, but the two growth conditions did not affect the morphological characteristics of C. albicans. The lipid profiles of the YNB- and YPD-grown C. albicans cells did vary, but these differences did not influence their response to the majority of the tested agents. Rather, the observed differences could be attributed to the slow growth rate of the Candida cells in YNB compared to YPD. Notably, the altered lipid changes between the two media did impact the susceptibility to some drugs. This data provided evidence that changes in media can lead to certain lipid alterations, which may affect specific pathways but, in general, do not affect the majority of the phenotypic properties of C. albicans. It was determined that either YNB or YPD may be suitable for the growth and lipid analysis of C. albicans, depending upon the experimental requirements, but additional precautions are necessary when correlating the phenotypes with the lipids. PMID:25423360

  6. Critical role for CaFEN1 and CaFEN12 of Candida albicans in cell wall integrity and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Alfatah, Md.; Bari, Vinay K.; Nahar, Anubhav S.; Bijlani, Swati; Ganesan, K.

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids are involved in several cellular functions, including maintenance of cell wall integrity. To gain insight into the role of individual genes of sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, we have screened Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deleted in these genes for sensitivity to cell wall perturbing agents calcofluor white and congo red. Only deletants of FEN1 and SUR4 genes were found to be sensitive to both these agents. Candida albicans strains deleted in their orthologs, CaFEN1 and CaFEN12, respectively, also showed comparable phenotypes, and a strain deleted for both these genes was extremely sensitive to cell wall perturbing agents. Deletion of these genes was reported earlier to sensitise cells to amphotericin B (AmB), which is a polyene drug that kills the cells mainly by binding and sequestering ergosterol from the plasma membrane. Here we show that their AmB sensitivity is likely due to their cell wall defect. Further, we show that double deletant of C. albicans is defective in hyphae formation as well as biofilm development. Together this study reveals that deletion of FEN1 and SUR4 orthologs of C. albicans leads to impaired cell wall integrity and biofilm formation, which in turn sensitise cells to AmB. PMID:28079132

  7. Methods of Synchronization of Yeast Cells for the Analysis of Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Juanes, M Angeles

    2017-01-01

    Cell division is a fascinating and fundamental process that sustains life. By this process, unicellular organisms reproduce and multicellular organisms sustain development, growth, and tissue repair. Division of a mother cell gives rise to two daughter cells according to an ordered set of events within four successive phases called G1 (gap1), S (DNA Synthesis), G2 (gap2), and M (Mitosis) phase. How these different phases are orchestrated to ensure the physical separation of the two daughter cells is a tightly regulated process. Indeed, inappropriate cell division could lead to uncontrolled cell proliferation and ultimately to cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model system for unraveling the secrets of cell division. A large community of researchers has chosen budding yeast as a model because of its advantages: rapid growth in simple and economical media, tractable genetics, powerful biochemistry, cell biology, and proteomics approaches. Furthermore, the cell cycle mechanisms, as elucidated in yeast, are conserved in higher eukaryotes. The ability to synchronize and get large numbers of cells in a particular stage of the cell cycle is crucial to properly explore the mechanisms of the cell cycle. An overview of the most common yeast synchronization techniques has been compiled in this chapter.

  8. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  9. Evaluation of Antifungal Activity and Mechanism of Action of Citral against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Maria Clerya Alvino; Bezerra, André Parente de Brito; de Sousa, Janiere Pereira; Guerra, Felipe Queiroga Sarmento; Lima, Edeltrudes de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a yeast that commensally inhabits the human body and can cause opportunistic or pathogenic infections. Objective. To investigate the antifungal activity of citral against C. albicans. Methodology. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined by the broth microdilution techniques. We also investigated possible citral action on cell walls (0.8 M sorbitol), cell membranes (citral to ergosterol binding), the time-kill curve, and biological activity on the yeast's morphology. Results. The MIC and MFC of citral were, respectively, 64 µg/mL and 256 µg/mL. Involvement with the cell wall and ergosterol binding were excluded as possible mechanisms of action. In the morphological interference assay, it was observed that the product inhibited pseudohyphae and chlamydoconidia formation. The MIC and the MFC of citral required only 4 hours of exposure to effectively kill 99.9% of the inoculum. Conclusion. Citral showed in vitro antifungal potential against strains of C. albicans. Citral's mechanism of action does not involve the cell wall or ergosterol, and further study is needed to completely describe its effects before being used in the future as a component of new antifungals. PMID:25250053

  10. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Vanessa; Mattivi, Fulvio; Silvestri, Romano; La Regina, Giuseppe; Falcone, Claudio; Mazzoni, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components. PMID:22970337

  11. The Monoterpene Carvacrol Generates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaillot, Julien; Tebbji, Faiza; Remmal, Adnane; Boone, Charlie; Brown, Grant W; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Sellam, Adnane

    2015-08-01

    The monoterpene carvacrol, the major component of oregano and thyme oils, is known to exert potent antifungal activity against the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. This monoterpene has been the subject of a considerable number of investigations that uncovered extensive pharmacological properties, including antifungal and antibacterial effects. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we used integrative chemogenomic approaches, including genome-scale chemical-genetic and transcriptional profiling, to uncover the mechanism of action of carvacrol associated with its antifungal property. Our results clearly demonstrated that fungal cells require the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway to resist carvacrol. The mutants most sensitive to carvacrol in our genome-wide competitive fitness assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressed mutations of the transcription factor Hac1 and the endonuclease Ire1, which is required for Hac1 activation by removing a nonconventional intron from the 3' region of HAC1 mRNA. Confocal fluorescence live-cell imaging revealed that carvacrol affects the morphology and the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcriptional profiling of pathogenic yeast C. albicans cells treated with carvacrol demonstrated a bona fide UPR transcriptional signature. Ire1 activity detected by the splicing of HAC1 mRNA in C. albicans was activated by carvacrol. Furthermore, carvacrol was found to potentiate antifungal activity of the echinocandin antifungal caspofungin and UPR inducers dithiothreitol and tunicamycin against C. albicans. This comprehensive chemogenomic investigation demonstrated that carvacrol exerts its antifungal activity by altering ER integrity, leading to ER stress and the activation of the UPR to restore protein-folding homeostasis.

  12. The Monoterpene Carvacrol Generates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chaillot, Julien; Tebbji, Faiza; Remmal, Adnane; Boone, Charlie; Brown, Grant W.

    2015-01-01

    The monoterpene carvacrol, the major component of oregano and thyme oils, is known to exert potent antifungal activity against the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. This monoterpene has been the subject of a considerable number of investigations that uncovered extensive pharmacological properties, including antifungal and antibacterial effects. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we used integrative chemogenomic approaches, including genome-scale chemical-genetic and transcriptional profiling, to uncover the mechanism of action of carvacrol associated with its antifungal property. Our results clearly demonstrated that fungal cells require the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway to resist carvacrol. The mutants most sensitive to carvacrol in our genome-wide competitive fitness assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressed mutations of the transcription factor Hac1 and the endonuclease Ire1, which is required for Hac1 activation by removing a nonconventional intron from the 3′ region of HAC1 mRNA. Confocal fluorescence live-cell imaging revealed that carvacrol affects the morphology and the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcriptional profiling of pathogenic yeast C. albicans cells treated with carvacrol demonstrated a bona fide UPR transcriptional signature. Ire1 activity detected by the splicing of HAC1 mRNA in C. albicans was activated by carvacrol. Furthermore, carvacrol was found to potentiate antifungal activity of the echinocandin antifungal caspofungin and UPR inducers dithiothreitol and tunicamycin against C. albicans. This comprehensive chemogenomic investigation demonstrated that carvacrol exerts its antifungal activity by altering ER integrity, leading to ER stress and the activation of the UPR to restore protein-folding homeostasis. PMID:26014932

  13. Yeast extracellular proteases.

    PubMed

    Ogrydziak, D M

    1993-01-01

    Many species of yeast secrete significant amounts of protease(s). In this article, results of numerous surveys of yeast extracellular protease production have been compiled and inconsistencies in the data and limitations of the methodology have been examined. Regulation, purification, characterization, and processing of yeast extracellular proteases are reviewed. Results obtained from the sequences of cloned genes, especially the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bar protease, the Candida albicans acid protease, and the Yarrowia lipolytica alkaline protease, have been emphasized. Biotechnological applications and the medical relevance of yeast extracellular proteases are covered. Yeast extracellular proteases have potential in beer and wine stabilization, and they probably contribute to pathogenicity of Candida spp. Yeast extracellular protease genes also provide secretion and processing signals for yeast expression systems designed for secretion of heterologous proteins. Coverage of the secretion of foreign proteases such as prochymosin, urokinase, and tissue plasminogen activator by yeast in included.

  14. Continuous beer fermentation using immobilized yeast cell bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Brányik, Tomás; Vicente, António A; Dostálek, Pavel; Teixeira, José A

    2005-01-01

    Traditional beer fermentation and maturation processes use open fermentation and lager tanks. Although these vessels had previously been considered indispensable, during the past decades they were in many breweries replaced by large production units (cylindroconical tanks). These have proved to be successful, both providing operating advantages and ensuring the quality of the final beer. Another promising contemporary technology, namely, continuous beer fermentation using immobilized brewing yeast, by contrast, has found only a limited number of industrial applications. Continuous fermentation systems based on immobilized cell technology, albeit initially successful, were condemned to failure for several reasons. These include engineering problems (excess biomass and problems with CO(2) removal, optimization of operating conditions, clogging and channeling of the reactor), unbalanced beer flavor (altered cell physiology, cell aging), and unrealized cost advantages (carrier price, complex and unstable operation). However, recent development in reactor design and understanding of immobilized cell physiology, together with application of novel carrier materials, could provide a new stimulus to both research and application of this promising technology.

  15. Live fast, die soon: cell cycle progression and lifespan in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Javier; Bru, Samuel; Ribeiro, Mariana; Clotet, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of lifespan has benefited enormously from the study of a simple model, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although a unicellular organism, yeasts undergo many of the processes directly related with aging that to some extent are conserved in mammalian cells. Nutrient-limiting conditions have been involved in lifespan extension, especially in the case of caloric restriction, which also has a direct impact on cell cycle progression. In fact, other environmental stresses (osmotic, oxidative) that interfere with normal cell cycle progression also influence the lifespan of cells, indicating a relationship between lifespan and cell cycle control. In the present review we compile and discuss new findings related to how cell cycle progression is regulated by other nutrients. We centred this review on the analysis of phosphate, also give some attention to nitrogen, and the impact of these nutrients on lifespan. PMID:28357278

  16. The conserved dual phosphorylation sites of the Candida albicans Hog1 protein are crucial for white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Han; Liang, Shen-Huan; Deng, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has a unique morphological transition between white and opaque phases. These two cells differ in virulence, mating capability, biofilm formation, and host-cell interaction. Previous studies revealed that deletion of the SSK2, PBS2, or HOG1 gene resulted in 100% opaque cell formation and suppressed the mating response. Thr-174 and Tyr-176 of the Hog1 protein are important phosphoacceptors and can be activated in response to stimuli. In this study, we first demonstrated the importance of two conserved phosphorylation sites in white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion. Six Hog1 point-mutated strains were generated, including nonphosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174A), Hog1(Y176F), and Hog1(T174A,Y176F)) and negatively charged phosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174D), Hog1(Y176D), and Hog1(T174D,Y176D)). Point mutation on Thr-174, Tyr-176 or in combination with the Hog1 protein in C. albicans MTL homozygous strains stimulated opaque cell formation at a frequency of 100%. Furthermore, mating projections of point-mutated strains were significantly shorter and their mating efficiencies and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesive numbers were lower than those of the wild-type. By investigating the effects of Hog1 phosphorylation in ssk1Δ and sln1Δ, we also demonstrate that the phosphorylation intensity of Hog1p is directly involved in the white-opaque switching. Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate that dual phosphorylation sites of C. albicans are crucial for white-opaque transition, sexual mating, and pheromone-induced cell adhesion.

  17. Effect of exogenous administration of Candida albicans autoregulatory alcohols in a murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Martins, Margarida; Lazzell, Anna L; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2012-08-01

    Candida albicans supernatants contain a mixture of autoregulatory alcohols. In vitro, when added individually or in combination, these alcohols inhibit the yeast to filamentous form conversion. Here we evaluate the in vivo effect of the exogenous administration of a Cocktail solution simulating the composition of alcohols present in a C. albicans culture supernatant (1 ml; 94 μmol l(-1) isoamyl alcohol, 70 μmol l(-1) 2-phenylethanol, 3.2 n mol l(-1) E -nerolidol, and 18 n mol l(-1) E,E -farnesol) using the well established murine model of hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. Mice injected intraperitoneally with the Cocktail solution demonstrated increased survival and decreased organ fungal burden compared to control mice. Histological observations suggest that the Cocktail, to some extent, has an inhibitory effect on cell filamentation within the kidney. These findings suggest that the exogenous administration of C. albicans autoregulatory alcohols displays a protective effect during disseminated candidiasis.

  18. A Highly Conserved Kinase Is an Essential Component for Stress Tolerance in Yeast and Plant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hee; van Montagu, Marc; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    1999-05-01

    Osmotic stress (drought, salt stress) is a major limiting factor for crop productivity in the world. Because cellular responses to osmotic stress are thought to be conserved in eukaryotes and because yeast is much more amenable than plants to genetic research, a functional strategy has been performed to identify limiting steps in osmotolerance of plants based on the complementation of yeast with a plant library. A new plant cDNA that encodes a functional homologue of the yeast Dbf2 kinase enhances salt, drought, cold, and heat tolerance upon overexpression in yeast as well as in transgenic plant cells.

  19. Antifungal Action of Methylene Blue Involves Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Disruption of Redox and Membrane Homeostasis in C. albicans

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Moiz A.; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is known to cause infections ranging from superficial and systemic in immunocompromised person. In this study, we explored that the antifungal action of Methylene blue (MB) is mediated through mitochondrial dysfunction and disruption of redox and membrane homeostasis against C. albicans. We demonstrated that MB displayed its antifungal potential against C. albicans and two clinical isolates tested. We also showed that MB is effective against two non- albicans species as well. Notably, the antifungal effect of MB seems to be independent of the major drug efflux pumps transporter activity. We explored that MB treated Candida cells were sensitive on non-fermentable carbon source leading us to propose that MB inhibits mitochondria. This sensitive phenotype was reinforced with the fact that sensitivity of Candida cells to MB could be rescued upon the supplementation of ascorbic acid, an antioxidant. This clearly suggests that disturbances in redox status are linked with MB action. We further demonstrated that Candida cells were susceptible to membrane perturbing agent viz. SDS which was additionally confirmed by transmission electron micrographs showing disruption of membrane integrity. Moreover, the ergosterol levels were significantly decreased by 66% suggesting lipid compositional changes due to MB. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that MB inhibits the yeast to hyphal transition in C. albicans which is one of the major virulence attribute in most of the hyphal inducing conditions. Taken together, the data generated from present study clearly establishes MB as promising antifungal agent that could be efficiently employed in strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:27006725

  20. Cellular Structural Changes in Candida albicans Caused by the Hydroalcoholic Extract from Sapindus saponaria L.

    PubMed

    Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane S; Bonfim-Mendonça, Patricia S; Moreira, Amanda L; Ferreira, Izabel C P; Donatti, Lucelia; Fiorini, Adriana; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E

