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Sample records for albumin fusion proteins

  1. Recombinant fusion protein of albumin-retinol binding protein inactivates stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soyoung; Park, Sangeun; Kim, Suhyun; Lim, Chaeseung; Kim, Jungho; Cha, Dae Ryong; Oh, Junseo

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed novel recombinant albumin-RBP fusion proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of fusion proteins inactivates pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fusion proteins are successfully internalized into and inactivate PSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RBP moiety mediates cell specific uptake of fusion protein. -- Abstract: Quiescent pancreatic- (PSCs) and hepatic- (HSCs) stellate cells store vitamin A (retinol) in lipid droplets via retinol binding protein (RBP) receptor and, when activated by profibrogenic stimuli, they transform into myofibroblast-like cells which play a key role in the fibrogenesis. Despite extensive investigations, there is, however, currently no appropriate therapy available for tissue fibrosis. We previously showed that the expression of albumin, composed of three homologous domains (I-III), inhibits stellate cell activation, which requires its high-affinity fatty acid-binding sites asymmetrically distributed in domain I and III. To attain stellate cell-specific uptake, albumin (domain I/III) was coupled to RBP; RBP-albumin{sup domain} {sup III} (R-III) and albumin{sup domain} {sup I}-RBP-albumin{sup III} (I-R-III). To assess the biological activity of fusion proteins, cultured PSCs were used. Like wild type albumin, expression of R-III or I-R-III in PSCs after passage 2 (activated PSCs) induced phenotypic reversal from activated to fat-storing cells. On the other hand, R-III and I-R-III, but not albumin, secreted from transfected 293 cells were successfully internalized into and inactivated PSCs. FPLC-purified R-III was found to be internalized into PSCs via caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and its efficient cellular uptake was also observed in HSCs and podocytes among several cell lines tested. Moreover, tissue distribution of intravenously injected R-III was closely similar to that of RBP. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin-RBP fusion protein comprises

  2. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-04-11

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  3. The effect of albumin fusion patterns on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-14 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Yang, Runlin; Peng, Ying; Deng, Lili; Wu, Yu; Fu, Qiang

    2013-08-01

    Somatostatin is a natural inhibitor of growth hormone, and its analogues are clinically used for the therapy of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndrome. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins, and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins, (somatostatin (SS)14)2-human serum albumin (HSA), (SS14)3-HSA, and HSA-(SS14)3, were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-14 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS14)3-HSA and HSA-(SS14)3 was much lower than (SS14)2-HSA due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-14 molecule. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard of somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit growth hormone secretion in the blood, with (SS14)2-HSA being the most effective one. On the whole, (SS14)2-HSA was the most effective protein in both production level and bioactivity, and increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method to improve the protein bioactivity. PMID:23712794

  4. The effect of albumin fusion structure on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-28 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Peng, Ying; Yang, Runlin; Deng, Lili; Fu, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin, a natural inhibitor of growth hormone (GH), and its analogs have been used in clinical settings for the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndromes. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins (SS28)(2)-HSA, (SS28)(3)-HSA, and HSA-(SS28)(2), were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-28 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS28)(3)-HSA was much lower than (SS28)(2)-HSA and HSA-(SS28)(2) due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-28 molecule. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard, somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit GH secretion in blood, with (SS28)(2)-HSA being the most effective one. A pharmacokinetics study showed that (SS28)(2)-HSA had a prolonged half-life of 2 h. These results showed that increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method for improving protein bioactivity.

  5. The effect of albumin fusion structure on the production and bioactivity of the somatostatin-28 fusion protein in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuedi; Fan, Jun; Li, Wenxin; Peng, Ying; Yang, Runlin; Deng, Lili; Fu, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin, a natural inhibitor of growth hormone (GH), and its analogs have been used in clinical settings for the treatment of acromegaly, gigantism, thyrotropinoma, and other carcinoid syndromes. However, natural somatostatin is limited for clinical usage because of its short half-life in vivo. Albumin fusion technology was used to construct long-acting fusion proteins and Pichia pastoris was used as an expression system. Three fusion proteins (SS28)(2)-HSA, (SS28)(3)-HSA, and HSA-(SS28)(2), were constructed with different fusion copies of somatostatin-28 and fusion orientations. The expression level of (SS28)(3)-HSA was much lower than (SS28)(2)-HSA and HSA-(SS28)(2) due to the additional fusion of the somatostatin-28 molecule. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that severe degradation occurred in the fermentation process. Similar to the standard, somatostatin-14, all three fusion proteins were able to inhibit GH secretion in blood, with (SS28)(2)-HSA being the most effective one. A pharmacokinetics study showed that (SS28)(2)-HSA had a prolonged half-life of 2 h. These results showed that increasing the number of small protein copies fused to HSA may not be a suitable method for improving protein bioactivity. PMID:24752560

  6. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  7. Long-Acting Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX with Albumin (rIX-FP) in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chambost, Hervé; Male, Christoph; Lambert, Thierry; Halimeh, Susan; Chernova, Tatiana; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Curtin, Julie; Voigt, Christine; Li, Yanyan; Jacobs, Iris; Santagostino, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Summary A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of a recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 27 previously treated male children (1–11 years) with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2 IU/dl). All patients received routine prophylaxis once every seven days for up to 77 weeks, and treated any bleeding episodes on-demand. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 91.4 hours (h), 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment and clearance was 1.11 ml/h/kg, 6.4-fold slower than previous FIX treatment. The median (Q1, Q3) annualised spontaneous bleeding rate was 0.00 (0.00, 0.91) and was similar between the <6 years and ≥6 years age groups, with a weekly median prophylactic dose of 46 IU/kg. In addition, patients maintained a median trough level of 13.4 IU/dl FIX activity on weekly prophylaxis. Overall, 97.2% of bleeding episodes were successfully treated with one or two injections of rIX-FP (95% CI: 92% to 99%), 88.7% with one injection, and 96% of the treatments were rated effective (excellent or good) by the Investigator. No patient developed FIX inhibitors and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate that rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in children with haemophilia B with weekly prophylaxis. Routine prophylaxis with rIX-FP at treatment intervals of up to 14 days are currently being investigated in children with severe and moderately severe haemophilia B. Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01662531) PMID:27583313

  8. Protection against influenza A virus by vaccination with a recombinant fusion protein linking influenza M2e to human serum albumin (HSA).

    PubMed

    Mu, Xupeng; Hu, Kebang; Shen, Mohan; Kong, Ning; Fu, Changhao; Yan, Weiqun; Wei, Anhui

    2016-02-01

    The highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) of influenza A viruses has limited immunogenicity on its own. Hence, aiming to enhance immunogenicity of M2e protein, optimal approaches remain to be established. In this study, we created recombinant fusion protein vaccines by linking M2e consensus sequence of influenza A viruses with C-terminal domain of human serum albumin (HSA). Then HSA/M2e recombinant fusion protein was studied. Our results showed that HSA/M2e could induce strong anti-M2e specific humoral immune responses in the established mice model. Administration of HSA/M2e with Freund's adjuvant resulted in a higher number of IFN-γ-producing cells compared to HSA/M2e or M2e peptide emulsified in Freund's adjuvant. Furthermore, HSA/M2e was able to reduce viral load in the mice lungs and provide significant protection against lethal challenge with an H1N1 or an H3N2 virus compared to controls. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated a potential vaccine that could provide protection in preventing the threat of influenza outbreak because of rapid variation of the influenza virus.

  9. Monovalent Fc receptor blockade by an anti-Fcγ receptor/albumin fusion protein ameliorates murine ITP with abrogated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojie; Menard, Melissa; Prechl, József; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) commonly have antiplatelet antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia through Fcγ receptors (FcγRs). Antibodies specific for FcγRs, designed to inhibit antibody-FcγR interaction, had been shown to improve ITP in refractory human patients. However, the development of such FcγR-specific antibodies has stalled because of adverse events, a phenomenon recapitulated in mouse models. One hypothesis behind these adverse events involved the function of the Fc region of the antibody, which engages FcγRs, leading to inflammatory responses. Unfortunately, inhibition of Fc function by deglycosylation failed to prevent this inflammatory response. In this work, we hypothesize that the bivalent antigen-binding fragment regions of immunoglobulin G are sufficient to trigger adverse events and have reasoned that designing a monovalent targeting strategy could circumvent the inflammatory response. To this end, we generated a fusion protein comprising a monovalent human FcγRIIIA-specific antibody linked in tandem to human serum albumin, which retained FcγR-binding activity in vitro. To evaluate clinically relevant in vivo FcγR-blocking function and inflammatory effects, we generated a murine version targeting the murine FcγRIII linked to murine albumin in a passive murine ITP model. Monovalent blocking of FcγR function dramatically inhibited antibody-dependent murine ITP and successfully circumvented the inflammatory response as assessed by changes in body temperature, basophil activation, and basophil depletion. Consistent with our hypothesis, in vivo cross-linking of the fusion protein induced these inflammatory effects, recapitulating the adverse events of the parent antibody. Thus, monovalent blocking of FcγR function demonstrates a proof of concept to successfully treat FcγR-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  10. A novel exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein, E2HSA, with an extended half-life and good glucoregulatory effect in healthy rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Lin; Meng, Zhiyun; Gan, Hui; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Gao, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Wenzhong; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Dou, Guifang

    2014-03-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has attracted considerable research interest in terms of the treatment of type 2 diabetes due to their multiple glucoregulatory functions. However, the short half-life, rapid inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and excretion, limits the therapeutic potential of the native incretin hormone. Therefore, efforts are being made to develop the long-acting incretin mimetics via modifying its structure. Here we report a novel recombinant exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein E2HSA with HSA molecule extends their circulatory half-life in vivo while still retaining exendin-4 biological activity and therapeutic properties. In vitro comparisons of E2HSA and exendin-4 showed similar insulinotropic activity on rat pancreatic islets and GLP-1R-dependent biological activity on RIN-m5F cells, although E2HSA was less potent than exendin-4. E2HSA had a terminal elimation half-life of approximate 54 h in healthy rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, E2HSA could reduce postprandial glucose excursion and control fasting glucose level, dose-dependent suppress food intake. Improvement in glucose-dependent insulin secretion and control serum glucose excursions were observed during hyperglycemic clamp test (18 h) and oral glucose tolerance test (42 h) respectively. Thus the improved physiological characterization of E2HSA make it a new potent anti-diabetic drug for type 2 diabetes therapy.

  11. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-01-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P < .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274. PMID:26755710

  12. Long-acting recombinant coagulation factor IX albumin fusion protein (rIX-FP) in hemophilia B: results of a phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Santagostino, Elena; Martinowitz, Uri; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Hanabusa, Hideji; Oldenburg, Johannes; Boggio, Lisa; Negrier, Claude; Pabinger, Ingrid; von Depka Prondzinski, Mario; Altisent, Carmen; Castaman, Giancarlo; Yamamoto, Koji; Álvarez-Roman, Maria-Teresa; Voigt, Christine; Blackman, Nicole; Jacobs, Iris

    2016-04-01

    A global phase 3 study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of recombinant fusion protein linking coagulation factor IX with albumin (rIX-FP) in 63 previously treated male patients (12-61 years) with severe hemophilia B (factor IX [FIX] activity ≤2%). The study included 2 groups: group 1 patients received routine prophylaxis once every 7 days for 26 weeks, followed by either 7-, 10-, or 14-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 50, 38, or 51 weeks, respectively; group 2 patients received on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes for 26 weeks and then switched to a 7-day prophylaxis regimen for a mean of 45 weeks. The mean terminal half-life of rIX-FP was 102 hours, 4.3-fold longer than previous FIX treatment. Patients maintained a mean trough of 20 and 12 IU/dL FIX activity on prophylaxis with rIX-FP 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks, respectively. There was 100% reduction in median annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR) and 100% resolution of target joints when subjects switched from on-demand to prophylaxis treatment with rIX-FP (P< .0001). The median AsBR was 0.00 for all prophylaxis regimens. Overall, 98.6% of bleeding episodes were treated successfully, including 93.6% that were treated with a single injection. No patient developed an inhibitor, and no safety concerns were identified. These results indicate rIX-FP is safe and effective for preventing and treating bleeding episodes in patients with hemophilia B at dosing regimens of 40 IU/kg weekly and 75 IU/kg every 2 weeks. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT0101496274.

  13. A novel exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein, E2HSA, with an extended half-life and good glucoregulatory effect in healthy rhesus monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Lin; Meng, Zhiyun; Gan, Hui; Gu, Ruolan; Wu, Zhuona; Gao, Lei; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Sun, Wenzhong; Li, Jian; Zheng, Ying; Dou, Guifang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2HSA has an extended half-life and good plasma stability. • E2HSA could improve glucose-dependent insulin secretion. • E2HSA has excellent glucoregulatory effects in vivo. • E2HSA could potentially be used as a new long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist for type 2 diabetes management. - Abstract: Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has attracted considerable research interest in terms of the treatment of type 2 diabetes due to their multiple glucoregulatory functions. However, the short half-life, rapid inactivation by dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and excretion, limits the therapeutic potential of the native incretin hormone. Therefore, efforts are being made to develop the long-acting incretin mimetics via modifying its structure. Here we report a novel recombinant exendin-4 human serum albumin fusion protein E2HSA with HSA molecule extends their circulatory half-life in vivo while still retaining exendin-4 biological activity and therapeutic properties. In vitro comparisons of E2HSA and exendin-4 showed similar insulinotropic activity on rat pancreatic islets and GLP-1R-dependent biological activity on RIN-m5F cells, although E2HSA was less potent than exendin-4. E2HSA had a terminal elimation half-life of approximate 54 h in healthy rhesus monkeys. Furthermore, E2HSA could reduce postprandial glucose excursion and control fasting glucose level, dose-dependent suppress food intake. Improvement in glucose-dependent insulin secretion and control serum glucose excursions were observed during hyperglycemic clamp test (18 h) and oral glucose tolerance test (42 h) respectively. Thus the improved physiological characterization of E2HSA make it a new potent anti-diabetic drug for type 2 diabetes therapy.

  14. Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin Ratio Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio Share this ... Globulin Ratio; A/G Ratio Formal name: Total Protein; Albumin to Globulin Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Liver ...

  15. Extending the pharmacokinetic half-life of coagulation factors by fusion to recombinant albumin.

    PubMed

    Metzner, H J; Pipe, S W; Weimer, T; Schulte, S

    2013-11-01

    The prophylactic treatment of haemophilia B and the management of haemophilia A or B with inhibitors demand frequent administrations of coagulation factors due to the suboptimal half-lives of the products commercially available and currently in use, e.g. recombinant factor IX (rFIX) and recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa), respectively. The extension of the half-lives of rFIX and rFVIIa could allow for longer intervals between infusions and could thereby improve adherence and clinical outcomes and may improve quality of life. Albumin fusion is one of a number of different techniques currently being examined to prolong the half-life of rFIX and rFVIIa. Results from a phase I clinical trial demonstrated that the recombinant fusion protein linking FIX to albumin (rIX-FP) has a five-times longer half-life than rFIX, and preclinical studies with the recombinant fusion protein linking FVIIa to albumin (rVIIa-FP) suggest that rVIIa-FP possesses a significantly extended half-life versus rFVIIa. In this review, we describe albumin fusion technology and examine the recent progress in the development of rIX-FP and rVIIa-FP.

  16. Fusion to a highly stable consensus albumin binding domain allows for tunable pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Steven A; Gibbs, Alan C; Conk, Michelle; Yi, Fang; Maguire, Diane; Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn T

    2015-10-01

    A number of classes of proteins have been engineered for high stability using consensus sequence design methods. Here we describe the engineering of a novel albumin binding domain (ABD) three-helix bundle protein. The resulting engineered ABD molecule, called ABDCon, is expressed at high levels in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli and is highly stable, with a melting temperature of 81.5°C. ABDCon binds human, monkey and mouse serum albumins with affinity as high as 61 pM. The solution structure of ABDCon is consistent with the three-helix bundle design and epitope mapping studies enabled a precise definition of the albumin binding interface. Fusion of a 10 kDa scaffold protein to ABDCon results in a long terminal half-life of 60 h in mice and 182 h in cynomolgus monkeys. To explore the link between albumin affinity and in vivo exposure, mutations were designed at the albumin binding interface of ABDCon yielding variants that span an 11 000-fold range in affinity. The PK properties of five such variants were determined in mice in order to demonstrate the tunable nature of serum half-life, exposure and clearance with variations in albumin binding affinity.

  17. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  18. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  19. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  20. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S.; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL × h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety. PMID:25862515

  1. Site-specific albumination of a therapeutic protein with multi-subunit to prolong activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung In; Hahn, Young S; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-06-10

    Albumin fusion/conjugation (albumination) has been an effective method to prolong in vivo half-life of therapeutic proteins. However, its broader application to proteins with complex folding pathway or multi-subunit is restricted by incorrect folding, poor expression, heterogeneity, and loss of native activity of the proteins linked to albumin. We hypothesized that the site-specific conjugation of albumin to a permissive site of a target protein will expand the utilities of albumin as a therapeutic activity extender to proteins with a complex structure. We show here the genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid (NNAA) followed by chemoselective albumin conjugation to prolong therapeutic activity in vivo. Urate oxidase (Uox), a therapeutic enzyme for treatment of hyperuricemia, is a homotetramer with multiple surface lysines, limiting conventional approaches for albumination. Incorporation of p-azido-l-phenylalanine into two predetermined positions of Uox allowed site-specific linkage of dibenzocyclooctyne-derivatized human serum albumin (HSA) through strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). The bio-orthogonality of SPAAC resulted in the production of a chemically well-defined conjugate, Uox-HSA, with a retained enzymatic activity. Uox-HSA had a half-life of 8.8 h in mice, while wild-type Uox had a half-life of 1.3 h. The AUC increased 5.5-fold (1657 vs. 303 mU/mL x h). These results clearly demonstrated that site-specific albumination led to the prolonged enzymatic activity of Uox in vivo. Site-specific albumination enabled by NNAA incorporation and orthogonal chemistry demonstrates its promise for the development of long-acting protein therapeutics with high potency and safety.

  2. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  3. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. 2S Albumin Storage Proteins: What Makes them Food Allergens?

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F. Javier; Clemente, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    2S albumin storage proteins are becoming of increasing interest in nutritional and clinical studies as they have been reported as major food allergens in seeds of many mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. This review describes the main biochemical, structural and functional properties of these proteins thought to play a role in determining their potential allergenicity. 2S albumins are considered to sensitize directly via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The high stability of their intrinsic protein structure, dominated by a well-conserved skeleton of cysteine residues, to the harsh conditions present in the GIT suggests that these proteins are able to cross the gut mucosal barrier to sensitize the mucosal immune system and/or elicit an allergic response. The flexible and solvent-exposed hypervariable region of these proteins is immunodominant and has the ability to bind IgE from allergic patients´ sera. Several linear IgE-binding epitopes of 2S albumins spanning this region have been described to play a major role in allergenicity; the role of conformational epitopes of these proteins in food allergy is far from being understood and need to be investigated. Finally, the interaction of these proteins with other components of the food matrix might influence the absorption rates of immunologically reactive 2S albumins but also in their immune response. PMID:18949071

  5. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  10. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  11. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kiaw Kiaw; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Sofiman Othman, Ahmad; Kigawa, Takanori; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa) was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa) into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa) conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa) into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology. PMID:27100681

  12. Fusion of an albumin-binding domain extends the half-life of immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Guo, Wenjun; Cao, Li; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jieyu; Xu, Hua; Huang, Weiqiang; Wang, Fengwei; Hong, Zhangyong

    2016-09-10

    Immunotoxins have documented potential as a cancer treatment due to their extreme potency; a single toxin molecule delivered to the cytosol may be sufficient to kill a cell. However, their short half-life in the circulatory system may be one of the key problems associated with the clinical use of immunotoxins and may continue to limit their therapeutic activity. Herein, we genetically fused an albumin-binding domain (ABD) to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-specific immunotoxin ZHER2-PE38 to extend the circulation time and thus improve the therapeutic outcome of this immunotoxin. Furthermore, the fusion of an ABD to the immunotoxin was found to promote non-covalent interactions between the immunotoxin and serum albumin, which rescue the immunotoxin from lysosomal degradation through a serum albumin-mediated interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). This manuscript reports the construction, purification, and characterization of the ABD-fused HER2-specific immunotoxin, ABD-ZHER2-PE38, both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with non-fused ZHER2-PE38, this new construct exhibits a clearly increased half-life in plasma (330.8 versus 13.5min, approximately 24.4-fold extension) and remarkably improved antitumor effects in an NCI-N87 subcutaneous xenograft model. Therefore, the new construct represents a potentially attractive therapeutic modality, and the proposed strategy may also have useful applications for current immunotoxin designs.

  13. Fusion of an albumin-binding domain extends the half-life of immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Guo, Wenjun; Cao, Li; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jieyu; Xu, Hua; Huang, Weiqiang; Wang, Fengwei; Hong, Zhangyong

    2016-09-10

    Immunotoxins have documented potential as a cancer treatment due to their extreme potency; a single toxin molecule delivered to the cytosol may be sufficient to kill a cell. However, their short half-life in the circulatory system may be one of the key problems associated with the clinical use of immunotoxins and may continue to limit their therapeutic activity. Herein, we genetically fused an albumin-binding domain (ABD) to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-specific immunotoxin ZHER2-PE38 to extend the circulation time and thus improve the therapeutic outcome of this immunotoxin. Furthermore, the fusion of an ABD to the immunotoxin was found to promote non-covalent interactions between the immunotoxin and serum albumin, which rescue the immunotoxin from lysosomal degradation through a serum albumin-mediated interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). This manuscript reports the construction, purification, and characterization of the ABD-fused HER2-specific immunotoxin, ABD-ZHER2-PE38, both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with non-fused ZHER2-PE38, this new construct exhibits a clearly increased half-life in plasma (330.8 versus 13.5min, approximately 24.4-fold extension) and remarkably improved antitumor effects in an NCI-N87 subcutaneous xenograft model. Therefore, the new construct represents a potentially attractive therapeutic modality, and the proposed strategy may also have useful applications for current immunotoxin designs. PMID:27457423

  14. Exo-endo cellulase fusion protein

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Benjamin S.; Larenas, Edmund A.; Mitchinson, Colin

    2012-01-17

    The present invention relates to a heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct, which encodes a fusion protein having cellulolytic activity comprising a catalytic domain derived from a fungal exo-cellobiohydrolase and a catalytic domain derived from an endoglucanase. The invention also relates to vectors and fungal host cells comprising the heterologous exo-endo cellulase fusion construct as well as methods for producing a cellulase fusion protein and enzymatic cellulase compositions.

  15. Photo selective protein immobilization using bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Kim, Ansoon; Huh, Chul; Park, Chan Woo; Ah, Chil Seong; Kim, Bong Kyu; Yang, Jong-Heon; Chung, Kwang Hyo; Choi, Yo Han; Hong, Jongcheol; Sung, Gun Yong

    2012-11-01

    A simple and selective technique which immobilizes protein onto a solid substrate by using UV illumination has been developed. In protein immobilization, a Bovine serum albumin (BSA) performed bifunctional role as a cross-linker between substrate and proteins and as a blocker inhibiting a nonspecific protein adsorption. A new photo-induced protein immobilization process has been investigated at each step by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A UV photomask has been used to induce selective protein immobilization on target regions of the surface of the SiO2 substrates under UV illumination with negligible nonspecific binding. The UV illumination also showed improved photostability than the conventional methods which employed bifunctional photo-crosslinker molecules of photo-reactive diazirine. This new UV illumination-based photo-addressable protein immobilization provides a new approach for developing novel protein microarrays for multiplexed sensing as well as other types of bio-immobilization in biomedical devices and biotechnologies.

  16. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression.

  17. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression. PMID:26668316

  18. Fusion to an albumin-binding domain with a high affinity for albumin extends the circulatory half-life and enhances the in vivo antitumor effects of human TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yang, Hao; Jia, Dianlong; Nie, Qianxue; Cai, Huawei; Fan, Qing; Wan, Lin; Li, Lin; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-04-28

    Clinical applications of recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL) have been limited by their poor pharmacokinetics. Using endogenous albumin as a carrier is an attractive approach for circulatory half-life extension. Here, we produced ABD-hTRAIL and hTRAIL-ABD by fusing the albumin-binding domain (ABD) from protein G to the N- or C-terminus of hTRAIL. We found that ABD-hTRAIL bound human serum albumin (HSA) with a high affinity (0.4 ± 0.18 nM) and formed nanoparticles with an average diameter (~12 nm) above the threshold (~7 nm) of renal filtration. ABD-hTRAIL also bound mouse serum albumin (MSA); thus, its half-life was 40-50-fold greater than that of hTRAIL (14.1 ± 0.87 h vs 0.32 ± 0.14 h). Tumor uptake of ABD-hTRAIL 8-48 h post-injection was 6-16-fold that of hTRAIL. Consequently, the tumor suppression of ABD-hTRAIL in mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts was 3-4 times greater than that of hTRAIL. Additionally, the time period during which ABD-hTRAIL could kill circulating tumor cells was approximately 8 times longer than that of hTRAIL. These results demonstrate that ABD fused to the N-terminus endows hTRAIL with albumin binding ability; once it enters the vasculature, ABD mediates binding with endogenous albumin, thus prolonging the half-life and enhancing the antitumor effect of hTRAIL. However, hTRAIL-ABD did not show a high affinity for albumin and therefore did not display the prolonged circulatory half-life and enhanced antitumor effects. These results demonstrate that N-terminal, but not C-terminal, ABD-fusion is an efficient technique for enhancing the antitumor effects of hTRAIL by using endogenous albumin as a carrier.

  19. Protein-protein fusion catalyzed by sortase A.

    PubMed

    Levary, David A; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2011-04-06

    Chimeric proteins boast widespread use in areas ranging from cell biology to drug delivery. Post-translational protein fusion using the bacterial transpeptidase sortase A provides an attractive alternative when traditional gene fusion fails. We describe use of this enzyme for in vitro protein ligation and report the successful fusion of 10 pairs of protein domains with preserved functionality--demonstrating the robust and facile nature of this reaction.

  20. Protein-Protein Fusion Catalyzed by Sortase A

    PubMed Central

    Levary, David A.; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T.; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    Chimeric proteins boast widespread use in areas ranging from cell biology to drug delivery. Post-translational protein fusion using the bacterial transpeptidase sortase A provides an attractive alternative when traditional gene fusion fails. We describe use of this enzyme for in vitro protein ligation and report the successful fusion of 10 pairs of protein domains with preserved functionality — demonstrating the robust and facile nature of this reaction. PMID:21494692

  1. Deployment of membrane fusion protein domains during fusion.

    PubMed

    Bentz, J; Mittal, A

    2000-01-01

    It is clear that both viral and intracellular membrane fusion proteins contain a minimal set of domains which must be deployed at the appropriate time during the fusion process. An account of these domains and their functions is given here for the four best-described fusion systems: influenza HA, sendai virus F1, HIV gp120/41 and the neuronal SNARE core composed of synaptobrevin (syn), syntaxin (stx) and the N- and C-termini of SNAP25 (sn25), together with the Ca(2+)binding protein synaptotagmin (syt). Membrane fusion begins with the binding of the virion or vesicle to the target membrane via receptors. The committed step in influenza HA- mediated fusion begins with an aggregate of HAs (at least eight) with some of their HA2 N-termini, a.k.a. fusion peptides, embedded into the viral bilayer (Bentz, 2000 a). The hypothesis presented in Bentz (2000 b) is that the conformational change of HA to the extended coiled coil extracts the fusion peptides from the viral bilayer. When this extraction occurs from the center of the site of restricted lipid flow, it exposes acyl chains and parts of the HA transmembrane domains to the aqueous media, i.e. a hydrophobic defect is formed. This is the 'transition state' of the committed step of fusion. It is stabilized by a 'dam' of HAs, which are inhibited from diffusing away by the rest of the HAs in the aggregate and because that would initially expose more acyl chains to water. Recruitment of lipids from the apposed target membrane can heal this hydrophobic defect, initiating lipid mixing and fusion. The HA transmembrane domains are required to be part of the hydrophobic defect, because the HA aggregate must be closely packed enough to restrict lipid flow. This hypothesis provides a simple and direct coupling between the energy released by the formation of the coiled coil to the energy needed to create and stabilize the high energy intermediates of fusion. Several of these essential domains have been described for the viral fusion

  2. Novel Hydrophobin Fusion Tags for Plant-Produced Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ritala, Anneli; Linder, Markus; Joensuu, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobin fusion technology has been applied in the expression of several recombinant proteins in plants. Until now, the technology has relied exclusively on the Trichoderma reesei hydrophobin HFBI. We screened eight novel hydrophobin tags, T. reesei HFBII, HFBIII, HFBIV, HFBV, HFBVI and Fusarium verticillioides derived HYD3, HYD4 and HYD5, for production of fusion proteins in plants and purification by two-phase separation. To study the properties of the hydrophobins, we used N-terminal and C-terminal GFP as a fusion partner. Transient expression of the hydrophobin fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed large variability in accumulation levels, which was also reflected in formation of protein bodies. In two-phase separations, only HFBII and HFBIV were able to concentrate GFP into the surfactant phase from a plant extract. The separation efficiency of both tags was comparable to HFBI. When the accumulation was tested side by side, HFBII-GFP gave a better yield than HFBI-GFP, while the yield of HFBIV-GFP remained lower. Thus we present here two alternatives for HFBI as functional fusion tags for plant-based protein production and first step purification. PMID:27706254

  3. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-08-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH{sub 2}-terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å.

  4. Fusion Proteins for Half-Life Extension of Biologics as a Strategy to Make Biobetters.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of making a "biobetter" biologic is to improve on the salient characteristics of a known biologic for which there is, minimally, clinical proof of concept or, maximally, marketed product data. There already are several examples in which second-generation or biobetter biologics have been generated by improving the pharmacokinetic properties of an innovative drug, including Neulasta(®) [a PEGylated, longer-half-life version of Neupogen(®) (filgrastim)] and Aranesp(®) [a longer-half-life version of Epogen(®) (epoetin-α)]. This review describes the use of protein fusion technologies such as Fc fusion proteins, fusion to human serum albumin, fusion to carboxy-terminal peptide, and other polypeptide fusion approaches to make biobetter drugs with more desirable pharmacokinetic profiles.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a... are characterized by proteinuria or albuminuria. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  6. Single-chain Variable Fragment Albumin Fusions Bind the Neonatal Fc Receptor (FcRn) in a Species-dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jan Terje; Cameron, Jason; Plumridge, Andrew; Evans, Leslie; Sleep, Darrell; Sandlie, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Albumin has a serum half-life of 3 weeks in humans. This has been utilized to extend the serum persistence of biopharmaceuticals that are fused to albumin. In light of the fact that the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is a key regulator of albumin homeostasis, it is crucial to address how fusion of therapeutics to albumin impacts binding to FcRn. Here, we report on a detailed molecular investigation on how genetic fusion of a short peptide or an single-chain variable fragment (scFv) fragment to human serum albumin (HSA) influences pH-dependent binding to FcRn from mouse, rat, monkey, and human. We have found that fusion to the N- or C-terminal end of HSA only slightly reduces receptor binding, where the most noticeable effect is seen after fusion to the C-terminal end. Furthermore, in contrast to the observed strong binding to human and monkey FcRn, HSA and all HSA fusions bound very poorly to mouse and rat versions of the receptor. Thus, we demonstrate that conventional rodents are limited as preclinical models for analysis of serum half-life of HSA-based biopharmaceuticals. This finding is explained by cross-species differences mainly found within domain III (DIII) of albumin. Our data demonstrate that although fusion, particularly to the C-terminal end, may slightly reduce the affinity for FcRn, HSA is versatile as a carrier of biopharmaceuticals. PMID:23818524

  7. Protein degradation by ruminal microorganisms from sheep fed dietary supplements of urea, casein, or albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, R J; Broderick, G A; Brammall, M L

    1987-01-01

    Ruminal fluid from sheep fed hay plus concentrate diets containing 1.8% urea, 6% casein, or 6% egg albumin had proteolytic activities of 4.12, 3.02, or 4.00 mg of [14C]casein hydrolyzed ml-1 h-1, respectively. Dietary albumin had no effect on the rate of albumin breakdown relative to that of casein (0.06). Greater numbers of highly proteolytic bacteria, mainly Butyrivibrio spp., were isolated from the rumens of sheep receiving albumin. Albumin hydrolysis by these isolates was even slower relative to that of casein (0.03) than in ruminal fluid and was similar to that found in isolates from urea- and casein-fed sheep. Hence, there appears to be no mechanism by which ruminal bacteria can alter their proteolytic activity to utilize resistant soluble protein more effectively. PMID:3579280

  8. Changes of protein solutions during storage: a study of albumin pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Cathrine; Skotland, Tore

    2010-03-05

    During the production of air-filled albumin microspheres, to be used as an ultrasound contrast agent, it was observed that some albumin lots could not be used owing to albumin precipitation. In order to understand the reason for these lot-to-lot variations, 24 lots of 5% (w/v) human albumin pharmaceutical preparations were analysed. The results revealed that the good albumin lots all contained <0.03 mol of free SH groups per mol of albumin. The precipitation observed with other lots was most probably due to higher amounts of free SH groups. The lower amount of free SH groups in the good lots correlated with: (i) a yellow colour of the solutions and a UV-visible spectrum similar to that observed for non-enzymatic glycosylation; (ii) a decreased fructosamine content; (iii) an increased mobility against the anode in isoelectric focusing; and (iv) an increased truncation of the two N-terminal amino acids. No, or only small, differences were observed for the amounts of albumin dimer, albumin aggregates and protein impurities, and these could not account for the albumin precipitation. The differences observed between the albumin lots were most probably due to varying storage times and/or storage conditions, and incubation experiments revealed changes in all parameters that differed between the good and bad lots. Increasing the storage temperature or exposing the solutions to light resulted in a faster decrease of free SH groups and increase of the yellow colouration. It is likely that at least some of the changes observed were due to reactive degradation products formed from the stabilizer N-acetyl-L-tryptophan. The results presented should also be of interest regarding the storage of monoclonal antibodies and other proteins used in pharmaceuticals.

  9. Influence of diets with different levels of protein and energy on liver albumin content in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maurice, M; Lardeux, B; De Saint-Steban, C; Bourdel, G; Feldmann, G

    1986-11-01

    The influence of protein ingestion on liver albumin synthesis and albumin content was investigated in rats fed protein as a meal (90% casein) given apart from the other dietary components provided ad libitum. In this condition, protein ingestion rapidly stimulates liver total protein synthesis. Separately fed rats were studied 6 and 20 h after the protein meal. Control rats fed mixed diets containing 13 or 80% casein were killed either during the absorptive (night) or postabsorptive (light) periods. The ratio of hepatic albumin synthesis to total protein synthesis remained fairly constant (12-15%) in all groups, indicating that albumin synthesis paralleled total protein synthesis. Liver albumin content measured in microsomes by immunonephelometry was significantly higher in separately fed rats killed 6 h postmeal than in those killed after 20 h. In rats fed 13% casein, the liver albumin content remained high regardless of the time of killing. In rats fed 80% casein, the albumin content was higher during the absorptive period than during the postabsorptive period. Immunoperoxidase staining of the hepatocyte organelles involved in albumin synthesis, especially the Golgi apparatus, was more intense for separately fed rats killed 6 h postmeal than for those killed after 20 h. Livers of rats fed 13% casein also exhibited a pattern indicative of high hepatocyte albumin content, whereas livers of rats fed 80% casein contained less. These results show that, in separate feeding, wide circadian variations of albumin synthesis run parallel to changes in liver albumin content.

  10. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  11. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  12. Fusion proteins useful for producing pinene

    DOEpatents

    Peralta-Yahya, Pamela P.; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-06-28

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous pinene synthase (PS), or enzymatically active fragment or variant thereof, and optionally a geranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GPPS), or enzymatically active fragment or variant thereof, or a fusion protein comprising: (a) a PS and (b) a GPPS linked by a linker.

  13. Study of the effect of total serum protein and albumin concentrations on canine fructosamine concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Loste, A; Marca, M C

    1999-01-01

    The relationship among serum fructosamine concentration and total serum protein and albumin concentrations were evaluated in healthy and sick dogs (diabetics and dogs with insulinoma were not included). Fructosamine was determined using a commercial colorimetric nitroblue tetrazolium method applied to the Technicon RA-500 (Bayer). Serum fructosamine concentration was not correlated to total protein in normoproteinemic (r = 0.03) and hyperproteinemic dogs (r = 0.29), but there was a high correlation (r = 0.73) in hypoproteinemic dogs. Similar comparison between serum fructosamine and albumin concentrations showed middle correlation (r = 0.49) in normoalbuminemic dogs and high degree of correlation (r = 0.67) in hypoalbuminemic dogs. These results showed the importance of recognizing serum glucose concentration as well as total serum protein and albumin concentrations in the assay of canine serum fructosamine concentration. PMID:10369572

  14. Albiglutide, an albumin-based fusion of glucagon-like peptide 1 for the potential treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2009-10-01

    Albiglutide, under development by GlaxoSmithKline plc for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is an albumin-fusion peptide. The compound is a mimetic of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a hormone that decreases glucose levels, but has a short half-life because of degradation by dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4. Albiglutide has a longer half-life as a result of its fusion with albumin and its resistance to degradation by DPP-4, caused by an amino acid substitution (Ala to Glu) at the DPP-4-sensitive hydrolysis site. Data from phase II clinical trials in patients with T2DM revealed that albiglutide was well tolerated and that the drug significantly reduced HbA1c levels compared with placebo. At the time of publication, phase III trials assessing albiglutide alone and in combination with other antidiabetic drugs were recruiting patients with T2DM. Albiglutide represents a promising new drug for the treatment of patients with T2DM; the results of long-term trials are awaited with interest.

  15. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  16. Scavenger receptor-mediated recognition of maleyl bovine plasma albumin and the demaleylated protein in human monocyte macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, M E; Fogelman, A M

    1985-01-01

    Maleyl bovine plasma albumin competed on an equimolar basis with malondialdehyde low density lipoprotein (LDL) in suppressing the lysosomal hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL mediated by the scavenger receptor of human monocyte macrophages. Maleyl bovine plasma albumin, in which 94% of the amino groups were modified, exhibited an anodic mobility in agarose electrophoresis 1.7 times that of the native protein. Incubation of maleyl bovine plasma albumin at pH 3.5 regenerated the free amino groups and restored the protein to the same electrophoretic mobility as native albumin. The demaleylated protein suppressed 75% of the hydrolysis of 125I-labeled malondialdehyde LDL and greater than 80% of 125I-labeled maleyl bovine plasma albumin. The ability of the demaleylated protein to compete was abolished after treatment with guanidine hydrochloride. Although ligands recognized by the scavenger receptor typically are anionic, we propose that addition of new negative charge achieved by maleylation, rather than directly forming the receptor binding site(s), induces conformational changes in albumin as a prerequisite to expression of the recognition domain(s). The altered conformation of the modified protein apparently persists after removal of the maleyl groups. We conclude that the primary sequence of albumin, rather than addition of new negative charge, provides the recognition determinant(s) essential for interaction of maleyl bovine plasma albumin with the scavenger receptor. PMID:3857610

  17. Significance of Total Protein, Albumin, Globulin, Serum Effusion Albumin Gradient and LDH in the Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Effusion Secondary to Tuberculosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish; Das, Biswajit; Mallick, Ayaz K; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer and Pulmonary tuberculosis are two major public health problems associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide particularly in low and middle income countries like India. Wrong diagnosis of lung cancer cases as pulmonary tuberculosis in primary health care system delays the onset of anti-cancer chemotherapy as well as initiation of DOTS thus increasing complication and mortality rate in malignancy patients. In this context easy, cost effective diagnostic tool at primary level must be the priority and need of hour. Aim To study and evaluate any significance of biochemical parameters (total protein, albumin, globulin, serum effusion albumin gradient, LDH) in serum and pleural effusion secondary to tuberculosis and lung cancer. Materials and Methods A case control study was carried out on patients attending OPD and IPD, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, RMCH. Hundred cases of Tuberculosis effusion, 50 cases of Malignant effusion and 100 age and sex matched apparently healthy controls were taken for correlation of biochemical parameters (total protein, albumin, globulin, serum effusion albumin gradient, LDH) and statistically evaluated to find any significance between tuberculosis, lung cancer and control group. Blood and pleural fluid samples were collected and then subjected to assessment of parameters (total protein, albumin, LDH) by using EM360 Autoanalyser and kits were supplied by Transasia diagnostics. Globulin and Serum Effusion Albumin Gradient (SEAG) was calculated mathematically. Statistical Analysis Data is presented as mean ± SD. Comparison of serum and pleural fluid levels (of taken parameters) were done in TB, Lung Cancer and Control groups by ANOVA and students t-test. The p-value <0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results We found serum-total protein, albumin, globulin to be significantly higher in TB group than lung cancer group but serum LDH was higher in lung cancer group (in all parameters p

  18. Acute metabolic acidosis decreases muscle protein synthesis but not albumin synthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Kleger, G R; Turgay, M; Imoberdorf, R; McNurlan, M A; Garlick, P J; Ballmer, P E

    2001-12-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis induces negative nitrogen balance by either increased protein breakdown or decreased protein synthesis. Few data exist regarding effects of acute metabolic acidosis on protein synthesis. We investigated fractional synthesis rates (FSRs) of muscle protein and albumin, plasma concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones (free thyroxin [fT(4)] and triiodothyronine [fT(3)]) in seven healthy human volunteers after a stable controlled metabolic period of 5 days and again 48 hours later after inducing metabolic acidosis by oral ammonium chloride intake (4.2 mmol/kg/d divided in six daily doses). Muscle and albumin FSRs were obtained by the [(2)H(5)ring]phenylalanine flooding technique. Ammonium chloride induced a significant decrease in pH (7.43 +/- 0.02 versus 7.32 +/- 0.04; P < 0.0001) and bicarbonate concentration (24.6 +/- 1.6 versus 16.0 +/- 2.7 mmol/L; P < 0.0001) within 48 hours. Nitrogen balance decreased significantly on the second day of acidosis. The FSR of muscle protein decreased (1.94 +/- 0.25 versus 1.30 +/- 0.39; P < 0.02), whereas the FSR of albumin remained constant. TSH levels increased significantly (1.1 +/- 0.5 versus 1.9 +/- 1.1 mU/L; P = 0.03), whereas IGF-I, fT(4), and fT(3) levels showed no significant change. We conclude that acute metabolic acidosis for 48 hours in humans induces a decrease in muscle protein synthesis, which contributes substantially to a negative nitrogen balance. In contrast to prolonged metabolic acidosis of 7 days, a short period of acidosis in the present study did not downregulate albumin synthesis.

