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Sample records for alborz mountains iran

  1. Analogue and geophysical modelling of the Garmsar Salt Nappe, Iran: constraints on the evolution of the Alborz Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikpour, Shahram; Zulauf, Gernold; Sebti, Arash; Kheirolahi, Hassan; Dietl, Carlo

    2010-08-01

    The Alborz Mountains are forming a ~100-km-wide east-west trending orogenic belt that stretches 2000 m across northern Iran south of the Caspian Sea. The Alborz Mountains consist of salt-bearing Neogene sediments, which are folded and cut by faults. Global positioning system studies indicate N-S directed shortening across the Alborz range, which is accommodated by right and left-lateral strike-slip along ESE-WNW and ENE-WSW trending faults, respectively. A 20 km × 10 km × 03 km sheet of salt extruded over the central plateau of Iran arising at the front of the advancing Alborz Mountains. The extruded salt forms the Eyvanekey plateau between Eyvanekey and Garmsar, which is now known, as the Garmsar Salt Nappe. To get more insights in the evolution of the Garmsar Salt Nappe, analogue modelling has been carried out using PDMS as salt analogue and sand as analogue for the brittle overburden. The structures produced consist of folds and thrusts, which were formed while the salt analogue PDMS was rising up. The modelling results are compatible with our interpretation that the deformation front of the Alborz Mountains advanced SSW when overriding a salt sequence in the Garmsar area. Depth estimations using the gravity and magnetic fields suggest that the salt in the Garmsar Salt Nappe extruded from a depth less than 2000 m.

  2. Dinosaur tracks from the Jurassic Shemshak Group in the Central Alborz Mountains (Northern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassi, Nasrollah; Madanipour, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    The Shemshak Group includes alternating layers of coal-bearing shale and siliciclastic sediments in the Baladeh area in the central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. A diverse and abundant Jurassic dinosaur footprint assemblage is now recognized in the group, which is Toarcian to Bajocian in age in the northern Baladeh. This is the first report of a diverse dinosaur ichnoassemblage from Iran that includes the footprints of sauropods. These tracks can be assigned to three groups of trackmakers: theropods, ornithopods and sauropods. Those of theropods are typically tridactyl in shape, their trackways reflecting bipedal movement. Theropod footprints are very abundant in both northern and western Baladeh. The studied theropod tracks themselves are divided into three major dimensional groups. The medium sized footprints (footprint length, 11-15 cm) are abundant and have a stride length, digit and pace angles like the coelurosaurs footprints and trackway. Theropod footprints were identified as similar to Schizograllator otariensis, Talmontopus tersi and Wildeichnus isp. Ornithopod footprints are tridactyl with rounded and thick toes and belong to bipeds. Some didactyl imprints were also observed. Skin imprints were well preserved in these footprints. The ornithopod tracks resemble Jiayinosorupus johnsoni, as well as Velociraptorichnus sichuanensis for didactyl footprints. Sauropod footprints found in the western part of Baladeh are assigned here to Eosauropus isp., which are pentadactyl pes imprints of a quadruped. The assemblage from Iran resembles similar associations from eastern Asia.

  3. Variations in erosional efficiency modulate orogenic growth of the Alborz Mountains (N Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballato, Paolo; Landgraf, Angela; Stockli, Daniel; Ghasemi, Mohammad; Strecker, Manfred; Kirby, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The recognition that redistribution of mass by erosion governs orogenic evolution has radically changed our perspective on the coupling between climate and mountain building processes. Climate modulates the efficiency of surface processes, which modifies crustal stresses and this is expected to produce the cessation of shortening at the orogenic front, onset of out-of-sequence thrusting, and increased rates of rock -uplift and sediment supply. Unambiguous characterization of these multiple responses through field-based studies, however, has remained challenging. Here, we show that coordinated changes in the rates and patterns of exhumation and deformation during the development of the Alborz Mountains (N Iran) were driven by abrupt, large magnitude (0.6 to 1.5 km) fluctuations in base level in the adjacent Caspian Sea. We argue that sustained regression of the paleoshoreline from ~6 to 3.2 Ma enhanced erosional efficiency of fluvial systems and increased exhumation within the axial orogenic zone and along the northern range flank which, in turn, drove coordinated retreat of the deformation fronts. When base level rose again at 3.2 Ma, exhumation in the orogen interior slowed and range-bounding faults were reactivated. This was associated with the progressive establishment of positive feedbacks loop between orographically-induced precipitation, focused erosion, exhumation, and rock uplift. Overall, these coordinated changes offer compelling evidence that enhanced erosion can indeed trigger a structural reorganization within an actively deforming orogen.

  4. Palaeobiogeographic implications of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian (Middle Jurassic) dinoflagellate cysts from the Central Alborz Mountains, northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Nejad, Ebrahim; Sabbaghiyan, Hossein; Mosaddegh, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The Dalichai Formation with an age of Late Bajocian-Late Callovian was sampled in Central Alborz Mountains of northern Iran and studied for palynological, palaeobiogeographical and palynocorrelation purposes. Palynological studies revealed diverse and well-preserved dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and lead to identification of three zones i.e., Cribroperidiniumcrispum (Late Bajocian), Dichadogonyaulaxsellwoodii (Bathonian to Early Callovian) and Ctenidodiniumcontinuum (Early to Middle Callovian) Zones. Subzone a of the D. sellwoodii Zone (Early to Middle Bathonian) was also differentiated. This biozonation corresponds to those recognised in Northwest Europe. Furthermore, the ammonoid families recorded including Phylloceratidae, Oppeliidae, Reineckeiidae, Perisphinctidae, Haploceratidae, Parkinsoniidae and Sphaeroceratidae, which confirm the Late Bajocian to Late Callovian age, are quite similar to those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys. The close similarities of the dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and ammonite fauna of northern Iran with those of Northwest Europe and the northwestern Tethys during the Middle Jurassic indicate direct but episodic marine connection and faunal exchange between the two areas.

  5. Quaternary evolution of mechanical fault-linkage between the North Tehran Thrust (NTT) and Mosha Fasham Fault (MFF), Alborz Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, A.; Ballato, P.; Strecker, M. R.; Friedrich, A.; Tabatabaei, S. H.

    2006-12-01

    The kinematic relationship between the neighboring MFF and the NTT is an open question in the fault interaction during the late Cenozoic evolution of the Alborz Mountains. Despite numerous Quaternary faults and their importance for hazard mitigation, the interaction and linkage between these structures are not understood. The ENE-striking NTT is a frontal thrust that delimits the Alborz Mountains to the south, but no instrumentally recorded earthquakes are known here. The E-striking MFF, with a double-bend toward a NW- strike in its central part, is located within the Alborz Mountains. Sinistral motion along its eastern part is corroborated by microseismicity and fault kinematic data, documenting ongoing transtension. Four possible kinematic scenarios may be inferred for both fault systems: (1) each is a separate entity without interaction, (2) progressive eastward propagation of the NTT and linkage with the MFF, resulting in a "master" fault, (3) a "triple junction" with three interacting blocks or (4) a transpressional duplex involving the NW- prolongation of the NTT as frontal, and the ENE-striking NTT segments as lateral ramps between the E-striking east-central and westernmost MFF. The eastern MFF is characterized by sinistral offsets and stream deflections. However, these phenomena are absent in the central-western fault branch. Structural observations along the eastern, slightly north-convex NTT imply dip-slip faulting, where Eocene volcanic units were thrust onto Plio-Pleistocene conglomerates. In addition, fluvial knickpoints, narrow bedrock channels, fluvial terrace remnants, and wineglass-shaped canyons in the hanging wall suggest Quaternary uplift along this fault. However, there must have been a Pleistocene kinematic change along the NTT, involving sinistral reactivation as shown by 80m stream-offsets and horizontal striations on dip-slip faults. NE-trending ravines are sigmoidally shaped, suggesting conjugate shearing by shortening oblique to the

  6. Inclined transpression in the Neka Valley, eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi, Seyed Tohid; Díaz-Azpiroz, Manuel; Talbot, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    Three major nappes in the Neka Valley in the eastern Alborz Mountains of Iran allow the Cimmerian to present convergence following the oblique collision between Iran and the southern margin of Eurasia. This work reports the identification of an inclined transpression zone recognized by field investigations and strain analyses of the geometries of formations and detailed mesoscopic structural analyses of multiple faults, folds and a cleavage. The main structures encountered include refolded recumbent asymmetric fold nappes, highly curved fold hinges, in a transpression zone that dips 37° to the NW between boundaries thrusts striking from N050° to N060°. The β angle (the angle between the zone boundary and direction of horizontal far-field shortening) is about 80°. The north-west and south-east boundaries of this zone coincide with the Haji-abad thrust and the Shah-Kuh thrust, respectively. Fold axes generally trend NE-SW and step to both right and left as a result of strike-slip components of fault displacements. Strain analyses using Fry's method on macroscopic ooids and fusulina deformed into oblate ellipsoids indicate that the natural strain varies between 2.1 and 3.14. The estimated angle between the maximum instantaneous strain axis (ISAmax) and the transpression zone boundary (θ') is between 6° and 20°. The estimated oblique convergence angle (α), therefore, ranges between 31° and 43°. The average kinematic vorticity number (W k ) is 0.6, in a zone of sinistral pure shear-dominated inclined triclinic transpression. These results support the applicability of kinematic models of triclinic transpression to natural brittle-ductile shear zones.

  7. Body wave attenuation characteristics in the crust of Alborz region and North Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, M.; Hamzehloo, H.

    2016-11-01

    Attenuation of P and S waves has been investigated in Alborz and north central part of Iran using the data recorded by two permanent and one temporary networks during October 20, 2009, to December 22, 2010. The dataset consists of 14,000 waveforms from 380 local earthquakes (2 < M L < 5.6). The extended coda normalization method (CNM) was used to estimate quality factor of P (Q P) and S waves (Q S) at seven frequency bands (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, 3, 6, 12, 24 Hz). The Q P and Q S values have been estimated at lapse times from 40 to 100 s. It has been observed that the estimated values of Q P and Q S are time independent; therefore, the mean values of Q P and Q S at different lapse times have been considered. The frequency dependence of quality factor was determined by using a power-law relationship. The frequency-dependent relationship for Q P was estimated in the form of (62 ± 7)f (1.03 ± 0.07) and (48 ± 5)f (0.95 ± 0.07) in Alborz region and North Central Iran, respectively. These relations for Q S for Alborz region and North Central Iran have estimated as (83 ± 8)f (0.99 ± 0.07) and (68 ± 5)f (0.96 ± 0.05), respectively. The observed low Q values could be the results of thermoelastic effects and/or existing fracture. The estimated frequency-dependent relationships are comparable with tectonically active regions.

  8. Stratigraphy and ammonite fauna of the upper Shemshak Formation (Toarcian Aalenian) at Tazareh, eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed-Emami, K.; Fürsich, F. T.; Wilmsen, M.; Cecca, F.; Majidifard, M. R.; Schairer, G.; Shekarifard, A.

    2006-12-01

    With a thickness of 3900 m, the Tazareh section is one of the thickest developments of the Shemshak Formation in the Alborz range. It overlies with sharp and disconformable contact the limestones and dolomites of the Lower-Middle Triassic Elikah Formation and is topped, again with a disconformable contact, by the marls and limestones of the Middle Jurassic Dalichai Formation. The nearly exclusively siliciclastic succession represents a range of environments, from fluvial channels, flood plains, swamps and lake systems to storm-dominated shelf, and a comparatively deep marine and partly dysoxic basin. The segment of the section between 2300 and 3500 m is exclusively marine and contains a moderately diverse ammonite fauna, ranging from the Middle Toarcian to the Upper Aalenian. The ammonite fauna comprises 21 taxa, among them the new genus Shahrudites with two new species, Shahrudites asseretoi and S. stoecklini from the Middle Aalenian Bradfordensis Zone. The other ammonites from the Shemshak Formation at Tazareh (as elsewhere in North and Central Iran) are exclusively Tethyan in character and closely related to faunas from western and central Europe. An ammonite-based correlation of Toarcian-Aalenian successions of the eastern Alborz with time-equivalent strata of the Lut Block, part of the Central-East Iranian Microcontinent (ca. 500 km to the south), suggests a strong influence of synsedimentary tectonics during the deposition of the upper Shemshak Formation.

  9. Structural pattern and emplacement mechanism of the Neka Valley nappe complex, eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabavi, Seyed Tohid; Rahimi-Chakdel, Aziz; Khademi, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    The Neka Valley nappe complex is exposed in the south of Gorgan County in the eastern Alborz fold-and-thrust belt. We use the results of a regional survey of the structural data and their patterns to interpret the mechanisms that emplaced the unmetamorphosed nappes in the foreland fold-and-thrust belt of the Alborz Mountains. Most of the strain magnitudes are low in the study area but increase slightly towards what are probably their proximal ends. Strain ellipsoid is dominantly oblate with XY aligned along and across the belt (or the nappe complex). The average kinematic vorticity number, W k = 0.6 which indicates most of the strain partitioning resulted in a general shear. Most of Flinn's k values and α (the stretch along the shear plane) values are lower than 1. Structural indicators such as orthogonal extensional joints, pinch-and-swell structures, anastomosing cleavages, and listric normal and growth faults developed by push from the rear. Large-scale thrust complexes with opposed-dips such as triangle zones (as well as k and α-values <1) are compatible with the shear flow diverging distally and streamlines expected of the rear compression emplacement mechanism. Together with a later minor brittle deformation, these major ductile strains appears to provide a general model suitable for the emplacement of the nappes studied in a thin-skinned fold-and-thrust belt where the sedimentary cover strata shortened and imbricated in the upper crust.

  10. The Rudbār Mw 7.3 earthquake of 1990 June 20; seismotectonics, coseismic and geomorphic displacements, and historic earthquakes of the western `High-Alborz', Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberian, Manuel; Walker, Richard

    2010-09-01

    The Rudbār earthquake of 1990 June 20, the first large-magnitude earthquake with 80 km left-lateral strike-slip motion in the western `High-Alborz' fold-thrust mountain belt, was one of the largest, and most destructive, earthquakes to have occurred in Iran during the instrumental period. We bring together new and existing data on macroseismic effects, the rupture characteristics of the mainshock, field data, and the distribution of aftershocks, to provide a better description of the earthquake source, its surface ruptures, and active tectonic characteristics of the western `High-Alborz'. The Rudbār earthquake is one of three large magnitude events to have occurred in this part of the Alborz during recorded history. The damage distribution of the 1485 August 15 Upper Polrud earthquake suggests the east-west Kelishom left-lateral fault, which is situated east of the Rudbār earthquake fault, as a possible source. The 1608 April 20 Alamutrud earthquake may have occurred on the Alamutrud fault farther east. Analysis of satellite imagery suggests that total left-lateral displacements on the Rudbār fault are a maximum of ~1 km. Apparent left-lateral river displacements of ~200 m on the Kashachāl fault and up to ~1.5 km of the Kelishom fault, which are situated at the eastern end of the Rudbār earthquake fault, also appear to indicate rather small cumulative displacements. Given the relatively small displacements, the presently active left-lateral strike-slip faults of the western High-Alborz fold-thrust belt, may be younger than onset of deformation within the Alborz Mountains as a whole.

  11. Microfacies and biofabric of nummulite accumulations (Bank) from the Eocene deposits of Western Alborz (NW Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadi, Mehdi; Mosaddegh, Hossein; Abbassi, Nasrollah

    2016-12-01

    The nummulite bank from the Eocene Ziarat Formation is described for the first time from Alborz, Iran, enhancing the record of these nummulite-rich accumulations in the Eocene of the circum-Tethyan carbonate platform. Five microfacies types have been defined within the shallow-water carbonate deposits of the Ziarat formation located in the western Alborz zone. Microfacies type 1 contains the most diverse Alveolina species associated with predominance of Nummulites A-forms. Microfacies type 2 is characterized by the presence of bivalve (oysters) fragments. Microfacies type 3 is supported by the high abundance of nummulitids. Microfacies type 4 is dominated by the occurrence of encrusting foraminifera-algal with flat growth forms that are mainly formed within the acervulinids assemblage. Finally, there is the presence of orthophragminids and nummuitids represented by microfacies type 5. Microfacies data obtained from the investigation area show that nummulite banks were formed within the back, core and fore-bank palaeoenvironments. The classification method of this paper is based on use biometric, biofabric, taphonomic and palaeoecological characteristics of larger benthic foraminifera. In addition, the calculated intraskeletal porosity by the use of numerous sections and FE-SEM images of Nummulites tests were displacement of tests in order to achieve a better understanding of paleo-conditions that occurred during sedimentation. We conclude that differences among bank frameworks suggest that small biconvex A-forms of Nummulites tests along with alveolinids were living in shallow, euphotic waters, whereas robust and ovate nummulitid tests thrived and concentrated in the intermediate (40-80 m) water with biofabrics in the min-scales, which indicates the influence of waves and currents in combination with wave-winnowing processes. More distal accumulations, the fore-bank were characterized by orthophragminid and nummulitid tests in the deeper part of the photic zone

  12. A cholera outbreak in Alborz Province, Iran: a matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A total of 229 confirmed cholera cases were reported in Alborz Province during an outbreak that lasted from June 2011 to August 2011. This study aimed to identify potential sources of transmission in order to determine suitable interventions in similar outbreaks. In other words, the lessons learned from this retrospective study can be utilized to manage future similar outbreaks. METHODS: An age-matched and sex-matched case-control study was conducted during the outbreak. For each case, two control subjects were selected from the neighborhood. A case of cholera was defined as a bacteriologically confirmed case with signs and symptoms of cholera. This study was conducted from June 14, 2011 through August 23, 2011. The data were analyzed by calculating odds ratios (ORs) using the logistic regression method. RESULTS: In this outbreak, 229 confirmed cholera cases were diagnosed. The following risk factors were found to be associated with cholera: consumption of unrefrigerated leftover food (OR, 3.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72 to 5.41), consumption of vegetables and fruits in the previous three days (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.95 to 3.89), and a history of traveling in the previous five days (OR, 5.31; 95% CI, 2.21 to 9.72). CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of vegetables and fruits has remained an unresolved risk factor in cholera outbreaks in Iran in recent years. In order to reduce the risk of cholera, sanitary standards for fruits and vegetables should be observed at all points from production to consumption, the population should be educated regarding hygienic food storage during outbreaks, and sanitary standards should be maintained when traveling during cholera outbreaks. PMID:27188308

  13. Paleoenvironment of the Permian rocks: a comparison between central and eastern Alborz, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lankarani, M.; Amini, A.; Mosadegh, H.

    2009-04-01

    The succession of Permian rocks in Alborz region is composed of siliciclastic and carbonate facies. All of the sediments were deposited in the Paleotethyan passive continental margin but they show different facies architecture and paleoenvironmental condition in various parts of the region. This study, as part of a wider project, has investigated sedimentary facies and paleoenvironment of the Permian rocks in central and eastern Alborz. The Permian rocks in central Alborz are dominated by siliciclastic facies (Doroud Formation) in the lower, and carbonate facies (Ruteh Formation) in the upper half. Field studies and laboratory measurements resulted in recognition of 4 terrigenous and 13 carbonate facies in the succession. A siliciclastic shallow marine system was determined as depositional environment of the terrigenous facies. A homoclinal carbonate ramp, with scattered patch reefs, was determined as depositional environment of the carbonate facies. Dasycladacean green algae, ancestral red algae, hermatypic corals and bryozoans were the major bioconstructors of the ramp. The abundance of skeletal shoals respect to ooidal shoals in the ramp margin was high. The Permian rocks in eastern Alborz are dominated by mixed siliciclastic-carbonate facies (Ruteh Formation) in the lower, and siliciclastic facies (Nesen Formation) in the upper half. The studies resulted in recognition of 5 terrigenous and 6 carbonate facies in the succession. A mixed siliciclastic-carbonate shelf with high sediment influx was determined as depositional environment of the mixed siliciclastic-carbonate facies. Occurrence of the small patch reefs with high coral diversity in this mixed shelf indicates normal marine (hyposaline) condition. Upper terrigenous facies were deposited in fluvial-flood plain system. Difference in paleoclimate and tectonic activity of two sub-basins seems to be the major cause of the differences between the Permian facies in central and eastern Alborz.

  14. Integrative geomorphological mapping approach for reconstructing meso-scale alluvial fan palaeoenvironments at Alborz southern foothill, Damghan basin, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büdel, Christian; Majid Padashi, Seyed; Baumhauer, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Alluvial fans and aprons are common depositional features in general Iranian geomorphology. The countries major cities as well as settlements and surrounding area have often been developed and been built up on this Quaternary sediment covers. Hence they periodically face the effects of varying fluvial and slope-fluvial activity occurring as part of this geosystem. The Geological Survey of Iran therefore supports considerable efforts in Quaternary studies yielding to a selection of detailed mapped Quaternary landscapes. The studied geomorphologic structures which are settled up around an endorheic basin in Semnan Province represent a typical type of landform configuration in the area. A 12-km-transect was laid across this basin and range formation. It is oriented in north-south direction from the southern saltpan, called "Kavir-e-Haj Aligholi"/"Chah-e-Jam" ("Damghan Kavir"), across a vast sandy braided river plain, which is entering from the north east direction of the city of Shahroud. At its northern rim it covers alluvial sediment bodies, which are mainly constituted by broad alluvial aprons, fed by watersheds in Alborz Mountains and having their genetic origins in Mio-/Pliocene times. During this study a fully analytical mapping system was used for developing a geodatabase capable of integrating geomorphological analyses. Therefore the system must provide proper differentiation of form, material and process elements as well as geometric separation. Hence the German GMK25 system was set up and slightly modified to fit to the specific project demands. Due to its structure it offers most sophisticated standards and scale independent hierarchies, which fit very well to the software-determinated possibilities of advanced geodatabase applications. One of the main aspects of mapping Quaternary sediments and structures is to acquire a proper description and systematic correlation and categorization of the belonging mapping-objects. Therefore the team from GSI and

  15. Sedimentologic and paleoclimatic reconstructions of carbonate factory evolution in the Alborz Basin (northern Iran) indicate a global response to Early Carboniferous (Tournaisian) glaciations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar Abadi, Mehrdad; Kulagina, Elena I.; Voeten, Dennis F. A. E.; Boulvain, Frédéric; Da Silva, Anne-Christine

    2017-03-01

    The Lower Carboniferous Mobarak Formation records the development of a storm-sensitive pervasive carbonate factory on the southern Paleo-Tethyan passive margin following the opening of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean into the Alborz Basin along the northern margin of Gondwana. Its depositional facies encompass inner ramp peritidal environments, peloidal to crinoidal shoals, storm to fair-weather influenced mid-ramps, proximal to distal shell beds and low energy outer ramps. Sedimentological analyses and foraminiferal biostratigraphy reveal four events affecting carbonate platform evolution in the Alborz Basin during the Lower Carboniferous: (1) A transgression following global temperature rise in the Early Tournaisian (middle Hastarian) caused the formation of thick-bedded argillaceous limestones. This interval correlates with Early Tournaisian nodular to argillaceous limestones in the Moravia Basin (Lisen Formation, Czech Republic), the Dinant Basin (Pont d'Arcole Formation, Belgium), and at the Rhenish Slate Mountains (Lower Alum shale, Germany). (2) Late Hastarian-early Ivorian glaciations previously identified in Southern Gondwana but had not yet recognized in Northern Gondwana were recorded through a sequence boundary. (3) During the Late Tournaisian-Early Visean?, a differential block faulting regime along the basin's margin caused uplift of the westernmost parts of the Alborz Basin and resulted in subsidence in the eastern part of the central basin. This tectonically controlled shift in depositional regime caused vast sub-aerial exposure and brecciation preserved in the top of the Mobarak Formation in the western portion of the Central Alborz Basin. (4) Tectonic activity coinciding with a progressive, multiphase sea level drop caused indirectly by the Viséan and Serpukhovian glaciations phases ultimately led to the stagnation of the carbonate factory. Paleothermometry proxies, the presence of foraminiferal taxa with a northern Paleo-Tethyan affinity and evidence for

  16. Updated Long Term Fault Slip Rates and Seismic Hazard in the Central Alborz, Iran: New Constraints From InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Alborz mountain range, located south of the Caspian Sea, accommodates 30% of the 25 mm/yr convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. The resulting shortening and left lateral motion is distributed over several active fault zones within the Central Alborz. Despite earlier efforts using only GPS data, little is known about the long term rate of vertical deformation and aseismic slip. Several historical earthquakes have affected this region, some of the largest of these events occurred on the Mosha fault which is close to the capital city, Tehran, which has a population of over eight million. Thus, constraining the interseismic slip rates in this region is particularly important. In this study we complement existing horizontal velocities from a regional GPS network, with line of sight velocities from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), to provide additional constraints on the vertical deformation and enhance the spatial coverage. Assuming a seismogenic depth of 30 km, based on microseismicity data, we solve for the geometry and long term slip rates on four major fault strands in this region. We obtain a long term slip rate of ~ 3 mm/yr for the Mosha and North Alborz faults, and ~ 10 mm/yr for the Khazar fault and Parchin faults. These rates and fault geometries are in agreement with earlier works, and fit the GPS data well. However, close to the fault traces there are large residuals in the InSAR data, suggesting that there is shallow creep (< 30 km). Therefore, we carry out a subsequent inversion using only the residual InSAR displacements to solve for the distribution of creep within the seismogenic zones on these faults. We find that the Mosha and North Alborz faults remain locked between 0 - 30 km depth, whilst the Parchin and Khazar faults are creeping. This new observation of fault creep has direct implications for the seismic hazard in the region. On the Mosha fault we estimate a slip deficit equivalent to a Mw 7.0 event. The combination of In

  17. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  18. Strong Genetic Differentiation of Submerged Plant Populations across Mountain Ranges: Evidence from Potamogeton pectinatus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Shabnam; Afsharzadeh, Saeed; Saeidi, Hojjatollah; Triest, Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    Biogeographic barriers for freshwater biota can be effective at various spatial scales. At the largest spatial scale, freshwater organisms can become genetically isolated by their high mountain ranges, vast deserts, and inability to cross oceans. Isolation by distance of aquatic plants is expected to be stronger across than alongside mountain ridges whereas the heterogeneity of habitats among populations and temporary droughts may influence connectivity and hamper dispersal. Suitable aquatic plant habitats became reduced, even for the widespread submerged Potamogeton pectinatus L. (also named Stuckenia pectinata) giving structure to various aquatic habitats. We compared the level of genetic diversity in a heterogeneous series of aquatic habitats across Iran and tested their differentiation over distances and across mountain ranges (Alborz and Zagros) and desert zones (Kavir), with values obtained from temperate region populations. The diversity of aquatic ecosystems across and along large geographic barriers provided a unique ecological situation within Iran. P. pectinatus were considered from thirty-six sites across Iran at direct flight distances ranging from 20 to 1,200 km. Nine microsatellite loci revealed a very high number of alleles over all sites. A PCoA, NJT clustering and STRUCTURE analysis revealed a separate grouping of individuals of southeastern Iranian sites and was confirmed by their different nuclear ITS and cpDNA haplotypes thereby indicating an evolutionary significant unit (ESU). At the level of populations, a positive correlation between allelic differentiation Dest with geographic distance was found. Individual-based STRUCTURE analysis over 36 sites showed 7 genetic clusters. FST and RST values for ten populations reached 0.343 and 0.521, respectively thereby indicating that allele length differences are more important and contain evolutionary information. Overall, higher levels of diversity and a stronger differentiation was revealed among

  19. Makran Mountain Range, Iran and Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The long folded mountain ridges and valleys of the coastal Makran Ranges of Iran and Pakistan (26.0N, 63.0E) illustrate the classical Trellis type of drainage pattern, common in this region. The Dasht River and its tributaries is the principal drainage network for this area. To the left, the continental drift of the northward bound Indian sub-continent has caused the east/west parallel ranges to bend in a great northward arc.

  20. Late Eocene-Oligocene post-collisional monzonitic intrusions from the Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran. An example of monzonite magma generation from a metasomatized mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Antonio; Aghazadeh, Mehraj; Badrzadeh, Zahra; Chichorro, Martim

    2013-11-01

    A potassic magmatic association in the Zagros hinterland of the Tethyan orogen in Iran is identified and characterized for relevant geochronologic and petrologic features. New data, including a combination of field relations, U-Pb zircon geochronology and rock geochemistry, come from seven plutons (Khankandi, Shaivar-Dagh, Yuseflu, Mizan, Saheb-Divan, Roudbar and Abhar) that form the Arasbaran-Taroum batholith (ATB), which forms part of the Alborz magmatic belt (AMB) of NW Iran. Zircon SHRIMP ages range from 38.32 ± 0.17 Ma, 38.94 ± 0.42 Ma and 37.78 ± 0.28 Ma for magma pulses of the Abhar pluton, at the East of the batholith, to 24.51 ± 0.27 Ma and 23.55 ± 0.47 Ma for pulses of the Mizan pluton at the West. Considering these ages and the previously published ones together, emplacement of the batholith took place during Late Eocene and Oligocene, from 38 to 23 Ma, with an age progression from SE to NW at a rate of 2 cm/year. The whole batholith is characterized by potassic rocks with K2O > 2 wt.% in gabbros and diorites (SiO2 < 50 wt.%). Higher contents of K2O, of up to > 6 wt.%, are normally found in rocks with intermediate silica contents of about 60 wt.% SiO2. These intermediate silica rocks are truly monzonites and are the most abundant in each pluton. With regard to trace elements, the monzonitic rocks of the ATB show some of the typical signatures of arc magmatism (depletion in Nb and Ti). Most samples contain moderate contents of Sr (500-800 ppm), close to similar potassic magmas forming Cenozoic complexes in Central Iran. The relatively moderate Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios suggest that ATB magmas retain some adakitic signatures from the source region. Geochemical modeling is performed by using melt compositions and phase relations calculated with MELTS software, combined with experimental data and trace element signatures. We conclude that monzonitic and shoshonitic magmas of some plutons of the ATB (Shaivar-Dagh, Kahnkandi and Yuseflu) have an adakitic

  1. Epidemiologic and Drug Resistance Pattern of Vibrio cholerae O1 Biotype El Tor, Serotype Ogawa, in the 2011 Cholera Outbreak, in Alborz Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Hojatolah; Moradi, Ghobad; Rasouli, Mohammad Aziz; Mohammadi, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although the national guidelines recommend special antibiotics, based on the antibiogram of National Reference Laboratory, it seems that, because of uncontrolled usage of antibiotics in the society and due to the changes in the serotypes causing the disease, it is essential to monitor the status of drug resistance, permanently, and to revise the current prescriptions guidelines. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the epidemiological aspects and drug resistance pattern of Vibrio cholerae O1, biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa, in cholera outbreak, in Alborz province in Iran, during 2011. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study, which reviews a cholera epidemic that occurred in Iran. A total of 9844 specimens were taken from suspected cases, among diarrheal patients, via rectal swabs. The specimens were placed in Cary-Blair transport medium and sent to laboratory. Samples were enriched, in alkaline peptone water, and isolated on thiosulphate-citrate-bile salt-sucrose agar. From the 244 confirmed cases, 239 cases underwent antibiogram test, via disk diffusion method and based on national committee for clinical laboratory standards (NCCLS) instructions. The standard Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 was used for antibiogram quality control and, eventually, all results were interpreted and reported using NCCLS standard table. Results: In total, until October 22, 2011, which was announced as the end of outbreak, 9844 samples were taken from diarrheal patients. Regarding the type of V. cholerae, 244 El Tor biotype positive cases were reported. The case fatality rate was 1.3%. The mean age of patients was 37.8 years and the highest incidence rate occurred in the age group 21 - 30 years. After conducting antibiotic susceptibility test in the 244 V. cholerae, biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa, it was found that ciprofloxacin had the highest level of antibiotic susceptibility (99.6%) and the highest level of antibiotic resistance was observed in co

  2. Palaeoseismic evidence for a medieval earthquake, and preliminary estimate of late Pleistocene slip-rate, on the Firouzkuh strike-slip fault in the Central Alborz region of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Walker, R. T.; Salamati, R.; Rizza, M.; Patnaik, R.; Hollingsworth, J.; Alimohammadian, H.; Jalali, A.; Kaveh Firouz, A.; Shahidi, A.

    2014-03-01

    The ˜55 km-long Firouzkuh fault is located in the Central Alborz Mountains of Iran. It is a left-lateral fault, which dips to the south, and possesses a small dip-slip component of motion that we interpret to result from extension. The ratio of horizontal to vertical displacement across the fault, calculated from the cumulative displacement of landscape features, is 7.6. We provide constraints on the timing of the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault from two trenches (T1 and T2) across the fault zone, excavated in 2004, and located east of Firouzkuh city. The trenches expose faulted sedimentary deposits. Two optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from sediments in the lower part of trench T1 date from the late Pleistocene (15.9 ± 0.9 ka and 27.1 ± 1.7 ka). The younger of the two dated units in T1 is displaced vertically across the fault by 2.2-4.4 m, from which we estimate a strike-slip displacement of 18.2-33.4 m, and hence a average horizontal slip-rate of 1.1-2.2 mm/yr. The sediments exposed in T1 do not yield constraints on the most recent earthquake history. In trench T2, however, human skeletal remains of a middle aged male, which yield a radiocarbon age of 1159 ± 28 BP (corresponding to a mean calendar age of 791 AD), were found within a faulted alluvial layer at a depth of 60-70 cm from the surface. The existence of these medieval human places shows that a surface-rupturing earthquake occurred at some time after 1159 ± 28 BP. The amount of slip in each earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault is difficult to estimate, but assuming the entire ˜55 km fault length ruptures in each event, they will have had a maximum magnitude of 7.1. At our estimated late Quaternary slip-rate of ˜1.1-2.2 mm/yr magnitude 7.1 earthquakes, involving ˜1.2 m average displacement, would be expected to occur every ˜1100-540 years. As the last earthquake on the Firouzkuh fault may be up to ˜700 years in age we suggest that the Firouzkuh fault is a major hazard for

  3. Zircon U-Pb ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton, Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabatian, Ghasem; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Honarmand, Maryam; Neubauer, Franz

    2016-02-01

    A petrological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic study was carried out on the Tarom-Olya pluton, Iran, in the central part of the Alpine-Himalayan orogenic belt. The pluton is composed of diorite, monzonite, quartz-monzonite and monzogranite, which form part of the Western Alborz magmatic belt. LA-ICP-MS analyses of zircons yield ages from 35.7 ± 0.8 Ma to 37.7 ± 0.5 Ma, interpreted as the ages of crystallization of magmas. Rocks from the pluton have SiO2 contents ranging from 57.0 to 69.9 wt.%, high K2O + Na2O (5.5 to 10.3 wt.%) and K2O/Na2O ratio of 0.9 to 2.0. Geochemical discrimination criteria show I-type and shoshonitic features for the studied rocks. All investigated rocks are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREEs), large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), depleted in high-field strength elements (HFSEs), and show weak or insignificant Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.57-1.02) in chondrite-normalized trace element patterns. The Tarom-Olya pluton samples also show depletions in Nb, Ta and Ti typical of subduction-related arc magmatic signatures. The samples have relatively low ISr (0.7047-0.7051) and positive εNd(36 Ma) (+ 0.39 to + 2.10) values. The Pb isotopic ratios show a (206Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 18.49-18.67, (207Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 15.58-15.61 and (208Pb/204Pb)i ratio of 38.33-38.77. The εHf(t) values of the Tarom-Olya pluton zircons vary from - 5.9 to + 8.4, with a peak at + 2 to + 4. The depleted mantle Hf model ages for the Tarom-Olya samples are close to 600 Ma. These isotope evidences indicate contribution of juvenile sources in petrogenesis of the Tarom-Olya pluton. Geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the parental magma of the Tarom-Olya pluton was mainly derived from a sub-continental lithospheric mantle source, which was metasomatized by fluids and melts from the subducted Neotethyan slab with a minor crustal contribution. Subsequent hot asthenospheric upwelling and lithospheric extension caused decompression melting in the final stage of

  4. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1200 meters (about 4000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This shaded relief image was created directly from an SRTM elevation model by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear

  5. Zagros Mountains, Iran, SRTM Shaded Relief Anaglyph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Zagros Mountains in Iran offer a visually stunning topographic display of geologic structure in layered sedimentary rocks. This scene is nearly 100 kilometers (62 miles) wide but is only a small part of similar terrain that covers much of southern Iran. This area is actively undergoing crustal shortening, as global tectonics moves Arabia toward Asia. Consequently, layers of sedimentary rock are folding much like a carpet will fold if pushed. The convex upward folds create structures called anticlines, which are prominently seen here. The convex downward folds (between the anticlines) create structures called synclines, which are mostly buried and hidden by sediments eroding off the anticlines. Layers having differing erosional resistance create distinctive patterns, often sawtooth triangular facets, that encircle the anticlines. Local relief between the higher mountain ridges and their intervening valleys is about 1,200 meters (about 4,000 feet).

    Salt extrusions and salt 'glaciers' are another set of geologic features readily evident in the topography. Salt deposits, likely created by the evaporation of an ancient inland sea, were buried by the sediments that now make up the layers of the anticlines and synclines. But salt is less dense than most other rocks, so it tends to migrate upward through Earth's crust in vertical columns called 'diapirs'. The compressive folding process has probably facilitated the formation of these diapirs, and the diapirs, in turn, are probably enhancing some anticlines by 'inflating' them with salt. Where the diapirs reach the surface, the salt extrudes, much like lava from a volcano, and the salt flows. Two prominent salt flows are evident in the same valley, leaking from neighboring anticlines, just north of the scene center.

    This anaglyph was created by deriving a shaded relief image from the SRTM data, draping it back over the SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye

  6. Western Alborz Volcanic Rocks, a new Geochemical Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, M.

    2001-12-01

    Volcanic and pyroclastic rocks of Eocene age comprise vast outcrops of Alborz Mountain Range, a fold-thrusted structural unit extending across northern Iran for 2000 km in a curvilinear pattern. In his account of structural evolution of Iranian plateau, Berberian (1983; p. 55) ascribed these rocks to a subduction-type magmatism. Based on a tectonostratigraphic study, these rocks are attributed to an arc-type magmatism (Alavi; 1996, p. 29). Recently a new data set of major and trace element (including REE) analyses of volcanic rocks from western Alborz, some 50 km west of city of Qazvin, has been made available (Asiabanha, 2001). Careful examination of the data (i.e., those of basic-intermediate rocks) in present study revealed, for the first time, some geochemical characteristics which have important implications on the geodynamic synthesis of this structural unit. The rocks contain 50-60 wt% SiO2. They lie in the midalkaline-to-subalkaline domain of TAS diagram (Middlemost, 1997; p.216) and fall in the calcalkaline field of AFM diagram. The volcanic rocks display two distinct chondrite-normalized REE patterns, one is MREE-depleted while the other is a rather smooth uniform M-HREE pattern. These are called MREE-depleted and smooth M-HREE series. Basic rocks from the latter contain higher silica than the former (>53 vs. >50 wt%), yet they show lower incompatible elements (e.g., K and Rb) and HFSE contents. These features can not be explained by differentiation and might be interpreted as implying the involvement of two source regions. Chondrite-normalized trace element patterns of the MREE-depleted series is more akin to the island arc calcalkaline (IACA) basic rocks than the basic rocks from any other tectonic settings. However, island arc products, known for being depleted in HFSE relative to other incompatible elements, differ from the MREE-depleted series which is rich in both HFSE and incompatible elements. One may advocate the role of OIB-type mantle

  7. Turnover and paleoenvironmental changes across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary at the Galanderud section (Northern Alborz, Iran) based on benthic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharianrostami, Masoud; Leckie, R. Mark; Font, Eric; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Koeberl, Christian

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution quantitative study of benthic foraminifera across the expanded and continuous Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary at the Galanderud section in northern Iran provides an excellent record of the K/Pg event. The benthic foraminiferal assemblages, in contrast to the planktic foraminifers, did not suffer mass extinction at the K/Pg boundary. Uppermost Maastrichtian assemblages are well preserved and highly diverse. Only ~3% of the benthic species became extinct, including Bolivinoides draco, Eouvigerina subsculptura, Neoflabellina sp. and Praebulimina reussi. Other species are temporarily absent for a short interval after the K/Pg boundary. Benthic foraminifera indicate outer neritic-uppermost bathyal depths during the Plummerita hantkeninoides Zone until 70 cm below the K/Pg boundary. This interval contains abundant species of Bolivinoides draco, Gaudryina pyramidata, Cibicidoides hyphalus, P. reussi, and Sitella cushmani. The paleodepth decreased to outer neritic in the uppermost Maastrichtian based on the dominance of Stensioeina excolata, G. pyramidata, Cibicidoides pseudoacutus, and Coryphostoma incrassata forma gigantea. On the other hand, some species such as P. reussi and C. hyphalus, which are normally found at bathyal depths, decreased in their abundances. These data suggest a sea-level fall at the end of Maastrichtian. Additional evidence for sea-level fall is a decrease of planktic/benthic ratio from ~60% to ~40% in the uppermost Maastrichtian. The K/Pg clay layer is characterized by a high abundance of opportunistic species such as Cibicidoides spp., C. pseudoacutus, and Tappanina selemensis. The drastic change of benthic foraminiferal assemblages coincides with a sharp drop in magnetic susceptibility and %CaCO3, mass extinction of planktic foraminifera, a sharp enrichment in Ir, and a 2.25‰ negative excursion in ∂13C at the K/Pg boundary, which is largely compatible with the catastrophic effects of an asteroid impact on Earth that

  8. The Crust and Upper Mantle Structure of Northeastern Iran from Joint Waveform Tomography Imaging of Body and Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, B.; Roecker, S. W.; Priestley, K. F.; Tatar, M.

    2012-12-01

    The deformation resulting from the Arabian-Eurasian collision at the longitude of Iran is concentrated in the Zagros, Alborz and Kopeh Dagh Mountains. The Zagros and Alborz Mountains have been the focus of a number of studies but little is known about the structure of NE Iran and the Kopeh Dagh. The Kopeh Dagh form a linear intracontinental fold-and-thrust belt trending NW-SE between the stable Turkmenistan platform and Central Iran, and mark the northern limit to deformation in NE Iran. To the south of the Kopeh Dagh lie a series of elongated mountain ranges: the Binalud, which is a structural and geological eastward continuation of the Alborz, the Siah Kuh near Sabzevar and the Kuh-e-Sorkh near Kashmar. Between August 2006 and February 2008 we operated 17 broadband seismographs along a profile from Sarakhs, near the northeastern political border of Iran with Turkmenistan, across the Kopeh Dagh Mountains, to Yazd in Central Iran. We apply a combination of the teleseismic body wave waveform tomography technique of Roecker et al (2010) with an extension of this technique to surface waves (Roecker et al, 2011) to analyze this data to determine the elastic wavespeed structure of this area. The joint inversion of these different types of waves affords similar types of advantages that are common to combined surface wave dispersion/receiver function inversions in compensating for intrinsic weaknesses in horizontal and vertical resolution capabilities. We compare results recovered from a several different inverse methods, starting with simple gradient techniques to the more sophisticated pseudo-Hessian or L-BFGS approach, and find that the latter are generally more robust. Modelling of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion prior to the analysis is shown to be an efficacious way to generate starting models for this analysis.

  9. Oroclinal bending, distributed deformation, and Arabia-Eurasia convergence in NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mac Niocaill, C.; Alimohammadian, H.; Walker, R. T.; Hollingsworth, J.

    2013-05-01

    The collision of Arabia with Eurasia has produced significant region shortening across wide areas of Iran. These plates converge in a N-S direction at about 25mm/yr, and virtually the entire active collision zone is contained with the geographical and political boundaries of the country. Many features of continental tectonics are well preserved within the region, such as the partitioning of oblique motions onto parallel strike-slip and thrust faults, the concentration of deformation around the boundaries of rigid blocks, and the rotations of tectonic blocks around vertical axes. The collision zone terminates abruptly in the NE of the country, with active deformation trending N-S along the border with Afghanistan, and this is converted into shortening in the Kopeh Dagh and Alborz mountains. There mountain ranges changing from a NW-SE trend along the border with Turkmenistan to an E-W trend in Northern Iran. In the eastern Alborz mountains, the overall pattern of N-S shortening is accommodated on major thrust systems bounding the eastern branch of the Alborz (east of 57°E), Sabzevar, andKuh-e-Sorkh mountain ranges, which lie south of the Kopeh Dagh mountains. This shortening has resulted in significant crustal thickening, forming peaks up to 3000m high. To the west of 57°E much of the convergence seems to be accommodated on large left-lateral strike-slip faults. Active shortening dies out eastward into Afghanistan, which is thought to belong to stable Eurasia. This change in deformation style has given rise to a significant curvature of the eastern Alborz, and a major issue of contention is whether this curvature reflects a component of oroclinal bending of an originally linear mountain belt that has been rotated to its present configuration of whether the motion is purely translational. We present new palaeomagnetic data from Neogene sediments, distributed across NE Iran that provide new constraints on the deformation of the region. A complex pattern of both

  10. Evaluation of parasite fauna in Fish of Alborz Dam.

    PubMed

    Shokrolahi, Soodeh; Hosseinifard, Seyed Mehdi; Youssefi, Mohammad Raza; Sadough, Mina

    2016-03-01

    In this study on fish parasites of Alborz Dam in Iran, 202 fish were caught in years 2010-2011. Caught fish include Leucissus cephalus, Alburnoides bipunctatus, Neogobius flaviatilis. Samples transferred alive to Babol University lab and after investigate, these parasites were identified. One species of Protozoan (Icthyophithirious), 4 genus of Monogen (Gyrodoctylus. Sp, Dactylogyrus. sp, Diplozoon. sp, Paradiplozoon. Sp), one species of Cestode (Bothriocephalus gow kongensis) and one genus of nematode (Rhabdochona. Sp). All of these above parasites were found for first time from Alborz Dam in Iran. Rhabdochona genus was reported from Alburnoides bipunctatus and Bothriocephalus gowkongensis species was reported from all 2 fish species for the first time. Percentage of Pollution was higher on spring season on fish species (79.2 %). Pollution percentage was higher in Leuciscus cephalus than other fish species (28.7 %). Besides the fish were examined in this study had lower species diversity but a high percentage of parasites was seen in investigated fish.