    2015-05-22

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is a disease caused by the abnormal growth of yeast-like fungi in the mucosa of the female genital tract. Candida albicans is the principal etiological agent involved in VVC, but reports have shown an increase in the prevalence of Candida non-C. albicans (CNCA) cases, which complicates VVC treatment because CNCA does not respond well to antifungal therapy. Our group has reported the in vitro antifungal activity of extracts from Sapindus saponaria L. The present study used scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to further evaluate the antifungal activity of hydroalcoholic extract from S. saponaria (HE) against yeast obtained from VVC and structural changes induced by HE. We observed the antifungal activity of HE against 125 vaginal yeasts that belonged to four different species of the Candida genus and S. cerevisae. The results suggest that saponins that are present in HE act on the cell wall or membrane of yeast at the first moments after contact, causing damage to these structures and cell lysis.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus adherence to Candida albicans hyphae is mediated by the hyphal adhesin Als3p.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian M; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Krom, Bastiaan P; Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Zhou, Han; Hoyer, Lois L; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus (St.) aureus and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans are currently among the leading nosocomial pathogens, often co-infecting critically ill patients, with high morbidity and mortality. Previous investigations have demonstrated preferential adherence of St. aureus to C. albicans hyphae during mixed biofilm growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the mechanism behind this observed interaction. C. albicans adhesin-deficient mutant strains were screened by microscopy to identify the specific receptor on C. albicans hyphae recognized by St. aureus. Furthermore, an immunoassay was developed to validate and quantify staphylococcal binding to fungal biofilms. The findings from these experiments implicated the C. albicans adhesin agglutinin-like sequence 3 (Als3p) in playing a major role in the adherence process. This association was quantitatively established using atomic force microscopy, in which the adhesion force between single cells of the two species was significantly reduced for a C. albicans mutant strain lacking als3. Confocal microscopy further confirmed these observations, as St. aureus overlaid with a purified recombinant Als3 N-terminal domain fragment (rAls3p) exhibited robust binding. Importantly, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae heterologously expressing Als3p was utilized to further confirm this adhesin as a receptor for St. aureus. Although the parental strain does not bind bacteria, expression of Als3p on the cell surface conferred upon the yeast the ability to strongly bind St. aureus. To elucidate the implications of these in vitro findings in a clinically relevant setting, an ex vivo murine model of co-infection was designed using murine tongue explants. Fluorescent microscopic images revealed extensive hyphal penetration of the epithelium typical of C. albicans mucosal infection. Interestingly, St. aureus bacterial cells were only seen within the epithelial tissue when associated with the invasive

  2. Modelling of Yeast Mating Reveals Robustness Strategies for Cell-Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weitao; Nie, Qing; Yi, Tau-Mu; Chou, Ching-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Mating of budding yeast cells is a model system for studying cell-cell interactions. Haploid yeast cells secrete mating pheromones that are sensed by the partner which responds by growing a mating projection toward the source. The two projections meet and fuse to form the diploid. Successful mating relies on precise coordination of dynamic extracellular signals, signaling pathways, and cell shape changes in a noisy background. It remains elusive how cells mate accurately and efficiently in a natural multi-cell environment. Here we present the first stochastic model of multiple mating cells whose morphologies are driven by pheromone gradients and intracellular signals. Our novel computational framework encompassed a moving boundary method for modeling both a-cells and α-cells and their cell shape changes, the extracellular diffusion of mating pheromones dynamically coupled with cell polarization, and both external and internal noise. Quantification of mating efficiency was developed and tested for different model parameters. Computer simulations revealed important robustness strategies for mating in the presence of noise. These strategies included the polarized secretion of pheromone, the presence of the α-factor protease Bar1, and the regulation of sensing sensitivity; all were consistent with data in the literature. In addition, we investigated mating discrimination, the ability of an a-cell to distinguish between α-cells either making or not making α-factor, and mating competition, in which multiple a-cells compete to mate with one α-cell. Our simulations were consistent with previous experimental results. Moreover, we performed a combination of simulations and experiments to estimate the diffusion rate of the pheromone a-factor. In summary, we constructed a framework for simulating yeast mating with multiple cells in a noisy environment, and used this framework to reproduce mating behaviors and to identify strategies for robust cell-cell interactions. PMID

  3. Microchannel-free collection and single-cell isolation of yeast cells in a suspension using liquid standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Takada, Ayako

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate a microchannel-free collection method at nodes of liquid standing waves by the vertical vibration of a suspension including yeast cells. The pattern formation of the collection of cells using standing waves in a suspension was investigated by varying the frequency and waveform of vibrations. The single-cell isolation of yeast cells was achieved using a microenclosure array set at the nodes. In addition, we succeeded in the microchannel-free collection of yeast cells in a suspension, where patterns were formed by tapping vibration. The proposed technique is very simple and we believe that it will be useful for single-cell analysis and investigation.

  4. Candida albicans adhesion to human epithelial cells and polystyrene and formation of biofilm is reduced by sub-inhibitory Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) essential oil.

    PubMed

    Sudjana, Aurelia N; Carson, Christine F; Carson, Kerry C; Riley, Thomas V; Hammer, Katherine A

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of the volatile terpene-rich oil from Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil) on the formation of biofilms and the adhesion of C. albicans cells to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Biofilm formation on polystyrene was significantly inhibited for 70% of the isolates at the lowest test concentration of 0.016% of tea tree oil (TTO) when quantified by XTT and 40% of isolates when measured by crystal violet staining. Adhesion to polystyrene, quantified by crystal violet staining, was significantly reduced for 3 isolates at 0.031%, 6 isolates at 0.062% and 0.125% and for all 7 isolates at 0.25% TTO. Reductions in adhesion were not due to loss of viability (at concentrations of ≤ 0.125%) or interactions between the TTO and polystyrene. Similarly, adhesion to buccal epithelial and HeLa cells was also significantly reduced in the presence of 0.016-0.062% TTO. Treatment with 0.125% TTO, but not 0.062%, decreased the cell surface hydrophobicity of C. albicans, indicating one potential mechanism by which adhesion may be reduced. These data demonstrate that sub-inhibitory TTO reduces the adhesion of C. albicans to both human cells and polystyrene, inhibits biofilm formation and decreases cell surface hydrophobicity.

  5. Aptamer-guided gene targeting in yeast and human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Patrick; Koh, Kyung Duk; Keskin, Havva; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is a genetic technique to modify an endogenous DNA sequence in its genomic location via homologous recombination (HR) and is useful both for functional analysis and gene therapy applications. HR is inefficient in most organisms and cell types, including mammalian cells, often limiting the effectiveness of gene targeting. Therefore, increasing HR efficiency remains a major challenge to DNA editing. Here, we present a new concept for gene correction based on the development of DNA aptamers capable of binding to a site-specific DNA binding protein to facilitate the exchange of homologous genetic information between a donor molecule and the desired target locus (aptamer-guided gene targeting). We selected DNA aptamers to the I-SceI endonuclease. Bifunctional oligonucleotides containing an I-SceI aptamer sequence were designed as part of a longer single-stranded DNA molecule that contained a region with homology to repair an I-SceI generated double-strand break and correct a disrupted gene. The I-SceI aptamer-containing oligonucleotides stimulated gene targeting up to 32-fold in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and up to 16-fold in human cells. This work provides a novel concept and research direction to increase gene targeting efficiency and lays the groundwork for future studies using aptamers for gene targeting. PMID:24500205

  6. Performance of a Yeast-mediated Biological Fuel Cell

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Anuradh; Fernando, Sandun; To, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae present in common Baker’s yeast was used in a microbial fuel cell in which glucose was the carbon source. Methylene blue was used as the electronophore in the anode compartment, while potassium ferricyanide and methylene blue were tested as electron acceptors in the cathode compartment. Microbes in a mediator-free environment were used as the control. The experiment was performed in both open and closed circuit configurations under different loads ranging from 100 kΩ to 400Ω. The eukaryotic S. cerevisiae-based fuel cell showed improved performance when methylene blue and ferricyanide were used as electron mediators, rendering a maximum power generation of 146.71±7.7 mW/m3. The fuel cell generated a maximum open circuit voltage of 383.6±1.5 mV and recorded a maximum efficiency of 28±1.8 % under 100 kΩ of external load. PMID:19325724

  7. MECHANISM OF GLUCOSE TRANSPORT ACROSS THE YEAST CELL MEMBRANE

    PubMed Central

    Cirillo, Vincent P.

    1962-01-01

    Cirillo, Vincent P. (Seton Hall College of Medicine and Dentistry, Jersey City, N.J.). Mechanism of glucose transport across the yeast cell membrane. J. Bacteriol. 84:485–491. 1962.—The kinetics of d-glucose and l-sorbose transport was studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae inhibited with iodoacetic acid under nitrogen to prevent glucose metabolism. d-Glucose was found to compete with l-sorbose for a common membrane transport system with an apparent affinity greater than 25 times that of sorbose. A comparison of the net rate of glucose and sorbose transport at 50 and 500 mm external concentration showed that glucose transport is greater than that of sorbose from the lower concentration, but sorbose transport is greater than glucose at the higher concentration. This reversal of transport rate of two sugars with markedly different affinities is predicted by the membrane carrier theory. A further prediction of carrier theory was confirmed by the demonstration that the rate of glucose transport into fructose-loaded cells is greater than into unloaded cells. PMID:14021412

  8. Differentiation and numerical analysis of oral yeasts based on SDS-Page profiles. Influence of the culture media on the whole-cell protein extracts.

    PubMed

    Höfling, J F; Rosa, E A; Pereira, C V; Boriollo, M F; Rodrigues, J A

    2001-08-01

    The application of gel electrophoresis and numerical analysis of yeast soluble proteins analysis to the investigation of 12 oral yeast strains belonging to five species is described. It involves one-dimensional electrophoresis of SDS-solubilized whole-cell proteins using different culture media for the cultivation of the cells, integration densitometries in the areas of the gels and percentages of the proteins extraction. These extracts were prepared from four isolates of Candida albicans, two of C. tropicalis, C. guilliermondii, C. parapsilosis and C. krusei. The extracts from whole-cells proteins using different culture media for the cultivation of the cells were fractionated by slab electrophoresis using a discontinuous buffer system. The corresponding patterns showed at least 36 polypeptides in the range of 14.4-200 kDa. Different isolates of each species were clearly different in each of the five species. The data obtained suggest that different nutritional compositions led to the expression of different proteins derived from alternatives metabolic pathways expressed by the electrophoretic profiles. The construction of a database of protein fingerprints and numerical analysis based on such data, may have some implications in the classification and identification of such species with epidemiological, ecological and taxonomic purposes. A well defined or synthetic culture media seems to be much properly.

  9. SOME CYTOLOGICAL AND PATHOGENIC PROPERTIES OF SPHEROPLASTS OF CANDIDA ALBICANS

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, George S.; Friedman, Lorraine; Kofroth, Judith F.

    1964-01-01

    Kobayashi, George S. (Tulane University, New Orleans, La.), Lorraine Friedman, and Judith F. Kofroth. Some cytological and pathogenic properties of spheroplasts of Candida albicans. J. Bacteriol. 88:795–801. 1964.—Spheroplasts of Candida albicans were prepared by use of an enzymatic mixture from the digestive tract of the snail Helix pomatia. Untreated cells exhibited well-defined cell walls, whereas such structures were absent from spheroplasts. The intravenous inoculation of either spheroplasts or intact cells into rabbits produced a fever which was apparent within 30 min, the “immediate” fever response characteristic of microbial endotoxin. Cell-wall fragments of enzyme-treated cells did not induce a convincing pyrogenic response. When the inoculum was viable, body temperatures did not return to normal but remained elevated until death of the animal 1 or more days later, exhibiting the “delayed” fever of infection. The gross pathological picture in animals succumbing to infection by viable spheroplasts was similar to that obtained with untreated yeast cells. Images PMID:14208520

  10. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  11. Candida albicans cells lacking CaMCA1-encoded metacaspase show resistance to oxidative stress-induced death and change in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yingying; Huang, Shan; Dai, Baodi; Zhu, Zhenyu; Lu, Hui; Dong, Lingling; Cao, Yongbing; Wang, Yan; Gao, Pinghui; Chai, Yifeng; Jiang, Yuanying

    2009-02-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic pathogen, can undergo programmed cell death upon various stimuli, including oxidative stress. In this study, we showed that deletion of CaMCA1, a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase YCA1, could both attenuated oxidative stress-induced cell death and caspase activation. Compared to wild-type strain, Camca1Delta mutant showed higher accumulation of trehalose and transcription of the genes related to trehalose biosynthesis (TPS2 and TPS3) under the condition of oxidative stress. Furthermore, lower intracellular ATP concentration and mitochondrial membrane potential, less endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were observed in Camca1Delta mutant. Our results suggest that CaMCA1 might mediate the sensitiveness to oxidative stress by affecting energy metabolism in C. albicans.

  12. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV–Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  13. Imaging of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Mitochondria in Fixed Budding Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Swayne, Theresa C; Boldogh, Istvan R; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used as a model system to study the organization and function of the cytoskeleton. In the past, its small size, rounded shape, and rigid cell wall created obstacles to explore the cell biology of this model eukaryote. It is now possible to acquire and analyze high-resolution and super-resolution multidimensional images of the yeast cell. As a result, imaging of yeast has emerged as an important tool in eukaryotic cell biology. This chapter describes labeling methods and optical approaches for visualizing the cytoskeleton and interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with mitochondria in fixed yeast cells using wide-field and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  15. Evidence for degradation of gastrointestinal mucin by Candida albicans secretory aspartyl proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Colina, A R; Aumont, F; Deslauriers, N; Belhumeur, P; de Repentigny, L

    1996-01-01

    A zone of extracellular digestion of the mucin layer around Candida albicans blastoconidia was observed by transmission electron microscopy in the jejunum of mice inoculated intragastrically (G. T. Cole, K. R. Seshan, L. M. Pope, and R. J. Yancey, J. Med. Vet. Mycol. 26:173-185, 1988). This observation prompted the hypothesis that a putative mucinolytic enzyme(s) may contribute to the virulence of C. albicans by facilitating penetration of the mucus barrier and subsequent adherence to and invasion of epithelial cells. Mucinolytic activity was observed as zones of clearing around colonies of C. albicans LAM-1 grown on agarose containing yeast nitrogen base, glucose, and hog gastric mucin. In addition, concentrated culture filtrate obtained after growth for 24 h in yeast nitrogen base, supplemented with glucose and mucin as the sole nitrogen source, contained proteolytic activity against biotin-labelled mucin which was inhibited by pepstatin A. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the culture filtrate revealed two components of 42 and 45 kDa, with pIs of 4.1 and 5.3, respectively. A zymogram showed that mucin was degraded only by the 42-kDa component, which was also recognized by immunoblotting with an anti-secretory aspartyl proteinase (anti-Sap) 2p monoclonal antibody. The N-terminal sequence of the first 20 amino acids matched that reported for Sap2p. These results demonstrate that Sap2p is responsible for proteolysis of mucin by C. albicans in vitro and may be involved as a virulence factor in the breakdown of mucus and penetration of the mucin barrier by C. albicans. PMID:8890200

  16. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  17. Candida albicans: adapting to succeed.

    PubMed

    Kadosh, David; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2013-11-13

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lu et al. (2013) report on the redundancy of signaling pathways controlling Candida albicans filamentation and pathogenicity. In the process, they provide important insight into how this normal commensal of humans adapts to different host microenvironments to become a highly successful opportunistic pathogen.

  18. Cell dualism: presence of cells with alternative membrane potentials in growing populations of bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Volodymyr; Rezaeinejad, Saeid; Chu, Jian

    2013-10-01

    It is considered that all growing cells, for exception of acidophilic bacteria, have negatively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁻-cells). Here we show that growing populations of microbial cells contain a small portion of cells with positively charged inside cytoplasmic membrane (Δψ⁺-cells). These cells were detected after simultaneous application of the fluorescent probes for positive membrane potential (anionic dye DIBAC⁻) and membrane integrity (propidium iodide, PI). We found in exponentially growing cell populations of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that the content of live Δψ⁻-cells was 93.6 ± 1.8 % for bacteria and 90.4 ± 4.0 % for yeasts and the content of live Δψ⁺-cells was 0.9 ± 0.3 % for bacteria and 2.4 ± 0.7 % for yeasts. Hypothetically, existence of Δψ⁺-cells could be due to short-term, about 1 min for bacteria and 5 min for yeasts, change of membrane potential from negative to positive value during the cell cycle. This change has been shown by the reversions of K⁺, Na⁺, and Ca²⁺ ions fluxes across the cell membrane during synchronous yeast culture. The transformation of Δψ(⁻-cells to Δψ⁺-cells can be explained by slow influx of K⁺ ions into Δψ⁻-cell to the trigger level of K⁺ concentration ("compression of potassium spring"), which is forming "alternative" Δψ⁺-cell for a short period, following with fast efflux of K⁺ ions out of Δψ⁺-cell ("release of potassium spring") returning cell to normal Δψ⁻ state. We anticipate our results to be a starting point to reveal the biological role of cell dualism in form of Δψ⁻- and Δψ⁺- cells.

  19. Roles of Edc3 in the oxidative stress response and CaMCA1-encoded metacaspase expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Jinmi

    2014-11-01

    The Edc3 protein is an enhancer of mRNA decapping, and acts as a scaffold protein for the mRNA granules that are known as processing bodies in yeast. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, various stresses, such as glucose depletion, oxidative stress, and filamentation defects, induce the accumulation of processing bodies. Here, we report that the edc3/edc3 deletion strain showed increased resistance to various stresses, including hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, and high temperature. Oxidative stress is known to induce the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic cell death in C. albicans. We found that the ROS level was lower in edc3/edc3 cells than in wild-type cells following oxidative stress. We also observed that expression of the metacaspase gene CaMCA1 was decreased in edc3/edc3 cells. Overexpression of CaMCA1 suppressed the decreased accumulation of ROS and the increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide in edc3/edc3 cells. The catalase Cat1 and the superoxide dismutase Sod1 were upregulated in edc3/edc3 cells as compared with wild-type cells. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that EDC3 plays a critical role in the expression of CaMCA1 and the oxidative stress response in C. albicans.