  19. Differential cholesterol binding by class II fusion proteins determines membrane fusion properties.

    PubMed

    Umashankar, M; Sánchez-San Martín, Claudia; Liao, Maofu; Reilly, Brigid; Guo, Alice; Taylor, Gwen; Kielian, Margaret

    2008-09-01

    The class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses mediate virus infection by driving the fusion of the virus membrane with that of the cell. These fusion proteins are triggered by low pH, and their structures are strikingly similar in both the prefusion dimer and the postfusion homotrimer conformations. Here we have compared cholesterol interactions during membrane fusion by these two groups of viruses. Using cholesterol-depleted insect cells, we showed that fusion and infection by the alphaviruses Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and Sindbis virus were strongly promoted by cholesterol, with similar sterol dependence in laboratory and field isolates and in viruses passaged in tissue culture. The E1 fusion protein from SFV bound cholesterol, as detected by labeling with photocholesterol and by cholesterol extraction studies. In contrast, fusion and infection by numerous strains of the flavivirus dengue virus (DV) and by yellow fever virus 17D were cholesterol independent, and the DV fusion protein did not show significant cholesterol binding. SFV E1 is the first virus fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol. Taken together, our results reveal important functional differences conferred by the cholesterol-binding properties of class II fusion proteins.

  20. Exocytotic fusion pores are composed of both lipids and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Huan; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel; Jeggle, Pia; Chanda, Baron; Edwardson, J Michael; Chapman, Edwin R

    2016-01-01

    During exocytosis, fusion pores form the first aqueous connection that allows escape of neurotransmitters and hormones from secretory vesicles. Although it is well established that SNARE proteins catalyze fusion, the structure and composition of fusion pores remain unknown. Here, we exploited the rigid framework and defined size of nanodiscs to interrogate the properties of reconstituted fusion pores, using the neurotransmitter glutamate as a content-mixing marker. Efficient Ca2+-stimulated bilayer fusion, and glutamate release, occurred with approximately two molecules of mouse synaptobrevin 2 reconstituted into ~6-nm nanodiscs. The transmembrane domains of SNARE proteins assumed distinct roles in lipid mixing versus content release and were exposed to polar solvent during fusion. Additionally, tryptophan substitutions at specific positions in these transmembrane domains decreased glutamate flux. Together, these findings indicate that the fusion pore is a hybrid structure composed of both lipids and proteins. PMID:26656855

  1. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 Boosts Endothelial Albumin Transcytosis through the RAGE/Src/Caveolin-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Dan; Peng, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yiqing; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Yang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory mediator, has been reported to destroy cell-cell junctions, resulting in vascular endothelial hyperpermeability. Here, we report that HMGB1 increases the endothelial transcytosis of albumin. In mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs), HMGB1 at a concentration of 500 ng/ml or less did not harm cell-cell junctions but rapidly induced endothelial hyperpermeability to 125I-albumin. HMGB1 induced an increase in 125I-albumin and AlexaFluor 488-labeled albumin internalization in endocytosis assays. Depletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not TLR2 or TLR4, suppressed HMGB1-induced albumin transcytosis and endocytosis. Genetic and pharmacological destruction of lipid rafts significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced albumin endocytosis and transcytosis. HMGB1 induced the rapid phosphorylation of caveolin (Cav)-1 and Src. Either RAGE gene silencing or soluble RAGE suppressed Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation and Src Tyr418 phosphorylation. The Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP2) blocked HMGB1-induced Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation. PP2 and overexpression of Cav-1 with a T14F mutation significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced transcytosis and albumin endocytosis. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 induces the transcytosis of albumin via RAGE-dependent Src phosphorylation and Cav-1 phosphorylation. These studies revealed a new mechanism of HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:27572515

  2. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 Boosts Endothelial Albumin Transcytosis through the RAGE/Src/Caveolin-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shang, Dan; Peng, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yiqing; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Yang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory mediator, has been reported to destroy cell-cell junctions, resulting in vascular endothelial hyperpermeability. Here, we report that HMGB1 increases the endothelial transcytosis of albumin. In mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs), HMGB1 at a concentration of 500 ng/ml or less did not harm cell-cell junctions but rapidly induced endothelial hyperpermeability to (125)I-albumin. HMGB1 induced an increase in (125)I-albumin and AlexaFluor 488-labeled albumin internalization in endocytosis assays. Depletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not TLR2 or TLR4, suppressed HMGB1-induced albumin transcytosis and endocytosis. Genetic and pharmacological destruction of lipid rafts significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced albumin endocytosis and transcytosis. HMGB1 induced the rapid phosphorylation of caveolin (Cav)-1 and Src. Either RAGE gene silencing or soluble RAGE suppressed Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation and Src Tyr418 phosphorylation. The Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP2) blocked HMGB1-induced Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation. PP2 and overexpression of Cav-1 with a T14F mutation significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced transcytosis and albumin endocytosis. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 induces the transcytosis of albumin via RAGE-dependent Src phosphorylation and Cav-1 phosphorylation. These studies revealed a new mechanism of HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:27572515

  3. Conformational and adsorptive characteristics of albumin affect interfacial protein boundary lubrication: from experimental to molecular dynamics simulation approaches.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsu-Wei; Hsieh, Man-Ching; Huang, Huei-Ting; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Min-Hui

    2009-02-01

    The lifetime of artificial joints is mainly determined by their biotribological properties. Synovial fluid which consists of various biological molecules acts as the lubricant. Among the compositions of synovial fluid, albumin is the most abundant protein. Under high load and low sliding speed articulation of artificial joint, it is believed the lubricants form protective layers on the sliding surfaces under the boundary lubrication mechanism. The protective molecular layer keeps two surfaces from direct collision and thus decreases the possibility of wear damage. However, the lubricating ability of the molecular layer may vary due to the conformational change of albumin in the process. In this study, we investigated the influence of albumin conformation on the adsorption behaviors on the articulating surfaces and discuss the relationship between adsorbed albumin and its tribological behaviors. We performed the friction tests to study the effects of albumin unfolding on the frictional behaviors. The novelty of this research is to further carry out molecular dynamics simulation, and protein adsorption experiments to investigate the mechanisms of the albumin-mediated boundary lubrication of arthroplastic materials. It was observed that the thermal processes induce the loss of secondary structure of albumin. The compactness of the unfolded structure leads to a higher adsorption rate onto the articulating material surface and results in the increase of friction coefficient.

  4. Membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus involves homotrimers of the fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, J M; Bron, R; Wilschut, J; Garoff, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated fusion process of the alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The spike protein of SFV is composed of three copies of the protein heterodimer E2E1. This structure is resistant to solubilization in mild detergents such as Nonidet P-40 (NP40). We have recently shown that the spike structure is reorganized during virus entry into acidic endosomes (J. M. Wahlberg and H. Garoff, J. Cell Biol. 116:339-348, 1992). The original NP40-resistant heterodimer is dissociated, and the E1 subunits form new NP40-resistant protein oligomers. Here, we show that the new oligomer is represented by an E1 trimer. From studies that use an in vitro assay for fusion of SFV with liposomes, we show that the E1 trimer is efficiently expressed during virus-mediated membrane fusion. Time course studies show that both E1 trimer formation and fusion are fast processes, occurring in seconds. It was also possible to inhibit virus binding and fusion with a monoclonal antibody directed toward the trimeric E1. These results give support for a model in which the E1 trimeric structure is involved in the SFV-mediated fusion reaction. Images PMID:1433520

  5. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion. PMID:19570912

  6. Distinct roles for key karyogamy proteins during yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Melloy, Patricia; Shen, Shu; White, Erin; Rose, Mark D

    2009-09-01

    During yeast mating, cell fusion is followed by the congression and fusion of the two nuclei. Proteins required for nuclear fusion are found at the surface (Prm3p) and within the lumen (Kar2p, Kar5p, and Kar8p) of the nuclear envelope (NE). Electron tomography (ET) of zygotes revealed that mutations in these proteins block nuclear fusion with different morphologies, suggesting that they act in different steps of fusion. Specifically, prm3 zygotes were blocked before formation of membrane bridges, whereas kar2, kar5, and kar8 zygotes frequently contained them. Membrane bridges were significantly larger and occurred more frequently in kar2 and kar8, than in kar5 mutant zygotes. The kinetics of NE fusion in prm3, kar5, and kar8 mutants, measured by live-cell fluorescence microscopy, were well correlated with the size and frequency of bridges observed by ET. However the kar2 mutant was defective for transfer of NE lumenal GFP, but not diffusion within the lumen, suggesting that transfer was blocked at the NE fusion junction. These observations suggest that Prm3p acts before initiation of outer NE fusion, Kar5p may help dilation of the initial fusion pore, and Kar2p and Kar8p act after outer NE fusion, during inner NE fusion.

  7. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  8. C-terminal tyrosine residues modulate the fusion activity of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Pager, Cara Teresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2011-02-15

    The paramyxovirus family includes important human pathogens such as measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial virus, and the recently emerged, highly pathogenic Hendra and Nipah viruses. The viral fusion (F) protein plays critical roles in infection, promoting both the virus-cell membrane fusion events needed for viral entry as well as cell-cell fusion events leading to syncytia formation. We describe the surprising finding that addition of the short epitope HA tag to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Hendra virus F protein leads to a significant increase in the extent of cell-cell membrane fusion. This increase was not due to alterations in surface expression, cleavage state, or association with lipid microdomains. Addition of a Myc tag of similar length did not alter Hendra F protein fusion activity, indicating that the observed stimulation was not solely a result of lengthening the CT. Three tyrosine residues within the HA tag were critical for the increase in the extent of fusion, suggesting C-terminal tyrosines may modulate Hendra fusion activity. The effects of addition of the HA tag varied with other fusion proteins, as parainfluenza virus 5 F-HA showed a decreased level of surface expression and no stimulation of fusion. These results indicate that additions to the C-terminal end of the F protein CT can modulate protein function in a sequence specific manner, reinforcing the need for careful analysis of epitope-tagged glycoproteins. In addition, our results implicate C-terminal tyrosine residues in the modulation of the membrane fusion reaction promoted by these viral glycoproteins.

  9. Transferrin-antibody fusion proteins are effective in brain targeting.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, S U; Friden, P; Moran, M; Olson, T; Kang, Y S; Pardridge, W M; Morrison, S L

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, the receptor binding potential of transferrin (Tf) was linked to an antibody binding specificity. Human Tf was fused to mouse-human chimeric IgG3 at three positions: at the end of heavy chain constant region 1 (CH1), after the hinge, and after CH3. The resulting Tf-antibody fusion proteins were able to bind antigen and the Tf receptor. The CH3-Tf fusion protein showed no complement-mediated cytolysis but possessed IgG receptor I (Fc gamma RI) binding activity. Most importantly, all of the fusion proteins demonstrated significant uptake into brain parenchyma, with 0.3% of the injected dose of the hinge-Tf fusion protein rapidly targeted to the brain. Recovery of iodinated CH3-Tf fusion protein from the brain parenchyma demonstrated that the fusion proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier intact. The binding specificity of these fusion proteins can be used for brain delivery of noncovalently bound ligands, such as drugs and peptides, or for targeting antigens present within the brain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7708731

  10. Interaction of bovine serum albumin protein with self assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonia, Monika; Agarwal, Hitesh; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of proteins and other biomolecules in liquid phase is the essence for the design of a biosensor. The sensitivity of a sensor can be enhanced by the appropriate functionalization of the sensing area so as to establish the molecular specific interaction. In the present work, we have studied the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with a chemically functionalized surface using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The gold-coated quartz crystals (AT-cut/5 MHz) were functionalized by forming self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). The adsorption characteristics of BSA onto SAM of MUA on quartz crystal are reported. BSA showed the highest affinity for SAM of MUA as compared to pure gold surface. The SAM of MUA provides carboxylated surface which enhances not only the adsorption of the BSA protein but also a very stable BSA-MUA complex in the liquid phase.

  11. Rho GTPase activity modulates paramyxovirus fusion protein-mediated cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Wurth, Mark A.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Lee, Benhur; Moncman, Carole L.; McCann, Richard O.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-07-05

    The paramyxovirus fusion protein (F) promotes fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane of target cells as well as cell-cell fusion. The plasma membrane is closely associated with the actin cytoskeleton, but the role of actin dynamics in paramyxovirus F-mediated membrane fusion is unclear. We examined cell-cell fusion promoted by two different paramyxovirus F proteins in three cell types in the presence of constitutively active Rho family GTPases, major cellular coordinators of actin dynamics. Reporter gene and syncytia assays demonstrated that expression of either Rac1{sup V12} or Cdc42{sup V12} could increase cell-cell fusion promoted by the Hendra or SV5 glycoproteins, though the effect was dependent on the cell type expressing the viral glycoproteins. In contrast, RhoA{sup L63} decreased cell-cell fusion promoted by Hendra glycoproteins but had little affect on SV5 F-mediated fusion. Also, data suggested that GTPase activation in the viral glycoprotein-containing cell was primarily responsible for changes in fusion. Additionally, we found that activated Cdc42 promoted nuclear rearrangement in syncytia.

  12. Ellipsometric studies of synthetic albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives and selected blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    This dissertation summarizes work on the synthesis of chitosan-derivatives and the development of ellipsometric methods to characterize materials of biological origin. Albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives were synthesized via addition reactions that involve amine groups naturally present in chitosan. These surfaces were shown to have an affinity towards human serum albumin via ELISA, UV spectroscopy and SDS PAGE. Modified surfaces were characterized with IR ellipsometry at various stages of their synthesis using appropriate optical models. It was found that spin cast chitosan films were anisotropic in nature. All optical models used for characterizing chitosan-derivatives were thus anisotropic. Chemical signal dependence on molecular structure and composition was illustrated via IR spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). An anisotropic optical model of an ensemble of Lorentz oscillators were used to approximate material behavior. The presence of acetic acid in spin-cast non-neutralized chitosan samples was thus shown. IRSE application to biomaterials was also demonstrated by performing a step-wise chemical characterizations during synthesis stages. Protein adsorbed from single protein solutions on these modified surfaces was monitored by visible in-situ variable wavelength ellipsometry. Based on adsorption profiles obtained from single protein adsorption onto silicon surfaces, lumped parameter kinetic models were developed. These models were used to fit experimental data of immunoglobulin-G of different concentrations and approximate conformational changes in fibrinogen adsorption. Biomaterial characterization by ellipsometry was further extended to include characterization of individual protein solutions in the IR range. Proteins in an aqueous environment were characterized by attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) IR ellipsometry using a ZnSe prism. Parameterized dielectric functions were created for individual proteins using Lorentz oscillators. These

  13. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  14. Multimeric Disintegrin Protein Polymer Fusions That Target Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant protein therapeutics have increased in number and frequency since the introduction of human insulin, 25 years ago. Presently, proteins and peptides are commonly used in the clinic. However, the incorporation of peptides into clinically approved nanomedicines has been limited. Reasons for this include the challenges of decorating pharmaceutical-grade nanoparticles with proteins by a process that is robust, scalable, and cost-effective. As an alternative to covalent bioconjugation between a protein and nanoparticle, we report that biologically active proteins may themselves mediate the formation of small multimers through steric stabilization by large protein polymers. Unlike multistep purification and bioconjugation, this approach is completed during biosynthesis. As proof-of-principle, the disintegrin protein called vicrostatin (VCN) was fused to an elastin-like polypeptide (A192). A significant fraction of fusion proteins self-assembled into multimers with a hydrodynamic radius of 15.9 nm. The A192-VCN fusion proteins compete specifically for cell-surface integrins on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435. Confocal microscopy revealed that, unlike linear RGD-containing protein polymers, the disintegrin fusion protein undergoes rapid cellular internalization. To explore their potential clinical applications, fusion proteins were characterized using small animal positron emission tomography (microPET). Passive tumor accumulation was observed for control protein polymers; however, the tumor accumulation of A192-VCN was saturable, which is consistent with integrin-mediated binding. The fusion of a protein polymer and disintegrin results in a higher intratumoral contrast compared to free VCN or A192 alone. Given the diversity of disintegrin proteins with specificity for various cell-surface integrins, disintegrin fusions are a new source of biomaterials with potential diagnostic and

  15. Staphylokinase as a Plasminogen Activator Component in Recombinant Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, S. J.; Sihota, E. G.; Habibi, H. R.; Wong, S.-L.

    1999-01-01

    The plasminogen activator staphylokinase (SAK) is a promising thrombolytic agent for treatment of myocardial infarction. It can specifically stimulate the thrombolysis of both erythrocyte-rich and platelet-rich clots. However, SAK lacks fibrin-binding and thrombin inhibitor activities, two functions which would supplement and potentially improve its thrombolytic potency. Creating a recombinant fusion protein is one approach for combining protein domains with complementary functions. To evaluate SAK for use in a translational fusion protein, both N- and C-terminal fusions to SAK were constructed by using hirudin as a fusion partner. Recombinant fusion proteins were secreted from Bacillus subtilis and purified from culture supernatants. The rate of plasminogen activation by SAK was not altered by the presence of an additional N- or C-terminal protein sequence. However, cleavage at N-terminal lysines within SAK rendered the N-terminal fusion unstable in the presence of plasmin. The results of site-directed mutagenesis of lysine 10 and lysine 11 in SAK suggested that a plasmin-resistant variant cannot be created without interfering with the plasmin processing necessary for activation of SAK. Although putative plasmin cleavage sites are located at the C-terminal end of SAK at lysine 135 and lysine 136, these sites were resistant to plasmin cleavage in vitro. Therefore, C-terminal fusions represent stable configurations for developing improved thrombolytic agents based on SAK as the plasminogen activator component. PMID:9925575

  16. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  17. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  18. About the structural role of disulfide bridges in serum albumins: evidence from protein simulated unfolding.

    PubMed

    Paris, Guillaume; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Christophe; Enescu, Mironel

    2012-11-01

    The role of the 17 disulfide (S-S) bridges in preserving the native conformation of human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated by performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on protein structures with intact and, respectively, reduced S-S bridges. The thermal unfolding simulations predict a clear destabilization of the protein secondary structure upon reduction of the S-S bridges as well as a significant distortion of the tertiary structure that is revealed by the changes in the protein native contacts fraction. The effect of the S-S bridges reduction on the protein compactness was tested by calculating Gibbs free energy profiles with respect to the protein gyration radius. The theoretical results obtained using the OPLS-AA and the AMBER ff03 force fields are in agreement with the available experimental data. Beyond the validation of the simulation method, the results here reported provide new insights into the mechanism of the protein reductive/oxidative unfolding/folding processes. It is predicted that in the native conformation of the protein, the thiol (-SH) groups belonging to the same reduced S-S bridge are located in potential wells that maintain them in contact. The -SH pairs can be dispatched by specific conformational transitions of the peptide chain located in the neighborhood of the cysteine residues.

  19. How Could SNARE Proteins Open a Fusion Pore?

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    The SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment protein REceptor) complex, which in mammalian neurosecretory cells is composed of the proteins synaptobrevin 2 (also called VAMP2), syntaxin, and SNAP-25, plays a key role in vesicle fusion. In this review, we discuss the hypothesis that, in neurosecretory cells, fusion pore formation is directly accomplished by a conformational change in the SNARE complex via movement of the transmembrane domains. PMID:24985331

  20. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  1. Immunological Properties of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Michael J.; Hastings, Gillian Z.; Brown, Alan L.; Grace, Ken G.; Rowlands, David J.; Brown, Fred; Clarke, Berwyn E.

    1990-04-01

    The immunogenicity of a 19 amino acid peptide from foot-and-mouth disease virus has previously been shown to approach that of the inactivated virus from which it was derived after multimeric particulate presentation as an N-terminal fusion with hepatitis B core antigen. In this report we demonstrate that rhinovirus peptide-hepatitis B core antigen fusion proteins are 10-fold more immunogenic than peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and 100-fold more immunogenic than uncoupled peptide with an added helper T-cell epitope. The fusion proteins can be readily administered without adjuvant or with adjuvants acceptable for human and veterinary application and can elicit a response after nasal or oral dosing. The fusion proteins can also act as T-cell-independent antigens. These properties provide further support for their suitability as presentation systems for "foreign" epitopes in the development of vaccines.

  2. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  3. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  4. Adsorption of proteins at physiological concentrations on pegylated surfaces and the compatibilizing role of adsorbed albumin with respect to other proteins according to optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS).

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Laurent; Modena, Enrico; Vert, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In literature, contacts between pegylated compounds and blood proteins are generally discussed in terms of excluded volume-related repulsions although adsorption and compatibility have been reported for some of these proteins occasionally. The major problem to investigate the behavior of blood in contact with pegylated surfaces is the complexity of the medium and especially the presence of albumin in large excess. In a model approach, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) was used to monitor the fate of albumin, fibrinogen, and γ-globulins at physiological concentrations in pH = 7.4 isotonic HEPES buffer after contact with SiTiO2 chips coated with diblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)s and triblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(DL-lactic acid) copolymers. Corresponding homopolymers were used as controls. The three protein systems were investigated separately, as a mixture and when added successively according to different orders of addition. OWLS gave access to the mass and the thickness of adhering protein layers that resist washing with HEPES buffer. Protein depositions were detected regardless of the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) segments on surfaces. Adsorption depended on the protein, on the surface and also on the presence of the other proteins. Unexpectedly any surface coated with a layer of adsorbed albumin prevented deposition of other proteins, including albumin itself. This outstanding finding suggests that it was the presence of albumin adsorbed on a surface, pegylated or not, that made that surface compatible with other proteins. As a consequence, dipping a device to be in contact with the blood of a patient in a solution of albumin could be a very simple means to avoid further protein deposition and maybe platelets adhesion after in vivo implantation.

  5. Role of Serum Interleukin 6, Albumin and C-Reactive Protein in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emami Ardestani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a non-specific inflammation, which involves the airways, lung parenchyma and pulmonary vessels. The inflammation causes the activation of inflammatory cells and the release of various inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6 and tumor necoris factor alpha (TNF-a). The purpose of the present study was to measure serum IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) (as a positive phase reactant) and albumin level (as a negative phase reactant) in COPD patients (only due to cigarette smoking not bio-mass), non COPD smokers and healthy subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); we compared the differences in inflammatory factors among groups. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 males were enrolled in this study and divided into three equal groups. The first group was 60 smokers who had COPD. The second group included 60 smokers without COPD and the third group consisted of people who were not smokers and did not have COPD; 5 mL of venous blood was taken from all participants and it was collected in a test tube containing anticoagulant and then centrifuged at 3000 rpm for 10 minutes. Serum was separated and used to measure the amount of IL-6, CRP and albumin. Spirometry was performed according to the criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. Results: The mean serum level of IL-6 was 83.2±7.5 pg/mL in group I, 54.9±24.3 pg/mL in group II and 46.9±10.4 pg/mL in group III. There was a significant difference among the three groups (P<0.001). The mean serum level of CRP was 28.9±14.9 mg/dL in the first group, 19.9±8.5 mg/dL in the second group and 4.2±2.3 mg/dL in the third group (P=0.02). But by controlling the confounding effects of age, this difference was not significant (P=0.49). The mean serum level of albumin was I 4.1±0.57 mg/dL in group I, 4.3±0.56 mg/dL in group II and 4.1±0.53 mg/dL in group III. There was no significant difference among the three groups in this regard (P=0

  6. Purification of an elastin-like fusion protein by microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xin; Trabbic-Carlson, Kimberly; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2006-10-20

    This article describes a simple and potentially scalable microfiltration method for purification of recombinant proteins. This method is based on the fact that when an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) is fused to a target protein, the inverse phase transition behavior of the ELP tag is imparted to the fusion protein. Triggering the phase transition of a solution of the ELP fusion protein by an increase in temperature, or isothermally by an increase in salt concentration, results in the formation of micron-sized aggregates of the ELP fusion protein. In this article, it is shown that these aggregates are efficiently retained by a microfiltration membrane, while contaminating E. coli proteins passed through the membrane upon washing. Upon reversing the phase transition by flow of Milli-Q water, soluble, pure, and functionally active protein is eluted from the membrane. Proof-of principle of this approach was demonstrated by purifying a fusion of thioredoxin with ELP (Trx-ELP) with greater than 95% recovery of protein and with greater than 95% purity (as estimated from SDS-PAGE gels). The simplicity of this method is demonstrated for laboratory scale purification by purifying Trx-ELP from cell lysate using a syringe and a disposable microfiltration cartridge. The potential scalability of this purification as an automated, continuous industrial-scale process is also demonstrated using a continuous stirred cell equipped with a microfiltration membrane.

  7. Association of a high normalized protein catabolic rate and low serum albumin level with carpal tunnel syndrome in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Lee, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common mononeuropathy in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The association between chronic inflammation and CTS in hemodialysis (HD) patients has rarely been investigated. HD patients with a high normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and low serum albumin level likely have adequate nutrition and inflammation. In this study, we assume that a low serum albumin level and high nPCR is associated with CTS in HD patients. We recruited 866 maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients and divided them into 4 groups according to their nPCR and serum albumin levels: (1) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (2) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL; (3) nPCR <1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL; and (4) nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level ≥4 g/dL. After adjustment for related variables, HD duration and nPCR ≥1.2 g/kg/d and serum albumin level <4 g/dL were positively correlated with CTS. By calculating the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, we calculated that the nPCR and HD duration cut-off points for obtaining the most favorable Youden index were 1.29 g/kg/d and 7.5 years, respectively. Advance multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in MHD patients, nPCR ≥1.29 g/kg/d and serum albumin <4 g/dL, and also HD duration >7.5 years were associated with CTS. A high nPCR and low serum albumin level, which likely reflect adequate nutrition and inflammation, were associated with CTS in MHD patients. PMID:27368039

  8. Electrochemical characterization of albumin protein on Ti-6AL-4V alloy immersed in a simulated plasma solution.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Norma; Bronson, Arturo

    2007-06-01

    The effect of oxygen and albumin on the electrochemical behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy immersed in a simulated inorganic plasma (SIP) solution was studied with a rotating-cylindrical electrode configuration to focus on the surface/electrolyte reactions. Potentiokinetic scans and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used to characterize the interface by determining the passive current density and capacitance. For the polarization scans, an albumin addition of 37.7 mg/cm(3) to the SIP solution (oxygenated and unoxygenated) decreased the passive current density, indicating a lowering of the corrosive rate. The surface capacitance for the Ti-6Al-4V alloy immersed in a SIP solution averaged 13 microF/cm(2), which transformed after albumin addition (37.7 mg/cm(3)) from a potential independent behavior to the capacitance ranging from 23 to 6 microF/cm(2) with increasing potentials from -800 to 1500 mV(SCE), respectively, indicative of albumin adsorption. Within the same potential range and albumin addition to oxygenated solutions, the capacitances expanded slightly with a similar decreasing trend from 31 to 6 microF/cm(2), although the capacitance depicts an interaction between the hydrated passive film and the adsorbed albumin from -550 to 500 mV(SCE) in which the capacitance plateaued at 15 microF/cm(2). The hydrated porous oxide film results from the porous rutile layer reacting with H(2)O(2) formed as an intermediary component of oxygen reduction at the Ti-6Al-4V surface. The passive film-albumin interaction would affect the processing of titanium alloys in their surface preparation for biocompatibility, as well as determining the reactivity of titanium alloys to proteins.

  9. Differential sensing using proteins: exploiting the cross-reactivity of serum albumin to pattern individual terpenes and terpenes in perfume.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michelle M; Anslyn, Eric V

    2009-12-01

    There has been a growing interest in the use of differential sensing for analyte classification. In an effort to mimic the mammalian senses of taste and smell, which utilize protein-based receptors, we have introduced serum albumins as nonselective receptors for recognition of small hydrophobic molecules. Herein, we employ a sensing ensemble consisting of serum albumins, a hydrophobic fluorescent indicator (PRODAN), and a hydrophobic additive (deoxycholate) to detect terpenes. With the aid of linear discriminant analysis, we successfully applied our system to differentiate five terpenes. We then extended our terpene analysis and utilized our sensing ensemble for terpene discrimination within the complex mixtures found in perfume.

  10. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Štěpánka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  11. Regulation of inflammation-primed activation of macrophages by two serum factors, vitamin D3-binding protein and albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Kumashiro, R; Yamamoto, M; Willett, N P; Lindsay, D D

    1993-01-01

    A very small amount (0.0005 to 0.001%) of an ammonium sulfate [50% saturated (NH4)2SO4]-precipitable protein fraction of alpha 2-globulin efficiently supported inflammation-primed activation of macrophages. This fraction contains vitamin D3-binding protein essential for macrophage activation. Comparative macrophage activation studies with fetal calf serum, alpha 2-globulin fraction, 50% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate, and purified bovine vitamin D3-binding protein revealed that fetal calf serum and alpha 2-globulin fraction appear to contain an inhibitor for macrophage activation while ammonium sulfate precipitate contains no inhibitor. This inhibitor was found to be serum albumin. When bovine serum albumin (25 micrograms/ml) was added to a medium supplemented with 0.0005 to 0.05% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate or 1 to 10 ng of vitamin D3-binding protein per ml, activation of macrophages was inhibited. PMID:8225612

  12. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:24708858

  13. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J

    2015-03-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction.

  14. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  15. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system.

  16. Subcellular localization of transiently expressed fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Collings, David A

    2013-01-01

    The recent and massive expansion in plant genomics data has generated a large number of gene sequences for which two seemingly simple questions need to be answered: where do the proteins encoded by these genes localize in cells, and what do they do? One widespread approach to answering the localization question has been to use particle bombardment to transiently express unknown proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) or its numerous derivatives. Confocal fluorescence microscopy is then used to monitor the localization of the fluorescent protein as it hitches a ride through the cell. The subcellular localization of the fusion protein, if not immediately apparent, can then be determined by comparison to localizations generated by fluorescent protein fusions to known signalling sequences and proteins, or by direct comparison with fluorescent dyes. This review aims to be a tour guide for researchers wanting to travel this hitch-hiker's path, and for reviewers and readers who wish to understand their travel reports. It will describe some of the technology available for visualizing protein localizations, and some of the experimental approaches for optimizing and confirming localizations generated by particle bombardment in onion epidermal cells, the most commonly used experimental system. As the non-conservation of signal sequences in heterologous expression systems such as onion, and consequent mis-targeting of fusion proteins, is always a potential problem, the epidermal cells of the Argenteum mutant of pea are proposed as a model system. PMID:23996319

  17. Size-dependent interaction of silica nanoparticles with lysozyme and bovine serum albumin proteins.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of three different sized (diameter 10, 18, and 28 nm) anionic silica nanoparticles with two model proteins-cationic lysozyme [molecular weight (MW) 14.7 kDa)] and anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) (MW 66.4 kDa) has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The adsorption behavior of proteins on the nanoparticles, measured by UV-vis spectroscopy, is found to be very different for lysozyme and BSA. Lysozyme adsorbs strongly on the nanoparticles and shows exponential behavior as a function of lysozyme concentration irrespective of the nanoparticle size. The total amount of adsorbed lysozyme, as governed by the surface-to-volume ratio, increases on lowering the size of the nanoparticles for a fixed volume fraction of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, BSA does not show any adsorption for all the different sizes of the nanoparticles. Despite having different interactions, both proteins induce similar phase behavior where the nanoparticle-protein system transforms from one phase (clear) to two phase (turbid) as a function of protein concentration. The phase behavior is modified towards the lower concentrations for both proteins with increasing the nanoparticle size. DLS suggests that the phase behavior arises as a result of the nanoparticles' aggregation on the addition of proteins. The size-dependent modifications in the interaction potential, responsible for the phase behavior, have been determined by SANS data as modeled using the two-Yukawa potential accounting for the repulsive and attractive interactions in the systems. The protein-induced interaction between the nanoparticles is found to be short-range attraction for lysozyme and long-range attraction for BSA. The magnitude of attractive interaction irrespective of protein type is enhanced with increase in the size of the nanoparticles. The total (attractive+repulsive) potential leading to two-phase formation is found to be

  18. In vivo genome editing of the albumin locus as a platform for protein replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajiv; Anguela, Xavier M.; Doyon, Yannick; Wechsler, Thomas; DeKelver, Russell C.; Sproul, Scott; Paschon, David E.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Davidson, Robert J.; Shivak, David; Zhou, Shangzhen; Rieders, Julianne; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Rebar, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific genome editing provides a promising approach for achieving long-term, stable therapeutic gene expression. Genome editing has been successfully applied in a variety of preclinical models, generally focused on targeting the diseased locus itself; however, limited targeting efficiency or insufficient expression from the endogenous promoter may impede the translation of these approaches, particularly if the desired editing event does not confer a selective growth advantage. Here we report a general strategy for liver-directed protein replacement therapies that addresses these issues: zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) –mediated site-specific integration of therapeutic transgenes within the albumin gene. By using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector delivery in vivo, we achieved long-term expression of human factors VIII and IX (hFVIII and hFIX) in mouse models of hemophilia A and B at therapeutic levels. By using the same targeting reagents in wild-type mice, lysosomal enzymes were expressed that are deficient in Fabry and Gaucher diseases and in Hurler and Hunter syndromes. The establishment of a universal nuclease-based platform for secreted protein production would represent a critical advance in the development of safe, permanent, and functional cures for diverse genetic and nongenetic diseases. PMID:26297739

  19. Impact of albumin on drug delivery--new applications on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Elsadek, Bakheet; Kratz, Felix

    2012-01-10

    Over the past decades, albumin has emerged as a versatile carrier for therapeutic and diagnostic agents, primarily for diagnosing and treating diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and infectious diseases. Market approved products include fatty acid derivatives of human insulin or the glucagon-like-1 peptide (Levemir(®) and Victoza(®)) for treating diabetes, the taxol albumin nanoparticle Abraxane(®) for treating metastatic breast cancer which is also under clinical investigation in further tumor indications, and (99m)Tc-aggregated albumin (Nanocoll(®) and Albures(®)) for diagnosing cancer and rheumatoid arthritis as well as for lymphoscintigraphy. In addition, an increasing number of albumin-based or albumin-binding drugs are in clinical trials such as antibody fusion proteins (MM-111) for treating HER2/neu positive breast cancer (phase I), a camelid albumin-binding nanobody anti-HSA-anti-TNF-α (ATN-103) in phase II studies for treating rheumatoid arthritis, an antidiabetic Exendin-4 analog bound to recombinant human albumin (phase I/II), a fluorescein-labeled albumin conjugate (AFL)-human serum albumin for visualizing the malignant borders of brain tumors for improved surgical resection, and finally an albumin-binding prodrug of doxorubicin (INNO-206) entering phase II studies against sarcoma and gastric cancer. In the preclinical setting, novel approaches include attaching peptides with high-affinity for albumin to antibody fragments, the exploitation of albumin-binding gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and physical or covalent attachment of antiviral, antibacterial, and anticancer drugs to albumin that are permanently or transiently attached to human serum albumin (HSA) or act as albumin-binding prodrugs. This review gives an overview of the expanding field of preclinical and clinical drug applications and developments that use albumin as a protein carrier to improve the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug or to target the drug

  20. Size-dependent interaction of silica nanoparticles with lysozyme and bovine serum albumin proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Indresh; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-05-01

    The interaction of three different sized (diameter 10, 18, and 28 nm) anionic silica nanoparticles with two model proteins—cationic lysozyme [molecular weight (MW) 14.7 kDa)] and anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) (MW 66.4 kDa) has been studied by UV-vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The adsorption behavior of proteins on the nanoparticles, measured by UV-vis spectroscopy, is found to be very different for lysozyme and BSA. Lysozyme adsorbs strongly on the nanoparticles and shows exponential behavior as a function of lysozyme concentration irrespective of the nanoparticle size. The total amount of adsorbed lysozyme, as governed by the surface-to-volume ratio, increases on lowering the size of the nanoparticles for a fixed volume fraction of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, BSA does not show any adsorption for all the different sizes of the nanoparticles. Despite having different interactions, both proteins induce similar phase behavior where the nanoparticle-protein system transforms from one phase (clear) to two phase (turbid) as a function of protein concentration. The phase behavior is modified towards the lower concentrations for both proteins with increasing the nanoparticle size. DLS suggests that the phase behavior arises as a result of the nanoparticles' aggregation on the addition of proteins. The size-dependent modifications in the interaction potential, responsible for the phase behavior, have been determined by SANS data as modeled using the two-Yukawa potential accounting for the repulsive and attractive interactions in the systems. The protein-induced interaction between the nanoparticles is found to be short-range attraction for lysozyme and long-range attraction for BSA. The magnitude of attractive interaction irrespective of protein type is enhanced with increase in the size of the nanoparticles. The total (attractive+repulsive) potential leading to two-phase formation is found to be

  1. Intrinsic Structural Disorder Confers Cellular Viability on Oncogenic Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Hedi; Buday, László; Tompa, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations, which often generate chimeric proteins by fusing segments of two distinct genes, represent the single major genetic aberration leading to cancer. We suggest that the unifying theme of these events is a high level of intrinsic structural disorder, enabling fusion proteins to evade cellular surveillance mechanisms that eliminate misfolded proteins. Predictions in 406 translocation-related human proteins show that they are significantly enriched in disorder (43.3% vs. 20.7% in all human proteins), they have fewer Pfam domains, and their translocation breakpoints tend to avoid domain splitting. The vicinity of the breakpoint is significantly more disordered than the rest of these already highly disordered fusion proteins. In the unlikely event of domain splitting in fusion it usually spares much of the domain or splits at locations where the newly exposed hydrophobic surface area approximates that of an intact domain. The mechanisms of action of fusion proteins suggest that in most cases their structural disorder is also essential to the acquired oncogenic function, enabling the long-range structural communication of remote binding and/or catalytic elements. In this respect, there are three major mechanisms that contribute to generating an oncogenic signal: (i) a phosphorylation site and a tyrosine-kinase domain are fused, and structural disorder of the intervening region enables intramolecular phosphorylation (e.g., BCR-ABL); (ii) a dimerisation domain fuses with a tyrosine kinase domain and disorder enables the two subunits within the homodimer to engage in permanent intermolecular phosphorylations (e.g., TFG-ALK); (iii) the fusion of a DNA-binding element to a transactivator domain results in an aberrant transcription factor that causes severe misregulation of transcription (e.g. EWS-ATF). Our findings also suggest novel strategies of intervention against the ensuing neoplastic transformations. PMID:19888473

  2. (Na+ + K+)-ATPase Is a Target for Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B and Protein Kinase C Pathways Triggered by Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Peruchetti, Diogo B.; Pinheiro, Ana Acacia S.; Landgraf, Sharon S.; Wengert, Mira; Takiya, Christina M.; Guggino, William B.; Caruso-Neves, Celso

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, evidence has confirmed the crucial role of albumin in the progression of renal disease. However, the possible role of signaling pathways triggered by physiologic concentrations of albumin in the modulation of proximal tubule (PT) sodium reabsorption has not been considered. In the present work, we have shown that a physiologic concentration of albumin increases the expression of the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase in LLC-PK1 cells leading to an increase in enzyme activity. This process involves the sequential activation of PI3K/protein kinase B and protein kinase C pathways promoting inhibition of protein kinase A. This integrative network is inhibited when albumin concentration is increased, similar to renal disease, leading to a decrease in the α1 subunit of (Na+ + K+)-ATPase expression. Together, the results indicate that variation in albumin concentration in PT cells has an important effect on PT sodium reabsorption and, consequently, on renal sodium excretion. PMID:22057272

  3. Fusions of elastin-like polypeptides to pharmaceutical proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassouneh, Wafa; MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are a class of stimulus responsive biopolymers whose physicochemical properties and biocompatibility are particularly suitable for in vivo applications, such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of ELPs allows them to be utilized as soluble macromolecules below their LCST, or as self-assembled nano-scale particles such as micelles, micron-scale coacervates, or viscous gels above their LCST, depending on the ELP architecture. As each ELP sequence is specified at its genetic level, functionalization of an ELP with peptides and proteins is simple to accomplish by the fusion of a gene encoding an ELP with that of the peptide or protein of interest. Protein ELP fusions, where the appended protein serves a therapeutic or targeting function, are suitable for applications in which the ELP can improve the systemic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the protein, or can be used as an injectable depot for sustained, local protein delivery. Here we describe considerations in the design of therapeutic protein ELP fusions and provide details of their gene design, expression, and purification. PMID:22208987

  4. Structural changes of envelope proteins during alphavirus fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Jose, Joyce; Xiang, Ye; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-12-08

    Alphaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have a diameter of about 700 {angstrom} and can be lethal human pathogens. Entry of virus into host cells by endocytosis is controlled by two envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2. The E2-E1 heterodimers form 80 trimeric spikes on the icosahedral virus surface, 60 with quasi-three-fold symmetry and 20 coincident with the icosahedral three-fold axes arranged with T = 4 quasi-symmetry. The E1 glycoprotein has a hydrophobic fusion loop at one end and is responsible for membrane fusion. The E2 protein is responsible for receptor binding and protects the fusion loop at neutral pH. The lower pH in the endosome induces the virions to undergo an irreversible conformational change in which E2 and E1 dissociate and E1 forms homotrimers, triggering fusion of the viral membrane with the endosomal membrane and then releasing the viral genome into the cytoplasm. Here we report the structure of an alphavirus spike, crystallized at low pH, representing an intermediate in the fusion process and clarifying the maturation process. The trimer of E2-E1 in the crystal structure is similar to the spikes in the neutral pH virus except that the E2 middle region is disordered, exposing the fusion loop. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of E2 each form immunoglobulin-like folds, consistent with the receptor attachment properties of E2.