  11. A preliminary study on the distribution patterns of endemic species of Fulgoromorpha (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Iran is known as the most complex and varied country in southwest Asia, in terms of geography, vegetation, climate and consequently biological diversity. The rather high number of recorded endemic species of Fulgoromorpha in Iran indicates a high potential for speciation in some areas. In this study, in order to identify the endemic zones for Fulgoromorpha of Iran, three main biogeographic regions of the country were divided into 13 primary zones, mainly according to the distribution of published and unpublished locality records of endemic species. Using Venn diagrams and cluster analyses on the primary zones, 6 final endemic zones were recognized: Caspian zone, southern slopes of Alborz, Zagros Mountains, Kerman Mountains, Khorasan Mountains, and Baluchestan and Persian Gulf coasts. Then a similarity map was produced for endemic zones using a Multidimensional analysis (Alscal) and the differences between the positions of the same zones in the similarity and geographic maps were discussed. PMID:24039521

  12. A preliminary study on the distribution patterns of endemic species of Fulgoromorpha (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mozaffarian, Fariba

    2013-01-01

    Iran is known as the most complex and varied country in southwest Asia, in terms of geography, vegetation, climate and consequently biological diversity. The rather high number of recorded endemic species of Fulgoromorpha in Iran indicates a high potential for speciation in some areas. In this study, in order to identify the endemic zones for Fulgoromorpha of Iran, three main biogeographic regions of the country were divided into 13 primary zones, mainly according to the distribution of published and unpublished locality records of endemic species. Using Venn diagrams and cluster analyses on the primary zones, 6 final endemic zones were recognized: Caspian zone, southern slopes of Alborz, Zagros Mountains, Kerman Mountains, Khorasan Mountains, and Baluchestan and Persian Gulf coasts. Then a similarity map was produced for endemic zones using a Multidimensional analysis (Alscal) and the differences between the positions of the same zones in the similarity and geographic maps were discussed.

  13. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Elburz Mountains, Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The Elburz Mountains run parallel to the southern coast of the Caspian Sea, and these mountains act as a barrier to rain clouds moving southward; as the clouds rise in altitude to cross the mountains they drop their moisture. This abundant rainfall supports a heavy rainforest (the bright red area) on the northern slopes. The valley to the south receives little precipitation because of this rain-shadow effect of the mountains.

  14. Hydrogeochemical processes and chemical characteristics around Sahand Mountain, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazand, Kaveh; Hezarkhani, Ardeshir

    2013-06-01

    The chemical analysis of 21 water wells in Sahand area, NW of Iran has been evaluated to determine the hydrogeochemical processes and ion, heavy and trace metal concentration background in the region. The dominated hydrochemical types are Ca-Mg-HCO3, Ca-SO4 and Na-Cl that vary in different group sample. The pH and Eh of the groundwater in the study area indicating an acidic to alkaline nature of the samples in group II, acidic nature in group I and neutral in group III. Also in Group III than Group I and II, the oxidizing condition is dominant, while in the other groups relative reducing conditions prevail. Due to Cu and other metal mineralization in I and II site, Cu, As, Au and other metal concentration in this water groups is higher than group III.

  15. Present-day deformation in NE Iran and the South Caspian constraint by Global Positioning System measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, Z.; Walpersdorf, A.; Walker, R. T.; Tavakoli, F.; Pathier, E.; Nankali, H.; Nilfouroushan, F.; Aghamohammadi, A.; Djamour, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The continental collision between Arabia, the Eurasia and distribution of earthquake epicenters show that most of the deformation is accommodated within the political borders of Iran. In recent years, constraints from GPS, seismology and geological estimates of fault slip-rate have allowed considerable advances in understanding the rates and kinematics of faulting across many parts of Iran. However, until now, only little is known on the present-day distribution of strain across the eastern and northeastern parts of the country, such that it has been difficult to assess the rates of faulting, the related earthquake hazard, and the relationship between the active faults and the overall tectonic motions. This area is one of the most densely populated regions of Iran with almost 6.5 million habitants and a significant number of historical earthquakes like the Qumis 856 A.D earthquake with 200.000 victims. But while eastern Alborz and Kopeh Dagh are clearly regions of active faulting, a lack of instrumental earthquakes is presently observed, making this area particularly interesting for hazard assessment studies. The sparse GPS measurements in NE Iran provide only limited constraints on the applicability of different kinematic scenarios that have been proposed to explain the role of the observed faults. Here, we present a velocity field, composed from 47 GPS stations (20 campaign and 27 permanent), recording over up to 11 years, and covering the entire NE of Iran. This new GPS velocity field helps to investigate how northward directed Arabia-Eurasia shortening is accommodated at the northern boundary of the deforming zone. A regional deformation field for NE Iran has been estimated from the GPS measurements. It shows how the incoming ~7 mm/yr of NS shortening between Central Iran and Eurasia is accommodated in Alborz, Binalud and Kopeh Dagh. The shortening rate decreases toward the east and dies out at the Afghanistan border. The deformation pattern is contrasted along

  16. Provenance of Neoproterozoic sedimentary basement of northern Iran, Kahar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemad-Saeed, Najmeh; Hosseini-Barzi, Mahboubeh; Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Sadeghi, Abbas; Houshmandzadeh, Abdolrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article presents new data to understand the nature of the hidden crystalline basement of northern Iran and the tectonic setting of Iran during late Neoproterozoic time. The siliciclastic-dominated Kahar Formation represents the oldest known exposures of northern Iran and comprises late Ediacaran (ca. 560-550 Ma) compositionally immature sediments including mudrocks, sandstones, and conglomerates. This work focuses on provenance of three well preserved outcrops of this formation in Alborz Mountains: Kahar Mountain, Sarbandan, and Chalus Road, through petrographic and geochemical methods. Mineralogical Index of Alteration (MIA) and Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA-after correction for K-metasomatism) values combined with A-CN-K relations suggest moderate weathering in the source areas. The polymictic nature of Kahar conglomerates indicates a mixed provenance for them. However, modal analysis of Kahar sandstones (volcanic to plagioclase-rich lithic arkose) and whole rock geochemistry of mudrocks suggest that they are largely first-cycle sediments and that their sources were remarkably late Ediacaran, intermediate-felsic igneous rocks from proximal arc settings. Tectonic setting discrimination diagrams also indicate a convergent plate margin and continental arc related basin for Kahar sediments. This interpretation is supported by the phyllo-tectic to tectic composition and geochemistry of mudrocks. These results reveal the presence of a felsic/intermediate subduction-related basement (∼600-550 Ma) in this region, which provides new constraints on subduction scenario during this time interval in Iran, as a part of the Peri-Gondwanan terranes.

  17. Tectonic and climatic controls on fan systems: The Kohrud mountain belt, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stuart J.; Arzani, Nasser; Allen, Mark B.

    2014-04-01

    Late Pleistocene to Holocene fans of the Kohrud mountain belt (Central Iran) illustrate the problems of differentiating tectonic and climatic drivers for the sedimentary signatures of alluvial fan successions. It is widely recognised that tectonic processes create the topography that causes fan development. The existence and position of fans along the Kohrud mountain belt, NE of Esfahan, are controlled by faulting along the Qom-Zefreh fault system and associated fault zones. These faults display moderate amounts of historical and instrumental seismicity, and so may be considered to be tectonically active. However, fluvial systems on the fans are currently incising in response to low Gavkhoni playa lake levels since the mid-Holocene, producing incised gullies on the fans up to 30 m deep. These gullies expose an interdigitation of lake deposits (dominated by fine-grained silts and clays with evaporites) and coarse gravels that characterise the alluvial fan sediments. The boundaries of each facies are mostly sharp, with fan sediments superimposed on lake sediments with little to no evidence of reworking. In turn, anhydrite-glauberite, mirabilite and halite crusts drape over the gravels, recording a rapid return to still water, shallow ephemeral saline lake sedimentation. Neither transition can be explained by adjustment of the hinterland drainage system after tectonic uplift. The potential influence in Central Iran of enhanced monsoons, the northward drift of the Intertopical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Mediterranean climates for the early Holocene (~ 6-10 ka) point to episodic rainfall (during winter months) associated with discrete high magnitude floods on the fan surfaces. The fan sediments were deposited under the general influence of a highstand playa lake whose level was fluctuating in response to climate. This study demonstrates that although tectonism can induce fan development, it is the sensitive balance between aridity and humidity resulting from changes in

  18. Seismotectonics of the Iran Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, E. R.; Bergman, E. A.; Myers, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    More than 2000 instrumentally recorded earthquakes occurring in the Iran region during the period 1918- 2008 have been relocated using an advanced seismic location technique. Relocation sharpens the image of seismic activity in the region and - more importantly - significantly improves event focal depths. Iranian seismicity is largely a result of the early stages of continent/continent collision (25-35mm/yr of northwards overall shortening) between the Arabian Peninsula and Eurasia. Most earthquakes in the Iranian continental lithosphere occur in the upper crust (consistent with focal depths of available local seismic network hypocenters), with crustal shortening accommodated entirely by thickening and distributed deformation. This shortening across Iran results in thrust and strike-slip faulting. In the Zagros Mountains nearly all earthquakes are confined to the upper crust (depths < 20 km), and there is no evidence for a seismically active subducted slab dipping NE beneath central Iran. Moreover, the Zagros has many earthquakes but their magnitudes are all less than Mw 7.0 and nearly all the moment release occurs near the SW topographic edge (i.e., elevations between 500-1000m) of the belt. The moment release in the Zagros cannot account for the expected convergence across it, suggesting that the missing moment release is being accommodated aseismically. In southeastern Iran, where the Arabian seafloor is being subducted beneath the Makran coast, low-level earthquake activity occurs in the upper crust as well as to depths of at least 150 km within a northward-dipping subducting slab. Near the Oman Line, a region transitional between the Zagros and the Makran, seismicity extends to depths of up to 30-45 km in the crust, consistent with low-angle thrusting of Arabian basement beneath central Iran. In north-central Iran, along the Alborz mountain belt, seismic activity occurs primarily in the upper crust but with some infrequent events in the lower crust

  19. Morphotectonic aspects of active folding in Zagros Mountains (Fin, SE of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roustaei, M.; Abbasi, M.

    2008-05-01

    Active deformation in Iran, structural province of Zagros is a result of the convergence between the Arabian & Eurasian plates. The Zagros Mountains in southern Iran are one of the seismically active region & is introduced as fold-thrust belt trending NW-SE within the Arabian plate. Fin lies in Hormozgan province; the south of Iran. The vastness is surrounded by central Iran in the north, High Zagros in the North West and west, Folded Zagros in the east, Makran in the south east and Persian Gulf in the south. The study area is determined by complex structures, alternation of folding, salt diapers and faulting. The surface geology mainly comprises Neogene; Marls, Conglomerate, Sandstones (Mishan, Aghajari, Bakhtiyari formations), old fans and alluvium as syncline that Shur River cuts its north limb and passes from the middle of core .The older formations( Ghachsaran, Rzak and Guri member) folded into prominent anticlines. The fold axes mostly follow the parallel trends .Folds trending are NW-SE (Tashkend anticline), NE-SW (Khur anticline), E-W (Guniz & Handun anticline) and the trend of axes Baz fold in the main part is E-W. Hormoz salt also outcrops in the cores of many whaleback anticlines. Thus, anticlines may be cored with evaporates, even though no salt is currently exposed at the surface. Reason of selecting this area as an example referred to active seismcity. Release of energy is gradually in every events, this seismic character cusses that there was not earthquake with high magnitude in the area but it can not be a role. Answer to the question concerning relationship between folding of the crust layer and faulting at depth is more difficult. There is 2 terms to describe this relationship; "detachment folds" and" forced folds". In this paper, we try to analysis of different satellite imagery; Aster, spot and digital elevation model with high resolution (10 m) in order to detect geomorphic indicators which can help us to find a relationship between faulting

  20. Distribution of ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) infesting domestic ruminants in mountainous areas of Golestan province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sarani, Moslem; Telmadarraiy, Zakkyeh; Moghaddam, Abdolreza Salahi; Azam, Kamal; Sedaghat, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of ticks on cattle in the mountainous areas of Golestan province and their geographical distribution. Methods In total, 498 animals from 25 herds were selected to search for ticks in 2009-2010. Tick collection was carried out during four seasons, twice per season over a period of 12 month from March 2009 through February 2010 in two districts, Azadshahr and Ramian. Meteorological data were obtained from Iran Meteorological Organization. The geographical points recorded using a Garmin eTrex®H GPS. Results A total of 255 ticks were collected from a total of 219 ruminants including 44 sheep, 63 goats, 99 cows and 13 camels in two districts of the mountainous area of Golestan province, including Azadshahr and Ramian. Five species of ixodid ticks were identified: Rhipicephalus sanguineus (66.5%), Rhipicephalus bursa (4.6%), Hyalomma marginatum (19.9%), Hyalomma anatolicum (6%) and Hyalomma asiaticum (4%). The densities of infestations were calculated for sheep, goats, cows and camels 0.9, 0.79, 0.16 and 0.43 respectively. Seasonal activity of each ixodid tick infesting domestic ruminants was determined. The distribution maps showed ixodid ticks on domestic ruminants, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus were dominant species in the area. Conclusions Such research provides necessary information for human and animal health service mangers to have a better understanding of prevention and control of vector borne diseases especially during the outbreaks. PMID:25183090

  1. Strike-slip faulting, rotation, and along-strike extension in the Kopeh Dagh mountains, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, J.; Jackson, J.; Walker, R.; Gheitanchi, M. R.; Bolourchi, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    The Kopeh Dagh is a linear mountain range separating the shortening in Iran from the stable, flat Turkmenistan shield. In its central part is an array of active right-lateral strike-slip faults that obliquely cut the range and produce offsets of several kilometers in the geomorphology and geological structure. They are responsible for major destructive earthquakes in the 19th and 20th centuries and represent an important seismic hazard for this now-populous region of NE Iran. These strike-slip faults all end in thrusts, revealed by the uplift and incision of late Quaternary river terraces, and do not continue beyond the Atrek river valley, which forms the southern margin of the Kopeh Dagh. The cumulative offset on these strike-slip faults, and their associated rotation about vertical axes, can account for ~ 60~km of N-S shortening. This value is similar to the Late Quaternary N-S right-lateral shear between central Iran and Afghanistan, which must be accommodated in NE Iran. The strike-slip faults also require ~ 30~km of along-strike extension of the Kopeh Dagh, which is taken up by the westward component of motion between the South Caspian Basin and both Eurasia and central Iran. It is probable that these motions occurred over the last ~ 10~Ma.

  2. Strike-slip faulting, rotation, and along-strike elongation in the Kopeh Dagh mountains, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollingsworth, James; Jackson, James; Walker, Richard; Reza Gheitanchi, Mohammad; Javad Bolourchi, Mohammad

    2006-09-01

    The Kopeh Dagh is a linear mountain range separating the shortening in Iran from the stable, flat Turkmenistan platform. In its central part is an array of active right-lateral strike-slip faults that obliquely cut the range and produce offsets of several kilometres in the geomorphology and geological structure. They are responsible for major destructive earthquakes in the 19th and 20th centuries and represent an important seismic hazard for this now-populous region of NE Iran. These strike-slip faults all end in thrusts, revealed by the uplift and incision of Late Quaternary river terraces, and do not continue beyond the Atrak river valley, which forms the southern margin of the Kopeh Dagh. The cumulative offset on these strike-slip faults, and their associated rotation about vertical axes, can account for ~60 km of N-S shortening. This value is similar to estimates of the Late Quaternary N-S right-lateral shear between central Iran and Afghanistan, which must be accommodated in NE Iran. The strike-slip faults also require ~30 km of along-strike extension of the Kopeh Dagh, which is taken up by the westward component of motion between the South Caspian Basin and both Eurasia and Central Iran. It is probable that these motions occurred over the last ~10 Ma.

  3. Slope gradient and shape effects on soil profiles in the northern mountainous forests of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlollahi Mohammadi, M.; Jalali, S. G. H.; Kooch, Y.; Said-Pullicino, D.

    2016-12-01

    In order to evaluate the variability of the soil profiles at two shapes (concave and convex) and five positions (summit, shoulder, back slope, footslope and toeslope) of a slope, a study of a virgin area was made in a Beech stand of mountain forests, northern Iran. Across the slope positions, the soil profiles demonstrated significant changes due to topography for two shape slopes. The solum depth of the convex slope was higher than the concave one in all five positions, and it decreased from the summit to shoulder and increased from the mid to lower slope positions for both convex and concave slopes. The thin solum at the upper positions and concave slope demonstrated that pedogenetic development is least at upper slope positions and concave slope where leaching and biomass productivity are less than at lower slopes and concave slope. A large decrease in the thickness of O and A horizons from the summit to back slope was noted for both concave and convex slopes, but it increased from back slope toward down slope for both of them. The average thickness of B horizons increased from summit to down slopes in the case of the concave slope, but in the case of convex slope it decreased from summit to shoulder and afterwards it increased to the down slope. The thicknesses of the different horizons varied in part in the different positions and shape slopes because they had different plant species cover and soil features, which were related to topography.

  4. Seismic hazard estimation of northern Iran using smoothed seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevis, Naeem; Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Cramer, Chris H.

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a seismic hazard assessment for northern Iran, where a smoothed seismicity approach has been used in combination with an updated seismic catalog and a ground motion prediction equation recently found to yield good fit with data. We evaluate the hazard over a geographical area including the seismic zones of Azerbaijan, the Alborz Mountain Range, and Kopeh-Dagh, as well as parts of other neighboring seismic zones that fall within our region of interest. In the chosen approach, seismic events are not assigned to specific faults but assumed to be potential seismogenic sources distributed within regular grid cells. After performing the corresponding magnitude conversions, we decluster both historical and instrumental seismicity catalogs to obtain earthquake rates based on the number of events within each cell, and smooth the results to account for the uncertainty in the spatial distribution of future earthquakes. Seismicity parameters are computed for each seismic zone separately, and for the entire region of interest as a single uniform seismotectonic region. In the analysis, we consider uncertainties in the ground motion prediction equation, the seismicity parameters, and combine the resulting models using a logic tree. The results are presented in terms of expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps and hazard curves at selected locations, considering exceedance probabilities of 2 and 10% in 50 years for rock site conditions. According to our results, the highest levels of hazard are observed west of the North Tabriz and east of the North Alborz faults, where expected PGA values are between about 0.5 and 1 g for 10 and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, respectively. We analyze our results in light of similar estimates available in the literature and offer our perspective on the differences observed. We find our results to be helpful in understanding seismic hazard for northern Iran, but recognize that additional efforts are necessary to

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of freshwater fishes of the genus Capoeta (Actinopterygii, Cyprinidae) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghanavi, Hamid Reza; Gonzalez, Elena G; Doadrio, Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    The Middle East contains a great diversity of Capoeta species, but their taxonomy remains poorly described. We used mitochondrial history to examine diversity of the algae-scraping cyprinid Capoeta in Iran, applying the species-delimiting approaches General Mixed Yule-Coalescent (GMYC) and Poisson Tree Process (PTP) as well as haplotype network analyses. Using the BEAST program, we also examined temporal divergence patterns of Capoeta. The monophyly of the genus and the existence of three previously described main clades (Mesopotamian, Anatolian-Iranian, and Aralo-Caspian) were confirmed. However, the phylogeny proposed novel taxonomic findings within Capoeta. Results of GMYC, bPTP, and phylogenetic analyses were similar and suggested that species diversity in Iran is currently underestimated. At least four candidate species, Capoeta sp4, Capoeta sp5, Capoeta sp6, and Capoeta sp7, are awaiting description. Capoeta capoeta comprises a species complex with distinct genetic lineages. The divergence times of the three main Capoeta clades are estimated to have occurred around 15.6-12.4 Mya, consistent with a Mio-Pleistocene origin of the diversity of Capoeta in Iran. The changes in Caspian Sea levels associated with climate fluctuations and geomorphological events such as the uplift of the Zagros and Alborz Mountains may account for the complex speciation patterns in Capoeta in Iran.

  6. Cenozoic intracontinental deformation of the Kopeh Dagh Belt, Northeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yang; Wan, Bo; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza

    2016-04-01

    Compressional intracontinental orogens represent large tectonic zones far from plate boundaries. Since intracontinental mountain belts cannot be framed in the conventional plate tectonics theory, several hypotheses have been proposed to account for the formations of these mountain belts. The far-field effect of collision/subduction at plate margins is now well accepted for the origin and evolution of the intracontinental crust thickening, as exemplified by the Miocene tectonics of central Asia. In northern Iran, the Binalud-Alborz mountain belt witnessed the Triassic tectonothermal events (Cimmerian orogeny), which are interpreted as the result of the Paleotethys Ocean closure between the Eurasia and Central Iran blocks. The Kopeh Dagh Belt, located to the north of the Binalud-Alborz Belt, has experienced two significant tectonic phases: (1) Jurassic to Eocene rifting with more than 7 km of sediments; and (2) Late Eocene-Early Oligocene to Quaternary continuous compression. Due to the high seismicity, deformation associated with earthquakes has received more and more attention; however, the deformation pattern and architecture of this range remain poorly understood. Detailed field observations on the Cenozoic deformation indicate that the Kopeh Dagh Belt can be divided into a western zone and an eastern zone, separated by a series of dextral strike-slip faults, i.e. the Bakharden-Quchan Fault System. The eastern zone characterized by km-scale box-fold structures, associated with southwest-dipping reverse faults and top-to-the NE kinematics. In contrast, the western zone shows top-to-the SW kinematics, and the deformation intensifies from NE to SW. In the northern part of this zone, large-scale asymmetrical anticlines exhibit SW-directed vergence with subordinate thrusts and folds, whereas symmetrical anticlines are observed in the southern part. In regard to its tectonic feature, the Kopeh Dagh Belt is a typical Cenozoic intracontinental belt without ophiolites or

  7. Emergence of agriculture in the foothills of the Zagros Mountains of Iran.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Simone; Zeidi, Mohsen; Conard, Nicholas J

    2013-07-05

    The role of Iran as a center of origin for domesticated cereals has long been debated. High stratigraphic resolution and rich archaeological remains at the aceramic Neolithic site of Chogha Golan (Ilam Province, present-day Iran) reveal a sequence ranging over 2200 years of cultivation of wild plants and the first appearance of domesticated-type species. The botanical record from Chogha Golan documents how the inhabitants of the site cultivated wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum) and other wild progenitor species of modern crops, such as wild lentil and pea. Wild wheat species (Triticum spp.) are initially present at less than 10% of total plant species but increase to more than 20% during the last 300 years of the sequence. Around 9800 calendar years before the present, domesticated-type emmer appears. The archaeobotanical remains from Chogha Golan represent the earliest record of long-term plant management in Iran.

  8. Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, M.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Above the forest: the alpine tundra; Solar energy, water, wind and soil in mountains; Mountain weather; Mountain building and plate tectonics; Mountain walls: forming, changing, and disappearing; Living high: mountain ecosystems; Distribution of mountain plants and animals; On foot in the mountains: how to hike and backpack; Ranges and peaks of the world. Map and guidebook sources, natural history and mountain adventure trips, mountain environmental education centers and programs, and sources of information on trails for the handicapped are included.

  9. A new species and new record of Reticulolaelaps Costa (Acari: Laelapidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Alireza; Joharchi, Omid; Babaeian, Esmaeil; Gwiazdowicz, Dariusz J

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new species of mite from Iran--Reticulolaelaps hallidayi Joharchi, Nemati & Babaeian sp. nov. (Acari: Laelapidae). The new species was collected in a nest of Tapinoma sp. (Hymnoptera: Formicidae) in Taleghan city, Alborz Province and in soil in Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran. Reticulolaelapsfaini is reported for the first time from Iran. The genus Reticulolaelaps is redescribed, and Reticulolaelaps lativentris Karg is transferred to Pseudoparasitus Oudemans.

  10. Morphological and molecular characterization of Paractinolaimus sahandi n. sp. (Nematoda: Actinolaimidae) from the Sahand Mountains in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pedram, M; Niknam, G; Vinciguerra, M T; Ye, W; Robbins, R T

    2011-09-01

    Paractinolaimus sahandi n. sp., found in wet soil samples collected from the rhizosphere of grasses of Sahand Mountains, Iran, is described. This new species is characterized by its long body (3.5-4.7 mm), high a value (74.5-88.5), anterior location of posterior subventral nuclei, occupying 62.5-68.0% of glandularium distance, the presence of 1-4 pre- and 1-3 post-vulval papillae and numerous tiny, not innervated papillae in front and behind the vulva in the outer layer of cuticle; common functional males in the population, with 62.5-81.3 μm long spicules and 15-17 ventromedian supplements. The new species, which is the only one in the genus showing the advulval cuticular tiny papillae and is unusually slender, is compared to four species of Paractinolaimus, namely P. macrolaimus, P. longidrilus, P. spanithelus and P. rafiqi. The ribosomal 18S rDNA (1246 bp sequenced) and 28S rDNA D2/D3 region (844 bp sequenced) of P. sahandi n. sp. were sequenced for molecular characterization. Sequences of the 18S and 28S D2/D3 of P. sahandi n. sp. have distinct differences from those of the only sequenced P. macrolaimus, with 6 bp differences in 18S and 38 bp differences and five gaps in 28S. This is the first report of the occurrence of members of Actinolaimidae in Iran.

  11. Modelling spatial, altitudinal and temporal variability of annual precipitation in mountainous regions: The case of the Middle Zagros, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidabadi, Rashid; Najafi, Mohammed S.; Roshan, GholamReza; Fitchett, Jennifer M.; Abkharabat, Shoaieb

    2016-11-01

    Relationships between precipitation and elevation are difficult to model for mountainous regions, due to complexities in topography and moisture sources. Attempts to model these relationships need to be tested against long-term location specific meteorological data, and hence require a case-study approach. This study uses artificial neural networks to model these relationships for the Middle of Zagros region, in semi-arid western Iran. Precipitation data for the region were collected for 1995-2007. Annual precipitation was designated as the target variable for the network, which additionally included variables significantly related to precipitation for the region, including longitude, latitude, elevation, slope, distance from the ridge, and relative distance from moisture. Long-term changes in annual precipitation for the region are investigated for 1961-2010. The artificial neural network (ANN) model explains 76% of the spatial variability of precipitation in the Middle Zagros. Precipitation predominantly increases with elevation on the windward slope, to a maximum height of 2500 m.asl, and thereafter either remains constant or decreases slowly to the ridge. Precipitation in the region has decreased significantly over the study period, with fluctuations driven by AO, NAO, ENSO and variability in the strength of pressure centers. Spectral analysis reveals significant oscillations of 2-4 and 5 yr periods, which correspond temporally with cycles in macro-scale circulation, ENSO and the Mediterranean Low pressure.

  12. First record of the family Heloridae (Hymenoptera: Proctotrupoidea) from Iran, with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Izadizadeh, Mohammad; Talebi, Ali Asghar; Achterberg, Cornelis Van; Rakhshani, Ehsan

    2015-04-13

    For the first time in more than 100 years, a new western Palaearctic species of Heloridae is described. Specimens of Helorus alborzicus Izadizadeh, van Achterberg & Talebi sp. nov. and Helorus ruficornis Förster were collected from the Alborz province of Iran. An illustrated identification key for Western Palaearctic Heloridae is provided.

  13. Section of Permian deposits and fusulinids in the Halvan Mountains, Yazd province, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, E. Ya.; Gorgij, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    The Permian section situated northwest of Tabas in the Halvan Mountains is studied and fusulinids occurring in the section are described. The Chili, Sartakht, and Hermez formations distinguished in the section are separated by horizons of bauxitic laterite and belong to the Khan Group formerly ranked as a synonymous formation. Fusulinids occur at two levels in the section. The lower one confined to the Chili Formation yields the so-called Kalaktash fusulinid assemblage of the late Sakmarian age. The second late Asselian assemblage has been discovered in pebbles from conglomerate-breccia in the basal laterite of the Sartakht Formation. A brief characterization of fusulinids is presented and three new species are described. The new Benshiella genus is discriminated from the Rugosofusulinidae family. As Skinner and Wilde (1965, 1966) changed the original diagnosis of the Pseudofusulina genus, we suggest, regarding all species, which have been attributed to this genus but do not satisfy the new diagnosis, as representing the new Nonpseudofusulina genus.

  14. Lateral and depth variations of coda Q in the Zagros region of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irandoust, Mohsen Ahmadzadeh; Sobouti, Farhad; Rahimi, Habib

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed more than 2800 local earthquakes recorded by the Iranian National Seismic Network (INSN) and the Iranian Seismological Center (IRSC) to estimate coda wave quality factor, Q c , in the Zagros fold and thrust belt and the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone in Iran. We used the single backscattering model to investigate lateral and depth variations of Q c in the study region. In the interior of Zagros, no strong lateral variation in attenuation parameters is observed. In SE Zagros (the Bandar-Abbas region) where transition to the Makran subduction setting begins, the medium shows lower attenuation. The average frequency relations for the SSZ, the Bandar-Abbas region, and the Zagros are Q c = (124 ± 11) f 0.82 ± 0.04, Q c = (109 ± 2) f 0.99 ± 0.01, and Q c = (85 ± 5) f 1.06 ± 0.03, respectively. To investigate the depth variation of Q c , 18 time windows between 5 and 90 s and at two epicentral distance ranges of R < 100 km and 100 < R < 200 km were considered. It was observed that with increasing coda lapse time, Q 0 ( Q c at 1 Hz) and n (frequency dependence factor) show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively. Beneath the SSZ and at depths of about 50 to 80 km, there is a correlation between the reported low velocity medium and the observed sharp change in the trend of Q 0 and n curves. In comparison with results obtained in other regions of the Iranian plateau, the Zagros along with the Alborz Mountains in the north show highest attenuation of coda wave and strongest frequency dependence, an observation that reflects the intense seismicity and active faulting in these mountain ranges. We also observe a stronger depth dependence of attenuation in the Zagros and SSZ compared to central Iran, indicating a thicker lithosphere in the Zagros region than in central Iran.

  15. Two new mountainous species of Lactuca (Cichorieae, Asteraceae) from Iran, one presenting a new, possibly myrmecochorous achene variant.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Norbert; Djavadi, Seyyedeh Bahereh; Eskandari, Majid

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the concept of the Iranian endemic Lactuca polyclada in the sense of both its original author Boissier and its current use actually admixes two entirely different species, as was first noted by Beauverd a hundred years ago but has been neglected by later workers. One is a putative relative of Lactuca rosularis, the other was recognised by Beauverd as a member of the genus Cicerbita. The name Lactuca polyclada Boiss. is lectotypified here, maintaining its use as established by Beauverd for the Cicerbita species. Both species are morphologically delimited and mature achenes of Cicerbita polyclada are illustrated for the first time. The putative relative of Lactuca rosularis, a rare local endemic of the summit area of Kuh e-Dena, which has remained without a valid name by now, is described as a new species, Lactuca denaensis N. Kilian & Djavadi, and illustrated. A third member of the Lactuca rosularis group, Lactuca hazaranensis Djavadi & N. Kilian, discovered among a recent collection and apparently being a rare chasmophyte of the Hazaran mountain massif in the province of Kerman, Iran, is described as a species new to science, illustrated and delimited from the other two species. This new species has peculiar achenes representing a hitherto unknown variant: the body of the beaked achenes is divided into two segments by a transversal constriction in the distal third. The proximal segment contains the embryo, the distal segment is solid with a lipid-containing yellow tissue. The easily detachable pappus and the equally easily detachable beak potentially obstruct dispersal by wind. Since detachment of the beak also exposes the lipid-containing tissue of the distal segment, its potential as an elaiosome and myrmecochory as a possible mode of dispersal are discussed.

  16. Paleolithic hominin remains from Eshkaft-e Gavi (southern Zagros Mountains, Iran): description, affinities, and evidence for butchery.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremiah E; Marean, Curtis W

    2009-09-01

    Eshkaft-e Gavi is a cave located in the southern Zagros Mountains of Iran and is one of the few archaeological sites in the region to preserve both Middle Paleolithic and Upper Paleolithic occupations. Excavation of the site in the 1970s yielded an assemblage of lithic and faunal remains, including ten hominin specimens: a mandibular molar, four cranial fragments, a clavicular diaphysis, the proximal half of a metacarpal, a fragment of os coxa, the proximal diaphysis of a juvenile femur, and a patella. The bones derive from a minimum of four individuals, including two juveniles. Although many of these remains could be Epi-Paleolithic in age, one of the juvenile specimens-the mandibular molar-occurs at the base of the cave's Upper Paleolithic sequence. The remains are very fragmentary, but those that preserve diagnostic morphology indicate that they represent modern humans. The molar is taxonomically diagnostic, thus confirming the association of the Aurignacian-like Baradostian Industry with modern humans. Four of the specimens-a piece of frontal bone, the clavicle, the juvenile femur, and the patella-display clear evidence for intentional butchery in the form of stone-tool cutmarks. These cutmarked specimens, along with a fragment of parietal bone, are also burned. Although this evidence is consistent with cannibalism, the small sample makes it difficult to say whether or not the individuals represented by the hominin remains were butchered and cooked for consumption. Nevertheless, the cutmarked Eshkaft-e Gavi specimens add to a growing sample of hominin remains extending back into the Plio-Pleistocene that display evidence of intentional defleshing.

  17. Detrital Record of Phanerozoic Tectonics in Iran: Evidence From U-Pb Zircon Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, B. K.; Gillis, R. J.; Stockli, D. F.; Hassanzadeh, J.; Axen, G. J.; Grove, M.

    2004-12-01

    Ion-microprobe U-Pb ages of 91 detrital zircon grains supplement ongoing investigations of the tectonic history of Iran, a critical region bridging the gap between the Alpine and Himalayan orogenic belts. These data improve understanding of the distribution of continental blocks during a complex history of Late Proterozoic (Pan-African) crustal growth, Paleozoic passive-margin sedimentation, early Mesozoic collision with Eurasia, and Cenozoic collision with Arabia. U-Pb analyses of detrital zircon grains from four sandstone samples (two Lower Cambrian, one uppermost Triassic-Lower Jurassic, one Neogene) collected from the Alborz mountains of northern Iran reveal a spectrum of ages ranging from 50 to 2900 Ma. Most analyses yield concordant to moderately discordant ages. The Lower Cambrian Lalun and Barut sandstones yield age distribution peaks at approximately 550-650, 1000, and 2500 Ma, consistent with a Gondwanan source area presently to the south and west in parts of Iran and the Arabian-Nubian shield (Saudi Arabia and northwestern Africa). The uppermost Triassic-Lower Jurassic Shemshak Formation exhibits a broad range of U-Pb ages, including peaks of approximately 200-260, 330, 430, 600, and 1900 Ma, requiring a Eurasian source area presently to the north and east in the Turan plate (Turkmenistan and southwestern Asia). Neogene strata display both the youngest and oldest ages (approximately 50 and 2900 Ma) of any samples, a result of substantial sedimentary recycling of older Phanerozoic cover rocks. Because the youngest zircon ages for three of the four samples are indistinguishable from their stratigraphic (depositional) ages, these data suggest rapid exhumation and help constrain the termination age of Late Proterozoic-Early Cambrian (Pan-African) orogenesis and the timing of the Iran-Eurasia collision.

  18. Structural analysis of the Gachsar sub-zone in central Alborz range; constrain for inversion tectonics followed by the range transverse faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaghi, A.; Naeimi, A.

    2010-04-01

    Analysis of the Gachsar structural sub-zone has been carried out to constrain structural evolution of the central Alborz range situated in the central Alpine Himalayan orogenic system. The sub-zone bounded by the northward-dipping Kandovan Fault to the north and the southward-dipping Taleghan Fault to the south is transversely cut by several sinistral faults. The Kandovan Fault that controls development of the Eocene rocks in its footwall from the Paleozoic-Mesozoic units in the fault hanging wall is interpreted as an inverted basin-bounding fault. Structural evidences include the presence of a thin-skinned imbricate thrust system propagated from a detachment zone that acts as a footwall shortcut thrust, development of large synclines in the fault footwall as well as back thrusts and pop-up structures on the fault hanging wall. Kinematics of the inverted Kandovan Fault and its accompanying structures constrain the N-S shortening direction proposed for the Alborz range until Late Miocene. The transverse sinistral faults that are in acute angle of 15° to a major magnetic lineament, which represents a basement fault, are interpreted to develop as synthetic Riedel shears on the cover sequences during reactivation of the basement fault. This overprinting of the transverse faults on the earlier inverted extensional fault occurs since the Late Miocene when the south Caspian basin block attained a SSW movement relative to the central Iran. Therefore, recent deformation in the range is a result of the basement transverse-fault reactivation.

  19. Geochemistry of Gabbroic and Diabasic sills in the Central Alborz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarian, A. R.

    2012-04-01

    There are several gabbroic and diabasic sills, in the central Alborz, which represent more than 50 meter thickness. These intrusive rocks are overlaid by Khosh-Yeylagh formation and underlain by Mobarak formation. So their stratigraphic interval demonstrates an epoch between late Devonian and early Mississippian. These intrusive sills spread through the Alborz structure zone between two main Iranian geological sedimentary formations as a key bed and may indicate an extensional zone in Iranian Paleozoic platform. Due to Hercynian orogenic movement which happend in the late Paleozoic era in Europe but it acted as extension movements in Iranian platform. Petrographically, these intrusive sills consist of gabbro, gabbroic diorite, monzodiorite, and monzogabbro. Their major minerals are plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine plus accessory minerals such as apatite, ilmenite, and spinel. Most of samples display deeply alteration and secondary phases such as amphibole, chlorite, calcite, epidote, and zoisite. Texturally, these rocks show variety of grain size range of coarse grain gabbroic rocks to hypabyssal fine grain diabasic once. From geochemical point of view, all of the rock samples on TAS diagram plot in sub-alkaline field. Due to high alteration, samples plot on Nb/Y vs. Zr/TiO2 as immobile trace elements and once again they show sub-alkaline series too. On the AFM diagram majority of samples fall into calc-alkaline domain next to tholeiitic border. REE pattern in chondrite normalized spider diagram reveal LREE enrichment by a factor of 30 to 80 and HREE depletion by a factor of 10. There is no Eu and Sr anomaly thus plagioclase differentiation hasn't main role to control of evolved magma. All of the samples represent intra plate rift gabbros on TiO2-Y/20-K2O diagram. Consequently, a peridotite with ratio of [garnet/ (garnet+spinel)] ≈ 0.3 to 0.5, at 70 to 100 km depth from enriched source, has undergone 10% to 15% partial melting to produce primary magma. This

  20. Relocation and assessment of seismicity in the Iran region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert Engdahl, E.; Jackson, James A.; Myers, Stephen C.; Bergman, Eric A.; Priestley, Keith

    2006-11-01

    extends to depths of up to 30-45 km in the crust, consistent with low-angle thrusting of Arabian basement beneath central Iran. In north-central Iran, along the Alborz mountain belt, seismic activity occurs primarily in the upper crust but with some infrequent events in the lower crust, particularly in the western part of the belt (the Talesh), where the South Caspian basin underthrusts NW Iran. Earthquakes that occur in a band across the central Caspian, following the Apscheron-Balkhan sill between Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan, have depths in the range 30-100 km, deepening northwards. These are thought to be connected with either incipient or remnant northeast subduction of the South Caspian basin basement beneath the east-west trending Apscheron-Balkhan sill. Curiously, in this region of genuine mantle seismicity, there is no evidence for earthquakes shallower than 30 km.

  1. The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation of the Tabas Block, east central Iran: Succesion of a failed-rift basin at the Paleotethys margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Ghomashi, M.; Amin-Rasouli, H.; Kheradmand, A.

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation is a dominantly red colored marginal marine succession deposited in the north-south trending Tabas Basin of east central Iran. It is correlated with the unconformity-bounded lower limestone member of the Elika Formation of the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran. The Sorkh Shale is bounded by the pre-Triassic and post-Lower Triassic interregional unconformities and consists mainly of carbonates, sandstones, and evaporites with shale being a minor constituent. Detailed facies analysis of the Sorkh Shale Formation resulted in recognition of several genetically linked peritidal facies that are grouped into restricted subtidal, carbonate tidal flat, siliciclastic tidal flat, coastal plain and continental evaporite facies associations. These were deposited in a low energy, storm-dominated inner-ramp setting with a very gentle slope that fringed the Tabas Block of east central Iran and passed northward (present-day coordinates) into deeper water facies of the Paleotethys passive margin of northern Cimmerian Continent. Numerous carbonate storm beds containing well-rounded intraclasts, ooids and bioclasts of mixed fauna are present in the Sorkh Shale Formation of the northern Tabas Basin. The constituents of the storm beds are absent in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, but are present throughout the lower limestone member of the Elika Formation. The Tabas Block, a part of the Cimmerian continent in east central Iran, is a rift basin that developed during Early Ordovician-Silurian Paleotethys rifting. Facies and sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Sorkh Shale Formation has revealed additional evidence supporting the Tabas Block as a failed rift basin related to the Paleotethys passive margin. Absence of constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather peritidal facies of the Sorkh Shale Formation, presence of the constituents of the storm beds in the fair weather facies of the Elika Formation (the

  2. Reply to: Comment by Aftabi and Atapour on « Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences »

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Jafar; Agard, Philippe; Whitechurch, Hubert; Benoit, Mathieu; Prouteau, Gaëlle; Jolivet, Laurent

    2009-12-01

    We herein answer the comments by Aftabi and Atapour to our paper entitled "Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences". We show that their criticism rests on rather weak grounds and numerous contradictions. We reassess the validity of our analytical results and stress the lack of alteration in our adakitic samples. We further discuss the interpretation of our findings, in particular the fact that the distribution of these adakites is not random in the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, neither in space nor time (being restricted to the central part and to Upper Miocene to younger rocks). Finally, we point out that Aftabi and Atapour even somewhat support our model when they suggest "slab break-off (as a cause) for the Miocene-Pliocene adakitic rocks" .

  3. The Kalaktash and Halvan assemblages of Permian fusulinids from the Padeh and Sang-Variz sections (Halvan Mountains, Yazd Province, Central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, E. Ja.; Gorgij, M. N.

    2011-04-01

    New Permian sections have been studied in the Halvan Mountains of Iran, northwestward of Tabas. In addition to the Chili, Sartakht, and Hermez formations established here earlier, the new Rizi Formation is distinguished, underlying deposits of the Triassic Sorkh Shale Formation. Conodonts, fusulinids, and smaller foraminifers found in the rocks date the formations. In particular, it is demonstrated that the Chili Formation bearing the Kalaktash fusulinid assemblage is of Sakmarian age. The age of the Halvan fusulinid assemblage from clasts in the breccia-conglomerate at the Sartakht Formation base is reevaluated, and it is shown to be late Sakmarian but not Asselian in age. The Bolorian-Kubergandian age is established for the greater part of the Sartakht Formation. Correlation of the sections studied with the other Permian sections in different regions of Iran showed their lithological and paleontological specifics as compared to the latter. On the other hand, the sections in question are surprisingly similar in both respects to sections in the Central Pamirs. Fusulinids of the Kalaktash and Halvan assemblages are figured in four plates, and five new species belonging to the genera Rugosochusenella, Benshiella, Parazellia, and Nonpseudofusulina are described.

  4. Study of Upper Miocene Oysters(Plecypoda) From the Mishan Formation in south west of Firuzabad, Fars, Iran(Zagros mountain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbozorgi, Mehdi; Sabouhi, Mostafa; Nabavi, Hamid

    2010-05-01

    The out crapes of Mishan Formation located in Aghar area(Firuzabad city) south west of Fars and 70km south west of Firuzabad. this Formation mostly consist of limestone, marly limestone and marlstone with 800m thickness. 6key beds distinctive from limestone beds are recognized in this area. this key beds are useful for local and regional correlation in Zagros mountains. the key beds from base to top are: Red algae, Bryozoa, Gastropoda and Plecypoda, Crabs and Oysters. Mishan Formation in this area is between Gachsaran F.M(Under Formation), Conformable and Aghajari F.M(Upper Formation), Conformable. With due attention to rang and distribution of the Macrofossils, 5 local assmblage biozone were recognized, that is confirming time limit from Early- Upper Miocene. this research cheked and controled a biostrom Plecypoda(Oysters) level by thickness 3- 4m. this biostrom located around 550m the base of section. Ofcurse more of this Plecypoda be assinged to order pterriodia and Genus Oyster. Along with Oysters, Pecten and Venus can be see. This biostrom made up a bioclastic shoal shallow deep in the margin of sea Miocene. This Oysters report from Mishan Formation of Firuzabad, Fars, Zagros, Iran: Ostrea virleti var. crassicostat, Ostrea virleti Desh var. persica, Ostrea digitatai Echiwald var. rohlfsi, Ostrea lamellose. Ostrea cf. biowwondeli. Master of science in Geology (Paleontology), University of Isfahan, Iran.