  20. Candida albicans Shed Msb2 and Host Mucins Affect the Candidacidal Activity of Salivary Hst 5

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sumant; Friedman, Justin; Saraswat, Darpan; Kumar, Rohitashw; Li, Rui; Ruszaj, Donna; Edgerton, Mira

    2015-01-01

    Salivary Histatin 5 (Hst 5) is an antimicrobial peptide that exhibits potent antifungal activity towards Candida albicans, the causative agent of oral candidiasis. However, it exhibits limited activity in vivo, largely due to inactivation by salivary components of both host and pathogen origin. Proteins secreted by C. albicans during infection such as secreted aspartyl proteases (Saps) and shed mucin Msb2 can reduce Hst 5 activity; and human salivary mucins, while suggested to protect Hst 5 from proteolytic degradation, can entrap peptides into mucin gels, thereby reducing bioavailability. We show here that Sap6 that is secreted during hyphal growth reduces Hst 5 activity, most likely a result of proteolytic degradation of Hst 5 since this effect is abrogated with heat inactivated Sap 6. We further show that just like C. albicans shedding Msb2, mammalian mucins, fetuin and porcine gut mucin (that is related to salivary mucins), also reduce Hst 5 activity. However, we identify mucin-like protein-induced changes in C. albicans cell morphology and aggregation patterns, suggesting that the effect of such proteins on Hst 5 cannot be interpreted independently of their effect on yeast cells. PMID:26529023

  1. Using dielectrophoresis to study the dynamic response of single budding yeast cells to Lyticase.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Yi, Pyshar; Soffe, Rebecca; Nahavandi, Sofia; Shukla, Ravi; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2015-05-01

    Budding yeast cells are quick and easy to grow and represent a versatile model of eukaryotic cells for a variety of cellular studies, largely because their genome has been widely studied and links can be drawn with higher eukaryotes. Therefore, the efficient separation, immobilization, and conversion of budding yeasts into spheroplast or protoplast can provide valuable insight for many fundamentals investigations in cell biology at a single cell level. Dielectrophoresis, the induced motion of particles in non-uniform electric fields, possesses a great versatility for manipulation of cells in microfluidic platforms. Despite this, dielectrophoresis has been largely utilized for studying of non-budding yeast cells and has rarely been used for manipulation of budding cells. Here, we utilize dielectrophoresis for studying the dynamic response of budding cells to different concentrations of Lyticase. This involves separation of the budding yeasts from a background of non-budding cells and their subsequent immobilization onto the microelectrodes at desired densities down to single cell level. The immobilized yeasts are then stimulated with Lyticase to remove the cell wall and convert them into spheroplasts, in a highly dynamic process that depends on the concentration of Lyticase. We also introduce a novel method for immobilization of the cell organelles released from the lysed cells by patterning multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) between the microelectrodes.

  2. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Oxidative Stress, Growth Inhibition, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chih-Hung; Hsia, Simon; Shih, Min-Yi; Hsieh, Fang-Chin; Chen, Pei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that selenium (Se) yeast may exhibit potential anti-cancer properties; whereas the precise mechanisms remain unknown. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Se yeast on oxidative stress, growth inhibition, and apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Treatments of ER-positive MCF-7 and triple-negative MDA-MB-231 cells with Se yeast (100, 750, and 1500 ng Se/mL), methylseleninic acid (MSA, 1500 ng Se/mL), or methylselenocysteine (MSC, 1500 ng Se/mL) at a time course experiment (at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h) were analyzed. Se yeast inhibited the growth of these cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with the same level of MSA, cancer cells exposure to Se yeast exhibited a lower growth-inhibitory response. The latter has also lower superoxide production and reduced antioxidant enzyme activities. Furthermore, MSA (1500 ng Se/mL)-exposed non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) have a significant growth inhibitory effect, but not Se yeast and MSC. Compared with MSA, Se yeast resulted in a greater increase in the early apoptosis in MCF-7 cells as well as a lower proportion of early and late apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, nuclear morphological changes and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were observed. In conclusion, a dose of 100 to 1500 ng Se/mL of Se yeast can increase oxidative stress, and stimulate growth inhibitory effects and apoptosis induction in breast cancer cell lines, but does not affect non-tumorigenic cells.

  3. [Detection of viable metabolically active yeast cells using a colorimetric assay].

    PubMed

    Růzicka, F; Holá, V

    2008-02-01

    The increasing concern of yeasts able to form biofilm brings about the need for susceptibility testing of both planktonic and biofilm cells. Detection of viability or metabolic activity of yeast cells after exposure to antimicrobials plays a key role in the assessment of susceptibility testing results. Colorimetric assays based on the color change of the medium in the presence of metabolically active cells proved suitable for this purpose. In this study, the usability of a colorimetric assay with the resazurin redox indicator for monitoring the effect of yeast inoculum density on the reduction rate was tested. As correlation between the color change rate and inoculum density was observed, approximate quantification of viable cells was possible. The assay would be of relevance to antifungal susceptibility testing in both planktonic and biofilm yeasts.

  4. Extracellular electron transfer in yeast-based biofuel cells: A review.

    PubMed

    Hubenova, Yolina; Mitov, Mario

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the art of the yeast-based biofuel cell research and development. The established extracellular electron transfer (EET) mechanisms in the presence and absence of exogenous mediators are summarized and discussed. The approaches applied for improvement of mediator-less yeast-based biofuel cells performance are also presented. The overview of the literature shows that biofuel cells utilizing yeasts as biocatalysts generate power density in the range of 20 to 2440 mW/m(2), which values are comparable with the power achieved when bacteria are used instead. The electrons' origin and the contribution of the glycolysis, fermentation, aerobic respiration, and phosphorylation to the EET are commented. The reported enhanced current generation in aerobic conditions presumes reconsideration of some basic MFC principles. The challenges towards the practical application of the yeast-based biofuel cells are outlined.

  5. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    PubMed

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-08-01

    The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast's exceptional ethanol tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance.

  6. Fast automated yeast cell counting algorithm using bright-field and fluorescence microscopic images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The faithful determination of the concentration and viability of yeast cells is important for biological research as well as industry. To this end, it is important to develop an automated cell counting algorithm that can provide not only fast but also accurate and precise measurement of yeast cells. Results With the proposed method, we measured the precision of yeast cell measurements by using 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% viability samples. As a result, the actual viability measured with the proposed yeast cell counting algorithm is significantly correlated to the theoretical viability (R2 = 0.9991). Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of our algorithm in various computing platforms. The results showed that the proposed algorithm could be feasible to use with low-end computing platforms without loss of its performance. Conclusions Our yeast cell counting algorithm can rapidly provide the total number and the viability of yeast cells with exceptional accuracy and precision. Therefore, we believe that our method can become beneficial for a wide variety of academic field and industries such as biotechnology, pharmaceutical and alcohol production. PMID:24215650

  7. Succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes using hydrolysates of spent yeast cells and corn fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Quan; Li, Jian; Ma, Jiang-Feng; Jiang, Min; Wei, Ping; Liu, Zhong-Min; Ying, Han-Jie

    2011-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysate of spent yeast cells was evaluated as a nitrogen source for succinic acid production by Actinobacillus succinogenes NJ113, using corn fiber hydrolysate as a carbon source. When spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used directly as a nitrogen source, a maximum succinic acid concentration of 35.5 g/l was obtained from a glucose concentration of 50 g/l, with a glucose utilization of 95.2%. Supplementation with individual vitamins showed that biotin was the most likely factor to be limiting for succinic acid production with spent yeast cell hydrolysate. After supplementing spent yeast cell hydrolysate and 90 g/l of glucose with 150 μg/l of biotin, cell growth increased 32.5%, glucose utilization increased 37.6%, and succinic acid concentration was enhanced 49.0%. As a result, when biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate was used with corn fiber hydrolysate, a succinic acid yield of 67.7% was obtained from 70.3 g/l of total sugar concentration, with a productivity of 0.63 g/(l h). Our results suggest that biotin-supplemented spent yeast cell hydrolysate may be an alternative nitrogen source for the efficient production of succinic acid by A. succinogenes NJ113, using renewable resources.

  8. Cell Differentiation and Spatial Organization in Yeast Colonies: Role of Cell-Wall Integrity Pathway.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Morales, Rita; White, Melissa G; Smith, Keston; Kapros, Tamas; Honigberg, Saul M

    2015-12-01

    Many microbial communities contain organized patterns of cell types, yet relatively little is known about the mechanism or function of this organization. In colonies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sporulation occurs in a highly organized pattern, with a top layer of sporulating cells sharply separated from an underlying layer of nonsporulating cells. A mutant screen identified the Mpk1 and Bck1 kinases of the cell-wall integrity (CWI) pathway as specifically required for sporulation in colonies. The CWI pathway was induced as colonies matured, and a target of this pathway, the Rlm1 transcription factor, was activated specifically in the nonsporulating cell layer, here termed feeder cells. Rlm1 stimulates permeabilization of feeder cells and promotes sporulation in an overlying cell layer through a cell-nonautonomous mechanism. The relative fraction of the colony apportioned to feeder cells depends on nutrient environment, potentially buffering sexual reproduction against suboptimal environments.

  9. Antifungal susceptibility against yeasts isolated from pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kersun, L S; Reilly, A F; Ingram, M E; Nicholaou, M J; McGowan, K L

    2008-06-01

    Yeast infections cause morbidity in children with cancer and we evaluated species distribution and antifungal susceptibilities of the etiologic agents in this group. Specimens from 58 children yielded 64 cultures positive for yeasts. Central venous catheters were present in 56 (97%) of the children and neutrophil counts were <500 cells/ml3 in 34% of the patients. Twenty-two (38%) had received recent antifungal treatment, with 15 (25%) receiving fluconazole (FLU) prophylaxis. The Candida isolates recovered from four (27%) of the children on FLU prophylaxis, were resistant to this drug. Candida albicans isolates were susceptible to 100% of antifungals tested, whereas non-C. albicans Candida spp. were variable in their susceptibility patterns. FLU prophylaxis minimally affected susceptibility.

  10. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Yeast Cells during Sake Brewing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Zheng, Xiaohong; Araki, Yoshio; Sahara, Hiroshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    During the brewing of Japanese sake, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells produce a high concentration of ethanol compared with other ethanol fermentation methods. We analyzed the gene expression profiles of yeast cells during sake brewing using DNA microarray analysis. This analysis revealed some characteristics of yeast gene expression during sake brewing and provided a scaffold for a molecular level understanding of the sake brewing process. PMID:16997994

  11. Synthetic arylquinuclidine derivatives exhibit antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Sterol biosynthesis is an essential pathway for fungal survival, and is the biochemical target of many antifungal agents. The antifungal drugs most widely used to treated fungal infections are compounds that inhibit cytochrome P450-dependent C14α-demethylase (CYP51), but other enzymes of this pathway, such as squalene synthase (SQS) which catalyses the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, could be viable targets. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of SQS inhibitors on Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis strains. Methods Ten arylquinuclidines that act as SQS inhibitors were tested as antiproliferative agents against three ATCC strains and 54 clinical isolates of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilopsis. Also, the morphological alterations induced in the yeasts by the experimental compounds were evaluated by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Results The most potent arylquinuclidine derivative (3-[1'-{4'-(benzyloxy)-phenyl}]-quinuclidine-2-ene) (WSP1267) had a MIC50 of 2 μg/ml for all species tested and MIC90 varying from 4 μg/ml to 8 μg/ml. Ultrathin sections of C. albicans treated with 1 μg/ml of WSP1267 showed several ultrastructural alterations, including (a) loss of cell wall integrity, (b) detachment of the plasma membrane from the fungal cell wall, (c) accumulation of small vesicles in the periplasmic region, (d) presence of large electron-dense vacuoles and (e) significantly increased cell size and cell wall thickness. In addition, fluorescence microscopy of cells labelled with Nile Red showed an accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm of treated yeasts. Nuclear staining with DAPI revealed the appearance of uncommon yeast buds without a nucleus or with two nuclei. Conclusion Taken together, our data demonstrate that arylquinuclidine derivatives could be useful as lead compounds for the rational synthesis of new antifungal drugs. PMID

  12. Human ribosomal protein L9 is a Bax suppressor that promotes cell survival in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Lapointe, Jason F; Horowitz, Avital; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    The identification of a human ribosomal protein L9 (hRPL9) cDNA as a sequence capable of suppressing the lethal effects of heterologously expressed murine Bax in yeast led us to investigate its antiapoptotic potential. Using growth and viability assays, we show that yeast cells heterologously expressing hRPL9 are resistant to the growth inhibitory and lethal effects of exogenously supplied copper, indicating that it has pro-survival properties. To explore potential mechanisms, we used yeast mutants defective in all three types of programmed cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy). The ability to retain pro-survival function in all the mutants suggests that hRPL9 may regulate a common pro-death process. In contrast, the yeast RPL9 orthologues, RPL9A and RPL9B, have opposite effects when overexpressed in yeast. In effect, instead of showing resistance to stress, RPL9A and RPL9B overexpressing cells show reduced cell growth. Further analysis indicates that the effects of overexpressed RPL9A and RPL9B are not in themselves lethal, instead, they serve to increase cell doubling time. Thus, yeast RPL9s are more representative of RPs whose extra-ribosomal function is similar to that of tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPL9 represents a species- and sequence-specific regulator of cell growth and survival.

  13. SHIP-1 Couples to the Dectin-1 hemITAM and Selectively Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Dendritic Cells in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Menéndez, Noelia; del Fresno, Carlos; Fernandes, Sandra; Calvo, Enrique; Conde-Garrosa, Ruth; Kerr, William G; Sancho, David

    2015-11-01

    Dectin-1 (Clec7a) is a paradigmatic C-type lectin receptor that binds Syk through a hemITAM motif and couples sensing of pathogens such as fungi to induction of innate responses. Dectin-1 engagement triggers a plethora of activating events, but little is known about the modulation of such pathways. Trying to define a more precise picture of early Dectin-1 signaling, we explored the interactome of the intracellular tail of the receptor in mouse dendritic cells. We found unexpected binding of SHIP-1 phosphatase to the phosphorylated hemITAM. SHIP-1 colocalized with Dectin-1 during phagocytosis of zymosan in a hemITAM-dependent fashion. Moreover, endogenous SHIP-1 relocated to live or heat-killed Candida albicans-containing phagosomes in a Dectin-1-dependent manner in GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM). However, SHIP-1 absence in GM-BM did not affect activation of MAPK or production of cytokines and readouts dependent on NF-κB and NFAT. Notably, ROS production was enhanced in SHIP-1-deficient GM-BM treated with heat-killed C. albicans, live C. albicans, or the specific Dectin-1 agonists curdlan or whole glucan particles. This increased oxidative burst was dependent on Dectin-1, Syk, PI3K, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, and NADPH oxidase. GM-BM from CD11c∆SHIP-1 mice also showed increased killing activity against live C. albicans that was dependent on Dectin-1, Syk, and NADPH oxidase. These results illustrate the complexity of myeloid C-type lectin receptor signaling, and how an activating hemITAM can also couple to intracellular inositol phosphatases to modulate selected functional responses and tightly regulate processes such as ROS production that could be deleterious to the host.