  5. Albumin extinction without methylation of its gene.

    PubMed

    Ott, M O; Sperling, L; Weiss, M C

    1984-03-01

    In earlier work we identified at the 5' end of the rat albumin gene an Msp I site whose undermethylation appears to be necessary but not sufficient for stable expression of the gene in rat hepatoma cells. Here, we ask whether the block to expression of albumin production, which occurs when rat hepatoma cells are hybridized with cells that do not produce the protein, could be the result of de novo methylation of this site. In two types of somatic hybrids, rat hepatoma-mouse L cell fibroblasts, and rat hepatoma-dedifferentiated variant rat hepatoma cells, extinction occurs and is maintained during the first 5-15 generations after fusion. During this time the Msp I site of the now inactive rat albumin gene remained unmethylated.

  6. ANALYSIS OF DRUG-PROTEIN BINDING BY ULTRAFAST AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY USING IMMOBILIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Mallik, Rangan; Yoo, Michelle J.; Briscoe, Chad J.; Hage, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was explored for use as a stationary phase and ligand in affinity microcolumns for the ultrafast extraction of free drug fractions and the use of this information for the analysis of drug-protein binding. Warfarin, imipramine, and ibuprofen were used as model analytes in this study. It was found that greater than 95% extraction of all these drugs could be achieved in as little as 250 ms on HSA microcolumns. The retained drug fraction was then eluted from the same column under isocratic conditions, giving elution in less than 40 s when working at 4.5 mL/min. The chromatographic behavior of this system gave a good fit with that predicted by computer simulations based on a reversible, saturable model for the binding of an injected drug with immobilized HSA. The free fractions measured by this method were found to be comparable to those determined by ultrafiltration, and equilibrium constants estimated by this approach gave good agreement with literature values. Advantages of this method include its speed and the relatively low cost of microcolumns that contain HSA. The ability of HSA to bind many types of drugs also creates the possibility of using the same affinity microcolumn to study and measure the free fractions for a variety of pharmaceutical agents. These properties make this technique appealing for use in drug binding studies and in the high-throughput screening of new drug candidates. PMID:20227701

  7. Ratio of C-Reactive Protein to Albumin Predicts Muscle Mass in Adult Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Tong; Wu, Pei-Yu; Chen, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Hsu, Yung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the ratio of C-reactive protein to albumin (CRP–Alb ratio) is associated with clinical outcomes in patients with disease. We examined the predictive value of this ratio in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In this cross-sectional study, 91 eligible adult HD patients were analyzed, and the correlation between the CRP–Alb ratio and skeletal muscle mass normalized for body weight (SMM/wt; estimated using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer) was investigated. The mean age of the study participants was 54.9 ± 6.6 years (ranging from 27 to 64 years); 43 (47.2%) were men. The mean values for the SMM/wt were 39.1% ± 5.4%. The CRP–Alb ratio was found to be negatively correlated with SMM/wt (r = −0.33, P = 0.002) and creatinine (r = −0.20, P = 0.056). All the univariate significant and nonsignificant relevant covariates were selected for multivariable stepwise regression analysis. We determined that the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance and CRP–Alb ratio were independent risk determinants for SMM/wt (βHOMA-IR = −0.18 and βCRP–Alb ratio = −3.84, adjusted R2 = 0.32). This study indicated that the CRP–Alb ratio may help clinicians in predicting muscle mass in adult patients undergoing HD. PMID:27768746

  8. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer. PMID:27540857

  9. Molecular Principles of Gene Fusion Mediated Rewiring of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Oates, Matt E; Maddox, Louis; Flock, Tilman; Gough, Julian; Buljan, Marija; Weatheritt, Robert J; Babu, M Madan

    2016-08-18

    Gene fusions are common cancer-causing mutations, but the molecular principles by which fusion protein products affect interaction networks and cause disease are not well understood. Here, we perform an integrative analysis of the structural, interactomic, and regulatory properties of thousands of putative fusion proteins. We demonstrate that genes that form fusions (i.e., parent genes) tend to be highly connected hub genes, whose protein products are enriched in structured and disordered interaction-mediating features. Fusion often results in the loss of these parental features and the depletion of regulatory sites such as post-translational modifications. Fusion products disproportionately connect proteins that did not previously interact in the protein interaction network. In this manner, fusion products can escape cellular regulation and constitutively rewire protein interaction networks. We suggest that the deregulation of central, interaction-prone proteins may represent a widespread mechanism by which fusion proteins alter the topology of cellular signaling pathways and promote cancer.

  10. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  11. Exploring the interaction between picoplatin and human serum albumin: The effects on protein structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Peirong; Zhou, Xinchun; Zhang, Hongmei; Qiu, Ligan; Cao, Jian

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, the effects of picoplatin on the structure and esterase-like catalytic activity of human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic approaches and molecular modeling. The circular dichroism (CD) spectral examinations indicated that the binding of picoplatin with HSA induced a slight decrease of a-helix content of protein and unfolded the constituent polypeptides of the protein. The synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectral methods were used to estimate the effect of picoplatin on the micro-environmental changes of the Trp and Tyr residues of HSA, indicating that the micro-environment around the Tyr and Trp residue is partly disturbed by picoplatin. UV-vis absorption spectral result indicated the formation of the ground state complex between picoplatin with HSA. The ANS binding assay indicated the existence of competitive combination of picoplatin and ANS with HSA. The studies on the effects of picoplatin on the binding of HSA with bilirubin and heme showed that picoplatin binding caused a change of angle between two chromophores of bound bilirubin and the binding site of picoplatin does not locate in subdomain IB in HSA that bound with heme. The molecular modeling results showed that picoplatin binds to the connection between domain I and domain II by hydrophobic, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals forces. In addition, HSA maintains most of its esterase activity in the presence of picoplatin. The investigations on how picoplatin interacts with HSA are important for the understanding of the anticancer mechanism and toxicity of platinum-based anticancer drug. PMID:27484966

  12. Tandem mass spectral libraries of peptides in digests of individual proteins: Human Serum Albumin (HSA).

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Yan, Xinjian; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Liang, Yuxue; Mirokhin, Yuri A; Roth, Jeri S; Rudnick, Paul A; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    This work presents a method for creating a mass spectral library containing tandem spectra of identifiable peptide ions in the tryptic digestion of a single protein. Human serum albumin (HSA(1)) was selected for this purpose owing to its ubiquity, high level of characterization and availability of digest data. The underlying experimental data consisted of ∼3000 one-dimensional LC-ESI-MS/MS runs with ion-trap fragmentation. In order to generate a wide range of peptides, studies covered a broad set of instrument and digestion conditions using multiple sources of HSA and trypsin. Computer methods were developed to enable the reliable identification and reference spectrum extraction of all peptide ions identifiable by current sequence search methods. This process made use of both MS2 (tandem) spectra and MS1 (electrospray) data. Identified spectra were generated for 2918 different peptide ions, using a variety of manually-validated filters to ensure spectrum quality and identification reliability. The resulting library was composed of 10% conventional tryptic and 29% semitryptic peptide ions, along with 42% tryptic peptide ions with known or unknown modifications, which included both analytical artifacts and post-translational modifications (PTMs) present in the original HSA. The remaining 19% contained unexpected missed-cleavages or were under/over alkylated. The methods described can be extended to create equivalent spectral libraries for any target protein. Such libraries have a number of applications in addition to their known advantages of speed and sensitivity, including the ready re-identification of known PTMs, rejection of artifact spectra and a means of assessing sample and digestion quality.

  13. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Joanne M.; Bharadwaj, Prashant R.; Sankovich, Sonia E.; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  14. Fusion protein technologies for biopharmaceuticals: Applications and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sven; Lowe, Peter; Tesar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stefan R. Schmidt consolidates the hugely diverse field of fusion proteins and their application in the creation of biopharmaceuticals. The text is replete with case studies and clinical data that inform and intrigue the reader as to the myriad possibilities available when considering the creation of a fusion protein. This valuable text will serve the novice as a broad introduction or the seasoned professional as a thorough review of the state of the art. The first marketed therapeutic recombinant protein was human insulin (Humulin® R). Its approval in 1982 was followed by other such products, including erythropoietin (EPO), interferon (IFN), and tissue plasminogen activator (tPa). Since the 1980s, the number and general availability of recombinant products that replace natural proteins harvested from animal or human sources has increased considerably. Following the initial success, researchers started de novo designs of therapeutic proteins that do not occur in nature. The first of these new drugs to be approved was etanercept (Enbrel®), a fusion portion containing a section of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1.

  15. Albumin-coated SPIONs: an experimental and theoretical evaluation of protein conformation, binding affinity and competition with serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Siming; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Minelli, Caterina; Faraudo, Jordi; Roig, Anna; Laromaine, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The variety of nanoparticles (NPs) used in biological applications is increasing and the study of their interaction with biological media is becoming more important. Proteins are commonly the first biomolecules that NPs encounter when they interact with biological systems either in vitro or in vivo. Among NPs, super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show great promise for medicine. In this work, we study in detail the formation, composition, and structure of a monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on SPIONs. We determine, both by molecular simulations and experimentally, that ten molecules of BSA form a monolayer around the outside of the SPIONs and their binding strength to the SPIONs is about 3.5 × 10-4 M, ten times higher than the adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS) on the same SPIONs. We elucidate a strong electrostatic interaction between BSA and the SPIONs, although the secondary structure of the protein is not affected. We present data that supports the strong binding of the BSA monolayer on SPIONs and the properties of the BSA layer as a protein-resistant coating. We believe that a complete understanding of the behavior and morphology of BSA-SPIONs and how the protein interacts with SPIONs is crucial for improving NP surface design and expanding the potential applications of SPIONs in nanomedicine.The variety of nanoparticles (NPs) used in biological applications is increasing and the study of their interaction with biological media is becoming more important. Proteins are commonly the first biomolecules that NPs encounter when they interact with biological systems either in vitro or in vivo. Among NPs, super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show great promise for medicine. In this work, we study in detail the formation, composition, and structure of a monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on SPIONs. We determine, both by molecular simulations and experimentally, that ten molecules of BSA form a monolayer around the

  16. Preparation of protein imprinted materials by hierarchical imprinting techniques and application in selective depletion of albumin from human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Deng, Qiliang; Tao, Dingyin; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-06-01

    Hierarchical imprinting was developed to prepare the protein imprinted materials, as the artificial antibody, for the selective depletion of HSA from the human serum proteome. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) was employed as the dummy template for the fabrication of the recognition sites. To demonstrate the advantages of the hierarchical imprinting, molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique (h-MIPs) were compared with those obtained by bulk imprinting (b-MIPs), in terms of the binding capacity, adsorption kinetics, selectivity and synthesis reproducibility. The binding capacity of h-MIPs could reach 12 mg g-1. And saturation binding could be reached in less than 20 min for the h-MIPs. In the protein mixture, h-MIPs exhibit excellent selectivity for PSA, with imprinting factors as about 3.6, much higher than those for non-template proteins. For the proteomic application, the identified protein group number in serum treated by h-MIPs was increased to 422, which is 21% higher than that obtained from the original serum, meanwhile the identified protein group number for the Albumin Removal kit was only 376. The results demonstrate that protein imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique, might become the artificial antibodies for the selective depletion of high abundance proteins in proteome study.

  17. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C

    2016-04-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  18. Measles Virus Fusion Protein: Structure, Function and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Plattet, Philippe; Alves, Lisa; Herren, Michael; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV), a highly contagious member of the Paramyxoviridae family, causes measles in humans. The Paramyxoviridae family of negative single-stranded enveloped viruses includes several important human and animal pathogens, with MeV causing approximately 120,000 deaths annually. MeV and canine distemper virus (CDV)-mediated diseases can be prevented by vaccination. However, sub-optimal vaccine delivery continues to foster MeV outbreaks. Post-exposure prophylaxis with antivirals has been proposed as a novel strategy to complement vaccination programs by filling herd immunity gaps. Recent research has shown that membrane fusion induced by the morbillivirus glycoproteins is the first critical step for viral entry and infection, and determines cell pathology and disease outcome. Our molecular understanding of morbillivirus-associated membrane fusion has greatly progressed towards the feasibility to control this process by treating the fusion glycoprotein with inhibitory molecules. Current approaches to develop anti-membrane fusion drugs and our knowledge on drug resistance mechanisms strongly suggest that combined therapies will be a prerequisite. Thus, discovery of additional anti-fusion and/or anti-attachment protein small-molecule compounds may eventually translate into realistic therapeutic options. PMID:27110811

  19. Grading of severity of the condition in burn patients by serum protein and albumin/globulin studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod

    2010-07-01

    Capillary permeability increases after inflammation with consequent leak of fluid, electrolytes, and proteins. The albumin molecule size being smaller (69 kDa) than the globulin molecule (90-156 kDa) will leak relatively at an early stage of the disease (with moderate increase in capillary pore size) than globulin leading to albumin/globulin reversal. In cases with severe permeability changes with rapid progression to larger pore size with simultaneous leak of both albumin and globulin, albumin/globulin reversal will not occur. In this study estimation the serum protein and albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio at frequent intervals was done to grade the severity of the condition of burn patients by assessing the severity of capillary leak.A total of 61 admitted patients (from March 2002 to December 2004) based on the protein values were divided into 3 groups (group 1: 6-8 g/dL, group 2: 5.1-5.9 g/dL, group 3: < or =5.0 g/dL), and all the patients who showed change in their protein levels during the study were shifted to appropriate group and were classified as group shifters. The mean survival time and mortality of various groups were compared, and A/G ratio of all the expired cases was analyzed.Group 3 patients showed higher mortality (95%) as compared to that in other groups (group 1 and 2: 0% each and group shifters: 30.2%). Median survival time of group 3 was significantly low as compared to that of group 1 (P < 0.0026), group 2 (P < 0.0006), and group shifters (P < 0.0000). In group shifters the mean time (days) required for shifting from one group to other just before death or discharge in survivors was significantly higher than that in expired cases. Of 26 cases expired during the study, initial A/G ratio at the time of first assigning the group was not reversed in 22 cases (84.6%).The study concluded that the severity (indicated by lower serum protein values) and speed (judged by A/G ratio changes and median survival time analysis) of capillary permeability changes

  20. Protein design by fusion: implications for protein structure prediction and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Skorupka, Katarzyna; Han, Seong Kyu; Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Sanguk; Faham, Salem

    2013-11-19

    Domain fusion is a useful tool in protein design. Here, the structure of a fusion of the heterodimeric flagella-assembly proteins FliS and FliC is reported. Although the ability of the fusion protein to maintain the structure of the heterodimer may be apparent, threading-based structural predictions do not properly fuse the heterodimer. Additional examples of naturally occurring heterodimers that are homologous to full-length proteins were identified. These examples highlight that the designed protein was engineered by the same tools as used in the natural evolution of proteins and that heterodimeric structures contain a wealth of information, currently unused, that can improve structural predictions.

  1. Glutaraldehyde mediated conjugation of amino-coated magnetic nanoparticles with albumin protein for nanothermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingyun; Yang, Bing; Dai, Xiaochen; Wang, Xiaowen; Gao, Fuping; Zhang, Xiaodong; Tang, Jintian

    2010-11-01

    A novel bioconjugation of amino saline capped Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was developed by applying glutaraldehyde as activator. Briefly, Fe3O4 MNs were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method. Surface modification of the prepared MNPs was performed by employing amino saline as the coating agent. Glutaraldehyde was further applied as an activation agent through which BSA was conjugated to the amino-coated MNPs. The structure of the BSA-MNs was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Physico-chemical characterizations of the BSA-MNPs, such as surface morphology, surface charge and magnetic properties were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), zeta-Potential and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), etc. Magnetic inductive heating characteristics of the BSA-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the MNPs suspension (magnetic fluid) under alternative magnetic field (AMF). The results demonstrate that BSA was successfully conjugated with amino-coated MNs mediated through glutaraldehyde activation. The nanoparticles were spherical shaped with approximately 10 nm diameter. Possessing ideal magnetic inductive heating characteristics, which can generate very rapid and efficient heating while upon AMF exposure, BSA-MNPs can be applied as a novel candidature for magnetic nanothermotherapy for cancer treatment. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG-2) indicates that BSA-MNP is an efficient agent for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfied biocompatibility, as rare cytotoxicity was observed in the absence of AMF. Moreover, our investigation provides a methodology for fabrication protein conjugated MNPs, for instance monoclonal antibody conjugated MNPs for targeting cancer nanothermotherapy. PMID:21137877

  2. Phycobiliprotein fusion proteins: versatile intensely fluorescent constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Cai, Yuping A.; Tooley, Aaron J.

    2004-06-01

    Since 1982, phycobiliproteins have served as fluorescent labels in a wide variety of cell and molecule analyses. The exceptional spectroscopic properties of these labels include very high absorbance coefficients and quantum yields, and large Stokes shifts. The spectroscopic diversity of these reagents is restricted to a subset of naturally occurring phycobiliproteins with stable assembly states in vitro, whose target specificity is generated by chemical conjugation to proteins or small molecules. The latter step generates heterogeneity. These limitations have been overcome by expressing various recombinant phycobiliprotein constructs in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Modular recombinant phycobiliprotein-based labels were constructed with some or all of the following features (a) an affinity purification tag; (b) a stable oligomerization domain (to maintain stable higher order assemblies of the phycobiliprotein monomers at very low protein concentration); (c) a biospecific recognition domain. Such phycobiliprotein constructs are readily purified from crude cell extracts by affinity chromatography and used directly as fluorescent labels. To generate constructs for intracellular in vivo labeling, the entire pathways for the biosynthesis of the His-tagged holo- α (phycocyanobilin-bearing) subunit of phycocyanin (emission max. 641 nm) and of the His-tagged holo-α (phycobiliviolin-bearing) subunit of phycoerythrocyanin (emission max. 582 nm) were reconstituted in Escherichia coli.

  3. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Gilmara C.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% ( n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l -1 albumin and 90 g l -1 total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l -1 albumin ( r=0.998) and total protein ( r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 μl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO 4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  4. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling.

    PubMed

    Luca, Gilmara C; Reis, Boaventura F

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% (n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l(-1) albumin and 90 g l(-1) total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l(-1) albumin (r=0.998) and total protein (r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 microl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  5. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R; Krishnakumar, Shyam S; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle -the fusion pore- can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, "flipped" t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  6. Nanodisc-cell fusion: control of fusion pore nucleation and lifetimes by SNARE protein transmembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenyong; Auclair, Sarah M.; Bello, Oscar; Vennekate, Wensi; Dudzinski, Natasha R.; Krishnakumar, Shyam S.; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-01-01

    The initial, nanometer-sized connection between the plasma membrane and a hormone- or neurotransmitter-filled vesicle –the fusion pore– can flicker open and closed repeatedly before dilating or resealing irreversibly. Pore dynamics determine release and vesicle recycling kinetics, but pore properties are poorly known because biochemically defined single-pore assays are lacking. We isolated single flickering pores connecting v-SNARE-reconstituted nanodiscs to cells ectopically expressing cognate, “flipped” t-SNAREs. Conductance through single, voltage-clamped fusion pores directly reported sub-millisecond pore dynamics. Pore currents fluctuated, transiently returned to baseline multiple times, and disappeared ~6 s after initial opening, as if the fusion pore fluctuated in size, flickered, and resealed. We found that interactions between v- and t-SNARE transmembrane domains (TMDs) promote, but are not essential for pore nucleation. Surprisingly, TMD modifications designed to disrupt v- and t-SNARE TMD zippering prolonged pore lifetimes dramatically. We propose that the post-fusion geometry of the proteins contribute to pore stability. PMID:27264104

  7. Accelerated Nucleation of Hydroxyapatite Using an Engineered Hydrophobin Fusion Protein.

    PubMed

    Melcher, Melanie; Facey, Sandra J; Henkes, Thorsten M; Subkowski, Thomas; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Calcium phosphate mineralization is of particular interest in dental repair. A biomimetic approach using proteins or peptides is a highly promising way to reconstruct eroded teeth. In this study, the screening of several proteins is described for their binding and nucleating activities toward hydroxyapatite. Out of 27 tested candidates, only two hydrophobin fusion proteins showed binding abilities to hydroxyapatite in a mouthwash formulation and an increased nucleation in artificial saliva. Using a semirational approach, one of the two candidates (DEWA_5), a fusion protein consisting of a truncated section of the Bacillus subtilis synthase YaaD, the Aspergillus nidulans hydrophobin DEWA, and the rationally designed peptide P11-4 described in the literature, could be further engineered toward a faster mineral formation. The variants DEWA_5a (40aaYaaD-SDSDSD-DEWA) and DEWA_5b (40aaYaaD-RDRDRD-DEWA) were able to enhance the nucleation activity without losing the ability to form hydroxyapatite. In the case of variant DEWA_5b, an additional increase in the binding toward hydroxyapatite could be achieved. Especially with the variant DEWA_5a, the protein engineering of the rationally designed peptide sequence resulted in a resemblance of an amino acid motif that is found in nature. The engineered peptide resembles the amino acid motif in dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major proteins involved in dentinogenesis. PMID:27010648

  8. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:27515077

  9. Post-translational control of protein function with light using a LOV-intein fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Mistry, I N; Tavassoli, A

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the post-translational control of protein function with light hold much value as tools in cell biology. To this end, we report a fusion protein that consists of DnaE split-inteins, flanking the light sensitive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa. The resulting chimera combines the activities of these two unrelated proteins to enable controlled formation of a functional protein via upregulation of intein splicing with blue light in bacterial and human cells. PMID:26940144

  10. Evaluation of Ischemia-Modified Albumin, Malondialdehyde, and Advanced Oxidative Protein Products as Markers of Vascular Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Afzal; Manjrekar, Poornima; Yadav, Charu; Agarwal, Ashish; Srikantiah, Rukmini Mysore; Hegde, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    AIM This study aimed at evaluation of ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), malondialdehyde (MDA), and advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP) as markers of vascular injury in diabetic nephropathy (DN) with derivation of cutoff values for the same. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study population comprised 60 diabetes patients and 30 controls, with diabetes patients further categorized into three groups based on urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) of <30 mg/g (diabetes without microalbuminuria), 30–300 mg/g (early DN), and >300 mg/g of creatinine (overt DN). Serum IMA, MDA, and AOPP were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; HbA1c, serum creatinine, urine albumin, and urine creatinine were estimated using automated analyzers. Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and receiver-operating characteristic curve. RESULTS A statistically significant difference was found in the levels of IMA among patients with early DN (154 ng/mL), diabetes without nephropathy (109.4 ng/mL), and healthy controls (45.7 ng/mL), with highest levels in early DN cases. Similar increase was seen in AOPP as well. A significant correlation was observed between IMA and UACR in diabetes without nephropathy (r = 0.448). CONCLUSION The present study postulates serum IMA as a novel biomarker for the assessment of disease progression in diabetes even before microalbuminuria, and a cutoff point ≥99 ng/mL can be used for detection of early DN. PMID:27158221

  11. Structure of Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Ho, Joseph X.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its availability, low cost, stability, and unusual ligand-binding properties, serum albumin has been one of the mst extensively studied and applied proteins in biochemistry. However, as a protein, albumin is far from typical, and the widespread interest in and application of albumin have not been balanced by an understanding of its molecular structure. Indeed, for more than 30 years structural information was surmised based solely on techniques such as hydrodynamics, low-angle X-ray scattering, and predictive methods.

  12. The promises and challenges of fusion constructs in protein biochemistry and enzymology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Xu, Fei

    2016-10-01

    Fusion constructs are used to improve the properties of or impart novel functionality to proteins for biotechnological applications. The biochemical characteristics of enzymes or functional proteins optimized by fusion include catalytic efficiency, stability, activity, expression, secretion, and solubility. In this review, we summarize the parameters of enzymes or functional proteins that can be modified by fusion constructs. For each parameter, fusion strategies and molecular partners are examined using examples from recent studies. Future prospects in this field are also discussed. This review is expected to increase interest in and advance fusion strategies for optimization of enzymes and other functional proteins. PMID:27541749

  13. Behaviors of bovine serum albumin and rapeseed proteins at the air/water interface after grafting aliphatic or aromatic chains.

    PubMed

    Gerbanowski, Alice; Rabiller, Claude; Guéguen, Jacques

    2003-06-15

    The influence of grafting aliphatic or aromatic groups on the behaviors of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and rapeseed proteins (napin and cruciferin) at the air/water interface is studied. From compression isotherms, it is shown that the chemical modification induces an increase in the interfacial molecular areas of the three proteins. The more hydrophobic the groups grafted, the more important this increase is. The dilatational modulus clearly emphasized that the grafting of hydrophobic groups also leads to an increase of the collapse pressure, demonstrating a higher cohesiveness and resistance to pressure of the interfacial films. These results are discussed on the basis of the physicochemical changes due to these chemical modifications, especially the conformation, the surface hydrophobicity, and the flexibility of the modified proteins. The improvement of surface properties obtained by grafting aliphatic or aromatic chains onto these proteins looks very promising in regard to emulsifying and foaming properties.

  14. Protein function prediction based on data fusion and functional interrelationship.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Wekesa, Jael-Sanyanda; Shi, Guan-Li; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2016-04-01

    One of the challenging tasks of bioinformatics is to predict more accurate and confident protein functions from genomics and proteomics datasets. Computational approaches use a variety of high throughput experimental data, such as protein-protein interaction (PPI), protein sequences and phylogenetic profiles, to predict protein functions. This paper presents a method that uses transductive multi-label learning algorithm by integrating multiple data sources for classification. Multiple proteomics datasets are integrated to make inferences about functions of unknown proteins and use a directed bi-relational graph to assign labels to unannotated proteins. Our method, bi-relational graph based transductive multi-label function annotation (Bi-TMF) uses functional correlation and topological PPI network properties on both the training and testing datasets to predict protein functions through data fusion of the individual kernel result. The main purpose of our proposed method is to enhance the performance of classifier integration for protein function prediction algorithms. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of Bi-TMF on multi-sources datasets in yeast, human and mouse benchmarks. Bi-TMF outperforms other recently proposed methods. PMID:26869536

  15. Biodegradable synthetic polymer scaffolds for reinforcement of albumin protein solders used for laser-assisted tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Grant T; Soller, Eric C; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M

    2002-01-01

    Laser tissue soldering has been investigated for several years by researchers in our laboratory as an alternative to conventional tissue fasteners, including sutures, staples and clips. Laser tissue soldering is a bonding technique in which protein solder is applied to the tissue surfaces to be joined, and laser energy is used to bond the solder to the tissue surfaces. Over the past four years we have been investigating the use of synthetic polymer membranes as a means for reinforcing the strength of tissue repairs formed using traditional laser tissue soldering techniques. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various processing parameters on the strength of tissue repairs formed using the reinforced solder. Biodegradable polymer membranes of specific porosity were fabricated by means of a solvent-casting and particulate-leaching technique, using three different poly(alpha ester)s: polyglycolic acid (PGA), polylactic acid (PLA) and poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). In addition, several membranes were also prepared with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The membranes were then doped with the traditional protein solder mixture of serum albumin and indocyanine green dye. Varied processing parameters included the polymer type, the PLGA copolymer blend ratio, the polymer/PEG blend ratio, the porosity of the polymer membrane and the initial albumin weight fraction. Variation of the polymer type had negligible effect on the strength of the repairs. Although it is known that alteration of the copolymer blend ratio of PLGA influences the degradation rate of the polymer, this variation also had no significant effect on the strength of the repairs formed. Increased membrane flexibility was observed when PEG was added during the casting stage. An increase in the porosity of the polymer membranes led to a subsequent increase in the final concentration of protein contained within the membranes, hence aiding in strengthening the resultant repairs. Likewise

  16. The protein structure determines the sensitizing capacity of Brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e1) in a rat food allergy model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    It is not exactly known why certain food proteins are more likely to sensitize. One of the characteristics of most food allergens is that they are stable to the acidic and proteolytic conditions in the digestive tract. This property is thought to be a risk factor in allergic sensitization. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the protein structure of 2S albumin (Ber e1), a major allergen from Brazil nut, on the sensitizing capacity in vivo using an oral Brown Norway rat food allergy model. Disulphide bridges of 2S albumin were reduced and alkylated resulting in loss of protein structure and an increased pepsin digestibility in vitro. Both native 2S albumin and reduced/alkylated 2S albumin were administered by daily gavage dosing (0.1 and 1 mg) to Brown Norway rats for 42 days. Intraperitoneal administration was used as a positive control. Sera were analysed by ELISA and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Oral exposure to native or reduced/alkylated 2S albumin resulted in specific IgG1 and IgG2a responses whereas only native 2S albumin induced specific IgE in this model, which was confirmed by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. This study has shown that the disruption of the protein structure of Brazil nut 2S albumin decreased the sensitizing potential in a Brown Norway rat food allergy model, whereas the immunogenicity of 2S albumin remained preserved. This observation may open possibilities for developing immunotherapy for Brazil nut allergy. PMID:24180644

  17. The protein structure determines the sensitizing capacity of Brazil nut 2S albumin (Ber e1) in a rat food allergy model.

    PubMed

    Van Bilsen, Jolanda Hm; Knippels, Léon Mj; Penninks, André H; Nieuwenhuizen, Willem F; De Jongh, Harmen Hj; Koppelman, Stef J

    2013-11-04

    : It is not exactly known why certain food proteins are more likely to sensitize. One of the characteristics of most food allergens is that they are stable to the acidic and proteolytic conditions in the digestive tract. This property is thought to be a risk factor in allergic sensitization. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of the protein structure of 2S albumin (Ber e1), a major allergen from Brazil nut, on the sensitizing capacity in vivo using an oral Brown Norway rat food allergy model. Disulphide bridges of 2S albumin were reduced and alkylated resulting in loss of protein structure and an increased pepsin digestibility in vitro. Both native 2S albumin and reduced/alkylated 2S albumin were administered by daily gavage dosing (0.1 and 1 mg) to Brown Norway rats for 42 days. Intraperitoneal administration was used as a positive control. Sera were analysed by ELISA and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Oral exposure to native or reduced/alkylated 2S albumin resulted in specific IgG1 and IgG2a responses whereas only native 2S albumin induced specific IgE in this model, which was confirmed by passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. This study has shown that the disruption of the protein structure of Brazil nut 2S albumin decreased the sensitizing potential in a Brown Norway rat food allergy model, whereas the immunogenicity of 2S albumin remained preserved. This observation may open possibilities for developing immunotherapy for Brazil nut allergy.

  18. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  19. Novel channel enzyme fusion proteins confer arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binghua; Song, Jie; Beitz, Eric

    2010-12-17

    Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H(2)As(V)O(4)(-)/HAs(V)O(4)(2-)) to arsenite (As(III)(OH)(3)) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion.

  20. Novel channel enzyme fusion proteins confer arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binghua; Song, Jie; Beitz, Eric

    2010-12-17

    Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H(2)As(V)O(4)(-)/HAs(V)O(4)(2-)) to arsenite (As(III)(OH)(3)) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion. PMID:20947511

  1. Novel Channel Enzyme Fusion Proteins Confer Arsenate Resistance*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Binghua; Song, Jie; Beitz, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Steady exposure to environmental arsenic has led to the evolution of vital cellular detoxification mechanisms. Under aerobic conditions, a two-step process appears most common among microorganisms involving reduction of predominant, oxidized arsenate (H2AsVO4−/HAsVO42−) to arsenite (AsIII(OH)3) by a cytosolic enzyme (ArsC; Escherichia coli type arsenate reductase) and subsequent extrusion via ArsB (E. coli type arsenite transporter)/ACR3 (yeast type arsenite transporter). Here, we describe novel fusion proteins consisting of an aquaglyceroporin-derived arsenite channel with a C-terminal arsenate reductase domain of phosphotyrosine-phosphatase origin, providing transposable, single gene-encoded arsenate resistance. The fusion occurred in actinobacteria from soil, Frankia alni, and marine environments, Salinispora tropica; Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an analogous ACR3-ArsC fusion. Mutations rendered the aquaglyceroporin channel more polar resulting in lower glycerol permeability and enhanced arsenite selectivity. The arsenate reductase domain couples to thioredoxin and can complement arsenate-sensitive yeast strains. A second isoform with a nonfunctional channel may use the mycothiol/mycoredoxin cofactor pool. These channel enzymes constitute prototypes of a novel concept in metabolism in which a substrate is generated and compartmentalized by the same molecule. Immediate diffusion maintains the dynamic equilibrium and prevents toxic accumulation of metabolites in an energy-saving fashion. PMID:20947511

  2. Localization of a Region in the Fusion Protein of Avian Metapneumovirus That Modulates Cell-Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Feng, Kurtis; Yao, Xiangjie; Cai, Hui; Li, Junan; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    The genus Metapneumovirus within the subfamily Pneumovirinae of the family Paramyxoviridae includes two members, human metapneumovirus (hMPV) and avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), causing respiratory tract infections in humans and birds, respectively. Paramyxoviruses enter host cells by fusing the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. Membrane fusion of hMPV appears to be unique, in that fusion of some hMPV strains requires low pH. Here, we show that the fusion (F) proteins of aMPV promote fusion in the absence of the attachment protein and low pH is not required. Furthermore, there are notable differences in cell-cell fusion among aMPV subtypes. Trypsin was required for cell-cell fusion induced by subtype B but not subtypes A and C. The F protein of aMPV subtype A was highly fusogenic, whereas those from subtypes B and C were not. By construction and evaluation of chimeric F proteins composed of domains from the F proteins of subtypes A and B, we localized a region composed of amino acid residues 170 to 338 in the F protein that is responsible for the hyperfusogenic phenotype of the F from subtype A. Further mutagenesis analysis revealed that residues R295, G297, and K323 in this region collectively contributed to the hyperfusogenicity. Taken together, we have identified a region in the aMPV F protein that modulates the extent of membrane fusion. A model for fusion consistent with these data is presented. PMID:22915815

  3. Live Salmonella recruits N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein on phagosomal membrane and promotes fusion with early endosome.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, K; Siddiqi, S A; Hashim, S; Raje, M; Basu, S K; Mukhopadhyay, A

    2000-02-21

    To understand intracellular trafficking modulations by live Salmonella, we investigated the characteristics of in vitro fusion between endosomes and phagosomes containing live (LSP) or dead Salmonella (DSP). We observed that fusion of both DSP and LSP were time, temperature and cytosol dependent. GTPgammaS and treatment of the phagosomes with Rab-GDI inhibited fusion, indicating involvement of Rab-GTPases. LSP were rich in rab5, alpha-SNAP, and NSF, while DSP mainly contained rab7. Fusion of endosomes with DSP was inhibited by ATP depletion, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) treatment, and in NEM-sensitive factor (NSF)-depleted cytosol. In contrast, fusion of endosomes with LSP was not inhibited by ATP depletion or NEM treatment, and occurred in NSF-depleted cytosol. However, ATPgammaS inhibited both fusion events. Fusion of NEM-treated LSP with endosomes was abrogated in NSF- depleted cytosol and was restored by adding purified NSF, whereas no fusion occurred with NEM-treated DSP, indicating that NSF recruitment is dependent on continuous signals from live Salmonella. Binding of NSF with LSP required prior presence of rab5 on the phagosome. We have also shown that rab5 specifically binds with Sop E, a protein from Salmonella. Our results indicate that live Salmonella help binding of rab5 on the phagosomes, possibly activate the SNARE which leads to further recruitment of alpha-SNAP for subsequent binding with NSF to promote fusion of the LSP with early endosomes and inhibition of their transport to lysosomes.

  4. The antifungal properties of a 2S albumin-homologous protein from passion fruit seeds involve plasma membrane permeabilization and ultrastructural alterations in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Agizzio, Ana Paula; Da Cunha, Maura; Carvalho, André O; Oliveira, Marco Antônio; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Gomes, Valdirene M

    2006-10-01

    Different types of antimicrobial proteins were purified from plant seeds, including chitinases, β-1,3-glucanases, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins and 2S albumins. It has become clear that these groups of proteins play an important role in the protection of plants from microbial infection. Recent results from our laboratory have shown that the defense-related proteins from passion fruit seeds, named Pf1 and Pf2 (which show sequence homology with 2S albumins), inhibit fungal growth and glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether 2S albumins from passion fruit seeds induce plasma membrane permeabilization and cause morphological alterations in yeast cells. Initially, we used an assay based on the uptake of SYTOX Green, an organic compound that fluoresces upon interaction with nucleic acids and penetrates cells with compromised plasma membranes, to investigate membrane permeabilization in S. cerevisiae cells. When viewed with a confocal laser microscope, S. cervisiae cells showed strong SYTOX Green fluorescence in the cytosol, especially in the nuclei. 2S albumins also inhibited glucose-stimulated acidification of the medium by S. cerevisiae cells, which indicates a probable impairment of fungal metabolism. The microscopical analysis of the yeast cells treated with 2S albumins demonstrated several morphological alterations in cell shape, cell surface, cell wall and bud formation, as well as in the organization of intracellular organelles. PMID:25193649

  5. Spectroscopic investigations of the interactions of tramadol hydrochloride and 5-azacytidine drugs with human serum albumin and human hemoglobin proteins.

    PubMed

    Tunç, Sibel; Cetinkaya, Ahmet; Duman, Osman

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of tramadol hydrochloride (THC) and 5-azacytidine (AZA) drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) and human hemoglobin (HMG) proteins were investigated by fluorescence, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy at pH 7.4 and different temperatures. The UV absorption spectra and the fluorescence quenching of HSA and HMG proteins indicated the formation of HSA-THC and HMG-THC complexes via static quenching mechanism. AZA did not interact with HSA and HMG proteins. It was found that the formation of HMG-THC complex was stronger than that of HSA-THC complex. The stability of HSA-THC and HMG-THC complexes decreased with increasing temperature. The number of binding site was found as one for HSA-THC and HMG-THC systems. Negative enthalpy change (ΔH) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG) and positive entropy change (ΔS) values were obtained for these systems. The binding of THC-HSA and HMG proteins was spontaneous and exothermic. In addition, electrostatic interactions between protein and drug molecules played an important role in the binding processes. The results of CD analysis revealed that the addition of THC led to a significant conformational change in the secondary structure of HSA protein, on the contrary to HMG protein. PMID:23428887

  6. Protein fold recognition using geometric kernel data fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Pooya; Jeuris, Ben; Vandebril, Raf; Moreau, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Various approaches based on features extracted from protein sequences and often machine learning methods have been used in the prediction of protein folds. Finding an efficient technique for integrating these different protein features has received increasing attention. In particular, kernel methods are an interesting class of techniques for integrating heterogeneous data. Various methods have been proposed to fuse multiple kernels. Most techniques for multiple kernel learning focus on learning a convex linear combination of base kernels. In addition to the limitation of linear combinations, working with such approaches could cause a loss of potentially useful information. Results: We design several techniques to combine kernel matrices by taking more involved, geometry inspired means of these matrices instead of convex linear combinations. We consider various sequence-based protein features including information extracted directly from position-specific scoring matrices and local sequence alignment. We evaluate our methods for classification on the SCOP PDB-40D benchmark dataset for protein fold recognition. The best overall accuracy on the protein fold recognition test set obtained by our methods is ∼86.7%. This is an improvement over the results of the best existing approach. Moreover, our computational model has been developed by incorporating the functional domain composition of proteins through a hybridization model. It is observed that by using our proposed hybridization model, the protein fold recognition accuracy is further improved to 89.30%. Furthermore, we investigate the performance of our approach on the protein remote homology detection problem by fusing multiple string kernels. Availability and implementation: The MATLAB code used for our proposed geometric kernel fusion frameworks are publicly available at http://people.cs.kuleuven.be/∼raf.vandebril/homepage/software/geomean.php?menu=5/ Contact: pooyapaydar@gmail.com or yves

  7. Comparative methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate oxidation in the presence of bovine serum albumin at several lipid/protein ratios.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2003-07-30

    The oxidation of methyl linoleate (LMe) and methyl linolenate (LnMe) in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the dark at 60 degrees C was studied to analyze the role of the type of fatty acid and the protein/lipid ratio on the relative progression of the processes involved when lipid oxidation occurs in the presence of proteins. The disappearance of the fatty acid, the formation of primary and secondary products of lipid peroxidation, the loss of amino acid residues, the production of oxidized lipid/amino acid reaction products, and the development of color and fluorescence were studied as a function of incubation time in protein/lipid samples at 10:1, 6:1, and 3:1 w/w ratios. The incubation of LMe and LnMe in the presence of BSA at 60 degrees C rapidly produced lipid peroxidation and protein damage. Although reaction rates were much faster for LnMe than for LMe, both fatty acids had similar behaviors, and LnMe seemed to be only slightly more reactive than LMe for BSA by producing a higher increase of protein pyrroles in the protein and the development of increased browning and fluorescence. The protein/lipid ratio also influenced the relative progress of the reactions implicated. Thus, a lower protein/lipid ratio increased sample oxidation and protein damage. This also produced an increased browning, in accordance with the mechanisms proposed for browning production by oxidized lipid/protein reactions. On the contrary, browning of extracted lipids increased at higher protein/lipid ratios. This opposite tendency allowed evaluation of the overall significance of the different browning processes implicated in the final colors observed, concluding that color changes observed in BSA/lipid samples were mostly a consequence of oxidized lipid/protein reactions. PMID:14705893

  8. Side chain packing below the fusion peptide strongly modulates triggering of the Hendra virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2010-10-01

    Triggering of the Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is required to initiate the conformational changes which drive membrane fusion, but the factors which control triggering remain poorly understood. Mutation of a histidine predicted to lie near the fusion peptide to alanine greatly reduced fusion despite wild-type cell surface expression levels, while asparagine substitution resulted in a moderate restoration in fusion levels. Slowed kinetics of six-helix bundle formation, as judged by sensitivity to heptad repeat B-derived peptides, was observed for all H372 mutants. These data suggest that side chain packing beneath the fusion peptide is an important regulator of Hendra virus F triggering.