  5. Quantitative textural investigation of trachyandesites of Damavand volcano (N Iran): Insights into the magmatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadsaleh, Mohsen; Pourkhorsandi, Hamed

    2016-08-01

    Damavand volcano is a dormant stratovolcano in northern Iran in the middle of the Alborz Mountains. Investigation of the magmatic processes responsible for the eruption of the volcano and the conditions of the magma chamber is important in order to understand the volcanism of this system. Owing to their higher abundance and younger age, trachyandesitic rocks are the main components of this volcano. To get insights into the crystallization of these rocks, we carried out a quantitative and qualitative petrographic study of three main volcanic units erupted between 63 and 66.5 years ago. Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) studies can reveal details about magmatic processes. Measuring 4732 individual plagioclase crystals and conducting a CSD study, revealed a non-straight and concave-up CSD curve for nearly all of the studied volcanic units which suggests the occurrence of similar physico-chemical processes responsible for their magmatism. Plagioclase crystals occur as microlites and phenocrysts; the phenocrysts show either oscillatory zoning or sieve textures. Each segment of the CSD curves are consistent with a particular plagioclase texture in all the studied volcanic units. The presence of different plagioclase textures and the concave-up shape of the CSD curves suggests the variation of the physico-chemical conditions of the magma chamber during the magmatism of the Damavand in this time period. Mixing of magmas with different crystal populations can be an alternative for this phenomena.

  6. Quaternary slip rates along the northeastern boundary of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone (Kopeh Dagh Mountains, Northeast Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanian, Esmaeil; Siame, Lionel; Bellier, Olivier; Benedetti, Lucilla; Abbassi, Mohammad R.

    2009-08-01

    The Kopeh Dagh is accommodating a large portion of the northward motion of central Iran with respect to Eurasia, involving a major right-lateral strike-slip fault system (Bakharden-Quchan). This fault system corresponds to the northeastern boundary of the Arabia-Eurasia collision, and can be considered as a lithospheric-scale tectonic feature. We present a well-constrained estimation of late Quaternary slip rates along two major strike-slip faults (the Baghan and Quchan faults) in this fault system, using in situ-produced 36Cl nuclide to date two offset alluvial fan surfaces. Combining detailed satellite image and digital topographic data analyses complemented with geomorphic fieldwork allows quantifying the cumulative offset values of 940 +/- 100 and 360 +/- 50 m of the fan surfaces along the Baghan and Quchan faults, respectively. A total of 12 carbonate boulders from the fan surfaces were collected and dated. This yields minimum age of two episodes of fan abandonment at 280 +/- 16 (Baghan fault) and 83 +/- 4 ka (Quchan fault). Age estimates and measured offsets of the fans are consistent with respective maximum long-term fault slip rates of 2.8 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 0.6 mm yr-1 for the Baghan and Quchan faults over the Middle-Late Pleistocene. Applying the slip rates to cumulative post-folding offsets along the Baghan and Quchan faults indicates that strike-slip motion within the Kopeh Dagh may have started ~4 Ma. This constrains the timing of a major tectonic reorganization in the Kopeh Dagh, previously recorded through Arabia-Eurasia collision between 3 and 7 Ma. At the regional scale, the sum of total cumulative strike-slip offsets is about 35-40 km, which implies a total maximum slip rate of about 9 +/- 2 mm yr-1 in the Central-Eastern Kopeh Dagh. This is resolved to average northward and westward slip rates of ~8 and ~4 mm yr-1, respectively, for the Western Kopeh Dagh with respect to Eurasia. Our results also suggests that the localized strike-slip faulting

  7. Timing of atmospheric precipitation in the Zagros Mountains inferred from a multi-proxy record from Lake Mirabad, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Lora R.; Ito, Emi; Schwalb, Antje; Wright, Herbert E.

    2006-11-01

    A sediment core 7.2 m long from Lake Mirabad, Iran, was examined for loss-on-ignition, mineralogy, oxygen-isotopic composition of authigenic calcite, and trace-element composition of ostracodes to complement earlier pollen and ostracode-assemblage studies. Pollen, ostracode-inferred lake level, and high Sr/Ca ratios indicate that the early Holocene (10000 to 6500 cal yr BP) was drier than the late Holocene. Low δ18O values during this interval are interpreted as resulting from winter-dominated precipitation, characteristic of a Mediterranean climate. Increasing δ18O values after 6500 cal yr BP signal a gradual increase in spring rains, which are present today. A severe 600-yr drought occurred at ca. 5500 cal yr BP, shortly after the transition from pistachio-almond to oak forest. During the late Holocene, two milder droughts occurred at about 1500 and 500 cal yr BP. Within the resolution of the record, no drought is evident during the collapse of the Akkadian empire (4200-3900 cal yr BP). Rather, a decrease in δ18O values to early-Holocene levels may indicate the return to a Mediterranean precipitation regime.

  8. A comparative study of Dempster-Shafer and fuzzy models for landslide susceptibility mapping using a GIS: An experience from Zagros Mountains, SW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangestani, Majid H.

    2009-06-01

    A catchment area at the Zagros Mountains, NW Shiraz, Iran is selected as a test site to comparing the output results of the Dempster-Shafer (D-S) and fuzzy models in landslide hazard mapping. Lithology, slope angle, slope aspect, land cover, and soil depth were considered as landslide causal factors. The factor maps were input into a GIS and a modified landslide hazard evaluation factor (MLHEF) rating and fuzzy membership functions as well as belief function values were assessed for each class of the factor maps. The fuzzy sum, product and gamma combination approaches were examined and output maps were assessed based on the known landslides. The outputs of fuzzy sum and product combination rules were not reasonable because these approaches classified the area into 'very-high' or 'very low' susceptibility zones respectively, which were not compatible to the field and factor maps criteria. A γ value of 0.94 yielded the most reliable susceptibility for landslides. Overlay of the known landslides with the output favorability map showed that the identified landslides were located in the high- and very-high susceptible zones. The output results of the Dempster-Shafer model: plausibility, belief, and uncertainty images were also evaluated based on the known landslides. The results of this approach revealed that although it was expected that most of the known landslides correspond the plausibility, or the belief map, only a few of them supported the case, and some landslides were coincided into the disbelief, or uncertainty maps. It is concluded that in comparison to the fuzzy model, the D-S model obtains less reliable results for landslide hazard mapping. Since the belief functions were assigned based on the fuzzy membership functions this might be due to the integration equations used by the model, or the number of evidence maps used as input layers.

  9. I. Cenozoic geology of Iran: An integrated study of extensional tectonics and related volcanism. II. Ediacaran stratigraphy of the North American Cordillera: New observations from eastern California and northern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Charles

    2009-12-01

    I. The late Oligocene to Miocene collision of Arabia and Eurasia was preceded by ~175 My of subduction of Neotethyan oceanic crust. Associated magmatic activity includes late Triassic(?) to Jurassic plutons in the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone of southern Iran, limited Cretaceous magmatism in the Alborz Mountains of northern Iran, and widespread Eocene volcanism across central Iran. Metamorphic core complexes of Eocene age have recently been recognized in widely separated parts of Iran, suggesting that Tertiary volcanism was related to extension. Geochemical data indicate that Eocene volcanism was typical of continental arcs and was followed by less voluminous Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the type often associated with back-arc basins. This set of observations suggests that mid-Mesozoic plutons in southern Iran are the remnants of an original volcanic arc that was only weakly developed because of slow subduction rate. Magmatic activity largely ceased in southern and central Iran during the Cretaceous and shifted to the north, suggesting a period of flat slab subduction. Subsequent slab-rollback during the Eocene extended the overriding plate, forming metamorphic core complexes and inducing pressure-release melting of partially hydrated lithospheric mantle and upwelling of asthenosphere. II. The Ediacaran Period spans from the base of cap carbonates overlying glacial deposits of the Marinoan "Snowball Earth" event to the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary, ~635 to 542 Ma. Sediments deposited during the rifting of southwest Laurentia, which are now exposed in a relatively narrow belt in the western US, are one of the best records on earth of the geological, geochemical, and geobiological events that occurred during this period. Evidence for one of the most significant of these, the final oxygenation of the oceans, is found within the upper Johnnie Formation in the southern Great Basin. C isotope data from thick, basinal facies of the Johnnie Fm. in the Panamint Range provide a

  10. The Middle Jurassic basinal deposits of the Surmeh Formation in the Central Zagros Mountains, southwest Iran: Facies, sequence stratigraphy, and controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lasemi, Y.; Jalilian, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The lower part of the Lower to Upper Jurassic Surmeh Formation consists of a succession of shallow marine carbonates (Toarcian-Aalenian) overlain by a deep marine basinal succession (Aalenian-Bajocian) that grades upward to Middle to Upper Jurassic platform carbonates. The termination of shallow marine carbonate deposition of the lower part of the Surmeh Formation and the establishment of deep marine sedimentation indicate a change in the style of sedimentation in the Neotethys passive margin of southwest Iran during the Middle Jurassic. To evaluate the reasons for this change and to assess the basin configuration during the Middle Jurassic, this study focuses on facies analysis and sequence stratigraphy of the basinal deposits (pelagic and calciturbidite facies) of the Surmeh Formation, referred here as 'lower shaley unit' in the Central Zagros region. The upper Aalenian-Bajocian 'lower shaley unit' overlies, with an abrupt contact, the Toarcian-lower Aalenian platform carbonates. It consists of pelagic (calcareous shale and limestone) and calciturbidite facies grading to upper Bajocian-Bathonian platform carbonates. Calciturbidite deposits in the 'lower shaley unit' consist of various graded grainstone to lime mudstone facies containing mixed deep marine fauna and platform-derived material. These facies include quartz-bearing lithoclast/intraclast grainstone to lime mudstone, bioclast/ooid/peloid intraclast grainstone, ooid grainstone to packstone, and lime wackestone to mudstone. The calciturbidite layers are erosive-based and commonly exhibit graded bedding, incomplete Bouma turbidite sequence, flute casts, and load casts. They consist chiefly of platform-derived materials including ooids, intraclasts/lithoclasts, peloids, echinoderms, brachiopods, bivalves, and open-ocean biota, such as planktonic bivalves, crinoids, coccoliths, foraminifers, and sponge spicules. The 'lower shaley unit' constitutes the late transgressive and the main part of the highstand

  11. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-12

    26 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” ................................................................ 28 Terrorism...resources” of Iran. These definitions are interpreted by the State Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as contracts to lead the...their border. State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement

  12. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-09

    16 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” ................................................................ 17 Terrorism...petroleum resources” of Iran. It is interpreted by the State Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as upgrades or expansions of...side of their border. State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap

  13. Description of new endemic species of the genus Niphargus Schiödte, 1849 (Amphipoda: Niphargidae) from a karst spring in Zagros Mountains in Iran.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili-Rineh, Somayeh; Heidari, Firoozeh; Fišer, Cene; Akmali, Vahid

    2016-06-20

    New species of the genus Niphargus is described and named as N. kermanshahi sp. nov. from a karst spring in west of Iran. This species is identified based on the analysis of morphological characters and 28S ribosomal DNA sequences. Taxonomic status and phylogenetic position of this species is discussed in comparison to other Iranian species of Niphargus genus.

  14. Comparing high-resolution daily gridded Precipitation data with satellite rainfall estimates of TRMM_3B42 over Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javanmard, S.; Yatagai, A.; Kawamoto, H.; Nodzu, M. I.; Jamali, J. B.

    2009-04-01

    Information on spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation is important for drought monitoring, water resource management in agriculture, power generation and etc. In this respect, high-resolution gridded rainfall datasets are useful for regional studies on the hydrological cycle, climate variability, evaluation of regional models as well as satellite rainfall data. Iran receives rainfall from three major air masses throughout the year and the precipitation regime is complicated due to existence of two main mountain chains of the Zagros and the Alborz. High-resolution gridded precipitation can reproduce the precipitation distribution along the complicated topography and they could improve our understanding of precipitation regime as well a weather systems. Here, firstly we will present precipitation analysis over Iran (20°-45° N, 40°-65° E) based on high-resolution gridded rainfall datasets (0.25° × 0.25° lat./long.) from 1998 to 2006 utilizing synoptic observation data network of Islamic Republic of Iran Meteorological Organization (IRIMO). The number of synoptic stations used in this study are 256 and these data have passed quality control operations such as checking location (latitude, longitude and elevation), consistency to other meteorological parameters, test for homogeneity of data, filling data gaps and etc. by IRIMO. The algorithm of interpolation method of gridded precipitation data is based on the Shepard (1968). Secondly, the comparison of the above mentioned interpolated gridded precipitation data and daily rainfall estimates of TRMM(3B42_V6) which is TRMM Merged High Quality (HQ)/Infrared Precipitation without using raingauge data with spatial resolution 0.25 ° × 0.25° will be presented. From the above analysis results we have shown that spatial distribution of average of precipitation over Iran has two main precipitation pattern with maxima about 4 mm/day along Caspian sea and Zagros mountain chains. Moreover, comparison of spatial

  15. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    this escrow account, although DOD has not provided CRS with a precise balance. In addition, according to the Treasury Department “Terrorist Assets...Control (OFAC) of the Treasury Department . • Oil Dealings. The 1995 trade ban greatly expanded a 1987 ban on imports from Iran under Executive...in Iran impractical. On September 10, 2013, the Treasury Department eliminated those licensing requirements for the provision to Iran of services

  16. Re-examination of the spatial distribution of landslides triggered by the Manjil-Iran 1990 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A. M.; Wasowski, J.; Capolongo, D.; Del Gaudio, V.; Mahdavifar, M. R.; Khamehchiyan, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Iranian Plateau, one of the most seismically active regions of the world, has a long history of catastrophic earthquakes. One of the recent destructive events that affected good part of Iran, was the large magnitude (MS =7.7, MW=7.3, Mb =6.4) Manjil earthquake of June 20, 1990, 21:00:10.9 UT. It completely destroyed 700 villages in the Sefidrud river valley and also the cities of Rudbar, Manjil and Loshan, killing more than 40,000 people, injuring 60,000 and rendering 500,000 homeless. Many landslides were triggered by the earthquake and some of them were catastrophic causing numerous fatalities and damage to infrastructure. In this paper the spatial distribution of 51 major landslides triggered by the Manjil earthquake is examined to assess the susceptibility to seismically induced landsliding of an area located in the middle of Alborz mountain range in the northern part of Iran. The study area, which covers 310 km2 is characterized by high relief (including elevations ranging between 1960 and 160 meters a.s.l.) and generaly steep slopes. From the lithological point of view, the study area contains Eocene age volcanic tuffs and andesites, Alborz magmatic assemblage (Karaj Formation, Eocene) consisting of porphyritic and nonporphyritic, andesitic and andesite-basaltic compositions, rhyodacites, calcareous and non-calcareous pyroclastics such as tuffs and agglomerates, limestone, shale and sandstone (Shamshak Formation), unconsolidated, poorly sorted Quaternary deposits. In this study, topographic data with a 30 m resolution and a digital representation of, geology, relevant geotechnical parameters and seismic shaking (Arias intensity) were ingested into a GIS. Then, using regional attenuation relations, Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis was applied to estimate coseismic landslide displacements and to predict spatial probability of slope-failures. The modelled displacements were compared with the inventory of landslides triggered by the

  17. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-04

    21 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” ................................................................ 23 Terrorism List...These definitions are interpreted by the State Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as contracts to lead the construction...ally Turkey—an Iran-Turkey natural gas pipeline in which each constructed the pipeline on its side of their border. State Department testimony

  18. Assessment of AflatoxinM1 Contamination in UHT Flavored Milk Samples in Karaj, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mashak, Zohreh; Jafari Sohi, Hadi; Heshmati, Ali; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to detect the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in 30 UHT flavored milk samples in Karaj, Alborz province, Iran. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was applied to analyze AFM1 in the samples. The results showed that aflatoxin M1 was detected in all the UHT flavored milk samples, the AFM1 concentration ranged from 0.015 to 0.14 µg/L. Also, 10 samples (33.3%) were contaminated with more than 0.05 µg/L of European Union regulations for aflatoxin M1. Wherease, according to the proposed Iranian national standard and FDA (0.5 µg/L), none of the samples has not been contaminated more than the maximum AFM1 concentrations threshold. This is the first report discovering the fact that UHT flavored milk is an important contributor to the dietary intake of AFM1 in Iran. PMID:27980575

  19. Development of a Transportation System in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    transport development was i greatly assisted by many navigable waterways, Iran possesses but a single navigable river, the Karun in the southwest. The...location. Being on the western slopes of the Zagros mountains, the Karun is situated in one of the less accessible regions of Iran. f Even from Shustar...land routes into the interior even the Karun river could only contribute to regional develop- ment. This dependence upon land transport has only begun

  20. Sinkholes, collapse structures and large landslides in an active salt dome submerged by a reservoir: The unique case of the Ambal ridge in the Karun River, Zagros Mountains, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Lizaga, Iván

    2016-02-01

    Ambal ridge, covering 4 km2, is a salt pillow of Gachsaran Formation with significant salt exposures in direct contact with the Karun River, Zagros Mountains. The highly cavernous salt dome is currently being flooded by the Gotvand Reservoir, second largest in Iran. Geomorphic evidence, including the sharp deflection of the Karun River and defeated streams indicate that Ambal is an active halokinetic structure, probably driven by erosional unloading. Around 30% of the salt dome is affected by large landslides up to ca. 50 × 106 m3 in volume. Slope oversteepening related to fluvial erosion and halokinetic rise seems to be the main controlling factor. A total of 693 sinkholes have been inventoried (170 sinkholes/km2), for which a scaling relationship has been produced. The depressions occur preferentially along a belt with a high degree of clustering. This spatial distribution is controlled by the proximity to the river, slope gradient and halite content in the bedrock. A large compound depression whose bottom lies below the normal maximum level of the reservoir will likely be flooded by water table rise forming a lake. The impoundment of the reservoir has induced peculiar collapse structures 220-280 m across, expressed by systems of arcuate fissures and scarps. Rapid subsurface salt dissolution is expected to generate and reactivate a large number of sinkholes and may reactivate landslides with a significant vertical component due to lack of basal support.

  1. Calculation of Confidence Intervals for the Maximum Magnitude of Earthquakes in Different Seismotectonic Zones of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamat, Mona; Zare, Mehdi; Holschneider, Matthias; Zöller, Gert

    2017-03-01

    The problem of estimating the maximum possible earthquake magnitude m_max has attracted growing attention in recent years. Due to sparse data, the role of uncertainties becomes crucial. In this work, we determine the uncertainties related to the maximum magnitude in terms of confidence intervals. Using an earthquake catalog of Iran, m_max is estimated for different predefined levels of confidence in six seismotectonic zones. Assuming the doubly truncated Gutenberg-Richter distribution as a statistical model for earthquake magnitudes, confidence intervals for the maximum possible magnitude of earthquakes are calculated in each zone. While the lower limit of the confidence interval is the magnitude of the maximum observed event,the upper limit is calculated from the catalog and the statistical model. For this aim, we use the original catalog which no declustering methods applied on as well as a declustered version of the catalog. Based on the study by Holschneider et al. (Bull Seismol Soc Am 101(4):1649-1659, 2011), the confidence interval for m_max is frequently unbounded, especially if high levels of confidence are required. In this case, no information is gained from the data. Therefore, we elaborate for which settings finite confidence levels are obtained. In this work, Iran is divided into six seismotectonic zones, namely Alborz, Azerbaijan, Zagros, Makran, Kopet Dagh, Central Iran. Although calculations of the confidence interval in Central Iran and Zagros seismotectonic zones are relatively acceptable for meaningful levels of confidence, results in Kopet Dagh, Alborz, Azerbaijan and Makran are not that much promising. The results indicate that estimating m_max from an earthquake catalog for reasonable levels of confidence alone is almost impossible.

  2. Anagnorisma chamrani sp. n. (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Gyulai, Peter; Rabieh, Mohammad Mahdi; Seraj, Ali Asghar; Ronkay, Laslo; Esfandiari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    A new Anagnorisma species, Anagnorisma chamrani sp. n., is described from Binaloud Mountains of Khorasan-e-Razavi province in north-eastern Iran, and compared with its sister species, Anagnorisma eucratides (Boursin, 1960). The adults, and male and female genitalia of both species are illustrated in 11 figures. The genus Anagnorisma is recorded for the first time for the fauna of Iran.

  3. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-07

    not provided CRS with a precise balance. In addition, according to the Treasury Department “Terrorist Assets report” for 2010, about $48 million in... Department . • Oil Dealings. The 1995 trade ban greatly expanded a 1987 ban on imports from Iran under Executive Order 12613 (October 29, 1987). That...licensing requirements made work in Iran impractical. On September 10, 2013, the Treasury Department eliminated those licensing requirements for the

  4. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-12

    Department “Targeted Financial Measures” .......................................................... 17 Terrorism List Designation-Related Sanctions...for the development of petroleum resources” of Iran. It is interpreted by the State Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as...no projects have been determined as violations of ISA. Some of the projects listed in Table 1, and others, are under review by the State Department

  5. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    to the Treasury Department “Terrorist Assets report” for 2010, about $48 million in Iranian diplomatic property and accounts remains blocked—this... Department . • Oil Dealings. The 1995 trade ban greatly expanded a 1987 ban on imports from Iran under Executive Order 12613 (October 29, 1987...NGOs said the licensing requirements made work in Iran impractical. On September 10, 2013, the Treasury Department eliminated those licensing

  6. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-16

    has small amounts of natural gas exports; it had none at all before Iran opened its fields to foreign investment in 1996. Department of Defense and...constructed the pipeline on its side of their border. At the time the project was under construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey...would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason given for why the State Department did not

  7. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    the Iran market, and Iranian firms are laying off workers. Department of Defense and other assessments indicate that sanctions have not stopped...construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement...That was one reason given for why the State Department did not determine that the project was sanctionable under ISA. However, many believe the

  8. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was...one reason given for why the State Department did not determine that the project was sanctionable under ISA. However, many believe the decision not to... Department reports to Congress on ISA, required every six months, have routinely stated that U.S. diplomats raise U.S. policy concerns about Iran with

  9. Iran: spotlight.

    PubMed

    Roudi, N

    1987-09-01

    Given its location between Asia and Asia Minor, Iran has been a country of strategic political importance throughout history. More than 98% of Iran's population is Moslem. During the early 20th century, as Iran gradually gained independence from the USSR and Turkey, a modernization process was begun. However, this modernization process was forced to yield to Islamic traditionalism after the 1979 Islamic Revolution. Women have been most affected by this change. The implementation of Islamic traditions has meant low job opportunity or motivation for continuing education among women. Although fertility remains high, the present government is satisfied with the current rate of population growth. Family planning is allowed if implemented within the framework of Islamic law, but abortion is illegal. Mortality fell substantially after World War II, but has not continued to decline. At present, both males and females have the same life expectancy at birth. Iran's population is growing at a rate of 4%/year, and can be expected to double in another 21 years. It has been projected that Iran, currently the 21st largest country in the world with a population of 50 million, will become the 15th largest with a population of 97 million by the year 2025. Tehran, the 20th largest city in 1985, is projected to be the 9th largest by the year 2000, with a population of 13.6 million.

  10. Surficial deposits on salt diapirs (Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform, Iran): Characterization, evolution, erosion and the influence on landscape morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Asadi, Naser; Zare, Mohammad; Šlechta, Stanislav; Churáčková, Zdenka

    2009-06-01

    The surfaces of salt diapirs in the Zagros Mountains are mostly covered by surficial deposits, which significantly affect erosion rates, salt karst evolution, land use and the density of the vegetation cover. Eleven salt diapirs were selected for the study of surficial deposits in order to cover variability in the geology, morphology and climate in a majority of the diapirs in the Zagros Mountains and Persian Gulf Platform. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of 80 selected samples were studied mainly by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray fluorescence. Changes in salinity along selected vertical profiles were studied together with the halite and gypsum distribution. The subaerial residuum formed from minerals and rock detritus released from the dissolved rock salt is by far the most abundant material on the diapirs. Fluvial sediments derived from this type of residuum are the second most common deposits found, while submarine residuum and marine sediments have only local importance. The mineralogical/chemical composition of surficial deposits varies amongst the three end members: evaporite minerals (gypsum/anhydrite and minor halite), carbonates (dolomite and calcite) and silicates-oxides (mainly quartz, phyllosilicates, and hematite). Based on infiltration tests on different types of surficial deposits, most of the rainwater will infiltrate, while overland flow predominates on rock salt exposures. Recharge concentration and thick accumulations of fine sediment support relatively rich vegetation cover in some places and even enable local agricultural activity. The source material, diapir relief, climatic conditions and vegetation cover were found to be the main factors affecting the development and erosion of surficial deposits. A difference was found in residuum type and landscape morphology between the relatively humid NW part of the studied area and the arid Persian Gulf coast: In the NW, the medium and thick residuum seems to be stable under current

  11. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-26

    19 Banking: Treasury Department Financial Measures, CISADA, and Patriot Act Section 311... Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason given...for why the State Department did not determine that the project was sanctionable under ISA. However, many believe the decision not to sanction the

  12. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-23

    Subsidiaries of U.S. Firms ............................................................... 24 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures...interpreted by the State Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as contracts to lead the construction, upgrading, or expansions of...pipeline in which each constructed the pipeline on its side of their border. State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas

  13. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-10

    Treasury Department Financial Measures, CISADA, and Patriot Act Section 311...construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement...That was one reason given for why the State Department did not determine that the project was sanctionable under ISA. However, many believe the

  14. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-09

    29 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” ................................................................ 30 Terrorism List...the pipeline on its side of their border. At the time the project was under construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be...importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason given for why the State Department did not determine

  15. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-03

    29 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” ................................................................ 30... Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason...given for why the State Department did not determine that the project was sanctionable under ISA. However, many believe the decision not to sanction

  16. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-09

    Investment With Iran....................................................................... 12 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures...report and in Table 1 below may be under review by the State Department (Bureau of Economic Affairs), but no publication of such deals has been...placed in the Federal Register (requirement of Section 5e of ISA), and no determinations of violation have been announced. State Department reports to

  17. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-02

    14 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures” .......................................................... 16... Department to include pipelines to or through Iran, as well as upgrades or expansions of such energy related projects as refineries. The definition...ISA. Some of the projects listed in the Table 1, and others, are under review by the State Department (Bureau of Economic Affairs), as discussed

  18. Late Jurassic low latitude of Central Iran: paleogeographic and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, Massimo; Muttoni, Giovanni; Cifelli, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    The individual blocks forming present-day Central Iran are now comprised between the Zagros Neo-Tethys suture to the south and the Alborz Palaeo-Tethys suture to the north. At the end of the Palaeozoic, the Iranian blocks rifted away from the northern margin of Gondwana as consequence of the opening of the Neo-Tethys, and collided with Eurasia during the Late Triassic, giving place to the Eo-Cimmerian orogeny. From then on, the Iranian block(s) should have maintained European affinity. Modern generations of apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) show the occurrence in North American and African coordinates of a major and rapid shift in pole position (=plate shift) during the Middle-Late Jurassic. This so-called monster polar shift is predicted also for Eurasia from the North Atlantic plate circuit, but Jurassic data from this continent are scanty and problematic. Here, we present paleomagnetic data from the Kimmeridgian-Tithonian (Upper Jurassic) Garedu Formation of Iran. Paleomagnetic component directions of primary (pre-folding) age indicate a paleolatitude of deposition of 10°N ± 5° that is in excellent agreement with the latitude drop predicted for Iran from APWPs incorporating the Jurassic monster polar shift. We show that paleolatitudes calculated from these APWPs, used in conjunction with simple zonal climate belts, better explain the overall stratigraphic evolution of Iran during the Mesozoic.

  19. The rupture process of the Manjil, Iran earthquake of 20 june 1990 and implications for intraplate strike-slip earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Zednik, J.

    1997-01-01

    In terms of seismically radiated energy or moment release, the earthquake of 20 January 1990 in the Manjil Basin-Alborz Mountain region of Iran is the second largest strike-slip earthquake to have occurred in an intracontinental setting in the past decade. It caused enormous loss of life and the virtual destruction of several cities. Despite a very large meizoseismal area, the identification of the causative faults has been hampered by the lack of reliable earthquake locations and conflicting field reports of surface displacement. Using broadband data from global networks of digitally recording seismographs, we analyse broadband seismic waveforms to derive characteristics of the rupture process. Complexities in waveforms generated by the earthquake indicate that the main shock consisted of a tiny precursory subevent followed in the next 20 seconds by a series of four major subevents with depths ranging from 10 to 15 km. The focal mechanisms of the major subevents, which are predominantly strike-slip, have a common nodal plane striking about 285??-295??. Based on the coincidence of this strike with the dominant tectonic fabric of the region we presume that the EW striking planes are the fault planes. The first major subevent nucleated slightly south of the initial precursor. The second subevent occurred northwest of the initial precursor. The last two subevents moved progressively southeastward of the first subevent in a direction collinear with the predominant strike of the fault planes. The offsets in the relative locations and the temporal delays of the rupture subevents indicate heterogeneous distribution of fracture strength and the involvement of multiple faults. The spatial distribution of teleseismic aftershocks, which at first appears uncorrelated with meizoseismal contours, can be decomposed into stages. The initial activity, being within and on the periphery of the rupture zone, correlates in shape and length with meizoseismal lines. In the second stage

  20. Fusulinoids from the Bashkirian-Moscovian transition beds of the Shahreza region in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassihi, Shirin; Sone, Masatoshi; Hairapetian, Vachik; Esfahani, Fariba Shirezadeh

    2016-12-01

    The presence of the Bashkirian-Moscovian (lower Pennsylvanian) sequence with mixed siliciclastics and fossil-rich carbonates has long been known from the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone in Iran. However, except for a few studies, its biostratigraphy was not previously investigated in detail. A fusulinoid fauna is recovered from newly measured section, which we named the Asad Abad II section. It is located near the Shahreza town in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone. The most important fusulinoids of this assemblage are Aljutovella cf. aljutovica Rauser-Chernosouva, Tikhonovichiella tikhonovichi (Rauser-Chernosouva), and Profusulinella (Depratina) prisca (Deprat); they occur in association with species of Ozawainella, Staffellaeformis, and Pseudostaffella. This fauna overall represents a fauna of the latest Bashkirian-earliest Moscovian transition period in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone. This new fusulinoid fauna shares some common species with the concurrent faunas of the Alborz, East Iran, and Central Iran. Furthermore, it can be easily compared with those of the Russian Platform, Southern and Northern Urals, and Central Taurides (Turkey). The four species of the current fauna, namely Eostaffella compressa Brazhnikova, E. primitiva (Dutkevich), Pseudostaffella timanica Rauser-Chernosouva, and Profusulinella postpararhombiformis Dzhenchuraeva are reported from Iran for the first time. This study also presents the first occurrence of the genera Aljutovella and Tikhonovichiella in the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone of Iran.

  1. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-02

    constructed the pipeline on its side of their border. At the time the project was under construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey...would be importing gas originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason given for why the State Department did...been imposed for violations of ISA. State Department reports to Congress on ISA, required every six months, have routinely stated that U.S. diplomats

  2. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-19

    Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the Treasury Department . • Oil Dealings. The 1995 trade ban greatly expanded a 1987 ban on imports from...required a specific license to do so, which apparently made work in Iran impractical. On September 10, 2013, the Treasury Department eliminated...clarifying that it is the responsibility of the Treasury Department to implement those ISA sanctions that involve the financial sector, including

  3. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-09

    9 Ban on U.S. Trade and Investment With Iran.........................................................................9 Treasury Department ...determined as violations of ISA. Some of the projects listed in the GAO report and in the table below may be under review by the State Department ...determinations of violation have been announced. State Department reports to Congress on ISA, required every six months, have routinely stated that U.S

  4. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-07

    needed technology from foreign sources. However, Department of Defense and other assessments indicate that sanctions have not stopped Iran from building...Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act primarily by specifying the separate authorities of the Department of State and the Department of the Treasury...their border. At the time the project was under construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas originating in

  5. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    pipeline on its side of their border. At the time the project was under construction, State Department testimony stated that Turkey would be importing gas...originating in Turkmenistan, not Iran, under a swap arrangement. That was one reason given for why the State Department did not determine that the...violations of ISA. State Department reports to Congress on ISA, required every six months, have routinely stated that U.S. diplomats raise U.S. policy

  6. Iran Sanctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-24

    and Investment With Iran....................................................................... 12 Treasury Department “Targeted Financial Measures...in the GAO report and in Table 1 below may be under review by the State Department (Bureau of Economic Affairs), but no publication of such deals has...been placed in the Federal Register (requirement of Section 5e of ISA), and no determinations of violation have been announced. State Department

  7. Post-Eocene volcanics of the Abazar district, Qazvin, Iran: Mineralogical and geochemical evidence for a complex magmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiabanha, A.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Kananian, A.; Rahimi, G.

    2012-02-01

    The style of volcanism of post-Eocene volcanism in the Alborz zone of northern Iran is different to that of Eocene volcanism (Karaj Formation). Indeed, the volcanic succession of the Abazar district, located in a narrow volcanic strip within the Alborz magmatic assemblage, is characterized by distinct mineralogical and chemical compositions linked to a complex magmatic evolution. The succession was produced by explosive eruptions followed by effusive eruptions. Two main volcanic events are recognized: (1) a thin rhyolitic ignimbritic sheet underlain by a thicker lithic breccia, and (2) lava flows including shoshonite, latite, and andesite that overlie the first event across a reddish soil horizon. Plagioclase in shoshonite (An 48-92) shows normal zoning, whereas plagioclase in latite and andesite (An 48-75) has a similar composition but shows reverse and oscillatory zoning. QUILF temperature calculations for shoshonites and andesites yield temperatures of 1035 °C and 1029 °C, respectively. The geothermometers proposed by Ridolfi et al. (2010) and Holland and Blundy (1994) yield temperatures of 960 °C and 944 °C for latitic lava, respectively. The samples of volcanic rock show a typical geochemical signature of the continental arc regime, but the andesites clearly differ from the shoshonites, the latites and the rhyolites. The mineralogical and chemical characteristics of these rocks are explained by the following petrogenesis: (1) intrusion of a hot, mantle-depth mafic (shoshonitic) magma, which differentiated in the magma chamber to produce a latitic and then a rhyolitic liquid; (2) rhyolitic ignimbritic eruptions from the top of the magma chamber, following by shoshonitic and then latitic extrusions; (3) magma mingling between the latitic and andesitic magmas, as indicated by the occurrence of andesite clasts within the latite; and (4) andesitic effusions. The youngest volcanic events in the Alborz zone show a close chemical relationship with continental arc

  8. The Paleotethys suture in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, S.; Stampfli, G. M.

    2003-04-01

    The Triassic rocks of the Nakhlak area have been used to justify the hypothesis of the rotation of the Central-East Iranian microplate, mainly based on paleomagnetic data. Davoudzadeh and his coworkers (1981) pointed out the existing contrast between the Nakhlakh succession and the time-equivalent lithostratigraphic units exposed in the surrounding regions and compared them with the Triassic rocks of the Aghdarband area on the southern edge of the Turan plate. We recently gathered evidences that this part of central Iran effectively belongs to the Northern Iranian Paleo-Tethys suture zone and related Variscan terrains of the Turan plate. This is the case for the northwestern part of central Iran, where the Anarak-Khur belt (Anarak schists and their thick Cretaceous-Paleocene sedimentary cover) presents all the elements of an orogenic zone such as dismembered ophiolites and silisiclastics, calcareous and volcanic cover which has been deformed and metamorphosed. This belt is separated to the northwest from the Alborz microcontinent by the Great Kavir fault and Cretaceous ophiolite mélanges. To the southeast it is bounded by the Biabanak fault and serpentinites and the Biabanak block, part of the central-east Iranian plate. The later zone is formed by Proterozoic metamorphic basement and marine sedimentary cover, nearly continuous from the Ordovician to the Triassic, at the uppermost part upper Triassic-lower Jurassic bauxites and silisiclastics are observed. Excepted the Ordovician angular unconformities and the boundary between lower Jurassic and younger layers, this sequence displays no significant main unconformities and can be attributed to the Cimmerian super-terrain. Thus, this sequences represents the classical evolution of the southern Paleo-Tethys passive margin, as found in the Alborz microcontinent or the Band-e Bayan zone of Afghanistan and is the witness of large scale duplication of the Paleo-Tethys suture zone through major Alpine strike-slip faults

  9. A five-year study on the epidemiological approaches to cholera in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mafi, Moharam; Goya, Mohammad Mahdi; Hajia, Massoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cholera is considered a key indicator of social development but still is reported in various cities of Iran. The present study aimed to analyze the available information regarding cholera outbreaks since 2010 in Iran. Methods: All cases reported to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Ministry of Health and Education who had been confirmed as cholera cases by the Health Reference Laboratory, were entered into this study since 2010. A specific spreadsheet was designed to ensure the safe keeping of the patient records. Results: A total of 1522 patients were clinically diagnosed as cholera with laboratory confirmation over the study period. Cholera was detected in 26 Provinces and 115 cities during this period. Mean age of the patients was 35.1±17, both the Inaba and Ogawa strains were isolated. The highest mortality and the morbidity rate was 1.98% in 2013. The most cholera prevalent provinces in order of frequency were Baluchistan, Alborz, Gilan, Golestan and Qom, as well as Tehran. Inaba serotype was the most common cause of mortality and morbidity in 2013. Conclusion: These findings indicate significant outbreaks of cholera in some of the provinces of Iran and warrant appropriate treatment and preventive measures. PMID:27757199

  10. Occurrence and molecular characterization of free-living amoeba species (Acanthamoeba, Hartmannella, and Saccamoeba limax) in various surface water resources of Iran.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Rahmati, Behnaz; Seyedpour, Seyed Hosssen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence and molecular identity of Acanthamoeba species in the surface water resources of four provinces in Iran, namely Guilan, Mazandaran (North of Iran), Alborz, and Tehran (capital city), using culture- and molecular-based methods. During March to November 2014, 49 surface water samples were collected from environmental water sources-the distinct surface waters of Guilan, Mazandaran, Alborz, and Tehran provinces, in Iran. For the isolation of Acanthamoeba species, approximately 500 ml of the water samples were filtered through a cellulose nitrate membrane with a pore size of 0.45 μ. The filter was transferred onto non-nutrient agar plates seeded with Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) as a food source. The presence of Acanthamoeba was confirmed by the genus-specific primer pair JDP1 and 2, and/or NA primers were used to identify Acanthamoeba and certain other free-living amoebae. In total, 38 out of 49 samples were positive by culture and/or PCR for Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoebae from all three provinces. By sequencing the positive isolates, the strains were shown to belong to Acanthamoeba (16 isolates belonged to T4 and 2 isolates belonged to T5), Hartmannella vermiformis (3/24), and Saccamoeba limax (2/24). The T4 and T5 genotypes were detected in Guilan and Mazandaran provinces. Two isolates from Guilan and Tehran provinces belonged to S. limax, and H. vermiformis was detected in Guilan province. The results of this study highlight the need to pay more attention to free-living amoebae, as human activity was observed in all of the localities from which these samples were taken. These surface waters can be potential sources for the distribution and transmission of pathogenic Acanthamoeba in the study areas, and free-living amoebas (FLA) (particularly the Acanthamoeba species) can serve as hosts for and vehicles of various microorganisms.

  11. Geology and geochemistry of the Mendejin plutonicrocks, Mianeh, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somarin, A. Karimzadeh

    2006-10-01

    The Mendejin pluton is located in the Mianeh area, NW Iran, 550 km from Tehran. This pluton is probably of Oligo-Miocene age and is the result of extensive magmatism which occurred during and after the Alpine Orogeny. Similar plutons are common in the Alborz-Azarbaijan structural zone of Iran, and it is likely that there are concealed plutons related to this extensive Cenozoic magmatism, but due to their youth and low rates of erosion they have not yet been exposed. The Mendejin pluton is a composite body made up of four types of plutonic rocks: pink tonalite, grey tonalite, diorite and aplite. The pink tonalite is porphyritic and contains phenocrysts of plagioclase, K-feldspar and hornblende in a groundmass consisting of quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, hornblende, zircon, monazite, leucoxene, apatite and hematite. The grey porphyritic tonalite has more biotite, pyroxene and pyrite and less accessory phases compared with the pink tonalite. The diorite has a microporphyritic texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende and augite. This rock also occurs as xenoliths in the Mendejin pluton. The aplitic dykes are the youngest magmatic products at Mendejin. The Mendejin tonalite contains more Cl, As, S, Cu, Ni and Zn than the global granite. These rocks are of I-type, peraluminous and calc-alkaline, with medium to high potassium, and were formed as part of a volcanic arc. The Mendejin pluton contains up to 8 ppb gold and could potentially have been the source of an economic gold deposit by leaching of Au from wall rocks and deposition in extensive hydrothermally altered marginal zones.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Seismic Provinces of Iran Using DBSCAN Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi-Beydokhti, Mohammad; Ali Abbaspour, Rahim; Mojarab, Masoud

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the field of engineering seismology is identification and classification of seismic provinces. Due to the importance of this issue in Iran, various studies have been conducted using different methods such as expert judgment, computational methods, data-driven methods, and smart methods. The purpose of the present research is to develop a spatio-temporal seismic model for Iran using robust and objective clustering tools. In the present study, one of the most powerful clustering methods, DBSCAN, is selected based on its ability to analyze huge amounts of data. The DBSCAN algorithm, which acts based on the density of seismic events, is capable of detecting arbitrarily shaped clusters. The seismic datasets used in this study, which were obtained from the seismic catalog of Iran from 1900 to 2015, have been divided into three window periods including 2- , 5- , and 10-year intervals. Afterward, different seismicity patterns for each period are obtained by applying DBSCAN algorithm. Then, those exhibited high agreements in terms of shapes and locations of clusters with the other models are determined. Ultimately, by considering these models and using expert judgments, a unified spatio-temporal model is presented. The results reveal meaningful information in different parts of Iran especially in Zagros, Alborz, and Azerbaijan zones and are generally in good agreement with previous studies. Moreover, the results emphasize that a seismic model, which is obtained based on considering seismogenic zones in various time periods along with the application of density-based clustering tools, will produce reliable results.

  13. Genetic Characterization of Echinococcus granulosus from a Large Number of Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples of Human Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Sima; Torbaghan, Shams Shariat; Dabiri, Shahriar; Babaei, Zahra; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Sharbatkhori, Mitra; Harandi, Majid Fasihi

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE), caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus, presents an important medical and veterinary problem globally, including that in Iran. Different genotypes of E. granulosus have been reported from human isolates worldwide. This study identifies the genotype of the parasite responsible for human hydatidosis in three provinces of Iran using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. In this study, 200 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from human CE cases were collected from Alborz, Tehran, and Kerman provinces. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene were performed for genetic characterization of the samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates from this study and reference sequences of different genotypes was done using a maximum likelihood method. In total, 54.4%, 0.8%, 1%, and 40.8% of the samples were identified as the G1, G2, G3, and G6 genotypes, respectively. The findings of the current study confirm the G1 genotype (sheep strain) to be the most prevalent genotype involved in human CE cases in Iran and indicates the high prevalence of the G6 genotype with a high infectivity for humans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the first documented human CE case in Iran infected with the G2 genotype. PMID:25535316

  14. Desert and desertification in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the greatest environmental concerns in Iran as in other arid and semiarid countries is the transformation of once productive, or marginally productive, land to deteriorated land and soil unable to support plants and animals. Because the land becomes barren and dry, the process is described as desertification, which occurs as a sequence of events. The area of deserts in Iran is about 340,000 Km2 (less than one fifth of its total area), of which 100,000 Km2 is being used for some cultivation, 120,000 Km2 is subjected to moving sands about 40 % of which is active sand dunes. Most of features and processes usual in world famous deserts are also observed in Iran: low precipitation, high evaporation, poor or lack of vegetation, saline and alkaline soils, low population and small and sparse oases. The deserts of Iran are generally classified in the subtropical, warm, arid and semiarid group, but the effect and presence of some geographical and geoclimatical factors such as height, vicinity to Indian Ocean and so on do some changes in climatic conditions and geographical features causing some local and regional differences in them. Geographically, two groups of deserts have been known in Iran: (1) Coastal deserts which, like a ribbon with variable width, stretch from extreme southeast to extreme southwest, at the north parts of Oman Sea and Persian Gulf. One important feature of these deserts is relatively high humidity which differentiates them from other deserts. This causes an increase in vegetation coverage and hence a decrease in eolian erosion and also a dominance of chemical weathering to that of physical. (2) internal deserts, which rest in central, eastern and southeastern plateau of the country and in independent and semi dependent depressions. This situation, which is due to the surrounding high mountains, blocks humidity entry and causes the aridity of these deserts. Wind as a dominant process in the area causes deflated features such as Reg (desert

  15. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Iran currently faces many soil erosion-related problems (see citations below). These issues are resulted from some inherent characteristic and anthropogenic triggering forces. Nowadays, the latter plays more important rule to accelerate the erosion with further emphasis on soil erosion-prone arid and semi arid regions of the country. This contribution attempts to identify and describe the existing main reasons behind accelerated soil erosion in Iran. Appropriate solutions viz. structural and non-structural approaches will be then advised to combat or minimise the problems. Iran can be used as a pilot research site to understand the soil erosion processes in semiarid, arid and mountainous terrain and our research will review the scientific literature and will give an insight of the soil erosion rates in the main factors of the soil erosion in Iran. Key words: Anthropogenic Erosion, Land Degradation; Sediment Management; Sediment Problems Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7-ENV-2013- supported this research. References Aghili Nategh, N., Hemmat, A., & Sadeghi, M. (2014). Assessing confined and semi-confined compression curves of highly calcareous remolded soil amended with farmyard manure. Journal of Terramechanics, 53, 75-82. Arekhi, S., Bolourani, A. D., Shabani, A., Fathizad, H., Ahamdy-Asbchin, S. 2012. Mapping Soil Erosion and Sediment Yield Susceptibility using RUSLE, Remote Sensing and GIS (Case study: Cham Gardalan Watershed, Iran). Advances in Environmental Biology, 6(1), 109-124. Arekhi, S., Shabani, A., Rostamizad, G. 2012. Application of the modified universal soil loss equation (MUSLE) in prediction of sediment yield (Case study: Kengir Watershed, Iran). Arabian Journal of Geosciences, 5(6), 1259-1267.Sadeghi, S. H., Moosavi, V., Karami, A., Behnia, N. 2012. Soil erosion assessment and prioritization of affecting factors at plot

  16. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Appalachian Mountains     View Larger Image Multi-angle views of the Appalachian Mountains, March 6, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... location:  United States region:  Eastern United States Order:  3 ...