  14. Cell size and budding during starvation of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, G C

    1977-01-01

    When starved for nitrogen, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced abnormally small cells. Nonetheless, during starvation, only cells of a size characteristic of growing cells were capable of initiating a bud. Even when growth was severely limited, some event(s) in G1 required growth to a critical size for completion. PMID:334753

  15. Origin of irreversibility of cell cycle start in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Charvin, Gilles; Oikonomou, Catherine; Siggia, Eric D; Cross, Frederick R

    2010-01-19

    Budding yeast cells irreversibly commit to a new division cycle at a regulatory transition called Start. This essential decision-making step involves the activation of the SBF/MBF transcription factors. SBF/MBF promote expression of the G1 cyclins encoded by CLN1 and CLN2. Cln1,2 can activate their own expression by inactivating the Whi5 repressor of SBF/MBF. The resulting transcriptional positive feedback provides an appealing, but as yet unproven, candidate for generating irreversibility of Start. Here, we investigate the logic of the Start regulatory module by quantitative single-cell time-lapse microscopy, using strains in which expression of key regulators is efficiently controlled by changes of inducers in a microfluidic chamber. We show that Start activation is ultrasensitive to G1 cyclin. In the absence of CLN1,2-dependent positive feedback, we observe that Start transit is reversible, due to reactivation of the Whi5 transcriptional repressor. Introduction of the positive feedback loop makes Whi5 inactivation and Start activation irreversible, which therefore guarantees unidirectional entry into S phase. A simple mathematical model to describe G1 cyclin turn on at Start, entirely constrained by empirically measured parameters, shows that the experimentally measured ultrasensitivity and transcriptional positive feedback are necessary and sufficient dynamical characteristics to make the Start transition a bistable and irreversible switch. Our study thus demonstrates that Start irreversibility is a property that arises from the architecture of the system (Whi5/SBF/Cln2 loop), rather than the consequence of the regulation of a single component (e.g., irreversible protein degradation).

  16. Cell-Cell Communication in Yeast Using Auxin Biosynthesis and Auxin Responsive CRISPR Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Khakhar, Arjun; Bolten, Nicholas J; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Klavins, Eric

    2016-04-15

    An engineering framework for synthetic multicellular systems requires a programmable means of cell-cell communication. Such a communication system would enable complex behaviors, such as pattern formation, division of labor in synthetic microbial communities, and improved modularity in synthetic circuits. However, it remains challenging to build synthetic cellular communication systems in eukaryotes due to a lack of molecular modules that are orthogonal to the host machinery, easy to reconfigure, and scalable. Here, we present a novel cell-to-cell communication system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) based on CRISPR transcription factors and the plant hormone auxin that exhibits several of these features. Specifically, we engineered a sender strain of yeast that converts indole-3-acetamide (IAM) into auxin via the enzyme iaaH from Agrobacterium tumefaciens. To sense auxin and regulate transcription in a receiver strain, we engineered a reconfigurable library of auxin-degradable CRISPR transcription factors (ADCTFs). Auxin-induced degradation is achieved through fusion of an auxin-sensitive degron (from IAA corepressors) to the CRISPR TF and coexpression with an auxin F-box protein. Mirroring the tunability of auxin perception in plants, our family of ADCTFs exhibits a broad range of auxin sensitivities. We characterized the kinetics and steady-state behavior of the sender and receiver independently as well as in cocultures where both cell types were exposed to IAM. In the presence of IAM, auxin is produced by the sender cell and triggers deactivation of reporter expression in the receiver cell. The result is an orthogonal, rewireable, tunable, and, arguably, scalable cell-cell communication system for yeast and other eukaryotic cells.

  17. Differentiation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Kenneth; Haase, Gerhard; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens Jo/rgen; Stender, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The recent discovery of Candida dubliniensis as a separate species that traditionally has been identified as Candida albicans has led to the development of a variety of biochemical and molecular methods for the differentiation of these two pathogenic yeasts. rRNA sequences are well-established phylogenetic markers, and probes targeting species-specific rRNA sequences have been used in diagnostic assays for the detection and identification of microorganisms. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic with improved hybridization characteristics, and the neutral backbone of PNA probes offers significant advantages in whole-cell in situ hybridization assays. In this study, we developed PNA probes targeting the rRNAs of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis and applied them to a fluorescence in situ hybridization method (PNA FISH) for differentiation between C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. Liquid cultures were smeared onto microscope slides, heat fixed, and then hybridized for 30 min. Unhybridized PNA probe was removed by washing, and smears were examined by fluorescence microscopy. Evaluation of the PNA FISH method using smears of 79 C. dubliniensis and 70 C. albicans strains showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for both PNA probes. We concluded that PNA FISH is a powerful tool for the differentiation of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis. PMID:11682542

  18. Deficient beta-mannosylation of Candida albicans phospholipomannan affects the proinflammatory response in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Devillers, Audrey; Courjol, Flavie; Fradin, Chantal; Coste, Agnes; Poulain, Daniel; Pipy, Bernard; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Jouault, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans produces a complex glycosphingolipid called phospholipomannan (PLM), which is present on the cell-wall surface of yeast and shed upon contact with host cells. The glycan moiety of PLM is composed of β-mannosides with degrees of polymerization up to 19 in C. albicans serotype A. PLM from serotype B strains displays a twofold decrease in the length of the glycan chains. In this study we compared the proinflammatory activities of PLMs purified from C. albicans serotype A and serotype B strains and from a bmt6Δ mutant of C. albicans, whose PLM is composed of short truncated oligomannosidic chain. We found that PLMs activate caspase-1 in murine macrophage cell line J774 independent of the glycan chain length although IL-1β secretion is more intense with long glycan chain. None of the tested PLMs stimulate ROS production, indicating that caspase-1 activation may occur through a ROS-independent pathway. On the other hand, only long-chain oligomannosides present on PLM from serotype A strain (PLM-A) are able to induce TNF-α production in macrophages, a property that is not affect by blocking endocytosis through latrunculin A treatment. Finally, we demonstrate that soluble and not cell surface-bound galectin-3, is able to potentiate PLM-A-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. PLMs from C. albicans serotype B and from bmt6∆ mutant are not able to induce TNF-α production and galectin-3 pretreatment does not interfere with this result. In conclusion, we show here that PLMs are able to evoke a proinflammatory state in macrophage, which is in part dependent on their glycosylation status. Long-glycan chains favor interaction with soluble galectin-3 and help amplify inflammatory response.

  19. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  20. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions.

  1. An Automated High-Throughput Cell-Based Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Assay to Identify Novel Compounds to Target Candida albicans Virulence-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Stella M.; Allen, Christopher P.; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M.; Oprea, Tudor; Sklar, Larry A.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Although three major classes of systemic antifungal agents are clinically available, each is characterized by important limitations. Thus, there has been considerable ongoing effort to develop novel and repurposed agents for the therapy of invasive fungal infections. In an effort to address these needs, we developed a novel high-throughput, multiplexed screening method that utilizes small molecules to probe candidate drug targets in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. This method is amenable to high-throughput automated screening and is based upon detection of changes in GFP levels of individually tagged target proteins. We first selected four GFP-tagged membrane-bound proteins associated with virulence or antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans. We demonstrated proof-of-principle that modulation of fluorescence intensity can be used to assay the expression of specific GFP-tagged target proteins to inhibitors (and inducers), and this change is measurable within the HyperCyt automated flow cytometry sampling system. Next, we generated a multiplex of differentially color-coded C. albicans strains bearing C-terminal GFP-tags of each gene encoding candidate drug targets incubated in the presence of small molecules from the Prestwick Chemical Library in 384-well microtiter plate format. Following incubation, cells were sampled through the HyperCyt system and modulation of protein levels, as indicated by changes in GFP-levels of each strain, was used to identify compounds of interest. The hit rate for both inducers and inhibitors identified in the primary screen did not exceed 1% of the total number of compounds in the small-molecule library that was probed, as would be expected from a robust target-specific, high-throughput screening campaign. Secondary assays for virulence characteristics based on null mutant strains were then used to further validate specificity. In all, this study presents a method for the identification and verification of new

  2. Warburg effect and translocation-induced genomic instability: two yeast models for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Valentina; Grüning, Nana-Maria; Breitenbach, Michael; Arnak, Remigiusz; Ralser, Markus; Bruschi, Carlo V.

    2013-01-01

    Yeast has been established as an efficient model system to study biological principles underpinning human health. In this review we focus on yeast models covering two aspects of cancer formation and progression (i) the activity of pyruvate kinase (PK), which recapitulates metabolic features of cancer cells, including the Warburg effect, and (ii) chromosome bridge-induced translocation (BIT) mimiking genome instability in cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study cancer cell metabolism, as exponentially growing yeast cells exhibit many metabolic similarities with rapidly proliferating cancer cells. The metabolic reconfiguration includes an increase in glucose uptake and fermentation, at the expense of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation (the Warburg effect), and involves a broad reconfiguration of nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Both in yeast and humans, the regulation of this process seems to have a central player, PK, which is up-regulated in cancer, and to occur mostly on a post-transcriptional and post-translational basis. Furthermore, BIT allows to generate selectable translocation-derived recombinants (“translocants”), between any two desired chromosomal locations, in wild-type yeast strains transformed with a linear DNA cassette carrying a selectable marker flanked by two DNA sequences homologous to different chromosomes. Using the BIT system, targeted non-reciprocal translocations in mitosis are easily inducible. An extensive collection of different yeast translocants exhibiting genome instability and aberrant phenotypes similar to cancer cells has been produced and subjected to analysis. In this review, we hence provide an overview upon two yeast cancer models, and extrapolate general principles for mimicking human disease mechanisms in yeast. PMID:23346549

  3. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  4. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2011-04-22

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B). Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip) is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  5. Compositional and immunobiological analyses of extracellular vesicles released by Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Gabriele; Rocha, Juliana D B; Oliveira, Debora Leite; Albuquerque, Priscila Costa; Frases, Susana; Santos, Suelen S; Nosanchuk, Joshua Daniel; Gomes, Andre Marco Oliveira; Medeiros, Lia C A S; Miranda, Kildare; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Arigi, Emma A; Casadevall, Arturo; Guimaraes, Allan J; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Freire-de-Lima, Celio Geraldo; Almeida, Igor C; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2015-03-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EV) by fungal organisms is considered an alternative transport mechanism to trans-cell wall passage of macromolecules. Previous studies have revealed the presence of EV in culture supernatants from fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii, Malassezia sympodialis and Candida albicans. Here we investigated the size, composition, kinetics of internalization by bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (MO) and dendritic cells (DC), and the immunomodulatory activity of C. albicans EV. We also evaluated the impact of EV on fungal virulence using the Galleria mellonella larvae model. By transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, we identified two populations ranging from 50 to 100 nm and 350 to 850 nm. Two predominant seroreactive proteins (27 kDa and 37 kDa) and a group of polydispersed mannoproteins were observed in EV by immunoblotting analysis. Proteomic analysis of C. albicans EV revealed proteins related to pathogenesis, cell organization, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, response to stress, and several other functions. The major lipids detected by thin-layer chromatography were ergosterol, lanosterol and glucosylceramide. Short exposure of MO to EV resulted in internalization of these vesicles and production of nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-12, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and IL-10. Similarly, EV-treated DC produced IL-12p40, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. In addition, EV treatment induced the up-regulation of CD86 and major histocompatibility complex class-II (MHC-II). Inoculation of G. mellonella larvae with EV followed by challenge with C. albicans reduced the number of recovered viable yeasts in comparison with infected larvae control. Taken together, our results demonstrate that C. albicans EV were immunologically active and could potentially interfere with the host responses in the setting of

  6. Antifungal chitinase against human pathogenic yeasts from Coprinellus congregatus.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yeeun; Choi, Hyoung T

    2014-05-01

    The inky cap, Coprinellus congregatus, produces mushrooms which become autolyzed rapidly to generate black liquid droplets, in which no cell wall is detected by microscopy. A chitinase (Chi2) which is synthesized during the autolytic phase of C. congregatus inhibits the growths of Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans up to 10% at the concentration of 10 μg/ml, about 50% at concentration of 20 μg/ml, and up to 95% at the concentration of 70 μg/ml. Upon treatment these yeast cells are observed to be severely deformed, with the formation of large holes in the cell wall. The two yeast species show no growth inhibition at the concentration of 5 μg/ml, which means the minimum inhibitory concentrations for both yeast species are 10 μg/ml under these experimental conditions.

  7. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  8. Untangling the Roles of Anti-Apoptosis in Regulating Programmed Cell Death using Humanized Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Clapp, Caitlin; Portt, Liam; Khoury, Chamel; Sheibani, Sara; Eid, Rawan; Greenwood, Matthew; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A.; Greenwood, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Genetically programmed cell death (PCD) mechanisms, including apoptosis, are important for the survival of metazoans since it allows, among things, the removal of damaged cells that interfere with normal function. Cell death due to PCD is observed in normal processes such as aging and in a number of pathophysiologies including hypoxia (common causes of heart attacks and strokes) and subsequent tissue reperfusion. Conversely, the loss of normal apoptotic responses is associated with the development of tumors. So far, limited success in preventing unwanted PCD has been reported with current therapeutic approaches despite the fact that inhibitors of key apoptotic inducers such as caspases have been developed. Alternative approaches have focused on mimicking anti-apoptotic processes observed in cells displaying increased resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Hormesis and pre-conditioning are commonly observed cellular strategies where sub-lethal levels of pro-apoptotic stimuli lead to increased resistance to higher or lethal levels of stress. Increased expression of anti-apoptotic sequences is a common mechanism mediating these protective effects. The relevance of the latter observation is exemplified by the observation that transgenic mice overexpressing anti-apoptotic genes show significant reductions in tissue damage following ischemia. Thus strategies aimed at increasing the levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, using gene therapy or cell penetrating recombinant proteins are being evaluated as novel therapeutics to decrease cell death following acute periods of cell death inducing stress. In spite of its functional and therapeutic importance, more is known regarding the processes involved in apoptosis than anti-apoptosis. The genetically tractable yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has emerged as an exceptional model to study multiple aspects of PCD including the mitochondrial mediated apoptosis observed in metazoans. To increase our knowledge of the process of anti

  9. C. albicans Colonization of Human Mucosal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Southern, Peter; Horbul, Julie; Maher, Diane; Davis, Dana A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a low level commensal organism in normal human populations with the continuous potential to expand and cause a spectrum of clinical conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using ex vivo human organ cultures and populations of primary human cells, we have developed several related experimental systems to examine early-stage interactions between C. albicans and mucosal surfaces. Experiments have been conducted both with exogenously added C. albicans and with overtly normal human mucosal surfaces supporting pre-existing infections with natural isolates of Candida. Under different culture conditions, we have demonstrated the formation of C. albicans colonies on human target cells and filament formation, equivalent to tissue invasion. Conclusions/Significance These organ culture systems provide a valuable new resource to examine the molecular and cellular basis for Candida colonization of human mucosal surfaces. PMID:18446191

  10. Production of tyrosol by Candida albicans biofilms and its role in quorum sensing and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mohammed A S; Oteef, Mohammed D Y; Flowers, T Hugh; Douglas, L Julia

    2006-10-01

    Tyrosol and farnesol are quorum-sensing molecules produced by Candida albicans which accelerate and block, respectively, the morphological transition from yeasts to hyphae. In this study, we have investigated the secretion of tyrosol by C. albicans and explored its likely role in biofilm development. Both planktonic (suspended) cells and biofilms of four C. albicans strains, including three mutants with defined defects in the Efg 1 and Cph 1 morphogenetic signaling pathways, synthesized extracellular tyrosol during growth at 37 degrees C. There was a correlation between tyrosol production and biomass for both cell types. However, biofilm cells secreted at least 50% more tyrosol than did planktonic cells when tyrosol production was related to cell dry weight. The addition of exogenous farnesol to a wild-type strain inhibited biofilm formation by up to 33% after 48 h. Exogenous tyrosol appeared to have no effect, but scanning electron microscopy revealed that tyrosol stimulated hypha production during the early stages (1 to 6 h) of biofilm development. Experiments involving the simultaneous addition of tyrosol and farnesol at different concentrations suggested that the action of farnesol was dominant, and 48-h biofilms formed in the presence of both compounds consisted almost entirely of yeast cells. When biofilm supernatants were tested for their abilities to inhibit or enhance germ tube formation by planktonic cells, the results indicated that tyrosol activity exceeds that of farnesol after 14 h, but not after 24 h, and that farnesol activity increases significantly during the later stages (48 to 72 h) of biofilm development. Overall, our results support the conclusion that tyrosol acts as a quorum-sensing molecule for biofilms as well as for planktonic cells and that its action is most significant during the early and intermediate stages of biofilm formation.