  9. A New Type of Fusion Analysis Applicable to Many Organisms: Protein Fusions to the URA3 Gene of Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alani, Eric; Kleckner, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    We have made constructs that join the promoter sequences and a portion of the coding region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HIS4 and GAL1 genes and the E. coli lacZ gene to the sixth codon of the S. cerevisiae URA3 gene (encodes orotidine-5'-phosphate (OMP) decarboxylase) to form three in frame protein fusions. In each case the fusion protein has OMP decarboxylase activity as assayed by complementation tests and this activity is properly regulated. A convenient cassette consisting of the URA3 segment plus some immediately proximal amino acids of HIS4C is available for making URA3 fusions to other proteins of interest. URA3 fusions offer several advantages over other systems for gene fusion analysis: the URA3 specified protein is small and cytosolic; genetic selections exist to identify mutants with either increased or decreased URA3 function in both yeast (S. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and bacteria (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium); and a sensitive OMP decarboxylase enzyme assay is available. Also, OMP decarboxylase activity is present in mammals, Drosophila and plants, so URA3 fusions may eventually be applicable in these other organisms as well. PMID:3311876

  10. Pooled-matrix protein interaction screens using Barcode Fusion Genetics.

    PubMed

    Yachie, Nozomu; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Mellor, Joseph C; Weile, Jochen; Jacob, Yves; Verby, Marta; Ozturk, Sedide B; Li, Siyang; Cote, Atina G; Mosca, Roberto; Knapp, Jennifer J; Ko, Minjeong; Yu, Analyn; Gebbia, Marinella; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Tyagi, Tanya; Sheykhkarimli, Dayag; Roth, Jonathan F; Wong, Cassandra; Musa, Louai; Snider, Jamie; Liu, Yi-Chun; Yu, Haiyuan; Braun, Pascal; Stagljar, Igor; Hao, Tong; Calderwood, Michael A; Pelletier, Laurence; Aloy, Patrick; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput binary protein interaction mapping is continuing to extend our understanding of cellular function and disease mechanisms. However, we remain one or two orders of magnitude away from a complete interaction map for humans and other major model organisms. Completion will require screening at substantially larger scales with many complementary assays, requiring further efficiency gains in proteome-scale interaction mapping. Here, we report Barcode Fusion Genetics-Yeast Two-Hybrid (BFG-Y2H), by which a full matrix of protein pairs can be screened in a single multiplexed strain pool. BFG-Y2H uses Cre recombination to fuse DNA barcodes from distinct plasmids, generating chimeric protein-pair barcodes that can be quantified via next-generation sequencing. We applied BFG-Y2H to four different matrices ranging in scale from ~25 K to 2.5 M protein pairs. The results show that BFG-Y2H increases the efficiency of protein matrix screening, with quality that is on par with state-of-the-art Y2H methods. PMID:27107012

  11. Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract inhibits reducing monosaccharide-induced protein glycation and oxidation of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Nunthanawanich, Pornpimon; Sompong, Weerachat; Sirikwanpong, Sukrit; Mäkynen, Kittana; Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Dahlan, Winai; Ngamukote, Sathaporn

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important factor for pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Moringa oleifera is one of the medicinal plants that have anti-hyperglycemic activity. However, anti-glycation property of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on the different types of reducing monosaccharides-induced protein glycation has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the protective effect of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract (MOE) on reducing sugars-induced protein glycation and protein oxidation. Total phenolic content of MOE was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Bovine serum albumin was incubated with 0.5 M of reducing sugars (glucose or fructose) with or without MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The results found that total phenolic content was 38.56 ± 1.50 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry extract. The formation of fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs [N (ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML)] and the level of fructosamine were determined to indicate protein glycation, whereas the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group were examined for protein oxidation. MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) significantly inhibited the formation of fluorescent, N (ε)-CML and markedly decreased fructosamine level (P < 0.05). Moreover, MOE significantly prevented protein oxidation manifested by reducing protein carbonyl and the depletion of protein thiol in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Thus, the findings indicated that polyphenols containing in MOE have high potential for decreasing protein glycation and protein oxidation that may delay or prevent AGE-related diabetic complications. PMID:27468399

  12. Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract inhibits reducing monosaccharide-induced protein glycation and oxidation of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Nunthanawanich, Pornpimon; Sompong, Weerachat; Sirikwanpong, Sukrit; Mäkynen, Kittana; Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Dahlan, Winai; Ngamukote, Sathaporn

    2016-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important factor for pathophysiology of diabetes and its complications. Moringa oleifera is one of the medicinal plants that have anti-hyperglycemic activity. However, anti-glycation property of Moringa oleifera leaf extract on the different types of reducing monosaccharides-induced protein glycation has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the protective effect of Moringa oleifera aqueous leaf extract (MOE) on reducing sugars-induced protein glycation and protein oxidation. Total phenolic content of MOE was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Bovine serum albumin was incubated with 0.5 M of reducing sugars (glucose or fructose) with or without MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) for 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. The results found that total phenolic content was 38.56 ± 1.50 mg gallic acid equivalents/g dry extract. The formation of fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs [N (ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML)] and the level of fructosamine were determined to indicate protein glycation, whereas the level of protein carbonyl content and thiol group were examined for protein oxidation. MOE (0.5-2.0 mg/mL) significantly inhibited the formation of fluorescent, N (ε)-CML and markedly decreased fructosamine level (P < 0.05). Moreover, MOE significantly prevented protein oxidation manifested by reducing protein carbonyl and the depletion of protein thiol in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). Thus, the findings indicated that polyphenols containing in MOE have high potential for decreasing protein glycation and protein oxidation that may delay or prevent AGE-related diabetic complications.

  13. A promiscuous biotin ligase fusion protein identifies proximal and interacting proteins in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Raida, Manfred; Burke, Brian

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new technique for proximity-dependent labeling of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Named BioID for proximity-dependent biotin identification, this approach is based on fusion of a promiscuous Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase to a targeting protein. BioID features proximity-dependent biotinylation of proteins that are near-neighbors of the fusion protein. Biotinylated proteins may be isolated by affinity capture and identified by mass spectrometry. We apply BioID to lamin-A (LaA), a well-characterized intermediate filament protein that is a constituent of the nuclear lamina, an important structural element of the nuclear envelope (NE). We identify multiple proteins that associate with and/or are proximate to LaA in vivo. The most abundant of these include known interactors of LaA that are localized to the NE, as well as a new NE-associated protein named SLAP75. Our results suggest BioID is a useful and generally applicable method to screen for both interacting and neighboring proteins in their native cellular environment. PMID:22412018

  14. Novel nanocomposites from spider silk–silica fusion (chimeric) proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wong Po Foo, Cheryl; Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Belton, David J.; Kitchel, Brandon; Anastasiades, Daphne; Huang, Jia; Naik, Rajesh R.; Perry, Carole C.; Kaplan, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Silica skeletal architectures in diatoms are characterized by remarkable morphological and nanostructural details. Silk proteins from spiders and silkworms form strong and intricate self-assembling fibrous biomaterials in nature. We combined the features of silk with biosilica through the design, synthesis, and characterization of a novel family of chimeric proteins for subsequent use in model materials forming reactions. The domains from the major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) protein of Nephila clavipes spider dragline silk provide control over structural and morphological details because it can be self-assembled through diverse processing methods including film casting and fiber electrospinning. Biosilica nanostructures in diatoms are formed in aqueous ambient conditions at neutral pH and low temperatures. The R5 peptide derived from the silaffin protein of Cylindrotheca fusiformis induces and regulates silica precipitation in the chimeric protein designs under similar ambient conditions. Whereas mineralization reactions performed in the presence of R5 peptide alone form silica particles with a size distribution of 0.5–10 μm in diameter, reactions performed in the presence of the new fusion proteins generate nanocomposite materials containing silica particles with a narrower size distribution of 0.5–2 μm in diameter. Furthermore, we demonstrate that composite morphology and structure could be regulated by controlling processing conditions to produce films and fibers. These results suggest that the chimeric protein provides new options for processing and control over silica particle sizes, important benefits for biomedical and specialty materials, particularly in light of the all aqueous processing and the nanocomposite features of these new materials. PMID:16769898

  15. Affinity of rosmarinic acid to human serum albumin and its effect on protein conformation stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Wang, Xiangchao; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol contained in many aromatic plants with promising biological activities. The interaction between RA and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by multi-spectroscopic, electrochemistry, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by RA through a combined static and dynamic quenching mechanism, but the static quenching was the major constituent. Fluorescence experiments suggested that RA was bound to HSA with moderately strong binding affinity through hydrophobic interaction. The probable binding location of RA was located near site I of HSA. Additionally, as shown by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, RA can result in conformational and structural alterations of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics studies were used to investigate the stability of the HSA and HSA-RA system. Altogether, the results can provide an important insight for the applications of RA in the food industry.

  16. Affinity of rosmarinic acid to human serum albumin and its effect on protein conformation stability.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin; Wang, Xiangchao; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-02-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a natural polyphenol contained in many aromatic plants with promising biological activities. The interaction between RA and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by multi-spectroscopic, electrochemistry, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by RA through a combined static and dynamic quenching mechanism, but the static quenching was the major constituent. Fluorescence experiments suggested that RA was bound to HSA with moderately strong binding affinity through hydrophobic interaction. The probable binding location of RA was located near site I of HSA. Additionally, as shown by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra, RA can result in conformational and structural alterations of HSA. Furthermore, the molecular dynamics studies were used to investigate the stability of the HSA and HSA-RA system. Altogether, the results can provide an important insight for the applications of RA in the food industry. PMID:26304336

  17. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  18. Rate constant for reaction of vitamin C with protein radicals in γ-irradiated aqueous albumin solution at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Yoshimura, Toru; Mita, Kazuya; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1995-02-01

    When an aqueous solution of albumin (0.1 kg dm -3) is irradiated by γ-rays at 295 K, albumin radicals with a long lifetime are observed by ESR. The reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals has been studied at 295 K in the albumin solution, which is considered as a model of cells. The rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C with the albumin radicals was measured as 0.014 dm 3 mol -1 s -1, which is much smaller than the reported rate constants (10 6-10 10 dm 3 mol -1 s -1) for the reaction of vitamin C with radicals in a dilute aqueous solution. The small rate constant for the reaction of vitamin C is ascribed to the reaction in polymer coils in the albumin solution, since vitamin C and albumin radicals diffuse very slowly in the coils.

  19. pH responsive Janus-like supramolecular fusion proteins for functional protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Seah Ling; Ng, David Y W; Wu, Yuzhou; Förtsch, Christina; Barth, Holger; Doroshenko, Mikheil; Koynov, Kaloian; Meier, Christoph; Weil, Tanja

    2013-11-20

    A facile, noncovalent solid-phase immobilization platform is described to assemble Janus-like supramolecular fusion proteins that are responsive to external stimuli. A chemically postmodified transporter protein, DHSA, is fused with (imino)biotinylated cargo proteins via an avidin adaptor with a high degree of spatial control. Notably, the derived heterofusion proteins are able to cross cellular membranes, dissociate at acidic pH due to the iminobiotin linker and preserve the enzymatic activity of the cargo proteins β-galactosidase and the enzymatic subunit of Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin. The mix-and-match strategy described herein opens unique opportunities to access macromolecular architectures of high structural definition and biological activity, thus complementing protein ligation and recombinant protein expression techniques. PMID:24156787

  20. Premature activation of the paramyxovirus fusion protein before target cell attachment with corruption of the viral fusion machinery.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Palermo, Laura M; Yokoyama, Christine C; Orefice, Gianmarco; Fornabaio, Micaela; Sarkar, Aurijit; Kellogg, Glen E; Greengard, Olga; Porotto, Matteo; Moscona, Anne

    2011-11-01

    Paramyxoviruses, including the childhood pathogen human parainfluenza virus type 3, enter host cells by fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. This fusion results from the concerted action of its two envelope glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and the fusion protein (F). The receptor-bound HN triggers F to undergo conformational changes that render it competent to mediate fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. We proposed that, if the fusion process could be activated prematurely before the virion reaches the target host cell, infection could be prevented. We identified a small molecule that inhibits paramyxovirus entry into target cells and prevents infection. We show here that this compound works by an interaction with HN that results in F-activation prior to receptor binding. The fusion process is thereby prematurely activated, preventing fusion of the viral membrane with target cells and precluding viral entry. This first evidence that activation of a paramyxovirus F can be specifically induced before the virus contacts its target cell suggests a new strategy with broad implications for the design of antiviral agents.

  1. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-03-01

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  2. Measles virus attachment proteins with impaired ability to bind CD46 interact more efficiently with the homologous fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Iorio, Ronald M.

    2009-01-05

    Fusion promotion by measles virus (MV) depends on an interaction between the hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Amino acid substitutions in MV H that drastically reduce hemagglutinating activity result in an increase in the amount of H (primarily the 74 kDa isoform) detectable in a complex with F at the cell surface. This is in direct contrast to the loss of the ability to detect a complex between the fusion protein of Newcastle disease virus and most attachment proteins that lack receptor binding activity. These opposing results provide support for the existence of different mechanisms for the regulation of fusion by these two paramyxoviruses.

  3. Albumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a variety of conditions in addition to malnutrition , a decrease in albumin needs to be evaluated ... can also be seen in inflammation , shock, and malnutrition . They may be seen with conditions in which ...

  4. Generation of New M2e-HA2 Fusion Chimeric Peptide to Development of a Recombinant Fusion Protein Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ameghi, Ali; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghaiypour, Khosrow; Barzegar, Abolfazl; Pilehvar-Soltanahmadi, Yones; Moghadampour, Masood; Taghizadeh, Morteza; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to design a new construction containing influenza virus (H1N1) M2e gene and HA2 gene by bioinformatics approach, cloning the construct in to Escherichia coli and produce M2e-HA2 peptide. Methods: The procedure was done by virus cultivation in SPF eggs, hemagglutination assay (HA), RNA isolation, RT-PCR, primers designed (DNAMAN 4 and Oligo7), virtual fusion construction translation (ExPASy), N-Glycosylated sites prediction (Ensemblegly-Iowa), complete open reading frame (ORF), stop codon studied (NCBI ORF Finder), rare codon determination (GenScript), Solvent accessibility of epitopes (Swiss-PdbViewer), antigenic sites prediction (Protean), fusion PCR of M2e-HA2 gene, sequence analysis, nested PCR, gel electrophoresis, double digestion of pET22b(+) plasmid and the fusion construct, ligation of them, transformation of the ligated vector (pET22b-M2e-HA2) to E.coli (BL21), mass culture the cloned bacterium ,induction the expression by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), purification the fusion peptide by Ni-NTA column, western blot to verify the purification. Results: In this study we developed a new approach for fusion of Influenza virus M2e (96 nucleotides) and HA2 (663 nucleotides) genes based on fusion PCR strategy and produced a fused fragment with 793 nucleotides. The construct was successfully cloned and expressed. Conclusion: This construct is a 261 amino acid chimeric fusion peptide with about 30 KD molecular weight. According on the latest information; this is the first case of expression and purification M2e-HA2 fusion chimeric peptide, which could be used for development of a recombinant M2e-HA2 fusion protein vaccine. PMID:26793615

  5. Albuminated Glycoenzymes: Enzyme Stabilization through Orthogonal Attachment of a Single-Layered Protein Shell around a Central Glycoenzyme Core.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Dustin W; Newton, Jared M; Roberts, Jason R; McShane, Michael J

    2016-05-18

    Here we demonstrate an approach to stabilize enzymes through the orthogonal covalent attachment of albumin on the single-enzyme level. Albuminated glycoenzymes (AGs) based upon glucose oxidase and catalase from Aspergillus niger were prepared in this manner. Gel filtration chromatography and dynamic light scattering support modification, with an increase in hydrodynamic radius of ca. 60% upon albumination. Both AGs demonstrate a marked resistance to aggregation during heating to 90 °C, but this effect is more profound in albuminated catalase. The functional characteristics of albuminated glucose oxidase vary considerably with exposure type. The AG's thermal inactivation is reduced more than 25 times compared to native glucose oxidase, and moderate stabilization is observed with one month storage at 37 °C. However, albumination has no effect on operational stability of glucose oxidase.

  6. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion on nanoscale bioactive coatings formed from poly(ethylene glycol) and albumin microgels

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Evan A.; Nichols, Michael D.; Cordova, Lee H.; George, Brandon J.; Jun, Young-Shin; Elbert, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    Late-term thrombosis on drug-eluting stents is an emerging problem that might be addressed using extremely thin, biologically-active hydrogel coatings. We report a dip-coating strategy to covalently link poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to substrates, producing coatings with <≈100 nm thickness. Gelation of PEG-octavinylsulfone with amines in either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or PEG-octaamine was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS), revealing the presence of microgels before macrogelation. NMR also revealed extremely high end group conversions prior to macrogelation, consistent with the formation of highly crosslinked microgels and deviation from Flory-Stockmayer theory. Before macrogelation, the reacting solutions were diluted and incubated with nucleophile-functionalized surfaces. Using optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), we identified a highly hydrated, protein-resistant layer with a thickness of approximately 75 nm. Atomic force microscopy in buffered water revealed the presence of coalesced spheres of various sizes but with diameters less than about 100 nm. Microgel-coated glass or poly(ethylene terephthalate) exhibited reduced protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular interactions with the surface could be controlled by using different proteins to cap unreacted vinylsulfone groups within the coating. PMID:18771802

  7. Rapid Screening of Drug-Protein Binding Using High-Performance Affinity Chromatography with Columns Containing Immobilized Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Qiong; Hu, Wei-Yu; Li, Zheng; Liu, Ping-Xia; Zhang, Zhen-Qing

    2013-01-01

    For drug candidates, a plasma protein binding (PPB) more than 90% is more meaningful and deserves further investigation in development. In the study, a high-performance liquid chromatography method employing column containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA) to screen in vitro PPB of leading compounds was established and successfully applied to tested compounds. Good correlation (a coefficient correlation of 0.96) was attained between the reciprocal values (X) of experimentally obtained retention time of reference compounds eluted through HSA column and the reported PPB values (Y) with a correlation equation of Y = 92.03 − 97.01X. The method was successfully applied to six test compounds, and the result was confirmed by the conventional ultrafiltration technique, and both yielded equal results. However, due to the particular protein immobilized to column, the method cannot be applied for all compounds and should be exploited judiciously based on the value of the logarithmic measure of the acid dissociation constant (pKa) as per the requirement. If α1-acid glycoprotein and other plasma proteins could be immobilized like HSA with their actual ratio in plasma to column simultaneously, the result attained using immobilized column may be more accurate, and the method could be applied to more compounds without pKa limitation. PMID:23607050

  8. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  9. Graphene Biosensor Programming with Genetically Engineered Fusion Protein Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Soikkeli, Miika; Kurppa, Katri; Kainlauri, Markku; Arpiainen, Sanna; Paananen, Arja; Gunnarsson, David; Joensuu, Jussi J; Laaksonen, Päivi; Prunnila, Mika; Linder, Markus B; Ahopelto, Jouni

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a label-free biosensor concept based on specific receptor modules, which provide immobilization and selectivity to the desired analyte molecules, and on charge sensing with a graphene field effect transistor. The receptor modules are fusion proteins in which small hydrophobin proteins act as the anchor to immobilize the receptor moiety. The functionalization of the graphene sensor is a single-step process based on directed self-assembly of the receptor modules on a hydrophobic surface. The modules are produced separately in fungi or plants and purified before use. The modules form a dense and well-oriented monolayer on the graphene transistor channel and the receptor module monolayer can be removed, and a new module monolayer with a different selectivity can be assembled in situ. The receptor module monolayers survive drying, showing that the functionalized devices can be stored and have a reasonable shelf life. The sensor is tested with small charged peptides and large immunoglobulin molecules. The measured sensitivities are in the femtomolar range, and the response is relatively fast, of the order of one second. PMID:26960769

  10. Aequorin fusion proteins as bioluminescent tracers for competitive immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Deo, Sapna K.; Dikici, Emre; Roda, Aldo; Daunert, Sylvia

    2004-06-01

    The use of bio- and chemiluminescence for the development of quantitative binding assays offers undoubted advantages over other detection systems, such as spectrophotometry, fluorescence, or radioactivity. Indeed, bio- and chemiluminescence detection provides similar, or even better, sensitivity and detectability than radioisotopes, while avoiding the problems of health hazards, waste disposal, and instability associated with the use of radioisotopes. Among bioluminescent labels, the calcium-activated photoprotein aequorin, originally isolated from Aequorea victoria and today available as a recombinant product, is characterized by very high detectability, down to attomole levels. It has been used as a bioluminescent label for developing a variety of highly sensitive immunoassays, using various analyte-aequorin conjugation strategies. When the analyte is a protein or a peptide, genetic engineering techniques can be used to produce protein fusions where the analyte is in-frame fused with aequorin, thus producing homogeneous one-to-one conjugation products, available in virtually unlimited amount. Various assays were developed using this strategy: a short review of the most interesting applications is presented, as well as the cloning, purification and initial characterization of an endothelin-1-aequorin conjugate suitable for developing a competitive immunoassay for endothelin-1, a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, involved in hypertension.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein in pediatric spine fusion surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Christine; Kerr, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of literature describing the use of bone graft substitutes to achieve fusion in the pediatric spine. Outcomes and complications involving the off-label use of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) in the pediatric spine are not clearly defined. The purpose of this study is to review the existing literature with respect to reported outcomes and complications involving the use of low-dose BMP-2 in pediatric patients. Methods A Medline and PubMed literature search was conducted using the words bone morphogenetic protein, BMP, rh-BMP-2, bone graft substitutes, and pediatric spine. Results To date, there are few published reports on this topic. Complications and appropriate BMP-2 dosage application in the pediatric spine remain unknown. Conclusions This report describes the potential for BMP-2 to achieve successful arthrodesis of the spine in pediatric patients. Usage should be judicious as complications and long-term outcomes of pediatric BMP-2 usage remain undefined in the existing literature.

  12. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-24

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcgammaIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  13. Protein body formation in stable transgenic tobacco expressing elastin-like polypeptide and hydrophobin fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plants are recognized as an efficient and inexpensive system to produce valuable recombinant proteins. Two different strategies have been commonly used for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants: transient expression mediated by Agrobacterium; or stable transformation of the plant genome. However, the use of plants as bioreactors still faces two main limitations: low accumulation levels of some recombinant proteins and lack of efficient purification methods. Elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), hydrophobin I (HFBI) and Zera® are three fusion partners found to increase the accumulation levels of recombinant proteins and induce the formation of protein bodies (PBs) in leaves when targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transient expression assays. In this study the effects of ELP and HFBI fusion tags on recombinant protein accumulation levels and PB formation was examined in stable transgenic Nicotiana tabacum. Results The accumulation of recombinant protein and PB formation was evaluated in two cultivars of Nicotiana tabacum transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to ELP or HFBI, both targeted and retrieved to the ER. The ELP and HFBI tags increased the accumulation of the recombinant protein and induced the formation of PBs in leaves of stable transgenic plants from both cultivars. Furthermore, these tags induced the formation of PBs in a concentration-dependent manner, where a specific level of recombinant protein accumulation was required for PBs to appear. Moreover, agro-infiltration of plants accumulating low levels of recombinant protein with p19, a suppressor of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), increased accumulation levels in four independent transgenic lines, suggesting that PTGS might have caused the low accumulation levels in these plants. Conclusion The use of ELP and HFBI tags as fusion partners in stable transgenic plants of tobacco is feasible and promising. In a constitutive environment, these tags

  14. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W; Waring, Alan J; Wong, Gerard C L; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. (31)P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand-rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. (1)H-(31)P 2D correlation spectra and (2)H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation.

  15. Albumin stimulates p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in opossum kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Brunskill, N J

    2000-03-01

    The presence of protein in the urine of patients with renal disease is an adverse prognostic feature. It has therefore been suggested that proteinuria per se may be responsible for the development of renal tubulo-interstitial scarring and fibrosis, and disturbances in tubular cell growth and proliferation. We have used the opossum kidney proximal tubular cell line to investigate the effects of albumin on cell growth. The effect of albumin on cell proliferation was investigated by cell counting and measurement of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. We studied the effect of recombinant human albumin on the activity of p44/p42 extracellular-signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase ) using an in vitro kinase assay, and immunoblotting with antibodies against active extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK). The effects of the ERK inhibitor PD98059 were also examined. Recombinant human albumin was found to stimulate proliferation of opossum kidney cells in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal stimulation at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. In addition, recombinant human albumin activated ERK in a time-dependent (maximal after 5 min) and dose-dependent (maximal at 1 mg/ml) fashion. These effects on cell proliferation and ERK activity were inhibited by PD98059, and were not reproduced by ovalbumin or mannitol. The data therefore indicate that albumin is able to stimulate growth and proliferation of proximal tubular cells that is dependent on the ERK family of MAP kinases. The potential importance of this pathway in the development of renal disease is discussed. PMID:10677388

  16. The Importance of Protein-Protein Interactions on the pH-Induced Conformational Changes of Bovine Serum Albumin: A Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering Study

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Leandro R.S.; Ortore, Maria Grazia; Spinozzi, Francesco; Mariani, Paolo; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Itri, Rosangela

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The combined effects of concentration and pH on the conformational states of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are investigated by small-angle x-ray scattering. Serum albumins, at physiological conditions, are found at concentrations of ∼35–45 mg/mL (42 mg/mL in the case of humans). In this work, BSA at three different concentrations (10, 25, and 50 mg/mL) and pH values (2.0–9.0) have been studied. Data were analyzed by means of the Global Fitting procedure, with the protein form factor calculated from human serum albumin (HSA) crystallographic structure and the interference function described, considering repulsive and attractive interaction potentials within a random phase approximation. Small-angle x-ray scattering data show that BSA maintains its native state from pH 4.0 up to 9.0 at all investigated concentrations. A pH-dependence of the absolute net protein charge is shown and the charge number per BSA is quantified to 10(2), 8(1), 13(2), 20(2), and 26(2) for pH values 4.0, 5.4, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0, respectively. The attractive potential diminishes as BSA concentration increases. The coexistence of monomers and dimers is observed at 50 mg/mL and pH 5.4, near the BSA isoelectric point. Samples at pH 2.0 show a different behavior, because BSA overall shape changes as a function of concentration. At 10 mg/mL, BSA is partially unfolded and a strong repulsive protein-protein interaction occurs due to the high amount of exposed charge. At 25 and 50 mg/mL, BSA undergoes some re-folding, which likely results in a molten-globule state. This work concludes by confirming that the protein concentration plays an important role on the pH-unfolded BSA state, due to a delicate compromise between interaction forces and crowding effects. PMID:20085727

  17. Surface density of the Hendra G protein modulates Hendra F protein-promoted membrane fusion: role for Hendra G protein trafficking and degradation.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Shannon D; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-07-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels of glycoproteins expressed in transfected cells. Using two different fusion assays, we found a marked increase in fusion when expression of the Hendra G protein was increased, with a 1:1 molar ratio of Hendra F:G on the cell surface resulting in optimal membrane fusion. Our results also showed that Hendra G protein levels are modulated by both more rapid protein turnover and slower protein trafficking than is seen for Hendra F.

  18. Surface density of the Hendra G protein modulates Hendra F protein-promoted membrane fusion: Role for Hendra G protein trafficking and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels of glycoproteins expressed in transfected cells. Using two different fusion assays, we found a marked increase in fusion when expression of the Hendra G protein was increased, with a 1:1 molar ratio of Hendra F:G on the cell surface resulting in optimal membrane fusion. Our results also showed that Hendra G protein levels are modulated by both more rapid protein turnover and slower protein trafficking than is seen for Hendra F.

  19. [Albumin in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Tamion, F

    2010-09-01

    Human serum albumin is a small (66kD) globular protein representing over 60 % of the total plasma protein content. It is made up of 585 amino 6 acids and contains 35 cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges that contribute to its overall tertiary structure. It has a free cysteine-derived thiol group at Cys-34, which accounts for 80 % of its redox activity. Physiologically, serum albumin exists in a reduced form with a free thiol contributing to its antioxidant properties. It is synthesized primarily in the liver and is an acute-phase protein. It is a multifunctional plasma protein ascribed ligand-binding and transport properties as well as antioxidants and enzymatic functions. It maintains colloid osmotic pressure, modulates inflammatory response and may influence oxidative damage. Hypoalbuminemia is common in the intensive care unit and may be due to decreased synthesis by the liver and/or to increased losses or increased proteolysis and clearance. Although albumin was long used to control vascular collapse in critically ill patients, the evidence suggests that it does not offer a benefit over crystalloid solutions in vascular collapse. However, human serum albumin is an important circulating antioxidant and it may be beneficial in critically ill patients to limit oxidative damage. A number of studies suggest that in specific groups of hypoalbuminemic critically ill patients, albumin administration may have beneficial effects on organ function, although the exact mechanisms remain undefined. Further trials are needed to confirm theses observations and to clearly demonstrate whether albumin should be administered in critically ill patients with hypoalbuminemia. PMID:20675098

  20. Cell fusion assay by expression of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion protein to analyze the mutation of palivizumab-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yosuke; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Sawada, Akihito; Ito, Takashi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) consists of fusion (F), glyco (G), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins as envelope proteins, and infects through cell fusion. F protein is expressed on the surface of infected cells, and induces cell fusion. In the present report, expression plasmids of the F, G and SH proteins were constructed and cell fusion activity was investigated under T7 RNA polymerase. F protein alone induced cell fusion at a lower concentration than previously reported, and co-expression of F and SH proteins induced cell fusion more efficiently than F protein alone. Palivizumab is the only prophylactic agent against RSV infection. Palivizumab-resistant strains having mutations of the F protein of K272E and S275F were reported. These mutations were introduced into an F-expression plasmid, and exhibited no inhibition of cell fusion with palivizumab. Among the RSV F protein mutants, N276S has been reported to have partial resistance against palivizumab, but the F expression plasmid with the N276S mutation showed a reduction in cell fusion in the presence of palivizumab, showing no resistance to palivizumab. The present expression system was useful for investigating the mechanisms of RSV cell fusion. PMID:26794681

  1. The immunogenicity of MUC1 peptides and fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, V; Pietersz, G A; Xing, P X; Lees, C J; Michael, M; Bishop, J; McKenzie, I F

    1995-03-23

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is highly expressed in breast cancer, has an ubiquitous distribution and, due to altered glycosylation, peptides within the VNTR are exposed. These peptides are the target for anti-MUC1 antibodies, which give a differential reaction on cancer compared with normal tissue. The amino acids, APDTR or adjacent amino acids, are highly immunogenic in mice for antibody production (after immunisation with either breast cancer cells, human milk fat globule (HMFG) or the VNTR peptide). In addition, human studies show that this region of the MUC1 VNTR functions as target epitopes for cytotoxic T cells. We have performed preclinical and clinical studies to examine the immune responses to MUC1 in mice and humans: (a) MUC1+ 3T3 or P815+ 3T3 cells in syngeneic mice are rejected, with the generation of both cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and DTH responses and a weak antibody response and a weak antibody responses; this type of immunity gives rise to total resistance to re-challenge with high doses of these tumors; (b) immunisation with peptides (VNTR x 2), a fusion protein (VNTR x 5), or HMFG leads to no CTLs, DTH, good antibody production and weak tumour protection (to 10(6) cells, but not 5 x 10(6) cells) (possibly a TH2 type response); (c) immunisation with mannan-fusion protein (MFP) gives rise to good protection (resistance to 50 x 10(6) cells), CTL and DTH responses and weak antibody responses (possibly a TH1 type response, similar in magnitude to that obtained after tumor rejection); (d) established tumors can be rapidly rejected by delayed treatment of MFP; (e) the CTL responses are MHC restricted (in contrast to the human studies); (f) APDTR appears not to be the T cell reactive epitope in mice. On the basis of these findings, two clinical trials are in progress: (a) VNTR x 2 (diphtheria toxoid) which gives rise to some T cell proliferation, DTH and antibody responses in some patients and (b) an MFP trial. The ability to alter the immune response towards

  2. Expression and purification of recombinant antibody formats and antibody fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; Richter, Fabian; Seifert, Oliver; Unverdorben, Felix; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-01-01

    In the laboratory-scale production of antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins, it is often difficult to keep track on the most suitable affinity tags for protein purification from either prokaryotic or eukaryotic host systems. Here, we describe how such recombinant proteins derived from Escherichia coli lysates as well as HEK293 cell culture supernatants are purified by IMAC and by different affinity chromatography methods based on fusions to FLAG-tag, Strep-tag, and Fc domains. PMID:24515473

  3. Development of new fusion proteins for visualizing amyloid-β oligomers in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Doi, Motomichi; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Hirose, Keiko; Kitamura, Akira; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka; Kinjo, Masataka; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Shimura, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers critically contributes to disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can be the potential target of AD therapy. Direct observation of molecular dynamics of Aβ oligomers in vivo is key for drug discovery research, however, it has been challenging because Aβ aggregation inhibits the fluorescence from fusion proteins. Here, we developed Aβ1-42-GFP fusion proteins that are oligomerized and visualize their dynamics inside cells even when aggregated. We examined the aggregation states of Aβ-GFP fusion proteins using several methods and confirmed that they did not assemble into fibrils, but instead formed oligomers in vitro and in live cells. By arranging the length of the liker between Aβ and GFP, we generated two fusion proteins with "a long-linker" and "a short-linker", and revealed that the aggregation property of fusion proteins can be evaluated by measuring fluorescence intensities using rat primary culture neurons transfected with Aβ-GFP plasmids and Aβ-GFP transgenic C. elegans. We found that Aβ-GFP fusion proteins induced cell death in COS7 cells. These results suggested that novel Aβ-GFP fusion proteins could be utilized for studying the physiological functions of Aβ oligomers in living cells and animals, and for drug screening by analyzing Aβ toxicity. PMID:26982553

  4. Development of new fusion proteins for visualizing amyloid-β oligomers in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Doi, Motomichi; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Hirose, Keiko; Kitamura, Akira; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka; Kinjo, Masataka; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Shimura, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers critically contributes to disease progression in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and can be the potential target of AD therapy. Direct observation of molecular dynamics of Aβ oligomers in vivo is key for drug discovery research, however, it has been challenging because Aβ aggregation inhibits the fluorescence from fusion proteins. Here, we developed Aβ1-42-GFP fusion proteins that are oligomerized and visualize their dynamics inside cells even when aggregated. We examined the aggregation states of Aβ-GFP fusion proteins using several methods and confirmed that they did not assemble into fibrils, but instead formed oligomers in vitro and in live cells. By arranging the length of the liker between Aβ and GFP, we generated two fusion proteins with “a long-linker” and “a short-linker”, and revealed that the aggregation property of fusion proteins can be evaluated by measuring fluorescence intensities using rat primary culture neurons transfected with Aβ-GFP plasmids and Aβ-GFP transgenic C. elegans. We found that Aβ-GFP fusion proteins induced cell death in COS7 cells. These results suggested that novel Aβ-GFP fusion proteins could be utilized for studying the physiological functions of Aβ oligomers in living cells and animals, and for drug screening by analyzing Aβ toxicity. PMID:26982553

  5. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific of the postfusion conformation of the Pneumovirinae fusion (F) protein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura; Olmedillas, Eduardo; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C; Luque, Daniel; Palomo, Concepción; Melero, José A

    2015-11-01

    Paramyxovirus entry into cells requires fusion of the viral and cell membranes mediated by one of the major virus glycoproteins, the fusion (F) glycoprotein which transits from a metastable pre-fusion conformation to a highly stable post-fusion structure during the membrane fusion process. F protein refolding involves large conformational changes of the protein trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) from each protomer into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of the Pneumovirinae F proteins, and as extension of previous work (Palomo et al., 2014), a general strategy was designed to obtain polyclonal and particularly monoclonal antibodies specific of the 6HB motif of the Pneumovirinae fusion protein. The antibodies reported here should assist in the characterization of the structural changes that the F protein of human metapneumovirus or respiratory syncytial virus experiences during the process of membrane fusion. PMID:26275682

  6. Revealing Surface Waters on an Antifreeze Protein by Fusion Protein Crystallography Combined with Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tianjun; Gauthier, Sherry Y; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2015-10-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) adsorb to ice through an extensive, flat, relatively hydrophobic surface. It has been suggested that this ice-binding site (IBS) organizes surface waters into an ice-like clathrate arrangement that matches and fuses to the quasi-liquid layer on the ice surface. On cooling, these waters join the ice lattice and freeze the AFP to its ligand. Evidence for the generality of this binding mechanism is limited because AFPs tend to crystallize with their IBS as a preferred protein-protein contact surface, which displaces some bound waters. Type III AFP is a 7 kDa globular protein with an IBS made up two adjacent surfaces. In the crystal structure of the most active isoform (QAE1), the part of the IBS that docks to the primary prism plane of ice is partially exposed to solvent and has clathrate waters present that match this plane of ice. The adjacent IBS, which matches the pyramidal plane of ice, is involved in protein-protein crystal contacts with few surface waters. Here we have changed the protein-protein contacts in the ice-binding region by crystallizing a fusion of QAE1 to maltose-binding protein. In this 1.9 Å structure, the IBS that fits the pyramidal plane of ice is exposed to solvent. By combining crystallography data with MD simulations, the surface waters on both sides of the IBS were revealed and match well with the target ice planes. The waters on the pyramidal plane IBS were loosely constrained, which might explain why other isoforms of type III AFP that lack the prism plane IBS are less active than QAE1. The AFP fusion crystallization method can potentially be used to force the exposure to solvent of the IBS on other AFPs to reveal the locations of key surface waters.

  7. Protein binding of fentanyl and its metabolite nor-fentanyl in human plasma, albumin and α-1 acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bista, Sudeep Raj; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Lobb, Michael; Tapuni, Angela; Norris, Ross

    2015-03-01

    1.Fentanyl is a highly lipophilic opioid commonly used to treat cancer pain. Plasma protein binding (PPB) of fentanyl in human plasma is reported as 80-85%, however it is unclear whether fentanyl binds primarily to albumin (ALB) or α-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) and no studies have been conducted on the metabolite, nor-fentanyl. Fentanyl is also known to bind to plasticware and ultrafiltration (UF) devices which impacts adversely on binding experiments. 2.PPB of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to ALB and AAG in isotonic phosphate buffer solution and seeded human plasma was quantified. PPB was also performed in plasma samples obtained from cancer patients receiving transdermal fentanyl. The adsorption of fentanyl and nor-fentanyl to UF devices and plasticware commonly used in PPB studies was also assessed. 3.Fentanyl was shown to bind primarily to ALB as opposed to AAG, with nor-fentanyl exhibiting negligible binding to plasma proteins. Total PPB of fentanyl was 86-89% in seeded human plasma. PPB in 56 cancer patient samples was 95.1 ± 3.52% for fentanyl and 32.4 ± 21.9% for nor-fentanyl. 4.UF was shown to be a reliable and convenient method for PPB studies, thereby removing the need for complex testing for adsorption of the drug to plasticware during UF.

  8. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) can replace patient serum as a protein source in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) program.

    PubMed

    Benadiva, C A; Kuczynski-Brown, B; Maguire, T G; Mastoianni, L; Flickinger, G L

    1989-06-01

    Alternate protein sources have been suggested to replace the commonly used cord or patient serum for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures. During an 11-month period 127 patients treated for in vitro fertilization had either their serum (N = 71) or bovine serum albumin (BSA; N = 56) used as the protein source in the insemination and growth media. Ham's F-10 + 0.5% BSA was used for sperm swim-up and insemination media and 1% BSA was used for the growth media. Patient's serum was added to Ham's F-10 culture media at concentrations of 7.5 and 15% for insemination and growth, respectively. Embryo transfer was performed with Ham's F-10 containing 90% maternal serum in both groups. Fertilization rate of 259 oocytes inseminated in medium containing patient's serum did not differ when compared with 200 oocytes inseminated in medium containing BSA. Likewise, rates of abnormal fertilization, cleavage, and pregnancy were similar in both groups. In a second experiment, 148 normally fertilized oocytes were transferred after 24 hr in culture to growth media containing two different concentrations of BSA (0.5 or 1%). Cleavage rates for the two groups were similar and the percentage of embryos developed to greater than or equal to 4 cells did not differ significantly. We conclude that a single concentration of BSA can safely be used to supplement culture media in human IVF with several practical and economical benefits.

  9. Biocompatible Size-Defined Dendrimer-Albumin Binding Protein Hybrid Materials as a Versatile Platform for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Maly, Jan; Stanek, Ondrej; Frolik, Jan; Maly, Marek; Ennen, Franka; Appelhans, Dietmar; Semeradtova, Alena; Wrobel, Dominika; Stofik, Marcel; Knapova, Tereza; Kuchar, Milan; Stastna, Lucie Cervenkova; Cermak, Jan; Sebo, Peter; Maly, Petr

    2016-04-01

    For the design of a biohybrid structure as a ligand-tailored drug delivery system (DDS), it is highly sophisticated to fabricate a DDS based on smoothly controllable conjugation steps. This article reports on the synthesis and the characterization of biohybrid conjugates based on noncovalent conjugation between a multivalent biotinylated and PEGylated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer and a tetrameric streptavidin-small protein binding scaffold. This protein binding scaffold (SA-ABDwt) possesses nM affinity toward human serum albumin (HSA). Thus, well-defined biohybrid structures, finalized by binding of one or two HSA molecules, are available at each conjugation step in a controlled molar ratio. Overall, these biohybrid assemblies can be used for (i) a controlled modification of dendrimers with the HSA molecules to increase their blood-circulation half-life and passive accumulation in tumor; (ii) rendering dendrimers a specific affinity to various ligands based on mutated ABD domain, thus replacing tedious dendrimer-antibody covalent coupling and purification procedures.