  17. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Aerosols over the Appalachian Mountains     View ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) acquired these views of the Appalachian Mountains on March 6, 2000. The image at left is a downward-looking ... location:  United States region:  Eastern United States Order:  2 ...

  18. A new genus and species of gekkonid lizard (Squamata: Gekkota: Gekkonidae) from Hormozgan Province with a revised key to gekkonid genera of Iran.

    PubMed

    Safaei-Mahroo, Barbod; Ghaffari, Hanyeh; Anderson, Steven C

    2016-05-10

    We describe a new genus and species of gekkonid from two gravid specimens which were found within Koh-e Homag Protected Area, Hormozgan Province, southern Iran. The genus Parsigecko gen. nov. can be distinguished from other genera of Middle East Gekkonidae by a combination of the following characteristics: digits not dilated, dorsal tail covered with small scales without any tubercles or keels, having two strong keeled and pointed scales on each side of each annulus. Parsigecko ziaiei sp. nov. is a ground-dwelling lizard. The new species was found in the Zagros Mountain forest steppe patch with scattered wild pistachio trees and mountain almond shrubs surrounded by South Iran Nubo-Sindian desert and semi-desert habitat in the south of Iran. The genus is the 13th gekkonid genus known from Iran, and the only gekkonid genus endemic to the Zagros Mountains. A key to the genera of the Gekkonidae in Iran is provided.

  19. Environmental Impacts Of Zirab Coal Washing Plant, Mazandaran, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, F.; Esmaeili, A.

    2009-04-01

    Extraction and beneficiation operations associated with coal mining increase the rate of chemical reaction of waste material to air and water media. Zirab coal washing plant is located on the bank of the Cherat stream in Mazandaran province, Iran. coal Mined from central Alborz coalfield mines is not suitable for use in Iranian Steel Corporation. Hence, coal ash content is reduced by physical and chemical processes in this plant. These processes leave a large quantity of liquid and solid wastes that accumulate in waste dump and tailing dam. sediment and water samples taken from Sheshrudbar and Cherat streams and also from Talar river show high concentration of Cd, Mo and As in water samples of coal washing plant and the associated drainage. Eh-pH diagrams revealed the chemical species of elements in water. The enrichment factor and geoaccumulation index show that Cd, Hg, Mo and V are enriched in bottom sediments of the coal washing plant and decrease with increasing distance from the plant. Sequential extraction analysis Results of three sediment samples of Cherat stream show that silicate bound is the major phase in samples taken before and after the plant, but adjacent to the plant, organic bound is dominant. The high concentration of Cd and Mo in the water soluble phase, is noticeable and may result in high mobility and bioavailability of these elements. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests on six samples, before and after the coal washing plant support the obtained results. Keywords: Zirab; coal washing plant; Sequential extraction analysis; Mann-whitney; Wilcoxon; Enrichment factor; Geoaccumulation index.

  20. Stone Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This color image taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the part of the rock outcrop dubbed Stone Mountain at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Scientists are examining Stone Mountain with the instruments on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' in search of clues about the composition of the rock outcrop. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] A Patch of Stone (Figure credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS)

    The colorless square in this color image of the martian rock formation called Stone Mountain is one portion of the rock being analyzed with tools on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The square area is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. Stone Mountain is located within the rock outcrop on Meridiani Planum, Mars. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  1. A new species of the genus Microgecko Nikolsky, 1907 (Sauria: Gekkonidae) from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Gholamifard, Ali; Rastegar-Pouyani, Nasrullah; Rastegar-Pouyani, Eskandar; Khosravani, Azar; Yousefkhani, Seyyed Saeed Hosseinian; Oraei, Hamzeh

    2016-03-20

    The dwarf geckos of the recently revived genus Microgecko Nikolsky, 1907 comprise four species, ranging from western Iran to northwestern India. Iran hosts three species of the four recognized species of the genus Microgecko. Here, we describe a new species of this genus based on two and single specimens from southeastern and southern Iran, respectively. Combinations of scalation characters and distinct morphology, coloration and habitat peculiarities in calcareous mountains distinguish Microgecko chabaharensis sp. nov. from its congeners. Detailed information and an updated identification key for the genus Microgecko are also presented.

  2. Molecular and serological detection of Ehrlichia canis in naturally exposed dogs in Iran: an analysis on associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Maazi, Nadi; Malmasi, Abdolali; Shayan, Parviz; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Salehi, Taghi Zahraei; Fard, Mojdeh Sharifian

    2014-03-01

    The general aim of this study, which was conducted for the first time in Iran, was to evaluate the seroprevalence and geographical distribution of Ehrlichia canis in a dog population in Iran, followed by molecular confirmation using PCR and sequencing. Blood samples were collected from 240 dogs in different areas of Alborz and Tehran Provinces and initially analyzed using the immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) test to detect anti-Ehrlichia canis IgG antibodies. Subsequently, nested PCR was performed based on a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene of E. canis on serologically positive samples. The results showed that 40/240 dogs (16.6%) presented anti-Ehrlichia canis IgG antibodies and that nine of the blood samples from the 40 seropositive dogs (22.5%) contained E. canis DNA, which was confirmed by sequencing. The seroprevalence of E. canis tended to be higher in purebred, one to three-year-old male dogs living in the Plain zone, in rural areas; however, this difference was not statistically significant.

  3. 31 CFR 561.329 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran. 561.329 Section 561.329 Money... Iran. The term Iran means the Government of Iran and the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of...

  4. 31 CFR 561.329 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran. 561.329 Section 561.329 Money... Iran. The term Iran means the Government of Iran and the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of...

  5. Nuclear Politics in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    system. States with prestige are recognized by other actors as having a high 21 Nuclear Politics in Iran standing either generally or with regard to...Nuclear Politics in Iran Edited by Judith S. Yaphe MIDDLE EAST STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVES 1 Center for Strategic Research Institute for National...OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAY 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Nuclear Politics in

  6. Study and comparison of the maximum stress directions and main fault orientations in some active zones in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouhid, Khatereh; Faraji, Atefeh; Ghorashi, Manouchehr

    2010-05-01

    Study and comparison of the maximum stress directions and main fault orientations in some active zones in Iran Khatereh Forouhid, Manouchehr Ghorashi, Atefeh Faraji Institute of Geophysics, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran kforouhid@yahoo.com Farajiatefeh@yahoo.com The Iranian plateau is the widest active zone in Alpine-Himalayan collision system that is located between two stable platforms, the Arabia in southwest and Eurasia in northeast. The convergence of these two platforms towards each other is the main reason for seismicity and different styles of deformation observed in Iran. In this study, the Iranian plateau is divided into 7 regions based on their seismotectonic characteristics. These regions are; Zagros, Makran, East Iran, Alborz, Kopeh Dagh, Central Iran and Azarbayejan (northwest of Iran). In each region, focal mechanism solutions of early and modern instrumental earthquakes (the only source of information suitable to use for stress distribution study in Iran) with magnitudes more than 5.0 and their relations to active faults are considered. By studying each maximum stress direction based on a group of earthquake focal mechanisms and considering main fault orientations, each region is studied individually. According to these data, some of these regions are divided into smaller parts. These sub-divided parts have some characters that make them different from their neighbors in the same region. In this regard, Zagros is studied in detail based on seismotectonic characteristics and divided into three parts, with N-S maximum stress direction (compressional) in one part and two different kind of NE-SW direction in two other. We use this information to investigate the style and distribution of active faulting in the Zagros and the relationships of this activity with shortening of the Arabia-Eurasia collision. It is worth to mention that as the fault slip will almost occur in the direction of maximum resolved shear stress on the fault plane, probably strain

  7. A new present-day velocity field for eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walpersdorf, A.; Tavakoli, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Jadidi, A.; Vergnolle, M.; Djamour, Y.; Nankali, H. R.; Sedighi, M.; Bellier, O.; Shabanian, E.

    2009-04-01

    Since 2004, extensive GPS campaigns and the upcoming Iranian permanent GPS network are monitoring the present-day deformation in eastern Iran. We present a new GPS velocity field that extends from Central Iran to the Turkmen shield and the Hellmand block on the Eurasian plate. It permits to monitor the right lateral shear across the aseismic Lut block between Central Iran and the Hellmand block, and the resulting shortening across the Kopeh Dagh mountain belt limiting NE Iran towards Turkmenistan. The present-day deformation pattern is used to verify existing tectonic models. Individual instantaneous fault slip rates are compared to short term and long term geological estimates. We find that GPS slip rates are generally coherent with short term geologic determinations (from dating of geomorphologic offsets over some 10-100 ka). Some differences with respect to long term estimates (from total geologic fault offsets and onset ages of several Ma) indicate non-constant slip rates over different time scales or that the onset of the present-day deformation presumed to 3-7 Ma in eastern Iran has to be revised.

  8. Review of the Ordovician stratigraphy and fauna of the Anarak Region in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Leonid E.; Hairapetian, Vachik; Evans, David H.; Pour, Mansoureh Ghobadi; Holmer, Lars E.; Baars, Christian

    2015-12-01

    The Ordovician sedimentary succession of the Pol-e Khavand area, situated on the northern margin of the Yazd block, has important differences from those in other parts of Central Iran. It has been established that the presumably terminal Cambrian to Lower Ordovician volcano-sedimentary Polekhavand Formation, exposed in the Pol-e Khavand area, has non-conformable contact with greenschists of the Doshakh Metamorphic Complex. The succeeding, mainly siliciclastic Chahgonbad Formation contains low to moderately diverse faunal assemblages, including brachiopods, cephalopods, trilobites and tentaculitids. The Darriwilian age of the lower part of the formation is well established by the co-occurrence of brachiopod genera Camerella, Phragmorthis, Tritoechia and Yangtzeella. The associated rich cephalopod fauna is different from the Darriwilian cephalopod associations of the Alborz terrane and may show some affinity with warm water faunas of North China and South Korea. It is likely that the Mid Ordovician fauna recovered from the lower part of the Chahgonbad Formation settled in the area sometime during a warming episode in the late Darriwilian. By contrast the low diversity mid Katian brachiopod association includes only three taxa, which occur together with the trilobite Vietnamia cf. teichmulleri and abundant, but poorly preserved tentaculitids questionably assigned to the genus Costatulites. This faunal association bears clear signatures linking it to the contemporaneous cold water faunas of the Arabian, Mediterranean and North African segments of Gondwana. Four brachiopod species recovered from the Chahgonbad Formation, including Hibernodonta lakhensis, Hindella prima, Lomatorthis? multilamellosa and Yangtzeella chupananica are new to science.

  9. FINITE FAULT MODELING OF FUTURE LARGE EARTHQUAKE FROM NORTH TEHRAN FAULT IN KARAJ, IRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaei, Meghdad; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Saffari, Hamid; Tsurugi, Masato

    The main purpose of this study is to predict strong ground motions from future large earthquake for Karaj city, the capital of Alborz province of Iran. This city is an industrialized city having over one million populations and is located near several active faults. Finite fault modeling with a dynamic corner frequency has adopted here for simulation of future large earthquake. Target fault is North Tehran fault with the length of 110 km and rupture of west part of the fault which is closest to Karaj, assumed for this simulation. For seven rupture starting points, acceleration time series in the site of Karaj Caravansary -historical building- are predicted. Peak ground accelerations for those are vary from 423 cm/s2 to 584 cm/s2 which is in the range of 1990 Rudbar earthquake (Mw=7.3) . Results of acceleration simulations in different distances are also compared with attenuation relations for two types of soil. Our simulations show general agreement with one of the most well known world attenuation relations and also with one of the newest attenuation relation that hase developed for Iranian plateau.

  10. Investigating the source of contaminated plumes downstream of the Alborz Sharghi coal washing plant using EM34 conductivity data, VLF-EM and DC-resistivity geophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraz, Farzin Amirkhani; Ardejani, Faramarz Doulati; Moradzadeh, Ali; Arab-Amiri, Ali Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coal washing factories may create serious environmental problems due to pyrite oxidation and acid mine drainage generation from coal waste piles on nearby land. Infiltration of pyrite oxidation products through the porous materials of the coal waste pile by rainwater cause changes in the conductivity of underground materials and groundwater downstream of the pile. Electromagnetic and electrical methods are effective for investigation and monitoring of the contaminated plumes caused by coal waste piles and tailings impoundments. In order to investigate the environmental impact from a coal waste pile at the Alborz Sharghi coal washing plant, an EM34 ground conductivity meter was used on seven parallel lines in an E-W direction, downstream of the waste pile. Two-dimensional resistivity models obtained by the inversion of EM34 conductivity data identified conductive leachate plumes. In addition, quasi-3D inversion of EM34 data has confirmed the decreasing resistivity at depth due to the contaminated plumes. Comparison between EM34, VLF and DC-resistivity datasets, which were acquired for similar survey lines, agree well in identifying changes in the resistivity trend. The EM34 and DC-resistivity sections have greater similarity and better smoothness rather than those of the VLF model. Two-dimensional inversion models of these methods have shown some contaminated plumes with low resistivity.

  11. Prevalence and Morphological Characterization of Cheilospirura hamulosa, Diesing, 1861 (Nematoda: Acuarioidea), from Partridges in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Maryam; Rouhani, Soheila; Mobedi, Iraj; Rostami, Ali; Khazan, Hoshang; Ahoo, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    This study reports data on the prevalence, morphology, and morphometry of the nematode Cheilospirura hamulosa on the basis of light and stereoscopic microscopy and also camera lucida. Specimens were recovered after necropsies of 100 partridges (Alectoris chukar) from Taleqan County in Alborz Province, Iran. The prevalence of C. hamulosa in partridges was of 30% with a mean intensity of 3.9 and range of infection of 1–12. The mean length and width of females were 17.5 ± 2.14 and 0.39 ± 0.04 mm, while those of males were 12.2 ± 0.67 and 0.3 ± 0.06 mm, respectively. The characteristic digitiform tail was observed in females, and the unequal spicules, caudal alae, and ten pairs of caudal papillae were seen in males. The taxonomic characteristic longitudinal cordons and muscular and glandular oesophagus were observed in both sexes. Ratio between cordons and body length in males and females was 1 : 1.33 and 1 : 1.68, respectively. Ratio between long and short spicules in males was 1 : 2.3. The average size of embryonated eggs was 51.25 × 29.5 μm. In the present study, C. hamulosa (Nematoda: Acuarioidea) is recorded for the first time from partridges in Iran. Therefore, the morphological characters described in this study will be useful in the future diagnostic and taxonomic studies of Acuarioidea family. PMID:26693346

  12. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran, and any other territory or marine area, including the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, over which the Government of Iran...

  13. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Definitions § 560.303 Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of...

  14. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Definitions § 560.303 Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran and any other territory or... Iran claims sovereignty, sovereign rights, or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of...

  15. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iran; Iranian. 560.303 Section 560.303... Iran; Iranian. The term Iran means the territory of Iran, and any other territory or marine area, including the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, over which the Government of Iran...

  16. Country Profiles, Iran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, John K.; Moore, Richard V.

    A profile of Iran is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population--size, number of households, women of reproductive age, growth patterns, role of women, urban/rural distribution,…

  17. Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Anti-Atlas Mountains of northern Africa and the nearby Atlas mountains were created by the prolonged collision of the African and Eurasian tectonic plates, beginning about 80 million years ago. Massive sandstone and limestone layers have been crumpled and uplifted more than 4,000 meters in the High Atlas and to lower elevations in the Anti-Atlas. Between more continuous major fold structures, such as the Jbel Ouarkziz in the southwestern Anti-Atlas, tighter secondary folds (arrow) have developed. Earlier, the supercontinent of Pangea rifted apart to form precursors to the Mediterranean and the Atlantic Ocean (Beauchamp and others, 1996). In those seas sands, clays, limey sediments, and evaporite layers (gypsum, rock salt) were deposited. Later, during the mountain-building plate collision, the gypsum layers flowed under the pressure and provided a slippery surface on which overlying rigid rocks could glide (Burkhard, 2001). The broad, open style of folds seen in this view is common where evaporites are involved in the deformation. Other examples can be found in the Southern Zagros of Iran and the Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. Information Sources: Beauchamp, W., Barazangi, M., Demnati, A., and El Alji, M., 1996, Intracontinental rifting and inversion: Missour Basin and Atlas Mountains, Morocco: Tulsa, American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 80, No. 9, p. 1459-1482. Burkhard, Martin, 2001, Tectonics of the Anti-Atlas of Morocco -- Thin-skin/thick-skin relationships in an atypical foreland fold belt. University of Neuchatel, Switzerland: http://www-geol.unine.ch/Structural/Antiatlas.html (accessed 1/29/02). STS108-711-25 was taken in December, 2001 by the crew of Space Shuttle mission 108 using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography

  18. An investigation on thermal patterns in Iran based on spatial autocorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah Ghalhari, Gholamabbas; Dadashi Roudbari, Abbasali

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed at investigating temporal-spatial patterns and monthly patterns of temperature in Iran using new spatial statistical methods such as cluster and outlier analysis, and hotspot analysis. To do so, climatic parameters, monthly average temperature of 122 synoptic stations, were assessed. Statistical analysis showed that January with 120.75% had the most fluctuation among the studied months. Global Moran's Index revealed that yearly changes of temperature in Iran followed a strong spatially clustered pattern. Findings showed that the biggest thermal cluster pattern in Iran, 0.975388, occurred in May. Cluster and outlier analyses showed that thermal homogeneity in Iran decreases in cold months, while it increases in warm months. This is due to the radiation angle and synoptic systems which strongly influence thermal order in Iran. The elevations, however, have the most notable part proved by Geographically weighted regression model. Iran's thermal analysis through hotspot showed that hot thermal patterns (very hot, hot, and semi-hot) were dominant in the South, covering an area of 33.5% (about 552,145.3 km2). Regions such as mountain foot and low lands lack any significant spatial autocorrelation, 25.2% covering about 415,345.1 km2. The last is the cold thermal area (very cold, cold, and semi-cold) with about 25.2% covering about 552,145.3 km2 of the whole area of Iran.

  19. Roundness of heavy minerals (zircon and apatite) as a provenance tool for unraveling recycling: A case study from the Sefidrud and Sarbaz rivers in N and SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoleikhaei, Yousef; Frei, Dirk; Morton, Andrew; Zamanzadeh, S. Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    In order to improve techniques for provenance studies, and especially to address the question of sediment recycling, morphological changes of two minerals with contrasting durability (zircon and apatite) were tracked during both fluvial transport and littoral reworking. The Sefidrud river system in northern Iran, which drains the Alborz volcano-sedimentary range into the Caspian Sea, and the Sarbaz river system in southeastern Iran, which drains the Makran Accretionary Prism into the Oman Sea, were chosen for this study. To determine source rocks of the grains, and thus their nature in terms of sedimentary cycles, zircon geochronology was conducted on both rivers. The zircon data indicate that most of the Sefidrud sediments are first cycle, derived from crystalline rocks, and the Sarbaz sediments are generally recycled from older wedges of the Makran. Results from SEM analysis show significant differences between the roundness of associated zircon and apatite grains. Zircon grains remain unrounded through several cycles, while apatite grains show abrasion from the early stages of their first cycle.

  20. Uplift of Zagros Mountains slows plate convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-05-01

    Research has indicated that mountain ranges can slow down the convergence between two tectonic plates on timescales as short as a few million years, as the growing mountains provide enough tectonic force to impact plate motions. Focusing on the convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates at the Zagros mountain range, which runs across Iran and Iraq, Austermann and Iaffaldano reconstructed the relative motion of the plates using published paleomagnetic data covering the past 13 million years, as well as current geodetic measurements. They show that the convergence of the two plates has decreased by about 30% over the past 5 million years. Looking at the geological record to infer past topography and using a computer model of the mantle-lithosphere system, the authors examined whether the recent uplift across the Zagros Mountains could have caused the observed slowdown. They also considered several other geological events that might have influenced the convergence rate, but the authors were able to rule those out as dominant controls. The authors conclude that the uplift across the Zagros Mountains in the past 5 million years did indeed play a key role in slowing down the convergence between the Eurasian and Arabian plates. (Tectonics, doi:10.1002/tect.20027, 2013)

  1. Application of a time probabilistic approach to seismic landslide hazard estimates in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A. M.; Del Gaudio, V.; Capolongo, D.; Khamehchiyan, M.; Mahdavifar, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    Iran is a country located in a tectonic active belt and is prone to earthquake and related phenomena. In the recent years, several earthquakes caused many fatalities and damages to facilities, e.g. the Manjil (1990), Avaj (2002), Bam (2003) and Firuzabad-e-Kojur (2004) earthquakes. These earthquakes generated many landslides. For instance, catastrophic landslides triggered by the Manjil Earthquake (Ms = 7.7) in 1990 buried the village of Fatalak, killed more than 130 peoples and cut many important road and other lifelines, resulting in major economic disruption. In general, earthquakes in Iran have been concentrated in two major zones with different seismicity characteristics: one is the region of Alborz and Central Iran and the other is the Zagros Orogenic Belt. Understanding where seismically induced landslides are most likely to occur is crucial in reducing property damage and loss of life in future earthquakes. For this purpose a time probabilistic approach for earthquake-induced landslide hazard at regional scale, proposed by Del Gaudio et al. (2003), has been applied to the whole Iranian territory to provide the basis of hazard estimates. This method consists in evaluating the recurrence of seismically induced slope failure conditions inferred from the Newmark's model. First, by adopting Arias Intensity to quantify seismic shaking and using different Arias attenuation relations for Alborz - Central Iran and Zagros regions, well-established methods of seismic hazard assessment, based on the Cornell (1968) method, were employed to obtain the occurrence probabilities for different levels of seismic shaking in a time interval of interest (50 year). Then, following Jibson (1998), empirical formulae specifically developed for Alborz - Central Iran and Zagros, were used to represent, according to the Newmark's model, the relation linking Newmark's displacement Dn to Arias intensity Ia and to slope critical acceleration ac. These formulae were employed to evaluate

  2. Annotated checklist and distribution of the lizards of Iran.

    PubMed

    Smíd, Jiří; Moravec, Jiří; Kodym, Petr; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Yousefkhani, Seyyed Saeed Hosseinian; Frynta, Daniel

    2014-08-20

    We present a comprehensive summary of the distribution of the lizards of Iran accompanied by an annotated checklist. The updated maps of distribution of all 146 species of 41 genera of 11 families are based on all available bibliographic records, catalogues of museum collections and our own field observations. The final dataset used for the distribution maps contains 8525 georeferenced records and cover 41% of the country when plotted on a grid of 0.25° × 0.25° resolution. The dataset is publicly accessible through GBIF portal (http://www.gbif.org/dataset/7db4f705-61ae-4c6e-9de2-06674e7d46b2). Following the latest biogeographic division of the country, ~53% of the species (76 species) inhabit the Iranian Province, ~41% (60 species) the Western Asian mountain transition zone, ~9% (13 species) the Turanian Province, and ~18% (27 species) the Arabian Province. In addition, ~2% (3 species) reach Iran from the Indo-Malay biogeographic region and ~2% (3 species) are believed to have been introduced to Iran by humans. Endemic species (46) represent ~32% of the known species diversity. The most species-rich family of lizards in Iran is Lacertidae with 47 species, followed by Gekkonidae (41), Agamidae (18), Scincidae (15), Phyllodactylidae (10), Sphaerodactylidae (4), Eublepharidae and Uromastycidae (3), Anguidae and Varanidae (2), and Trogonophidae with one representative. 

  3. 2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  4. Herbs and hazards: risk of aristolochic acid nephropathy in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Khodaie, Laleh; Nasri, Hamid; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-01-01

    Herbs are usually considered as inherently harmless products. Nonetheless, various renal injuries have been reported in association with several herbs. The best-known herb-induced chronic kidney disease is aristolochic acid nephropathy. Aristolochic acid is found in Chinese slim herbs. Balkan endemic nephropathy is nowadays considered as an aristolochic acid nephropathy. Plants of Aristolochiaceae (also known as birthwort, dutchman's pipe, and somersworth) is named zaravand or chopoghak in Persian and it grows in different mountainous and rural areas of Iran. The fruit and the steam of the Aristolochiacae are named zaravand gerd (nokhod alvand) and zaravand dearaz, respectively, and have different usage in Iranian teadirional such as treatment of headache, back pain, and anxiety. Some patients with end-stage renal disease and bilateral small kidneys have a history of exposure to some herbal remedies. We need to consider the possibility of environmental toxins and even Aristolochia nephrotoxicity as a potential danger in Iran.

  5. A new Bradyporus Charpentier, 1825 species from Iran (Orthoptera, Bradyporinae).

    PubMed

    Garai-Gyulai, Adrienne; Unal, Mustafa

    2014-06-09

    The species of Bradyporus Charpentier, 1825 found in Turkey has been revised by the second author (M. Ünal, 2011). Bradyporus comprises thirteen species and subspecies at present. The species of the genus have a range of Central Palaearctic distribution; most of the species are Balkanian-Anatolian-Iranian, whereas some of them are restricted to Ukraine, the Caucasus, Transcaucasus, being inhabitants in the continental mountain steppe belt. It seems that Anatolia, with 8 species, and Balkans, with 6 species, are two diversity centres of this genus. Iran represented by only species, B. latipes (Stal, 1875). But, one more peculiar species is described from north west of Iran herein. The species of this genus are very similar to one another in their external features, however, detailed descriptions and characterizations are given for the authentic separation of the known species in the exhausting revision of the genus by the second author (Ünal, 2011).

  6. Primary report on distribution of tick fauna in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, Sadegh; Nabian, Sedighe; Shayan, Parviz

    2007-09-01

    A tick survey was carried out in four different geographical areas of Iran, where the majority of the domestic ruminants in Iran exist. About 1,500 sheep, 1,200 goats and 500 cattle of 12 herds in different provinces lying in the corresponding zones were inspected for tick infestation. The occurrence of ticks on cattle, sheep and goats were 62, 55 and 57%, respectively, with no differences between the zones. The mean number of ticks on each animal was low (10-20 ticks per animal). Ixodid ticks were found throughout the year, whereas the soft tick Ornithodoros sp., which occurred in mountainous area with a significant difference in abundance, showed a clear pattern of seasonality, being generally present from November to March. The largest numbers of adult ixodid ticks were generally present from April to August. Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis and Dermacentor ticks occurred in the mountainous area, whereas Boophilus and Ixodes ticks were only present in the Caspian region. Hyalomma were very abundant in each zone but especially in the mountainous area, whereas Ixodes ticks were the minor genus.

  7. Popularising astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafreshi, Babak A.

    2011-06-01

    The interest to astronomy has incredibly risen in the younger generation of Iranians during the last two decades. By the end of the devastating war with Iraq, science popularisation activities started again in Iran and with only a handful of astronomers and few dozens of serious amateur astronomers in the whole country in late 1980s now there are thousands of amateur astronomers (60% female on average) and over 100 professional astronomers propelling the fun and science of astronomy in the society.

  8. Using luminescence dating of coarse matrix material to estimate the slip rate of the Astaneh fault, Iran

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizza, M.; Mahan, S.; Ritz, J.-F.; Nazari, H.; Hollingsworth, J.; Salamati, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present optically and infrared stimulated luminescence (OSL and IRSL) ages for four samples from alluvial fan surfaces in the Astaneh Valley. This valley is located in the north-east part of the Alborz range in Iran. Our morphologic interpretations recognize at least three generations of fans in the study area, all of which have been displaced along the left-lateral strike-slip Astaneh fault. Because of the dry, loose, and sometimes complex juxtaposition of the target sediments, we collected the samples in total darkness beneath dark plastic layers placed atop the pit openings. Luminescence ages of the fans are ???55 ka, ???32 ka and ???16 ka. These ages are concurrent with periods of loess deposition and wet climatic conditions previously recorded in the Arabia-Iranian region. They allow estimation of a horizontal slip rate of ???2 mm/yr along the Astaneh fault, which is consistent with additional slip rates determined for the Holocene period along faults further west of the Astaneh fault. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Astronomy in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobouti, Y.

    2006-08-01

    Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan, Iran In spite of her renowned pivotal role in the advancement of astronomy on the world scale during 9th to 15th centuries, Iran's rekindled interest in modern astronomy is a recent happening. Serious attempts to introduce astronomy into university curricula and to develop it into a respectable and worthwhile field of research began in the mid 60's. The pioneer was Shiraz University. It should be credited for the first few dozens of astronomy- and astrophysics- related research papers in international journals, for training the first half a dozen of professional astronomers and for creating the Biruni Observatory. Here, I take this opportunity to acknowledge the valuable advice of Bob Koch and Ed Guinan, then of the University of Pennsylvania, in the course of the establishment of this observatory. At present the astronomical community of Iran consists of about 65 professionals, half university faculty members and half MS and PhD students. The yearly scientific contribution of its members has, in the past three years, averaged to about 15 papers in reputable international journals, and presently has a healthy growth rate. Among the existing observational facilities, Biruni Observatory with its 51 cm Cassegrain, CCD cameras, photometers and other smaller educational telescopes, is by far the most active place. Tusi Observatory of Tabriz University has 60 and 40 cm Cassegrains, and a small solar telescope. A number of smaller observing facilities exist in Meshed, Zanjan, Tehran, Babol and other places. The Astronomical Society of Iran (ASI), though some 30 years old, has expanded and institutionalized its activities since early 1990's. ASI sets up seasonal schools for novices, organizes annual colloquia and seminars for professionals and supports a huge body of amateur astronomers from among high school and university students. Over twenty of ASI members are also members of IAU and take active part in its

  10. Mountains: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Introduces the lessons from "Mountain: A Global Resource" that were developed by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and The Mountain Institute for use by NCSS members and their students. Provides an overview that introduces the mountains, mountain cultures, historical perceptions, and the geographical importance of…

  11. A new species and new records of the genus Hypogastrura Bourlet, 1839 (Collembola, Hypogastruridae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kahrarian, Morteza; Vafaei-Shoushtar, Reza; Skarżyński, Dariusz; Konikiewicz, Marta; Soleymannezhadyan, Ebrahim; Mehr, Masoumeh Shayan; Shams, Bahman

    2013-01-01

    Hypogastrura persica sp. nov. is described from the Zagros Mountains (Kermanshah Province, Iran). The new species can be distinguished from two nearest congeners, namely H. exigua Gisin, 1958 (Alps) and H. magistri Babenko, 1994 (Siberia), by the body size, the number of sensilla on antennal segment IV, the number of setae on dens and ventral tube as well as chaetotaxy of abdominal terga IV and V. Three species of the genus, viz. H. martiani Skarżyński & Kaprus', 2009, H. purpurescens (Lubbock, 1867) and H. socialis (Uzel, 1891), have been recorded from Iran for the first time.

  12. Zircon Hf isotopic constraints on the magmatic evolution in Iran: Implications of the Phanerozoic continental growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, H.; Chung, S.; Zarrinkoub, M. H.; Lee, H.; Pang, K.; Mohammadi, S. S.; Khatib, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Combined LA-ICPMS analyses of zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope compositions for magmatic rocks from major domains of Iran allow us to better understand the magmatic evolution regarding the development of the Tethys oceans in the regions. In addition to 79 igneous rocks from Iran, 12 others were also collected from Armenia for isotopic studies. Two major episodes of magmatism were identified in the late Neoproterozoic to Cambrian and the Late Triassic. While the former represents the depleted mantle-derived magma and has associated with the magmatic events that produced the peri-Gondwanan terranes and the Arabian-Nubian Shield, the latter shows the continental crust-type zircon Hf isotopic characteristic and is attributed to the subduction and closing of the Paleotethys ocean. The Neotethyan subduction-related magmatism started from the Jurassic period as granitoids that now exposed along the Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone (SSZ) and in the central part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc (UDMA), and exhibit heterogeneous isotopic affinities of variable zircon ɛHf(T) values between +12 and -5. The igneous activities migrated inland in the southeastern segment of the UDMA from which the Late Cretaceous granitoids occurred in the Jiroft and Bazman areas with zircon ɛHf(T) values from +15 to +11 and from +5 to -9, respectively, implying the remarkable involvement of crustal material in the Bazman magma. Then, the most widespread magmatic activities which took place during the Eocene to Miocene in the UDMA, Armenia, the SSZ and the Alborz yielded mainly positive zircon ɛHf(T) values from +17 to -1. However, the Eocene intrusive rocks from the Central Iran, in the Saghand area have less radiogenic zircon Hf isotopes of ɛHf(T) values between +6 and -7. Magmatic zircons with juvenile signatures, ɛHf(T) values from +17 to 0, were also found during the Oligocene to Quaternary in the southern Sistan suture zone and the Makran region. Significantly, the positive ɛHf(T) values

  13. Iran's Million-Student Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    The Islamic Azad University was founded by Hashemi Rafsanjani, a cleric who was in the past the first speaker of the Majlis, or Parliament, of Iran's postrevolutionary government. He served as president of Iran from 1989 to 1997 and ran for re-election in 2005, when he was defeated by Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. In the two decades after Azad was founded,…

  14. Preliminary Pollen Studies at Lake Zeribar, Zagros Mountains, Southwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    van Zeist, W; Wright, H E

    1963-04-05

    A late Pleistocene Artemisia steppe, implying a cool, dry climate, changed about 13,000 years ago to an oak-pistachio savanna, as the climate became warmer. About 5500 years ago the savanna thickened to an oak forest, presumably reflecting an increase in precipitation or decrease in temperature to modern levels.

  15. Natural Gas Exports from Iran

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

  16. Cigarette Smoking in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Meysamie, A; Ghaletaki, R; Zhand, N; Abbasi, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cigarette smoking is the largest preventable cause of death worldwide. No systematic review is available on the situation of the smoking in Iran, so we decided to provide an overview of the studies in the field of smoking in Iranian populations. Methods: Published Persian-language papers of all types until 2009 indexed in the IranMedex (http://www.iranmedex.com) and Magiran (http://www.magiran.com). Reports of World Health Organization were also searched and optionally employed. The studies concerning passive smoking or presenting the statistically insignificant side effects were excluded. Databases were searched using various combinations of the following terms: cigarette, smoking, smoking cessation, prevalence, history, side effects, and lung cancer by independent reviewers. All the 83 articles concerning the prevalence or side effects of the smoking habit in any Iranian population were selected. The prevalence rate of daily cigarette smoking and the 95% confidence interval as well as smoking health risk associated odds ratio (OR) were retrieved from the articles or calculated. Results: The reported prevalence rates of the included studies, the summary of smoking-related side effects and the ORs (95%CI) of smoking associated risks and the available data on smoking cessation in Iran have been shown in the article. Conclusion: Because of lack of certain data, special studies on local pattern of tobacco use in different districts, about the relationship between tobacco use and other diseases, especially non communicable diseases, and besides extension of smoking cessation strategies, studies on efficacy of these methods seems to be essential in this field. PMID:23113130

  17. Women, Change, and Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-22

    Women, Change, and Iran by MAJ Michelle M. T. Letcher U.S. Army School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) LETCHER, Michelle M. T., Major, USA 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 SCHOOL OF ADVANCED MILITARY STUDIES MONOGRAPH APPROVAL MAJ Michelle M.T. Letcher Title of

  18. Tertiary stress field evolution in Sistan (Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Jentzer; Marc, Fournier; Philippe, Agard; Jafar, Omrani

    2016-04-01

    The Sistan orogenic belt in eastern Iran, near the boundary with Afghanistan, results from the closure of a branch of the Neo-Thethys: the Sistan Ocean. It was divided by Tirrul et al. (1983) in five main units: the Lut (1) and Afghan (2) continental blocks where basement is exposed; the Neh (3) and Ratuk (4) complexes which display ophiolitic rocks weakly and highly (HP-BT) metamorphosed, respectively, and the Sefidabeh basin lying over these complexes and interpreted as a fore-arc basin. Sistan is bordered by the Makran and Zagros (formed by the closure of the Neo-Tethys) to the south and by the Kopet Dagh (formed by the closure of Paleo-Tethys) to the North. The aim of this study is to fill the gap between preliminary studies about the overall structure of the Sistan Suture Zone and recent investigations of active tectonics in the region (e.g., Walker et al., 2004 and 2006 a and b). Questions herein addressed are: (1) how are stresses transfered throughout Iran from the Zagros to the Sistan belts? (2) Did the Zagros, Makran and Sistan belts evolve independently through time, or were they mechanically coupled? In order to answer these questions, we have determined paleostress evolution in the Sistan, using a direct inversion method for 42 microtectonic sites in almost all lithologies of the Neh complex and the Sefidabeh basin. We find three successive directions of compression: (1) 87°N for the oldest deformation stage dated of the Late Miocene, (2) 59°N for the intermediate stage probably dated of the Early Pliocene, and (3) 26°N for the youngest stage dated of the Plio-Quaternary. A counterclockwise rotation of about 60° of the main stress (σ1) in less than 10 Ma is therefore documented in Sistan. These same three stages of deformation were also documented by several microtectonic studies in Iran, especially in Makran and Zagros. The direction of the youngest compression is very homogeneous indicating that the mountain belts and continental blocks of Iran

  19. Study on mycoflora of poultry feed ingredients and finished feed in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghaemmaghami, Seyed Soheil; Modirsaneii, Mehrdad; Khosravi, Ali Reza; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Unhygienic poultry feedstuffs can lead to nutrient losses and detrimental effect on poultry production and public health. In the present study, mycobiota and colony-forming units per gram in ingredients and finish poultry feed was evaluated with special reference to potentially mycotoxigenic fungi. Materials and Methods: Eighty five samples of corn, soybean meal and poultry finished feed were collected from nine poultry feed factories located in three provinces i.e. Tehran, Alborz and Qom in Iran from October 2014 to January 2015. Samples were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA), Aspergillus flavus and parasiticus agar (AFPA) and dichloran rosebengal chloramphenicol agar (DRBC) and incubated at 28 °C for 7–10 days. Purified fungal colonies were identified by a combination of macro- and microscopic morphological criteria. For determining the rate of fungal contamination, samples were cultured on SDA and colony forming units (CFUs) were calculated. Results: A total of 384 fungal isolates belonging to 7 genera of filamentous fungi and yeasts were obtained from corn (124 isolates), soybean meal (92 isolates), and feed before (72 isolates), and after pelleting (96 isolates). The most prominent fungal isolate in corn, soybean meal and feed before pelleting (feed as mash form) was Fusarium but in feed after pelleting was Aspergillus. Among 5 Aspergillus species isolated, potentially aflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates was predominant in corn (46.6%), soybean meal (72.7%) and poultry finished feed (75%). CFUs results indicated that 9/22 corn samples (40.9%), none of 22 soybean meal samples, 19/41 finished feed (46.3%) were contaminated higher than the standard limit. Conclusions: Our results indicated that corn, soybean meal and finished feed of poultry feed mill are contaminated with various fungal genera by different levels sometimes higher that the standard limits. Contamination with potentially mycotoxigenic fungi especially Aspergillus

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000654.htm Rocky Mountain spotted fever To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a disease caused by a type of ...

  1. Iran’s Security Dilemma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    see William 0. Beeman , "Images of the Great Satan: Representations of the United States in the Iranian Revolution," Religion and Politics in Iran...Books, 1984. Beeman , William 0., "Images of the Great Satan: Representations of the United States in the Iranian Revolution," Religion and Politics in...University Press, 1986. Wilber, Donald N., Iran: Past and Present, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1981. Woodward, Bob, veil, New York: Simon and

  2. Coping with a Nuclearizing Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    2010: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7386001.stm Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, Murder at Mykonos: Anatomy of a Political Assassination, New Haven...to international norms, is at peace with its neighbors, and respects human rights might still encourage other potential proliferators but would...direct involvement in the affair dampened Iranian-European rapprochement (Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, 2007). 12 Sadr, 2010. Iran’s

  3. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal stratification in Iran: relationship between Iran and the Arabian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Terreros, Maria C; Rowold, Diane J; Mirabal, Sheyla; Herrera, Rene J

    2011-03-01

    Modern day Iran is strategically located in the tri-continental corridor uniting Africa, Europe and Asia. Several ethnic groups belonging to distinct religions, speaking different languages and claiming divergent ancestries inhabit the region, generating a potentially diverse genetic reservoir. In addition, past pre-historical and historical events such as the out-of-Africa migrations, the Neolithic expansion from the Fertile Crescent, the Indo-Aryan treks from the Central Asian steppes, the westward Mongol expansions and the Muslim invasions may have chiseled their genetic fingerprints within the genealogical substrata of the Persians. On the other hand, the Iranian perimeter is bounded by the Zagros and Albrez mountain ranges, and the Dasht-e Kavir and Dash-e Lut deserts, which may have restricted gene flow from neighboring regions. By utilizing high-resolution mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) markers and reanalyzing our previously published Y-chromosomal data, we have found a previously unexplored, genetic connection between Iranian populations and the Arabian Peninsula, likely the result of both ancient and recent gene flow. Furthermore, the regional distribution of mtDNA haplogroups J, I, U2 and U7 also provides evidence of barriers to gene flow posed by the two major Iranian deserts and the Zagros mountain range.

  4. Lesson 2: Sacred Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Alton; Gilligan, Nancy; Golston, Syd; Linville, Rex

    1999-01-01

    Presents a lesson in which the students are divided into four Mountain Study Teams in order to examine a sacred mountain. Explains that the students in each group assume a particular role, such as an historian or scientist. Provides a profile on the four mountains and a definition of the seven student roles. (CMK)

  5. Managing Proliferation Issues with Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C. Richard; Saltiel, David H.

    2002-02-15

    Any government in Tehran will be inclined to seek weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and missile delivery options given the realities of its strategic environment. These weapons might help Iran to deter potential external threats, to achieve equality with other major regional powers armed with WMD, and to attain self-reliance in national security, given the isolating experience of arms embargoes. A more pluralist leadership in the future, however, may examine broader choices and trade-offs, and perhaps be less likely to cross key thresholds in WMD acquisition. In any event, Iran's WMD behavior is likely to be determined by both external factors, mainly the availability of crucial components, and internal factors, including calculations of costs, risks, and benefits. Among the benefits, psychological factors, such as prestige, will play an important role. Other important factors that might well shape Iran's WMD behavior include developments in Iraq, relations with the United States and other Gulf states, Israeli-Palestinian relations and the future price of oil. This paper offers recommendations on how the United States can best hope to influence Iranian decisions regarding the acquisition of WMD and missile delivery systems if the United States decides to pursue more direct engagement with Tehran. An engagement-nonproliferation strategy should involve at least three types of parallel efforts: public, private and indirect. Public efforts should seek to create a more positive, less-threatening image of the United States among opinion leaders in Iran. Private efforts should seek to determine the purposes, nature and extent of Iran's efforts to develop WMD and missiles and to suggest better alternatives for Iran's security and prestige needs. Indirect efforts should involve key third countries and organizations in an attempt both to address Iran's security concerns and to deny Iran access to critical WMD and missile technology and components. Russian policy, in

  6. Geochemical characterisation of pyrite oxidation and environmental problems related to release and transport of metals from a coal washing low-grade waste dump, Shahrood, northeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Doulati Ardejani, Faramarz; Jodieri Shokri, Behshad; Moradzadeh, Ali; Shafaei, Seyed Ziadin; Kakaei, Reza

    2011-12-01

    Pyrite oxidation and release of the oxidation products from a low-grade coal waste dump to stream, groundwater and soil was investigated by geochemical and hydrogeochemical techniques at Alborz Sharghi coal washing plant, Shahrood, northeast Iran. Hydrogeochemical analysis of water samples indicates that the metal concentrations in the stream waters were low. Moreover, the pH of the water showed no considerable change. The analysis of the stream water samples shows that except the physical changes, pyrite oxidation process within the coal washing waste dump has not affected the quality of the stream water. Water type was determined to be calcium sulphate. The results of the analysis of groundwater samples indicate that the pH varies from 7.41 to 7.51. The concentrations of the toxic metals were low. The concentration of SO4 is slightly above than its standard concentration in potable water. It seems that the groundwater less affected by the coal washing operation in the study area. Geochemical analysis of the sediment samples shows that Fe concentration decreases gradually downstream the waste dump with pH rising. SO(4) decreases rapidly downstream direction. Copper, Zn and Co concentrations decrease with distance from the waste dump due to a dilution effect by the mixing of uncontaminated sediments. These elements, in particular, Zn are considerably elevated in sediment sample collected at the nearest distance to the waste dump. There is no doubt that such investigations can help to develop an appropriate water remediation plan.