  11. Scaffolded Antigens in Yeast Cell Particle Vaccines Provide Protection against Systemic Polyoma Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tipper, Donald J.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Background. U65, a self-aggregating peptide scaffold, traps fused protein antigens in yeast cells. Conversion to Yeast Cell Particle (YCP) vaccines by partial removal of surface mannoproteins exposes β-glucan, mediating efficient uptake by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). YCP vaccines are inexpensive, capable of rapid large-scale production and have potential for both parenteral and oral use. Results. YCP processing by alkaline hydrolysis exposes up to 20% of the glucan but converts scaffolded antigen and internal yeast proteins into a common aggregate, preventing selective yeast protein removal. For U65-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or U65-Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) subcutaneous vaccines, maximal IgG responses in mice required 10% glucan exposure. IgG responses to yeast proteins were 5-fold lower. Proteolytic mannoprotein removal produced YCPs with only 6% glucan exposure, insufficiently porous for selective removal of even native yeast proteins. Vaccine efficacy was reduced 10-fold. Current YCP formulations, therefore, are not suitable for human use but have considerable potential for use in feed animal vaccines. Significantly, a YCP vaccine expressing a GFP fusion to VP1, the murine polyoma virus major capsid protein, after either oral or subcutaneous administration, protected mice against an intraperitoneal polyoma virus challenge, reducing viral DNA levels in spleen and liver by >98%. PMID:27213160

  12. Measurement of mass, density, and volume during the cell cycle of yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Andrea K.; Goranov, Alexi; Amon, Angelika; Manalis, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Cell growth comprises changes in both mass and volume—two processes that are distinct, yet coordinated through the cell cycle. Understanding this relationship requires a means for measuring each of the cell’s three basic physical parameters: mass, volume, and the ratio of the two, density. The suspended microchannel resonator weighs single cells with a precision in mass of 0.1% for yeast. Here we use the suspended microchannel resonator with a Coulter counter to measure the mass, volume, and density of budding yeast cells through the cell cycle. We observe that cell density increases prior to bud formation at the G1/S transition, which is consistent with previous measurements using density gradient centrifugation. To investigate the origin of this density increase, we monitor relative density changes of growing yeast cells. We find that the density increase requires energy, function of the protein synthesis regulator target of rapamycin, passage through START (commitment to cell division), and an intact actin cytoskeleton. Although we focus on basic cell cycle questions in yeast, our techniques are suitable for most nonadherent cells and subcellular particles to characterize cell growth in a variety of applications. PMID:20080562

  13. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. PMID:27605377

  14. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells.

  15. Yeast cells-derived hollow core/shell heteroatom-doped carbon microparticles for sustainable electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoxi; Zou, Xiaoxin; Meng, Yuying; Mikmeková, Eliška; Chen, Hui; Voiry, Damien; Goswami, Anandarup; Chhowalla, Manish; Asefa, Tewodros

    2015-01-28

    The use of renewable resources to make various synthetic materials is increasing in order to meet some of our sustainability challenges. Yeast is one of the most common household ingredients, which is cheap and easy to reproduce. Herein we report that yeast cells can be thermally transformed into hollow, core-shell heteroatom-doped carbon microparticles that can effectively electrocatalyze the oxygen reduction and hydrazine oxidation reactions, reactions that are highly pertinent to fuel cells or renewable energy applications. We also show that yeast cell walls, which can easily be separated from the cells, can produce carbon materials with electrocatalytic activity for both reactions, albeit with lower activity compared with the ones obtained from intact yeast cells. The results reveal that the intracellular components of the yeast cells such as proteins, phospholipids, DNAs and RNAs are indirectly responsible for the latter's higher electrocatalytic activity, by providing it with more heteroatom dopants. The synthetic method we report here can serve as a general route for the synthesis of (electro)catalysts using microorganisms as raw materials.

  16. Factor H Binds to Extracellular DNA Traps Released from Human Blood Monocytes in Response to Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Luke D.; Abdelfatah, Mahmoud A.; Jo, Emeraldo A. H.; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Westermann, Martin; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Lorkowski, Stefan; Zipfel, Peter F.; Skerka, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Upon systemic infection with human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans (C. albicans), human monocytes and polymorph nuclear neutrophilic granulocytes are the first immune cells to respond and come into contact with C. albicans. Monocytes exert immediate candidacidal activity and inhibit germination, mediate phagocytosis, and kill fungal cells. Here, we show that human monocytes spontaneously respond to C. albicans cells via phagocytosis, decondensation of nuclear DNA, and release of this decondensed DNA in the form of extracellular traps (called monocytic extracellular traps: MoETs). Both subtypes of monocytes (CD14++CD16−/CD14+CD16+) formed MoETs within the first hours upon contact with C. albicans. MoETs were characterized by the presence of citrullinated histone, myeloperoxidase, lactoferrin, and elastase. MoETs were also formed in response to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, indicating a general reaction of monocytes to infectious microbes. MoET induction differs from extracellular trap formation in macrophages as MoETs are not triggered by simvastatin, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and inducer of extracellular traps in macrophages. Extracellular traps from both monocytes and neutrophils activate complement and C3b is deposited. However, factor H (FH) binds via C3b to the extracellular DNA, mediates cofactor activity, and inhibits the induction of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta in monocytes. Altogether, the results show that human monocytes release extracellular DNA traps in response to C. albicans and that these traps finally bind FH via C3b to presumably support clearance without further inflammation. PMID:28133459

  17. Impact of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure on the Candida Albicans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malíková, Ivona; Janoušek, Ladislav; Fantova, Vladyslava; Jíra, Jaroslav; Kříha, Vítĕzslav

    2015-03-01

    Effect of low frequency electromagnetic field on growth of selected microorganism is studied in the article. The diploid fungus that grows both as yeast and filamentous cell was chosen for this research. The theory of ion parametric resonance was taken as the base for studying the influence of electromagnetic field on biological structures. We tested the hypothesis, whether it is possible to observe the change in growth properties of Candida albicans with an AC electromagnetic field tuned to resonance with calcium ions cyclotron frequency.

  18. Pho4 mediates phosphate acquisition in Candida albicans and is vital for stress resistance and metal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeh, Mélanie A. C.; Kastora, Stavroula L.; Day, Alison M.; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen M.; Tarrant, Emma; Waldron, Kevin J.; Banks, A. Peter; Bain, Judith M.; Lydall, David; Veal, Elizabeth A.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Erwig, Lars P.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Quinn, Janet

    2016-01-01

    During interactions with its mammalian host, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is exposed to a range of stresses such as superoxide radicals and cationic fluxes. Unexpectedly, a nonbiased screen of transcription factor deletion mutants revealed that the phosphate-responsive transcription factor Pho4 is vital for the resistance of C. albicans to these diverse stresses. RNA-Seq analysis indicated that Pho4 does not induce stress-protective genes directly. Instead, we show that loss of Pho4 affects metal cation toxicity, accumulation, and bioavailability. We demonstrate that pho4Δ cells are sensitive to metal and nonmetal cations and that Pho4-mediated polyphosphate synthesis mediates manganese resistance. Significantly, we show that Pho4 is important for mediating copper bioavailability to support the activity of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase Sod1 and that loss of Sod1 activity contributes to the superoxide sensitivity of pho4Δ cells. Consistent with the key role of fungal stress responses in countering host phagocytic defenses, we also report that C. albicans pho4Δ cells are acutely sensitive to macrophage-mediated killing and display attenuated virulence in animal infection models. The novel connections between phosphate metabolism, metal homeostasis, and superoxide stress resistance presented in this study highlight the importance of metabolic adaptation in promoting C. albicans survival in the host. PMID:27385340

  19. One-Cell Doubling Evaluation by Living Arrays of Yeast, ODELAY!

    PubMed Central

    Herricks, Thurston; Dilworth, David J.; Mast, Fred D.; Li, Song; Smith, Jennifer J.; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Aitchison, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth is a complex phenotype widely used in systems biology to gauge the impact of genetic and environmental perturbations. Due to the magnitude of genome-wide studies, resolution is often sacrificed in favor of throughput, creating a demand for scalable, time-resolved, quantitative methods of growth assessment. We present ODELAY (One-cell Doubling Evaluation by Living Arrays of Yeast), an automated and scalable growth analysis platform. High measurement density and single-cell resolution provide a powerful tool for large-scale multiparameter growth analysis based on the modeling of microcolony expansion on solid media. Pioneered in yeast but applicable to other colony forming organisms, ODELAY extracts the three key growth parameters (lag time, doubling time, and carrying capacity) that define microcolony expansion from single cells, simultaneously permitting the assessment of population heterogeneity. The utility of ODELAY is illustrated using yeast mutants, revealing a spectrum of phenotypes arising from single and combinatorial growth parameter perturbations. PMID:27856698

  20. Permeabilization of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls using nanosecond high power electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirke, A.; Zimkus, A.; Balevicius, S.; Stankevic, V.; Ramanaviciene, A.; Ramanavicius, A.; Zurauskiene, N.

    2014-12-01

    The electrical field-induced changes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells permeabilization to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) ions were studied using square-shaped, nanosecond duration high power electrical pulses. It was obtained that pulses having durations ranging from 10 ns to 60 ns, and generating electric field strengths up to 190 kV/cm significantly (up to 65 times) increase the absorption rate of TPP+ ions without any detectible influence on the yeast cell viability. The modelling of the TPP+ absorption process using a second order rate equation demonstrates that depending on the duration of the pulses, yeast cell clusters of different sizes are homogeniously permeabilized. It was concluded, that nanosecond pulse-induced permeabilization can be applied to increase the operational speed of whole cell biosensors.

  1. Types of cell death and methods of their detection in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wloch-Salamon, D M; Bem, A E

    2013-02-01

    The occurrence of programmed cell death in unicellular organisms is a subject that arouses great interest of theoreticians and experimental scientists. Already found evolutionarily conserved genes and metabolic pathways confirmed its existence in yeast, protozoa and even bacteria. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, at least three main types of death are distinguished: apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Their classification suggested by the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death initially based on the morphological characteristics has now been extended to include the measurable biochemical characteristics. Several laboratory methods previously used to detect the types of cell death of higher eucaryotes and later developed and successfully used for the analysis of yeast cells are here critically reviewed. Their advantages and limitations are described.

  2. Functional genomics in the study of yeast cell polarity: moving in the right direction.

    PubMed

    Styles, Erin; Youn, Ji-Young; Mattiazzi Usaj, Mojca; Andrews, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used extensively for the study of cell polarity, owing to both its experimental tractability and the high conservation of cell polarity and other basic biological processes among eukaryotes. The budding yeast has also served as a pioneer model organism for virtually all genome-scale approaches, including functional genomics, which aims to define gene function and biological pathways systematically through the analysis of high-throughput experimental data. Here, we outline the contributions of functional genomics and high-throughput methodologies to the study of cell polarity in the budding yeast. We integrate data from published genetic screens that use a variety of functional genomics approaches to query different aspects of polarity. Our integrated dataset is enriched for polarity processes, as well as some processes that are not intrinsically linked to cell polarity, and may provide new areas for future study.

  3. Candida albicans Biofilms and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nobile, Clarissa J.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, microbial cells (including bacteria, archaea, and fungi) greatly outnumber host cells. Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal species of the human microbiota; this species asymptomatically colonizes many areas of the body, particularly the gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals. Alterations in host immunity, stress, resident microbiota, and other factors can lead to C. albicans overgrowth, causing a wide range of infections, from superficial mucosal to hematogenously disseminated candidiasis. To date, most studies of C. albicans have been carried out in suspension cultures; however, the medical impact of C. albicans (like that of many other microorganisms) depends on its ability to thrive as a biofilm, a closely packed community of cells. Biofilms are notorious for forming on implanted medical devices, including catheters, pacemakers, dentures, and prosthetic joints, which provide a surface and sanctuary for biofilm growth. C. albicans biofilms are intrinsically resistant to conventional antifungal therapeutics, the host immune system, and other environmental perturbations, making biofilm-based infections a significant clinical challenge. Here, we review our current knowledge of biofilms formed by C. albicans and closely related fungal species. PMID:26488273

  4. The SPA2 protein of yeast localizes to sites of cell growth

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A yeast gene, SPA2, was isolated with human anti-spindle pole autoantibodies. The SPA2 gene was fused to the Escherichia coli trpE gene, and polyclonal antibodies were prepared to the fusion protein. Immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the SPA2 gene product has a sharply polarized distribution in yeast cells. In budded cells the SPA2 protein is present at the tip of the bud; in unbudded cells, it is localized to one edge of the cell. When a-cells are induced to form schmoos with alpha-factor, the SPA2 protein is found at the tip of the schmoo. These areas of SPA2 localization correspond to cellular sites expected to be involved in bud formation and/or cell growth. The SPA2 antigen is present in a-cells, alpha-cells, and a/alpha-diploid cells, but is absent in mutant cells in which the SPA2 gene has been disrupted. spa2 mutant cells are viable, but display defects in the direction and control of cell growth. Compared to wild-type cells, spa2 mutant cells have slightly altered budding patterns. Entry into stationary phase is impaired for spa2 mutants, and mutants with one particular allele, spa2-7, form multiple buds under nutrient-limiting conditions. Thus, SPA2 is a newly identified yeast gene that is involved in the direction and control of cell division, and whose gene product localizes to the site of cell growth. PMID:2647769

  5. Killer toxin from several food-derived Debaryomyces hansenii strains effective against pathogenic Candida yeasts.

    PubMed

    Banjara, Nabaraj; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Suhr, Mallory J; Hallen-Adams, Heather E

    2016-04-02

    Candida yeasts are the dominant fungi in the healthy human microbiome, but are well-known for causing disease following a variety of perturbations. Evaluation of fungal populations from the healthy human gut revealed a significant negative correlation between the foodborne yeast, Debaryomyces hansenii, and Candida species. D. hansenii is reported to produce killer toxins (mycocins) effective against other yeast species. In order to better understand this phenomenon, a collection of 42 D. hansenii isolates was obtained from 22 cheeses and evaluated for killer activity against Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis over a range of temperatures and pH values. Twenty three strains demonstrated killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis, which was pH- and temperature-dependent, with no killer activity observed for any strain at pH6.5 or higher, or at ≥ 35 °C (physiological conditions in the human gastrointestinal tract). A cell-free mycocin preparation showed transient killer activity against C. albicans at 35 °C and a cheese sample containing a killer D. hansenii strain demonstrated sustained killer activity against both C. albicans and C. tropicalis. Together, these observations raise the possibility that D. hansenii could influence Candida populations in the gut.

  6. Yeast clathrin has a distinctive light chain that is important for cell growth

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The structure and physiologic role of clathrin light chain has been explored by purification of the protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, molecular cloning of the gene, and disruption of the chromosomal locus. The single light chain protein from yeast shares many physical properties with the mammalian light chains, in spite of considerable sequence divergence. Within the limited amino acid sequence identity between yeast and mammalian light chains (18% overall), three regions are notable. The carboxy termini of yeast light chain and mammalian light chain LCb are 39% homologous. Yeast light chain contains an amino- terminal region 45% homologous to a domain that is completely conserved among mammalian light chains. Lastly, a possible homolog of the tissue- specific insert of LCb is detected in the yeast gene. Disruption of the yeast gene (CLC1) leads to a slow-growth phenotype similar to that seen in strains that lack clathrin heavy chain. However, light chain gene deletion is not lethal to a strain that cannot sustain a heavy chain gene disruption. Light chain-deficient strains frequently give rise to variants that grow more rapidly but do not express an immunologically related light chain species. These properties suggest that clathrin light chain serves an important role in cell growth that can be compensated in light chain deficient cells. PMID:2211819

  7. Regulation of the Candida albicans Hypha-Inducing Transcription Factor Ume6 by the CDK1 Cyclins Cln3 and Hgc1

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, Sigal; Pinsky, Mariel; Weissman, Ziva

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to switch between proliferation as yeast cells and development into hyphae is a hallmark of Candida albicans. The switch to hyphal morphogenesis depends on external inducing conditions, but its efficiency is augmented in stationary-phase cells. Ume6, a transcription factor that is itself transcriptionally induced under hypha-promoting conditions, is both necessary and sufficient for hyphal morphogenesis. We found that Ume6 is regulated posttranslationally by the cell cycle kinase Cdc28/Cdk1, which reduces Ume6 activity via different mechanisms using different cyclins. Together with the cyclin Hgc1, Cdk1 promotes degradation of Ume6 via the SCFCDC4 ubiquitin ligase. Since HGC1 is a key transcriptional target of Ume6, this results in a negative-feedback loop between Hgc1 and Ume6. In addition, we found that Cln3, a G1 cyclin that is essential for cell cycle progression and yeast proliferation, suppresses hyphal morphogenesis and that Cln3 suppresses Ume6 activity both in the heterologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae system and in C. albicans itself. This activity of Cln3 may provide the basis for the antagonistic relationship between yeast proliferation and hyphal development in C. albicans. IMPORTANCE The yeast to hypha (mold) morphogenetic switch of Candida albicans plays a role in its virulence and constitutes a diagnostic trait for this organism, the most prevalent systemic fungal pathogen in industrialized countries. It has long been known that hyphae are most efficiently induced from stationary cultures. Here, a molecular basis for this observation is provided. The G1 cyclin Cln3, an essential promoter of yeast proliferation, was found to suppress hyphal induction. Suppression of hyphal induction is achieved by inhibition of the activity of the central activator of hyphal morphogenesis, the transcription factor Ume6. Thus, levels of Cln3 control the switch between proliferation of C. albicans as individual yeast cells and development into