  10. Biocompatible Size-Defined Dendrimer-Albumin Binding Protein Hybrid Materials as a Versatile Platform for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Maly, Jan; Stanek, Ondrej; Frolik, Jan; Maly, Marek; Ennen, Franka; Appelhans, Dietmar; Semeradtova, Alena; Wrobel, Dominika; Stofik, Marcel; Knapova, Tereza; Kuchar, Milan; Stastna, Lucie Cervenkova; Cermak, Jan; Sebo, Peter; Maly, Petr

    2016-04-01

    For the design of a biohybrid structure as a ligand-tailored drug delivery system (DDS), it is highly sophisticated to fabricate a DDS based on smoothly controllable conjugation steps. This article reports on the synthesis and the characterization of biohybrid conjugates based on noncovalent conjugation between a multivalent biotinylated and PEGylated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer and a tetrameric streptavidin-small protein binding scaffold. This protein binding scaffold (SA-ABDwt) possesses nM affinity toward human serum albumin (HSA). Thus, well-defined biohybrid structures, finalized by binding of one or two HSA molecules, are available at each conjugation step in a controlled molar ratio. Overall, these biohybrid assemblies can be used for (i) a controlled modification of dendrimers with the HSA molecules to increase their blood-circulation half-life and passive accumulation in tumor; (ii) rendering dendrimers a specific affinity to various ligands based on mutated ABD domain, thus replacing tedious dendrimer-antibody covalent coupling and purification procedures. PMID:26748571

  11. Malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins and albumin-disulphide as useful oxidative markers in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Greilberger, J; Koidl, C; Greilberger, M; Lamprecht, M; Schroecksnadel, K; Leblhuber, F; Fuchs, D; Oettl, K

    2008-07-01

    The question arises as to whether oxidative stress has a primary role in neurodegeneration or is a secondary end-stage epiphenomenon. The aim of the present study was to determine oxidative stress parameters like malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl proteins (CP) and Albumin-disulphide (Alb-SSR) and relate these parameters to the immune parameter neopterin, folic acid and vitamin B12 as vitamins and homocysteine in patients with neuro-degenerative diseases (NDD), namely mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to an aged matched control group. MDA, CP and Alb-SSR were significantly increased in the NDD group compared to controls, but not vitamin B12, folic acid and neopterin. Significant correlations were found between CP and Alb-SSR, CP and MDA and between MDA and Alb-SSR including patients with NDD and the control group. These results support the hypothesis that oxidative damage to lipids and proteins is an important early event in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides.

  13. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides. PMID:26821345

  14. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. A capsid protein of nonenveloped Bluetongue virus exhibits membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Forzan, Mario; Wirblich, Christoph; Roy, Polly

    2004-02-17

    The outer capsid layer of Bluetongue virus, a member of the nonenveloped Reoviridae family, is composed of two proteins, a receptor-binding protein, VP2, and a second protein, VP5, which shares structural features with class I fusion proteins of enveloped viruses. In the replication cycle of Bluetongue virus VP5 acts as a membrane permeabilization protein that mediates release of viral particles from endosomal compartments into the cytoplasm. Here, we show that VP5 can also act as a fusion protein and induce syncytium formation when it is fused to a transmembrane anchor and expressed on the cell surface. Fusion activity is strictly pH-dependent and is triggered by short exposure to low pH. No cell-cell fusion is observed at neutral pH. Deletion of the first 40 amino acids, which can fold into two amphipathic helices, abolishes fusion activity. Syncytium formation by VP5 is inhibited in the presence of VP2 when it is expressed in a membrane-anchored form. The data indicate an interaction between the outer capsid protein VP2 and VP5 and show that VP5 undergoes pH-dependent conformational changes that render it capable of interacting with cellular membranes. More importantly, our data show that a membrane permeabilization protein of a nonenveloped virus can evolve into a fusion protein by the addition of an appropriate transmembrane anchor. The results strongly suggest that the mechanism of membrane permeabilization by VP5 and membrane fusion by viral fusion proteins require similar structural features and conformational changes.

  17. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  18. A Stable Prefusion Intermediate of the Alphavirus Fusion Protein Reveals Critical Features of Class II Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Claudia Sánchez-San; Sosa, Hernando

    2009-01-01

    Summary Alphaviruses infect cells via a low-pH-triggered membrane fusion reaction mediated by the class II virus fusion protein E1, an elongated molecule with three extramembrane domains (DI–III). E1 drives fusion by inserting its fusion peptide loop into the target membrane and refolding to a hairpin-like trimer in which DIII moves toward the target membrane and packs against the central trimer. Three-dimensional structures provide static pictures of prefusion and postfusion E1 but do not explain this transition. Using truncated forms of E1, we reconstituted a low-pH-dependent intermediate composed of trimers of DI/II. Unexpectedly, DI/II trimers were stable in the absence of DIII. Once formed at a low pH, DI/II trimers efficiently and specifically bound recombinant DIII through a pH-independent reaction. Even in the absence of DIII, DI/II trimers interacted to form hexagonal lattices and to cause membrane deformation and tubulation. These studies identify a prefusion intermediate in class II membrane fusion. PMID:19064260

  19. Role of protein disulfide isomerase and other thiol-reactive proteins in HIV-1 envelope protein-mediated fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ou Wu . E-mail: wou@niaid.nih.gov; Silver, Jonathan . E-mail: jsilver@nih.gov

    2006-07-05

    Cell-surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been proposed to promote disulfide bond rearrangements in HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) that accompany Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated the role of PDI in ways that have not been previously tested by downregulating PDI with siRNA and by overexpressing wild-type or variant forms of PDI in transiently and stably transfected cells. These manipulations, as well as treatment with anti-PDI antibodies, had only small effects on infection or cell fusion mediated by NL4-3 or AD8 strains of HIV-1. However, the cell-surface thiol-reactive reagent 5, 5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) had a much stronger inhibitory effect in our system, suggesting that cell-surface thiol-containing molecules other than PDI, acting alone or in concert, have a greater effect than PDI on HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion. We evaluated one such candidate, thioredoxin, a PDI family member reported to reduce a labile disulfide bond in CD4. We found that the ability of thioredoxin to reduce the disulfide bond in CD4 is enhanced in the presence of HIV-1 Env gp120 and that thioredoxin also reduces disulfide bonds in gp120 directly in the absence of CD4. We discuss the implications of these observations for identification of molecules involved in disulfide rearrangements in Env during fusion.

  20. [Preparation and the biological effect of fusion protein GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc) fusion protein as long acting GLP-1 receptor agonist].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-cheng

    2015-12-01

    GLP-1 has a variety of anti-diabetic effects. However, native GLP-1 is not suitable for treatment of diabetes due to its short half-life (t½, 2-5 min). Exendin-4 is a polypeptide isolated from lizard saliva, which can bind to GLP-1 receptor, produce physiological effects similar to GLP-1, t½ up to 2.5 h, therefore, we developed a long-lasting GLP-1 receptor agonists and GLP-1-exendin-4 fusion IgG4 Fc [GLP-1-exendin-4/ IgG4(Fc)]. We constructed the eukaryotic expression vector of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc)-pOptiVEC- TOPO by gene recombination technique and expressed the fusion protein human GLP-1-IgG4 (Fc) in CHO/DG44 cells. The fusion protein stimulated the INS-1 cells secretion of insulin, GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein in CD1 mice pharmacokinetic experiments, as well as GLP-1, exendin-4 and fusion protein did anti-diabetic effect on streptozotocin induced mice. Results demonstrated that the GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) positive CHO/DG44 clones were chosen and the media from these positive clones. Western blotting showed that one protein band was found to match well with the predicted relative molecular mass of human GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc). Insulin RIA showed that GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) dose-dependently stimulated insulin secretion from INS-1 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies in CD1 mice showed that with intraperitoneal injection (ip), the fusion protein peaked at 30 min in circulation and maintained a plateau for 200 h. Natural biological half-life of exendin-4 was (1.39 ± 0.28) h, GLP-1 in vivo t½ 4 min, indicating that fusion protein has long-lasting effects on the modulation of glucose homeostasis. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) was found to be effective in reducing the incidence of diabetes in multiple-low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, longer duration of the biological activity of the fusion protein. The biological activity was significantly higher than that of GLP-1 and exendin-4. GLP-1-exendin-4/IgG4(Fc) has good anti-diabetic activity

  1. Structure of the uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus (hPIV3) fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Paterson, Reay G.; Wen, Xiaolin; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2005-01-01

    Class I viral fusion proteins share common mechanistic and structural features but little sequence similarity. Structural insights into the protein conformational changes associated with membrane fusion are based largely on studies of the influenza virus hemagglutinin in pre- and postfusion conformations. Here, we present the crystal structure of the secreted, uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus, human parainfluenza virus 3 fusion (F) protein, a member of the class I viral fusion protein group. The secreted human parainfluenza virus 3 F forms a trimer with distinct head, neck, and stalk regions. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals a six-helix bundle associated with the postfusion form of F, suggesting that the anchor-minus ectodomain adopts a conformation largely similar to the postfusion state. The transmembrane anchor domains of F may therefore profoundly influence the folding energetics that establish and maintain a metastable, prefusion state. PMID:15964978

  2. Structure of the uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus (hPIV3) fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Hsien-Sheng; Paterson, Reay G.; Wen, Xiaolin; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    Class I viral fusion proteins share common mechanistic and structural features but little sequence similarity. Structural insights into the protein conformational changes associated with membrane fusion are based largely on studies of the influenza virus hemagglutinin in pre- and postfusion conformations. Here, we present the crystal structure of the secreted, uncleaved ectodomain of the paramyxovirus, human parainfluenza virus 3 fusion (F) protein, a member of the class I viral fusion protein group. The secreted human parainfluenza virus 3 F forms a trimer with distinct head, neck, and stalk regions. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals a six-helix bundle associated with the postfusion form of F, suggesting that the anchor-minus ectodomain adopts a conformation largely similar to the postfusion state. The transmembrane anchor domains of F may therefore profoundly influence the folding energetics that establish and maintain a metastable, prefusion state.

  3. Low protein catabolic rate and serum albumin correlate with increased mortality and abdominal complications in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Germain, M; Harlow, P; Mulhern, J; Lipkowitz, G; Braden, G

    1992-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 167 consecutive peritoneal dialysis patients with regard to serum albumin (Alb), mortality and abdominal complications. In addition, 25 patients were studied with serial measurements of urea kinetics. The patients were divided into four groups based on their dialysis index (DI) and normalized protein catabolic rate (NPCR) (Table I). 12/167 patients were identified with abdominal catastrophes. Before these complications occurred, the M Alb in this group was 2.67 + 0.24 (compared to age, sex and disease matched controls of 3.55 + .11 P < .05). Six of these patients died from abdominal complications. In the 26 patients with serial urea kinetic studies, 4/11 patients in group IV died (low NPCR and low DI) (P < .05 compared to Group I, II or III). We conclude that urea kinetic modeling is predictive of outcome in those patients with presumed poor nutrition and inadequate dialysis and that abdominal catastrophes are more common in those patients with poor nutrition. Prospective interventional studies should be designed in an attempt to improve the poor outcome in this group of patients.

  4. Synthesis of nano-bioactive glass-ceramic powders and its in vitro bioactivity study in bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabian, Nima; Jahanshahi, Mohsen; Rabiee, Sayed Mahmood

    2011-07-01

    Bioactive glasses and ceramics have proved to be able to chemically bond to living bone due to the formation of an apatite-like layer on its surface. The aim of this work was preparation and characterization of bioactive glass-ceramic by sol-gel method. Nano-bioglass-ceramic material was crushed into powder and its bioactivity was examined in vitro with respect to the ability of hydroxyapatite layer to form on the surface as a result of contact with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. The obtained nano-bioactive glass-ceramic was analyzed before and after contact with BSA solution. This study used scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to examine its morphology, crystallinity and composition. The TEM images showed that the NBG particles size were 10-40 nm. Bioactivity of nanopowder was confirmed by SEM and XRD due to the presence of a rich bone-like apatite layer. Therefore, this nano-BSA-bioglass-ceramic composite material is promising for medical applications such as bone substitutes and drug carriers.

  5. Preparation and characterization of bovine serum albumin surface-imprinted thermosensitive magnetic polymer microsphere and its application for protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangjie; Zhang, Baoliang; Li, Wei; Lei, Xingfeng; Fan, Xinlong; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Hepeng; Zhang, Qiuyu

    2014-01-15

    A novel bovine serum albumin surface-imprinted thermosensitive magnetic composite microsphere was successfully prepared by the surface grafting copolymerization method in the presence of temperature-sensitive monomer N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), functional monomer methacrylic acid (MAA) and cross-linking agent N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). The structure and component of the thermosensitive magnetic molecularly imprinted microsphere were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results of thermosensitivity, adsorption capacity, selectivity and reusability showed the formation of a thermosensitivity grafting polymer layer P(NIPAM-MAA-MBA) on the surface of Fe3O4@SiO2 and the good adsorption capacity and specific recognition for template protein. When the adsorption temperature was higher than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), shape memory effect of imprinted cavities would be more effective. In other words, it was more conducive to capture template molecules under this condition and the imprinting factor would be higher. On the other hand, when the desorption temperature was lower than LCST of PNIPAM, the decrease of shape memory effect between imprinted cavities and template molecules would facilitate the release of template molecules from the imprinted cavities. Based on this property, the adsorption and desorption of template molecules could be regulated by system temperature indirectly which benefited from the existence of thermosensitivity imprinting layer.

  6. Fusion tags for protein solubility, purification and immunogenicity in Escherichia coli: the novel Fh8 system

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia; Almeida, André; Castro, António; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-01-01

    Proteins are now widely produced in diverse microbial cell factories. The Escherichia coli is still the dominant host for recombinant protein production but, as a bacterial cell, it also has its issues: the aggregation of foreign proteins into insoluble inclusion bodies is perhaps the main limiting factor of the E. coli expression system. Conversely, E. coli benefits of cost, ease of use and scale make it essential to design new approaches directed for improved recombinant protein production in this host cell. With the aid of genetic and protein engineering novel tailored-made strategies can be designed to suit user or process requirements. Gene fusion technology has been widely used for the improvement of soluble protein production and/or purification in E. coli, and for increasing peptide’s immunogenicity as well. New fusion partners are constantly emerging and complementing the traditional solutions, as for instance, the Fh8 fusion tag that has been recently studied and ranked among the best solubility enhancer partners. In this review, we provide an overview of current strategies to improve recombinant protein production in E. coli, including the key factors for successful protein production, highlighting soluble protein production, and a comprehensive summary of the latest available and traditionally used gene fusion technologies. A special emphasis is given to the recently discovered Fh8 fusion system that can be used for soluble protein production, purification, and immunogenicity in E. coli. The number of existing fusion tags will probably increase in the next few years, and efforts should be taken to better understand how fusion tags act in E. coli. This knowledge will undoubtedly drive the development of new tailored-made tools for protein production in this bacterial system. PMID:24600443

  7. The heads of the measles virus attachment protein move to transmit the fusion-triggering signal

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K; Oezguen, Numan; Rupp, Levi; Kay, Leah; Leonard, Vincent HJ; Braun, Werner; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The measles virus entry system, constituted of attachment (hemagglutinin, H) and fusion proteins, operates based on a variety of natural and targeted receptors. However, the mechanism triggering fusion of the viral envelope with the plasma membrane is not understood. Here we tested a model considering that the two heads of an H-dimer, which are covalently linked at their base, after binding two receptor molecules, move relative to each other to transmit the fusion-triggering signal. Indeed, stabilizing the H-dimer interface by additional inter-molecular disulfide bonds prevented membrane fusion, an effect reversed by a reducing agent. Moreover, a membrane-anchored designated receptor efficiently triggered fusion, provided it engaged the H-dimer at locations proximal to where the natural receptors bind, and distal to the H-dimer interface. We discuss how receptors may force H-heads to switch partners and transmit the fusion-triggering signal. PMID:21217701

  8. The distribution and apoptotic function of outer membrane proteins depend on mitochondrial fusion

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, David; Eisner, Verónica; Liu, Xingguo; Várnai, Péter; Hunyady, László; Gross, Atan; Hajnóczky, György

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cells deficient in mitochondrial fusion have been shown to have defects linked to the exchange of innermembrane and matrix components. Because outer-mitochondrial membrane (OMM) constituents insert directly from the cytoplasm, a role for fusion in their inter-mitochondrial transfer was unanticipated. Here we show that fibroblasts lacking the GTPases responsible for OMM fusion, Mitofusins1/2 (MFN1/2), display more heterogeneous distribution of OMM proteins. Proteins with different modes of OMM association display varying degrees of heterogeneity in Mfn1/2−/− cells and different kinetics of transfer during fusion in fusion-competent cells. Pro-apoptotic Bak exhibits marked heterogeneity, which is normalized upon expression of MFN2. Bak is critical for Bid-induced OMM permeabilization and cytochrome c release and Mfn1/2−/− cells show dysregulation of Bid-dependent apoptotic signaling. Bid sensitivity of Bak-deficient mitochondria is regained upon fusion with Bak-containing mitochondria. Thus, OMM protein distribution depends on mitochondrial fusion and is a locus of apoptotic dysfunction in conditions of fusion deficiency. PMID:24813948

  9. Bacteriophage membrane protein P9 as a fusion partner for the efficient expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuna; Jung, Hyeim; Lim, Dongbin

    2015-12-01

    Despite their important roles and economic values, studies of membrane proteins have been hampered by the difficulties associated with obtaining sufficient amounts of protein. Here, we report a novel membrane protein expression system that uses the major envelope protein (P9) of phage φ6 as an N-terminal fusion partner. Phage membrane protein P9 facilitated the synthesis of target proteins and their integration into the Escherichia coli cell membrane. This system was used to produce various multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including G-protein-coupled receptors, transporters, and ion channels of human origin. Green fluorescent protein fusion was used to confirm the correct folding of the expressed proteins. Of the 14 membrane proteins tested, eight were highly expressed, three were moderately expressed, and three were barely expressed in E. coli. Seven of the eight highly expressed proteins could be purified after extraction with the mild detergent lauryldimethylamine-oxide. Although a few proteins have previously been developed as fusion partners to augment membrane protein production, we believe that the major envelope protein P9 described here is better suited to the efficient expression of eukaryotic transmembrane proteins in E. coli.

  10. Towards reconstitution of membrane fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Cipriano, Daniel J.; Diao, Jiajie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Proteoliposomes have been widely used for in vitro studies of membrane fusion mediated by synaptic proteins. Initially, such studies were made with large unsynchronized ensembles of vesicles. Such ensemble assays limited the insights into the SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism that could be obtained from them. Single particle microscopy experiments can alleviate many of these limitations but they pose significant technical challenges. Here we summarize various approaches that have enabled studies of fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins at a single-particle level. Currently available methods are described and their advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:25788028

  11. Real-Time Trapping of Intact Singly-Charged Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins with a Big Frequency-Adjusted Quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hideya; Whitten, William B; Reilly, Pete

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution real-time particle mass measurements have not been achievable because the enormous amount of kinetic energy imparted to the particles upon expansion into vacuum competes with and overwhelms the forces applied to the charged particles within the mass spectrometer. It is possible to reduce the kinetic energy of a collimated particulate ion beam through collisions with a buffer gas while radially constraining their motion using a quadrupole guide or trap over a limited mass range. Controlling the pressure drop of the final expansion into a quadrupole trap permits a much broader mass range at the cost of sacrificing collimation. To achieve high-resolution mass analysis of massive particulate ions, an efficient trap with a large tolerance for radial divergence of the injected ions was developed that permits trapping a large range of ions for on-demand injection into an awaiting mass analyzer. The design specifications required that frequency of the trapping potential be adjustable to cover a large mass range and the trap radius be increased to increase the tolerance to divergent ion injection. The large-radius linear quadrupole ion trap was demonstrated by trapping singly-charged bovine serum albumin ions for on-demand injection into a mass analyzer. Additionally, this work demonstrates the ability to measure an electrophoretic mobility cross section (or ion mobility) of singly-charged intact proteins in the low-pressure regime. This work represents a large step toward the goal of high-resolution analysis of intact proteins, RNA, DNA, and viruses.

  12. Purification of inclusion body-forming peptides and proteins in soluble form by fusion to Escherichia coli thermostable proteins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Arjun; Shahnawaz, Md; Karki, Pratap; Raj Dahal, Giri; Sharoar, Md Golam; Yub Shin, Song; Sup Lee, Jung; Cho, Byungyun; Park, Il-Seon

    2008-05-01

    Proteins and peptides expressed in the prokaryotic system often form inclusion bodies. Solubilization and refolding procedures can be used for their recovery, but this process remains difficult. One strategy for improving the solubility of a protein of interest is to fuse it to a highly soluble protein. To select a suitable fusion partner capable of solubilizing the aggregation-prone (inclusion body-forming) proteins and peptides, Escherichia coli thermostable proteins were identified and tested. Among them, trigger factor (TF) protein was selected because of its high expression and stability. Using an expression system based on fusion to TF, selected proteins and peptides that otherwise form inclusion bodies were expressed in soluble state and were purified like other soluble proteins. This system provides a convenient method for production of aggregation-prone proteins and peptides. PMID:18476832

  13. Polymeric human Fc-fusion proteins with modified effector functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhaiel, David N. A.; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Andersen, Jan Terje; Shi, Jianguo; El-Faham, Marwa; Doenhoff, Michael; McIntosh, Richard S.; Sandlie, Inger; He, Jianfeng; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng; Pleass, Richard J.

    2011-10-01

    The success of Fc-fusion bio-therapeutics has spurred the development of other Fc-fusion products for treating and/or vaccinating against a range of diseases. We describe a method to modulate their function by converting them into well-defined stable polymers. This strategy resulted in cylindrical hexameric structures revealed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polymeric Fc-fusions were significantly less immunogenic than their dimeric or monomeric counterparts, a result partly owing to their reduced ability to interact with critical Fc-receptors. However, in the absence of the fusion partner, polymeric IgG1-Fc molecules were capable of binding selectively to FcγRs, with significantly increased affinity owing to their increased valency, suggesting that these reagents may prove of immediate utility in the development of well-defined replacements for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Overall, these findings establish an effective IgG Fc-fusion based polymeric platform with which the therapeutic and vaccination applications of Fc-fusion immune-complexes can now be explored.

  14. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  15. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-01

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell-cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459-567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell-cell fusion). PMID:25804638

  16. Mitochondrial Fusion and ERK Activity Regulate Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein Localization in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J.; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR. PMID:24945345

  17. Targeted expression, purification, and cleavage of fusion proteins from inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Peter M; Pan, Jonathan S; Sykes, Brian D

    2014-01-21

    Today, proteins are typically overexpressed using solubility-enhancing fusion tags that allow for affinity chromatographic purification and subsequent removal by site-specific protease cleavage. In this review, we present an alternative approach to protein production using fusion partners specifically designed to accumulate in insoluble inclusion bodies. The strategy is appropriate for the mass production of short peptides, intrinsically disordered proteins, and proteins that can be efficiently refolded in vitro. There are many fusion protein systems now available for insoluble expression: TrpLE, ketosteroid isomerase, PurF, and PagP, for example. The ideal fusion partner is effective at directing a wide variety of target proteins into inclusion bodies, accumulates in large quantities in a highly pure form, and is readily solubilized and purified in commonly used denaturants. Fusion partner removal under denaturing conditions is biochemically challenging, requiring harsh conditions (e.g., cyanogen bromide in 70% formic acid) that can result in unwanted protein modifications. Recent advances in metal ion-catalyzed peptide bond cleavage allow for more mild conditions, and some methods involving nickel or palladium will likely soon appear in more biological applications.

  18. Enhanced protein expression in the baculovirus/insect cell system using engineered SUMO fusions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Spurrier, Joshua; Butt, Tauseef R; Strickler, James E

    2008-11-01

    Recombinant protein expression in insect cells varies greatly from protein to protein. A fusion tag that is not only a tool for detection and purification, but also enhances expression and/or solubility would greatly facilitate both structure/function studies and therapeutic protein production. We have shown that fusion of SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) to several test proteins leads to enhanced expression levels in Escherichia coli. In eukaryotic expression systems, however, the SUMO tag could be cleaved by endogenous desumoylase. In order to adapt SUMO-fusion technology to these systems, we have developed an alternative SUMO-derived tag, designated SUMOstar, which is not processed by native SUMO proteases. In the present study, we tested the SUMOstar tag in a baculovirus/insect cell system with several proteins, i.e. mouse UBP43, human tryptase beta II, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Our results demonstrate that fusion to SUMOstar enhanced protein expression levels at least 4-fold compared to either the native or His(6)-tagged proteins. We isolated active SUMOstar tagged UBP43, USP4, USP15, and GFP. Tryptase was active following cleavage with a SUMOstar specific protease. The SUMOstar system will make significant impact in difficult-to-express proteins and especially to those proteins that require the native N-terminal residue for function.

  19. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  20. Continuous Flow Separation of Hydrophobin Fusion Proteins from Plant Cell Culture Extract.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Lauri J; Conley, Andrew J; Joensuu, Jussi J

    2016-01-01

    Fusion to fungal hydrophobins has proven to be a useful tool to enhance accumulation and recovery of recombinant proteins in plants. Aqueous two-phase separation (ATPS) is an attractive system to capture hydrophobin fusion proteins from plant extracts. The process can simultaneously purify and concentrate target protein with minimal background. ATPS avoids the use of chromatographic column steps, can be carried out in a short time frame, and is amenable to industrial-scale protein purification. A drawback of performing ATPS in large volumes is the lengthy time required for phase separation; however, this can be avoided by incorporating continuous systems, which are often preferred by the processing industry. This method chapter illustrates the capture of GFP-HFBI hydrophobin fusion protein from BY-2 plant cell suspension extract using a semi-continuous ATPS method. PMID:26614291

  1. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  2. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis. PMID:27031510

  3. Expression of Leukemia-Associated Nup98 Fusion Proteins Generates an Aberrant Nuclear Envelope Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Martinelli, Valérie; Nilles, Nadine; Fruhmann, Gernot; Chatel, Guillaume; Juge, Sabine; Sauder, Ursula; Di Giacomo, Danika; Mecucci, Cristina; Schwaller, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the nucleoporin NUP98 have been described in several hematopoietic malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the resulting chimeric proteins, Nup98's N-terminal region is fused to the C-terminal region of about 30 different partners, including homeodomain (HD) transcription factors. While transcriptional targets of distinct Nup98 chimeras related to immortalization are relatively well described, little is known about other potential cellular effects of these fusion proteins. By comparing the sub-nuclear localization of a large number of Nup98 fusions with HD and non-HD partners throughout the cell cycle we found that while all Nup98 chimeras were nuclear during interphase, only Nup98-HD fusion proteins exhibited a characteristic speckled appearance. During mitosis, only Nup98-HD fusions were concentrated on chromosomes. Despite the difference in localization, all tested Nup98 chimera provoked morphological alterations in the nuclear envelope (NE), in particular affecting the nuclear lamina and the lamina-associated polypeptide 2α (LAP2α). Importantly, such aberrations were not only observed in transiently transfected HeLa cells but also in mouse bone marrow cells immortalized by Nup98 fusions and in cells derived from leukemia patients harboring Nup98 fusions. Our findings unravel Nup98 fusion-associated NE alterations that may contribute to leukemogenesis.

  4. Cellular localization and trafficking of vascular adhesion protein-1 as revealed by an N-terminal GFP fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Weston, Chris J; Shepherd, Emma L; Adams, David H

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) have greatly advanced our understanding of the important role this protein plays in the establishment and progression of inflammatory disease. To facilitate more detailed studies on the function of VAP-1, we developed a GFP-fusion protein that enabled us to monitor the trafficking of the protein in three selected cell types: hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells, liver myofibroblasts and an hepatic stellate cell line (LX-2). The fusion protein was detected as punctate cytoplasmic GFP staining, but was present only at low levels at the cell surface in all cell types studied. The subcellular distribution of the protein was not altered in a catalytically inactive mutant form of the protein (Tyr471Phe) or in the presence of exogenous VAP-1 substrate (methylamine) or inhibitor (semicarbazide). The GFP-VAP-1 protein was localized to the Golgi apparatus (GM-130), endoplasmic reticulum (GRP94) and early endosomes (EEA-1). Additional staining for VAP-1 revealed that the overexpressed protein was also present in vesicles that were negative for GFP fluorescent signal and did not express EEA-1. We propose that these vesicles are responsible for recycling the fusion protein and that the fluorescence of the GFP moiety is quenched at the low pH within these vesicles. This feature of the protein makes it well suited for live cell imaging studies where we wish to track protein that is being actively trafficked within the cell in preference to that which is being recycled.

  5. Purification of CD47-streptavidin fusion protein from bacterial lysate using biotin-agarose affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Nasrin; Peng, Ching-An

    2016-07-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed transmembrane glycoprotein that modulates the activity of a plethora of immune cells via its extracellular domain. Therefore, CD47 plays important roles in the regulation of immune responses and may serve as targets for the development of immunotherapeutic agents. To make sure CD47 functionality is intact under the process of protein conjugation, CD47-streptavidin fusion protein was expressed and purified because it can easily bind to biotin-tagged materials via the unique biotin-streptavidin affinity. In this study, gene sequences of CD47 extracellular domain (CD47ECD) and core streptavidin (coreSA) with a total 834 bp were inserted into pET20b plasmid to construct recombinant plasmid encoding CD47-SA fusion gene. After bacteria transformation, the CD47-SA fusion protein was expressed by isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction. The collected bacteria lysate was loaded on biotinylated agarose to proceed the purification of CD47-SA fusion protein. Due to the unexpected high affinity between biotin and coreSA, standard washing and elution approaches (e.g., varying pH, using biotin, and applying guanidine hydrochloride) reported for biotin-streptavidin affinity chromatography were not able to separate the target fusion protein. Instead, using low concentration of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 followed with alkaline buffer could efficiently weaken the binding between biotin and coreSA, thereby eluting out CD47-SA fusion protein from the biotin agarose column. The purified CD47-SA fusion protein was further characterized by molecular biology methods and its antiphagocytic functionality was confirmed by the phagocytosis assay. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:949-958, 2016. PMID:27110670

  6. Antibody-independent Targeted Quantification of TMPRSS2-ERG Fusion Protein Products in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jintang; Sun, Xuefei; Shi, Tujin; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Xie, Fang; Zhao, Rui; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Yang, Feng; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Chae, Sung Suk; Rubin, Mark; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Kagan, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.

    2014-10-01

    Fusions between the transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and ETS related gene (ERG) represent one of the most specific biomarkers that define a distinct molecular subtype of prostate cancer. The studies on TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions have seldom been performed at the protein level, primarily due to the lack of high-quality antibodies or an antibody-independent method that is sufficiently sensitive for detecting the truncated ERG protein products resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions and alternative splicing. Herein, we applied a recently developed PRISM (high-pressure high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing)-SRM (selected reaction monitoring) strategy for quantifying ERG protein in prostate cancer cell lines and tumors. The highly sensitive PRISM-SRM assays led to confident detection of 6 unique ERG peptides in either the TMPRSS2-ERG positive cell lines or tissues but not in the negative controls, indicating that ERG protein expression is highly correlated with TMPRSS2-ERG gene rearrangements. Significantly, our results demonstrated for the first time that at least two groups of ERG protein isoforms were simultaneously expressed at variable levels in TMPRSS2-ERG positive samples as evidenced by concomitant detection of two mutually exclusive peptides. Three peptides shared across almost all fusion protein products were determined to be the most abundant peptides, and hence can be used as “signature” peptides for detecting ERG overexpression resulting from TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion. These PRISM-SRM assays provide valuable tools for studying TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion protein products, thus improving our understanding of the role of TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion in the biology of prostate cancer.

  7. The cowpox virus fusion regulator proteins SPI-3 and hemagglutinin interact in infected and uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Turner, Peter C; Moyer, Richard W

    2006-03-30

    The serpin SPI-3 and the hemagglutinin (HA) encoded by cowpox virus (CPV) block cell-cell fusion, and colocalize at the cell surface. wtCPV does not fuse cells, but inactivation of either gene leads to fusion. SPI-3 mAb added to wtCPV-infected cells caused fusion, confirming that SPI-3 protein at the cell surface prevents fusion. The SPI-3 mAb epitope mapped to an 85-amino acid region at the C-terminus. Removal of either 44 residues from the SPI-3 C-terminus or 48 residues following the N-terminal signal sequence resulted in fusion. Interaction between SPI-3 and HA proteins in infected cells was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. SPI-3/HA was not associated with the A27L "fusion" protein. SPI-3 and HA were able to associate in uninfected cells in the absence of other viral proteins. The HA-binding domain in SPI-3 resided in the C-terminal 229 residues, and did not include helix D, which mediates cofactor interaction in many other serpins.

  8. Fusions involving protein kinase C and membrane-associated proteins in benign fibrous histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Płaszczyca, Anna; Nilsson, Jenny; Magnusson, Linda; Brosjö, Otte; Larsson, Olle; Vult von Steyern, Fredrik; Domanski, Henryk A; Lilljebjörn, Henrik; Fioretos, Thoas; Tayebwa, Johnbosco; Mandahl, Nils; Nord, Karolin H; Mertens, Fredrik

    2014-08-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a mesenchymal tumor that most often occurs in the skin (so-called dermatofibroma), but may also appear in soft tissues (so-called deep BFH) and in the skeleton (so-called non-ossifying fibroma). The origin of BFH is unknown, and it has been questioned whether it is a true neoplasm. Chromosome banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, RNA sequencing, RT-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to search for recurrent somatic mutations in a series of BFH. BFHs were found to harbor recurrent fusions of genes encoding membrane-associated proteins (podoplanin, CD63 and LAMTOR1) with genes encoding protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms PRKCB and PRKCD. PKCs are serine-threonine kinases that through their many phosphorylation targets are implicated in a variety of cellular processes, as well as tumor development. When inactive, the amino-terminal, regulatory domain of PKCs suppresses the activity of their catalytic domain. Upon activation, which requires several steps, they typically translocate to cell membranes, where they interact with different signaling pathways. The detected PDPN-PRKCB, CD63-PRKCD and LAMTOR1-PRKCD gene fusions are all predicted to result in chimeric proteins consisting of the membrane-binding part of PDPN, CD63 or LAMTOR1 and the entire catalytic domain of the PKC. This novel pathogenetic mechanism should result in constitutive kinase activity at an ectopic location. The results show that BFH indeed is a true neoplasm, and that distorted PKC activity is essential for tumorigenesis. The findings also provide means to differentiate BFH from other skin and soft tissue tumors. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Rare cancers.

  9. Three-month variation of plasma pentraxin 3 compared with C-reactive protein, albumin and homocysteine levels in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Bodil; Snaedal, Sunna; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Heimbürger, Olof; Bárány, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory markers vary considerably over time in haemodialysis (HD) patients, yet the variability is poorly defined. The aim of the study was to assess changes of plasma levels of pentraxin-3 (PTX-3), C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin and homocysteine (Hcy) over 3 months and the association between the changes in these biomarkers and mortality. Methods In 188 prevalent HD patients, inflammatory markers were measured at inclusion and after 3 months. Mortality was recorded during a median follow-up of 41 months. The changes of the biomarker levels were categorized according to change in tertile for the specific biomarker. The variation was calculated as the intra-class correlation (ICC). Mortality was analysed by Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards model. The predictive strength was calculated for single measurements and for the variation of each inflammatory marker. Results The intra-individual variation (low ICC) was largest for PTX-3 [ICC 0.44; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33–0.55], albumin (ICC 0.58; 95% CI: 0.49–0.67) and CRP (ICC 0.59; 95% CI: 0.51–0.68) and lowest for Hcy (ICC 0.81; 95% CI: 0.77–0.86). During follow-up, 88 patients died. Conclusions PTX-3 measurements are less stable and show higher variation within patients than CRP, albumin and Hcy. Persistently elevated PTX-3 levels are associated with high mortality. Moreover, in multivariate logistic regression we found that stable high PTX-3 adds to the mortality risk, even after inclusion of clinical factors and the three other biomarkers. The associations of decreasing albumin levels as well as low Hcy levels with worse outcome reflect protein-energy wasting. PMID:25852911

  10. Alternatives to freeze-drying for the removal of ethanol from plasma proteins. II. Gel filtration of albumin.

    PubMed

    Dickson, A J; Smith, J K

    1975-01-01

    Removal of ethanol from highly concentrated solutions of human albumin (Cohn fraction V) by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 is hindered by the contraction of the gel in ethanolic solution, by incomplete retardation of ethanol compared with other low MW solutes, and by restricted diffusion of ethanol from the albumin zone. Despite these obstacles, the hourly capacity of such gel filtration columns, for approximately 100-fold reduction of ethanol concentration, may exceed 0.06 kg albumin per litre of column volume. The gel can be used safely at 5 degrees C for several years. The ethanol content of the final product is higher than that achieved by vacuum distillation, and it may be desirable to operate the two techniques sequentially.

  11. A Betabaculovirus-Encoded gp64 Homolog Codes for a Functional Envelope Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel M. P.; Melo, Fernando L.; Clem, Rollie J.; Wolff, José L. C.

    2015-01-01

    The GP64 envelope fusion protein is a hallmark of group I alphabaculoviruses. However, the Diatraea saccharalis granulovirus genome sequence revealed the first betabaculovirus species harboring a gp64 homolog (disa118). In this work, we have shown that this homolog encodes a functional envelope fusion protein and could enable the infection and fusogenic abilities of a gp64-null prototype baculovirus. Therefore, GP64 may complement or may be in the process of replacing F protein activity in this virus lineage. PMID:26537678

  12. Synaptic proteins promote calcium-triggered fast transition from point contact to full fusion

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jiajie; Grob, Patricia; Cipriano, Daniel J; Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Shah, Sachi; Nguyen, Amie; Padolina, Mark; Srivastava, Ankita; Vrljic, Marija; Shah, Ankita; Nogales, Eva; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-01-01

    The molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle fusion for fast neurotransmitter release are still unclear. Here, we used a single vesicle–vesicle system with reconstituted SNARE and synaptotagmin-1 proteoliposomes to decipher the temporal sequence of membrane states upon Ca2+-injection at 250–500 μM on a 100-ms timescale. Furthermore, detailed membrane morphologies were imaged with cryo-electron microscopy before and after Ca2+-injection. We discovered a heterogeneous network of immediate and delayed fusion pathways. Remarkably, all instances of Ca2+-triggered immediate fusion started from a membrane–membrane point-contact and proceeded to complete fusion without discernible hemifusion intermediates. In contrast, pathways that involved a stable hemifusion diaphragm only resulted in fusion after many seconds, if at all. When complexin was included, the Ca2+-triggered fusion network shifted towards the immediate pathway, effectively synchronizing fusion, especially at lower Ca2+-concentration. Synaptic proteins may have evolved to select this immediate pathway out of a heterogeneous network of possible membrane fusion pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00109.001 PMID:23240085

  13. Synaptic proteins promote calcium-triggered fast transition from point contact to full fusion.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jiajie; Grob, Patricia; Cipriano, Daniel J; Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Shah, Sachi; Nguyen, Amie; Padolina, Mark; Srivastava, Ankita; Vrljic, Marija; Shah, Ankita; Nogales, Eva; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T

    2012-12-13

    The molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle fusion for fast neurotransmitter release are still unclear. Here, we used a single vesicle-vesicle system with reconstituted SNARE and synaptotagmin-1 proteoliposomes to decipher the temporal sequence of membrane states upon Ca(2+)-injection at 250-500 μM on a 100-ms timescale. Furthermore, detailed membrane morphologies were imaged with cryo-electron microscopy before and after Ca(2+)-injection. We discovered a heterogeneous network of immediate and delayed fusion pathways. Remarkably, all instances of Ca(2+)-triggered immediate fusion started from a membrane-membrane point-contact and proceeded to complete fusion without discernible hemifusion intermediates. In contrast, pathways that involved a stable hemifusion diaphragm only resulted in fusion after many seconds, if at all. When complexin was included, the Ca(2+)-triggered fusion network shifted towards the immediate pathway, effectively synchronizing fusion, especially at lower Ca(2+)-concentration. Synaptic proteins may have evolved to select this immediate pathway out of a heterogeneous network of possible membrane fusion pathways.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00109.001.

  14. Tandem SUMO fusion vectors for improving soluble protein expression and purification.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Fernando; Ciragan, Annika; Iwaï, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Availability of highly purified proteins in quantity is crucial for detailed biochemical and structural investigations. Fusion tags are versatile tools to facilitate efficient protein purification and to improve soluble overexpression of proteins. Various purification and fusion tags have been widely used for overexpression in Escherichia coli. However, these tags might interfere with biological functions and/or structural investigations of the protein of interest. Therefore, an additional purification step to remove fusion tags by proteolytic digestion might be required. Here, we describe a set of new vectors in which yeast SUMO (SMT3) was used as the highly specific recognition sequence of ubiquitin-like protease 1, together with other commonly used solubility enhancing proteins, such as glutathione S-transferase, maltose binding protein, thioredoxin and trigger factor for optimizing soluble expression of protein of interest. This tandem SUMO (T-SUMO) fusion system was tested for soluble expression of the C-terminal domain of TonB from different organisms and for the antiviral protein scytovirin.

  15. Beyond anchoring: the expanding role of the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Culler, Megan R; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    While work with viral fusion proteins has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain (TMD) can affect protein folding, stability, and membrane fusion promotion, the mechanism(s) remains poorly understood. TMDs could play a role in fusion promotion through direct TMD-TMD interactions, and we have recently shown that isolated TMDs from three paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins interact as trimers using sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analysis (E. C. Smith, et al., submitted for publication). Immediately N-terminal to the TMD is heptad repeat B (HRB), which plays critical roles in fusion. Interestingly, addition of HRB decreased the stability of the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions. This result, combined with previous findings that HRB forms a trimeric coiled coil in the prefusion form of the whole protein though HRB peptides fail to stably associate in isolation, suggests that the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions work in concert with elements in the F ectodomain head to stabilize a weak HRB interaction. Thus, changes in TMD-TMD interactions could be important in regulating F triggering and refolding. Alanine insertions between the TMD and HRB demonstrated that spacing between these two regions is important for protein stability while not affecting TMD-TMD interactions. Additional mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the TMD suggests that β-branched residues within the TMD play a role in membrane fusion, potentially through modulation of TMD-TMD interactions. Our results support a model whereby the C-terminal end of the Hendra virus F TMD is an important regulator of TMD-TMD interactions and show that these interactions help hold HRB in place prior to the triggering of membrane fusion.