  7. Social Movements in Post-Revolutionary Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Iranian revolution, itself, planted their seeds in post-revolutionary Iran by its outcomes, which created political opportunities, mobilizing ...Iran, Islamic Republic of Iran, Iranian Domestic Politics, Social Movements, Political Opportunities, Mobilizing Structures and Resources, Framing...political opportunities, mobilizing structures, resources, and framing. Social movements became an alternative way of political participation

  8. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports...

  9. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports...

  10. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports...

  11. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports...

  12. 15 CFR 746.7 - Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Iran. 746.7 Section 746.7 Commerce and... § 746.7 Iran. The Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) administers a comprehensive trade and investment embargo against Iran. This embargo includes prohibitions on exports...

  13. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.

  14. IRAN: Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, E.; Vakili, F.; Schutz, A.; Lanteri, H.; Abe, L.; Belu, A.; Gori, P. M.; Lardière, O.; Lopez, B.; Menut, J. L.; Patru, F.

    IRAN is a method of beam-combination in the hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. We propose to observe the interferometric image in the pupil plane, performing multi-axial pupil plane interferometry. Imaging is performed in a combined pupil-plane where the point-source intensity distribution (PSID) tends towards a pseudo Airy disc for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. The image is concentrated into the limited support of the output pupil of the individual telescopes, in which the object-image convolution relation is conserved. Specific deconvolution algorithms have been developped for IRAN hypertelescope imagery, based upon Lucy-like iterative techniques. We show that the classical (image plane) and IRAN (pupil plane) hypertelescope imaging techniques are equivalent if one uses optical fibers for beam transportation. An application to the VLT/VIDA concept is presented.

  15. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs....

  16. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs....

  17. 31 CFR 560.516 - Transfers of funds involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transfers of funds involving Iran. 560... involving Iran. (a) United States depository institutions are authorized to process transfers of funds to or from Iran, or for the direct or indirect benefit of persons in Iran or the Government of Iran, if...

  18. 31 CFR 560.516 - Transfers of funds involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transfers of funds involving Iran. 560... involving Iran. (a) United States depository institutions are authorized to process transfers of funds to or from Iran, or for the direct or indirect benefit of persons in Iran or the Government of Iran, if...

  19. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs....

  20. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs....

  1. 31 CFR 535.433 - Central Bank of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Central Bank of Iran. 535.433 Section... § 535.433 Central Bank of Iran. The Central Bank of Iran (Bank Markazi Iran) is an agency, instrumentality and controlled entity of the Government of Iran for all purposes under this part. (Secs....

  2. 31 CFR 560.427 - Exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. 560.427 Section 560.427 Money and Finance..., reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. (a) The prohibition on the exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of...

  3. 31 CFR 560.427 - Exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. 560.427 Section 560.427 Money and Finance..., reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of Iran. (a) The prohibition on the exportation, reexportation, sale or supply of financial services to Iran or the Government of...

  4. Iran: Soviet Interests, US Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    progress- ing onward toward Zanjan, Qazvin , and ultimately to the western approaches to Tehran. Another two-pronged attack was launched simultaneously...their control over northern Iran, Russian forces occupied Tabriz in 1908 and ultimately marched as far south as Qazvin in the west and Mashhad in the

  5. The Clerical Establishment in Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Political Action and Legitimate Domi- nation in Shi’ite Iran: Fourteenth to Eighteenth Centuries, A.D.," Archives Europ~ennes de Sociologie , Vol. 20, No...139 Archives Europ6ennes de Sociologie Bours, (moderate centrist) weekly in Persian, Tehran Conflict Studies, quarterly in English, London Enghelab

  6. Late Pleistocene human remains from Wezmeh Cave, western Iran.

    PubMed

    Trinkaus, Erik; Biglari, Fereidoun; Mashkour, Marjan; Monchot, Hervé; Reyss, Jean-Louis; Rougier, Hélène; Heydari, Saman; Abdi, Kamyar

    2008-04-01

    Paleontological analysis of remains from Wezmeh Cave in western Iran have yielded a Holocene Chalcolithic archeological assemblage, a rich Late Pleistocene carnivore faunal assemblage, and an isolated unerupted human maxillary premolar (P(3) or possibly P(4)). Species representation and U-series dating of faunal teeth place the carnivore assemblage during oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 3 and 2, and noninvasive gamma spectrometry dating of the human premolar places it at least as old as early OIS 2. The human premolar crown morphology is not diagnostic of late archaic versus early modern human affinities, but its buccolingual diameter places it at the upper limits of Late Pleistocene human P(3) and P(4) dimensions and separate from a terminal Pleistocene regional sample. Wezmeh Cave therefore provides additional Paleolithic human remains from the Zagros Mountains and further documents Late Pleistocene human association with otherwise carnivore-dominated cave assemblages.

  7. Status of Iran's nuclear program and negotiations

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2014-05-09

    Iran's nuclear program poses immense challenges to international security. Its gas centrifuge program has grown dramatically in the last several years, bringing Iran close to a point where it could produce highly enriched uranium in secret or declared gas centrifuge plants before its breakout would be discovered and stopped. To reduce the risk posed by Iran's nuclear program, the P5+1 have negotiated with Iran short term limits on the most dangerous aspects of its nuclear programs and is negotiating long-term arrangements that can provide assurance that Iran will not build nuclear weapons. These long-term arrangements need to include a far more limited and transparent Iranian nuclear program. In advance of arriving at a long-term arrangement, the IAEA will need to resolve its concerns about the alleged past and possibly on-going military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program.

  8. Iran: The Next Nuclear Threshold State?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    conversion to metallic, hemispheric shapes.244 IAEA inspections conducted in 2010 revealed that Iran received uranium from China and samples of polonium - 210 ...Security, accessed June 16, 2014. http://www.isisnucleariran.org/sites/detail/arak/. 210 WNA, “Nuclear Power in Iran.” 211 Ibid. 212 Pollack...Ambitions, 210 . 272 Solingen, Nuclear Logics, 165–166. 273 Pollack, Unthinkable: Iran, 39. 66 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 67 VI

  9. A new flea from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Darvishi, Mohammad Mehdi; Youssefi, Mohammad Reza; Changizi, Emad; Lima, Rasoul Rostami; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi

    2014-01-01

    Fleas are obligatory ectoparsites of humans and animals. These tiny insects are hematophagous and they can transmit a wide varity of disease agents to humans and domesticated animals. Indeed, this pest causes a considerable economic damages and health dangers particularly in tropical and subtropical. During an investigation on ectoparasites of five Mus muscuuls in Semnan province, Iran, 15 fleas (8 males and 7 females) were collected. The extracted fleas mounted using clearing, dehydrating, mounting process and preserved with Canada balsam. After precise study, all of examined specimens were recognized as Leptopsylla aethiopicus aethiopicus using available systematic keys. This is the first report of this genus and species in Iran. And this country is new locality for Leptopsylla aethiopicus aethiopicus.

  10. Reassessing US Policy Toward Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Islamic-governed society will act. These are the sort of issues with which St. Augustine, St. Thomas of Aquinas , Hobbes, Locke, and others struggled...and Attitudes, Thomas L. Friedman identifies three American schools of thought regarding policy toward Iran; those who advocate rolling back the...issue. In his book, The Lexus and the Olive Tree, Thomas L. Friedman offers the following passage: “...my old two-dimensional view of the world was

  11. Mountain regions in peril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The United Nations has declared 2002 the International Year of Mountains (IYM) to bring attention to a number of threats that affect ecosystems and human populations in mountainous and highland regions around the world.“More than half of humanity—3 billion people—relies on mountains for safe, fresh water, water to grow food, to produce electricity to sustain industries and, most important, water to drink,“ said Jacques Diouf, director-general of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the primary IYM sponsor. “Yet, mountain glaciers, the source of water for many of the world's river systems and people, are melting at unprecedented rates.”

  12. Acute mountain sickness

    MedlinePlus

    High altitude cerebral edema; Altitude anoxia; Altitude sickness; Mountain sickness; High altitude pulmonary edema ... If you have fluid in your lungs (pulmonary edema), treatment may include: Oxygen A high blood pressure ...

  13. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  14. Mountain Rivers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-12-01

    Published in 2000, the original Mountain Rivers was written to provide a concise summary of the scientific understanding of the distinct subset of rivers that gave the book its name. Spurred by developments in the field in the past decade, the book's author, Ellen Wohl, produced Mountain Rivers Revisited, an updated edition aimed at graduate students and professional researchers. In this interview, Eos talks to Wohl about steep channels, climate change, and opportunities for future research.

  15. Organic contaminants in mountains.

    PubMed

    Daly, Gillian L; Wania, Frank

    2005-01-15

    The study of organic contaminants at high altitudes is motivated by the potential risk that they pose to humans living in, or depending on resources derived from, mountains and to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in alpine areas. Mountains are also ideal settings to study contaminant transport and behavior along gradients of climate and surface cover. Information on organic contaminants in mountains is compiled from the literature and synthesized, with a focus on atmospheric transport and deposition, contaminant dynamics in alpine lakes and aquatic organisms, and concentration differences with altitude. Diurnal mountain winds, in connection with enhanced deposition at higher elevations caused by low temperatures and high precipitation rates, conspire to make mid-latitude mountains become convergence zones for selected persistent organic chemicals. In particular, the more volatile constituents of contaminant mixtures seem to become enriched, relative to the less volatile constituents at higher altitudes. For selected contaminants, concentration inversions (i.e., concentrations that increase with elevation) have been observed. A notable difference between cold trapping in high latitudes and high altitudes is the likely importance of precipitation. High rates of snow deposition in mid- and high-latitude mountains may lead to a large contaminant release during snowmelt. Regions above the tree line often have little capacity to retain the released contaminants, suggesting the potential for a highly dynamic contaminant fate situation during the snow-free season with significant revolatilization and runoff. The chemical and environmental factors that control the orographic cold trapping of organic contaminants should be examined further by measuring and comparatively interpreting concentration gradients along several mountain slopes with widely different characteristics. Future efforts should further focus on the bioaccumulation and potential effects of contaminants in

  16. Diversity of beet curly top Iran virus isolated from different hosts in Iran.

    PubMed

    Gharouni Kardani, Sara; Heydarnejad, Jahangir; Zakiaghl, Mohammad; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Kraberger, Simona; Varsani, Arvind

    2013-06-01

    Beet curly top Iran virus (BCTIV) is a major pathogen of sugar beet in Iran. In order to study diversity of BCTIV, we sampled 68 plants in Iran during the summer of 2010 with curly top disease symptoms on beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.), sea beets (Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima), and sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). Plant samples showing leaf curling, yellowing, and/or swelling of veins on the lower leaf surfaces were collected from various fields in Khorasan Razavi, Northern Khorasan (north-eastern Iran), East Azarbayejan, West Azarbayejan (north-western Iran), and Fars (southern Iran) provinces. Using rolling circle amplification coupled with restriction digests, cloning, and Sanger sequencing, we determined the genomes of nine new BCTIV isolates from bean, cowpea, tomato, sea beet, and sugar beet in Iran. Our analysis reveals ~11 % diversity amongst BCTIV isolates and we detect evidence of recombination within these genomes.

  17. The state of the environment in Iran.

    PubMed

    Zekavat, S M

    1997-06-01

    This article describes environmental conditions in Iran including air pollution, pesticide pollution, soil depletion and erosion, water pollution, natural resource loss, lack of appropriate waste management, lead poisoning, and desertification. Environmental policy and implementation is described under the Shah and the Islamic Republic. Iran is beset with interrelated problems of environmental degradation, unemployment, poverty, and population growth. Sustainability is being undermined at the cost of future generations. In 1995, Iran had a population of 67 million and a growth rate of 3.6%. Population is expected to exceed 100 million by the year 2000. The country is having difficulty in maintaining its current infrastructure, housing, food, and educational facilities. Competition for admission in higher education discourages women. Women with lower levels of education results in continued supremacy of men over women, more polygamy, and a lower quality of life for women. Iran was food self-sufficient in 1970, and exported its surplus. Today, Iran may be permanently dependent on food imports. Iran has abundant oil reserves, natural gas, copper, lead, and marketable items. Exchanging natural resources for food and technology has time and resource limits. Iran needs monetary assistance from wealthy nations. Population growth leads to increased demand for infrastructure and resources. Iran has signed many international environmental agreements and has enacted detailed environmental policies and regulations, but actual enforcement is lacking.

  18. Reflections on Foreign Language Education in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farhady, Hossein; Hezaveh, Fattaneh Sajadi; Hedayati, Hora

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects upon foreign-language education in Iran. Contrary to its political and historical reputation in the world, Iran has not been well presented regarding its educational system in general and its foreign-language education in particular. Of course, a critical assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the Iranian education…

  19. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity owned...

  20. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any...

  1. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity owned...

  2. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any...

  3. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any...

  4. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any entity owned...

  5. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... Definitions § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof, including...

  6. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any...

  7. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any...

  8. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any...

  9. 31 CFR 560.304 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Government of Iran. 560.304 Section... Definitions § 560.304 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof, including...

  10. 31 CFR 561.321 - Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Government of Iran. 561.321 Section... Definitions § 561.321 Government of Iran. The term Government of Iran includes: (a) The state and the Government of Iran, as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof; (b) Any...

  11. 31 CFR 535.301 - Iran; Iranian Entity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Iran; Iranian Entity. 535.301 Section... § 535.301 Iran; Iranian Entity. (a) The term Iran and Iranian Entity includes: (1) The state and the Government of Iran as well as any political subdivision, agency, or instrumentality thereof or any...

  12. 78 FR 46782 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Iran Threat Reduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... RIN 9000-AM44 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Iran Threat Reduction AGENCIES: Department of Defense... expansion of sanctions relating to the energy sector of Iran and sanctions with respect to Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps, as contained in titles II and III of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human...

  13. A new genus and species of edaphic mite (Acari: esostigmata: Eviphididae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Joharchi, Omid; Mašán, Peter; Babaeian, Esmaeil

    2014-03-06

    The new genus Pedoniphis gen. nov. (Acari: Mesostigmata: Eviphididae) is described from soil detritus in Sabalan Mountains, northwest Iran, with P. persicus sp. nov. as type species. Among known eviphidid genera, the new genus is the most similar to Scamaphis Karg and Scarabacariphis Mašán and it can be distinguished especially by the dorsal chaetotaxy (setae J2 absent, setae J5 rudimentary) and the specific form of the peritrematal-dorsal scutal complex (peritrematal shields reduced; peritremes well developed, fused to lateral margins of dorsal shield).

  14. Thin-skinned tectonics in the Central Basin of the Iranian Plateau in the Semnan area, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzari, Soheila; Konon, Andrzej; Koprianiuk, Marek; Julapour, Ali A.

    2013-01-01

    During continent-continent convergence of the Arabian and Eurasian plates, and after the late Eocene inversion of a back-arc rift, the Iranian Plateau underwent broad subsidence resulting in the formation of the Central Basin (Morley et al., 2009). New 2D seismic data acquired by National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) in the NW-SW-trending arm of the Central Basin suggest that during the main stage of shortening (middle-late? Miocene to Pliocene), strain concentrations resulted in the development of the thin-skinned Kuh-e-Gachab, Kuh-e-Gugerd, Garmsar and Sorkh-e-Kuh structures. These structures are built of Oligocene-Miocene/Pliocene(?) rocks belonging to the Lower Red, Qom and Upper Red formations. Seismic data suggest that one of these structures comprises the south-verging Kuh-e-Gachab anticline, which is bounded by the N-dipping Kuh-e-Gachab thrust and cored by a complex array of thrust sheets forming a triangle zone. During the deformation process, two salt evaporate levels played a significant role as detachment horizons. The main detachment horizon was rooted within the Lower Red Formation, whereas the second detachment horizon was located along evaporites belonging to the Upper Red Formation. Variations in the thin-skinned style of deformation between the larger triangle zone in the western part of the Kuh-e-Gachab structure contrasts with less shortening in the smaller triangle zone to the east. This suggests that the change resulted from the increase of thickness of the mobile detachment horizon to the east. Contraction deformations are still active south of the Alborz Mountains, which is confirmed by GPS data and present-day seismicity.

  15. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as...

  16. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise...

  17. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise...

  18. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology, or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as...

  19. 31 CFR 560.205 - Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons... Prohibitions § 560.205 Prohibited reexportation of goods, technology or services to Iran or the Government of Iran by persons other than United States persons; exceptions. (a) Except as otherwise...

  20. Archaeocyathan buildups within an entirely siliciclastic succession: New discovery in the Toyonian Lalun Formation of northern Iran, the Proto-Paleotethys passive margin of northern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasemi, Yaghoob; Amin-Rasouli, Hadi

    2007-10-01

    Meter-scale buildups constructed exclusively by archaeocyaths have been recognized within the uppermost Lower Cambrian siliciclastic succession of Eastern Alborz in northern Iran. They are the only known Toyonian reefs in Iran and adjacent countries and occur in the lower part of the Shale unit of the Lalun Formation. The reefs are of limited lateral extent, reach a maximum thickness of 2.5 m and consist of several reef complexes containing cabbage- or sack-shaped buildups surrounded by well-bedded, colored shale. Each reef complex in the main reef zone consists of meter-scale individual and kalyptrate (compound) buildups that are overgrown by laminated stromatolite. The individual buildups are 12 to 75 cm thick and 5 to 50 cm in diameter, but the compound buildups are up to 2 m thick and their diameter ranges from 75 to 120 cm. In contrast to most Lower Cambrian reefs, these compound buildups demonstrate a complete ecological succession including pioneer and climax phases. Archaeocyaths in the buildups are solitary and colonial types showing great diversity of growth forms, with vase-, bowl- and cup-shaped and cylindrical forms present. The cups range from less than 1 mm to 1.5 cm in diameter and are up to 4 cm tall in the majority of the skeletons, but they may reach up to 4 cm in diameter in the massive colonial forms or in the branching forms of the upper outer part of the compound bioherms. The limited lateral extent of the reef horizons, and lateral facies changes in the colored shale toward various reefs supports deposition in drowned tidal channels in an estuarine depositional environment. A change of the individual bioherms to larger compound buildups suggests lateral depth variation of the tidal channels. Partial infilling of the primary inter-biohermal cavities by large reef clasts and cross-laminated siltstone to very fine sandstone suggests occasional disturbances by storms and periodic influx of coarse siliciclastics. In striking contrast to other

  1. WILSON MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromfield, Calvin S.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The Wilson Mountains Wilderness consists of about 68 sq mi in the San Miguel Mountains in southwestern Colorado. Based on a mineral survey two areas in the wilderness have a probable mineral-resource potential. One area is on the east margin of the area in the Trout Lake mining district, and the other is near the center of the area, the Mount Wilson mining district. Both areas have had a modest base and (or) precious metal production from narrow veins and have a probable potential for the occurrence of similar deposits. Of more significance is a probable mineral-resource potential for disseminated copper mineralization in the Mount Wilson mining district.

  2. Mountain Home Well - Photos

    DOE Data Explorer

    Shervais, John

    2012-01-11

    The Snake River Plain (SRP), Idaho, hosts potential geothermal resources due to elevated groundwater temperatures associated with the thermal anomaly Yellowstone-Snake River hotspot. Project HOTSPOT has coordinated international institutions and organizations to understand subsurface stratigraphy and assess geothermal potential. Over 5.9km of core were drilled from three boreholes within the SRP in an attempt to acquire continuous core documenting the volcanic and sedimentary record of the hotspot: (1) Kimama, (2) Kimberly, and (3) Mountain Home. The Mountain Home drill hole is located along the western plain and documents older basalts overlain by sediment. Data submitted by project collaborator Doug Schmitt, University of Alberta

  3. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  4. Ten years of snakebites in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Fathi, Behrooz; Shahi, Morteza Panjeh; Jazayeri, Mehrdad

    2014-11-01

    Many species of venomous snakes are found in Iran. The most medically important species which are responsible for the most snakebite incidents in Iran belong to the Viperidae family, including Vipera lebetina, Echis carinatus, Pseudocerastes persicus, Vipera albicornuta and the Elapidae family, especially Naja naja oxiana. At least one kind of venomous snake is found in each of the 31 provinces, and many provinces have more than one venomous species. As a result, snakebite is a considerable health hazard in Iran, especially in the rural area of south and south-west of Iran. A retrospective, descriptive study of snakebite in Iran during 2002-2011 was carried out in order based on data collected from medical records of bite victims admitted to hospitals and health centers. From 2002 to 2011, 53,787 cases of snake bites were reported by medical centers in Iran. The annual incidence of snake bites in 100,000 of population varied from 4.5 to 9.1 during this decade and the number of recorded deaths were about 67 cases. The highest rate of snakebite was found in provinces of south and southwest of Iran. We suggest that people, especially in the rural areas, need to be trained and educated about venomous snakes, their hazards, prevention of bite and the importance of early hospital referral and treatment of victims. Also adequate antivenins as the main life saving medicine should be made available based on the recorded numbers of victims in each area of the country.

  5. Coding and traceability in Iran.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan

    2010-11-01

    Transplantation has a long history in Iran. Cornea was the first tissue transplantation in 1935. The Central Eye Bank of Iran was established in 1991 and the Iranian Tissue Bank (ITB) in 1994. Now, there are also some private cell and tissue banks in the country, that produce different tissue grafts such as homograft heart valves, musculoskeletal tissues, soft tissues, cartilages, pericardium, amniotic membrane and some cell based products. There is not a separate legislation for tissue transplantation but the legal framework for tissue donation is based on the "Deceased or Brain dead patient organ transplantation" act (passed on April 6, 2000). For tissue banking there is no regulatory oversight by the national health authority. To increase the level of safety and considering the importance of effective traceability, each tissue bank has its own policy and terminology for coding and documentation without any correlation to others. In some cases tissue banks have implemented ISO based standards (i.e., ISO 9001) as a basic quality management system.

  6. National Immunization Program in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Esteghamati, Abdoulreza

    2013-01-01

    The national immunization program of Iran has played an important role in achievements toward the control, elimination and eradication of some important infectious diseases. However, there are challenges regarding both diseases covered by the program and the type of vaccine or route of delivery, which are discussed in this Commentary. The current immunization program does not provide vaccines for rotavirus, Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), varicella, pneumococcal and influenza. There are also issues regarding use of oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) instead of inactivated vaccine (IPV) and whole cell pertussis (wP) instead of acellular pertussis vaccine (aP). We have reviewed the evidence regarding these immunization issues; it seems that at least for rotavirus and Hib, there is sufficient evidence regarding the efficiency of vaccination in Iran. OPV is currently preferred because of the endemic situation of polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan (eastern neighbors) and considerations of efficiency. More data are needed for the analysis of policies on pneumococcal and influenza vaccines and aP vaccine. PMID:23442584

  7. The Strongest Mountain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monnes, Colleen

    2004-01-01

    The article describes an activity for the author's fifth-grade students called "build the strongest mountain." To them, it was not a lesson--it was a challenge. To the author, it was an activity that turned a run-of-the-mill Earth science unit into a terrific opportunity for students to demonstrate their knowledge of erosion and develop…

  8. The Mountaineer Minority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egerton, John; Gaillard, Frye

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the new Appalachian movement, based on the assumption that mountain people are a distinct and maligned cultural minority; the people of Appalachia, white, black and red, have begun to strike back against the dam-builders, strip-miners, and others they say are gouging out the region's mineral resources by the cheapest means possible no…

  9. Rocky Mountain High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David

    2001-01-01

    Describes Colorado's Eagle Rock School, which offers troubled teens a fresh start by transporting them to a tuition- free campus high in the mountains. The program encourages spiritual development as well as academic growth. The atmosphere is warm, loving, structured, and nonthreatening. The article profiles several students' experiences at the…

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jennan

    2017-01-01

    The tick-borne disease Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) can have deadly outcomes unless treated appropriately, yet nonspecific flu-like symptoms complicate diagnosis. Occupational health nurses must have a high index of suspicion with symptomatic workers and recognize that recent recreational or occupational activities with potential tick exposure may suggest RMSF.

  11. DOE's Yucca Mountain Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This booklet is about the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in the United States with a particular focus on Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a repository site. Intended for readers who do not have a technical background, the booklet discusses why scientists and engineers think high-level nuclear waste may be disposed of safely underground. An…

  12. The genetics of an early Neolithic pastoralist from the Zagros, Iran.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Llorente, M; Connell, S; Jones, E R; Merrett, D C; Jeon, Y; Eriksson, A; Siska, V; Gamba, C; Meiklejohn, C; Beyer, R; Jeon, S; Cho, Y S; Hofreiter, M; Bhak, J; Manica, A; Pinhasi, R

    2016-08-09

    The agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39x) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding, ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most similar to hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus, but distinct from the Neolithic Anatolian people who later brought food production into Europe. The inhabitants of Ganj Dareh made little direct genetic contribution to modern European populations, suggesting those of the Central Zagros were somewhat isolated from other populations of the Fertile Crescent. Runs of homozygosity are of a similar length to those from Neolithic farmers, and shorter than those of Caucasus and Western Hunter-Gatherers, suggesting that the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh did not undergo the large population bottleneck suffered by their northern neighbours. While some degree of cultural diffusion between Anatolia, Western Iran and other neighbouring regions is possible, the genetic dissimilarity between early Anatolian farmers and the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh supports a model in which Neolithic societies in these areas were distinct.

  13. The genetics of an early Neolithic pastoralist from the Zagros, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gallego-Llorente, M.; Connell, S.; Jones, E. R.; Merrett, D. C.; Jeon, Y.; Eriksson, A.; Siska, V.; Gamba, C.; Meiklejohn, C.; Beyer, R.; Jeon, S.; Cho, Y. S.; Hofreiter, M.; Bhak, J.; Manica, A.; Pinhasi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39x) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding, ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most similar to hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus, but distinct from the Neolithic Anatolian people who later brought food production into Europe. The inhabitants of Ganj Dareh made little direct genetic contribution to modern European populations, suggesting those of the Central Zagros were somewhat isolated from other populations of the Fertile Crescent. Runs of homozygosity are of a similar length to those from Neolithic farmers, and shorter than those of Caucasus and Western Hunter-Gatherers, suggesting that the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh did not undergo the large population bottleneck suffered by their northern neighbours. While some degree of cultural diffusion between Anatolia, Western Iran and other neighbouring regions is possible, the genetic dissimilarity between early Anatolian farmers and the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh supports a model in which Neolithic societies in these areas were distinct. PMID:27502179

  14. 31 CFR 560.303 - Iran; Iranian.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... claims sovereignty, sovereign rights or jurisdiction, provided that the Government of Iran exercises partial or total de facto control over the area or derives a benefit from economic activity in the...

  15. Crystal in Iran: methamphetamine or heroin kerack

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, methamphetamine use has dramatically increased in Iran while there is a crucial misunderstanding about the colloquial words related to methamphetamine among health providers, policy makers, clinicians, scholars and people in the community. The word Crystal refers to methamphetamine in some parts of Iran while in some other parts of the country, Crystal refers to a high purity street-level heroin which is called Kerack and its abuse is epidemic. Methamphetamine and heroin Kerack are different drugs in Iran. Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug while heroin Kerack is an opioid. Health providers especially clinicians and emergency medicine specialists should consider colloquial words that Iranian drug users apply. Special training courses should be designed and implemented for clinicians in Iran to inform them about methamphetamine and its frequently used colloquial words in the community. This issue has important clinical and health implications. PMID:23497450

  16. Iran’s Nuclear Program: Status

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-25

    resolution February 4, 2006, that referred the matter to the Security Council. Two days later, Tehran announced that it would stop implementing its...35 Sylvia Westall, “Iran Wants New Nuclear Fuel Talks, Deepening Doubts,” Reuters, November 2, 2009; “Iran to Seek Fuel Supply Guarantees...180 days before introducing nuclear material into it.49 If Tehran does not alter this decision, the agency will receive considerably later notice about

  17. Lessons Learned: The Iran-Iraq War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    initiation of Iran’s human wave attacks) the Syrians cut off Iraq’s major oil pipeline to the Mediterannean , leaving it with only one oil outlet through...When one adds to this the fact that Iran inducted Basij for brief three-month tours. freeing them to return home in time for planting , the comparison...electric grids, sugar factories, concrete plants , and whatever vital facilities existed inside the country. In the past the Iraqis had targeted these

  18. The first southwest Asian record of the subfamily Microdontinae, and the description of a new species of Metadon Reemer from Iran (Diptera: Syrphidae).

    PubMed

    Gilasian, Ebrahim; Reemer, Menno; Parchami-Araghi, Mehrdad

    2015-12-15

    Metadon persicus Gilasian & Reemer sp. nov. is described, based on a single female specimen from the Zagros mountains in Iran. Morphological variation among the members of the genus Metadon Reemer and their distribution in the world are discussed. Photographs of the new species are provided. The subfamily Microdontinae represents a new taxon for southwestern Asia and the genus Metadon is reported from the western Palaearctic region for the first time.

  19. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran.

    PubMed

    Keshtkar-Jahromi, Maryam; Sajadi, Mohammad M; Ansari, Hossein; Mardani, Masoud; Holakouie-Naieni, Kourosh

    2013-10-01

    The presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) in Iran was first identified in studies of livestock sera and ticks in the 1970s, but the first human infection was not diagnosed until 1999. Since that time, the number of cases of CCHF in Iran has markedly increased. Through January 2012, articles in the published literature have reported a total of 870 confirmed cases, with 126 deaths, for a case fatality rate (CFR) of 17.6%. The disease has been seen in 26 of the country's 31 provinces, with the greatest number of cases in Sistan and Baluchestan, Isfahan, Fars, Tehran, Khorasan, and Khuzestan provinces. The increase in CCHF in Iran has paralleled that in neighboring Turkey, though the number of cases in Turkey has been much larger, with an overall CFR of around 5%. In this article, we review the features of CCHF in Iran, including its history, epidemiology, animal and tick reservoirs, current surveillance and control programs, diagnostic methods, clinical features and experience with ribavirin therapy, and consider possible explanations for the difference in the CFR of CCHF between Iran and Turkey. The emergence of CCHF in Iran calls for countermeasures at many levels to protect the population, but also provides opportunities for studying the epidemiology, diagnosis and management of the disease.

  20. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Lacz, N L; Schwartz, R A; Kapila, R

    2006-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an unusual but important dermatological condition to identify without hesitation. The classic triad of headache, fever, and a rash that begins on the extremities and travels proximally to involve the trunk is found in a majority of patients. The cutaneous centripetal pattern is a result of cell to cell migration by the causative organism Rickettsia rickettsii. Such individuals should receive prompt antimicrobial therapy and supportive care to avoid serious and potentially fatal complications.

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Kamper, C A; Chessman, K H; Phelps, S J

    1988-02-01

    The epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever are reviewed. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a severe infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii transmitted to man by various species of ticks. High-incidence areas exist in the southeast and south central United States. Only 60-70% of patients with the disease report a history of tick bite or exposure to tick-infested areas. The disease is initially characterized by fever, headache, gastrointestinal complaints, myalgia, and a generalized rash. In several days generalized vasculitis may lead to periorbital edema and nonpitting edema of the face and extremities. Central nervous system involvement is common. Because signs and symptoms associated with the disease are nonspecific, the diagnosis is often delayed or missed. Traditionally diagnostic confirmation relied on serologic testing, but an indirect fluorescent antibody assay will soon be commercially available. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is usually treated with the rickettsiostatic agents chloramphenicol or tetracycline, but few comparative data on these agents in patients with the disease are available. For patients who cannot tolerate oral medications, intravenous chloramphenicol sodium succinate is the preferred treatment; chloramphenicol is also the drug of choice for children less than eight years of age. Otherwise, oral tetracycline hydrochloride is the drug of choice. Antibiotic therapy should be continued for 7-10 days or until the patient is afebrile for two to five days. All cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever must be reported to the Centers for Disease Control. The best ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality of the disease are to increase awareness of its signs and symptoms and to prevent exposure to ticks.

  2. Patient-centred mountain medicine.

    PubMed

    Szawarski, Piotr; Hillebrandt, David

    2016-08-01

    Venturing into the mountains, doctors have accompanied expeditions to provide routine care to the teams, undertake research and occasionally take on a rescue role. The role of doctors practicing mountain medicine is evolving. Public health issues involving concepts of health and safety have become necessary with the coming of commercial and youth expeditions. Increasingly individuals with a disability or a medical diagnosis choose to ascend to high altitudes. Doctors become involved in assessment of risk and providing advice for such individuals. The field of mountain medicine is perhaps unique in that acceptance of risk is part of the ethos of climbing and adventure. The pursuit of mountaineering goals may represent the ultimate conquest of a disability. Knowledge of mountain environment is essential in facilitating mountain ascents for those who choose to undertake them, in spite of a disability or medical condition.

  3. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment or transit through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Transshipment or transit through Iran... REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment or transit through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204... transit of goods or technology through Iran to third countries....

  4. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment or transit through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transshipment or transit through Iran... REGULATIONS Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment or transit through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204... transit of goods or technology through Iran to third countries....

  5. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification. (1) As required by the Iran Sanctions Act, unless an exception applies or a waiver is granted...

  6. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification. (1) As required by the Iran Sanctions Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 note), unless an exception applies...

  7. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries....

  8. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification—(1) Certification relating to activities described in section 5 of the Iran Sanctions Act. As required by section...

  9. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  10. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification—(1) Certification relating to activities described in section 5 of the Iran Sanctions Act. As required by section...

  11. 48 CFR 25.703-2 - Iran Sanctions Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Iran Sanctions Act. 25.703... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Prohibited Sources 25.703-2 Iran Sanctions Act. (a) Certification. (1) As required by the Iran Sanctions Act, unless an exception applies or a waiver is granted...

  12. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries....

  13. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  14. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  15. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  16. 15 CFR 742.8 - Anti-terrorism: Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anti-terrorism: Iran. 742.8 Section... BASED CONTROLS § 742.8 Anti-terrorism: Iran. (a) License Requirements. (1) A license is required for anti-terrorism purposes to export or reexport to Iran any item for which AT column 1 or AT column 2...

  17. 31 CFR 560.403 - Transshipment through Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transshipment through Iran. 560.403... Interpretations § 560.403 Transshipment through Iran. The prohibitions in §§ 560.204, 560.206 and 560.208 apply to... through Iran to third countries....

  18. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran. PMID:26478671

  19. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Iran.

    PubMed

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2015-10-14

    In Iran, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is relatively low according to the population-based epidemiological studies. However, the epidemiology of HCV is changing and the rate of HCV infection is increasing due to the growth in the number of injecting drug users in the society. In addition, a shift has occurred in the distribution pattern of HCV genotypes among HCV-infected patients in Iran. Genotype 1a is the most prevalent genotype in Iran, but in recent years, an increase in the frequency of 3a and a decrease in 1a and 1b have been reported. These variations in the epidemiology of HCV reflect differences in the routes of transmission, status of public health, lifestyles, and risk factors in different groups and geographic regions of Iran. Health policy makers should consider these differences to establish better strategies for control and prevention of HCV infection. Therefore, this review was conducted to present a clear view regarding the current epidemiology of HCV infection in Iran.

  20. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever].

    PubMed

    Reinauer, K M; Jaschonek, K; Kusch, G; Heizmann, W R; Döller, P C; Jenss, H

    1990-01-12

    After returning from a holiday in the USA a 24-year-old man fell ill with diarrhoea, high fever and marked rash including the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. When a history of a tick bite in the USA was elicited, a rickettsial infection was suspected. Treatment with doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily, was instituted finally and the fever slowly resolved. The patient became completely well again within four weeks. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  1. 78 FR 21183 - Persons on Whom Sanctions Have Been Imposed Under the Iran Sanctions Act of 1996 and the Iran...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... on Whom Sanctions Have Been Imposed Under the Iran Sanctions Act of 1996 and the Iran Threat... persons have engaged in sanctionable activity described in section 5(a)(8) of the Iran Sanctions Act of...''), that the following persons have engaged in sanctionable activity described in section 212 of the...

  2. Domestic Abuse in Behshahr, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahmatian, Ali Akbar; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The United Nations in a resolution defined abuse as any violent act that is primarily or exclusively committed against females and results in physical, sexual and psychological harm. Objectives: The aim of this research was to study the contributing factors of husband’s violence against females residing in the city of Behshahr, Iran. Materials and Methods: We distributed a specifically designed questionnaire among 380 married females aged between 15 and 65 years. According to the Morgan table, the subjects were randomly selected from a list of 301000 females. Demographic data and data on spouse abuse were then analyzed using the SPSS software, Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficients. According to Cronbach’s alpha, the reliability of the questionnaire was 0.96. Results: All of the females reported at least one form of violence within the past year, with R square 0.20, indicating that the independent variable can explain 20% of the violence against females. years of marriage, female’s education, male’s addiction and the number of children each had their share in the explanation of violence against females. Conclusions: This study revealed a high prevalence of domestic violence in the sample population. Violence existed among all ages, social categories and male occupational groups, and also involved both employed and unemployed females. The situation regarding domestic abuse is similar worldwide. PMID:26834799

  3. IRAN: interferometric remapped array nulling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristidi, Eric; Vakili, Farrokh; Abe, Lyu; Belu, Adrian; Lopez, Bruno; Lanteri, Henri; Schutz, A.; Menut, Jean-Luc

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a method of beam-combination in the so-called hypertelescope imaging technique recently introduced by Labeyrie in optical interferometry. The method we propose is an alternative to the Michelson pupil reconfiguration that suffers from the loss of the classical object-image convolution relation. From elementary theory of Fourier optics we demonstrate that this problem can be solved by observing in a combined pupil plane instead of an image plane. The point-source intensity distribution (PSID) of this interferometric "image" tends towards a psuedo Airy disc (similar to that of a giant monolithic telescope) for a sufficiently large number of telescopes. Our method is applicable to snap-shot imaging of extended sources with a field comparable to the Airy pattern of single telescopes operated in a co-phased multi-aperture interferometric array. It thus allows to apply conveniently pupil plane coronagraphy. Our technique called Interferometric Remapped Array Nulling (IRAN) is particularly suitable for high dynamic imaging of extra-solar planetary companions, circumstellar nebulosities or extra-galactic objects where long baseline interferometry would closely probe the central regions of AGNs for instance.

  4. Otomycosis in iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Gharaghani, Maral; Seifi, Zahra; Zarei Mahmoudabadi, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Fungal infection of the external auditory canal (otitis externa and otomycosis) is a chronic, acute, or subacute superficial mycotic infection that rarely involves middle ear. Otomycosis (swimmer's ear) is usually unilateral infection and affects more females than males. The infection is usually symptomatic and main symptoms are pruritus, otalgia, aural fullness, hearing impairment, otorrhea, and tinnitus. Fungal species such as yeasts, molds, dermatophytes, and Malassezia species are agents for otitis externa. Among molds, Aspergillus niger was described as the most common agent in the literature. Candida albicans was more prevalent than other yeast species. Otomycosis has a worldwide distribution, but the prevalence of infection is related to the geographical location, areas with tropical and subtropical climate showing higher prevalence rates. Otomycosis is a secondary infection and is more prevalent among swimmers. As a result, a higher incidence is reported in summer season, when more people interested in swimming. Incidence of otomycosis in our review ranged from 5.7 to 81 %, with a mean value of 51.3 %. Our results showed that 78.59 % of otomycosis agents were Aspergillus, 16.76 % were Candida species, and the rest (4.65 %) were other saprophytic fungi. Among Iranian patients, incidence of infection was highest in summer, followed by autumn, winter, and spring. In Iran, otomycosis was most prevalent at the age of 20-40 years and the lowest prevalence was associated with being <10 years old. The sex ratio of otomycosis in our study was (M/F) 1:1.53.

  5. Human impacts to mountain streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen

    2006-09-01

    Mountain streams are here defined as channel networks within mountainous regions of the world. This definition encompasses tremendous diversity of physical and biological conditions, as well as history of land use. Human effects on mountain streams may result from activities undertaken within the stream channel that directly alter channel geometry, the dynamics of water and sediment movement, contaminants in the stream, or aquatic and riparian communities. Examples include channelization, construction of grade-control structures or check dams, removal of beavers, and placer mining. Human effects can also result from activities within the watershed that indirectly affect streams by altering the movement of water, sediment, and contaminants into the channel. Deforestation, cropping, grazing, land drainage, and urbanization are among the land uses that indirectly alter stream processes. An overview of the relative intensity of human impacts to mountain streams is provided by a table summarizing human effects on each of the major mountainous regions with respect to five categories: flow regulation, biotic integrity, water pollution, channel alteration, and land use. This table indicates that very few mountains have streams not at least moderately affected by land use. The least affected mountainous regions are those at very high or very low latitudes, although our scientific ignorance of conditions in low-latitude mountains in particular means that streams in these mountains might be more altered than is widely recognized. Four case studies from northern Sweden (arctic region), Colorado Front Range (semiarid temperate region), Swiss Alps (humid temperate region), and Papua New Guinea (humid tropics) are also used to explore in detail the history and effects on rivers of human activities in mountainous regions. The overview and case studies indicate that mountain streams must be managed with particular attention to upstream/downstream connections, hillslope

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2016-12-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  8. Malaria Elimination in Iran, Importance and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hemami, Mohsen Rezaei; Sari, Ali Akbari; Raeisi, Ahmad; Vatandoost, Hassan; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of study is to assess the importance and challenges of Malaria elimination (ME) in Iran's health system. Material: Opinion of experts from Ministry of Health and Medical Education and the chancellors of medical universities affected by malaria were gathered using Focus Group Discussions and in-depth interviews. We asked them about the importance and main challenges of ME in Iran. Results: Main factors on importance of ME were: it's a struggle to reach to equity in the poorest regions of county, prevention of emerging disease in susceptible regions, lowering the cost of control and its effects on the region's socioeconomic condition. Main challenges were Iran's long border with malaria-endemic countries Pakistan and Afghanistan and illegal immigrants, underdevelopment in rural areas, system's insensitivity and diagnosis problem due to reduction of cases. Conclusion: Quantitative and holistic researches are needed for assessing the consequences of ME. PMID:23413116

  9. SP mountain data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawson, R. F.; Hamilton, R. E.; Liskow, C. L.; Dias, A. R.; Jackson, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of synthetic aperture radar data of SP Mountain was undertaken to demonstrate the use of digital image processing techniques to aid in geologic interpretation of SAR data. These data were collected with the ERIM X- and L-band airborne SAR using like- and cross-polarizations. The resulting signal films were used to produce computer compatible tapes, from which four-channel imagery was generated. Slant range-to-ground range and range-azimuth-scale corrections were made in order to facilitate image registration; intensity corrections were also made. Manual interpretation of the imagery showed that L-band represented the geology of the area better than X-band. Several differences between the various images were also noted. Further digital analysis of the corrected data was done for enhancement purposes. This analysis included application of an MSS differencing routine and development of a routine for removal of relief displacement. It was found that accurate registration of the SAR channels is critical to the effectiveness of the differencing routine. Use of the relief displacement algorithm on the SP Mountain data demonstrated the feasibility of the technique.

  10. Economics of Gypsum Production in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaeili, Abdoulkarim

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the economics of gypsum production in Iran. The trend in production cost, selling price and profit are used to investigate economics of gypsum production. In addition, the multivariate time series method is used to determine factors affecting gypsum price in domestic market. The results indicated that due to increase in production and inflation, profitability of gypsum production has decreased during recent years. It is concluded that tariff and non-tariff barriers on mines machinery are among reasons for increasing production cost in Iranian gypsum mines. Decreasing such barriers could increase profitability of gypsum production in Iran.

  11. The Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of Iran.

    PubMed

    Khazeni, Atefeh; Adler, Peter H; Telmadareiiy, Zakieh; Oshaghi, Mohammad Ali; Vatandoost, Hasan; Abtahi, Seyed Mohammad; Lotfi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Although Iran has a large geographic area encompassing 13 ecoregions, its simuliid fauna remains largely unexplored. To begin redressing this faunal gap, we reviewed literature records and coupled morphological and chromosomal identifications of material newly collected from 16 sites in Iran. Twenty-three nominal species are now recognized, including new country records for Simulium crassicaulum (Rubtsov) and Simulium alajense Rubtsov, and the southernmost world record for Simulium transcaspicum Enderlein. Multiple cytoforms of the Simulium aureum group, Simulium bezzii complex, and Simulium ornatum group were found.

  12. The Impact of Culture: Communicating with Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    RESEARCH PROJECT THE IMPACT OF CULTURE: COMMUNICATING WITH IRAN by Colonel Eric J. Winkie United States Army Dr. Richard Meinhart Project Adviser This...St ra te gy Re se ar ch Pr oj ec t THE IMPACT OF CULTURE: COMMUNICATING WITH IRAN BY COLONEL ERIC J. WINKIE United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...position of the Department of the Army , Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013-5050 USAWC CLASS

  13. Brief History of pharmacy ethics in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farsam, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacy is an ethical profession. The aim of this study was to investigate the history of pharmacy ethics in Iran. In the ancient Persia, medical and pharmaceutical ethics were related to religious rules, and everybody had to respect it. The ethical rules were similar to some current pharmacy ethics. During Islamic era, the pharmacy ethics were edited according to the Islamic rules. After introduction of European pharmacy into Iran, the pharmacy ethics did not change and was regarded as before. By presentation of bioethics and medical ethics in recent years, new activities are carried out for better manipulation of their rules in health professions including pharmacy. PMID:23908727

  14. YUCCA MOUNTAIN PROJECT - A BRIEFING --

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2003-08-05

    This report has the following articles: Nuclear waste--a long-term national problem; Spent nuclear fuel; High-level radioactive waste; Radioactivity and the environment; Current storage methods; Disposal options; U.S. policy on nuclear waste; The focus on Yucca Mountain; The purpose and scope of the Yucca Mountain Project; The approach for permanently disposing of waste; The scientific studies at Yucca Mountain; The proposed design for a repository at Yucca Mountain; Natural and engineered barriers would work together to isolate waste; Meticulous science and technology to protect people and the environment; Licensing a repository; Transporting waste to a permanent repository; The Environmental Impact Statement for a repository; Current status of the Yucca Mountain Project; and Further information available on the Internet.