  8. Significant quantities of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase are present in the cell wall of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Motshwene, Precious; Brandt, Wolf; Lindsey, George

    2003-01-01

    NaOH was used to extract proteins from the cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This treatment was shown not to disrupt yeast cells, as NaOH-extracted cells displayed a normal morphology upon electron microscopy. Moreover, extracted and untreated cells had qualitatively similar protein contents upon disruption. When yeast was grown in the presence of 1 M mannitol, two proteins were found to be present at an elevated concentration in the cell wall. These were found to be the late-embryogenic-abundant-like protein heat-shock protein 12 and the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase. The presence of phosphoglycerate mutase in the cell wall was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis. Not only was the phosphoglycerate mutase in the yeast cell wall found to be active, but whole yeast cells were also able to convert 3-phosphoglycerate in the medium into ethanol, provided that the necessary cofactors were present. PMID:12238949

  9. Development of yeast cell factories for consolidated bioprocessing of lignocellulose to bioethanol through cell surface engineering.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    To build an energy and material secure future, a next generation of renewable fuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass is required. Although lignocellulosic biomass, which represents an abundant, inexpensive and renewable source for bioethanol production, is of great interest as a feedstock, the complicated ethanol production processes involved make the cost of producing bioethanol from it higher compared to corn starch and cane juice. Therefore, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which combines enzyme production, saccharification and fermentation in a single step, has gained increased recognition as a potential bioethanol production system. CBP requires a highly engineered microorganism developed for several different process-specific characteristics. The dominant strategy for engineering a CBP biocatalyst is to express multiple components of a cellulolytic system from either fungi or bacteria in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The development of recombinant yeast strains displaying cellulases and hemicellulases on the cell surface represents significant progress toward realization of CBP. Regardless of the process used for biomass hydrolysis, CBP-enabling microorganisms encounter a variety of toxic compounds produced during biomass pretreatment that inhibit microbial growth and ethanol yield. Systems biology approaches including disruptome screening, transcriptomics, and metabolomics have been recently exploited to gain insight into the molecular and genetic traits involved in tolerance and adaptation to the fermentation inhibitors. In this review, we focus on recent advances in development of yeast strains with both the ability to directly convert lignocellulosic material to ethanol and tolerance in the harsh environments containing toxic compounds in the presence of ethanol.

  10. Global Proteomic Profiling of the Secretome of Candida albicans ecm33 Cell Wall Mutant Reveals the Involvement of Ecm33 in Sap2 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-10-02

    Candida albicans secretes numerous proteins related to cell wall remodeling, adhesion, nutrient acquisition and host interactions. Also, extracellular vesicles containing cytoplasmic proteins are secreted into the medium. The C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) presents an altered cell wall and is avirulent. The proteomic analysis of proteins secreted by RML2U cells identified a total of 170 proteins: 114 and 154 of which correspond to the vesicle-free secretome and extracellular vesicles, respectively. Notably, 98 proteins were common to both samples, and the groups most represented were metabolic and cell wall-related proteins. The results of this study showed that RML2U had an altered pattern of proteins secreted by the classical secretion pathway as well as the formation of extracellular vesicles, including their size, quantity, and protein composition. Specifically, the secretion of aspartic protease 2 (Sap2) was compromised but not its intracellular expression, with bovine serum albumin (BSA) degradation by RML2U being altered when BSA was used as the sole nitrogen source. Furthermore, as recent research links the expression of Sap2 to the TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) signaling pathway, the sensitivity of RML2U to rapamycin (the inhibitor of TOR kinase) was tested and found to be enhanced, connecting Ecm33 with this pathway.

  11. Mitochondrial import of human and yeast fumarase in live mammalian cells: Retrograde translocation of the yeast enzyme is mainly caused by its poor targeting sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bhag; Gupta, Radhey S. . E-mail: gupta@mcmaster.ca

    2006-08-04

    Studies on yeast fumarase provide the main evidence for dual localization of a protein in mitochondria and cytosol by means of retrograde translocation. We have examined the subcellular targeting of yeast and human fumarase in live cells to identify factors responsible for this. The cDNAs for mature yeast or human fumarase were fused to the gene for enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and they contained, at their N-terminus, a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) derived from either yeast fumarase, human fumarase, or cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIII (COX) protein. Two nuclear localization sequences (2x NLS) were also added to these constructs to facilitate detection of any cytosolic protein by its targeting to nucleus. In Cos-1 cells transfected with these constructs, human fumarase with either the native or COX MTSs was detected exclusively in mitochondria in >98% of the cells, while the remainder 1-2% of the cells showed varying amounts of nuclear labeling. In contrast, when human fumarase was fused to the yeast MTS, >50% of the cells showed nuclear labeling. Similar studies with yeast fumarase showed that with its native MTS, nuclear labeling was seen in 80-85% of the cells, but upon fusion to either human or COX MTS, nuclear labeling was observed in only 10-15% of the cells. These results provide evidence that extramitochondrial presence of yeast fumarase is mainly caused by the poor mitochondrial targeting characteristics of its MTS (but also affected by its primary sequence), and that the retrograde translocation mechanism does not play a significant role in the extramitochondrial presence of mammalian fumarase.

  12. Interspecies Interactions between Clostridium difficile and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Pim T.; van der Peet, Jasper M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Oliveira Paiva, Ana M.; Kostidis, Sarantos; Mayboroda, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facultative anaerobic polymorphic fungus Candida albicans and the strictly anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens residing in the human gut. While a few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, the nature of the interactions between these two microbes has not been studied thus far. In the current study, both chemical and physical interactions between C. albicans and C. difficile were investigated. In the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile was able to grow under aerobic, normally toxic, conditions. This phenomenon was neither linked to adherence of bacteria to hyphae nor to biofilm formation by C. albicans. Conditioned medium of C. difficile inhibited hyphal growth of C. albicans, which is an important virulence factor of the fungus. In addition, it induced hypha-to-yeast conversion. p-Cresol, a fermentation product of tyrosine produced by C. difficile, also induced morphological effects and was identified as an active component of the conditioned medium. This study shows that in the presence of C. albicans, C. difficile can persist and grow under aerobic conditions. Furthermore, p-cresol, produced by C. difficile, is involved in inhibiting hypha formation of C. albicans, directly affecting the biofilm formation and virulence of C. albicans. This study is the first detailed characterization of the interactions between these two gut pathogens. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans and Clostridium difficile are two opportunistic pathogens that reside in the human gut. A few studies have focused on the prevalence of C. albicans in C. difficile-infected patients, but none have shown the interaction(s) that these two organisms may or may not have with each other. In this study, we used a wide range of different techniques to better understand this interaction at a macroscopic and microscopic level. We found that in the presence of C. albicans, C

  13. Comparison of various techniques for determining viability of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast-form cells.

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, A; Cano, L E; de Bedout, C; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A

    1982-01-01

    The viability of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast-form cells was determined by colony-forming units, direct fluorescent staining, and production of germ tubes in slide culture. The first procedure was unreliable and time consuming; the latter two showed better correlation with hemacytometer total cell counts and required significantly less time. PMID:7107858

  14. Proliferation enhancement of budding yeast and mammalian cells with periodic oxygen radical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Jun; Murata, Tomiyasu; Hahizume, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have been intensively studied for biological applications. However, the each effect of species in plasmas to biological tissue has not been clarified yet because various factors exist in the plasmas. Accordingly, we have studied effects of atomic oxygen dose on cell growth such as budding yeast and mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts of mammalian cells. Both of cells were suspended with PBS, and treated using oxygen radical source. In order to prevent the radicals from reacting with the ambient air, the treatment region was surrounded by a plastic cover and purged with Ar. The proliferative effect of 15 % was observed at the O3Pj dose of around 1 . 0 ×1017 cm-3 in NIH3T3 cells as well as in yeast cells. Moreover, periodic oxygen treatment enhanced the effect in budding yeast cells. The best interval of periodic oxygen radical treatment was around 2 hours, which is almost the same period as that of their cell cycle. With the optimum interval time, we have investigated the effect of the number of the treatments. As the number of treatments increases, the growth rate of budding yeast cells was gradually enhanced and saturated at thrice treatments. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26286072 and project for promoting Research Center in Meijo University.

  15. Chromatin Assembly in a Yeast Whole-Cell Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Michael C.; Hockman, Darren J.; Harkness, Troy A. A.; Garinther, Wendy I.; Altheim, Brent A.

    1997-08-01

    A simple in vitro system that supports chromatin assembly was developed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The assembly reaction is ATP-dependent, uses soluble histones and assembly factors, and generates physiologically spaced nucleosomes. We analyze the pathway of histone recruitment into nucleosomes, using this system in combination with genetic methods for the manipulation of yeast. This analysis supports the model of sequential recruitment of H3/H4 tetramers and H2A/H2B dimers into nucleosomes. Using a similar approach, we show that DNA ligase I can play an important role in template repair during assembly. These studies demonstrate the utility of this system for the combined biochemical and genetic analysis of chromatin assembly in yeast.

  16. Aeromonas hydrophila typing scheme based on patterns of agglutination with erythrocytes and yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D; Atkinson, H M; Woods, W H

    1983-01-01

    An agglutination typing scheme has been developed for strains of Aeromonas hydrophila. Primary agglutination typing is based on testing agar-grown A. hydrophila cells with human, horse, rat, and guinea pig erythrocytes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Further subdivision of primary groups is based firstly on whether yeast cell agglutination is inhibited by a D-mannose polymer, yeast mannan, and secondly on patterns of inhibition of hemagglutination by yeast mannan and the monomeric sugars L-fucose, D-galactose, and D-mannose. A total of 320 isolates were tested, and these were divisible into 39 distinct types on the basis of this scheme. Application of this typing scheme in the future to isolates of A. hydrophila known to be associated with human infection may enable correlations to be made between particular agglutination types and human pathogenicity. PMID:6841579

  17. PHR1, a pH-regulated gene of Candida albicans, is required for morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Saporito-Irwin, S M; Birse, C E; Sypherd, P S; Fonzi, W A

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans, like many fungi, exhibits morphological plasticity, a property which may be related to its biological capacity as an opportunistic pathogen of humans. Morphogenesis and alterations in cell shape require integration of many cellular functions and occur in response to environmental signals, most notably pH and temperature in the case of C. albicans. In the course of our studies of differential gene expression associated with dimorphism of C. albicans, we have isolated a gene, designated PHR1, which is regulated in response to the pH of the culture medium. PHR1 expression was repressed at pH values below 5.5 and induced at more alkaline pH. The predicted amino acid sequence of the PHR1 protein was 56% identical to that of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ggp1/Gas1 protein, a highly glycosylated cell surface protein attached to the membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol. A homozygous null mutant of PHR1 was constructed and found to exhibit a pH-conditional morphological defect. At alkaline pH, the mutant, unlike the parental type, was unable to conduct apical growth of either yeast or hyphal growth forms. This morphological aberration was not associated with defective cytoskeletal polarization or secretion. The results suggest that PHR1 defines a novel function required for apical cell growth and morphogenesis. PMID:7823929

  18. Expression of a chromosomally integrated, single-copy GFP gene in Candida albicans, and its use as a reporter of gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Morschhäuser, J; Michel, S; Hacker, J

    1998-02-01

    Genetically engineered versions of the GFP gene, which encodes the green fluorescent protein of Aequorea victoria, were placed under the control of the constitutively active Candida albicans ACT1 promoter and integrated in single copy into the genome of this pathogenic yeast. Integrative transformants in which one of the two ACT1 alleles had been replaced by a GFP gene exhibited a homogeneous, constitutive fluorescent phenotype. Cells expressing GFP with the wild-type chromophore exhibited very weak fluorescence compared to those GFP proteins with the S65T or S65A, V68L, S72A (GFPmut2) chromophore mutations. Substitution of the CTG codon, which specifies serine instead of leucine in C. albicans, by TTG was absolutely necessary for GFP expression. Although GFP mRNA levels in cells containing a GFP gene with the CTG codon were comparable to those of transformants containing GFP with the TTG substitution, only the latter produced GFP protein, as detected by Western blotting, suggesting that the frequent failure to express heterologous genes in C. albicans is principally due to the noncanonical codon usage. Transformants expressing the modified GFP gene from the promoter of the SAP2 gene, which encodes one of the secreted acid proteinases of C. albicans, showed fluorescence only under conditions which promote proteinase expression, thereby demonstrating the utility of stable, chromosomally integrated GFP reporter genes for the study of gene activation in C. albicans.

  19. Rapid flow cytometric susceptibility testing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, R; Ramani, A; Wong, S J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid flow cytometric assay for in vitro antifungal drug susceptibility testing was developed by adapting the proposed reference method for broth macrodilution testing of yeasts. Membrane permeability changes caused by the antifungal agent were measured by flow cytometry using propidium iodide, a nucleic acid-binding fluorochrome largely excluded by the intact cell membrane. We determined the in vitro susceptibility of 31 Candida albicans isolates and two quality control strains (Candida parapsilosis ATCC 22019 and Candida krusei ATCC 6258) to amphotericin B and fluconazole. Amphotericin B MICs ranged from 0.03 to 2.0 microg/ml, while fluconazole MICs ranged from 0.125 to 128 microg/ml. This method results in clear-cut endpoints that were reproducible. Four-hour incubation was required for fluconazole, whereas a 2-h incubation was sufficient for amphotericin B to provide MICs comparable to the reference macrodilution method developed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Tests. Results of these studies show that flow cytometry provides a rapid and sensitive in vitro method for antifungal susceptibility testing of C. albicans. PMID:9276410

  20. Dictyostelium discoideum as a Novel Host System to Study the Interaction between Phagocytes and Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Barbara; Schramm, Christin; Siebert, Susann; Triebel, János; Deland, Eric; Pfefferkorn, Anna M.; Rickerts, Volker; Thewes, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a well-established model organism to study the interaction between bacteria and phagocytes. In contrast, research using D. discoideum as a host model for fungi is rare. We describe a comprehensive study, which uses D. discoideum as a host model system to investigate the interaction with apathogenic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and pathogenic (Candida sp.) yeast. We show that Dictyostelium can be co-cultivated with yeasts on solid media, offering a convenient test to study the interaction between fungi and phagocytes. We demonstrate that a number of D. discoideum mutants increase (atg1−, kil1−, kil2−) or decrease (atg6−) the ability of the amoebae to predate yeast cells. On the yeast side, growth characteristics, reduced phagocytosis rate, as well as known virulence factors of C. albicans (EFG1, CPH1, HGC1, ICL1) contribute to the resistance of yeast cells against predation by the amoebae. Investigating haploid C. albicans strains, we suggest using the amoebae plate test for screening purposes after random mutagenesis. Finally, we discuss the potential of our adapted amoebae plate test to use D. discoideum for risk assessment of yeast strains. PMID:27818653

  1. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  2. Fungicidal monoclonal antibody C7 interferes with iron acquisition in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Brena, Sonia; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Moragues, María D; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Domínguez, Angel; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a monoclonal antibody (MAb), C7, that reacts with the Als3p and enolase present in the Candida albicans cell wall and exerts three anti-Candida activities: candidacidal activity and inhibition of both adhesion and filamentation. To investigate the mode of action of MAb C7 on fungal viability, we examined changes in the genome-wide gene expression profile of C. albicans grown in the presence of a subinhibitory concentration of MAb C7 (12.5 μg/ml) by using microarrays. A total of 49 genes were found to be differentially expressed upon treatment with MAb C7. Of these, 28 were found to be upregulated and 21 were found to be downregulated. The categories of upregulated genes with the largest number of variations were those involved in iron uptake or related to iron homeostasis (42.86%), while the energy-related group accounted for 38.10% of the downregulated genes (8/21). Results were validated by real-time PCR. Since these effects resembled those found under iron-limited conditions, the activity of MAb C7 on C. albicans mutants with deletions in key genes implicated in the three iron acquisition systems described in this yeast was also assessed. Only mutants lacking the TPK1 gene and, to a lesser extent, the TPK2 gene were less sensitive to the candidacidal effect of MAb C7. FeCl(3) or hemin at concentrations of ≥ 7.8 μM reversed the candidacidal effect of MAb C7 on C. albicans in a concentration-dependent manner. The results presented in this study provide evidence that the candidacidal effect of MAb C7 is related to the blockage of the reductive iron uptake pathway of C. albicans.