  16. [The actions of nucleating proteins in vesicle aggregation and fusion: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Zhang, Y; Cai, D

    1997-03-01

    After investigation of the effects of Con A-binding proteins, the major biliary pronucleating effectors system on the figures and lipid composition of model biliary vesicles, the authors found that Con A-binding proteins accelerate aggregation and fusion of vesicles as a result of increased vesicular cholesterol and decreased vesicular phospholipids as well as cholesterol-saturated vesicles. We also found that vesicular proteins though in small quantity are potent in pronucleating effects. The distribution of several known nucleating proteins between the vesicles and micelles is quite different, and there are higher content and more potent pronucleating effectors in patients with cholesterol gallstone than those with pigment stone. By affinity staining method, con A-binding proteins were shown in native biliary vesicles as lipid-protein complex. These results suggest that the existence and changes in their quantity and quality of vesicular nucleating proteins play an important role in vesicle aggregation and fusion.

  17. Construction and evaluation of novel fusion proteins for targeted delivery of micro particles to cellulose surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, William; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Windust, John; Bushell, Donna; Parry, Neil

    2006-07-01

    The use of IgG antibodies and fragments has been limited to specific sectors of the biotechnology industry due to the high cost of producing large batches of product necessary for alternative applications. A novel class of Camelid antibodies, known as V(HH) offer a more economical opportunity to meet a wider application in industry. In this study, we report the evaluation of four llama V(HH)-cellulose binding domain fusion proteins displaying varying formats of V(HH) and CBD domains. Proteins were characterized in a targeted particle delivery system as a method of delivering agents such as perfume to laundry in the wash cycle. Fusion proteins were shown to be stable at high pH and in the presence of a detergent base. They were also shown to bind effectively to both the designated antigen, the azo-dye reactive-red 6 (either conjugated to BSA or attached to coacervate microparticles), and cellulose. Binding strength differences were observed between the different fusion protein formats using surface plasmon resonance. The effect of key laundry ingredients was also studied. Combining the fusion proteins and particles into a delivery and deposition study generated clear microscopy evidence for bifunctionality. Confirmation of this was validated by GC-MS analysis of retained fragrance. This research, reporting the construction and characterization of a variety of fusion proteins, illustrates that the single multidomain fusion protein route offers a new technology for successful targeted delivery of encapsulated benefit agents. Furthermore, the potential to modify or select for proteins to recognize a wide range of surfaces is also possible.

  18. Analysis of drug-protein interactions by high-performance affinity chromatography: interactions of sulfonylurea drugs with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Hoy, Krina S; Hage, David S

    2015-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) is a type of liquid chromatography that has seen growing use as a tool for the study of drug-protein interactions. This report describes how HPAC can be used to provide information on the number of binding sites, equilibrium constants, and changes in binding that can occur during drug-protein interactions. This approach will be illustrated through recent data that have been obtained by HPAC for the binding of sulfonylurea drugs and other solutes to the protein human serum albumin (HSA), and especially to forms of this protein that have been modified by non-enzymatic glycation. The theory and use of both frontal analysis and zonal elution competition studies in such work will be discussed. Various practical aspects of these experiments will be presented, as well as factors to consider in the extension of these methods to other drugs and proteins or additional types of biological interactions. PMID:25749961

  19. Photooxidation of Tryptophan and Tyrosine Residues in Human Serum Albumin Sensitized by Pterin: A Model for Globular Protein Photodamage in Skin.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lara O; Roman, Ernesto A; Thomas, Andrés H; Dántola, M Laura

    2016-08-30

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the circulatory system. Oxidized albumin was identified in the skin of patients suffering from vitiligo, a depigmentation disorder in which the protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation fails because of the lack of melanin. Oxidized pterins, efficient photosensitizers under UV-A irradiation, accumulate in the skin affected by vitiligo. In this work, we have investigated the ability of pterin (Ptr), the parent compound of oxidized pterins, to induce structural and chemical changes in HSA under UV-A irradiation. Our results showed that Ptr is able to photoinduce oxidation of the protein in at least two amino acid residues: tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr). HSA undergoes oligomerization, yielding protein structures whose molecular weight increases with irradiation time. The protein cross-linking, due to the formation of dimers of Tyr, does not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. Trp is consumed in the photosensitized process, and N-formylkynurenine was identified as one of its oxidation products. The photosensitization of HSA takes place via a purely dynamic process, which involves the triplet excited state of Ptr. The results presented in this work suggest that protein photodamage mediated by endogenous photosensitizers can significantly contribute to the harmful effects of UV-A radiation on the human skin. PMID:27500308

  20. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  1. Inhibition of angiogenesis by a synthetic fusion protein VTF derived from vasostatin and tumstatin.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quliang; Sun, Cihuang; Luo, Jinxian; Zhang, Tianyuan; Wang, Lijing

    2014-10-01

    The inhibition of angiogenesis represents a potential strategy for antitumor therapy. A novel synthetic fusion protein VTF, composed of bioactive fragments from two different angiogenesis inhibitors, vasostatin and tumstatin with a (Gly-Ser-Gly)2 bridge, was generated using the pET-15b expression vector. The fusion protein VTF showed significantly enhanced efficacy in inhibiting human endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation and neovascularization on chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Moreover, VTF suppressed the growth of B16 melanoma and the formation of tumor blood vessels potently in vivo. These results indicated that the fusion protein containing the bioactive fragments of multiple angiogenesis inhibitors might be a promising therapeutic agent for tumor treatment. PMID:24942148

  2. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: II. In vivo wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Soller, Eric C.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Hoffman, Grant T.; Edward, Deepak

    2004-07-01

    Our Scaffold-Enhanced Biological Adhesive (SEBA) system was investigated as an alternative to sutures or adhesives alone for repair of wounds. Two scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biologic material, small intestinal submucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. Two adhesive materials were also investigated: (i) a biologic adhesive composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser; and (ii) Ethicon"s Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength and time-to-failure of skin incisions repaired in vivo in a rat model were measured at seven days postoperative. Incisions closed by protein solder alone, by Dermabond alone, or by suture, were also tested for comparison. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the SEBA system were 50% to 65% stronger than repairs formed by suture or either adhesive alone, with significantly less variations within each experimental group (average standard deviations of 15% for SEBA versus 38% for suture and 28% for adhesive alone). In addition, the time-to-failure curves showed a longevity not previously seen with the suture or adhesive alone techniques. The SEBA system acts to keep the dermis in tight apposition during the critical early phase of wound healing when tissue gaps are bridged by scar and granulation tissue. It has the property of being more flexible than either of the adhesives alone and may allow the apposed edges to move in conjunction with each other as a unit for a longer period of time and over a greater range of stresses than adhesives alone. This permits more rapid healing and establishment of integrity since the microgaps between the dermis edges are significantly reduced. By the time the scaffolds are sloughed from the wound site, there is greater strength and healing than that produced by adhesive alone or

  3. Production of bifunctional single-chain antibody-based fusion proteins in Pichia pastoris supernatants.

    PubMed

    Panjideh, Hossein; Coelho, Vânia; Dernedde, Jens; Fuchs, Hendrik; Keilholz, Ulrich; Thiel, Eckhard; Deckert, P Markus

    2008-10-01

    Recombinant antibody fusion constructs with heterologous functional domains are a promising approach to new therapeutic targeting strategies. However, expression of such constructs is mostly limited to cost and labor-intensive mammalian expression systems. Here we report on the employment of Pichia pastoris for the expression of heterologous antibody fusion constructs with green fluorescent protein, A33scFv::GFP, or with cytosine deaminase, A33scFv::CDy, their production in a biofermenter and a modified purification strategy. Combined, these approaches improved production yields by about thirty times over established standard protocols, with extracellular secretion of the fusion construct reaching 12.0 mg/l. Bifunctional activity of the fusion proteins was demonstrated by flow cytometry and an in-vitro cytotoxicity assay. With equal amounts of purified protein, the modified purification method lead to higher functional results. Our results demonstrate the suitability of methylotrophic Pichia expression systems and laboratory-scale bioreactors for the production of high quantities of bifunctionally active heterologous single-chain fusion proteins.

  4. In vivo immobilization of fusion proteins on bioplastics by the novel tag BioF.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Cristina; García, Pedro; García, José L; Prieto, María A

    2004-06-01

    A new protein immobilization and purification system has been developed based on the use of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs, or bioplastics), which are biodegradable polymers accumulated as reserve granules in the cytoplasm of certain bacteria. The N-terminal domain of the PhaF phasin (a PHA-granule-associated protein) from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 was used as a polypeptide tag (BioF) to anchor fusion proteins to PHAs. This tag provides a novel way to immobilize proteins in vivo by using bioplastics as supports. The granules carrying the BioF fusion proteins can be isolated by a simple centrifugation step and used directly for some applications. Moreover, when required, a practically pure preparation of the soluble BioF fusion protein can be obtained by a mild detergent treatment of the granule. The efficiency of this system has been demonstrated by constructing two BioF fusion products, including a functional BioF-beta-galactosidase. This is the first example of an active bioplastic consisting of a biodegradable matrix carrying an active enzyme. PMID:15184113

  5. The Chlamydia trachomatis IncA protein is required for homotypic vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Hackstadt, T; Scidmore-Carlson, M A; Shaw, E I; Fischer, E R

    1999-09-01

    Chlamydiae replicate within an intracellular vacuole, termed an inclusion, that is non-fusogenic with vesicles of the endosomal or lysosomal compartments. Instead, the inclusion appears to intersect an exocytic pathway from which chlamydiae intercept sphingomyelin en route from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Chlamydial protein synthesis is required to establish this interaction. In an effort to identify those chlamydial proteins controlling vesicle fusion, we have prepared polyclonal antibodies against several Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion membrane proteins. Microinjection of polyclonal antibodies against three C. trachomatis inclusion membrane proteins, IncA, F and G, into the cytosol of cells infected with C. trachomatis demonstrates reactivity with antigens on the cytoplasmic face of the inclusion membrane, without apparent inhibition of chlamydial multiplication. Microinjection of antibodies against the C. trachomatis IncA protein, however, results in the development of an aberrant multilobed inclusion structure remarkably similar to that of C. psittaci GPIC. These results suggest that the C. trachomatis IncA protein is involved in homotypic vesicle fusion and/or septation of the inclusion membrane that is believed to accompany bacterial cell division in C. psittaci. This proposal is corroborated by the expression of C. trachomatis and C. psittaci IncA in a yeast two-hybrid system to demonstrate C. trachomatis, but not C. psittaci, IncA interactions. Despite the inhibition of homotypic fusion of C. trachomatis inclusions, fusion of sphingomyelin-containing vesicles with the inclusion was not suppressed.

  6. Affinity Purification of a Recombinant Protein Expressed as a Fusion with the Maltose-Binding Protein (MBP) Tag

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Gabelli, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Expression of fusion proteins such as MBP fusions can be used as a way to improve the solubility of the expressed protein in E. coli (Fox and Waugh, 2003; Nallamsetty et al., 2005; Nallamsetty and Waugh, 2006) and as a way to introduce an affinity purification tag. The protocol that follows was designed by the authors as a first step in the purification of a recombinant protein fused with MBP, using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). Cells should have been thawed, resuspended in binding buffer, and lysed by sonication or microfluidization before mixing with the amylose resin or loading on the column. Slight modifications to this protocol may be made to accommodate both the protein of interest and the availability of equipment. PMID:26096500

  7. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  8. Mo-CBP3, an Antifungal Chitin-Binding Protein from Moringa oleifera Seeds, Is a Member of the 2S Albumin Family

    PubMed Central

    Freire, José E. C.; Vasconcelos, Ilka M.; Moreno, Frederico B. M. B.; Batista, Adelina B.; Lobo, Marina D. P.; Pereira, Mirella L.; Lima, João P. M. S.; Almeida, Ricardo V. M.; Sousa, Antônio J. S.; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C. O.; Oliveira, José T. A.; Grangeiro, Thalles B.

    2015-01-01

    Mo-CBP3 is a chitin-binding protein from M. oleifera seeds that inhibits the germination and mycelial growth of phytopathogenic fungi. This protein is highly thermostable and resistant to pH changes, and therefore may be useful in the development of new antifungal drugs. However, the relationship of MoCBP3 with the known families of carbohydrate-binding domains has not been established. In the present study, full-length cDNAs encoding 4 isoforms of Mo-CBP3 (Mo-CBP3-1, Mo-CBP3-2, Mo-CBP3-3 and Mo-CBP3-4) were cloned from developing seeds. The polypeptides encoded by the Mo-CBP3 cDNAs were predicted to contain 160 (Mo-CBP3-3) and 163 amino acid residues (Mo-CBP3-1, Mo-CBP3-2 and Mo-CBP3-4) with a signal peptide of 20-residues at the N-terminal region. A comparative analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that Mo-CBP3 is a typical member of the 2S albumin family, as shown by the presence of an eight-cysteine motif, which is a characteristic feature of the prolamin superfamily. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that Mo-CBP3 is a mixture of isoforms that correspond to different mRNA products. The identification of Mo-CBP3 as a genuine member of the 2S albumin family reinforces the hypothesis that these seed storage proteins are involved in plant defense. Moreover, the chitin-binding ability of Mo-CBP3 reveals a novel functionality for a typical 2S albumin. PMID:25789746

  9. Residue-level resolution of alphavirus envelope protein interactions in pH-dependent fusion.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Brooks, Charles L

    2015-02-17

    Alphavirus envelope proteins, organized as trimers of E2-E1 heterodimers on the surface of the pathogenic alphavirus, mediate the low pH-triggered fusion of viral and endosomal membranes in human cells. The lack of specific treatment for alphaviral infections motivates our exploration of potential antiviral approaches by inhibiting one or more fusion steps in the common endocytic viral entry pathway. In this work, we performed constant pH molecular dynamics based on an atomic model of the alphavirus envelope with icosahedral symmetry. We have identified pH-sensitive residues that cause the largest shifts in thermodynamic driving forces under neutral and acidic pH conditions for various fusion steps. A series of conserved interdomain His residues is identified to be responsible for the pH-dependent conformational changes in the fusion process, and ligand binding sites in their vicinity are anticipated to be potential drug targets aimed at inhibiting viral infections.

  10. Association of the fusion protein NSF with clathrin-coated vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G J; Tagaya, M; Woodman, P G

    1996-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is a component of intracellular transport reactions. In order to understand the role of NSF during the fusion of endocytic transport vesicles with the endosome, we have investigated the binding of NSF to purified clathrin-coated vesicle components. First, we have examined whether detergent-solubilized coated vesicle membranes will support formation of NSF-containing 'fusion complexes'. Our results show that these membranes are substantially enriched in components capable of driving formation of these complexes, when compared with membranes from other sources. Secondly, we have analysed coated vesicle preparations for their NSF content. Coated vesicle preparations contain significant amounts of NSF. This was shown to be associated with coated vesicles rather than contaminating membranes by a number of criteria, and was found to be bound in an ATP-independent manner. These findings are discussed in the light of current models for vesicle fusion. Images PMID:8631296

  11. Outcomes for Single-Level Lumbar Fusion: The Role of Bone Morphogenetic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Kevin S.; Chi, John H.; Groff, Michael W.; McGuire, Kevin; Afendulis, Christopher C.; Claus, Elizabeth B.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of a population-based insurance claims dataset. Objective To determine the risk of repeat fusion and total costs associated with bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) use in single-level lumbar fusion for degenerative spinal disease. Summary of Background Data The use of BMP has been proposed to reduce overall costs of spinal fusion through prevention of repeat fusion procedures. Although radiographic fusion rates associated with BMP use have been examined in clinical trials, little data exists regarding outcomes associated with BMP use in the general population. Methods Using the MarketScan© claims dataset, 15,862 patients that underwent single-level lumbar fusion from 2003 to 2007 for degenerative disease were identified. Propensity scores were used to match 2,372 patients that underwent fusion with BMP to patients that underwent fusion without BMP. Logistic regression models, Kaplan-Meier estimates, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine risk of repeat fusion, length of stay, and 30-day readmission by BMP use. Cost comparisons were evaluated with linear regression models using logarithmic transformed data. Results At one year from surgery, BMP was associated with a 1.1% absolute decrease in the risk of repeat fusion (2.3% with BMP vs 3.4% without BMP, p=.03) and an odds ratio for repeat fusion of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.47-0.94) after multivariate adjustment. BMP was also associated with a decreased hazards for long-term repeat fusion (adjusted hazards ratio =0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.58-0.93). Cost analysis indicated that BMP was associated with initial increased costs for the surgical procedure (13.9% adjusted increase, 95% confidence interval 9.9%-17.9%) as well as total one year costs (10.1% adjusted increase, 95% confidence interval 6.2%-14.0%). Conclusions At one year, BMP use was associated with a decreased risk of repeat fusion but also increased healthcare costs. PMID:21311404

  12. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  13. Chemokines derived from soluble fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli are biologically active

    SciTech Connect

    Magistrelli, Giovanni; Gueneau, Franck; Muslmani, Machadiya; Ravn, Ulla; Kosco-Vilbois, Marie; Fischer, Nicolas . E-mail: nfischer@novimmune.com

    2005-08-26

    Chemokines are a class of low molecular weight proteins that are involved in leukocytes trafficking. Due to their involvement in recruiting immune cells to sites of inflammation, chemokines, and chemokine receptors have become an attractive class of therapeutic targets. However, when expressed in Escherichia coli chemokines are poorly soluble and accumulate in inclusion bodies. Several purification methods have been described but involve time-consuming refolding, buffer exchange, and purification steps that complicate expression of these proteins. Here, we describe a simple and reliable method to express chemokines as fusions to the protein NusA. The fusion proteins were largely found in the soluble fraction and could be readily purified in a single step. Proteolytic cleavage was used to obtain soluble recombinant chemokines that were found to be very active in a novel in vitro chemotaxis assays. This method could be applied to several {alpha} and {beta} human chemokines, suggesting that it is generally applicable to this class of proteins.

  14. The Endocytic Recycling Protein EHD2 Interacts with Myoferlin to Regulate Myoblast Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Katherine R.; Demonbreun, Alexis R.; Wallace, Gregory Q.; Cave, Andrew; Posey, Avery D.; Heretis, Konstantina; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a multinucleated syncytium that develops and is maintained by the fusion of myoblasts to the syncytium. Myoblast fusion involves the regulated coalescence of two apposed membranes. Myoferlin is a membrane-anchored, multiple C2 domain-containing protein that is highly expressed in fusing myoblasts and required for efficient myoblast fusion to myotubes. We found that myoferlin binds directly to the eps15 homology domain protein, EHD2. Members of the EHD family have been previously implicated in endocytosis as well as endocytic recycling, a process where membrane proteins internalized by endocytosis are returned to the plasma membrane. EHD2 binds directly to the second C2 domain of myoferlin, and EHD2 is reduced in myoferlin null myoblasts. In contrast to normal myoblasts, myoferlin null myoblasts accumulate labeled transferrin and have delayed recycling. Introduction of dominant negative EHD2 into myoblasts leads to the sequestration of myoferlin and inhibition of myoblast fusion. The interaction of myoferlin with EHD2 identifies molecular overlap between the endocytic recycling pathway and the machinery that regulates myoblast membrane fusion. PMID:18502764

  15. Differences in dispersion of influenza virus lipids and proteins during fusion.

    PubMed

    Lowy, R J; Sarkar, D P; Whitnall, M H; Blumenthal, R

    1995-02-01

    Digitally enhanced low-light-level fluorescence video microscopy and immunochemical staining were used to examine influenza virus envelope lipid and protein redistribution during pH-induced fusion. Video microscopy was performed using viruses labeled with either the lipid analogue octadecylrhodamine B (R18) or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) covalently linked to envelope proteins. Viruses were bound to human red blood cells, and the pattern and intensity of fluorescence were monitored for 30 min while cell-virus complexes were perfused with pH 7.4 or 4.8 media at temperatures either above or below 20 degrees C. R18 showed complete redistribution and dequenching by 30 min at all incubation temperatures, confirming reports that viral fusion occurs at subphysiological temperatures. FITC-labeled protein showed spatial redistribution at 28 degrees C but no change at low temperature. Electron microscopy observations of immunochemical staining of viral proteins confirmed both that protein redistribution at 37 degrees C was slower than R18 and the failure of movement within 30 min at 16 degrees C. Video microscopy monitoring of RNA staining by acridine orange of virus-cell complexes showed redistribution to the RBCs at all temperatures but only after low pH-induced fusion. The results are consistent with differential dispersion of viral components into the RBC and the existence of relatively long-lived barriers to diffusion subsequent to fusion pore formation.

  16. Autoprotease N(pro): analysis of self-cleaving fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wellhoefer, Martin; Sprinzl, Wolfgang; Hahn, Rainer; Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-08-23

    A reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography method was developed for determination of in vitro refolding and cleavage kinetics for the N(pro) autoprotease fusion peptide EDDIE-pep6His using a TSK Super-Octyl column with a segmented acetonitrile gradient. Self-cleaving fusion proteins such as N(pro) autoprotease fusion proteins consist of the single autoprotease N(pro) and a target peptide or a target protein as fusion partner. Hence, three protein species are present after self-cleavage: the target peptide or protein, the single N(pro) autoprotease and, in case of incomplete cleavage, residual N(pro) fusion protein. Thus, for an accurate analysis the method must be standardized for three components in the presence of host cell impurities. For method validation, protein standards of EDDIE-pep6His and the single N(pro) autoprotease EDDIE were prepared from inclusion bodies (IBs) by ion exchange, immobilized metal ion affinity, size exclusion, and reversed phase chromatography. A linear correlation was obtained for EDDIE-pep6His and EDDIE in the range from 95 to 730μg/ml with a lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) and a lower limit of detection (LLOD) of 34.5 and 11.4μg/ml, respectively, for EDDIE-pep6His and 39.6 and 13.1μg/ml, respectively, for EDDIE. Finally, a fully automated batch refolding of EDDIE-pep6His from IBs was performed to demonstrate the applicability of this method. It was shown that the initial EDDIE-pep6His concentration in the refolding solution decreased from 194.3 to 83.8μg/ml over a refolding time of 385min resulting in a final refolding and cleavage yield of 50%.

  17. Design and characterization of novel recombinant listeriolysin O-protamine fusion proteins for enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Hyung; Provoda, Chester; Lee, Kyung-Dall

    2015-02-01

    To improve the efficiency of gene delivery for effective gene therapy, it is essential that the vector carries functional components that can promote overcoming barriers in various steps leading to the transport of DNA from extracellular to ultimately nuclear compartment. In this study, we designed genetically engineered fusion proteins as a platform to incorporate multiple functionalities in one chimeric protein. Prototypes of such a chimera tested here contain two domains: one that binds to DNA; the other that can facilitate endosomal escape of DNA. The fusion proteins are composed of listeriolysin O (LLO), the endosomolytic pore-forming protein from Listeria monocytogenes, and a 22 amino acid sequence of the DNA-condensing polypeptide protamine (PN), singly or as a pair: LLO-PN and LLO-PNPN. We demonstrate dramatic enhancement of the gene delivery efficiency of protamine-condensed DNA upon incorporation of a small amount of LLO-PN fusion protein and further improvement with LLO-PNPN in vitro using cultured cells. Additionally, the association of anionic liposomes with cationic LLO-PNPN/protamine/DNA complexes, yielding a net negative surface charge, resulted in better in vitro transfection efficiency in the presence of serum. An initial, small set of data in mice indicated that the observed enhancement in gene expression could also be applicable to in vivo gene delivery. This study suggests that incorporation of a recombinant fusion protein with multiple functional components, such as LLO-protamine fusion protein, in a nonviral vector is a promising strategy for various nonviral gene delivery systems.

  18. Expression, purification, and immobilization of recombinant tamavidin 2 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Yoshimitsu; Oka, Naomi; Tsunashima, Masako

    2014-01-01

    Tamavidin 2 is a fungal avidin-like protein that binds biotin with high affinity. Unlike avidin or streptavidin, tamavidin 2 in soluble form is produced at high levels in Escherichia coli. In this chapter, we describe a method for immobilization and purification of recombinant proteins with the use of tamavidin 2 as an affinity tag. The protein fused to tamavidin 2 is tightly immobilized and simultaneously purified on biotinylated magnetic microbeads without loss of activity. PMID:24943317

  19. Proximal Tubules Have the Capacity to Regulate Uptake of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark C; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Flores, Brittany; Lai, Xianyin; Myslinski, Jered; Pandit, Sweekar; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Wei, Yuan; Satlin, Lisa M; Wiggins, Roger C; Witzmann, Frank A; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from multiple studies supports the concept that both glomerular filtration and proximal tubule (PT) reclamation affect urinary albumin excretion rate. To better understand these roles of glomerular filtration and PT uptake, we investigated these processes in two distinct animal models. In a rat model of acute exogenous albumin overload, we quantified glomerular sieving coefficients (GSC) and PT uptake of Texas Red-labeled rat serum albumin using two-photon intravital microscopy. No change in GSC was observed, but a significant decrease in PT albumin uptake was quantified. In a second model, loss of endogenous albumin was induced in rats by podocyte-specific transgenic expression of diphtheria toxin receptor. In these albumin-deficient rats, exposure to diphtheria toxin induced an increase in albumin GSC and albumin filtration, resulting in increased exposure of the PTs to endogenous albumin. In this case, PT albumin reabsorption was markedly increased. Analysis of known albumin receptors and assessment of cortical protein expression in the albumin overload model, conducted to identify potential proteins and pathways affected by acute protein overload, revealed changes in the expression levels of calreticulin, disabled homolog 2, NRF2, angiopoietin-2, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that a regulated PT cell albumin uptake system can respond rapidly to different physiologic conditions to minimize alterations in serum albumin level.

  20. Integrin αvβ1 Modulation Affects Subtype B Avian Metapneumovirus Fusion Protein-mediated Cell-Cell Fusion and Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yun, Bing-Ling; Guan, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Qi, Xiao-Le; Cui, Hong-Yu; Liu, Chang-Jun; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Gao, Hong-Lei; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Gao, Yu-Long; Wang, Xiao-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) fusion (F) protein mediates virus-cell membrane fusion to initiate viral infection, which requires F protein binding to its receptor(s) on the host cell surface. However, the receptor(s) for aMPV F protein is still not identified. All known subtype B aMPV (aMPV/B) F proteins contain a conserved Arg-Asp-Asp (RDD) motif, suggesting that the aMPV/B F protein may mediate membrane fusion via the binding of RDD to integrin. When blocked with integrin-specific peptides, aMPV/B F protein fusogenicity and viral replication were significantly reduced. Specifically we identified integrin αv and/or β1-mediated F protein fusogenicity and viral replication using antibody blocking, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) knockdown, and overexpression. Additionally, overexpression of integrin αv and β1 in aMPV/B non-permissive cells conferred aMPV/B F protein binding and aMPV/B infection. When RDD was altered to RAE (Arg-Ala-Glu), aMPV/B F protein binding and fusogenic activity were profoundly impaired. These results suggest that integrin αvβ1 is a functional receptor for aMPV/B F protein-mediated membrane fusion and virus infection, which will provide new insights on the fusogenic mechanism and pathogenesis of aMPV. PMID:27226547

  1. A single vesicle-vesicle fusion assay for in vitro studies of SNAREs and accessory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jiajie; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Lee, Hanki; Joo, Chirlmin; Su, Zengliu; Syed, Salman; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly regulated class of membrane proteins that drive the efficient merger of two distinct lipid bilayers into one interconnected structure. This protocol describes our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based single vesicle-vesicle fusion assays for SNAREs and accessory proteins. Both lipid-mixing (with FRET pairs acting as lipophilic dyes in the membranes) and content-mixing assays (with FRET pairs present on a DNA hairpin that becomes linear via hybridization to a complementary DNA) are described. These assays can be used to detect substages such as docking, hemifusion, and pore expansion and full fusion. The details of flow cell preparation, protein-reconstituted vesicle preparation, data acquisition and analysis are described. These assays can be used to study the roles of various SNARE proteins, accessory proteins and effects of different lipid compositions on specific fusion steps. The total time required to finish one round of this protocol is 3–6 d. PMID:22582418

  2. Enhanced SUMOylation of proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif by SUMO-Ubc9 fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eui Tae; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Matunis, Mike J.; Ahn, Jin-Hyun

    2009-10-09

    Identifying new targets for SUMO and understanding the function of protein SUMOylation are largely limited by low level of SUMOylation. It was found recently that Ubc9, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme, is covalently modified by SUMO at a lysine 14 in the N-terminal alpha helix, and that SUMO-modified Ubc9 has enhanced conjugation activity for certain target proteins containing a SUMO-interacting motif (SIM). Here, we show that, compared to intact Ubc9, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein has higher conjugating activity for SIM-containing targets such as Sp100 and human cytomegalovirus IE2. Assays using an IE2 SIM mutant revealed the requirement of SIM for the enhanced IE2 SUMOylation by SUMO-Ubc9. In pull-down assays with cell extracts, the SUMO-Ubc9 fusion protein bound to more diverse cellular proteins and interacted with some SIM-containing proteins with higher affinities than Ubc9. Therefore, the devised SUMO-Ubc9 fusion will be useful for identifying SIM-containing SUMO targets and producing SUMO-modified proteins.

  3. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  4. Studies to Prevent Degradation of Recombinant Fc-Fusion Protein Expressed in Mammalian Cell Line and Protein Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Sanjukta; Barrow, Colin J.; Kanwar, Rupinder K.; Ramana, Venkata; Kanwar, Jagat R.

    2016-01-01

    Clipping of recombinant proteins is a major issue in animal cell cultures. A recombinant Fc-fusion protein, VEGFR1(D1–D3)-Fc expressed in CHOK1SV GS-KO cells was observed to be undergoing clippings in lab scale cultures. Partial cleaving of expressed protein initiated early on in cell culture and was observed to increase over time in culture and also on storage. In this study, a few parameters were explored in a bid to inhibit clipping in the fusion protein The effects of culture temperature, duration of culture, the addition of an anti-clumping agent, ferric citrate and use of protease inhibitor cocktail on inhibition of proteolysis of the Fc fusion were studied. Lowering of culture temperature from 37 to 30 °C alone appears to be the best solution for reducing protein degradation from the quality, cost and regulatory points of view. The obtained Fc protein was characterized and found to be in its stable folded state, exhibiting a high affinity for its ligand and also biological and functional activities. PMID:27294920

  5. Studies to Prevent Degradation of Recombinant Fc-Fusion Protein Expressed in Mammalian Cell Line and Protein Characterization.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Sanjukta; Barrow, Colin J; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Ramana, Venkata; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2016-06-09

    Clipping of recombinant proteins is a major issue in animal cell cultures. A recombinant Fc-fusion protein, VEGFR1(D1-D3)-Fc expressed in CHOK1SV GS-KO cells was observed to be undergoing clippings in lab scale cultures. Partial cleaving of expressed protein initiated early on in cell culture and was observed to increase over time in culture and also on storage. In this study, a few parameters were explored in a bid to inhibit clipping in the fusion protein The effects of culture temperature, duration of culture, the addition of an anti-clumping agent, ferric citrate and use of protease inhibitor cocktail on inhibition of proteolysis of the Fc fusion were studied. Lowering of culture temperature from 37 to 30 °C alone appears to be the best solution for reducing protein degradation from the quality, cost and regulatory points of view. The obtained Fc protein was characterized and found to be in its stable folded state, exhibiting a high affinity for its ligand and also biological and functional activities.

  6. Protein delivery to vacuole requires SAND protein-dependent Rab GTPase conversion for MVB-vacuole fusion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manoj K; Krüger, Falco; Beckmann, Hauke; Brumm, Sabine; Vermeer, Joop E M; Munnik, Teun; Mayer, Ulrike; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Grefen, Christopher; Schumacher, Karin; Jürgens, Gerd

    2014-06-16

    Plasma-membrane proteins such as ligand-binding receptor kinases, ion channels, or nutrient transporters are turned over by targeting to a lytic compartment--lysosome or vacuole--for degradation. After their internalization, these proteins arrive at an early endosome, which then matures into a late endosome with intraluminal vesicles (multivesicular body, MVB) before fusing with the lysosome/vacuole in animals or yeast. The endosomal maturation step involves a SAND family protein mediating Rab5-to-Rab7 GTPase conversion. Vacuolar trafficking is much less well understood in plants. Here we analyze the role of the single-copy SAND gene of Arabidopsis. In contrast to its animal or yeast counterpart, Arabidopsis SAND protein is not required for early-to-late endosomal maturation, although its role in mediating Rab5-to-Rab7 conversion is conserved. Instead, Arabidopsis SAND protein is essential for the subsequent fusion of MVBs with the vacuole. The inability of sand mutant to mediate MVB-vacuole fusion is not caused by the continued Rab5 activity but rather reflects the failure to activate Rab7. In conclusion, regarding the endosomal passage of cargo proteins for degradation, a major difference between plants and nonplant organisms might result from the relative timing of endosomal maturation and SAND-dependent Rab GTPase conversion as a prerequisite for the fusion of late endosomes/MVBs with the lysosome/vacuole.

  7. Anti-Diabetic Effects of CTB-APSL Fusion Protein in Type 2 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunlong; Gao, Zhangzhao; Guo, Qingtuo; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Ying; Sheng, Qing; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Wu, Wutong; Lv, Zhengbing; Shu, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether cholera toxin B subunit and active peptide from shark liver (CTB-APSL) fusion protein plays a role in treatment of type 2 diabetic mice, the CTB-APSL gene was cloned and expressed in silkworm (Bombyx mori) baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), then the fusion protein was orally administrated at a dose of 100 mg/kg for five weeks in diabetic mice. The results demonstrated that the oral administration of CTB-APSL fusion protein can effectively reduce the levels of both fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb), promote insulin secretion and improve insulin resistance, significantly improve lipid metabolism, reduce triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels and increase high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, as well as effectively improve the inflammatory response of type 2 diabetic mice through the reduction of the levels of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Histopathology shows that the fusion protein can significantly repair damaged pancreatic tissue in type 2 diabetic mice, significantly improve hepatic steatosis and hepatic cell cloudy swelling, reduce the content of lipid droplets in type 2 diabetic mice, effectively inhibit renal interstitial inflammatory cells invasion and improve renal tubular epithelial cell nucleus pyknosis, thus providing an experimental basis for the development of a new type of oral therapy for type 2 diabetes. PMID:24633252

  8. Transgenic Carrot Expressing Fusion Protein Comprising M. tuberculosis Antigens Induces Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Permyakova, Natalia V.; Zagorskaya, Alla A.; Belavin, Pavel A.; Uvarova, Elena A.; Nosareva, Olesya V.; Nesterov, Andrey E.; Novikovskaya, Anna A.; Zav'yalov, Evgeniy L.; Moshkin, Mikhail P.; Deineko, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious diseases, which continues to pose a major global health problem. Transgenic plants may serve as bioreactors to produce heterologous proteins including antibodies, antigens, and hormones. In the present study, a genetic construct has been designed that comprises the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes cfp10, esat6 and dIFN gene, which encode deltaferon, a recombinant analog of the human γ-interferon designed for expression in plant tissues. This construct was transferred to the carrot (Daucus carota L.) genome by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. This study demonstrates that the fusion protein CFP10-ESAT6-dIFN is synthesized in the transgenic carrot storage roots. The protein is able to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in laboratory animals (mice) when administered either orally or by injection. It should be emphasized that M. tuberculosis antigens contained in the fusion protein have no cytotoxic effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25949997

  9. Differing features of proteins in membranes may result in antioxidant or prooxidant action: opposite effects on lipid peroxidation of alcohol dehydrogenase and albumin in liposomal systems.

    PubMed

    Riedl, A; Shamsi, Z; Anderton, M; Goldfarb, P; Wiseman, A

    1996-02-01

    The influence of 3 thiol-containing compounds, bovine serum albumin (fatty acid free: BSA), glutathione (GSH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) on lipid peroxidation in multilamellar liposomes, prepared from ox-brain phospholipid, was investigated. Thiol-compounds were added either before liposome formation, or after liposome formation; and their effects compared to a positive control. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), an acidic hydrophilic protein, displays a small, concentration dependent, antioxidant effect when added to preformed liposomes. A much larger antioxidant effect was observed when the BSA was entrapped inside the liposome, by adding BSA just prior to liposome preparation. In contrast, a Zn(2+) containing redox enzyme, YADH, a basic hydrophobic membrane-associating protein, displays a large pro-oxidant effect at much lower concentrations especially when entrapped inside the liposome. This was observed also with GSH; but per mole of -SH, YADH was about 18 times as powerful a pro-oxidant perhaps because of structural changes to the membrane. Oxidized glutathione and N-acetylcysteine were also pro-oxidant (cysteine and cystine showed little effect). Formation of thiyl radicals may occur in the presence of iron ions with these pro-oxidant sulphur-containing compounds. Partial protection against lipid peroxidation was observed with EDTA, desferrioxamine and protoporphyrin (IX), potent iron-chelating agents.

  10. C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K. . E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rubella virus (RUB) replicons are derivatives of the RUB infectious cDNA clone that retain the nonstructural open reading frame (NS-ORF) that encodes the replicase proteins but not the structural protein ORF (SP-ORF) that encodes the virion proteins. RUB defective interfering (DI) RNAs contain deletions within the SP-ORF and thus resemble replicons. DI RNAs often retain the 5' end of the capsid protein (C) gene that has been shown to modulate virus-specific RNA synthesis. However, when replicons either with or without the C gene were passaged serially in the presence of wt RUB as a source of the virion proteins, it was found that neither replicon was maintained and DI RNAs were generated. The majority DI RNA species contained in-frame deletions in the SP-ORF leading to a fusion between the 5' end of the C gene and the 3' end of the E1 glycoprotein gene. DI infectious cDNA clones were constructed and transcripts from these DI infectious cDNA clones were maintained during serial passage with wt RUB. The C-E1 fusion protein encoded by the DI RNAs was synthesized and was required for maintenance of the DI RNA during serial passage. This is the first report of a functional novel gene product resulting from deletion during DI RNA generation. Thus far, the role of the C-E1 fusion protein in maintenance of DI RNAs during serial passage remained elusive as it was found that the fusion protein diminished rather than enhanced DI RNA synthesis and was not incorporated into virus particles.

  11. Transgenic plants expressing ω-ACTX-Hv1a and snowdrop lectin (GNA) fusion protein show enhanced resistance to aphids.

    PubMed

    Nakasu, Erich Y T; Edwards, Martin G; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A; Gatehouse, Angharad M R

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant fusion proteins containing arthropod toxins have been developed as a new class of biopesticides. The recombinant fusion protein Hv1a/GNA, containing the spider venom toxin ω-ACTX-Hv1a linked to snowdrop lectin (GNA) was shown to reduce survival of the peach-potato aphid Myzus persicae when delivered in artificial diet, with survival <10% after 8 days exposure to fusion protein at 1 mg/ml. Although the fusion protein was rapidly degraded by proteases in the insect, Hv1a/GNA oral toxicity to M. persicae was significantly greater than GNA alone. A construct encoding the fusion protein, including the GNA leader sequence, under control of the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter was transformed into Arabidopsis; the resulting plants contained intact fusion protein in leaf tissues at an estimated level of 25.6 ± 4.1 ng/mg FW. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hv1a/GNA induced up to 40% mortality of M. persicae after 7 days exposure in detached leaf bioassays, demonstrating that transgenic plants can deliver fusion proteins to aphids. Grain aphids (Sitobion avenae) were more susceptible than M. persicae to the Hv1a/GNA fusion protein in artificial diet bioassays (LC50 = 0.73 mg/ml after 2 days against LC50 = 1.81 mg/ml for M. persicae), as they were not able to hydrolyze the fusion protein as readily as M. persicae. Expression of this fusion protein in suitable host plants for the grain aphid is likely to confer higher levels of resistance than that shown with the M. persicae/Arabidopsis model system.

  12. Small-angle neutron scattering study of differences in phase behavior of silica nanoparticles in the presence of lysozyme and bovine serum albumin proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Indresh; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2014-03-01

    The differences in phase behavior of anionic silica nanoparticles (88 Å) in the presence of two globular proteins [cationic lysozyme (molecular weight (MW) 14.7 kD) and anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) (MW 66.4 kD)] have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The measurements were carried out on a fixed concentration (1 wt %) of Ludox silica nanoparticles with varying concentrations of proteins (0-5 wt %) at pH = 7. It is found that, despite having different natures (opposite charges), both proteins can render to the same kind of aggregation of silica nanoparticles. However, the concentration regions over which the aggregation is observed are widely different for the two proteins. Lysozyme with very small amounts (e.g., 0.01 wt %) leads to the aggregation of silica nanoparticles. On the other hand, silica nanoparticles coexist with BSA as independent entities at low protein concentrations and turn to aggregates at high protein concentrations (>1 wt %). In the case of lysozyme, the charge neutralization by the protein on the nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-mediated aggregation of the nanoparticles. The nanoparticle aggregates coexist with unaggregated nanoparticles at low protein concentrations, whereas, they coexist with a free protein at higher protein concentrations. For BSA, the nonadsorbing nature of the protein produces the depletion force that causes the aggregation of the nanoparticles at higher protein concentrations. The evolution of the interaction is modeled by the two Yukawa potential, taking account of both attractive and repulsive terms of the interaction in these systems. The nanoparticle aggregation is found to be governed by the short-range attraction for lysozyme and the long-range attraction for BSA. The aggregates are characterized by the diffusion limited aggregate type of mass fractal morphology.

  13. A general method for the covalent labeling of fusion proteins with small molecules in vivo.

    PubMed

    Keppler, Antje; Gendreizig, Susanne; Gronemeyer, Thomas; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Johnsson, Kai

    2003-01-01

    Characterizing the movement, interactions, and chemical microenvironment of a protein inside the living cell is crucial to a detailed understanding of its function. Most strategies aimed at realizing this objective are based on genetically fusing the protein of interest to a reporter protein that monitors changes in the environment of the coupled protein. Examples include fusions with fluorescent proteins, the yeast two-hybrid system, and split ubiquitin. However, these techniques have various limitations, and considerable effort is being devoted to specific labeling of proteins in vivo with small synthetic molecules capable of probing and modulating their function. These approaches are currently based on the noncovalent binding of a small molecule to a protein, the formation of stable complexes between biarsenical compounds and peptides containing cysteines, or the use of biotin acceptor domains. Here we describe a general method for the covalent labeling of fusion proteins in vivo that complements existing methods for noncovalent labeling of proteins and that may open up new ways of studying proteins in living cells.