  15. The Fleas (Siphonaptera) in Iran: Diversity, Host Range, and Medical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Maleki-Ravasan, Naseh; Solhjouy-Fard, Samaneh; Beaucournu, Jean-Claude; Laudisoit, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Amphipsyllinae (n = 17). Meriones persicus was infested by 11 flea subfamilies in the arid, rocky, mountainous regions and Xenopsyllinae were hosted by at least 43 mammal species. These findings place the Persian jird (M. persicus) and the Xenopsyllinae as the major vertebrate and vector hosts of flea-borne diseases in Iran including Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague. We found records of at least seven vector-borne pathogenic agents that can potentially be transmitted by the 117 flea species (or subspecies) of Iran. Conclusions/Significance Herein, we performed a thorough inventary of the flea species and their associated hosts, their medical importance and geographic distribution throughout Iran. This exercise allowed assessing the diversity of flea species with the potential flea-borne agents transmission risk in the country by arranging published data on flea-host associations. This information is a first step for issuing public health policies and rodent-flea control campaigns in Iran as well as those interested in the ecology/epidemiology of flea-borne disease. PMID:28068343

  16. Design issues concerning Iran`s Bushehr nuclear power plant VVER-1000 conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.F.

    1996-12-31

    On January 8, 1995, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) signed a contract for $800 million with the Russian Federation Ministry for Atomic Energy (Minatom) to complete Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP) unit 1. The agreement called for a Russian VVER-1000/320 pressurized water reactor (PWR) to be successfully installed into the existing German-built BNPP facilities in 5 yr. System design differences, bomb damage, and environmental exposure are key issues with which Minatom must contend in order to fulfill the contract. The AEOI under the Shah of Iran envisioned Bushehr as the first of many nuclear power plants, with Iran achieving 24 GW(electric) by 1993 and 34 GW(electric) by 2000. Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) began construction of the two-unit plant near the Persian Gulf town of Halileh in 1975. Unit 1 was {approx}80% complete and unit 2 was {approx}50% complete when construction was interrupted by the 1979 Iranian Islamic revolution. Despite repeated AEOI attempts to lure KWU and other companies back to Iran to complete the plant, Western concerns about nuclear proliferation in Iran and repeated bombings of the plant during the 1980-1988 Iran-Iraq war dissuaded Germany from resuming construction.

  17. A Review of Myiasis in Iran and a New Nosocomial Case from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Mahbobeh; Mowlavi, Gholamreza; Kargar, Faranak; Nateghpour, Mehdi; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Hajenorouzali-Tehrani, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to various climatic conditions in different parts of Iran, presenting of various kinds of human myiasis is expected. Despite of a few case series, most papers related to myiasis are case reports originated from various parts of Iran. This study discusses on different clinical features of myiasis in Iran and description of one case from Tehran as a representative to nosocomial infection in Iran. Methods: The information needed for this descriptive study was derived mainly from the digital library of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The larvae have been identified with observing on posterior spiracles, spines of their body and anal tubercles. Results: Total number of reported myiasis cases from Iran is 77 which can be categorized clinically as furuncular, wound, ophthalmic, auricular, nasopharyngeal, oral, intestinal and genitourinary. Based on parasitological features, all myiasis agents in Iran are belonging to Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Oestridae and Syrphidae flies. The case which is reporting in this paper can be mentioned as representative of nosocomial myiasis which it seems to be underreported because of some medicolegal reasons. Conclusion: Low number of investigations on various aspects of human myiasis, as well as incuriosity to report of the cases in disease reporting system of health minister, made the myiasis as a neglected disease. PMID:26114125

  18. Geology at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    Both advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Critics believe that there is sufficient geological evidence to rule the site unsuitable for further investigation. Some advocates claim that there is insufficient data and that investigations are incomplete, while others claim that the site is free of major obstacles. We have expanded our efforts to include both the critical evaluations of existing geological and geochemical data and the collection of field data and samples for the purpose of preparing scientific papers for submittal to journals. Summaries of the critical reviews are presented in this paper.

  19. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  20. PINE MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Canney, Frank C.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic study and geochemical survey were made of the Pine Mountain Wilderness in Arizona. Only slight traces of mineralization of no apparent significance were found and the results of the geochemical survey were negative. The presence of important near-surface mineral deposits in the area is considered unlikely. No evidence of nonmetallic or energy resources was identified during the course of this study. Ore deposits, if present, are probably of the massive sulfide type, and buried deeply beneath the ground surface, beyond the range of the various geochemical and geophysical techniques used in routine exploration. Some of the newer geophysical methods might possibly be capable of detecting such hidden ore bodies if not buried too deeply.

  1. Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Dantas-Torres, Filipe

    2007-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a life-threatening disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, an obligately intracellular bacterium that is spread to human beings by ticks. More than a century after its first clinical description, this disease is still among the most virulent human infections identified, being potentially fatal even in previously healthy young people. The diagnosis of RMSF is based on the patient's history and a physical examination, and often presents a dilemma for clinicians because of the non-specific presentation of the disease in its early course. Early empirical treatment is essential to prevent severe complications or a fatal outcome, and treatment should be initiated even in unconfirmed cases. Because there is no vaccine available against RMSF, avoidance of tick-infested areas is still the best way to prevent the infection.

  2. Iran and Iraq: Perspectives in Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    Wall Street Journal ; BS = Baltimore Sun; CSM = Christian Science Monitor; SIC = Senate Intelligence Committee Report dated 1/29/87; TCR = Tower...written out, one of following abbreviations will be used: WP = Washington Post; NYT = New York Times; MH = Miami Herald; LAT = Los Angeles Times; WSJ ...Time Magazine BIBLIOGRAPHY Primary Abdulghani, J. M., Iran and Iraq: The Years of Crisis, Baltimore MD, Johns

  3. Children's Early Numeracy in Finland and Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aunio, Pirjo; Korhonen, Johan; Bashash, Laaya; Khoshbakht, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates similarities and differences in young children's early numeracy skills related to age, nationality and gender. The participants were five- to seven-year-old children from Finland and Iran. Early numeracy was investigated by using tasks measuring number-related relational skills (e.g. comparison, one-to-one…

  4. Medical biotechnology trends and achievements in iran.

    PubMed

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Hamedifar, Haleh; Aghajani, Hamideh

    2012-10-01

    A healthcare system has been the most important priority for all governments worldwide. Biotechnology products have affected the promotion of health care over the last thirty years. During the last several decades, Iran has achieved significant success in extending healthcare to the rural areas and in reducing the rates of infant mortality and increasing population growth. Biomedical technology as a converging technology is considered a helpful tool to fulfill the Iranian healthcare missions. The number of biotechnology products has reached 148 in 2012. The total sales have increased to 98 billion USD without considering vaccines and plasma derived proteins in 2012. Iran is one of the leading countries in the Middle East and North Africa in the area of Medical biotechnology. The number of biotechnology medicines launched in Iran is 13 products until 2012. More than 15 products are in pipelines now. Manufacturers are expecting to receive the market release for more than 8 products by the end of 2012. Considering this information, Iran will lead the biotechnology products especially in area of biosimilars in Asia after India in next three years. The present review will discuss leading policy, decision makers' role, human resource developing system and industry development in medical biotechnology.

  5. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  6. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  7. 27 CFR 9.108 - Ozark Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ozark Mountain. 9.108... Ozark Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Ozark Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of Ozark Mountain...

  8. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  9. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  10. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  11. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  12. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  13. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  14. 27 CFR 9.80 - York Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false York Mountain. 9.80... Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “York Mountain.” (b) Approved map. The approved map for the York Mountain viticultural area is the U.S.G.S. map entitled...

  15. 27 CFR 9.167 - Red Mountain

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Mountain 9.167 Section... Mountain (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate map for determining the boundaries of the Red Mountain viticultural area...

  16. Injury epidemiology in Iran: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Azami-Aghdash, Saber; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Shabaninejad, Hosein; Abolghasem Gorji, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Injuries are the second greatest cause of mortality in Iran. Information about the epidemiological pattern of injuries is effective in decision-making. In this regard, the aim of the current study is to elaborate on the epidemiology of injuries in Iran through a systematic review. Methods: Required data were collected searching the following key words and their Persian equivalents; trauma, injury, accident, epidemiology, prevalence, pattern, etiology, risk factors and Iran. The following databases were searched: Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, MagIran, Iranian scientific information database (SID) and Iran Medex. Some of the relevant journals and web sites were searched manually. The lists of references from the selected articles were also investigated. We have also searched the gray literature and consulted some experts. Results: Out of 2747 retrieved articles, 25 articles were finally included in the review. A total of 3234481 cases have been investigated. Mean (SD) age among these cases was 30 (17.4) years. The males comprised 75.7% of all the patients. Only 31.1% of patients were transferred to hospital by ambulance. The most common mechanism of injuries was road traffic accidents (50.1%) followed by falls (22.3%). In road traffic accidents, motorcyclists have accounted for the majority of victims (45%). Roads were the most common accident scene for the injuries (57.5%). The most common injuries were to the head and neck. (47.3%). The mean (SD) Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 8.1(8.6%). The overall case-fatality proportion was 3.8% and 75% of all the mortalities related to road traffic accidents. Conclusions: The main priorities in reducing the burden of injuries include: the young, male target group, improving pre-hospital and ambulance services, preventing road traffic accidents, improving road safety and the safety of motorcyclists (compulsory helmet use, safer vehicles, dedicated motorcycle lanes). PMID:28039683

  17. Nutrition policy process challenges in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goshtaei, Massomeh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Sari, Ali Akbari; Abdollahi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nutrition transition is occurring rapidly in the world, especially in developing countries. The nutrition transition occurred in Iran very fast due to urbanization and changes in the lifestyle of people, leading to overweight and obesity. However, nutritional deficiencies are still detected due to economic factors and low nutritional knowledge. Nutrition policies do not adequately respond to the nutrition challenges in Iran. This study was conducted to evaluate and analyze the nutrition policy process challenges in Iran. Methods A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted with 59 policy makers and nutrition experts of medical universities across Iran. Interviews were continued until data saturation was achieved. Data were supplemented with surveys and documentary analysis. Thematic analysis was guided by the propositions of the stages heuristic framework. Results The results were categorized into four main themes and eight sub-themes. The main themes were 1) nutrition problem definition, 2) policy formulation, 3) implementation of the policies, and 4) evaluation of the policies. However, the multi-faceted nature of the nutritional problem makes it difficult to deal with, so a multi-sectoral approach is needed. Conclusion Nutrition policies have been implemented in Iran with varying degrees of success and with different levels of cross-sectoral collaboration. The nutrition policies sometimes have not been able to respond to the nutritional problems. One of the important reasons is that nutrition is not a priority for policy makers. Many policies suffer from a lack of adequate and appropriate resource allocation. Cooperation mechanisms to resolve nutritional problems are sometimes ineffective and inefficient. PMID:27053992

  18. Pasteur Institute of Iran- An Evaluation Model

    PubMed Central

    Dejman, Masoumeh; Habibi, Elham; Baradarn Eftekhari, Monir; Falahat, Katayoun; Malekafzali, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pasteur Institute of Iran was established in 1919 with the aim to produce vaccines and prevent communicable diseases in Iran. Over time, their activities extended into areas of research, education and services. Naturally, such a vast development begs establishment of a comprehensive management and monitoring system. With this outlook, the present study was carried out with the aim to design a performance assessment model for Pasteur Institute of Iran that, in addition to determining evaluation indicators, it could prepare the necessary grounds for providing a unified assessment model for the global network of the Pasteur Institutes. Method: This study was designed and performed in 4 stages: first; design of indicators and determining their scores. Second; editing indicators according to the outcome of discussions and debates held with members of Research Council of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Third; implementation of a pilot model based on the Institute’s activities in 2011. Fourth; providing the pilot model feedback to the stakeholders and finalizing the model according to an opinion survey. Results: Based on the results obtained, the developed indicators for Pasteur Institute of Iran evaluation were designed in 10 axes and 18 sub-axes, which included 101 major and 58 minor indicators. The axes included governance and leadership, resources and facilities, capacity building, knowledge production and collaborations, reference services, economic value of products and services, participation in industrial exhibitions, status of the institute, satisfaction and institute’s role in health promotion. Conclusion: The indicators presented in this article have been prepared based on the balance in the Institute’s four missions, to provide the basis for assessment of the Institute’s activities in consecutive years, and possibility of comparison with other institutes worldwide. PMID:24842146

  19. Groundwater depth and elevation interpolation by kriging methods in Mohr Basin of Fars province in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nikroo, Leila; Kompani-Zare, Mazda; Sepaskhah, Ali Reza; Shamsi, Seyed Rashid Fallah

    2010-07-01

    Prediction of groundwater depth and elevation is important in quantitative water management especially in arid areas. There are several basins in southwest of Iran, in Zagross Mountain, in which the water wells are distributed along a narrow elliptic ring band around the region. To find the most applicable interpolation method, both of the groundwater depth and elevation are predicted by different kriging methods. It is found that the groundwater elevation and depth can be predicted by different methods. Furthermore, it is found that the methods in which the trend is eliminated predicted the groundwater elevation and depth in central part of the region is with less standard error. Furthermore, the methods with no trend elimination, predicted the groundwater depths with less error near the water wells. Dividing the area to hydro-geologically homogeneous sub-areas improved the interpolation precision.

  20. 78 FR 15798 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting ACTION: Notice of...DL@state.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: Iran Program Grants. OMB.... Respondents: Potential grantees and participants for Iran programs. Estimated Number of Respondents:...

  1. 78 FR 31999 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Iran Democracy Program Grants Vetting ACTION: Notice of...: Iran Program Grants Vetting. OMB Control Number: 1405-0176. Type of Request: Extension. ] Originating.... Respondents: Potential grantees and participants for Iran programs. Estimated Number of Respondents:...

  2. 78 FR 55134 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Iran Modern”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Iran Modern'' ACTION: Notice..., number 153) of determinations made by the Department of State pertaining to the exhibit ``Iran Modern... in the exhibition ``Iran Modern,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the...

  3. [Polymorphism of hordein-coding loci in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) populations of Iran and Central Asian countries].

    PubMed

    Pomortsev, A A; Martynov, S P; Kovaleva, O N; Lialina, E V

    2011-11-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis was performed to study polymorphism of hordeins encoded by the Hrd A, Hrd B, and Hrd Floci in 366 local old barley accessions from Iran and Central Asian countries, including Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan (Mountain Badahsan), and Kirgizia. In total, 60 alleles with frequencies of 0.0003-0.2818 were observed for the Hrd A locus, 106 alleles with frequencies of 0.0003-0.1603 were observed for the Hrd B locus, and five alleles with frequencies of 0.0164-0.4131 were observed for the Hrd Flocus. The alleles and allele frequencies displayed irregular distributions in barley populations of the above countries. Cluster analysis of the matrix of allele frequencies in populations from known collection sites revealed a cluster structure of local barley populations within each country. Local populations formed five differently sized clusters in Iran, six in Turkmenistan, three in Uzbekistan, and three in Kirgizia. The variation and allele frequency distribution of the hordein-coding loci in Iran and Central Asian countries were assumed to result from the introduction and spreading of barley forms via migrations of husbandmen.

  4. Assessment of dust activity and dust-plume pathways over Jazmurian Basin, southeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashki, A.; Arjmand, M.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.

    2017-02-01

    Jazmurian (or hamun-e Jaz Murian) is a dried lake located in a topographic-low basin in southeast Iran and a major source for high dust emissions under favorable weather conditions. This work examines for the first time the dust activity over the basin by classifying the dust events (DEs, visibility <10 km) and dust-storm events (DSEs, visibility <1 km) based on observations at five local meteorological stations during the period 1990-2013. Analysis of the temporal evolution, seasonality, frequency and persistence (duration) of the DEs and DSEs, along with examination of the backward and forward air-mass trajectories in the Jazmurian Basin are the main objectives of the present study. The DEs exhibit maximum frequency in June-July and lowest in autumn and winter, while the DSEs peak mostly during March-May also presenting large variability between the stations. The frequency of both the DEs and DSEs increases during ∼2001-2004 due to a prolonged drought over southeastern Iran, while no significant tendency is found during the period 1990-2013. Further, the DEs and DSEs exhibit a clear diurnal pattern with highest frequency between 15:30 and 18:30 LST due to thermal convection and transported dust plumes. The analysis reveals an average frequency of 12.7 dust-storm days per year, while the DSEs last for 5.1 h, on average, during the dust-storm days. The dust storms originating from Jazmurian affect mostly the northern coast of the Arabian Sea (Makran mountains), the Oman Sea, the southeastern Arabian Peninsula and the western Pakistan, while air masses from the arid/desert areas of central-eastern Iran and Arabia seem to further aggravate the dust-aerosol loading over Jazmurian.

  5. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters. Images PMID:16593655

  6. Geography and Weather: Mountain Meterology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogil, H. Michael; Collins, H. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Provided are 26 ideas to help children explore the effects of mountains on the weather. Weather conditions in Nepal and Colorado are considered separately. Nine additional sources of information are listed. (CW)

  7. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Stella, Javier; Krüger, Hever; Recavarren, Sixto

    1973-01-01

    Arias-Stella, J., Krüger, H., and Recavarren, S. (1973).Thorax, 28, 701-708. Pathology of chronic mountain sickness. Pathological data on chronic mountain sickness are scarce due to the fact that the disease is ameliorated or cured by descent to a low altitude. In this report we describe a case of chronic mountain sickness occurring in a woman of 48 years at Cerro de Pasco (4,300 m above sea level). The necropsy findings are compared with the limited pathological observations reported by others. It is apparent from our findings that in fatal cases the main changes are located within the pulmonary circulation. So far histological studies have been reported only in cases of the secondary form of chronic mountain sickness. The basic pathology of the primary form (Monge's disease) remains to be defined. Images PMID:4787982

  8. Extinction of Harrington's Mountain Goat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Jim I.; Martin, Paul S.; Euler, Robert C.; Long, Austin; Jull, A. J. T.; Toolin, Laurence J.; Donahue, Douglas J.; Linick, T. W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 ± 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  9. Extinction of Harrington's mountain goat

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, J.I.; Martin, P.S.; Euler, R.C.; Long, A.; Jull, A.J.T.; Toolin, L.J.; Donahue, D.J.; Linick, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    Keratinous horn sheaths of the extinct Harrington's mountain goat, Oreamnos harringtoni, were recovered at or near the surface of dry caves of the Grand Canyon, Arizona. Twenty-three separate specimens from two caves were dated nondestructively by the tandem accelerator mass spectrometer (TAMS). Both the TAMS and the conventional dates indicate that Harrington's mountain goat occupied the Grand Canyon for at least 19,000 years prior to becoming extinct by 11,160 +/- 125 radiocarbon years before present. The youngest average radiocarbon dates on Shasta ground sloths, Nothrotheriops shastensis, from the region are not significantly younger than those on extinct mountain goats. Rather than sequential extinction with Harrington's mountain goat disappearing from the Grand Canyon before the ground sloths, as one might predict in view of evidence of climatic warming at the time, the losses were concurrent. Both extinctions coincide with the regional arrival of Clovis hunters.

  10. Rocky Mountain Arsenal NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit CO-0035009, the U.S. Department of Interior's Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to discharge from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal recycled water pipeline to Lower Derby Lake in Adams County, Colo.

  11. The Dilemma of Mountain Roads

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountain roads and trails are proliferating throughout developing Southeast Asia with severe but largely unrecognized long-term consequences related to effects of landslides and surface erosion on communities and downstream resources.

  12. Mid-pacific mountains revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroenke, Loren W.; Kellogg, James N.; Nemoto, Kenji

    1985-06-01

    The Mid-Pacific Mountains are guyots whose volcanic pedestals have been constructed on a broad basement plateau, the flanks of which are downfaulted. Edifice construction may have been controlled by an orthogonal system of intersecting faults trending roughly ENE and NNW. Low amplitude gravity anomalies observed over the Mid-Pacific Mountains indicate complete Airy-Heiskanen isostatic compensation, crustal thickening, and eruption on thin elastic lithosphere. Tholeiites of the Mid-Pacific Mountains resemble lavas of Iceland and the Galapagos Islands. The orthogonal fault system, low gravity anomalies, and lava chemistry of the Mid-Pacific Mountains can be explained by eruption on or near a great ENE-trending rift system.

  13. Assessment of mesoscale convective systems using IR brightness temperature in the southwest of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafati, Somayeh; Karimi, Mostafa

    2016-04-01

    In this research, the spatial and temporal distribution of Mesoscale Convective Systems was assessed in the southwest of Iran using Global merged satellite IR brightness temperature (acquired from Meteosat, GOES, and GMS geostationary satellites) and synoptic station data. Event days were selected using a set of storm reports and precipitation criteria. The following criteria are used to determine the days with occurrence of convective systems: (1) at least one station reported 6-h precipitation exceeding 10 mm and (2) at least three stations reported phenomena related to convection (thunderstorm, lightning, and shower). MCSs were detected based on brightness temperature, maximum areal extent, and duration thresholds (228 K, 10,000 km2, and 3 h, respectively). An MCS occurrence classification system is developed based on mean sea level, 850 and 500 hPa pressure patterns. The results indicated that the highest frequency of MCSs occurred in December and April. Assessment of MCSs spatial frequency showed that MCS occurrence is strongly correlated with topography in April and May unlike the cold months. In other words, the role of Zagros Mountains in developing MCSs varies based on the season so that its impact increases with enhancement of mean monthly temperature. In addition, the occurrence of MCSs depends closely on the configuration of the Sudan Low in the southwest of Iran.

  14. A new species of Acanthodactylus Fitzinger 1834 (Sauria: Lacertidae) from southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Nastaran, Heidari; Nasrullah Rastegar, Pouyani; Eskandar, Rastegar-Pouyani; Mehdi, Rajabizadeh

    2013-01-01

    A new and distinctive species of lacertid genus Acanthodactylus Fitzinger, 1834 is described from 7 km east of Khamir Port, Hormozgan Province, southern Iran at an elevation of 30-40m above sea level (asl). Analyses of morphological characters and the comparison with other formerly known species of this genus have proven the status of this taxon as a new, distinct species. Combinations of scalation characters and distinct morphology, coloration and habitat peculiarities in calcareous mountains distinguish Acanthodactylus khamirensis sp.nov from all remaining species of the genus in the area. In order to show the validity of the new species, we carried out a comparative statistical analysis using 13 metric and six meristic morphological characters on all of the neighboring congeners of the new species using descriptive (one-way ANOVA) as well as multivariate analyses (PCA and DFA). The results confirm the specific status of the new taxon. Detailed information and an updated identification key for the genus A canthodactylus in Iran are presented.

  15. Composition of the sand fly fauna in Khash County, Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Kassiri, Hamid; Javadian, Ezatoeddin

    2012-01-01

    Sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae) are the biological vectors of leishmaniasis all around the world. In 1997, sand flies were collected in 14 cities and villages of Khash County in southeastern Iran, using 848 sticky traps (castor oil-coated white papers 20 × 30 cm). In this study, a total of 4673 sand flies, with 25.23% females and 74.77% males, were collected and identified to species mainly from mountainous areas. The 21 species of sand flies belonged to the genus Phlebotomus (nine species) and the genus Sergentomyia (12 species). The following 14 species were reported for the first time in Khash County: P. papatasi, P. bergeroti, P. eleanorae, P. halepensis, P. major, P. mesghali, S. hodgsoni, S. mervynae, S. dreyfussi, S. iranica, S. theodori, S. africana, S. clydei, and S. christophersi. The composition of species in Khash County is similar to other parts of Iran. However, the dominance of P. kazeruni in Khash County may suggest that this species should be considered as a potential vector in the region of Khash.

  16. Seasonal Abundance and Host-Feeding Patterns of Anopheline Vectors in Malaria Endemic Area of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Basseri, Hamidreza; Raeisi, Ahmad; Ranjbar Khakha, Mansoor; Pakarai, Abaas; Abdolghafar, Hassanzehi

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal abundance and tendency to feed on humans are important parameters to measure for effective control of malaria vectors. The objective of this study was to describe relation between feeding pattern, abundance, and resting behavior of four malaria vectors in southern Iran. This study was conducted in ten indicator villages (based on malaria incidence and entomological indices) in mountainous/hilly and plain regions situated south and southeastern Iran. Mosquito vectors were collected from indoor as well as outdoor shelters and the blood meals were examined by ELISA test. Over all 7654 female Anopheles spp. were captured, the most common species were Anopheles stephensi, An. culicifacies, An. fluviatilis, and An. d'thali. The overall human blood index was 37.50%, 19.83%, 16.4%, and 30.1% for An. fluviatilis, An. stephensi, An. culicifacies, and An. d'thali, respectively. In addition, An. fluviatilis fed on human blood during the entire year but the feeding behavior of An. stephensi and An. culicifacies varied according to seasons. Overall, the abundance of the female mosquito positive to human blood was 4.25% per human shelter versus 17.5% per animal shelter. This result indicates that the vectors had tendency to rest in animal shelters after feeding on human. Therefore, vector control measure should be planned based on such as feeding pattern, abundance, and resting behavior of these vectors in the area. PMID:21559055

  17. Mountain Child: Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Audsley, Annie; Wallace, Rebecca M M; Price, Martin F

    2016-12-01

    Objectives This systematic review identifies and reviews both peer-reviewed and 'grey' literature, across a range of disciplines and from diverse sources, relating to the condition of children living in mountain communities in low- and middle-income countries. Findings The literature on poverty in these communities does not generally focus on the particular vulnerabilities of children or the impact of intersecting vulnerabilities on the most marginalised members of communities. However, this literature does contribute analyses of the broader context and variety of factors impacting on human development in mountainous areas. The literature on other areas of children's lives-health, nutrition, child mortality, education, and child labour-focuses more specifically on children's particular vulnerabilities or experiences. However, it sometimes lacks the broader analysis of the many interrelated characteristics of a mountainous environment which impact on children's situations. Themes Nevertheless, certain themes recur across many disciplines and types of literature, and point to some general conclusions: mountain poverty is influenced by the very local specificities of the physical environment; mountain communities are often politically and economically marginalised, particularly for the most vulnerable within these communities, including children; and mountain communities themselves are an important locus for challenging and interrupting cycles of increasing inequality and disadvantage. While this broad-scale review represents a modest first step, its findings provide the basis for further investigation.

  18. Uplift of the Transantarctic Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, E.

    1987-09-01

    The Transantarctic Mountains, a major continental range, extend approximately 3,000 kilometers, vary from less than 50 to more than 400 kilometers wide, and have elevations of up to 4,500 meters. Earth scientists have generally defined the stratigraphy of the range and recognize that uplift of the region occurred after the Jurassic period but still know very little about the processes that effected uplift. Unlike other major mountain chains, the Transantarctic Mountains show no evidence of thrusting, folding, regional metamorphism, and andesitic volcanism associated with their uplift. The objectives during austral summer 1987-1988 are to map the uplift geometry of the Transantarctic Mountains using erosion surfaces (pre-Devonian Kukir peneplain) and widespread terrace levels as datum planes and to determine the uplift rates for the mountain range using fission-track dating of apatites. Presently, fission-track dating provides only quantitative data on the initiation time, amount, and rate of uplift. Through research, the authors hopes to extend data from Victoria Land through 1,600 kilometers of the Transantarctic Mountains. This study also has implications for the glacial history of Antarctica, because the uplift occurred during the inception, growth, and subsequent fluctuations of the east and west antarctic ice sheets. It will also add to our understanding of the nature of the East-West Antarctic boundary and to the knowledge of the sedimentation history in the Ross embayment and the basins beneath polar plateau.

  19. Io: Mountains and crustal extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that there is good reason to conclude that mountains on Io, like those on Earth, are subject to growth and decay. The decay of mountains will be assisted by the ability of SO sub 2 to rot silicate rock and by explosive escape of sub-surface SO sub 2 from aquifers (Haemus Mons is seen to be covered by bright material, presumably fallout from a SO sub 2 rich plume which had been active on the mountain flanks). On the west side of the massif at 10 degrees S, 270 degrees W a rugged surface consists of long ridges running perpendicular to the downslope direction, suggesting tectonic denudation with crustal blocks sliding down the mountain flank. Tectonic denudation may be assisted, as in the case of the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana by overloading mountain flanks with volcanic products. The surfaces of some massifs exhibit a well developed, enigmatic corrugated terrain, consisting of complex ridge systems. Ridges may bifurcate, anastomose to form closed depressions and form concentric loops. Taken together, observations of morphology, heat flux, surface deposits and styles of volcanism may point to the existence of lithosphere domains with distinct compositions and tectonic regimes.

  20. Municipal solid waste management in Kurdistan Province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Abduli, Mohammad Ali; Nasrabadi, Touraj

    2007-03-01

    Kurdistan Province, with an area of 28,203 square kilometers, is located in a mountainous area in the western part of Iran. From 1967 to 1997, the urban population in the major eight cities of the Kurdistan Province-namely, Baneh, Bijar, Divan Darreh, Saghez, Sanandaj, Ghorveh, Kamyaran, and Marivan-increased from 102,250 to 705,715. The proportion of the population residing in urban areas increased 90 percent during this period. In most of the cities, solid waste handling remains primitive, and well-organized procedures for it have not been established. Traditional methods of disposal, with marginal inclusion of modern conveniences, appear to be the common practice. In general, the shortcomings of the prevailing practices can be summarized as follows: The municipal solid waste management systems (MSWMSs) in this province include unsegregated collection and open dumping of municipal solid wastes. Separation of municipal solid waste in this province is in the hands of scavengers. The MSWMSs in this province lack essential infrastructure. Thus, design and implementation of modern MSWMSs in this province are essential. Principal criteria for and methods of implementing these systems are as follows: (1) rationally evaluating all functional elements so that they operate in a steady-state or equilibrium manner; (2) creating all support elements for the MSWMS in each city; (3) introducing gradual privatization of MSWMS activities; (4) creating guidelines, regulations, and instructions for all elements of MSWMSs; and (5) giving priorities to source separation and recycling programs. This paper reviews the present status of MSWMSs in eight major cities of Kurdistan Province and outlines the principle guidelines and alternatives for MSWMSs.

  1. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-19

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses Summary The Bush Administration has pursued several avenues to attempt to contain or end the potential

  2. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-29

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses Summary The Bush Administration has pursued several avenues to attempt to contain or end the potential

  3. Exploitable Vulnerabilities of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-12

    Iraq war depicted an arrow stretching from Iran, through Iraq’s Shiite holy city of Karbala to the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. The image and its...during Iran-Iraq war Esfandiar Rahim-Mashaei -- Ahmadinejad’s Chief of Staff, established the IRGC intelligence unit in Kurdistan Hoseyn Dehgan...August 24, 2011). 68 Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran, chap. IV, art . 44, available at http://www.iranchamber.com/government/laws

  4. What Should be United States Policy for Iran?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    pursued the negative aims of controlling Iran’s objectionable behavior . The current relationship between the United States and Iran was established...regime in Iraq, but only demanded modifications to the behavior of the Iranian regime.11 With the overthrow of the Iraqi regime, the policy of...containing Iran continues, but it has not been notably successful. Iran has not significantly modified its behavior as a result of U.S. sanctions. To the

  5. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-05

    19 Iran says it wants to build up to 20 more nuclear power plants , including possibly six by Russia. On December 5, 2005, Iran announced it is...Natanz facility could produce enriched uranium, and the Arak facility reportedly is a heavy water production plant considered ideal for the production...January 1995 contract, on an $800 million nuclear power plant at Bushehr. Russia insisted that Iran sign an agreement under which Russia would provide

  6. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    PubMed

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-07-08

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species.

  7. Genetic epidemiology, hematological and clinical features of hemoglobinopathies in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    There is large variation in the molecular genetics and clinical features of hemoglobinopathies in Iran. Studying structural variants of hemoglobin demonstrated that the β-chain variants of hemoglobin S and D-Punjab are more prevalent in the Fars (southwestern Iran) and Kermanshah (western Iran) provinces, respectively. Also, α-chain variants of Hb Q-Iran and Hb Setif are prevalent in western Iran. The molecular basis and clinical severity of thalassemias are extremely heterogenous among Iranians due to the presence of multiethnic groups in the country. β-Thalassemia is more prevalent in northern and southern Iran. Among 52 different β-thalassemia mutations that have been identified among Iranian populations, IVSII-1 G:A is the most frequent mutation in most parts of the country. The presence of IVS I-5 G:C mutation with high frequency in southeastern Iran might reflect gene flow from neighboring countries. A wide spectrum of α-thalassemia alleles has been detected among Iranians with -α(3.7 kb) as the most prevalent α-thalassemia mutation. The prevention program of thalassemia birth in Iran has reduced the birth rate of homozygous β-thalassemia since the implementation of the program in 1997. In this review genetic epidemiology, clinical and hematological aspects of hemoglobinopathies, and the prevention programs of β-thalassemia in Iran will be discussed.

  8. IRAN: laboratory test bench for hypertelescope pupil-plane recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, F.; Vakili, F.; Glindemann, A.; Aristidi, E.; Abe, L.; Fossat, E.; Douet, R.

    2008-07-01

    In 2004, our group proposed IRAN, an alternative beam-combination technique to the so-called hypertelescope imaging method introduced by Labeyrie in the 1990s. We have recently set up a laboratory experiment aiming at validating our image densification approach instead of the pupil densification scheme of Labeyrie. In our experiment, seven sub-apertures illuminated by laser sources are recombined using the IRAN scheme. The validation of the IRAN recombination consists basically in retrieving the point-spread intensity distribution (PSID), demonstrating the conservation of the object-image convolution relation. We will introduce IRAN, compare it to the hyper-telescope, and present the experimental results that we obtained.

  9. A review of the subfamily Rogadinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Samira; Talebi, Ali Asghar; Achterberg, Cornelis Van; Rakhshani, Ehsan

    2015-06-17

    Specimens of the subfamily Rogadinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) were collected in northern Iran during 2010-2011 with a series of Malaise traps. Twelve species belonging to three genera (Aleiodes Wesmael, 1838, Heterogamus Wesmael, 1838 and Clinocentrus Haliday, 1833) were identified, with one genus (Heterogamus) and seven species new for the fauna of Iran. An updated checklist of the genera and species of the subfamily Rogadinae is included. A total of 26 species belonging to four genera are listed for Iran after correction for misidentifications. A key to the genera and the species of Rogadinae known from Iran is provided.

  10. Medical tourism in Iran: Issues and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jabbari, Alireza; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Mardani, Raja; Tabibi, Seid Jamaledin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Medical tourism is rapidly becoming a worldwide, multibillion-dollar industry. Iran has a high potential for this industry. The purpose of this study was to examine the medical tourism cluster, using Diamond Analysis tool. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive, analytical and qualitative one. Thirty professionals and researchers in this field were interviewed and official documents belonging to the Health ministry as well as tourism organization and finally related literature were examined. The data was analyzed using content analysis method. Results: Positive and negative parts of the medical tourism industry of Iran were determined according to diamond of advantage. Conclusion: The strategic issues were identified and a number of possible solutions for addressing them were recommended. More and effective public-private participations, aggressive marketing, improving infrastructures, and international accreditation of health care facilities and human resources development could improve medical tourism industry in the country. PMID:23555142

  11. Epidemiological Review of Scorpion Envenomation in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Amir; Rahim, Fakher

    2014-01-01

    This epidemiological review was carried out to display the magnitude and the geographic distribution of scorpion envenomation in Iran with focus on the southwestern region of Iran, particularly. The Iranian recognized scorpions belonging to two families, including Buthidae and Scorpionidae. Buthidae family consists of 14 genuses, 26 species, and 18 sub-species, while Scorpionidae family has three genuses and four species. The lack of basic knowledge, including the geographical distribution, clinical manifestations, and specific treatments related to scorpiofauna justifies such multidisciplinary studies. The venom of two endemic Iranian scorpions, including Hemiscorpius lepturus (H. lepturus) and Odonthubuthus doriae (O.doriae) have considered as an effective source of new neurotoxin peptides for the further development of physio-pharmacological probes and designing the clinical trials. Such epidemiological information may improve the determinants of Iranian scorpion stings in order to plan and implement effective public health intervention. PMID:25276176

  12. Epidemiological review of scorpion envenomation in iran.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir; Rahim, Fakher

    2014-01-01

    This epidemiological review was carried out to display the magnitude and the geographic distribution of scorpion envenomation in Iran with focus on the southwestern region of Iran, particularly. The Iranian recognized scorpions belonging to two families, including Buthidae and Scorpionidae. Buthidae family consists of 14 genuses, 26 species, and 18 sub-species, while Scorpionidae family has three genuses and four species. The lack of basic knowledge, including the geographical distribution, clinical manifestations, and specific treatments related to scorpiofauna justifies such multidisciplinary studies. The venom of two endemic Iranian scorpions, including Hemiscorpius lepturus (H. lepturus) and Odonthubuthus doriae (O.doriae) have considered as an effective source of new neurotoxin peptides for the further development of physio-pharmacological probes and designing the clinical trials. Such epidemiological information may improve the determinants of Iranian scorpion stings in order to plan and implement effective public health intervention.

  13. Lower Cretaceous Orbitolinids of Zagros Mountains in Iran and their evolutionary studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, F.; Yazdi Moghadam, M.; Sajjadi, F.

    2009-04-01

    Orbitolinids are among the most important group of foraminifera which are of high importance in sediment biostratigraphy of the Early-Mid Cretaceous sequences. Dariyan Formation contains a rich and diversified orbitolinid assemblage. The Dariyan Formation can be divided into three parts in the area investigated. The upper and lower parts of the formation consist of medium to thick bedded limestones, being separated by thin bedded limestones and marine marls of the middle part. Only limestones of upper part of the Dariyan Formation in study area contain the orbitolinid foraminifera which are studied here in this paper. Through studying the Lower Cretaceous shallow water limestones of the upper Dariyan Formation, Based on the size, shape and complexity of embryonic apparatus 6 species of orbitolinid belonging to subgenus Mesorbitolina Schroeder and genuse Praeorbitolina Schroeder are recognized as below: Orbitolina (M.) lotzei. Orbitolina (M.) parva. Orbitolina (M.) texana, Orbitolina (M.) subconcava. Orbitolina (M.) cf. pervia and Praeorbitolina wienandsi. Concerning the origin of orbitolinids, there are different ideas, the most important and newest one which has been introduced by Cherchi and Schroeder shows 4 different phylogenetic lineages in this group. 1. Eopalorbitolina pertenuis - palorbitolina lenticulari (Early Barremian-basal Late Aptian) 2 .Praeorbitolina cormyi - Mesorbitolina aperta (Early Aptian -Early Cenomanian) 3 .Orbitolina sefini - Orbitolina concava (Late Albian - Early Cenomanian) 4. Conicorbitolina moulladei- Conicorbitolina conica (Late Albian - Middle Cenomanian) Based on appearance and stratigraphic distribiutions of orbitolinids in the Dashtak stratigraphic section and comparison with Cherchi and Schroeder's evolutionary model, Praeorbitolina wienandsi - Mesorbitolina cf. pervia phylogenetic lineage is herein suggested for the upper part of the Dariyan orbitolinids in the studied area comprising part of the Praeorbitolina cormyi - Mesorbitolina aperta Cherchi and Schroeder phylogenetic lineage. The most important changes in the phylogenetic lineage, reperesented hereing are as following: Change in the position of embryonic apparatus, shape of protoconch and subembryonic zone, size increase in embryonic apparatus and protoconch, increase in number of subembryonic and deuteroconch partitions.

  14. Iran: The Post-Revolutionary Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    obligation are based on 20 Celeste Friend, “The Social Contract,” The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy , http...ideological fundamentalism of Iran’s unique theocratic system. By relaxing governmental control over newspapers, arts, and cinema , the Khatami years...articles.latimes.com/2007/sep/05/world/fg-iran5 (accessed on October 23, 2008). Friend, Celeste., The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy ; The Social

  15. JPRS Report, Near East, & South Asia, Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-18

    lethal German tehnology . And second that Iran of a joint work group to study the issue of the Bushehr has been a signatory to nuclear non...abandon the idea of nuclear power plant and instead press will only hinder and damage the prospects for accept German tehnology for conventional ones...munications is being planned for the province, which can and mobile telephones, he said: The communications be divided into four areas of development-long

  16. Coping with Iran: Confrontation, Containment, or Engagement?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    as a public service of the RAND Corporation. 6Jump down to document THE ARTS CHILD POLICY CIVIL JUSTICE EDUCATION ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT HEALTH AND...operational, at least in significant numbers. Iran appears to have focused much of its energy and resources on developing a family of ballistic missiles...array of cultural and educational exchange programs and reopening embassies, consulates, and information centers in both countries supporting efforts

  17. Suicidal Attempt and Psychiatric Disorders in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Rahgozart, Mehdi; Noorbala, Ahmad Ali; Malekafzali, Hossein; Davidian, Haratoun; Naghavi, Hamidreza; Soori, Hamid; Yazdi, Seyed Abbas Bagheri

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of broader research aimed to determine the lifetime prevalence and pattern of comorbidity on self-reported suicidal attempts in the general population of Iran. Overall, 25,180 subjects were interviewed, face-to-face, at home; the lifetime prevalence was 1.4% (0.9% males and 2% females). The majority of attempters were 26-55…

  18. Analyzing International Economic Influence on Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-03

    Group of 7 (G7) with the addition of Russia. Members and observers of the SCO (China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India ...Iran. From the top right around to the bottom right are: Tajikistan (TJ), Kazakhstan (KZ), Kyrgystan (KG), India (IN), China (CN), Pakistan (PK), and...historically global competitors with the US. Thus, unlike the members of the EU, the members of the SCO except perhaps India do not have a long history

  19. Analyzing International Economic Influence on Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-30

    the SCO (China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, India , Iran, Mongolia, and Pakistan) were included as the SCO represents...Kazakhstan (KZ), Kyrgystan (KG), India (IN), China (CN), Pakistan (PK), and Mongolia (MN). At about the same distance, as the SCO members and observers, and...except perhaps India do not have a long history of close friendly ties to the US. Even India has previously grossly defied US policy initiatives in

  20. Iran’s Influence in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-07

    to build a complex of houses, hotels , schools, markets, and other commercial buildings in Basra.26 Iran has also invested in Iraq’s banking...sites. The pilgrims support the local economy by patronizing the hotels , restaurants, transportation and other businesses associated with the... tourism infrastructure.27 There have been some negative impacts of Iran’s economic initiatives in Iraq. an effort by the Iranian government to flood

  1. JPRS Report, Near East & South Asia, Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    million. Min- bid to build the Karun III hydroelectric plant by a ister Santana has asked his colleague in the Ministry of margin of $60 million. Andrade...Wolfgang Sauer is also working on the formation of by the outcome of the negotiations on Karun III. another Brazilian consortium for setting up paper and...for building the Karun III for imports from Brazil, a concession they made because hydroelectric plant seems to be the one on which Iran Brazil began

  2. Scorpion sting in Iran: a review.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Rouhullah; Fathi, Behrooz

    2012-10-01

    Among Middle Eastern countries, at least 52 species of scorpions, especially dangerous types, have been reported in Iran. This is more than any other country in the region. In addition, in Iran the recorded scorpion stings from 2001 to 2009 were more than 42,500 per year, of which, approximately 19.5 deaths have been reported each year, mostly in spring and summer. About 10 species are responsible for the reported envenoming which belong to the Buthidae family apart from Hemiscorpius lepturus which is a Hemiscorpiidae. The Buthidae family includes: Androctonus crassicauda, Mesobuthus eupeus, Odontobuthus doriae, Hottentotta saulcyi, Hottentotta schach, Compsobuthus matthiesseni, Orthochirus scrobiculosus, Apistobuthus pterygocercus and Olivierus caucasicus. A. crassicauda and H. lepturus are usually cited as the most dangerous species among Iranian scorpions. This article focuses on the main Iranian scorpions and their geographical distribution, especially those which are medically important and considered to be the more dangerous to human, and also attempts to demonstrate an accurate magnitude of scorpion stings in Iran.

  3. Embryo donation in Iran: an ethical review.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Leila; Bagheri, Alireza

    2013-12-01

    Iran is the only Muslim country that has legislation on embryo donation, adopted in 2003. With an estimated 10-15% of couples in the country that are infertile, there are not any legal or religious barriers that prohibit an infertile couple from taking advantage of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs). Although all forms of ARTs available in Iran have been legitimized by religious authorities, there is a lack of legislation in all ARTs except embryo donation. By highlighting ethical issues in embryo donation, the paper presents a critical review of the Act of Embryo Donation in Iran. The paper argues that the Act does not provide enough safeguards for the future child and assurance for the safety of the donated embryos. It also does not restrict embryo donation to surplus embryos from infertile couples and is silent about the number of embryos that could be donated by each couple as well as the number of recipients for donated embryos by a couple. The Act is also silent about the issues of genetic linkage (nasab) and heritage which are challenging issues, especially in a conservative Islamic society. As a result, the future child may not inherit from their birth parents, as it is not required by the Act, or from the genetically related parents under the anonymity policy. Finally there is no standard national protocol or guidelines to evaluate the safety of the donated embryos. The paper concludes that despite its benefits, the Act lacks clarity, and it is subject to misunderstanding and confusion.