  3. Fungicidal Monoclonal Antibody C7 Interferes with Iron Acquisition in Candida albicans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brena, Sonia; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Moragues, María D.; Fernández de Larrinoa, Iñigo; Domínguez, Angel; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a monoclonal antibody (MAb), C7, that reacts with the Als3p and enolase present in the Candida albicans cell wall and exerts three anti-Candida activities: candidacidal activity and inhibition of both adhesion and filamentation. To investigate the mode of action of MAb C7 on fungal viability, we examined changes in the genome-wide gene expression profile of C. albicans grown in the presence of a subinhibitory concentration of MAb C7 (12.5 μg/ml) by using microarrays. A total of 49 genes were found to be differentially expressed upon treatment with MAb C7. Of these, 28 were found to be upregulated and 21 were found to be downregulated. The categories of upregulated genes with the largest number of variations were those involved in iron uptake or related to iron homeostasis (42.86%), while the energy-related group accounted for 38.10% of the downregulated genes (8/21). Results were validated by real-time PCR. Since these effects resembled those found under iron-limited conditions, the activity of MAb C7 on C. albicans mutants with deletions in key genes implicated in the three iron acquisition systems described in this yeast was also assessed. Only mutants lacking the TPK1 gene and, to a lesser extent, the TPK2 gene were less sensitive to the candidacidal effect of MAb C7. FeCl3 or hemin at concentrations of ≥7.8 μM reversed the candidacidal effect of MAb C7 on C. albicans in a concentration-dependent manner. The results presented in this study provide evidence that the candidacidal effect of MAb C7 is related to the blockage of the reductive iron uptake pathway of C. albicans. PMID:21518848

  4. Ultraviolet-C Light for Treatment of Candida albicans Burn Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Kharkwal, Gitika B; Zhao, Jie; St. Denis, Tyler G; Wu, Qiuhe; Xia, Yumin; Huang, Liyi; Sharma, Sulbha K; d’Enfert, Christophe; Hamblin, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Burn patients are at high risk of invasive fungal infections, which are a leading cause of morbidity, mortality, and related expense exacerbated by the emergence of drug resistant fungal strains. In this study, we investigated the use of UVC light (254-nm) for the treatment of Candida albicans infection in mouse third degree burns. In-vitro studies demonstrated that UVC could selectively kill the pathogenic yeast C. albicans compared to a normal keratinocyte cell line in a light exposure dependent manner. A mouse model of chronic C. albicans infection in non-lethal 3rd degree burns was developed. The C. albicans strain was stably transformed with a version of the Gaussia princeps luciferase gene that allowed real-time bioluminescence imaging of the progression of C. albicans infection. UVC treatment with a single exposure carried out on day 0 (30 minutes post-infection) gave an average 2.16-log10-unit (99.2%) loss of fungal luminescence when 2.92 J/cm2 UVC had been delivered, while UVC 24-hours post-infection gave 1.94-log10-unit (95.8%) reduction of fungal luminescence after 6.48 J/cm2. Statistical analysis demonstrated that UVC treatment carried out both on both day 0 and day 1 significantly reduced the fungal bioburden of infected burns. UVC was found to be superior to a topical antifungal drug, nystatin cream. UVC was tested on normal mouse skin and no gross damage was observed 24 hours after 6.48 J/cm2. DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) were observed by immunofluorescence in normal mouse skin immediately after a 6.48 J/cm2 UVC exposure, but the lesions were extensively repaired at 24-hours after UVC exposure. PMID:21208209

  5. Reverse Genetics in Candida albicans Predicts ARF Cycling Is Essential for Drug Resistance and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Epp, Elias; Vanier, Ghyslaine; Harcus, Doreen; Lee, Anna Y.; Jansen, Gregor; Hallett, Michael; Sheppard, Don C.; Thomas, David Y.; Munro, Carol A.; Mullick, Alaka; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans, the major fungal pathogen of humans, causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised individuals. Due to limited available therapy options, this can frequently lead to therapy failure and emergence of drug resistance. To improve current treatment strategies, we have combined comprehensive chemical-genomic screening in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and validation in C. albicans with the goal of identifying compounds that can couple with the fungistatic drug fluconazole to make it fungicidal. Among the genes identified in the yeast screen, we found that only AGE3, which codes for an ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase activating effector protein, abrogates fluconazole tolerance in C. albicans. The age3 mutant was more sensitive to other sterols and cell wall inhibitors, including caspofungin. The deletion of AGE3 in drug resistant clinical isolates and in constitutively active calcineurin signaling mutants restored fluconazole sensitivity. We confirmed chemically the AGE3-dependent drug sensitivity by showing a potent fungicidal synergy between fluconazole and brefeldin A (an inhibitor of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factors) in wild type C. albicans as well as in drug resistant clinical isolates. Addition of calcineurin inhibitors to the fluconazole/brefeldin A combination only initially improved pathogen killing. Brefeldin A synergized with different drugs in non-albicans Candida species as well as Aspergillus fumigatus. Microarray studies showed that core transcriptional responses to two different drug classes are not significantly altered in age3 mutants. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting ARF activities was demonstrated by in vivo studies that showed age3 mutants are avirulent in wild type mice, attenuated in virulence in immunocompromised mice and that fluconazole treatment was significantly more efficacious when ARF signaling was genetically compromised. This work describes a new, widely conserved, broad

  6. Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the CAI microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (CAI) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the CAI genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the CAI locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the CAI microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans.

  7. Effects of aging and heat treatment on whole yeast cells and yeast cell walls and on adsorption of ochratoxin A in a wine model system.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Y P; Pueyo, E; Carrascosa, A V; Martínez-Rodríguez, A J

    2008-07-01

    A wine model was evaluated to determine the influence of aging on the ability of whole yeast cells (WY) and yeast cell walls (YCW) to remove ochratoxin A (OTA). Aging and autolysis were monitored for 214 h in the model wine. The original concentration of OTA in the model wine was 10 microg/liter, and WY and YCW were added at a final concentration of 1 g/liter. YCW mannoproteins were involved in the removal of OTA from the model wine through adsorption mechanisms. Aging affected the capacity of WY to remove OTA, but YCW removal capacity remained constant during aging. A previous heat treatment (85 degrees C for 10 min) of WY and YCW increased their removal capacity and increased the efficiency of the decontamination process.

  8. Cell surface display of functional human MHC class II proteins: yeast display versus insect cell display

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Fei; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Zhao, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and robust systems for engineering functional major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) proteins have proved elusive. Availability of such systems would enable the engineering of peptide-MHCII (pMHCII) complexes for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. In this paper, we have developed a system based on insect cell surface display that allows functional expression of heterodimeric DR2 molecules with or without a covalently bound human myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide, which is amenable to directed evolution of DR2–MBP variants with improved T cell receptor (TCR)-binding affinity. This study represents the first example of functional display of human pMHCII complexes on insect cell surface. In the process of developing this pMHCII engineering system, we have also explored the potential of using yeast surface display for the same application. Our data suggest that yeast display is a useful system for analysis and engineering of peptide binding of MHCII proteins, but not suitable for directed evolution of pMHC complexes that bind with low affinity to self-reactive TCRs. PMID:21752831

  9. The effect of cell density on the production of xylitol from D-xylose by yeast.

    PubMed

    Cao, N J; Tang, R; Gong, C S; Chen, L F

    1994-01-01

    The rate of xylitol production from D-xylose increased with increasing yeast cell density. The optimal temperature for xylitol production is 36 degrees C, and the optimal pH range is from 4.0 to 6.0. At high initial yeast cell concentration of 26 mg/mL, 210 g/L of xylitol was produced from 260 g/L of D-xylose after 96 h of incubation with an indicated yield of 81% of the theoretical value.

  10. [Production of plant-derived natural products in yeast cells - A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-03-04

    Plant-derived natural products (PNPs) have been widely used in pharmaceutical and nutritional fields. So far, the main method to produce PNPs is extracting them from their original plants, however, there remains lots of problems. With the concept of synthetic biology, construction of yeast cell factories for production of PNPs provides an alternative way. In this review, we will focus on PNPs' market and application, research progress for production of artemisinin, research progress for production of terpenes, alkaloids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) and recent technology development to give a brief introduction of construction of yeast cells for production of PNPs.

  11. Soft x-ray-controlled dose deposition in yeast cells: techniques, model, and biological assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Batani, Dimitri; Conti, Aldo; Masini, Alessandra; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Turcu, I. C. Edmond

    1996-12-01

    A procedure is presented to release soft x-rays onto yeast cell membrane allegedly damaging the resident enzymatic processes connected with fermentation. The damage is expected to be restricted to regulating fermentation processes without interference with respiration. By this technique fermentation is followed leading to CO2 production, and respiration resulting in global pressure measurements. A solid state pressure sensor system has been developed linked to a data acquisition system. Yeast cells cultures have been investigated at different concentrations and with different nutrients. A non-monotone response in CO2 production as a function of the delivered x-ray dose is observed.

  12. Effect of Tetrandrine against Candida albicans Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Hu, Dan-Dan; Hu, Gan-Hai; Yan, Lan; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and has a high propensity to develop biofilms that are resistant to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the effect of tetrandrine (TET) on growth, biofilm formation and yeast-to-hypha transition of C. albicans. We characterized the inhibitory effect of TET on hyphal growth and addressed its possible mechanism of action. Treatment of TET at a low concentration without affecting fungal growth inhibited hyphal growth in both liquid and solid Spider media. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that TET down-regulated the expression of hypha-specific genes ECE1, ALS3 and HWP1, and abrogated the induction of EFG1 and RAS1, regulators of hyphal growth. Addition of cAMP restored the normal phenotype of the SC5314 strain. These results indicate that TET may inhibit hyphal growth through the Ras1p-cAMP-PKA pathway. In vivo, at a range of concentrations from 4 mg/L to 32 mg/L, TET prolonged the survival of C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans significantly. This study provides useful information for the development of new strategies to reduce the incidence of C. albicans biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24260276

  13. Transcriptional profiling of a yeast colony provides new insight into the heterogeneity of multicellular fungal communities.

    PubMed

    Traven, Ana; Jänicke, Amrei; Harrison, Paul; Swaminathan, Angavai; Seemann, Torsten; Beilharz, Traude H

    2012-01-01

    Understanding multicellular fungal structures is important for designing better strategies against human fungal pathogens. For example, the ability to form multicellular biofilms is a key virulence property of the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans biofilms form on indwelling medical devices and are drug resistant, causing serious infections in hospital settings. Multicellular fungal communities are heterogeneous, consisting of cells experiencing different environments. Heterogeneity is likely important for the phenotypic characteristics of communities, yet it is poorly understood. Here we used colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model fungal multicellular structure. We fractionated the outside colony layers from the cells in the center by FACS, using a Cit1-GFP marker expressed exclusively on the outside. Transcriptomics analysis of the two subpopulations revealed that the outside colony layers are actively growing by fermentative metabolism, while the cells residing on the inside are in a resting state and experience changes to mitochondrial activity. Our data shows several parallels with C. albicans biofilms providing insight into the contributions of heterogeneity to biofilm phenotypes. Hallmarks of C. albicans biofilms - the expression of ribosome and translation functions and activation of glycolysis and ergosterol biosynthesis occur on the outside of colonies, while expression of genes associates with sulfur assimilation is observed in the colony center. Cell wall restructuring occurs in biofilms, and cell wall functions are enriched in both fractions: the outside cells display enrichment of cell wall biosynthesis enzymes and cell wall proteins, while the inside cells express cell wall degrading enzymes. Our study also suggests that noncoding transcription and posttranscriptional mRNA regulation play important roles during growth of yeast in colonies, setting the scene for investigating these pathways in the development of multicellular

  14. Transcriptional Profiling of a Yeast Colony Provides New Insight into the Heterogeneity of Multicellular Fungal Communities

    PubMed Central

    Traven, Ana; Jänicke, Amrei; Harrison, Paul; Swaminathan, Angavai; Seemann, Torsten; Beilharz, Traude H.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding multicellular fungal structures is important for designing better strategies against human fungal pathogens. For example, the ability to form multicellular biofilms is a key virulence property of the yeast Candida albicans. C. albicans biofilms form on indwelling medical devices and are drug resistant, causing serious infections in hospital settings. Multicellular fungal communities are heterogeneous, consisting of cells experiencing different environments. Heterogeneity is likely important for the phenotypic characteristics of communities, yet it is poorly understood. Here we used colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model fungal multicellular structure. We fractionated the outside colony layers from the cells in the center by FACS, using a Cit1-GFP marker expressed exclusively on the outside. Transcriptomics analysis of the two subpopulations revealed that the outside colony layers are actively growing by fermentative metabolism, while the cells residing on the inside are in a resting state and experience changes to mitochondrial activity. Our data shows several parallels with C. albicans biofilms providing insight into the contributions of heterogeneity to biofilm phenotypes. Hallmarks of C. albicans biofilms – the expression of ribosome and translation functions and activation of glycolysis and ergosterol biosynthesis occur on the outside of colonies, while expression of genes associates with sulfur assimilation is observed in the colony center. Cell wall restructuring occurs in biofilms, and cell wall functions are enriched in both fractions: the outside cells display enrichment of cell wall biosynthesis enzymes and cell wall proteins, while the inside cells express cell wall degrading enzymes. Our study also suggests that noncoding transcription and posttranscriptional mRNA regulation play important roles during growth of yeast in colonies, setting the scene for investigating these pathways in the development of multicellular

  15. Inhibition of Candida albicans virulence factors by novel levofloxacin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Raja Mohamed Beema; Raja Mohamed, Beema Shafreen; Muthamil, Subramanian; Subramanian, Muthamil; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian

    2014-08-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, responsible for biofilm associated infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibiofilm properties of novel levofloxacin derivatives on C. albicans biofilms. The levofloxacin derivatives at their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentrations (BIC) were able to inhibit the biofilms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition and were also able to disrupt their mature biofilms. Furthermore, Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene (ERG11) and the efflux pump-encoding genes (CDR1 and MDR1) was decreased upon treatment with the levofloxacin derivatives. The total ergosterol content quantified using UV spectrophotomer showed decrease in ergosterol in the presence of levofloxacin derivatives. Overall, levofloxacin derivatives (6a, 6c and 7d) are capable of inhibiting C. albicans virulence factors. Therefore, these compounds with potential therapeutic implications can be used as new strategy to treat biofilm-related candidal infections.

  16. Employment of methylene blue irradiated with laser light source in photodynamic inactivation of biofilm formed by Candida albicans strain resistant to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Černáková, Lucia; Dižová, Stanislava; Bujdáková, Helena

    2017-01-03

    A promising approach for the eradication of biofilm formed by the yeast Candida albicans seems to be photodynamic inactivation (PDI). This work presents a use of methylene blue (MB, 1 mM) irradiated with a red laser (output power 190 mW/cm(2), wavelength 660 nm) for the eradication of a biofilm formed by the fluconazole-resistant (FLC-resistant) strain C. albicans CY 1123 compared to the standard strain C. albicans SC5314. The periods of irradiation corresponded to the fluence of 15, 23 and 57 J/cm(2) Effectiveness of PDI was evident with following percentage of survived biofilm cells: 24.57, 23.46, and 22.29% for SC5314 and 40.28, 17.91, and 5.89% for CY 1123, respectively, compared to the samples without irradiation. Light and confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed the effectiveness of PDI. However, the morphological form of C. albicans seems to play an important role as well, since prolonged duration of irradiation did not increase efficiency of PDI on C. albicans SC5314. An experiment with the yeast-to-hyphae transition revealed that the FLC-resistant strain expressed a markedly reduced capacity to form hyphae compared to SC5314. We summarized that PDI was effective on biofilm formed by the FLC-resistant strain, but resistance most likely did not play significant role in PDI. Additionally, we observed differences in susceptibility to PDI between biofilms composed of the mycelia and only of the yeasts, and finally, the employment of a laser in PDI enabled a decreasing period of irradiation while maintaining the high effectiveness of PDI.