  14. Purification of recombinant protein by cold-coacervation of fusion constructs incorporating resilin-inspired polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Russell E; Elvin, Christopher M; Taylor, Karin; Lekieffre, Nicolas; Ramshaw, John A M

    2012-12-01

    Polypeptides containing between 4 and 32 repeats of a resilin-inspired sequence AQTPSSYGAP, derived from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, have been used as tags on recombinant fusion proteins. These repeating polypeptides were inspired by the repeating structures that are found in resilins and sequence-related proteins from various insects. Unexpectedly, an aqueous solution of a recombinant resilin protein displays an upper critical solution temperature (cold-coacervation) when held on ice, leading to a separation into a protein rich phase, typically exceeding 200 mg/mL, and a protein-poor phase. We show that purification of recombinant proteins by cold-coacervation can be performed when engineered as a fusion partner to a resilin-inspired repeat sequence. In this study, we demonstrate the process by the recombinant expression and purification of enhanced Green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in E. coli. This facile purification system can produce high purity, concentrated protein solutions without the need for affinity chromatography or other time-consuming or expensive purification steps, and that it can be used with other bulk purification steps such as low concentration ammonium sulfate precipitation. Protein purification by cold-coacervation also minimizes the exposure of the target protein to enhanced proteolysis at higher temperature.

  15. Immunization with a pentameric L1 fusion protein protects against papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Estes, P A; Chen, Y; Newsome, J; Olcese, V A; Garcea, R L; Schlegel, R

    2001-09-01

    The prophylactic papillomavirus vaccines currently in clinical trials are composed of viral L1 capsid protein that is synthesized in eukaryotic expression systems and purified in the form of virus-like particles (VLPs). To evaluate whether VLPs are necessary for effective vaccination, we expressed the L1 protein as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein in Escherichia coli and assayed its immunogenic activity in an established canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) model that previously validated the efficacy of VLP vaccines. The GST-COPV L1 fusion protein formed pentamers, but these capsomere-like structures did not assemble into VLPs. Despite the lack of VLP formation, the GST-COPV L1 protein retained its native conformation as determined by reactivity with conformation-specific anti-COPV antibodies. Most importantly, the GST-COPV L1 pentamers completely protected dogs from high-dose viral infection of their oral mucosa. L1 fusion proteins expressed in bacteria represent an economical alternative to VLPs as a human papillomavirus vaccine. PMID:11483728

  16. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions. PMID:26394862

  17. Impaired telomerase activity in human cells expressing GFP-Ku86 fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Badie, C; Yáñez-Muñoz, R J; Muller, C; Salles, B; Porter, A C G

    2008-01-01

    The Ku heterodimer is a DNA end-binding protein that promotes the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double strand break (DSB) repair by recruiting the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). Ku is also a normal component of telomeres where it is required for telomere maintenance, interacting not only with the DNA but also with various telomere proteins including telomerase. The way in which Ku simultaneously plays such distinct roles, end-joining at DSBs and end-maintenance at telomeres, is unclear. One way to address this is to study cells in which the NHEJ and telomeric roles of Ku have been separated. Here we describe human cells that express fusions between the large human Ku subunit (Ku86) and a fluorescent protein tag. These cells have reduced telomerase activity and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) but no change in their DNA-PK activity or in the DNA end-binding of endogenous Ku. Cells with particularly large amounts of one fusion protein undergo progressive telomere shortening and cellular senescence. These data are consistent with models in which Ku recruits telomerase to telomeres or activates recruited telomerase and suggest that the Ku86 fusion proteins specifically block this role. PMID:19188702

  18. An Efficient Genome-Wide Fusion Partner Screening System for Secretion of Recombinant Proteins in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Hyun Sung, Bong; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Park, Soon-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Mook; Kim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To produce rarely secreted recombinant proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we developed a novel genome-wide optimal translational fusion partner (TFP) screening system that involves recruitment of an optimal secretion signal and fusion partner. A TFP library was constructed from a genomic and truncated cDNA library by using the invertase-based signal sequence trap technique. The efficiency of the system was demonstrated using two rarely secreted proteins, human interleukin (hIL)-2 and hIL-32. Optimal TFPs for secretion of hIL-2 and hIL-32 were easily selected, yielding secretion of these proteins up to hundreds of mg/L. Moreover, numerous uncovered yeast secretion signals and fusion partners were identified, leading to efficient secretion of various recombinant proteins. Selected TFPs were found to be useful for the hypersecretion of other recombinant proteins at yields of up to several g/L. This screening technique could provide new methods for the production of various types of difficult-to-express proteins. PMID:26195161

  19. Construction of a linker library with widely controllable flexibility for fusion protein design.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Huang, Ziliang; Zhang, Chong; Dong, Bo-Jun; Guo, Ruo-Hai; Yue, Hong-Wei; Yan, Li-Tang; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility or rigidity of the linker between two fused proteins is an important parameter that affects the function of fusion proteins. In this study, we constructed a linker library with five elementary units based on the combination of the flexible (GGGGS) and the rigid (EAAAK) units. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation showed that more rigid units in the linkers lead to more helical conformation and hydrogen bonds, and less distance fluctuation between the N- and C-termini of the linker. The diversity of linker flexibility of the linker library was then studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion proteins, which showed that there is a wide range of distribution of the FRET efficiency. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation of CFP-YFP with different linkers also gave identical results with that of FRET efficiency analysis, and we further found that the combination manner of the linker peptide had a remarkable effect on the orientation of CFP and YFP domains. Our studies demonstrated that the construction of the linker library with the widely controllable flexibility could provide appropriate linkers with the desirable characteristics to engineer the fusion proteins with the expected functions.

  20. Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Posterolateral Spinal Fusion: What's the Right Dose?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clifford Barry; Sietsema, Debra Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Single center retrospective cohort analysis. Purpose The goal was to evaluate the influence of varying amount of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) per level on fusion rates and complications in posterolateral spinal fusions. Overview of Literature rhBMP-2 has been utilized for lumbar posterolateral fusions for many years. Initial rhBMP-2 recommendations were 20 mg/level of fusion. Dose and concentration per level in current studies vary from 4.2 to 40 mg and 1.5 to 2.0 mg/mL, respectively. Variable fusion and complication rates have been reported. Methods Patients (n=1,610) undergoing instrumented lumbar spinal fusion (2003–2009) with utilization of rhBMP-2 were retrospectively evaluated. Patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), comorbidities, number of levels, associated interbody fusion, and types of bone void filler were analyzed. Fusions rates and nonunions were subdivided into number of levels and amount of rhBMP-2 used per level. Results Patients (n=559) were evaluated with 58.5% females having an average age of 63 years, BMI of 31 kg/m2. Number of levels fused ranged from 1 to 8. rhBMP-2 averaged 7.3 mg/level (range, 1.5–24 mg/level) based upon length of collagen sponge in relation to length of fusion levels. Patients with non-union formation had lower rhBMP-2 dose per level (p=0.016). A significant difference in non-union rate was found between patients undergoing fusion with <6 mg/level compared to those with >6 mg/level (9.1% vs. 2.4%, χ2=0.012). No significant differences were noted between 6–11.9 mg/level and ≥12 mg/level. No threshold was found for seroma formation or bone overgrowth. Conclusions Previous recommendation of 20 mg/level of rhBMP-2 is more than what is required for predictable fusion rates of 98%. No dose related increase of infection, seroma formation, and bone overgrowth has been found. In order to provide variable dosing and cost reduction, industry generated rhBMP-2 kit size should be

  1. Safety assessment of Cry1Ab/Ac fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cao, Sishuo; He, Xiaoyun; Luo, Yunbo; Guo, Xing; Yuan, Yanfang; Huang, Kunlun

    2009-07-01

    Cry1ab/ac gene was fused by both the cry1ab gene (GenBank Accession No. X54939) and the cry1ac gene (GenBank Accession No. Y09787), which was widely used in genetically modified (GM) rice, cotton, maize and so on. In order to support the safety assessment of GM food or feed products containing Cry1Ab/Ac protein, sufficient quantities of Cry1Ab/Ac protein were produced in Escherichia coli for in vitro evaluation and animal studies. The Cry1Ab/Ac protein does not possess the characteristics associated with food toxins or allergens, i.e., it has no sequence homology with any known allergens or toxins, and no N-glycosylation sites, can be rapidly degraded in gastric and intestinal fluids, and is devoid of adverse effects in mice by gavage at a high dose level of 5g (Cry1Ab/Ac protein)/kg body weight. In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the Cry1Ab/Ac protein in human food or animal feed.

  2. Osmotically unresponsive water fraction on proteins: non-ideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin as a function of pH and salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Gary D; Kanal, Kalpana M; Cameron, Ivan L

    2006-01-01

    How much does protein-associated water differ in colligative properties (freezing point, boiling point, vapor pressure and osmotic behavior) from pure bulk water? This question was approached by studying the globular protein bovine serum albumin (BSA), using changes in pH and salt concentration to alter its native structural conformation and state of aggregation. BSA osmotic pressure was investigated experimentally and analyzed using the molecular model of Fullerton et al. [Biochem Cell Biol 1992;70(12):1325]. Analysis yielded both the extent of osmotically unresponsive water (OUW) and the effective molecular weight values of the membrane-impermeable BSA solute. Manipulation of BSA conformation and aggregation by membrane-penetrating cosolutes show that alterations in pH and salt concentration change the amount of bulk water that escapes into BSA from a minimum of 1.4 to a maximum of 11.7 g water per g dry mass BSA.

  3. The BAR domain proteins: molding membranes in fission, fusion, and phagy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt alpha-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  4. The BAR Domain Proteins: Molding Membranes in Fission, Fusion, and Phagy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S.; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt α-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  5. Nuclear localization and hepatic zonation of rat "spot 14" protein: immunohistochemical investigation employing anti-fusion protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kinlaw, W B; Tron, P; Friedmann, A S

    1992-12-01

    S14 protein and mRNA levels are rapidly regulated by hormones and diet. We have purified a 45-Kd fusion protein from lysates of transformed E. coli that includes the entire S14 polypeptide. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-fusion protein antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of S14 protein across the hepatic lobule, and to reassess its intracellular location. In hyperthyroid liver, S14 protein clustered near the central venous zone, and was not detectable in the periportal area of the acinus. The signal in perivenous hepatocytes was primarily nuclear in location, in stark contrast to previous subcellular fractionation studies. Visualization of identical hepatic distribution and subcellular localization employing anti-synthetic peptide antiserum provided evidence for the specificity of the immunostaining, as did attenuation of the signal by preincubation of the antibody with its antigen. No staining was observed in sections of heart or hypothyroid liver, as expected from the low levels of S14 protein in those tissues. The data indicate that induction of S14 protein expression by T3 occurs through enhanced expression by perivenous hepatocytes, rather than by recruitment of cells in more peripheral zones of the lobule. Nuclear localization of the S14 protein by immunohistochemistry suggests that it is lost from nuclei during standard fractionation procedures, and prompts consideration of a role for S14 in regulation of nuclear structure and/or function.

  6. Preparation of λN-GST fusion protein for affinity immobilization of RNA.

    PubMed

    Di Tomasso, Geneviève; Lampron, Philipe; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Affinity purification of in vitro transcribed RNA is becoming an attractive alternative to purification using standard denaturing gel electrophoresis. Affinity purification is particularly advantageous because it can be performed in a few hours under non-denaturing conditions. However, the performance of affinity purification methods can vary tremendously depending on the RNA immobilization matrix. It was previously shown that RNA immobilization via an optimized λN-GST fusion protein bound to glutathione-Sepharose resin allows affinity purification of RNA with very high purity and yield. This Chapter outlines the experimental procedure employed to prepare the λN-GST fusion protein used for RNA immobilization in successful affinity purifications of RNA. It describes the details of protein expression and purification as well as routine quality control analyses. PMID:23065558

  7. Sorting of growth hormone-erythropoietin fusion proteins in rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Samuni, Yuval Zheng Changyu; Cawley, Niamh X.; Cotrim, Ana P.; Loh, Y. Peng; Baum, Bruce J.

    2008-08-15

    Neuroendocrine and exocrine cells secrete proteins in either a constitutive manner or via the regulated secretory pathway (RSP), but the specific sorting mechanisms involved are not fully understood. After gene transfer to rat salivary glands, the transgenic model proteins human growth hormone (hGH) and erythropoietin (hEpo) are secreted primarily into saliva (RSP; exocrine) and serum (constitutive; endocrine), respectively. We hypothesized that fusion of hGH at either the C-terminus or the N-terminus of hEpo would re-direct hEpo from the bloodstream into saliva. We constructed and expressed two fusion proteins, hEpo-hGH and hGH-hEpo, using serotype 5-adenoviral vectors, and delivered them to rat submandibular glands in vivo via retroductal cannulation. Both the hEpo-hGH and hGH-hEpo fusion proteins, but not hEpo alone, were secreted primarily into saliva (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0083, respectively). These in vivo studies demonstrate for the first time that hGH, in an N- as well as C-terminal position, influences the secretion of a constitutive pathway protein.

  8. Domain fusion analysis by applying relational algebra to protein sequence and domain databases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Kevin; Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    Background Domain fusion analysis is a useful method to predict functionally linked proteins that may be involved in direct protein-protein interactions or in the same metabolic or signaling pathway. As separate domain databases like BLOCKS, PROSITE, Pfam, SMART, PRINTS-S, ProDom, TIGRFAMs, and amalgamated domain databases like InterPro continue to grow in size and quality, a computational method to perform domain fusion analysis that leverages on these efforts will become increasingly powerful. Results This paper proposes a computational method employing relational algebra to find domain fusions in protein sequence databases. The feasibility of this method was illustrated on the SWISS-PROT+TrEMBL sequence database using domain predictions from the Pfam HMM (hidden Markov model) database. We identified 235 and 189 putative functionally linked protein partners in H. sapiens and S. cerevisiae, respectively. From scientific literature, we were able to confirm many of these functional linkages, while the remainder offer testable experimental hypothesis. Results can be viewed at . Conclusion As the analysis can be computed quickly on any relational database that supports standard SQL (structured query language), it can be dynamically updated along with the sequence and domain databases, thereby improving the quality of predictions over time. PMID:12734020

  9. Targeting antitumor effect of rhTNF-α fusion protein mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xin; Ren, Hui; Wang, Yue-Li; Wang, Fa; Hou, Gan; Huang, Di-Nan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the tumor therapy, targeting effects and side effects of tumor-targeting rhTNF-α fusion protein mediated by matrix metalloproteinase-2 in an animal model in order to provide experimental data for future development of drugs. The median lethal dose (LD50) was obtained from acute toxicity experiments. The A549 lung cancer xenograft model was established, and then randomly divided into the saline, standard substance, and low-, middle- and high-dose fusion protein experiment groups. Each group was administered drugs for 18 days. The length and width of the xenografts were measured every three days, after which the xenograft growth curve was drawn. The mice were sacrificed in each group following treatment and the tumor volume and weight were measured. The targeting, effectiveness and toxicity of the transformed fusion protein, and pathological changes of tumor and organ tissues were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Additionally, biochemical markers were used to detect damage of various organs after protein processing. Cell apoptosis and angiogenesis were determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) testing and immunohistochemistry, respectively, in different dose groups. Tumor growth was markedly retarded in the high-dose experimental and standard hTNF-α groups with antitumor rates of 85.91 and 72.25%, respectively, as compared with the control group. Furthermore, the tumor tissue showed obvious apoptosis (the apoptotic index was 78.78 and 66.65%, respectively) and pathological changes in the high-dose experimental and standard hTNF-α groups. Tumor angiogenesis in each fusion protein group was inhibited (P<0.01) and the biochemical markers of various organs were greatly reduced in the high-dose experimental group (P<0.05). This finding indicated that slight toxic effects of fusion proteins were evident for the heart, liver and kidney. The reforming fusion protein

  10. Specific, sensitive and accurate quantification of albumin, retinol binding protein and transferrin in human urine and serum by zone immunoelectrophoresis assay (ZIA).

    PubMed

    Vesterberg, O

    1994-05-01

    For zone immunoelectrophoresis assay (ZIA) glass tubes, ID 2 mm and 90 mm high, are filled to 2/3 with buffer containing agarose and antibodies against the protein to be quantified, each sample being pipetted on top of separate agarose gel rods. On electrophoresis at 35-150 V for several hours, the sample proteins enter the gel with resultant immunoprecipitates, visualized by staining. The extension of each immunoprecipitation zone from the upper gel surface (measured with a ruler) is directly proportional to the amount of protein in each sample and can easily be quantitated by comparison with a linear calibration curve. ZIA can be used for quantification of several proteins in blood serum and plasma as well as in urine, as is illustrated for albumin, retinol-binding protein (RBP) and transferrin. The recovery of the pure proteins added to urine is often close to 100%. ZIA has many advantages: (i) simple apparatus and procedure (no gel punching nor cooling), (ii) minimal antiserum consumption (1 mL may allow > 1000 assays), (iii) electrophoresis can be performed within a few hours or overnight, (iv) low coefficient of variation (often < 4%), (v) linear calibration curves, (vi) low detection limit (< 20 ng/mL), (vii) wide concentration ranges, (viii) no kits nor unique antisera preparation are required, and (ix) good agreement with the results from other methods.

  11. Exploring the affinity binding of alkylmaltoside surfactants to bovine serum albumin and their effect on the protein stability: A spectroscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence together with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies was performed to examine the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two alkylmaltoside surfactants, i.e. n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C10G2) and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C12G2), having identical structures but different tail lengths. Changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA from static as well as dynamic measurements revealed a weak protein-surfactant interaction and gave the corresponding binding curves, suggesting that the binding mechanism of surfactants to protein is essentially cooperative in nature. The behavior of both surfactants is similar, so that the differences detected were attributed to the more hydrophobic nature of β-C12G2, which favors the adsorption of micelle-like aggregates onto the protein surface. These observations were substantially demonstrated by data derived from synchronous, three-dimensional and anisotropy fluorescence experiments. Changes in the secondary structure of the protein induced by the interaction with surfactants were analyzed by CD to determine the contents of α-helix and β-strand. It was noted that whereas the addition of β-C10G2 appears to stabilize the secondary structure of the protein, β-C12G2 causes a marginal denaturation of BSA for a protein:surfactant molar ratio as high as 1 to 100.

  12. [Construction of cTnC-linker-TnI (P) Genes, Expression of Fusion Protein and Preparation of Lyophilized Protein].

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyun; Cai, Lei; Wu, Jianwei; Wang, Jihua

    2015-12-01

    In order to construct and express human cardiac troponin C-linker-troponin I(P) [ cTnC-linker-TnI(P)] fusion protein, detect its activity and prepare lyophilized protein, we searched the CDs of human cTnC and cTnI from GenBank, synthesized cTnC and cTnI(30-110aa) into cloning vector by a short DNA sequence coding for 15 neutral amino acid residues. pCold I-cTnC-linker-TnI(P) was constructed and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3). Then, cTnC-linker-TnI(P) fusion protein was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Soluable expression of cTnC-linker-TnI(P) in prokaryotic system was successfully obtained. The fusion protein was purified by Ni²⁺ Sepharose 6 Fast Flow affinity chromatography with over 95% purity and prepared into lyophilized protein. The activity of purified cTnC-linker-TnI(P) and its lyophilized protein were detected by Wondfo Finecare™ cTnI Test. Lyophilized protein of cTnC-linker-TnI(P) was stable for 10 or more days at 37 °C and 4 or more months at 25 °C and 4 °C. The expression system established in this research is feasible and efficient. Lyophilized protein is stable enough to be provided as biological raw materials for further research. PMID:27079099

  13. MitoTimer probe reveals the impact of autophagy, fusion, and motility on subcellular distribution of young and old mitochondrial protein and on relative mitochondrial protein age.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Andrew W; Trudeau, Kyle; Zik, Eden; Benador, Ilan Y; Twig, Gilad; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Shirihai, Orian S

    2013-11-01

    To study mitochondrial protein age dynamics, we targeted a time-sensitive fluorescent protein, MitoTimer, to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial age was revealed by the integrated portions of young (green) and old (red) MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial protein age was dependent on turnover rates as pulsed synthesis, decreased import, or autophagic inhibition all increased the proportion of aged MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial fusion promotes the distribution of young mitochondrial protein across the mitochondrial network as cells lacking essential fusion genes Mfn1 and Mfn2 displayed increased heterogeneity in mitochondrial protein age. Experiments in hippocampal neurons illustrate that the distribution of older and younger mitochondrial protein within the cell is determined by subcellular spatial organization and compartmentalization of mitochondria into neurites and soma. This effect was altered by overexpression of mitochondrial transport protein, RHOT1/MIRO1. Collectively our data show that distribution of young and old protein in the mitochondrial network is dependent on turnover, fusion, and transport.

  14. Effects of polycystin‑1 N‑terminal fragment fusion protein on the proliferation and apoptosis of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Qing; Chen, Ping; Fu, Lili; Zhao, Haidan; Zou, Zhuying; Mei, Changlin

    2014-09-01

    Mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis (MsPGN) is characterized by widespread mesangial cell proliferation and an accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the mesangial area. In a previous study we developed a polycystin‑1 N‑terminal fragment (PC‑1 NF) fusion protein that inhibits the proliferation of cyst‑lining epithelial cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In addition, the PC‑1 NF fusion protein arrests the cell cycle of cancer cells at the G0/G1 phase, inhibiting their proliferation. In the present study, the effect of the PC‑1 NF fusion protein on MsPGN was investigated. It was found that the PC‑1 NF fusion protein inhibited the proliferation of rat mesangial cells and induced G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in vitro. PC‑1 NF fusion protein treatment also resulted in a decrease in mRNA expression levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2) and an increase in mRNA expression levels of Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax) and p21Waf1. Furthermore, a decrease in Bcl‑2, c‑fos, c‑jun and protein kinase C‑α protein levels was observed, whereas Bax protein levels increased. Additionally, PC‑1 NF fusion protein induced ECM degradation and inhibited ECM expansion. The results also demonstrated that PC‑1 NF fusion protein treatment resulted in a decrease in type IV collagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase mRNA levels but an increase in matrix metalloproteinase 2 mRNA levels. In combination, these results suggest that the PC‑1 NF fusion protein inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis and induces ECM degradation in MsPGN rats. This study offers novel perspectives for the treatment of MsPGN.

  15. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research.

  16. Effect of COR proteins on the freeze-induced fusion of liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Uemura, M.; Steponkus, P.L. ); Gilmour, S.J.; Thomashow, M.F. )

    1993-05-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are regulated during cold acclimation, with few exceptions, the function of the COR proteins encoded by these genes is not known. The objectives of this study were to determine if COR6.6 and COR15am, which are synthesized in Arabidopsis thaliana, influence the freeze-induced fusion of lipid bilayers. When small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) composed of either POPC (16:0/18:1) or DOPC (18:1/18:1) were frozen to temperatures over the range of [minus]2[degrees]C to [minus]30[degrees]C liposome fusion occurred at temperatures below [minus]2[degrees]C, with a substantial increase occurring at temperatures below the T[sub m] of the lipids ([minus]3[degrees]C for POPC and [minus]18[degrees]C for DOPC). Freeze-induced fusion was not observed SUVs composed of BL[sub 2]PC (18:2/18:2), which has a t[sub m] of [minus]55[degrees]C. Addition of either COR6.6 or COR15am significantly decreased the incidence of fusion of large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC if proteins were added to the liposome suspension before freezing; there was no effect if the COR proteins were only encapsulated within the liposomes. With SUVs formed from the total lipid extract of the plasma membrane of either non-acclimated (NA) or cold-acclimated (ACC) rye leave, there was differential response to freezing. In NA-SUVs, the incidence of fusion increased after freezing to [minus]5[degrees]C and reached a maximum at [minus]10[degrees]C; in ACC-SUVs, the maximum incidence of fusion occurred at [minus]20[degrees]C. The difference in cryostability reflects differences in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane after cold acclimation. But there was a significant decrease in the incidence of fusion in both NA- and ACC-SUVs when frozen in the presence of either COR6.6 or COR15am. Thus, although the cryostability of lipid bilayers is primarily influenced by the lipid composition of the bilayers, there is an additive effect of the COR proteins.

  17. Orthogonal assembly of a designed ankyrin repeat protein-cytotoxin conjugate with a clickable serum albumin module for half-life extension.

    PubMed

    Simon, Manuel; Frey, Raphael; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe; Plückthun, Andreas

    2013-11-20

    The generation of drug conjugates for safe and effective tumor targeting requires binding proteins tolerant to functionalization by rational engineering. Here, we show that Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins), a novel class of binding proteins not derived from antibodies, can be used as building blocks for facile orthogonal assembly of bioconjugates for tumor targeting with tailored properties. DARPin Ec1, which targets the Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), was genetically modified with a C-terminal cysteine for conjugation of the small molecule cytotoxin monomethylauristatin F (MMAF). In addition, it was N-terminally functionalized by metabolic introduction of the non-natural amino acid azidohomoalanine to enable linkage of site-specifically dibenzocyclooctyne-modified mouse serum albumin (MSA) for half-life extension using Cu(I)-free click chemistry. The conjugate MSA-Ec1-MMAF was assembled to obtain high yields of a pure and stable drug conjugate as confirmed by various analytical methods and in functional assays. The orthogonality of the assembly led to a defined reaction product and preserved the functional properties of all modules, including EpCAM-specific binding and internalization, FcRn binding mediated by MSA, and cytotoxic potency. Linkage of MMAF to the DARPin increased receptor-specific uptake of the drug while decreasing nonspecific uptake, and further coupling of the conjugate to MSA enhanced this effect. In mice, albumin conjugation increased the serum half-life from 11 min to 17.4 h, resulting in a more than 22-fold increase in the area-under-the-curve (AUC). Our data demonstrate the promise of the DARPin format for facile modular assembly of drug conjugates with improved pharmacokinetic performance for tumor targeting.

  18. Combining random gene fission and rational gene fusion to discover near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments that report on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Naresh; Nobles, Christopher L; Zechiedrich, Lynn; Maresso, Anthony W; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2015-05-15

    Gene fission can convert monomeric proteins into two-piece catalysts, reporters, and transcription factors for systems and synthetic biology. However, some proteins can be challenging to fragment without disrupting function, such as near-infrared fluorescent protein (IFP). We describe a directed evolution strategy that can overcome this challenge by randomly fragmenting proteins and concomitantly fusing the protein fragments to pairs of proteins or peptides that associate. We used this method to create libraries that express fragmented IFP as fusions to a pair of associating peptides (IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3) and proteins (CheA and CheY) and screened for fragmented IFP with detectable near-infrared fluorescence. Thirteen novel fragmented IFPs were identified, all of which arose from backbone fission proximal to the interdomain linker. Either the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides or CheA and CheY proteins could assist with IFP fragment complementation, although the IAAL-E3 and IAAL-K3 peptides consistently yielded higher fluorescence. These results demonstrate how random gene fission can be coupled to rational gene fusion to create libraries enriched in fragmented proteins with AND gate logic that is dependent upon a protein-protein interaction, and they suggest that these near-infrared fluorescent protein fragments will be suitable as reporters for pairs of promoters and protein-protein interactions within whole animals.

  19. Intercellular delivery of a herpes simplex virus VP22 fusion protein from cells infected with lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhennan; Han, Ina; Zirzow, Gregory; Brady, Roscoe O.; Reiser, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    Effective gene therapy depends on the efficient transfer of therapeutic genes and their protein products to target cells. Lentiviral vectors appear promising for virus-mediated gene delivery and long-term expression in nondividing cells. The herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 has recently been shown to mediate intercellular transport of proteins, raising the possibility that it may be helpful in a setting where the global delivery of therapeutic proteins is desired. To investigate the effectiveness of lentiviral vectors to deliver genes encoding proteins fused to VP22, and to test whether the system is sufficiently potent to allow protein delivery from transduced cells in vitro and in vivo, fusion constructs of VP22 and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were prepared and delivered into target cells by using HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors. To follow the spread of VP22-EGFP to other cells, transduced COS-7 cells were coplated with a number of different cell types, including brain choroid plexus cells, human endothelial cells, H9 cells, and HeLa cells. We found that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported from transduced cells to recipient cells and that such fusion proteins accumulated in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of such cells. To determine the ability to deliver fusion proteins in vivo, we injected transduced H9 cells as well as the viral vector directly into the brain of mice. We present evidence that VP22-EGFP fusion proteins were transported effectively from lentivirus transduced cells in vivo. We also show that the VP22-EGFP fusion protein encoded by the lentivirus is transported between cells. Our data indicate that such fusion proteins are present in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of neighboring cells. Therefore, lentiviral vectors may provide a potent biological system for delivering genes encoding therapeutic proteins fused to VP22. PMID:11027330

  20. rDNA-directed integration by an HIV-1 integrase--I-PpoI fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Turkki, Vesa; Ahlroth, Mervi K; Timonen, Oskari; Airenne, Kari J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-03-01

    Integrating viral vectors are efficient gene transfer tools, but their integration patterns have been associated with genotoxicity and oncogenicity. The recent development of highly specific designer nucleases has enabled target DNA modification and site-specific gene insertion at desired genomic loci. However, a lack of consensus exists regarding a perfect genomic safe harbour (GSH) that would allow transgenes to be stably and reliably expressed without adversely affecting endogenous gene structure and function. Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has many advantages as a GSH, but efficient means to target integration to this locus are currently lacking. We tested whether lentivirus vector integration can be directed to rDNA by using fusion proteins consisting of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) and the homing endonuclease I-PpoI, which has natural cleavage sites in the rDNA. A point mutation (N119A) was introduced into I-PpoI to abolish unwanted DNA cleavage by the endonuclease. The vector-incorporated IN-I-PpoIN119A fusion protein targeted integration into rDNA significantly more than unmodified lentivirus vectors, with an efficiency of 2.7%. Our findings show that IN-fusion proteins can be used to modify the integration pattern of lentivirus vectors, and to package site-specific DNA-recognizing proteins into vectors to obtain safer transgene integration.

  1. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M.

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  2. Proteolytic Activation of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Coronavirus Spike Fusion Protein by Trypsin in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J.; Wubbolts, Richard W.; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. IMPORTANCE Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  3. Proteolytic activation of the porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus spike fusion protein by trypsin in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Oliver; Li, Wentao; Willems, Lione; Meuleman, Tom J; Wubbolts, Richard W; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan

    2014-07-01

    Isolation of porcine epidemic diarrhea coronavirus (PEDV) from clinical material in cell culture requires supplementation of trypsin. This may relate to the confinement of PEDV natural infection to the protease-rich small intestine of pigs. Our study focused on the role of protease activity on infection by investigating the spike protein of a PEDV isolate (wtPEDV) using a reverse genetics system based on the trypsin-independent cell culture-adapted strain DR13 (caPEDV). We demonstrate that trypsin acts on the wtPEDV spike protein after receptor binding. We mapped the genetic determinant for trypsin-dependent cell entry to the N-terminal region of the fusion subunit of this class I fusion protein, revealing a conserved arginine just upstream of the putative fusion peptide as the potential cleavage site. Whereas coronaviruses are typically processed by endogenous proteases of the producer or target cell, PEDV S protein activation strictly required supplementation of a protease, enabling us to study mechanistic details of proteolytic processing. Importance: Recurring PEDV epidemics constitute a serious animal health threat and an economic burden, particularly in Asia but, as of recently, also on the North-American subcontinent. Understanding the biology of PEDV is critical for combatting the infection. Here, we provide new insight into the protease-dependent cell entry of PEDV. PMID:24807723

  4. Transient fusion and selective secretion of vesicle proteins in Phytophthora nicotianae zoospores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Blackman, Leila M; Hardham, Adrienne R

    2013-01-01

    Secretion of pathogen proteins is crucial for the establishment of disease in animals and plants. Typically, early interactions between host and pathogen trigger regulated secretion of pathogenicity factors that function in pathogen adhesion and host penetration. During the onset of plant infection by spores of the Oomycete, Phytophthora nicotianae, proteins are secreted from three types of cortical vesicles. Following induction of spore encystment, two vesicle types undergo full fusion, releasing their entire contents onto the cell surface. However, the third vesicle type, so-called large peripheral vesicles, selectively secretes a small Sushi domain-containing protein, PnCcp, while retaining a large glycoprotein, PnLpv, before moving away from the plasma membrane. Selective secretion of PnCcp is associated with its compartmentalization within the vesicle periphery. Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin function, purportedly in vesicle fission, by dynasore treatment provides evidence that selective secretion of PnCcp requires transient fusion of the large peripheral vesicles. This is the first report of selective protein secretion via transient fusion outside mammalian cells. Selective secretion is likely to be an important aspect of plant infection by this destructive pathogen. PMID:24392285

  5. The construction of a bifunctional fusion protein consisting of SEC2 and EGFP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanli; Xu, Mingkai; Li, Xu; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Chenggang; Zhang, Huiwen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to construct a bifunctional fusion protein consisting of staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). We inserted EGFP and SEC2 fragments into the pET-28a(+) vector to create the expression plasmid vector, pET-28a(+)-SEC2-EGFP, using a two-step method. After verification of the plasmid, successful isolation of the fusion protein, SEC2-EGFP, was achieved by Ni+-affinity chromatography. Fluorescence microscopy, methylthiazol tetrazolium, and flow cytometry assays demonstrated that the constructed fusion protein not only retained the fluorescence signal of EGFP but also exhibited SEC2 bioactivity. Therefore, SEC2-EGFP is a promising tool for the study of the detailed temporal and spatial distributions of SEC2 in cells. Future studies with this vector may help uncover novel therapeutic strategies to treat or manage SEC2-associated diseases and be a new clinical tool for exploiting SEC2 in immunotherapy.

  6. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  7. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature.

  8. Analysis of nuclear export using photoactivatable GFP fusion proteins and interspecies heterokaryons.

    PubMed

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, we review protocols for the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors and nuclear proteins, using two different approaches. The first involves the use of photoactivatable forms of the protein of interest by fusion to photoactivatable green fluorescent protein to follow its movement out of the nucleus by live-cell confocal microscopy. This methodology allows for the kinetic characterization of protein movements as well as measurement of steady-state levels. In a second procedure to assess the ability of a nuclear protein to move into and out of the nucleus, we describe the use of interspecies heterokaryon assays, which provide a measurement of steady-state distribution. These technologies are directly applicable to the analysis of nucleocytoplasmic movements not only of transcription factors, but also other nuclear proteins.

  9. Characterization of the binding of metoprolol tartrate and guaifenesin drugs to human serum albumin and human hemoglobin proteins by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duman, Osman; Tunç, Sibel; Kancı Bozoğlan, Bahar

    2013-07-01

    The interactions of metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and guaifenesin (GF) drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) and human hemoglobin (HMG) proteins at pH 7.4 were studied by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Drugs quenched the fluorescence spectra of HSA and HMG proteins through a static quenching mechanism. For each protein-drug system, the values of Stern-Volmer quenching constant, bimolecular quenching constant, binding constant and number of binding site on the protein molecules were determined at 288.15, 298.15, 310.15 and 318.15 K. It was found that the binding constants of HSA-MPT and HSA-GF systems were smaller than those of HMG-MPT and HMG-GF systems. For both drugs, the affinity of HMG was much higher than that of HSA. An increase in temperature caused a negative effect on the binding reactions. The number of binding site on blood proteins for MPT and GF drugs was approximately one. Thermodynamic parameters showed that MPT interacted with HSA through electrostatic attraction forces. However, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were the main interaction forces in the formation of HSA-GF, HMG-MPT and HMG-GF complexes. The binding processes between protein and drug molecules were exothermic and spontaneous owing to negative ∆H and ∆G values, respectively. The values of binding distance between protein and drug molecules were calculated from Förster resonance energy transfer theory. It was found from CD analysis that the bindings of MPT and GF drugs to HSA and HMG proteins altered the secondary structure of HSA and HMG proteins. PMID:23471625

  10. Vaccinia mature virus fusion regulator A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 proteins of the viral entry fusion complex and dissociates from mature virions at low pH.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Shih, Ao-Chun; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2012-04-01

    Vaccinia mature virus enters cells through either endocytosis or plasma membrane fusion, depending on virus strain and cell type. Our previous results showed that vaccinia virus mature virions containing viral A26 protein enter HeLa cells preferentially through endocytosis, whereas mature virions lacking A26 protein enter through plasma membrane fusion, leading us to propose that A26 acts as an acid-sensitive fusion suppressor for mature virus (S. J. Chang, Y. X. Chang, R. Izmailyan R, Y. L. Tang, and W. Chang, J. Virol. 84:8422-8432, 2010). In the present study, we investigated the fusion suppression mechanism of A26 protein. We found that A26 protein was coimmunoprecipitated with multiple components of the viral entry-fusion complex (EFC) in infected HeLa cells. Transient expression of viral EFC components in HeLa cells revealed that vaccinia virus A26 protein interacted directly with A16 and G9 but not with G3, L5 and H2 proteins of the EFC components. Consistently, a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-A26 fusion protein, but not GST, pulled down A16 and G9 proteins individually in vitro. Together, our results supported the idea that A26 protein binds to A16 and G9 protein at neutral pH contributing to suppression of vaccinia virus-triggered membrane fusion from without. Since vaccinia virus extracellular envelope proteins A56/K2 were recently shown to bind to the A16/G9 subcomplex to suppress virus-induced fusion from within, our results also highlight an evolutionary convergence in which vaccinia viral fusion suppressor proteins regulate membrane fusion by targeting the A16 and G9 components of the viral EFC complex. Finally, we provide evidence that acid (pH 4.7) treatment induced A26 protein and A26-A27 protein complexes of 70 kDa and 90 kDa to dissociate from mature virions, suggesting that the structure of A26 protein is acid sensitive.

  11. Construction of human LRIG1-TAT fusions and TAT-mediated LRIG1 protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuchun; Fu, Liqi; Liu, Bo; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Kai; Ye, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG1) is a tumor suppressor in animals and also functions as an endogenous suppressor in human tumor. The level of LRIG1 expression is highly associated with patient survival in clinic. The exploration of LRIG1 as a protein drug is an important task. HIV-1 transactivator of transcription peptide (TAT) is an excellent candidate for protein transduction. In this study, human LRIG1 was cloned and LRIG1-TAT fusion gene was constructed. The fusion proteins were produced by an Escherichia coli strain and purified by Ni(2+)-resin. Western blot assay and immunofluorescence microscopy were employed for monitoring LRIG1-TAT protein transduction into human neuroblastoma cells. Cell proliferation and invasion were measured for evaluating the effect of LRIG1-TAT on neuroblastoma cell. Our data showed that LRIG1 protein can be delivered into cells or organs in living animals by TAT. One-time transduction of LRIG1 proteins into human neuroblastoma cells enhanced cell proliferation and increased cell invasion. In vivo transduction showed that LRIG1-TAT protein can be presented in living animal organs. Our experiments provide a new vision on LRIG1 applications and also offer a therapy window for revealing the intrinsic function of LRIG1 on cells.

  12. Construction of human LRIG1-TAT fusions and TAT-mediated LRIG1 protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuchun; Fu, Liqi; Liu, Bo; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Kai; Ye, Ming

    2015-02-01

    Human leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains (LRIG1) is a tumor suppressor in animals and also functions as an endogenous suppressor in human tumor. The level of LRIG1 expression is highly associated with patient survival in clinic. The exploration of LRIG1 as a protein drug is an important task. HIV-1 transactivator of transcription peptide (TAT) is an excellent candidate for protein transduction. In this study, human LRIG1 was cloned and LRIG1-TAT fusion gene was constructed. The fusion proteins were produced by an Escherichia coli strain and purified by Ni(2+)-resin. Western blot assay and immunofluorescence microscopy were employed for monitoring LRIG1-TAT protein transduction into human neuroblastoma cells. Cell proliferation and invasion were measured for evaluating the effect of LRIG1-TAT on neuroblastoma cell. Our data showed that LRIG1 protein can be delivered into cells or organs in living animals by TAT. One-time transduction of LRIG1 proteins into human neuroblastoma cells enhanced cell proliferation and increased cell invasion. In vivo transduction showed that LRIG1-TAT protein can be presented in living animal organs. Our experiments provide a new vision on LRIG1 applications and also offer a therapy window for revealing the intrinsic function of LRIG1 on cells. PMID:25661388

  13. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 Protein: Roles of Histidine Residues in Triggering Membrane Fusion and Fusion Pore Expansion▿†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaofei; Blissard, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) GP64 protein mediates membrane fusion during entry. Fusion results from a low-pH-triggered conformational change in GP64 and subsequent interactions with the membrane bilayers. The low-pH sensor and trigger of the conformational change are not known, but histidine residues are implicated because the pKa of histidine is near the threshold for triggering fusion by GP64. We used alanine substitutions to examine the roles of all individual and selected clusters of GP64 histidine residues in triggering and mediating fusion by GP64. Three histidine residues (H152, H155, and H156), located in fusion loop 2, were identified as important for membrane fusion. These three histidine residues were important for efficient pore expansion but were not required for the pH-triggered conformational change. In contrast, a cluster of three histidine residues (H245, H304, and H430) located near the base of the central coiled coil was identified as a putative sensor for low pH. Three alanine substitutions in cluster H245/H304/H430 resulted in dramatically reduced membrane fusion and the apparent loss of the prefusion conformation at neutral pH. Thus, the H245/H304/H430 cluster of histidines may function or participate as a pH sensor by stabilizing the prefusion structure of GP64. PMID:21937651

  14. Full-length trimeric influenza virus hemagglutinin II membrane fusion protein and shorter constructs lacking the fusion peptide or transmembrane domain: Hyperthermostability of the full-length protein and the soluble ectodomain and fusion peptide make significant contributions to fusion of membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U; Prabodha Ekanayaka, E A; Komanduru, Sweta S; Weliky, David P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus is a class I enveloped virus which is initially endocytosed into a host respiratory epithelial cell. Subsequent reduction of the pH to the 5-6 range triggers a structural change of the viral hemagglutinin II (HA2) protein, fusion of the viral and endosomal membranes, and release of the viral nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. HA2 contains fusion peptide (FP), soluble ectodomain (SE), transmembrane (TM), and intraviral domains with respective lengths of ∼ 25, ∼ 160, ∼ 25, and ∼ 10 residues. The present work provides a straightforward protocol for producing and purifying mg quantities of full-length HA2 from expression in bacteria. Biophysical and structural comparisons are made between full-length HA2 and shorter constructs including SHA2 ≡ SE, FHA2 ≡ FP+SE, and SHA2-TM ≡ SE+TM constructs. The constructs are helical in detergent at pH 7.4 and the dominant trimer species. The proteins are highly thermostable in decylmaltoside detergent with Tm>90 °C for HA2 with stabilization provided by the SE, FP, and TM domains. The proteins are likely in a trimer-of-hairpins structure, the final protein state during fusion. All constructs induce fusion of negatively-charged vesicles at pH 5.0 with much less fusion at pH 7.4. Attractive protein/vesicle electrostatics play a role in fusion, as the proteins are positively-charged at pH 5.0 and negatively-charged at pH 7.4 and the pH-dependence of fusion is reversed for positively-charged vesicles. Comparison of fusion between constructs supports significant contributions to fusion from the SE and the FP with little effect from the TM.