  4. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Taherkhani, Reza; Farshadpour, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Iran is known as an endemic country for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection, while there are variations in the epidemiology of HEV infection throughout the country. The available epidemiological studies in different regions of Iran show HEV seroprevalence of 1.1%-14.2% among general population, 4.5% -14.3% among blood donors, 6.1%-22.8% among injecting drug users, 6.3%-28.3% among hemodialysis patients, 1.6%-11.3% among patients infected with other hepatitis viruses, 27.5% among patients with chronic liver disease, 30.8% among kidney transplant recipient patients, and 10%-16.4% among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. These variations reflect differences in the status of public health and hygiene, risk factors, and routes of transmission in different regions and groups. Therefore, it is necessary to review the epidemiology of HEV infection to determine the most prevalent risk factors and routes of transmission, and to evaluate the effectiveness of preventive strategies employed in the public health services of the country. Moreover, the other epidemiological aspects of HEV, including the genotypic pattern, extra hepatic manifestations, and incidence of chronic infection need to be investigated among Iranian population to expand the current knowledge on the epidemiology of HEV and to clarify the real burden of HEV infection. Therefore, this review was performed to provide a general overview regarding the epidemiology of HEV in Iran. PMID:27298557

  5. Factors Associated With Suicidal Attempts in Iran: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Hakim Shooshtari, Mitra; Malakouti, Seyyed Kazem; Panaghi, Leili; Mohseni, Shohreh; Mansouri, Naghmeh; Rahimi Movaghar, Afarin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Suicide prevention is a health service priority. Some surveys have assessed suicidal behaviors and potential risk factors. Objectives: The current paper aimed to gather information about etiology of suicide attempts in Iran. Data Sources: Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched. Study Selection: By electronic and gray literature search, 128 articles were enrolled in this paper. Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc were searched for electronic search. After reading the abstracts, 84 studies were excluded and full texts of 44 articles were reviewed critically. Data Extraction: Pubmed, ISI web of science, PsychInfo, IranPsych, IranMedex, IranDoc as well as gray literature were searched to find any study about etiologic factors of suicide attempt in Iran. Results: Depressive disorder was the most common diagnosis in suicide attempters that is 45% of the evaluated cases had depression. One study that had used Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory (MMPI) found that Histrionics in females and Schizophrenia and Paranoia in males were significantly influential. Family conflicts with 50.7% and conflict with parents with 44% were two effective psychosocial factors in suicidal attempts. In around one fourth (28.7%) of the cases, conflict with spouse was the main etiologic factor. Conclusions: According to the methodological limitations, outcomes should be generalized cautiously. Further studies will help to plan preventive strategies for suicidal attempts; therefore, continued researches should be conducted to fill the data gaps. PMID:27284284

  6. Case Study: Iran, Islam, the NPT, and the Bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, E .

    2011-04-01

    The goals of this case study are: (1) To examine the correlation between Iran's nuclear program and clerical statements; (2) To evaluate the importance of these statements; (3) To understand the relationship between policy and fatwas (Islamic decrees); (4) To address the issue of a 'nuclear fatwa'; and (5) To examine how, if at all, Sharia (Islamic law) has influenced Iran's actions or inactions with respect to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Iran's adherence to its IAEA Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol. The Islamic Republic of Iran (hereinafter Iran) is one of two theocracies in the world, the second being Vatican City. Iran's government derives its constitutional, moral, and political legitimacy from Islam. As a result of this theocratic culture, rules are set and interpreted with a much different calibrator than that of the Western world. Islam affects all aspects of Iranian life. This is further complicated by the fact that Islam is not a nationalistic faith, in that many people all over the world believe in and adhere to Islamic principles. As a result, a political system that derives much of its fervor from being nationalistic is caught between two worlds, one within the land boundaries of Iran and the other within a faith that transcends boundaries. Thus, any understanding of Islamic law must first be understood within this delicate balance of nationalism and transcendence. Iran has found itself on the international stage concerning its nuclear program. Because Iran is a theocratic state, it is imperative to examine its political moves, speeches, rights, and obligations through the lens of Islam. This study will examine how Islam plays a role in Iran's dealing with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its understanding of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), including parties obligations under Safeguards Agreements and the Additional Protocol, and also provide a

  7. Mountaineer`s gas facilities decision support system

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Mountaineer Gas Co. of Charleston, W.Va., is justifiably proud of its capacity to combine electronic maps with a full database of information about its facilities and customers, and use that mix to make the decisions required in operating a gas company with better information and more quickly. Determining when a pipeline needs replacement or repair used to take several days at Mountaineer. With the new system in place, the decision can be made in a matter of minutes. The paper describes the system and its development, then discusses adding customer information as the next step.

  8. Sero-survey of Avian Influenza in backyard poultry and wild bird species in Iran-2014.

    PubMed

    Fallah Mehrabadi, M H; Bahonar, A R; Vasfi Marandi, M; Sadrzadeh, A; Tehrani, F; Salman, M D

    2016-06-01

    In almost all villages in Iran backyard birds, especially chickens, are kept for egg and meat production. AI H9N2 subtype is endemic in Iran. Therefore, estimation of AI prevalence among these birds is important to determine the risk of transmission of infection to commercial farms. The aim of this study was to estimate subclinical infections or previous exposure to H5, H7, and H9 subtypes and to identify potentially important determinants of prevalence of this infectious at premises level in backyard poultry, bird gardens, zoos, and wild bird markets in Iran. A survey was conducted using a cross-sectional design throughout the entire country. A total of 329 villages, seven bird gardens, three zoos and five wild bird markets were included. In each village four families that kept birds were included in the collection of biological samples and background information. The Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used as the screening test and all ELISA-positive samples were examined with the HI test to differentiate H5, H7, and H9. Among the bird gardens, eight of 15 premises (53.3%) were positive in both the ELISA test and HI for H9N2. Testing of samples collected in the villages revealed that 296 out of 329 villages (90%) had positive ELISA tests and also HI tests for H9. The HI-H9 mean titers in positive units were significantly higher than negative units (P<.001). This study revealed no significant statistical differences between risk variables in seropositive and seronegative bird gardens in the case of H9 (P>.05). The results of this study showed that among the risk variables, mountainous area was a protective factor and lack of hygienic disposal of dead birds was a risk factor for AI; this was also observed in rural poultry. The high sero-prevalence of influenza H9N2 in rural domestic poultry indicates that the disease is endemic. It is necessary to include backyard poultry in any surveillance system and control strategy due to the existence of AIV in

  9. Spatial Distribution of Scorpion Sting in a High-Risk Area of Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Mehran; Moosavy, Seyed Hamid; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahamd Ali; Navidpour, Shahrokh; Zare, Shahram; Madani, Abdolhossein; Rafinejad, Javad

    2016-06-16

    Scorpion sting is a public health problem in south and southwestern parts of Iran, with about 36,000 cases recorded annually. This study aimed to find the spatial distribution of scorpions and their stings in Bandar Abbas County. Monthly scorpion sting cases at the village level were obtained and used for mapping. Scorpions were collected from 14 collection sites using a UV lamp at night and searching under stones during the day time. During the study period, a total of 3,971 cases of scorpion sting were recorded, most of them were found in mountainous areas and affected individuals aged 25-44 yrs. In total, 18 scorpion species belonging to 10 genera were collected and identified. The peak of scorpion sting cases occurred from July to September. The northern part of the mountainous areas had a richer species composition. Hemiscorpius persicus and Hemiscorpius gaillardi were collected for the first time in the area. There were 22 scorpion species in the area across studies; among them, 10 were most dangerous. Hemiscorpius genus is the main etiologic agent in Bandar Abbas County. Mapping dangerous species allows the health system to provide relevant anti-scorpion venom serum accordingly and more cost-effectively.

  10. 10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE AUXILIARY STRUCTURES. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  11. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in

  12. [On the fauna of blackflies (Diptera: Simuliidae) of Iran].

    PubMed

    Iankovskiĭ, A V

    2010-01-01

    Collections of blacfklies from Iran have been examined; four species were recorded. Three new species are described--Tetisimulium iranicum sp. n., Wilhelmia lurestanica sp. n., and Crosskeyellum zagros sp. n. Presence of Tetisimulium coarctatum (Rubzov, 1940) in Iran is confirmed.

  13. Iran's Denial of Education to Baha'is

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the background of the persecution of the Baha'is in Iran, especially the denial of education, and explores what could be done to alleviate this injustice, including enlisting the support of nations, organizations, media and people around the world. Baha'is are the largest religious minority in Iran and have been…

  14. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-28

    high-level State Department official at multilateral nuclear talks with Iran on July 19, 2008, although that meeting, and subsequent discussions...45 Targeted Financial Measures by Treasury Department ...in order to build international consensus to pressure Iran. The latest State Department human rights report (released March 11, 2008), the 2008

  15. Iran’s Economic Conditions: U.S. Policy Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-22

    provided low-interest loans for agriculture, tourism , and industry and has instituted loan forgiveness policies. Other activities include the...affiliates involved in economic areas such as agriculture, construction, industries , mining, transportation, commerce, and tourism . Since 1991, the...penalties on companies that supply Iran with gasoline or support its domestic petroleum-related industries . Introduction The Islamic Republic of Iran is

  16. The Idea of English in Iran: An Example from Urmia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Karim; Richards, Jack C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the place of English in Iran. To do this, we look at the social presence of English in Urmia (the capital of West Azerbaijan province, Iran). The paper draws on instances of the use of English in different contexts in Urmia, including its use in academia, business, state and private education, media, and people's ordinary…

  17. Iran: Economy, Senility, and Ineptitude Greasing the Slide to Instability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-13

    Middle East Institute, 1977. Banisadr , Abolhassan. The Fundamental Principles and Precepts of Islamic Government. Lexington: Mazda, 1981. Bill...Mohamed. Iran: The Untold Story. New York: Pantheon, 1981. Hooglund, Eric J. Land and Revolution in Iran: 1960-1980. Austin : University of Texas, 1982. "In

  18. An annotated checklist of Malachiidae (Coleoptera: Cleroidea) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirutenko, Vladyslav; Ghahari, Hassan

    2016-09-09

    A checklist of Iranian Malachiidae (Coleoptera) is given in this paper. Eighty two species from 22 genera (subfamily Malachiinae) are listed in the fauna of Iran. Of these species, 31 are endemic to Iran, and one Anthocomus pupillatus Abeille de Perrin, 1890 is a new record for this country.

  19. Organizational Commitment among High School Teachers of India and Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joolideh, Faranak; Yeshodhara, K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the organizational commitment of teachers in India and Iran. It is an attempt to understand how these perceptions vary by demographic variables such as age and subject taught by teachers. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from 721 high school teachers in Bangalore (India) and Sanandaj (Iran).…

  20. Yearly report, Yucca Mountain project

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, J.N.

    1992-09-30

    We proposed to (1) Develop our data logging and analysis equipment and techniques for analyzing seismic data from the Southern Great Basin Seismic Network (SGBSN), (2) Investigate the SGBSN data for evidence of seismicity patterns, depth distribution patterns, and correlations with geologic features (3) Repair and maintain our three broad band downhole digital seismograph stations at Nelson, nevada, Troy Canyon, Nevada, and Deep Springs, California (4) Install, operate, and log data from a super sensitive microearthquake array at Yucca Mountain (5) Analyze data from micro-earthquakes relative to seismic hazard at Yucca Mountain.

  1. BLOOD MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeppen, Robert P.; Armstrong, Michelle K.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Blood Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia, indicates that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral and energy resources. Natural gas may be present at great depth, perhaps 5 mi down and below the overthrust sheets of the Blue Ridge Mountains, but presently available information is not adequate to evaluate the resource potential of this commodity. Further seismic studies and exploratory drilling are needed to evaluate the gas potential of this part of the Eastern Overthrust Belt.

  2. Fault Slip Rate of the Kazerun Fault System (KFS), Iran, Investigated Using Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoorcheh, Bijan; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Bahroudi, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    A 3D non-homogenous finite element model (FEM) is developed to investigate the spatial variations of interseismic deformation for the Kazerun Fault System (KFS) in the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The model includes 19 fault segments that were extracted from geological maps and previous studies, and the average slips in the dip and strike directions on these segments were computed. The contemporary surface deformation is simulated using a free horizontal detachment surface. The dip angles of the faults in the model are varied at 90°, 70°, 50° and 30° to simulate different 3D representations of the fault systems. Tectonic loading at the boundaries of the region is applied using predicted GPS velocity vectors to the north (southern part of the Central Iran Block) and south (southern region of the Zagros mountain belt), which were obtained by solving inverse and forward problems. Where possible, the fault slip rates that are obtained using our non-homogeneous finite element model are validated using the long-term geologic and instantaneous GPS slip rates. The model is then used to estimate the dip- and strike-slip rates of the fault segments of the KFS for which no a priori information was available. We derive an upper bound of 1 mm/year for the average dip-slip rate in the region, which is consistent with estimates from geomorphologic observations. The modeling results show that in addition to the 4 main faults (Dena, Kazerun, Kareh Bas and Main Recent), other faults, such as the Zagros Front, Main Front, High Zagros and Mishan faults, accommodate up to 2.5 mm/year of the differential movement between the North and Central Zagros. We also investigated the contrast in rigidity between the southern and northern areas of the Zagros mountain belt and found that a rigidity contrast of 2 best explains the GPS data of contemporary surface deformation. Neglecting to account for the rigidity contrast in the model can lead to biased estimates of the fault slip rate of up to

  3. Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit CO-0034762, the Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station is authorized to discharge from the interior storm drainage system and air exhaust stacks at the Cheyenne Mountain Complex, in El Paso County, Colorado, to tributaries Fountain Creek.

  4. [Vertical zonation of mountain landscape: a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ran-Hao; Chen, Li-Ding; Zhang, Bai-Ping; Fu, Bo-Jie

    2009-07-01

    Vertical gradient of mountain landscape is about 1000 times of its horizontal gradient, and hence, only using landscape pattern index is quite difficult to reflect the landscape regularity along vertical gradient. Mountain altitudinal belt is a kind of classic geographic models representing the vertical differentiation of landscape, being of significance in geographic and ecological researches. However, the discrete expression pattern and the inaccuracy of the borderlines of mountain vertical belts limit the roles of mountain vertical belt in accurately describing landscape pattern in regional scale and in explaining ecological processes. This paper reviewed the research progress and existing problems on mountain altitudinal belt, put forward a suggestion of using modern information technology to establish a comprehensive and continuous mountain landscape information chart, and discussed the framework and prospect of the establishment of the chart, which would have reference value for accurately describing mountain landscape pattern and explaining specific ecological processes, and promote the further improvement of the methodology for mountain ecological research.

  5. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to...

  6. 31 CFR 560.551 - Student loan payments from persons in Iran authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Iran authorized. 560.551 Section 560.551 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... payments from persons in Iran authorized. United States depository institutions and private loan companies... payments from persons in Iran or ordinarily resident in Iran....

  7. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to...

  8. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to...

  9. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to...

  10. 31 CFR 560.551 - Student loan payments from persons in Iran authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Iran authorized. 560.551 Section 560.551 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... payments from persons in Iran authorized. United States depository institutions and private loan companies... payments from persons in Iran or ordinarily resident in Iran....

  11. 28 CFR 601.1 - Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Iran/Contra. 601.1 Section 601.1 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE JURISDICTION OF THE INDEPENDENT COUNSEL: IRAN/CONTRA § 601.1 Jurisdiction of the Independent Counsel: Iran/Contra. (a) The Independent Counsel. Iran/Contra has jurisdiction to investigate to...

  12. Rocky Mountain futures: An ecological perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, Jill S.

    2002-01-01

    The United Nations has proclaimed 2002 as the International Year of Mountains to increase international awareness of the global importance of mountain ecosystems. The case-based multidisciplinary approach of this book constitutes an important new model for understanding the implications of land-use practices and economic activity on mountains, and will serve a vital role in improving decisionmaking both in the Rocky Mountains and in other parts of the world that face similar challenges.

  13. Iran`s petroleum policy: Current trends and the future outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Pezeshki, S.; Fesharaki, F.

    1994-12-01

    The Iranian economy and political situation have undergone radical changes since the 1979 Islamic revolution. The excesses of the early years of the revolution have gradually given way to moderation and a more pragmatic economic policy--based on the principles of the free market. The petroleum policy, as a subset of the economic policies, has been somewhat affected by the political and economic developments in Iran. The petroleum policy has changed from a position of no foreign participation to a position that includes a desire for foreign participation, the text of a model contract, and an attempt to introduce new technologies in the upstream sector. This report provides an overview of the key issues facing the Iranian oil industry and the economic context in which the oil industry is operating in Iran. It describes the evolution of policies meant to move the oil industry toward the free market; it discusses Iran`s oil trading partners, the outlook for refining and project investments, and current and likely future developments in the natural gas and petrochemical sectors. In short, the report provides an up-to-date assessment of the Iranian petroleum sector and its likely evolution in the future.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of monthly reference crop evapotranspiration trends in Iran: a qualitative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaedi, Abolfazl; Ghabaei Sough, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sayed-Hossein; Mooshakhian, Yousof; Bannayan, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyze the sensitivity of the monthly reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo) trends to key climatic factors (minimum and maximum air temperature (T max and T min), relative humidity (RH), sunshine hours (t sun), and wind speed (U 2)) in Iran by applying a qualitative detrended method, rather than the historical mathematical approach. Meteorological data for the period of 1963-2007 from five synoptic stations with different climatic characteristics, including Mashhad (mountains), Tabriz (mountains), Tehran (semi-desert), Anzali (coastal wet), and Shiraz (semi-mountains) were used to address this objective. The Mann-Kendall test was employed to assess the trends of ETo and the climatic variables. The results indicated a significant increasing trend of the monthly ETo for Mashhad and Tabriz for most part of the year while the opposite conclusion was drawn for Tehran, Anzali, and Shiraz. Based on the detrended method, RH and U 2 were the two main variables enhancing the negative ETo trends in Tehran and Anzali stations whereas U 2 and temperature were responsible for this observation in Shiraz. On the other hand, the main meteorological variables affecting the significant positive trend of ETo were RH and t sun in Tabriz and T min, RH, and U 2 in Mashhad. Although a relative agreement was observed in terms of identifying one of the first two key climatic variables affecting the ETo trend, the qualitative and the quantitative sensitivity analysis solutions did never coincide. Further research is needed to evaluate this interesting finding for other geographic locations, and also to search for the major causes of this discrepancy.

  15. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arkansas Mountain. 9.112... Arkansas Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Arkansas Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Arkansas...

  16. Storymakers: Hopa Mountain's Early Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templin, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Hopa Mountain's StoryMakers program is an innovative, research-based program for donating high quality young children's books to parents. Hopa Mountain is a nonprofit organization based in Bozeman, Montana. Hopa Mountain works with groups of rural and tribal citizen leaders who form StoryMakers Community Teams to talk one-on-one with local parents…

  17. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  18. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  19. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  20. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  1. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  2. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  3. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  4. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  5. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  6. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  7. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  8. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  9. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  10. 27 CFR 9.94 - Howell Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Howell Mountain. 9.94... Howell Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Howell Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Howell...

  11. 27 CFR 9.102 - Sonoma Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sonoma Mountain. 9.102... Sonoma Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Sonoma Mountain.” (b) Approved maps. The approved maps for determining the boundary of the Sonoma...

  12. Research in the prehistory of central Western iran.

    PubMed

    Young, T C; Smith, P E

    1966-07-22

    The archeological sequence in the Bisitun and Kangovar valleys promises to fill a number of gaps in the prehistory of this part of southwestern Asia. Ghar-i Khar should yield data concerning the degree of cultural continuity or discontinuity in the Upper Pleistocene and early Holocene ranges of prehistory. This cave site should also be helpful in gaining further insight into the climatic conditions during these times, and in particular on the prevalent fauna and flor (and the human use of them) at the close of the Pleistocene, when some groups may already have been leading ways of life foreshadowing the Neolithic. Ganj-i Dareh offers the opportunity of examining in detail what seems to be an early farming community at or very near the beginning of an important shift in methods of subsistence. The geographical position of this latter site may also be of unusual significance in studying the spread of the Neolithic; located as it is near the traditional route across the Zagros Mountains into Iraq, this site, as well as others in the region, may have played an important role in the diffusion of the new elements and methods to other parts of the mountainous zone. That is, within the broad "natural habitat zone" it may be useful to distinguish optimum areas of development and diffusion during the early phases of the Neolithic. Comparison with small sites like Tepe Asiab in the Kermanshah Valley (considered to have been a temporary encampment of clam collectors) (7) may place such sites in their proper perspective as seasonally occupied satellites of more permanent villages such as Ganj-i Dareh; the same possibility is open for the later ceramic Neolithic phase now that the oldest level of Godin Tepe shows a community to which nearby sites on this time horizon can probably be related. However, it will require an intimate study of the two valleys as microenvironments, and comparison of them with each other and with the Kermanshah and Hulailan valleys, in order to reach a

  13. The Mountaineer-Malaysia Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    A 26-day summer field course of West Virginia University's (WVU) Recreation and Parks Department took students to Malaysia's mountains and rainforests to observe how Malaysians are managing national parks, problem elephants, and population pressures on parks. The adventure provided powerful learning experiences. Further exchanges between WVU and…

  14. Lone Mountain processing boosts recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgarth, T.; Bethell, P.; Gupta, B.K.

    2005-08-01

    A new deslime column flotation circuit installed at Arch Coal's Lone Mountain preparation plant in St. Charles, Va., USA recovers an additional 20 tph. The article describes how this column technology was selected. It explains the circuit design, start-up and post upgrade distant testing. 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Anatomy of a Mountain Range.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Berkeley

    1993-01-01

    Provides written tour of Colorado Rockies along San Juan Skyway in which the geological features and formation of the mountain range is explored. Discusses evidence of geologic forces and products such as plate tectonic movement and the Ancestral Rockies; subduction and the Laramide Orogeny; volcanism and calderas; erosion, faulting, land…

  16. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  17. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    PubMed

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  18. Profiteering on the Iran-Iraq war

    SciTech Connect

    Brzoska, M.

    1987-06-01

    The military gear delivered from the US in the Iran-contra affair represents only a minor portion of arms sales to the combatants in the Iraq-Iran war. That war has now lasted more than six years and has deeply influenced the international arms market. Occurring during a period when other demand for arms has been relatively low, the war has nourished new suppliers and has revived both the legal and illegal private arms market. The erratic behavior of the USSR and the US, until recently by far the most important arms suppliers to the Third World, has pushed Iran and Iraq toward more commercially oriented sources, including many in the Third World. Both countries have had ample supplies of weapons during the war, and these weapons have served their purpose. Mainly because of its duration, the war already ranks third among post-World War II wars - after the Vietnam war and the Biafra war - in battlefield victims, with 300,000-500,000 casualties. The economic cost has risen to nearly $500 billion in weapons, destruction, and lost income. While it is hard to see anything but losers on the battlefield, the arms traffickers are profiting. Total Iranian arms imports since August 1980 have been higher than $10 billion, while Iraq has imported more than $30 billion worth. It is difficult to know whether making arms more difficult to obtain would have stopped the war, but judging from other recent wars, such as those between India and Pakistan, between Uganda and Tanzania, and in the Middle East, it seems likely that hostilities could have been stopped long ago. 12 references.

  19. Epidemiology of Scorpionism in Iran during 2009

    PubMed Central

    Rafizadeh, Sina; Rafinejad, Javad; Rassi, Yavar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Scorpion sting is a major health problem in Iran. The aim of current study was to measure the incidence rates of scorpion stings, mortality, recovery, and affected age groups. The results of treatment with and without anti venom also were considered in the entire country during 2009. Methods: All the data were collected from emergency section of different hospitals and then were analyzed by related software. The responsibility of such data collection and surveillance is related to the Department of Violence and Injury, Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran. Results: A total incidence of 59.5/100000 was found for the 12-month period. During the study period the most and the least cases were reported from Khuzestan and Mazandaran Provinces with incidence of 541 and 0 per 100000 respectively. Totally 40220 anti venom vials were used, i.e., the ratio of 91 vial/ 100 affected cases. The stings occur mainly in rural areas (57.7%). Young people with the age group of 15–24 years old were the most victims of stings. The mortality and recovery rates of cases who had received anti venom less than 6 h of stings were calculated as 0.01% and 99.9% respectively. Conclusion: The high incidence of scorpion stings in Iran especially in Khuzestan suggests the necessity of preventive programmes for decreasing the incidence. Such programmes could start by community educating in the high prevalent areas. In addition prompt and local treatment is particularly important for infants and pre-school children. PMID:23785696

  20. Geology of the Henry Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilbert, G.K.

    1877-01-01

    If these pages fail to give a correct account of the structure of the Henry Mountains the fault is mine and I have no excuse. In all the earlier exploration of the Rocky Mountain Region, as well as in much of the more recent survey, the geologist has merely accompanied the geographer and has had no voice in the determination of either the route or the rate of travel. When the structure of a mountain was in doubt he was rarely able to visit the points which should resolve the doubt, but was compelled to turn regretfully away. Not so in the survey of the Henry Mountains. Geological exploration had shown that they were well disposed for examination, and that they promised to give the key to a type of structure which was at best obscurely known; and I was sent by Professor Powell to make a study of them, without restriction as to my order or method. I was limited only in time, the snow stopping my work two months after it was begun. Two months would be far too short a period in which to survey a thousand square miles in Pennsylvania or Illinois, but among the Colorado Plateaus it proved sufficient. A few comprehensive views from mountain tops gave the general distribution of the formations, and the remainder of the time was spent in the examination of the localities which best displayed the peculiar features of the structure. So thorough was the display and so satisfactory the examination, that in preparing my report I have felt less than ever before the desire to revisit the field and prove my conclusions by more extended observation.

  1. A Survey of the Agrotis of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Feizpoor, Sh.; Shirvani, A.; Rashki, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reviews the genus Agrotis Ochsenheimer, 1816 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Noctuinae) in Iran from a taxonomic and faunistic point of view. An identification key of external features is presented for 16 Iranian species and subspecies. A description of each taxon is presented based on external male and female genital characteristics. Diagnostic features and comparisons with the closest relatives are given for each species. Original combination and citation with the synonymy of each species or subspecies are expounded as well as their distribution and bionomy. Adult moths and male genitalia are illustrated. PMID:25368051

  2. Pediatric visceral leishmaniasis in northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Abdinia, Babak; Oliaei-Motlagh, Mohammad; Teimouri-Dereshki, Amir

    2016-11-01

    Leishmaniasis is one of the major health problems in Iran. Although the incidence of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is reported almost everywhere, the northwestern Iran is one of the major endemic regions.To do this study, clinical, laboratory as well as disease characteristics of children admitted to Children Cure and Health Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, were examined as the reference hospital for the treatment of VL in northwestern Iran.In this study, 156 children hospitalized in a pediatric hospital from 2000 to 2015 for VL were included. Gender, age, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increase in the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), alanine transaminase (SGPT), and aspartate transaminase (SGOT), major clinical manifestations such as fever, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, treatment type, and the disease were studied.Among 156 patients examined in this study, 88 (56.41%) and 68 (43.59%) participants were male and female, respectively. The minimum and maximum ages of the infection were 4.5 months and 6 years, respectively. The mean age of the infected children was 17.94 months. Fever (94.24%) and splenomegaly (86.53%) were the most common symptoms of this disease among children. In addition, 49 (31.41%), 64 (41.02%), 18 (11.53%), 33 (21.15%), and 40 (25.64%) participants had leukopenia, hemoglobin count below 8, ESR above 100, ESR above 60, and platelets below 100,000, respectively. Moreover, 39 (25%) and 17 (10.89%) patients had high aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT). Also, 96.2% of the participants responded to the treatment with glucantime. The rate of mortality in this study was 3.2%.Clinically, almost all children had fever and splenomegaly at the onset of the disease. In addition, hepatic involvement was observed in all cases of mortality, cases with a lack of initial response, and those in need of auxiliary medication. Hepatic involvement appears to be related to the prognosis of the disease. In our study, bone marrow

  3. Iran Nuclear Threat - An Environmental Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    situation can happen with the franian rivers like Karun River, not only will the water of this river contaminate, the forests of date palms that depend on...Shatt Al- Arab -which is linked to the Karun River- will be destroyed. Seismic Hazard Assessment of Iran The franian plateau is one of the seismically...htmllnational.htm 51 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Karun 52 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shatcal-Arab 53 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shatcal-Arab 54 http

  4. A survey of the Agrotis of Iran.

    PubMed

    Feizpoor, Sh; Shirvani, A; Rashki, M

    2014-01-01

    The present study reviews the genus Agrotis Ochsenheimer, 1816 (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Noctuinae) in Iran from a taxonomic and faunistic point of view. An identification key of external features is presented for 16 Iranian species and subspecies. A description of each taxon is presented based on external male and female genital characteristics. Diagnostic features and comparisons with the closest relatives are given for each species. Original combination and citation with the synonymy of each species or subspecies are expounded as well as their distribution and bionomy. Adult moths and male genitalia are illustrated.

  5. The spider family Filistatidae (Araneae) in Iran.

    PubMed

    Marusik, Yuri M; Zamani, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    All species of Filistatidae occurring in Iran are surveyed. Zaituniaakhanii sp. n. is described on the basis of female specimens collected in Tehran province, and the previously unknown male of Sahastatasinuspersica Marusik, Zamani & Mirshamsi, 2014 is described for the first time. Also, the endogynes of the holotypes of Zaituniaalexandri Brignoli, 1982, Zaituniamedica Brignoli, 1982 and Zaituniapersica Brignoli, 1982 are illustrated. Including these results, the number of Iranian species of Filistatidae is increased to seven, which indicates the highest species-richness of this family in the Western Palaearctic.

  6. The spider family Filistatidae (Araneae) in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Marusik, Yuri M.; Zamani, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Abstract All species of Filistatidae occurring in Iran are surveyed. Zaitunia akhanii sp. n. is described on the basis of female specimens collected in Tehran province, and the previously unknown male of Sahastata sinuspersica Marusik, Zamani & Mirshamsi, 2014 is described for the first time. Also, the endogynes of the holotypes of Zaitunia alexandri Brignoli, 1982, Zaitunia medica Brignoli, 1982 and Zaitunia persica Brignoli, 1982 are illustrated. Including these results, the number of Iranian species of Filistatidae is increased to seven, which indicates the highest species-richness of this family in the Western Palaearctic. PMID:26312024

  7. Plague in Iran: its history and current status

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Plague remains a public health concern worldwide, particularly in old foci. Multiple epidemics of this disease have been recorded throughout the history of Iran. Despite the long-standing history of human plague in Iran, it remains difficult to obtain an accurate overview of the history and current status of plague in Iran. METHODS: In this review, available data and reports on cases and outbreaks of human plague in the past and present in Iran and in neighboring countries were collected, and information was compiled regarding when, where, and how many cases occurred. RESULTS: This paper considers the history of plague in Persia (the predecessor of today’s Iran) and has a brief review of plague in countries in the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, including a range of countries in the Middle East and North Africa. CONCLUSIONS: Since Iran has experienced outbreaks of plague for several centuries, neighboring countries have reported the disease in recent years, the disease can be silent for decades, and the circulation of Yersinia pestis has been reported among rodents and dogs in western Iran, more attention should be paid to disease monitoring in areas with previously reported human cases and in high-risk regions with previous epizootic and enzootic activity. PMID:27457063

  8. POND MOUNTAIN AND POND MOUNTAIN ADDITION ROADLESS AREAS, TENNESSEE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffitts, W.R.; Bitar, Richard

    1984-01-01

    As a result of a mineral study of the Pond Mountain Roadless Areas, Tennessee, a probable potential for the occurrence of tin, niobium, and tungsten resource with associated beryllium, molybdenum, zinc, and fluorite was identified in rocks of Precambrian age particularly in the southeastern part of the area. Detailed geologic mapping and geochemical sampling of the soils and rocks in the area of Precambrian rocks is recommended to identify and delimit the areas of potential resources of tin, niobium, and tungsten.

  9. Best Practices Case Study: Pine Mountain Builders - Pine Mountain, GA

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Pine Mountain Builders who worked with DOE’s IBACOS team to achieve HERS scores of 59 on 140 homes built around a wetlands in Georgia. The team used taped rigid foam exterior sheathing and spray foam insulation in the walls and on the underside of the attic for a very tight 1.0 to 1.8 ACH 50 building shell.

  10. Energy portfolio of Iran: A case study of solar desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besharati, Adib

    Energy plays a very important role in the economic development of a country such as Iran where industrial progress and higher living standards increase demand for energy. Iran is one of the countries in the world that simultaneously produces and consumes large amounts of energy. Because of its geographic latitude and weather conditions, Iran has the potential to develop and use of both fossil and renewable energy sources. In South Iran, there are huge oil and gas resources, and at the same time high potential of solar radiation. However, at the present large-scale utilization, solar energy is prohibitively expensive for Iran. Therefore, this study investigates an economical way to utilize solar energy in a meaningful way for Iran. One of the possible uses of solar energy that is both economical and technically feasible is desalination of water using solar energy. People in South Iran live in different areas with relatively low population density. One of the critical problems in those areas is a lack of clean drinking water. As a result, there is an urgent need to investigate ways to produce clean water from the saltwater. Therefore, the present study conducts a case study of solar desalination in south Iran using solar. Different desalination methods, such as humidification dehumidification by using a solar collector, and reverse osmosis, are discussed. In the case study, a prototype desalination plant was considered and both technical and economic aspects of the plant were investigated in details. The results showed higher productivity of drinking water in reverse osmosis method for south Iran.

  11. Aflatoxins in Iran: Nature, Hazards and Carcinogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Khoshpey, B; Farhud, DD; Zaini, F

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that mycotoxin contamination of agricultural products is a challenge for individual’s health especially in developing countries. Improper production and storage of foods, prepare conditions for aflatoxin production in crops, especially rice, wheat, pistachio, walnut, almond, etc which are the main sources of foods for people. Feeding livestock by contaminated bread is another way of human exposure to mycotoxins, especially aflatoxin and because of expensive methods for detecting and analyzing aflatoxin in laboratory; it is not measured in foods. This manuscript is a review of some Iranian and nonIranian reports about aflatoxin, its exposure ways, its adverse effect on human health and nutrition, as well as methods for reducing its exposure. Based on studies on foods, aflatoxin exposure is high in Iran. Since livestock feeding by contaminated bread is one of the potential ways for milk contamination, we should control and reduce aflatoxin contamination by improving production process, storage condition and livestock feeding as soon as possible. Pistachio is one of the most important exporting products of Iran and to maintain Iran’s position in exporting of this product, specific regulations on lowering its contamination with aflatoxin should be considered seriously. Finally, effective controlling of all food and feedstuffs which are vulnerable to aflatoxin contamination is necessary to prevent its effects. PMID:23113099

  12. Snakebite management in Iran: Devising a protocol

    PubMed Central

    Monzavi, Seyed Mostafa; Dadpour, Bita; Afshari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snakebite in Iran has been a health concern. However, management of snakebite is not standardized and varies from center to center. This study is aimed at devising an evidence-based comprehensive protocol for snakebite management in Iran, to reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Materials and Methods: A narrative search in electronic databases was performed. Fifty peer-reviewed articles, guidelines, and textbooks were reviewed and practical details were extracted. Our currently used protocol in the Mashhad Toxicology Center was supplemented with this information. Consequently an improved wide-range protocol was developed. The protocol was then discussed and amended within a focus group comprised of medical toxicologists and internal medicine specialists. The amended version was finally discussed with expert physicians specialized in different areas of medicine, to be optimized by supplementing other specific considerations. Results: During a one-year process, the protocol was finalized. The final version of the protocol, which was designed in six steps, comprised of three components: A schematic algorithm, a severity grading scale, and instructions for supportive and adjunctive treatments. The algorithm pertains to both Viperidae and Elapidae snakebite envenomations and consists of a planned course of action and dosing of antivenom, based on the severity of the envenomation. Conclusion: Snakebite envenomation is a clinical toxicologic emergency, which needs to be treated in a timely and organized manner. Hence, a multi-aspect protocol was designed to improve the clinical outcomes, reduce unnecessary administration of antivenom, and help physicians make more proper clinical judgments. PMID:24778670

  13. Progress of Iran in Medical Research.

    PubMed

    Kolahdoozan, Shadi; Massarrat, Sadegh

    2016-11-01

     The indexed Iranian journals in ISI and PubMed at the end of 2012 with known impact factor (IF) were evaluated with regard to the number of articles published in 2010-2012, the number of citations by authors from inside and outside Iran, their IF as well as their ranking order among all other journals in their specialized categories. There were among 130 English journals, 21 indexed with known IF. The mean IF of these journals increased from 0.4 in 2010 to 0.68 in 2012. The number of citations per article by authors from outside Iran increased from 0.19 to 0.49 during the same time period. The rank of the majority of the indexed journals was in the lowest 20% of their category. Although some improvement has been observed in the quality and the number of citations of Iranian journals indexed in ISI during these two years, the quality of the manuscripts remains low. A reduction in the number of journals, a change of their structure as well as more financial resources for research is necessary for the improvement of the quality and better rank and status of Iranian science among an international audience.

  14. Mucormycosis in Iran: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, Afsane; Moazeni, Maryam; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; de Hoog, Sybren; Badali, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    Fungi in the order Mucorales cause acute, invasive and frequently fatal infections in susceptible patients. This study aimed to perform a systematic review of all reported mucormycosis cases during the last 25 years in Iran. After a comprehensive literature search, we identified 98 cases in Iran from 1990-2015. The mean patient age was 39.8 ± 19.2 years. Diabetes was the most common underlying condition (47.9%), and 22.4% of the patients underwent solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. The most common clinical forms of mucormycosis were rhinocerebral (48.9%), pulmonary (9.2%) and cutaneous (9.2%). Eight cases of disseminated disease were identified. Overall mortality in the identified cases was 40.8%, with the highest mortality rate in patients diagnosed with disseminated infection (75%). The mortality rate in rhinocerebral infection patients was significantly lower (45.8%). Rhinocerebral infection was the most common clinical manifestation in diabetes patients (72.9%). Patients were diagnosed using various methods including histopathology (85.7%), microscopy (12.3%) and culture (2.0%). Rhizopus species were the most prevalent (51.7%), followed by Mucor species (17.2%). Sixty-nine patients were treated with a combination of surgery and antifungal therapy (resulting survival rate, 66.7%). Owing to the high mortality rate of advanced mucormycosis, early diagnosis and treatment may significantly improve survival rates. Therefore, increased monitoring and awareness of this life-threatening disease is critical.

  15. Study of onychomycosis in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Chadeganipour, Mostafa; Nilipour, Shahi; Ahmadi, Gholamreza

    2010-03-01

    A mycological study was undertaken in 488 patients suspected of onychomycosis in Isfahan, a large province of Iran, to gain more insight into the prevalence and aetiology of this infection. Direct microscopy of the nail clips was positive in 194 (39.8%) and fingernail onychomycosis was recognised in 141 (72.7%) and toenail onychomycosis in 53 (27.3%) cases. As agents of onychomycosis, yeast were detected in 112 (57.7%), dermatophytes in 27 (13.9%) and non-dermatophyte fungi in 55 (28.4%) patients. Of the samples cultured, Candida albicans was the most prevalent (84%) yeast. Among dermatophytes, Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. interdigitale was found to be the commonest aetiological agent (8.6%) followed by Epidermophyton floccosum and T. rubrum. Among the non-dermatophyte moulds, Aspergillus flavus was the most prevalent species (13%). Moreover, nine samples with positive direct microscopy yielded no growth. Females were affected more frequently with fingernail candidal infections than males, and children under 7 years of age were predominantly involved with candidal paronychia. The majority of fungal nail infections were characterised clinically by distal and proximal subungual onychomycosis. The growing trend towards the frequency of fingernail onychomycosis in housewives was noticeable in the last decade in Iran.

  16. Epidemiology of Vasculitides in Khorasan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jokar, Mohammadhassan; Mirfeizi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitides are a heterogeneous group of more than 20 diseases defined by inflammation and destruction of blood vessels. We aimed to study the demographic characteristics of the primary vasculitides in the North East of Iran. We retrospectively studied the medical records of patients diagnosed with any kind of vasculitis at the Clinic and Department of Rheumatology of the Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2012. Patients were classified according to the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for the classification of vasculitis and the 2012 Revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference Nomenclature of Vasculitides. A total of 721 patients (51.5% male, 48.5% female) with a diagnosis of primary vasculitis was identified. The frequency distributions of vasculitic disorders were as follows: Behcet’s disease, 63.6%; cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis, 8.2%; granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s), 6.8%; Takayasu’s arteritis. 6%; giant cell arteritis, 4%; polyarteritis nodosa, 2.1%; microscopic polyangiitis, 0.6%; eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss), 1.8%; cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, 0.3%; and IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schonlein purpura), 3.5%. In our population, the most common forms of vasculitis are Behcet’s disease, cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s). PMID:26170524

  17. Timeliness of Malaria Surveillance System in Iran

    PubMed Central

    AKBARI, Hossein; MAJDZADEH, Reza; RAHIMI FOROUSHANI, Abbas; RAEISI, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Background: We aimed to evaluate the timeliness of reporting of malaria surveillance system and understanding the existing problems. Methods: The timeliness of malaria surveillance system of Iran was evaluated in four provinces of Iran including Sistan & Baluchistan, Hormozgan, Kerman (as provinces with local malaria transmission) and Khuzestan (without local malaria transmission). In this descriptive-analytic cross-sectional study two levels of Primary Health Care service providers including first level (Health Houses) and second level (Urban or Rural Health care units) were evaluated with regard to reporting of malaria surveillance system. Results: Forms number 1 (87% reported within one day) and number 2 (reporting median: 2 days) are reported from first level to second level, and forms number 4 (median: 4 days), number 3 (median: 6 days), number 7 (median: 9 days), number 5 (median: 11 days) and number 6 (median: 19 days) are reported from second level to the third level respectively in a shorter time. Independent variables such as distance, local malaria transmission level, and case finding type, are the factors affecting the reporting delay. Conclusion: Reporting in the first level compared to the second level is done with lower delay. In the areas where there is a deadline set for reporting, reporting is done more timely. Whatever number of malaria cases is decreased, sensitivity and subsequently timeliness reduced. It is recommended that the studies of timeliness be done with sensitivity and usefulness analysis of surveillance system. PMID:23515191

  18. Pharmaceutical laws and regulations in Iran: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Zaboli, Pardis; Hashemi-Meshkini, Amir; Varmaghani, Mehdi; Gholami, Hadi; Vazirian, Iman; Zekri, Hedieh-Sadat; Eslamitabar, Shahriar; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The pharmaceutical legal framework is a very important infrastructure in achieving predefined goals in pharmaceutical sector: Accessibility, quality, and rational use of medicine. This study aims to review the current pharmaceutical sector-related legal provisions in Iran where the Food and Drug Organization (FDO) is in charge of regulating all issues related to the pharmaceutical sector. The main laws and regulations enacted by parliament and cabinet and even internal regulations enacted by the Ministry of Health or Iran FDO are reviewed. Different laws and regulations are categorized according to the main goals of Iran national drug policy. PMID:27512704

  19. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-06

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

  20. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-20

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

  1. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-21

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

  2. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-31

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

  3. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-24

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

  4. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-11

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...SEP 2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy

  5. TRAY MOUNTAIN ROADLESS AREA, GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Arthur E.; Chatman, Mark L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey indicates that the Tray Mountain Roadless Area, Georgia has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Rocks underlying the Tray Mountain Roadless Area are suitable for crushed rock or aggregate; however, other sources for these materials are available closer to present markets. There is a possibility for the occurrence of hydrocarbon resources underlying the area at great depth, but no hydrocarbon potential was identified. Detailed studies are needed to establish the presence or absence and mineral-resource potential of olivine, nickel, cobalt, and chrome in the two mafic-ultramafic bodies in the Hayesville thrust sheet. The cause of the lead anomaly in pan concentrate samples taken from the southwest part of the roadless area has not been established; the mineral residence and source of the anomaly remain to be determined.

  6. Microbial activity at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, J.M.; Meike, A.

    1995-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy is engaged in a suitability study for a potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the containment and storage of commercially generated spent fuel and defense high-level nuclear waste. There is growing recognition of the role that biotic factors could play in this repository, either directly through microbially induced corrosion (MIC), or indirectly by altering the chemical environment or contributing to the transport of radionuclides. As a first step toward describing and predicting these processes, a workshop was held on April 10-12, 1995, in Lafayette, California. The immediate aims of the workshop were: (1) To identify microbially related processes relevant to the design of a radioactive waste repository under conditions similar to those at Yucca Mountain. (2) To determine parameters that are critical to the evaluation of a disturbed subterranean environment. (3) To define the most effective means of investigating the factors thus identified.

  7. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  8. A new species of the genus Acinopus Dejean, 1821 from west of Iran (Coleoptera; Carabidae; Harpalini) with a key to species of Iran.

    PubMed

    Azadbakhsh, Saeed; Wrase, David W

    2016-08-08

    A new species of the genus Acinopus Dejean, 1821, namely Acinopus (Acinopus) zagrosensis sp. n., is described on the basis of specimens collected from west Iran (type locality: Iran, Fars province, Zagros Mts., Sepidan env., 2060 m). The new species is compared with closely related species. A key for the identification of species of genus Acinopus in Iran is provided.