  17. Krüppel-like Factor 4 modulates interleukin-6 release in human dendritic cells after in vitro stimulation with Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Czakai, Kristin; Leonhardt, Ines; Dix, Andreas; Bonin, Michael; Linde, Joerg; Einsele, Hermann; Kurzai, Oliver; Loeffler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are associated with high mortality rates and are mostly caused by the opportunistic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. Immune responses against these fungi are still not fully understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial players in initiating innate and adaptive immune responses against fungal infections. The immunomodulatory effects of fungi were compared to the bacterial stimulus LPS to determine key players in the immune response to fungal infections. A genome wide study of the gene regulation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) confronted with A. fumigatus, C. albicans or LPS was performed and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) was identified as the only transcription factor that was down-regulated in DCs by both fungi but induced by stimulation with LPS. Downstream analysis demonstrated the influence of KLF4 on the interleukine-6 expression in human DCs. Furthermore, KLF4 regulation was shown to be dependent on pattern recognition receptor ligation. Therefore KLF4 was identified as a controlling element in the IL-6 immune response with a unique expression pattern comparing fungal and LPS stimulation. PMID:27346433

  18. Evaluation of latex reagents for rapid identification of Candida albicans and C. krusei colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Freydiere, A M; Buchaille, L; Guinet, R; Gille, Y

    1997-01-01

    A total of 322 yeast strains and yeastlike organisms belonging to the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Geotrichum, Saccharomyces, and Trichosporon were tested with the new monoclonal antibody-based Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color latex tests. Comparison of results with those obtained by conventional identification methods showed 100% sensitivity for both latex tests and 100% and 95% specificity for the Bichro-latex albicans and Krusei color tests, respectively. Because the test is easy to read and quick to perform, the Bichro-latex albicans test may be useful for rapid identification of Candida albicans colonies in the clinical laboratory. PMID:9157146

  19. A Phenotypic Profile of the Candida albicans Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Oliver R.; Dea, Jeanselle; Noble, Suzanne M.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract and also the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. It last shared a common ancestor with the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae over 300 million years ago. We describe a collection of 143 genetically matched strains of C. albicans, each of which has been deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. This collection represents a large fraction of the non-essential transcription circuitry. A phenotypic profile for each mutant was developed using a screen of 55 growth conditions. The results identify the biological roles of many individual transcriptional regulators; for many, this work represents the first description of their functions. For example, a quarter of the strains showed altered colony formation, a phenotype reflecting transitions among yeast, pseudohyphal, and hyphal cell forms. These transitions, which have been closely linked to pathogenesis, have been extensively studied, yet our work nearly doubles the number of transcriptional regulators known to influence them. As a second example, nearly a quarter of the knockout strains affected sensitivity to commonly used antifungal drugs; although a few transcriptional regulators have previously been implicated in susceptibility to these drugs, our work indicates many additional mechanisms of sensitivity and resistance. Finally, our results inform how transcriptional networks evolve. Comparison with the existing S. cerevisiae data (supplemented by additional S. cerevisiae experiments reported here) allows the first systematic analysis of phenotypic conservation by orthologous transcriptional regulators over a large evolutionary distance. We find that, despite the many specific wiring changes documented between these species, the general phenotypes of orthologous transcriptional regulator knockouts are largely conserved. These observations support the idea that many wiring changes affect the detailed architecture of the circuit, but

  20. Cell-to-cell heterogeneity emerges as consequence of metabolic cooperation in a synthetic yeast community.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Ralser, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Cells that grow together respond heterogeneously to stress even when they are genetically similar. Metabolism, a key determinant of cellular stress tolerance, may be one source of this phenotypic heterogeneity, however, this relationship is largely unclear. We used self-establishing metabolically cooperating (SeMeCo) yeast communities, in which metabolic cooperation can be followed on the basis of genotype, as a model to dissect the role of metabolic cooperation in single-cell heterogeneity. Cells within SeMeCo communities showed to be highly heterogeneous in their stress tolerance, while the survival of each cell under heat or oxidative stress, was strongly determined by its metabolic specialization. This heterogeneity emerged for all metabolite exchange interactions studied (histidine, leucine, uracil, and methionine) as well as oxidant (H2 O2 , diamide) and heat stress treatments. In contrast, the SeMeCo community collectively showed to be similarly tolerant to stress as wild-type populations. Moreover, stress heterogeneity did not establish as sole consequence of metabolic genotype (auxotrophic background) of the single cell, but was observed only for cells that cooperated according to their metabolic capacity. We therefore conclude that phenotypic heterogeneity and cell to cell differences in stress tolerance are emergent properties when cells cooperate in metabolism.

  1. Susceptibility of Candida albicans to new synthetic sulfone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    The influence of halogenated methyl sulfones, i.e. bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named halogenated methyl sulfone 1), dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 2), and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (halogenated methyl sulfone 3), on cell growth inhibition, aspartic protease gene (SAP4-6) expression, adhesion to epithelium, and filamentation was investigated. Antifungal susceptibility of the halogenated methyl sulfones was determined with the M27-A3 protocol in the range of 16-0.0313 µg/mL. Adherence to Caco-2 cells was performed in 24-well plates; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells after 18 h of growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cells. SAP4-6 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR. Structure-activity relationship studies suggested that halogenated methyl sulfone 1 containing bromodichloromethyl or dichloromethyl function at C-4 (halogenated methyl sulfone 2) of the phenyl ring showed the best activity (100% cell inhibition at 0.5 µg/mL), while hydrazine at C-1 (halogenated methyl sulfone 3) reduced the sulfone potential (100% = 4 µg/mL). SAP4-6 were up- or down-regulated depending on the strains' genetic background and the substitutions on the phenyl ring. Halogenated methyl sulfone 2 repressed germination and affected adherence to epithelium (P ≤ 0.05). The tested halogenated methyl sulfones interfered with the adhesion of Candida albicans cells to the epithelial tissues, without affecting their viability after 90 min of incubation. The mode of action of the halogenated methyl sulfones was attributed to the reduced virulence of C. albicans. SAP5 and SAP6 contribute to halogenated methyl sulfones resistance. Thus, halogenated methyl sulfones can inhibit biofilm formation due to their interference with adherence and with the yeast-to-hyphae transition.

  2. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts.

  3. A systems-level approach for metabolic engineering of yeast cell factories.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kwon; Roldão, António; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The generation of novel yeast cell factories for production of high-value industrial biotechnological products relies on three metabolic engineering principles: design, construction, and analysis. In the last two decades, strong efforts have been put on developing faster and more efficient strategies and/or technologies for each one of these principles. For design and construction, three major strategies are described in this review: (1) rational metabolic engineering; (2) inverse metabolic engineering; and (3) evolutionary strategies. Independent of the selected strategy, the process of designing yeast strains involves five decision points: (1) choice of product, (2) choice of chassis, (3) identification of target genes, (4) regulating the expression level of target genes, and (5) network balancing of the target genes. At the construction level, several molecular biology tools have been developed through the concept of synthetic biology and applied for the generation of novel, engineered yeast strains. For comprehensive and quantitative analysis of constructed strains, systems biology tools are commonly used and using a multi-omics approach. Key information about the biological system can be revealed, for example, identification of genetic regulatory mechanisms and competitive pathways, thereby assisting the in silico design of metabolic engineering strategies for improving strain performance. Examples on how systems and synthetic biology brought yeast metabolic engineering closer to industrial biotechnology are described in this review, and these examples should demonstrate the potential of a systems-level approach for fast and efficient generation of yeast cell factories.

  4. [Alcohol fermentation: effect of temperature on ethanol accumulation within yeast cells (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Navarro, J M; Durand, G

    1978-01-01

    During fermentation, yeast growth is rapidly stopped when the concentration of alcohol in the medium increases but fermentive activity is not entirely inhibited until high alcohol concentrations are reached. The rate of alcohol accumulation within the cells and certain kinetic parameters were simultaneously determined in such fermentative processes using Saccharomyces carlsbergensis cells. The growth inhibitory effect of alcohol was related to its retention inside within the cells; i.e. yeast multiplication is stopped when intracellular alcohol concentration reaches a maximum value. Moreover, the higher the temperature, the deeper the inhibitory effect of ethanol and the higher the maximal intracellular alcohol concentration. Activation energy determinations showed that ethanol accumulation within the cells was a consequence of the resistance to its diffusion through the cell wall from within to outside the cell.

  5. Central Roles of Small GTPases in the Development of Cell Polarity in Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hay-Oak; Bi, Erfei

    2007-01-01

    Summary: The establishment of cell polarity is critical for the development of many organisms and for the function of many cell types. A large number of studies of diverse organisms from yeast to humans indicate that the conserved, small-molecular-weight GTPases function as key signaling proteins involved in cell polarization. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly attractive model because it displays pronounced cell polarity in response to intracellular and extracellular cues. Cells of S. cerevisiae undergo polarized growth during various phases of their life cycle, such as during vegetative growth, mating between haploid cells of opposite mating types, and filamentous growth upon deprivation of nutrition such as nitrogen. Substantial progress has been made in deciphering the molecular basis of cell polarity in budding yeast. In particular, it becomes increasingly clear how small GTPases regulate polarized cytoskeletal organization, cell wall assembly, and exocytosis at the molecular level and how these GTPases are regulated. In this review, we discuss the key signaling pathways that regulate cell polarization during the mitotic cell cycle and during mating. PMID:17347519

  6. Oscillatory Dynamics of Cell Cycle Proteins in Single Yeast Cells Analyzed by Imaging Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Ball, David A.; Marchand, Julie; Poulet, Magaly; Baumann, William T.; Chen, Katherine C.; Tyson, John J.; Peccoud, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Progression through the cell division cycle is orchestrated by a complex network of interacting genes and proteins. Some of these proteins are known to fluctuate periodically during the cell cycle, but a systematic study of the fluctuations of a broad sample of cell-cycle proteins has not been made until now. Using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, we profiled 16 strains of budding yeast, each containing GFP fused to a single gene involved in cell cycle regulation. The dynamics of protein abundance and localization were characterized by extracting the amplitude, period, and other indicators from a series of images. Oscillations of protein abundance could clearly be identified for Cdc15, Clb2, Cln1, Cln2, Mcm1, Net1, Sic1, and Whi5. The period of oscillation of the fluorescently tagged proteins is generally in good agreement with the inter-bud time. The very strong oscillations of Net1 and Mcm1 expression are remarkable since little is known about the temporal expression of these genes. By collecting data from large samples of single cells, we quantified some aspects of cell-to-cell variability due presumably to intrinsic and extrinsic noise affecting the cell cycle. PMID:22046265

  7. Chromosome or chromatin condensation leads to meiosis or apoptosis in stationary yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Ren, Qun; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2006-12-01

    When starved of essential nutrients, yeast cells cease mitotic division and enter an alternative state called the 'stationary phase'. In this paper, we report that stationary cells enter two major pathways: meiosis and apoptosis. Using transmission electron microscopy, five types of cell were identified in the stationary phase: (1) cells with chromosome condensed nuclei; (2) cells with normal, homogeneously stained nuclei; (3) sporulated cells; (4) apoptotic cells, in which chromatin, but not individual chromosomes, was condensed; and (5) dead cells, in which nuclei and cytoplasm were degraded. Further evidence using live cell imaging and mutation analysis suggested that cells with condensed chromosomes underwent meiosis, whereas chromatin condensed cells underwent apoptotic cell death. Cells with homogeneous nuclei are believed to be in the true resting state and undergo cell death when starvation continues. Chromosome or chromatin condensation may serve as a hallmark of life or death for stationary cells.

  8. Secreted aspartic protease 2 of Candida albicans inactivates factor H and the macrophage factor H-receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18).

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Eliška; Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Lermann, Ulrich; Staib, Peter; Kremlitzka, Mariann; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Barz, Dagmar; Erdei, Anna; Józsi, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    The opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans employs several mechanisms to interfere with the human complement system. This includes the acquisition of host complement regulators, the release of molecules that scavenge complement proteins or block cellular receptors, and the secretion of proteases that inactivate complement components. Secreted aspartic protease 2 (Sap2) was previously shown to cleave C3b, C4b and C5. C. albicans also recruits the complement inhibitor factor H (FH), but yeast-bound FH can enhance the antifungal activity of human neutrophils via binding to complement receptor type 3 (CR3). In this study, we characterized FH binding to human monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition studies with antibodies and siRNA targeting CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18), as well as analysis of colocalization of FH with these integrins indicated that both function as FH receptors on macrophages. Preincubation of C. albicans yeast cells with FH induced increased production of IL-1β and IL-6 in macrophages. Furthermore, FH enhanced zymosan-induced production of these cytokines. C. albicans Sap2 cleaved FH, diminishing its complement regulatory activity, and Sap2-treatment resulted in less detectable CR3 and CR4 on macrophages. These data show that FH enhances the activation of human macrophages when bound on C. albicans. However, the fungus can inactivate both FH and its receptors on macrophages by secreting Sap2, which may represent an additional means for C. albicans to evade the host innate immune system.

  9. Metabolism of benzoquinone by yeast cells and oxidative characteristics of corresponding hydroquinone: application to highly sensitive measurement of yeast cell density by using benzoquinone and a chemiluminescent probe.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Tadayuki; Ide, Seiji; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2004-07-01

    The metabolic efficiency of seven derivatives of 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) by yeast cells and the oxidative characteristics of the corresponding hydroquinones (HQs) were studied by electrochemical, spectrophotometric and chemiluminescent methods. The spectrophotometric method was based on the reduction of a tetrazolium salt to formazan dye during the autoxidation of HQs generated by yeast cells under alkaline conditions. The amounts of HQs detected directly by the electrochemical method did not agree with those calculated from the formazan dye obtained by the spectrophotometric method. A tetrazolium salt was reduced to a formazan dye by both the superoxide anion radical (O2-*) generated during the autoxidation of 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-HQ and by HQ itself. Little formazan dye was formed, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was then finally produced during the autoxidation of 1,4-HQ or 2-methyl-1,4-HQ. Formazan dye and H2O2 were generated at a certain ratio during the autoxidation of derivatives of dimethyl-1,4-HQ or 2,3,5-trimethyl-1,4-HQ. The analytical method based on chemiluminescence with lucigenin and 2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-BQ was applied to highly sensitive measurement of the yeast cell density. A linear relationship between the chemiluminescence intensity and viable cell density was obtained in the range of 1.2 x 10(3) - 4.8 x 10(4) cells/ml. The detection limit was 4.8 x 10(2) cells/ml.

  10. An Imaging Flow Cytometry-based approach to analyse the fission yeast cell cycle in fixed cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James O; Swaffer, Matthew; Filby, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is an excellent model organism for studying eukaryotic cell division because many of the underlying principles and key regulators of cell cycle biology are conserved from yeast to humans. As such it can be employed as tool for understanding complex human diseases that arise from dis-regulation in cell cycle controls, including cancers. Conventional Flow Cytometry (CFC) is a high-throughput, multi-parameter, fluorescence-based single cell analysis technology. It is widely used for studying the mammalian cell cycle both in the context of the normal and disease states by measuring changes in DNA content during the transition through G1, S and G2/M using fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Unfortunately analysis of the fission yeast cell cycle by CFC is not straightforward because, unlike mammalian cells, cytokinesis occurs after S-phase meaning that bi-nucleated G1 cells have the same DNA content as mono-nucleated G2 cells and cannot be distinguished using total integrated fluorescence (pulse area). It has been elegantly shown that the width of the DNA pulse can be used to distinguish G2 cells with a single 2C foci versus G1 cells with two 1C foci, however the accuracy of this measurement is dependent on the orientation of the cell as it traverses the laser beam. To this end we sought to improve the accuracy of the fission yeast cell cycle analysis and have developed an Imaging Flow Cytometry (IFC)-based method that is able to preserve the high throughput, objective analysis afforded by CFC in combination with the spatial and morphometric information provide by microscopy. We have been able to derive an analysis framework for subdividing the yeast cell cycle that is based on intensiometric and morphometric measurements and is thus robust against orientation-based miss-classification. In addition we can employ image-based metrics to define populations of septated/bi-nucleated cells and measure cellular dimensions. To our knowledge

  11. Candida albicans Als3p is required for wild-type biofilm formation on silicone elastomer surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaomin; Daniels, Karla J.; Oh, Soon-Hwan; Green, Clayton B.; Yeater, Kathleen M.; Soll, David R.; Hoyer, Lois L.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans ALS3 encodes a large cell-surface glycoprotein that has adhesive properties. Immunostaining of cultured C. albicans germ tubes showed that Als3p is distributed diffusely across the germ tube surface. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy of model catheter biofilms grown using a PALS3-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter strain showed GFP production in hyphae throughout the biofilm structure while biofilms grown using a PTPI1-GFP reporter strain showed GFP in both hyphae and yeast-form cells. Model catheter biofilms