  9. Mountain rescue stretchers: usability trial.

    PubMed

    Hignett, Sue; Willmott, Joseph Wayne; Clemes, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    In the UK mountain rescues are carried out by highly trained volunteers in all weather conditions and at any time of the day/night. They interface with other services when they hand over the casualty to either land or air ambulances. The design of the stretcher is important to the safety of both the volunteers and casualties. This paper reports a usability trial to evaluate the features of mountain rescue stretchers and identify characteristics for future design. Two mountain rescue teams in the English Lake District participated in a five week field experiment. Data were collected using postural analysis with Rapid Entire Body Analysis, Body Part Discomfort Surveys, Rated Perceived Exertion and focus groups to compare the performance of four stretchers: Split Thomas, Ferno Titan, MacInnes mark 6 and MacInnes mark 7. None of the stretchers had an overall advantage, with benefits for some features counterbalanced by disadvantages resulting from others. All the stretchers produced shoulder discomfort with the Split Thomas and MacInnes 6 lowering the postural risks through the use of skids/wheel in the carrying phase. The key design features for future MR stretchers include: reduced unloaded weight (e.g. light weight materials and mesh platforms); undercarriage system to reduce the carrying load; adjustable handles at the front and back positions; flexible carrying system with an optional harness attachment; ease of assembly in adverse environmental conditions; large carrying capacity. It is suggested that military emergency evacuation should be considered in addition to mountain rescue tasks to identify a larger commercial market for development.

  10. Iran’s Role in Iraq: Room for U.S.-Iran Cooperation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Badrists (Stanford University, 2014b). While in Iran, he decided to restructure his organization to focus on social services that were not being...by the IRGC and Badr Organi- zation. These included the liberation of the Sunni town of Jurf al-Sakhar. Iranian media , however, tend to highlight...tance it places on providing a wide range of social services that serve as a means of disseminating its pro-Iranian ideology. As opposed to the

  11. Hydrology of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Fabryka-Martin, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nevada in the Mojave Desert, is being considered as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Although the site is arid, previous studies indicate net infiltration rates of 5-10 mm yr-1 under current climate conditions. Unsaturated flow of water through the mountain generally is vertical and rapid through the fractures of the welded tuffs and slow through the matrix of the nonwelded tuffs. The vitric-zeolitic boundary of the nonwelded tuffs below the potential repository, where it exists, causes perching and substantial lateral flow that eventually flows through faults near the eastern edge of the potential repository and recharges the underlying groundwater system. Fast pathways are located where water flows relatively quickly through the unsaturated zone to the water table. For the bulk of the water a large part of the travel time from land surface to the potential repository horizon (~300 m below land surface) is through the interlayered, low fracture density, nonwelded tuff where flow is predominately through the matrix. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being modeled using a three-dimensional, dual-continuum numerical model to predict the results of measurements and observations in new boreholes and excavations. The interaction between experimentalists and modelers is providing confidence in the conceptual model and the numerical model and is providing researchers with the ability to plan further testing and to evaluate the usefulness or necessity of further data collection.

  12. The hydrology of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Flint, A.L.; Flint, L.E.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Fabryka-Martin, J.M.

    2000-12-04

    Yucca Mountain, located in southern Nevada in the Mojave Desert, is being considered as a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. Although the site is arid, previous studies indicate net infiltration rates of 5-10 mm yr(-1) under current climate conditions. Unsaturated flow of water through the mountain generally is vertical and rapid through the fractures of the welded tuffs and slow through the matrix of the nonwelded tuffs. The vitric-zeolitic boundary of the nonwelded tuffs below the potential repository, where it exists, causes perching and substantial lateral flow that eventually flows through faults near the eastern edge of the potential repository and recharges the underlying groundwater system. Fast pathways are located where water flows relatively quickly through the unsaturated zone to the water table. For the bulk of the water a large part of the travel time from land surface to the potential repository horizon (similar to 300 m below land surface) is through the interlayered, low fracture density, nonwelded tuff where flow is predominantly through the matrix. The unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain is being modeled using a three-dimensional, dual-continuum numerical model to predict the results of measurements and observations in new boreholes and excavations. The interaction between experimentalists and modelers is providing confidence in the conceptual model and the numerical model and is providing researchers with the ability to plan further testing and to evaluate the usefulness or necessity of further data collection.

  13. Micrometeorites from the Transantarctic Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, P.; Folco, L.; Suavet, C.; van Ginneken, M.; Gattacceca, J.; Perchiazzi, N.; Braucher, R.; Harvey, R. P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of large accumulations of micrometeorites on the Myr-old, glacially eroded granitic summits of several isolated nunataks in the Victoria Land Transantarctic Mountains. The number (>3,500) of large (>400 μm and up to 2 mm in size) melted and unmelted particles is orders of magnitudes greater than other Antarctic collections. Flux estimates, bedrock exposure ages and the presence of ≈0.8-Myr-old microtektites suggest that extraterrestrial dust collection occurred over the last 1 Myr, taking up to 500 kyr to accumulate based on 2 investigated find sites. The size distribution and frequency by type of cosmic spherules in the >200-μm size fraction collected at Frontier Mountain (investigated in detail in this report) are similar to those of the most representative known micrometeorite populations (e.g., South Pole Water Well). This and the identification of unusual types in terms of composition (i.e., chondritic micrometeorites and spherulitic aggregates similar to the ≈480-kyr-old ones recently found in Antarctic ice cores) and size suggest that the Transantarctic Mountain micrometeorites constitute a unique and essentially unbiased collection that greatly extends the micrometeorite inventory and provides material for studies on micrometeorite fluxes over the recent (≈1 Myr) geological past. PMID:19011091

  14. Petrography, XRD and Wet Chemistry os Sassanid Rock Reliefs at Khan Tahkti (230 a.d.), Iran : A Case Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaniana, Kouros; Shirvanib, Maryam; Bakhshaeia, Hooman

    At Khan Takhti at North West of Iran a sculpted monument commemorating a war waged against the Romans by Shapour I, the second Sassanid king, has been archaeometrically studied. This relief monument carved into the rock in the mountains has faced a considerable destruction process. Petrography, wet chemistry experiments and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were performed to identify rock samples for conservation and preservation purposes. The rock used in this monument is limestone and dolomite. According to XRD analysis, a significant amount of quartz is present in the stone structure. The results of analysis and stone type identification show that a significant quantity of surface sediments and dissolved sulphate, chloride and nitrate salts have been deposited on the surface of the monument due to its proximity to the salty Urmia Lake, which is considered an important factor in the destruction process.

  15. Fine Crustal Structure in the Northwestern Iranian Plateau Revealed by Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Mingming; Chen, Ling; Talebian, Morteza; Ghods, Abdolreza; Ai, Yinshuang; Sobouti, Farhad; He, Yumei; Motaghi, Khalil; Chen, Qi-Fu; Lyv, Yan; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2016-04-01

    Detailed information about the crustal and lithospheric structures is crucial for understanding the geodynamics processes of continental collision and subsequent mountain building. Being at the initial stage of continental collision, the Iranian Plateau has not been well studied due to the lack of high-resolution, robust images of the crustal and lithospheric structures. Along the Zagros Orogen in the NW part of the Iranian Plateau the Arabian Plate has collided with the Eurasian Plate since about 30 Ma ago, whereas in the Makran region to the southeast oceanic subduction underneath the Eurasian Plate is still an ongoing process. For better understanding the geodynamic processes from subduction to collision, we planned to deploy multiple dense seismic arrays sampling regions at different tectonic stages in the Iranian Plateau. Up to now, we have finished the first seismic array observation in NW Iran. Based on the high quality data recorded, we conduct ambient noise tomography to investigate the fine crustal structure of the area from the south of the Zagros to the coast of the Southern Caspian Sea. Our results revel a salient decoupling between the upper crust and lower crust in the Zagros. The upper crust is slow, likely due to the effects of thick sediments, and displays a consistent anisotropy pattern with a NW-SE fast shear-wave direction, which is proximately parallel to the strike of the Zagros Orogen. The middle to lower crust, on the other hand, shows low-to-high velocity variations with depth and anisotropic fabrics trending to NE-SW, which is perpendicular to the strike of the orogen. Combined with the imaging results from receiver functions, we suggest that the collision between the Arabian and Eurasian Plates has caused strong crustal deformation and localized thickening of the lower crust beneath the Zagros. We also find a high velocity anomaly in the lower crust beneath the Alborz Mountain, isolated from the low velocities beneath the central Iran

  16. 77 FR 73516 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Iran Threat Reduction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... compelling Iran to abandon efforts to acquire a nuclear weapons capability and other threatening activities... nuclear weapon. However, pursuant to 41 U.S.C. 1707 and FAR 1.501-3(b), DoD, GSA, and NASA will...

  17. Iran: Politics, Gulf Security, and U.S. Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-19

    30 Table 5. The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) ............................................................ 31...the Caucasus (1828), western Afghanistan (1857), Baluchistan (1872), and what is now Turkmenistan (1894). Iran adopted Shiite Islam under the Safavid

  18. A new variety of Salvia macrosiphon (Lamiaceae) for Iran.

    PubMed

    Kharazian, Navaz

    2008-04-15

    In this study, Salvia macrosiphon Boiss. var. longiflora Kharaz. is reported for the first time as one of the new varieties of Salvia macrosiphon in Iran. The morphological characters of this variety have been described in details.

  19. Two new species of Gaeolaelaps (Acari: Laelapidae) from Iran.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Alireza; Mohseni, Mastaneh

    2013-12-17

    This paper reports on two new species of mites of the genus Gaeolaelaps in soil from Iran, G. farajii sp. nov., and G. orbiculatus sp. nov.. A key to the species of Gaeolaelaps with short peritremes is presented.

  20. Massanutten Mountain, Virginia, USA (Anaglyph)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Massanutten Mountain lies in the Shenandoah Valley of northern Virginia. Rock layers in the mountain are folded downward in an overall 'U' shape (called a syncline) which accounts for its peculiar double ridge shape with a highly elongated valley between. The ridges have formed because they are capped with a sandstone layer which is resistant to weathering and erosion. Limestones and shales are less resistant and form the lowlands and valleys. The north and south forks of the Shenandoah River flank Massanutten Mountain and display unusually pronounced meander patterns. Other layered sedimentary rocks form other ridgeline patterns in the Allegheny Mountains, to the upper left. But the igneous and metamorphic (crystalline) rocks of the Blue Ridge Mountains erode into a very different topographic pattern to the southeast. This small area provides an excellent example rock type, geologic structure, and fluvial (stream) processes all influencing landform development.

    This anaglyph was produced by first shading a preliminary elevation model from data acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The stereoscopic effect was then created by generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C

  1. The Vendian-Cambrian δ 13C record, North Iran: evidence for overturning of the ocean before the Cambrian Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroto; Matsumoto, Ryo; Kakuwa, Yoshitaka; Hamdi, Bahaeddin; Zibaseresht, Hamid

    Continuous fossilliferous successions across the Precambrian/Cambrian (PC/C) boundary in the Elburz Mountains of Northern Iran show a remarkable negative δ 13C excursion just below the PC/C boundary. High concentrations of manganese, phosphorus, barium, and high abundances of fossil phytoplankton, and black shale coincide with the excursion. Worldwide stratigraphic correlation shows that the isotopic anomaly is a global event. The initial Metazoan diversification, coupled with 13C enrichment, occurs stratigraphically just above the excursion. We propose the following scenario for oceanic environmental changes before the Cambrian Faunal Explosion based on new data from Iran: A global warm climate following the last Precambrian glaciation resulted in a generally stagnant oceanic condition, so that surface water was oxic; deep water was dysoxic, depleted in 13C, and enriched in nutrients. Massive upwelling of deep water (vertical advection of nutrients and 13C-depleted CO 2) caused enhanced phytoplankton productivity and a sharp drop in δ 13C in shallow water carbonate and organic carbon. We conclude that latest Cryptozoic overturning of ocean stratification preceded the Cambrian Explosion.

  2. Defense Implications of a Nuclear Iran for Turkey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    a detrimental threat to its security and to other Arab nations in the region. Therefore, it is important to review and mark the main historical and...November 2007). 83 Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Cheney, Like President, Has a Warning for Iran,” The New York Times, 22 October 2007, http://www.nytimes.com...115 Israel has the freedom to be a strong advocate of preventive strikes on Iran, because it perceives that, despite some Arab states’ possible

  3. Relations Between the U.S. and Iran

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    repressive regime. However, after 1979, the two countries have remained locked in a hostile relationship. The U.S. has been vocal in its...Baskerville, an American teacher in a Christian religious school in Tabriz, Iran, died fighting for Iranian democracy and liberalization. Baskerville’s...While the 444-day hostage crisis altered American perceptions and strategies toward Iran, the events experienced during and after the 1953 coup had

  4. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-08

    to approve the participation of a high- level State Department official at multilateral nuclear talks with Iran on July 19, 2008, although that... Department “religious freedom” report (released September 19, 2008) cite Iran for widespread serious abuses, including unjust executions, politically... Department reports on human rights and on religious freedom. [http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2006/78852.htm]; [http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls /irf/2005

  5. Elegant Coercion and Iran: Beyond the Unitary Actor Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    11-21 and Mehdi Moslem, Factional Politics in Post- Khomeini Iran (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2002). Both Buchta and Mehdi describe a...69. 147 Mehdi Moslem, Factional Politics in Post- Khomeini Iran (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 2002), 217. 148 Ibid., 219. 149 Buchta, 70...Search o Bomb.” International Security 21, no. 3 (Winter 1996/97): 54-86. Schelling, Thomas C. Arms and Influence. Yale University Press: New

  6. Imported lymphatic filariasis in an Indian immigrant to iran.

    PubMed

    Kia, Eshrat Beigom; Sharifdini, Meysam; Hajjaran, Homa; Shahbazi, Ali Ehsan; Sayyad Talaie, Zahra

    2014-03-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF), a nematode disease transmitted by arthropod vectors, is repeatedly reported in immigrant population. This disease is not endemic in Iran; however, different species of mosquitoes, capable of transmission of parasite microfilaria, are distributed in the country. Hereby, incidental detection of an imported case of LF due to Wuchereria bancrofti in an Indian worker in Iran is reported. Identification of the case was performed based on morphological and morphometrical characteristics of microfilaria and PCR sequencing.

  7. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-06

    influence there, while also building leverage against the United States by arming anti-U.S. militant groups . Iran is particularly interested in restoring...Iran’s strategic capabilities and regional influence . The Administration has not changed the previous Administration’s characterization of Iran as a...armed groups in Iraq and Afghanistan, to the Palestinian group Hamas, and to Lebanese Hezbollah. The Obama Administration formulated approaches to

  8. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-25

    million in loans for health and sewage projects. During April 2003-May 2005, a total of $725 million in loans were approved for environmental ...Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  9. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-12

    232 million in loans for health and sewage projects. During April 2003- May 2005, a total of $725 million in loans were approved for environmental ...Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  10. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-02

    Congressional Research Service ˜ The Library of Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RL32048 Iran: U.S. Concerns ...2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-06-2006 to 00-06-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... Concerns and Policy Responses Summary According to an Administration national security strategy document released on March 16, 2006, the United States

  11. Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-23

    says it wants to build up to 20 more nuclear power plants , including possibly six by Russia. On December 5, 2005, Iran announced it is putting out...enriched uranium, and a facility at Arak is a heavy water production plant considered ideal for the production of plutonium. ( In November 2006, the...nuclear power plant at Bushehr. Russia insisted that Iran sign an agreement under which Russia would provide reprocess the plant’s spent nuclear

  12. Favism, with special reference to Iran*

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, G.; Hedayat, H.; Khayatian, H.

    1969-01-01

    Fava beans (Vicia fava) are cultivated rather widely in most countries of the Eastern Mediterranean area and provide a cheap but protein-rich food that can be eaten alone, in various culinary preparations, including bread, or as a dietary supplement. However, the ingestion of fava beans may induce a haemolytic disease—favism—in some susceptible individuals and this might appear to limit the use of this pulse crop in those regions where favism occurs frequently. The uses of fava beans in Iran, the characteristics of favism and the present state of knowledge of the pathology of the disease are reviewed in this paper. Although some progress has been made in identifying the toxic substances and in explaining their mode of action, our understanding of favism is still limited. It appears that the disease is seen particularly in young children and is associated with a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) in the blood. PMID:5306718

  13. Endoparasites of Wild Rodents in Southeastern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Nateghpour, Mehdi; Motevalli-Haghi, Afsaneh; Akbarzadeh, Kamran; Akhavan, Amir Ahmad; Mohebali, Mehdi; Mobedi, Iraj; Farivar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to collect wild rodents for endoparasites determination in some parts of Sistan and Baluchistan Province, southeastern Iran nearby Pakistan and Afghanistan countries. Methods: A total of 100 wild rodents were captured alive with cage traps. Various samples were collected from blood and feces, also impression smear prepared from different organs. The samples were prepared by formalin-ether or stained with Giemsa, after that were examined under microscope. Results: All the caught rodents (47 Tatera indica, 44 Meriones hurriana, 5 Gerbilus nanus and 4 Meriones libycus) were studied for endoparasites emphasizing to their zoonotic aspects. Endoparasites including Spirurida, Hymenolepis diminuta, Hymenolepis nana feraterna, Trichuris trichiura, Skerjabino taenia, Trichostrongylus spp, Entamoeba muris, Chilomastix mesnili and Leishmania spp were parasitologically identified. Conclusion: Among 9 genera or species of the identified parasites at least 5 of them have zoonotic and public health importance. PMID:26114139

  14. Geographic Information Science and Mountain Geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Louis A.

    Mountain areas are among the most threatened environments worldwide.These sensitive systems suffer from human encroachment, resource extraction, and subsequent environmental degradation. Mountain ecosystems are also extremely sensitive to climate variability with impacts on snow and ice cover, hydrologic response, and sediment yield. From this perspective, mountain environments can be viewed as one of the “canaries in the coal mine” for the entire global environmental system.

  15. The history of organ donation and transplantation in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J

    2014-03-01

    The first kidney transplant in Iran was performed in 1967, and this was the first organ transplant in countries that are current members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. In 1988, in response to the long waiting list at the Iranian Ministry of Health for kidney transplant, a state-regulated living-unrelated donor kidney transplant program was adopted. By 1999, the kidney transplant waiting list in Iran was eliminated. In 1989, a fatwa (religious approval) from the Supreme Religious Leader was obtained that recognized brain death and allowed deceased-donor organ transplant. Subsequently, transplant centers began performing deceased-donor kidney, liver, and heart transplants. In 2000, the Brain Death and Organ Transplantation Act was passed by the Iranian parliament, legalizing deceased-donor organ transplant. The transplant team at Shiraz began performing more deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants and became a successful deceased-donor organ transplant model in the country. By the end of 2012, there were 34166 kidney (including 4436 deceased-donor) and 2021 liver (including 1788 deceased-donor), 482 heart, 147 pancreas, 63 lung, and several intestine and multiorgan transplants performed in Iran. In 2011, there were 2771 solid-organ transplants performed in Iran (37 transplants per million population), and Iran ranked as number 33 among the 50 most active countries worldwide. In 2011 and 2012, Iran was ahead of all country members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation in performing deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hooshyar, H; Rostamkhani, P; Rezaian, M

    2012-01-01

    Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran. PMID:23193500

  17. Molecular analysis and phylogenetic characterization of HIV in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sarrami-Forooshani, Ramin; Das, Suman Ranjan; Sabahi, Farzaneh; Adeli, Ahmad; Esmaeili, Rezvan; Wahren, Britta; Mohraz, Minoo; Haji-Abdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Rasoolinejad, Mehrnaz; Jameel, Shahid; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2006-07-01

    The rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in Iran has increased dramatically in the last few years. While the earliest cases were found in hemophiliacs, intravenous drug users are now fueling the outbreak. In this study, both the 122 clones of HIV-1 gag p17 and the 131 clones of env V1-V5 region were obtained from 61 HIV-1 seropositives belonging to these two groups in Iran. HIV-1 subtyping and phylogenetic analysis was done by heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) and multiple clone sequencing. The result indicated all hemophiliacs are infected with HIV-1 subtype B and all intravenous drug users are infected with HIV-1 subtype A. Since intravenous drug abuse is the major transmission route in Iran, HIV-1 subtype A is likely to be the dominant viral subtype circulating in the country. The analysis of genetic distances showed subtype B viruses in Iran to be twice as heterogeneous as the subtype A viruses. In conclusion, this first molecular study of HIV-1 genotypes in Iran suggests two parallel outbreaks in distinct high-risk populations and may offer clues to the origin and spread of infection in Iran.

  18. Sand Flies of the Subgenus Adlerius (Diptera: Psychodidae) in an Endemic Focus of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Introduction of Phlebotomus (Adlerius) comatus as a New Record for Iran

    PubMed Central

    Zahraei-Ramazani, Ali Reza; Kumar, Dinesh; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza; Naghian, Abdollah; Jafari, Reza; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Abdoli, Hamid; Soleimani, Hassan; Shareghi, Niloofar; Ghanei, Maryam; Arandian, Mohammad Hossein; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sand flies of subgenus Adlerius has a wide geographical distribution in Iran and are mostly found in wild form in mountainous areas. They are always considered as probable vectors of visceral leishmaniasis. The objective of this study was to determine the Adlerius species and its composition in an endemic focus of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in northwest of the country. Methods: Sand flies were collected from 6 different areas of Azarbaijan-e-Sharqi Province using sticky paper traps from August to September which is active season for sand flies in this area, in 2009. The flies were mounted and identified. The length of third antennal segments, ascoid, labrum, coxite, surstyle, style, aedeagus, genital filament, genital pump, width of style, and the end of aedeagus were measured and the number of costal hairs group was also counted as the morphological characters. Results: A total of 30 adult sand flies, (26 males and 4 females) including Phlebotomus halepensis (46.8%), P. longiductus (13.3%), P. balcanicus (23.3%), P. comatus (3.3%), and Adlerius spp. (13.3%) belong to subgenus Adlerius were identified respectively in 6 counties. One P. comatus male was captured in front of a cave located in the hillside of a mountain covered with the vegetation in Varzeqan area. Conclusion: The presence of at least 5 species of the subgenus Adlerius in Azarbaijan-e-Sharqi Province, an endemic focus of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in Iran, shows that the risk of parasite transmission among man and reservoir animals is high during the active season of sand flies. P. comatus is a new record for Iran and needs to be added to the list of Iranian phlebotomines of subgenus Adlerius. PMID:23785689

  19. Precipitation Across India's Ghats Mountains (IMERG)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Animation of precipitation rates across India and surrounding countries. Notice the heavy rains throughout the Ghats Mountain range which resulted in devastating landslides along India's west coast...

  20. Landscape, Mountain Worship and Astronomy in Socaire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyano, Ricardo

    The spatiotemporal analysis of mountain worship in the indigenous community of Socaire, Atacama, northern Chile, relates to cultural, geographical, climatic, psychological, and astronomical information gathered from ethno archaeological studies. We identify a system of offerings to the mountains that incorporates concepts such as ceque (straight line), mayllku (mountain lord or ancestor), and pacha (space and time). Here, the mountains on the visible horizon (Tumisa, Lausa, Chiliques, Ipira, and Miñiques) feature as the fingers on the left hand (PAH Triad). This structure regulates annual activities and rituals and sets the basis for the Socaireños' worldview raised on a humanized landscape.

  1. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Mountain viticultural area is located in northwestern Arkansas. Starting at the point where Frog Bayou... Frog Bayou near Winfrey, Arkansas. (xvii) Then generally southward along Frog Bayou, flowing...

  2. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Mountain viticultural area is located in northwestern Arkansas. Starting at the point where Frog Bayou... Frog Bayou near Winfrey, Arkansas. (xvii) Then generally southward along Frog Bayou, flowing...

  3. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Mountain viticultural area is located in northwestern Arkansas. Starting at the point where Frog Bayou... Frog Bayou near Winfrey, Arkansas. (xvii) Then generally southward along Frog Bayou, flowing...

  4. 27 CFR 9.112 - Arkansas Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Mountain viticultural area is located in northwestern Arkansas. Starting at the point where Frog Bayou... Frog Bayou near Winfrey, Arkansas. (xvii) Then generally southward along Frog Bayou, flowing...

  5. Iran’s Post-9/11 Grand Bargain: Missed Opportunity for Strategic Rapprochement Between Iran and the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    Gibbon Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY...accessed March 28, 2013); Alan Sipress and Steven Mufson, “U.S. Explores Recruiting Iran Into New Coalition,” Washington Post, September 25, 2001...202_162-4508360.html?tag=contentMain;contentBody (accessed March 12, 2013); Alan Sipress, “Bush’s Speech Shuts Door on Tenuous Opening to Iran

  6. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  7. Mountain building and mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenna, Claudio; Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Husson, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Mountain building at convergent margins requires tectonic forces that can overcome frictional resistance along large-scale thrust faults and support the gravitational potential energy stored within the thickened crust of the orogen. A general, dynamic model for this process is still lacking. Here we propose that mountain belts can be classified between two end-members. First, those of "slab pull" type, where subduction is mainly confined to the upper mantle, and rollback trench motion lead to moderately thick crustal stacks, such as in the Mediterranean. Second, those of "slab suction" type, where whole-mantle convection cells ("conveyor belts") lead to the more extreme expressions of orogeny, such as the largely thickened crust and high plateaus of present-day Tibet and the Altiplano. For the slab suction type, deep mantle convection produces the unique conditions to drag plates toward each other, irrespective of their nature and other boundary conditions. We support this hypothesis by analyzing the orogenic, volcanic, and convective history associated with the Tertiary formation of the Andes after ~40 Ma and Himalayas after collision at ~55 Ma. Based on mantle circulation modeling and tectonic reconstructions, we surmise that the forces necessary to sustain slab-suction mountain building in those orogens derive, after transient slab ponding, from the mantle drag induced upon slab penetration into the lower mantle, and from an associated surge of mantle upwelling beneath Africa. This process started at ~65-55 Ma for Tibet-Himalaya, when the Tethyan slab penetrated into the lower mantle, and ~10 Myr later in the Andes, when the Nazca slab did. This surge of mantle convection drags plates against each other, generating the necessary compressional forces to create and sustain these two orogenic belts. If our model is correct, the available geological records of orogeny can be used to decipher time-dependent mantle convection, with implications for the

  8. Getting Beyond Yucca Mountain - 12305

    SciTech Connect

    Halstead, Robert J.; Williams, James M.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has terminated the Yucca Mountain repository project. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has indefinitely suspended the Yucca Mountain licensing proceeding. The presidentially-appointed Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future is preparing a report, due in January 2012, to the Secretary of Energy on recommendations for a new national nuclear waste management and disposal program. The BRC Draft Report published in July 2011 provides a compelling critique of the past three decades failed efforts in the United States to site storage and disposal facilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). However, the BRC Draft Report fails to provide detailed guidance on how to implement an alternative, successful approach to facility site selection. The comments submitted to the BRC by the State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects provide useful details on how the US national nuclear waste program can get beyond the failed Yucca Mountain repository project. A detailed siting process, consisting of legislative elements, procedural elements, and 'rules' for volunteer sites, could meet the objectives of the BRC and the Western Governors Association (WGA), while promoting and protecting the interests of potential host states. The recent termination of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository provides both an opportunity and a need to re-examine the United States' nuclear waste management program. The BRC Draft Report published in July 2011 provides a compelling critique of the past three decades failed efforts in the United States to site storage and disposal facilities for SNF and HLW. It is anticipated that the BRC Final report in January 2012 will recommend a new general course of action, but there will likely continue to be a need for detailed guidance on how to implement an alternative, successful approach to facility site selection. Getting the nation's nuclear waste program back on track

  9. Yucca Mountain and The Environment

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-04-12

    The Yucca Mountain Project places a high priority on protecting the environment. To ensure compliance with all state and federal environmental laws and regulations, the Project established an Environmental Management System. Important elements of the Environmental Management System include the following: (1) monitoring air, water, and other natural resources; (2) protecting plant and animal species by minimizing land disturbance; (3) restoring vegetation and wildlife habitat in disturbed areas; (4) protecting cultural resources; (5) minimizing waste, preventing pollution, and promoting environmental awareness; and (6) managing of hazardous and non-hazardous waste. Reducing the impacts of Project activities on the environment will continue for the duration of the Project.

  10. Doctor on a mountaineering expedition.

    PubMed Central

    A'Court, C. H.; Stables, R. H.; Travis, S.

    1995-01-01

    Doctors are welcome members on mountaineering expeditions to remote areas, but practical advice on how to prepare and what kit to take can be difficult to find. This article is a ragbag of useful advice on diverse topics. It explains the necessary preparation, provides tips for a healthy expedition, and summarises the common disorders encountered at high altitude. The comprehensive drug and equipment lists and first aid kit for climbers were used for the 1992 Everest in winter expedition. They are there to be sacrificed to personal preference and the experience and size of individual expeditions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:7767198

  11. DRAGOON MOUNTAINS ROADLESS AREA, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewes, Harald; Kreidler, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The mineral and hydrocarbon resource potential of the Dragoon Mountains Roadless Area was assessed and six areas of probable mineral-resource potential were identified. The area may contain metamorphic skarn-type mineralization of copper, lead, molybdenum, and zinc, and some of these may contain silver and gold. More remotely, the area could also contain stockwork molybdenum mineralization and replacement or vein-type mineralization of beryllium, fluorite, thorium, tin, and tungsten. Rock products exist within the area and are discussed due to the proximity of a railroad, but similar materials occur outside the area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  12. SANDIA MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, NEW MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Kness, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and mineral-resource investigations in the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico indicate that a small part of the area has a probable mineral-resource potential. Most of the mineral occurrences are small barite-fluorite veins that occur along faults on the eastern slope of the range. The barite veins in the Landsend area and in the Tunnel Spring area are classed as having a probable mineral-resource potential. Fluorite veins which occur at the La Luz mine contain silver-bearing galeana and the area near this mine is regarded as having a probable resource potential for silver. No energy resources were identified in this study.

  13. The Study of Impacts of Water Transferring From Wet Regions To Dry Regions In Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motiee-Homayoun, Dr.; Ghomashchi, Dr.

    available. In this situation, water transformation from wet areas (with good water resources) to dried and desert regions of the country has been identified as a necessary and reasonable policy to tacklewater shortage. Mediterain climate and mountains in north, west and southwest regions of Iran grant a benefit of high level rate of rainfall, several deep and long rivers, and large capacity of groundwater resources in these areas. Existence of such rivers and water resources, especially a big river of Karoon in southwest, strengthens the goal of constructing hydraulic structures in order to transfer water fro m wet areas to central and eastern areas of the country. This goal has led to planning and implementing of several large and high cost projects. Experts of water affairs, believe that although drinking water supply is one of the most crucial missions of the government, it should also be noted that transformation huge amount of water from an area to another area, with a very long distant, undoubtedly, will cause significant environmental impacts in future. Therefore, decision making and implementing such strategic projects needs a very precise consideration and accurate cost-benefit analyzes. On the one hand, through a socio- economic approach, implementation of such big projects for water transferring requires a great amount of investment and a long period to complete, and benefit peoples. So in many cases multi-purpose and multi- dimensional projects should be considered carefully. On the other hand, water supply for some provinces is vital. In most identified areas, water scarcity is the main cause of urban decline, economic problems and finally loosing population because of emigration. Thus, fresh water should be supplied for these provinces at the earliest possible. This paper is an attempt to identify, define and explain the characteristics and specification of all projects for transferring in different parts of Iran. Generally, advantages and disadvantages of

  14. A new species of the genus Ectagela Schmidt from Iran (Hemiptera, Heteroptera, Miridae, Phylinae).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Reza; Shamsi, Mohsen

    2014-05-27

    A new species of the genus Ectagela Schmidt (Phylinae) from Iran, Ectagela kermanensis sp. nov. is described and illustrated. The type specimens are deposited in the insect collection of the Natural History Museum of University of Guilan, Rasht, Iran.

  15. 78 FR 48539 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Iran Modern”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Iran Modern'' SUMMARY: Notice is... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Iran Modern,'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  16. School fire in Iran: simple actions save lives.

    PubMed

    Ostad Taghizadeh, A; Mowafi, H; Ardalan, A

    2013-03-31

    On December 5, 2012 a fire broke out in a primary school in Iran, causing injuries to 26 children and two deaths. The fire came from an oil stove. Rather than evacuate the classroom and use the fire extinguisher, the teacher attempted to remove the stove itself from the classroom. During this process an explosion occurred resulting in a haphazard attempt at evacuation. This tragedy highlights gaps in both the policy and practice of fire safety. From 2005 to 2012, Iran experienced six large school fires that led to 67 injuries and five deaths. Five events were related to oil stoves. About 30% of Iran's classrooms use oil stoves for heating during the winter with 3.4 million students and 150,000 teachers at risk. Iran's Ministry of Education has mandated that regular training of school personnel in fire safety measures should be organized but no safety officer is tasked to prepare and conduct this training. Instead, the task is delegated to the Fire Departments, which fall under municipal administrations; however, such departments do not exist in 93% of the rural areas of Iran. School fires are not unique to Iran. Similar tragic events have occurred in several middle-income countries (India, Kenya, Russia) over the last decade. This article presents an overview of school fires in Iran and proposes preventive strategies through a reform in policy making and practice, including education of students and school personnel along with regular drills, designation of a fire safety officer, and development of a countrywide school fire registry.

  17. Knowledge of healthy lifestyle in Iran: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ghanei, Mostafa; Ahmady, Khodabakhsh; Babaei, Mansour; Tavana, Ali Mehrabi; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ebadi, Abbas; Poursaid, Syed Masood

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lifestyle is a set of goals, plans, values, attitudes, behaviors, and beliefs manifested in the personal and family life of the individual and in her or his social interactions. It is an interdisciplinary concept that involves a health-oriented view of the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual domains of life. Despite their great importance, there is not much knowledge in Iran about healthy lifestyles. The present study is an attempt to address the knowledge of healthy lifestyle in Iran through a review of the literature on the subject. Methods The present systematic review searched Elsevier, SID, Pub Med, Magiran, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases for relevant articles published between 2000 and 2014. We used various keywords for the searches, including knowledge, lifestyle, health, and Iran. As a result, 62 articles were included in the study. Results There has been a dramatic increase in the publication of articles on lifestyle in Iran over the past 10 years. The results obtained showed that 64% of the articles addressed physical health, 14% addressed psychological health, 10% addressed social health, and 12% addressed spiritual health. Most lifestyle studies conducted in Iran have focused on physical health, and a few have examined the psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of lifestyle. None of the studies has examined the knowledge map of healthy lifestyles in Iran. Conclusion Given the changes in the causes of mortality from infectious and chronic diseases that impose greater medication and treatment costs on the society, and since diseases caused by unhealthy lifestyles have become the leading cause of death, it is essential for health researchers to focus on the root cause of these diseases, i.e., lifestyle and human behaviors. PMID:27123231

  18. Mountain Glaciers and Ice Caps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ananichheva, Maria; Arendt, Anthony; Hagen, Jon-Ove; Hock, Regine; Josberger, Edward G.; Moore, R. Dan; Pfeffer, William Tad; Wolken, Gabriel J.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future rates of mass loss from mountain glaciers and ice caps in the Arctic focus primarily on projections of changes in the surface mass balance. Current models are not yet capable of making realistic forecasts of changes in losses by calving. Surface mass balance models are forced with downscaled output from climate models driven by forcing scenarios that make assumptions about the future rate of growth of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Thus, mass loss projections vary considerably, depending on the forcing scenario used and the climate model from which climate projections are derived. A new study in which a surface mass balance model is driven by output from ten general circulation models (GCMs) forced by the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) A1B emissions scenario yields estimates of total mass loss of between 51 and 136 mm sea-level equivalent (SLE) (or 13% to 36% of current glacier volume) by 2100. This implies that there will still be substantial glacier mass in the Arctic in 2100 and that Arctic mountain glaciers and ice caps will continue to influence global sea-level change well into the 22nd century.

  19. Mountaineering and Climbing on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowing, K. L.

    Initial human missions to Mars will be a precious commodity wherein a maximum amount of information is gathered by each crew. As was the case during innumerable terrestrial missions of exploration, the Martian terrain that visiting crews must traverse in order to gain an understanding will often be difficult. This is accentuated by the fact that Mars is a world of geology - one whose surface area is equal to dry surface on Earth. Human crews will be called upon to use a variety of skills and tools to traverse the Martian surface - including those often associated with hiking, mountaineering and technical climbing. While rovers and other mechanical devices will be employed, it should be assumed that skills commonly associated with rock climbing, caving, and mountaineering on Earth will also be required. This paper looks at the human factors associated with such activity on Mars: space suit design requirements, life support, tools and procedures, traverse planning, logistics issues and navigation. Implications for adaptation of terrestrial gear will be examined as will implications raised by planetary protection. Lessons learned during sorties conducted on the lunar surface during the Apollo program are discussed.

  20. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213... Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...

  1. 27 CFR 9.205 - Chehalem Mountains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chehalem Mountains. 9.205... Chehalem Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Chehalem Mountains”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Chehalem Mountains” is a term of...

  2. Cultural Ecology: Arts of the Mountain Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christine Ballengee

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes a schoolwide unit, organized around the ballad of John Henry, that integrated visual art, music, dance, and drama with ecological issues, Mountain Cultural heritage, and labor history. Gives background information on the Mountain Culture and the story of John Henry, while also discussing the students' reactions and interpretations…

  3. Determining Learning Styles of the Professional Mountaineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektas, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore learning styles of the professional mountaineers. The research was carried out according to the survey model. The research group composed of 61 professional mountaineers (n[subscript (men)] = 45, n[subscript (women)] = 16) who attended Advanced Snow Ice Education Camp in Rize on September 1-7, 2012, the last camp of…

  4. The Bauhaus and Black Mountain College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellert, JoAnn C.

    1972-01-01

    In view of the sixteen-year tenure (1933-1949) at Black Mountain College of Josef Albers, a former Bauhaus Master, and his wife, Anni, a Bauhaus graduate and teacher, exploration of the influence of the Bauhaus on this small, progressive, art-centered college in the mountains of North Carolina is warrented. (Author)

  5. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213... Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...

  6. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213... Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...

  7. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213... Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...

  8. 27 CFR 9.213 - Snipes Mountain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Snipes Mountain. 9.213... Snipes Mountain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Snipes Mountain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Snipes Mountain” is a term of viticultural...

  9. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    PubMed

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old.

  10. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Statistics and Epidemiology ...

  11. Summiteers--Moving Mountains with Bereaved Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, Hans-Georg

    2011-01-01

    Summiteers are people who rush to the top. There is a mountain summit and a metaphorical summit inside us which we can climb. In the area of mountain summits, Reinhold Messner is surely the best known and most successful summiteer. He climbed, among other things, the highest peak on earth without supplemental oxygen. In the language of the country…

  12. 78 FR 29366 - Green Mountain Power Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Green Mountain Power Corporation Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 2, 2013, Green Mountain Power Corporation filed additional information in support of its request...

  13. Helicopter emergency medical service in mountainous areas.

    PubMed

    Tomazin, Iztok

    2009-01-01

    The outcome of patient care can be dramatically improved by bringing rapid rescue-medical treatment to the scene and by rapid transport to a medical facility. In mountainous areas this is usually possible only with the use of helicopters. ICAR MEDCOM suggests international standards for competent and safe response to medical problems in mountainous and wilderness areas. Rescue helicopters should work within the existing emergency medical system with appropriate mountain rescue and medically-trained personnel and with medical and rescue equipment on board. Safety is most important issue in mountain rescue. Activation and approach time should be as short as possible. All persons responsible for activation and realization of a helicopter rescue operation should be aware of all specific problems in the mountains and wilderness.

  14. Influence of mountains on Arctic tropospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabrook, Jeffrey; Whiteway, James

    2016-02-01

    Tropospheric ozone was measured above Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic during spring of 2008 using a differential absorption lidar. The observations were carried out at Eureka Weather Station, which is located between various mountain ranges. Analysis of the observations revealed that mountains had a significant effect on the vertical distribution of ozone. Ozone depletion events were observed when air that had spent significant time near to the frozen surface of the Arctic Ocean reached Eureka. This air arrived at Eureka by flowing over the surrounding mountains. Surface level ozone depletions were not observed during periods when mountains blocked the flow of air from over the sea ice. In the case of blocking there was an enhancement in the amount of ozone near the surface as air from the midtroposphere descended in the lee of the mountains. Three case studies from spring of 2008 are described.

  15. Active accommodation of plate convergence in Southern Iran: Earthquake locations, triggered aseismic slip, and regional strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.; Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-01

    We present a catalog of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) constraints on deformation that occurred during earthquake sequences in southern Iran between 1992 and 2011, and explore the implications on the accommodation of large-scale continental convergence between Saudi Arabia and Eurasia within the Zagros Mountains. The Zagros Mountains, a salt-laden fold-and-thrust belt involving ~10 km of sedimentary rocks overlying Precambrian basement rocks, have formed as a result of ongoing continental collision since 10-20 Ma that is currently occurring at a rate of ~3 cm/yr. We first demonstrate that there is a biased misfit in earthquake locations in global catalogs that likely results from neglect of 3-D velocity structure. Previous work involving two M ~ 6 earthquakes with well-recorded aftershocks has shown that the deformation observed with InSAR may represent triggered slip on faults much shallower than the primary earthquake, which likely occurred within the basement rocks (>10 km depth). We explore the hypothesis that most of the deformation observed with InSAR spanning earthquake sequences is also due to shallow, triggered slip above a deeper earthquake, effectively doubling the moment release for each event. We quantify the effects that this extra moment release would have on the discrepancy between seismically and geodetically constrained moment rates in the region, finding that even with the extra triggered fault slip, significant aseismic deformation during the interseismic period is necessary to fully explain the convergence between Eurasia and Saudi Arabia.

  16. Dioctophyma renale (Goeze, 1782) Infection in a Domestic Dog from Hamedan, Western Iran

    PubMed Central

    ZOLHAVARIEH, Seyed Masoud; NORIAN, Alireza; YAVARI, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Dioctophyma renale infection is found in a wide range of mammalian species, typically in temperate areas of the world. Here, we report for the first time, the parasitism of a domestic dog by D. renale in Hamedan, Iran, a mountainous cold region, lacking significant amounts of rainfall, high humidity and temperature. A 2.5 yr old male mixed breed dog was presented with a two months history of progressive hematuria and muscle weakness. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry were performed with results indicating impaired renal function. Urinalysis, showed hematuria as well as parasitic eggs, suggestive of D. renale infection. Urinary system ultrasonography revealed a hypoecogenic tubular structure in the right kidney. The animal was treated with fenbendazole (45 mg/kg, PO, QD - five days) and ivermectin (0.02 mg/kg, SC, single dose). One week later, repeated laboratory examination confirmed presence of at least one alive worm in the affected kidney. A unilateral nephrectomy was performed; one female (60 × 5 cm) and one male (30 × 3.8 cm) live worm were taken out of the extremely thin walled right kidney. One month later, due to failure of the remained kidney and poor condition, the patient deceased. We conclude that dioctophymosis can be found in cold and or relatively dry area. Moreover, the results showed that the worm was not affected with common anthelmintic drugs. PMID:27095981

  17. Hard ticks (Ixodidae) and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in south west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Sharifinia, Narges; Rafinejad, Javad; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Chinikar, Sadegh; Piazak, Norayer; Baniardalan, Mojgan; Biglarian, Akbar; Sharifinia, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Ticks are vectors of some important arthropod-borne diseases in both fields of veterinary and medicine, such as Lyme, tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and some types of encephalitis as well as Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF). Iran is known as one of the main foci of CCHF in west of Asia. This study was conducted in DarrehShahr County because of the development of animal husbandry in this area to detect the fauna and viral infection of the hard ticks of livestock. A cross-sectional survey was conducted during 2011-2012 with random sampling in four villages. A sample of ticks was subjected to RT-PCR method for detection of viral infection. During the study period, 592 Ixodidae ticks were collected and identified as seven species of Hyalomma asiaticum, Hy. marginatum, Hy. anatolicum, Hy. dromedarii, Hy. detritum, Rhipicephalus bursa and Rh. sanguineus. More than 20% of these ticks were examined to detect the genome of CCHF virus while 6.6% were positive. All species of Hyalomma were found to be positive. A high rate of livestock was found to be infected with hard ticks, which can act as the vectors of the CCHF disease. Regarding infection of all five Hyalomma species captured in this area, this genus should be considered as the main vector of CCHF. Planning control program can be performed based on the obtained data on seasonal activity of Ixodidae to prevent animal infestation as well as to reduce the risk of CCHF transmission.

  18. natural background radiation dosimetry in the highest altitude region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush

    2003-09-01

    The natural background radiation has been measured in one of the highest altitude regions (Zagros Mountains), Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari province, in the south west of Iran. The outdoors-environmental monitoring exposure rate of radiation was measured in 200 randomly chosen regions using portable Geiger-Muller and scintillation detectors. Eight measurements were made in each region and an average value was used to calculate the exposure rate from natural background radiation. The average exposure rate was found to be 0.246 microGy/h and the annual average effective dose equivalent was found to be 0.49 mSv. An overall population-weighted mean outdoor dose rate was calculated to be 49 nGy/h, which is higher than the world-wide mean value of 44 nGy/h, as reported by UNSCEAR in 1998, and is comparable to the annual effective dose equivalent of 0.38 mSv. A good correlation between the altitude and the exposure rate was observed, as the higher altitude regions have higher natural background radiation levels.

  19. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Iran

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Iran Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Notice of March 8, 2011 Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Iran On March 15, 1995, by Executive Order 12957, the President declared a national emergency with respect to Iran pursuant to the International Emergency Economic...

  20. 31 CFR 560.313 - Entity owned or controlled by the Government of Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Government of Iran. 560.313 Section 560.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... REGULATIONS General Definitions § 560.313 Entity owned or controlled by the Government of Iran. The term entity owned or controlled by the Government of Iran includes any corporation, partnership,...