  15. Purification method for recombinant proteins based on a fusion between the target protein and the C-terminus of calmodulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Deo, Sapna K.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) was used as an affinity tail to facilitate the purification of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was used as a model target protein. The protein GFP was fused to the C-terminus of CaM, and a factor Xa cleavage site was introduced between the two proteins. A CaM-GFP fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and purified on a phenothiazine-derivatized silica column. CaM binds to the phenothiazine on the column in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and it was, therefore, used as an affinity tail for the purification of GFP. The fusion protein bound to the affinity column was then subjected to a proteolytic digestion with factor Xa. Pure GFP was eluted with a Ca(2+)-containing buffer, while CaM was eluted later with a buffer containing the Ca(2+)-chelating agent EGTA. The purity of the isolated GFP was verified by SDS-PAGE, and the fluorescence properties of the purified GFP were characterized.

  16. High-yield membrane protein expression from E. coli using an engineered outer membrane protein F fusion.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin-Chuan; Si, William; Baker, Deidre L; Berger, Bryan W

    2013-04-01

    Obtaining high yields of membrane proteins necessary to perform detailed structural study is difficult due to poor solubility and variability in yields from heterologous expression systems. To address this issue, an Escherichia coli-based membrane protein overexpression system utilizing an engineered bacterial outer membrane protein F (pOmpF) fusion has been developed. Full-length human receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1) was expressed using pOmpF, solubilized in FC15 and purified to homogeneity. Using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy, purified full-length RAMP1 is composed of approximately 90% α-helix, and retains its solubility and structure in FC15 over a wide range of temperatures (20-60°C). Thus, our approach provides a useful, complementary approach to achieve high-yield, full-length membrane protein overexpression for biophysical studies.

  17. Delivery of membrane proteins into small and giant unilamellar vesicles by charge-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Biner, Olivier; Schick, Thomas; Müller, Yannic; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    One of the current challenges in synthetic biology is the production of stable membrane mimetic systems and the insertion of components in these systems. Here, we employ fusion of oppositely charged liposomes to deliver separately reconstituted membrane proteins into a common lipid bilayer. After a systematic evaluation of different lipid compositions by lipid mixing and size distribution analysis, suitable conditions were further investigated for proteoliposome fusion. With this technique, we functionally coreconstituted bo3 oxidase and ATP synthase from Escherichia coli into unilamellar liposomes ranging from 100 nm to 50 μm in size. The presented method is a simple and versatile tool for oriented membrane protein reconstitution to produce biomimetic systems with increased complexity. PMID:27264202

  18. Inhibitory effects of a peptide-fusion protein (Latarcin-PAP1-Thanatin) against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Rothan, Hussin A; Bahrani, Hirbod; Shankar, Esaki M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2014-08-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreaks have led to a serious economic burden, as the available treatment strategies can only alleviate disease symptoms, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are currently available for human use. Here, we report the use of a new cost-effective approach involving production of a recombinant antiviral peptide-fusion protein that is scalable for the treatment of CHIKV infection. A peptide-fusion recombinant protein LATA-PAP1-THAN that was generated by joining Latarcin (LATA) peptide with the N-terminus of the PAP1 antiviral protein, and the Thanatin (THAN) peptide to the C-terminus, was produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The antiviral LATA-PAP1-THAN protein showed 89.0% reduction of viral plaque formation compared with PAP1 (46.0%), LATA (67.0%) or THAN (79.3%) peptides alone. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein reduced the viral RNA load that was 0.89-fold compared with the untreated control cells. We also showed that PAP1 resulted in 0.44-fold reduction, and THAN and LATA resulting in 0.78-fold and 0.73-fold reductions, respectively. The LATA-PAP1-THAN protein inhibited CHIKV replication in the Vero cells at an EC50 of 11.2μg/ml, which is approximately half of the EC50 of PAP1 (23.7μg/ml) and protected the CHIKV-infected mice at the dose of 0.75mg/ml. We concluded that production of antiviral peptide-fusion protein in E. coli as inclusion bodies could accentuate antiviral activities, enhance cellular internalisation, and could reduce product toxicity to host cells and is scalable to epidemic response quantities.

  19. Reconstitution of membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles via peptide-induced fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Kahya, N; Pécheur, E I; de Boeij, W P; Wiersma, D A; Hoekstra, D

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we present a protocol to reconstitute membrane proteins into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUV) via peptide-induced fusion. In principle, GUV provide a well-defined lipid matrix, resembling a close-to-native state for biophysical studies, including optical microspectroscopy, of transmembrane proteins at the molecular level. Furthermore, reconstitution in this manner would also eliminate potential artifacts arising from secondary interactions of proteins, when reconstituted in planar membranes supported on solid surfaces. However, assembly procedures of GUV preclude direct reconstitution. Here, for the first time, a method is described that allows the controlled incorporation of membrane proteins into GUV. We demonstrate that large unilamellar vesicles (LUV, diameter 0.1 microm), to which the small fusogenic peptide WAE has been covalently attached, readily fuse with GUV, as revealed by monitoring lipid and contents mixing by fluorescence microscopy. To monitor contents mixing, a new fluorescence-based enzymatic assay was devised. Fusion does not introduce changes in the membrane morphology, as shown by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Analysis of fluorescence confocal imaging intensity revealed that approximately 6 to 10 LUV fused per microm(2) of GUV surface. As a model protein, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was reconstituted into GUV, using LUV into which BR was incorporated via detergent dialysis. BR did not affect GUV-LUV fusion and the protein was stably inserted into the GUV and functionally active. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments show that BR inserted into GUV undergoes unrestricted Brownian motion with a diffusion coefficient of 1.2 microm(2)/s. The current procedure offers new opportunities to address issues related to membrane-protein structure and dynamics in a close-to-native state. PMID:11509360

  20. Recombinant albumin monolayers on latex particles.

    PubMed

    Sofińska, Kamila; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Kujda, Marta; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-14

    The adsorption of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) on negatively charged polystyrene latex micro-particles was studied at pH 3.5 and the NaCl concentration range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M. The electrophoretic mobility of latex monotonically increased with the albumin concentration in the suspension. The coverage of adsorbed albumin was quantitatively determined using the depletion method, where the residual protein concentration was determined by electrokinetic measurements and AFM imaging. It was shown that albumin adsorption was irreversible. Its maximum coverage on latex varied between 0.7 mg m(-2) for 10(-3) M NaCl to 1.3 mg m(-2) for 0.15 M NaCl. The latter value matches the maximum coverage previously determined for human serum albumin on mica using the streaming potential method. The increase in the maximum coverage was interpreted in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed molecules. These facts confirm that albumin adsorption at pH 3.5 is governed by electrostatic interactions and proceeds analogously to colloid particle deposition. The stability of albumin monolayers was measured in additional experiments where changes in the latex electrophoretic mobility and the concentration of free albumin in solutions were monitored over prolonged time periods. Based on these experimental data, a robust procedure of preparing albumin monolayers on latex particles of well-controlled coverage and molecule distribution was proposed. PMID:24354916

  1. Lungfish albumin is more similar to tetrapod than to teleost albumins: purification and characterisation of albumin from the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Victoria J; George, Peter M; Brennan, Stephen O

    2007-07-01

    Lobe-finned fish, particularly lungfish, are thought of as the closest extant relatives to tetrapods. Albumin, the major vertebrate plasma protein, has been well studied in tetrapods, but there exists no comparative study of the presence and characteristics of albumin in lobe-finned fish versus other vertebrates. There is a controversy over the presence of albumin in fish, although it is present in salmonids and lamprey. The presence of albumin in lungfish has also recently been documented. We identified albumin in plasma of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, using a combination of agarose gel electrophoresis, [(14)C]palmitic acid binding and SDS-PAGE. Lungfish albumin was purified using DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, and has a mass of 67 kDa, is present at approximately 8 g/L in plasma and like other fish albumins, does not bind nickel. However, like tetrapod albumins, it is not glycosylated. N-terminal and internal peptide sequencing generated 101 amino acids of sequence, which showed a high degree of identity with tetrapod albumins. Despite the similarity in sequence but congruent with the evolutionary distances separating them, lungfish albumin did not cross-react with anti-chicken or anti-tuatara A albumin antisera. Lungfish albumin has characteristics more akin with tetrapod albumin and less like those of other fish.

  2. Genetic conjugation of components in two pneumococcal fusion protein vaccines enhances paediatric mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pope, Caroline; Oliver, Elizabeth H; Ma, Jiangtao; Langton Hewer, Claire; Mitchell, Tim J; Finn, Adam

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae colonises the upper respiratory tract and can cause pneumonia, meningitis and otitis media. Existing pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are expensive to produce and only protect against 13 of the 90+ pneumococcal serotypes; hence there is an urgent need for the development of new vaccines. We have shown previously in mice that pneumolysin (Ply) and a non-toxic variant (Δ6Ply) enhance antibody responses when genetically fused to pneumococcal surface adhesin A (PsaA), a potentially valuable effect for future vaccines. We investigated this adjuvanticity in human paediatric mucosal primary immune cell cultures. Adenoidal mononuclear cells (AMNC) from children aged 0-15 years (n=46) were stimulated with conjugated, admixed or individual proteins, cell viability and CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses were assessed using flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was measured using multiplex technology. Proliferation of CD4+ T-cells in response to PsaAPly, was significantly higher than responses to individual or admixed proteins (p=0.002). In contrast, an enhanced response to PsaAΔ6Ply compared to individual or admixed proteins only occurred at higher concentrations (p<0.01). Evaluation of cytotoxicity suggested that responses occurred when Ply-induced cytolysis was inhibited, either by fusion or mutation, but importantly an additional toxicity independent immune enhancing effect was also apparent as a result of fusion. Responses were MHC class II dependent and had a Th1/Th17 profile. Genetic fusion of Δ6Ply to PsaA significantly modulates and enhances pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cell responses without the cytolytic effects of some other pneumolysoids. Membrane binding activity of such proteins may confer valuable adjuvant properties as fusion may assist Δ6Ply to deliver PsaA to the APC surface effectively, contributing to the initiation of anti-pneumococcal CD4+ T-cell immunity.

  3. Shank2 Regulates Renal Albumin Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Lewis, Linda; Doctor, R Brian; Okamura, Kayo; Lee, Min Goo; Altmann, Christopher; Faubel, Sarah; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong and independent predictor of kidney disease progression but the mechanisms of albumin handling by the kidney remain to be fully defined. Previous studies have shown that podocytes endocytose albumin. Here we demonstrate that Shank2, a large scaffolding protein originally identified at the neuronal postsynaptic density, is expressed in podocytes in vivo and in vitro and plays an important role in albumin endocytosis in podocytes. Knockdown of Shank2 in cultured human podocytes decreased albumin uptake, but the decrease was not statistically significant likely due to residual Shank2 still present in the knockdown podocytes. Complete knockout of Shank2 in podocytes significantly diminished albumin uptake in vitro. Shank2 knockout mice develop proteinuria by 8 weeks of age. To examine albumin handling in vivo in wild-type and Shank2 knockout mice we used multiphoton intravital imaging. While FITC-labeled albumin was rapidly seen in the renal tubules of wild-type mice after injection, little albumin was seen in the tubules of Shank2 knockout mice indicating dysregulated renal albumin trafficking in the Shank2 knockouts. We have previously found that caveolin-1 is required for albumin endocytosis in cultured podocytes. Shank2 knockout mice had significantly decreased expression and altered localization of caveolin-1 in podocytes suggesting that disruption of albumin endocytosis in Shank2 knockouts is mediated via caveolin-1. In summary, we have identified Shank2 as another component of the albumin endocytic pathway in podocytes. PMID:26333830

  4. Human podocytes perform polarized, caveolae-dependent albumin endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Okamura, Kayo; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Doctor, R Brian; Blaine, Judith

    2014-05-01

    The renal glomerulus forms a selective filtration barrier that allows the passage of water, ions, and small solutes into the urinary space while restricting the passage of cells and macromolecules. The three layers of the glomerular filtration barrier include the vascular endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and podocyte epithelium. Podocytes are capable of internalizing albumin and are hypothesized to clear proteins that traverse the GBM. The present study followed the fate of FITC-labeled albumin to establish the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis and processing by podocytes. Confocal imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of immortalized human podocytes showed FITC-albumin endocytosis occurred preferentially across the basal membrane. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis demonstrated that the majority of FITC-albumin entered podocytes through caveolae. Once internalized, FITC-albumin colocalized with EEA1 and LAMP1, endocytic markers, and with the neonatal Fc receptor, a marker for transcytosis. After preloading podocytes with FITC-albumin, the majority of loaded FITC-albumin was lost over the subsequent 60 min of incubation. A portion of the loss of albumin occurred via lysosomal degradation as pretreatment with leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, partially inhibited the loss of FITC-albumin. Consistent with transcytosis of albumin, preloaded podocytes also progressively released FITC-albumin into the extracellular media. These studies confirm the ability of podocytes to endocytose albumin and provide mechanistic insight into cellular mechanisms and fates of albumin handling in podocytes.

  5. TALE-PvuII fusion proteins--novel tools for gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Mert; Alzubi, Jamal; Lahaye, Thomas; Cathomen, Toni; Pingoud, Alfred; Wende, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) consist of zinc fingers as DNA-binding module and the non-specific DNA-cleavage domain of the restriction endonuclease FokI as DNA-cleavage module. This architecture is also used by TALE nucleases (TALENs), in which the DNA-binding modules of the ZFNs have been replaced by DNA-binding domains based on transcription activator like effector (TALE) proteins. Both TALENs and ZFNs are programmable nucleases which rely on the dimerization of FokI to induce double-strand DNA cleavage at the target site after recognition of the target DNA by the respective DNA-binding module. TALENs seem to have an advantage over ZFNs, as the assembly of TALE proteins is easier than that of ZFNs. Here, we present evidence that variant TALENs can be produced by replacing the catalytic domain of FokI with the restriction endonuclease PvuII. These fusion proteins recognize only the composite recognition site consisting of the target site of the TALE protein and the PvuII recognition sequence (addressed site), but not isolated TALE or PvuII recognition sites (unaddressed sites), even at high excess of protein over DNA and long incubation times. In vitro, their preference for an addressed over an unaddressed site is > 34,000-fold. Moreover, TALE-PvuII fusion proteins are active in cellula with minimal cytotoxicity.

  6. Sequential conformational changes in the morbillivirus attachment protein initiate the membrane fusion process.

    PubMed

    Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Herren, Michael; Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Bringolf, Fanny; Örvell, Claes; Langedijk, Johannes P; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Despite large vaccination campaigns, measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause major morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, respectively. The MeV and CDV cell entry system relies on two interacting envelope glycoproteins: the attachment protein (H), consisting of stalk and head domains, co-operates with the fusion protein (F) to mediate membrane fusion. However, how receptor-binding by the H-protein leads to F-triggering is not fully understood. Here, we report that an anti-CDV-H monoclonal antibody (mAb-1347), which targets the linear H-stalk segment 126-133, potently inhibits membrane fusion without interfering with H receptor-binding or F-interaction. Rather, mAb-1347 blocked the F-triggering function of H-proteins regardless of the presence or absence of the head domains. Remarkably, mAb-1347 binding to headless CDV H, as well as standard and engineered bioactive stalk-elongated CDV H-constructs treated with cells expressing the SLAM receptor, was enhanced. Despite proper cell surface expression, fusion promotion by most H-stalk mutants harboring alanine substitutions in the 126-138 "spacer" section was substantially impaired, consistent with deficient receptor-induced mAb-1347 binding enhancement. However, a previously reported F-triggering defective H-I98A variant still exhibited the receptor-induced "head-stalk" rearrangement. Collectively, our data spotlight a distinct mechanism for morbillivirus membrane fusion activation: prior to receptor contact, at least one of the morbillivirus H-head domains interacts with the membrane-distal "spacer" domain in the H-stalk, leaving the F-binding site located further membrane-proximal in the stalk fully accessible. This "head-to-spacer" interaction conformationally stabilizes H in an auto-repressed state, which enables intracellular H-stalk/F engagement while preventing the inherent H-stalk's bioactivity that may prematurely activate F. Receptor-contact disrupts the "head

  7. Sequential Conformational Changes in the Morbillivirus Attachment Protein Initiate the Membrane Fusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Herren, Michael; Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Bringolf, Fanny; Örvell, Claes; Langedijk, Johannes P.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite large vaccination campaigns, measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause major morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, respectively. The MeV and CDV cell entry system relies on two interacting envelope glycoproteins: the attachment protein (H), consisting of stalk and head domains, co-operates with the fusion protein (F) to mediate membrane fusion. However, how receptor-binding by the H-protein leads to F-triggering is not fully understood. Here, we report that an anti-CDV-H monoclonal antibody (mAb-1347), which targets the linear H-stalk segment 126-133, potently inhibits membrane fusion without interfering with H receptor-binding or F-interaction. Rather, mAb-1347 blocked the F-triggering function of H-proteins regardless of the presence or absence of the head domains. Remarkably, mAb-1347 binding to headless CDV H, as well as standard and engineered bioactive stalk-elongated CDV H-constructs treated with cells expressing the SLAM receptor, was enhanced. Despite proper cell surface expression, fusion promotion by most H-stalk mutants harboring alanine substitutions in the 126-138 “spacer” section was substantially impaired, consistent with deficient receptor-induced mAb-1347 binding enhancement. However, a previously reported F-triggering defective H-I98A variant still exhibited the receptor-induced “head-stalk” rearrangement. Collectively, our data spotlight a distinct mechanism for morbillivirus membrane fusion activation: prior to receptor contact, at least one of the morbillivirus H-head domains interacts with the membrane-distal “spacer” domain in the H-stalk, leaving the F-binding site located further membrane-proximal in the stalk fully accessible. This “head-to-spacer” interaction conformationally stabilizes H in an auto-repressed state, which enables intracellular H-stalk/F engagement while preventing the inherent H-stalk’s bioactivity that may prematurely activate F. Receptor-contact disrupts the

  8. Sequence motifs and prokaryotic expression of the reptilian paramyxovirus fusion protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franke, J.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen reptilian paramyxovirus isolates were chosen to represent the known extent of genetic diversity among this novel group of viruses. Selected regions of the fusion (F) gene were sequenced, analyzed and compared. The F gene of all isolates contained conserved motifs homologous to those described for other members of the family Paramyxoviridae including: signal peptide, transmembrane domain, furin cleavage site, fusion peptide, N-linked glycosylation sites, and two heptad repeats, the second of which (HRB-LZ) had the characteristics of a leucine zipper. Selected regions of the fusion gene of isolate Gono-GER85 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression system to generate three recombinant protein fragments of various sizes. The longest recombinant protein was cleaved by furin into two fragments of predicted length. Western blot analysis with virus-neutralizing rabbit-antiserum against this isolate demonstrated that only the longest construct reacted with the antiserum. This construct was unique in containing 30 additional C-terminal amino acids that included most of the HRB-LZ. These results indicate that the F genes of reptilian paramyxoviruses contain highly conserved motifs typical of other members of the family and suggest that the HRB-LZ domain of the reptilian paramyxovirus F protein contains a linear antigenic epitope. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  9. Senescence induction in human fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors by leukemogenic fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-Zong; Serra, Ryan W.; Solomon, Peter D.; Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Zhu, Xiaochun

    2010-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies are typically associated with leukemogenic fusion proteins, which are required to maintain the oncogenic state. Previous studies have shown that certain oncogenes that promote solid tumors, such as RAS and BRAF, can induce senescence in primary cells, which is thought to provide a barrier to tumorigenesis. In these cases, the activated oncogene elicits a DNA damage response (DDR), which is essential for the senescence program. Here we show that 3 leukemogenic fusion proteins, BCR-ABL, CBFB-MYH11, and RUNX1-ETO, can induce senescence in primary fibroblasts and hematopoietic progenitors. Unexpectedly, we find that senescence induction by BCR-ABL and CBFB-MYH11 occurs through a DDR-independent pathway, whereas RUNX1-ETO induces senescence in a DDR-dependent manner. All 3 fusion proteins activate the p38 MAPK pathway, which is required for senescence induction. Our results reveal diverse pathways for oncogene-induced senescence and further suggest that leukemias harbor genetic or epigenetic alterations that inactivate senescence induction genes. PMID:20421454

  10. The recombinant expression and activity detection of MAF-1 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ping; Wu, Jianwei; Gao, Song; Guo, Guo; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This study establishes the recombinant expression system of MAF-1 (Musca domestica antifungal peptide-1) and demonstrates the antifungal activity of the expression product and shows the relationship between biological activity and structure. The gene segments on mature peptide part of MAF-1 were cloned, based on the primers designed according to the cDNA sequence of MAF-1. We constructed the recombinant prokaryotic expression plasmid using prokaryotic expression vector (pET-28a(+)) and converted it to the competent cell of BL21(DE3) to gain recombinant MAF-1 fusion protein with His tag sequence through purifying affinity chromatographic column of Ni-NTA. To conduct the Western Blotting test, recombinant MAF-1 fusion protein was used to produce the polyclonal antibody of rat. The antifungal activity of the expression product was detected using Candida albicans (ATCC10231) as the indicator. The MAF-1 recombinant fusion protein was purified to exhibit obvious antifungal activity, which lays the foundation for the further study of MAF-1 biological activity, the relationship between structure and function, as well as control of gene expression. PMID:26423137

  11. IQCJ-SCHIP1, a novel fusion transcript encoding a calmodulin-binding IQ motif protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kwasnicka-Crawford, Dorota A. . E-mail: dakc@yorku.ca; Carson, Andrew R.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2006-12-01

    The existence of transcripts that span two adjacent, independent genes is considered rare in the human genome. This study characterizes a novel human fusion gene named IQCJ-SCHIP1. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is the longest isoform of a complex transcriptional unit that bridges two separate genes that encode distinct proteins, IQCJ, a novel IQ motif containing protein and SCHIP1, a schwannomin interacting protein that has been previously shown to interact with the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) protein. IQCJ-SCHIP1 is located on the chromosome 3q25 and comprises a 1692-bp transcript encompassing 11 exons spanning 828 kb of the genomic DNA. We show that IQCJ-SCHIP1 mRNA is highly expressed in the brain. Protein encoded by the IQCJ-SCHIP1 gene was localized to cytoplasm and actin-rich regions and in differentiated PC12 cells was also seen in neurite extensions.

  12. Determination of the topology of endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins using redox-sensitive green-fluorescence protein fusions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maria; Birk, Julia; Egert, Aurélie; Odermatt, Alex

    2015-07-01

    Membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are involved in a wide array of essential cellular functions. Identification of the topology of membrane proteins can provide significant insight into their mechanisms of action and biological roles. This is particularly important for membrane enzymes, since their topology determines the subcellular site where a biochemical reaction takes place and the dependence on luminal or cytosolic co-factor pools and substrates. The methods currently available for the determination of topology of proteins are rather laborious and require post-lysis or post-fixation manipulation of cells. In this work, we have developed a simple method for defining intracellular localization and topology of ER membrane proteins in living cells, based on the fusion of the respective protein with redox-sensitive green-fluorescent protein (roGFP). We validated the method and demonstrated that roGFP fusion proteins constitute a reliable tool for the study of ER membrane protein topology, using as control microsomal 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) proteins whose topology has been resolved, and comparing with an independent approach. We then implemented this method to determine the membrane topology of six microsomal members of the 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) family. The results revealed a luminal orientation of the catalytic site for three enzymes, i.e. 17β-HSD6, 7 and 12. Knowledge of the intracellular location of the catalytic site of these enzymes will enable future studies on their biological functions and on the role of the luminal co-factor pool.

  13. Functional NifD-K fusion protein in Azotobacter vinelandii is a homodimeric complex equivalent to the native heterotetrameric MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara . E-mail: gavini@biology.msstate.edu

    2005-11-18

    The MoFe protein of the complex metalloenzyme nitrogenase folds as a heterotetramer containing two copies each of the homologous {alpha} and {beta} subunits, encoded by the nifD and the nifK genes respectively. Recently, the functional expression of a fusion NifD-K protein of nitrogenase was demonstrated in Azotobacter vinelandii, strongly implying that the MoFe protein is flexible as it could accommodate major structural changes, yet remain functional [M.H. Suh, L. Pulakat, N. Gavini, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 5353-5360]. This finding led us to further explore the type of interaction between the fused MoFe protein units. We aimed to determine whether an interaction exists between the two fusion MoFe proteins to form a homodimer that is equivalent to native heterotetrameric MoFe protein. Using the Bacteriomatch Two-Hybrid System, translationally fused constructs of NifD-K (fusion) with the full-length {lambda}CI of the pBT bait vector and also NifD-K (fusion) with the N-terminal {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG target vector were made. To compare the extent of interaction between the fused NifD-K proteins to that of the {beta}-{beta} interactions in the native MoFe protein, we proceeded to generate translationally fused constructs of NifK with the {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG vector and {lambda}CI protein of the pBT vector. The strength of the interaction between the proteins in study was determined by measuring the {beta}-galactosidase activity and extent of ampicillin resistance of the colonies expressing these proteins. This analysis demonstrated that direct protein-protein interaction exists between NifD-K fusion proteins, suggesting that they exist as homodimers. As the interaction takes place at the {beta}-interfaces of the NifD-K fusion proteins, we propose that these homodimers of NifD-K fusion protein may function in a similar manner as that of the heterotetrameric native MoFe protein. The observation that the extent of protein-protein interaction between the {beta

  14. Immobilization of the N-terminal helix stabilizes prefusion paramyxovirus fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Song, Albert S; Poor, Taylor A; Abriata, Luciano A; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Lamb, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family. PIV5 fusion and entry are mediated by the coordinated action of the receptor-binding protein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), and the fusion protein (F). Upon triggering by HN, F undergoes an irreversible ATP- and pH-independent conformational change, going down an energy gradient from a metastable prefusion state to a highly stable postfusion state. Previous studies have highlighted key conformational changes in the F-protein refolding pathway, but a detailed understanding of prefusion F-protein metastability remains elusive. Here, using two previously described F-protein mutations (S443D or P22L), we examine the capacity to modulate PIV5 F stability and the mechanisms by which these point mutants act. The S443D mutation destabilizes prefusion F proteins by disrupting a hydrogen bond network at the base of the F-protein globular head. The introduction of a P22L mutation robustly rescues destabilized F proteins through a local hydrophobic interaction between the N-terminal helix and a hydrophobic pocket. Prefusion stabilization conferred by a P22L-homologous mutation is demonstrated in the F protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus of a different genus, suggesting a conserved stabilizing structural element within the paramyxovirus family. Taken together, the available data suggest that movement of the N-terminal helix is a necessary early step for paramyxovirus F-protein refolding and presents a novel target for structure-based drug design. PMID:27335462

  15. A recombinant antibody-interleukin 2 fusion protein suppresses growth of hepatic human neuroblastoma metastases in severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Sabzevari, H; Gillies, S D; Mueller, B M; Pancook, J D; Reisfeld, R A

    1994-09-27

    A genetically engineered fusion protein consisting of a human/mouse chimeric anti-ganglioside GD2 antibody (ch14.18) and recombinant human interleukin 2 (rhIL-2) was tested for its ability to target rhIL-2 to tumor sites and stimulate immune effector cells sufficiently to achieve effective tumor cell lysis in vivo. The ch14.18-IL-2 fusion protein proved more effective than equivalent doses of rhIL-2 in suppressing dissemination and growth of human neuroblastoma in an experimental hepatic metastases model of scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells. The ch14.18-IL-2 fusion protein was also more proficient than equivalent doses of rhIL-2 in prolonging the life-span of these animals. This recombinant antibody-cytokine fusion protein may prove useful for future treatment of GD2-expressing human tumors in an adjuvant setting.

  16. The ham-2 locus, encoding a putative transmembrane protein, is required for hyphal fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Qijun; Rasmussen, Carolyn; Glass, N Louise

    2002-01-01

    Somatic cell fusion is common during organogenesis in multicellular eukaryotes, although the molecular mechanism of cell fusion is poorly understood. In filamentous fungi, somatic cell fusion occurs during vegetative growth. Filamentous fungi grow as multinucleate hyphal tubes that undergo frequent hyphal fusion (anastomosis) during colony expansion, resulting in the formation of a hyphal network. The molecular mechanism of the hyphal fusion process and the role of networked hyphae in the growth and development of these organisms are unexplored questions. We use the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model to study the molecular mechanism of hyphal fusion. In this study, we identified a deletion mutant that was restricted in its ability to undergo both self-hyphal fusion and fusion with a different individual to form a heterokaryon. This deletion mutant displayed pleiotropic defects, including shortened aerial hyphae, altered conidiation pattern, female sterility, slow growth rate, lack of hyphal fusion, and suppression of vegetative incompatibility. Complementation with a single open reading frame (ORF) within the deletion region in this mutant restored near wild-type growth rates, female fertility, aerial hyphae formation, and hyphal fusion, but not vegetative incompatibility and wild-type conidiation pattern. This ORF, which we named ham-2 (for hyphal anastomosis), encodes a putative transmembrane protein that is highly conserved, but of unknown function among eukaryotes. PMID:11805054

  17. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2) on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E) that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26) abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9) loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly.

  18. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2) on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E) that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26) abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9) loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly. PMID:26157630

  19. Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Albumin-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Stenzel, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Albumin has been a popular building block to create nanoparticles for drug delivery purposes. The performance of albumin as a drug carrier can be enhanced by combining protein with polymers, which allows the design of carriers to encompass a broader spectrum of drugs while features unique to synthetic polymers such as stimuli-responsiveness are introduced. Nanoparticles based on polymer-albumin hybrids can be divided into two classes: one that carries album as a bioactive surface coating and the other that uses albumin as biocompatible, although nonbioactive, building block. Nanoparticles with bioactive albumin surface coating can either be prepared by self-assembly of albumin-polymer conjugates or by postcoating of existing nanoparticles with albumin. Albumin has also been used as building block, either in its native or denatured form. Existing albumin nanoparticles are coated with polymers, which can influence the degradation of albumin or impact on the drug release. Finally, an alternative way of using albumin by denaturing the protein to generate a highly functional chain, which can be modified with polymer, has been presented. These albumin nanoparticles are designed to be extremely versatile so that they can deliver a wide variety of drugs, including traditional hydrophobic drugs, metal-based drugs and even therapeutic proteins and siRNA.

  20. Effects of protein transduction domain (PTD) selection and position for improved intracellular delivery of PTD-Hsp27 fusion protein formulations.

    PubMed

    Ul Ain, Qurrat; Lee, Jong Hwan; Woo, Young Sun; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2016-09-01

    Protein drugs have attracted considerable attention as therapeutic agents due to their diversity and biocompatibility. However, hydrophilic proteins possess difficulty in penetrating lipophilic cell membrane. Although protein transduction domains (PTDs) have shown effectiveness in protein delivery, the importance of selection and position of PTDs in recombinant protein vector constructs has not been investigated. This study intends to investigate the significance of PTD selection and position for therapeutic protein delivery. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) would be a therapeutic protein for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases, but itself is insufficient to prevent systemic degradation and overcoming biochemical barriers during cellular transport. Among all PTD-Hsp27 fusion proteins we cloned, Tat-Hsp27 fusion protein showed the highest efficacy. Nona-arginine (9R) conjugation to the N-terminal of Hsp27 (Hsp27-T) showed higher efficacy than C-terminal. To test the synergistic effect of two PTDs, Tat was inserted to the N-terminal of Hsp27-9R. Tat-Hsp27-9R exhibited enhanced transduction efficiency and significant improvement against oxidative stress and apoptosis. PTD-Hsp27 fusion proteins have strong potential to be developed as therapeutic proteins for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases and selection and position of PTDs for improved efficacy of PTD-fusion proteins need to be optimized considering protein's nature, transduction efficiency and stability.

  1. Roles of the Putative Integrin-Binding Motif of the Human Metapneumovirus Fusion (F) Protein in Cell-Cell Fusion, Viral Infectivity, and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yongwei; Zhang, Yu; Cai, Hui; Mirza, Anne M.; Iorio, Ronald M.; Peeples, Mark E.; Niewiesk, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a relatively recently identified paramyxovirus that causes acute upper and lower respiratory tract infection. Entry of hMPV is unusual among the paramyxoviruses, in that fusion is accomplished by the fusion (F) protein without the attachment glycoprotein (G protein). It has been suggested that hMPV F protein utilizes integrin αvβ1 as a cellular receptor. Consistent with this, the F proteins of all known hMPV strains possess an integrin-binding motif (329RGD331). The role of this motif in viral entry, infectivity, and pathogenesis is poorly understood. Here, we show that α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and hMPV infection. Mutational analysis found that residues R329 and G330 in the 329RGD331 motif are essential for cell-cell fusion, whereas mutations at D331 did not significantly impact fusion activity. Furthermore, fusion-defective RGD mutations were either lethal to the virus or resulted in recombinant hMPVs that had defects in viral replication in cell culture. In cotton rats, recombinant hMPV with the R329K mutation in the F protein (rhMPV-R329K) and rhMPV-D331A exhibited significant defects in viral replication in nasal turbinates and lungs. Importantly, inoculation of cotton rats with these mutants triggered a high level of neutralizing antibodies and protected against hMPV challenge. Taken together, our data indicate that (i) α5β1 and αv integrins are essential for cell-cell fusion and viral replication, (ii) the first two residues in the RGD motif are essential for fusion activity, and (iii) inhibition of the interaction of the integrin-RGD motif may serve as a new target to rationally attenuate hMPV for the development of live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is one of the major causative agents of acute respiratory disease in humans. Currently, there is no vaccine or antiviral drug for hMPV. hMPV enters host cells via a unique mechanism, in that viral

  2. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on.

  3. Single Particle Dynamic Imaging and Fe3+ Sensing with Bright Carbon Dots Derived from Bovine Serum Albumin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingxiu; Wei, Lin; Zheng, Xuanfang; Xiao, Lehui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrated a convenient and green strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent and water-soluble carbon dots (Cdots) by carbonizing carbon precursors, i.e., Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles, in water solution. Without post surface modification, the as-synthesized Cdots exhibit fluorescence quantum yield (Q.Y.) as high as 34.8% and display superior colloidal stability not only in concentrated salt solutions (e.g. 2 M KCl) but also in a wide range of pH solutions. According to the FT-IR measurements, the Cdots contain many carboxyl groups, providing a versatile route for further chemical and biological functionalization. Through conjugation of Cdots with the transacting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide (a kind of cell penetration peptide (CPP)) derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), it is possible to directly monitor the dynamic interactions of CPP with living cell membrane at single particle level. Furthermore, these Cdots also exhibit a dosage-dependent selectivity toward Fe3+ among other metal ions, including K+, Na+, Mg2+, Hg2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Pb2+ and Al3+. We believed that the Cdots prepared by this strategy would display promising applications in various areas, including analytical chemistry, nanomedicine, biochemistry and so on. PMID:26634992

  4. Startling temperature effect on proteins when confined: single molecular level behaviour of human serum albumin in a reverse micelle.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Bhaswati; Yadav, Rajeev; Sen, Pratik

    2016-06-01

    The present work reports the effect of confinement, and temperature therein, on the conformational fluctuation dynamics of domain-I of human serum albumin (HSA) by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The water-pool of a sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelle has been used as the confined environment. It was observed that the conformational fluctuation time is about 6 times smaller compared to bulk medium when confined in a water-pool of 3.5 nm radius. On increasing the size of the water-pool the conformational fluctuation time was found to increase monotonically and approaches the bulk value. The effect of confinement is on par with the general belief about the restricted motion of a macromolecule upon confinement. However, the effect of temperature was found to be surprising. An increase in the temperature from 298 K to 313 K induces a larger change in the conformational fluctuation time in HSA, when confined. In the bulk medium, apparently there is no change in the conformational fluctuation time in the aforementioned temperature range, whereas, when HSA is present in an AOT water-pool of radius 3.5 nm, about an 88% increase in the fluctuation time was observed. The observed prominent thermal effect on the conformational dynamics of domain-I of HSA in the water-pool of an AOT reverse micelle as compared to in the bulk medium was concluded to arise from the confined solvent effect.

  5. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  6. Endocytosis plays a critical role in proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Meulendyke, Kelly Ann; Wurth, Mark Allen; McCann, Richard O; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-10-01

    The Hendra virus fusion (F) protein is synthesized as a precursor protein, F(0), which is proteolytically processed to the mature form, F(1) + F(2). Unlike the case for the majority of paramyxovirus F proteins, the processing event is furin independent, does not require the addition of exogenous proteases, is not affected by reductions in intracellular Ca(2+), and is strongly affected by conditions that raise the intracellular pH (C. T. Pager, M. A. Wurth, and R. E. Dutch, J. Virol. 78:9154-9163, 2004). The Hendra virus F protein cytoplasmic tail contains a consensus motif for endocytosis, YXXPhi. To analyze the potential role of endocytosis in the processing and membrane fusion promotion of the Hendra virus F protein, mutation of tyrosine 525 to alanine (Hendra virus F Y525A) or phenylalanine (Hendra virus F Y525F) was performed. The rate of endocytosis of Hendra virus F Y525A was significantly reduced compared to that of the wild-type (wt) F protein, confirming the functional importance of the endocytosis motif. An intermediate level of endocytosis was observed for Hendra virus F Y525F. Surprisingly, dramatic reductions in the rate of proteolytic processing were observed for Hendra virus F Y525A, although initial transport to the cell surface was not affected. The levels of surface expression for both Hendra virus F Y525A and Hendra virus F Y525F were higher than that of the wt protein, and these mutants displayed enhanced syncytium formation. These results suggest that endocytosis is critically important for Hendra virus F protein cleavage, representing a new paradigm for proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus F proteins.

  7. Molecular Aspects of the Interaction of Iminium and Alkanolamine Forms of the Anticancer Alkaloid Chelerythrine with Plasma Protein Bovine Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Das, Suman

    2016-01-14

    The interaction between a quaternary benzophenanthridine alkaloid chelerythrine (herein after, CHL) and bovine serum albumin (herein after, BSA) was probed by employing various spectroscopic tools and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Fluorescence studies revealed that the binding affinity of the alkanolamine form of the CHL is higher compared to the iminium counterpart. This was further established by fluorescence polarization anisotropy measurement and ITC. Fluorescence quenching study along with time-resolved fluorescence measurements establish that both forms of CHL quenched the fluorescence intensity of BSA through the mechanism of static quenching. Site selective binding and molecular modeling studies revealed that the alkaloid binds predominantly in the BSA subdomain IIA by electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. From Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies, the average distances between the protein donor and the alkaloid acceptor were found to be 2.71 and 2.30 nm between tryptophan (Trp) 212 (donor) and iminium and alkanolamine forms (acceptor), respectively. Circular dichroism (CD) study demonstrated that the α-helical organization of the protein is reduced due to binding with CHL along with an increase in the coiled structure. This is indicative of a small but definitive partial unfolding of the protein. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from ITC experiments revealed that the interaction is favored by negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. PMID:26653994

  8. Combination of UV-vis spectroscopy and chemometrics to understand protein-nanomaterial conjugate: a case study on human serum albumin and gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ni, Yongnian

    2014-02-01

    Study of the interactions between proteins and nanomaterials is of great importance for understanding of protein nanoconjugate. In this work, we choose human serum albumin (HSA) and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as a model of protein and nanomaterial, and combine UV-vis spectroscopy with multivariate curve resolution by an alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm to present a new and efficient method for comparatively comprehensive study of evolution of protein nanoconjugate. UV-vis spectroscopy coupled with MCR-ALS allows qualitative and quantitative extraction of the distribution diagrams, spectra and kinetic profiles of absorbing pure species (AuNPs and AuNPs-HSA conjugate are herein identified) and undetectable species (HSA) from spectral data. The response profiles recovered are converted into the desired thermodynamic, kinetic and structural parameters describing the protein nanoconjugate evolution. Analysis of these parameters for the system gives evidence that HSA molecules are very likely to be attached to AuNPs surface predominantly as a flat monolayer to form a stable AuNPs-HSA conjugate with a core-shell structure, and the binding process takes place mainly through electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions between the positively amino acid residues of HSA and the negatively carboxyl group of citrate on AuNPs surface. The results obtained are verified by transmission electron microscopy, zeta potential, circular dichroism spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, showing the potential of UV-vis spectroscopy for study of evolution of protein nanoconjugate. In parallel, concentration evolutions of pure species resolved by MCR-ALS are used to construct a sensitive spectroscopic biosensor for HSA with a linear range from 1.8 nM to 28.1 nM and a detection limit of 0.8 nM.

  9. Trans-splicing as a novel method to rapidly produce antibody fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, Ryohei; Kiuchi, Hiroki; Ihara, Masaki; Mori, Toshihiro; Kawakami, Masayuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2009-07-03

    To cultivate the use of trans-splicing as a novel means to rapidly express various antibody fusion proteins, we tried to express antibody-reporter enzyme fusions in a COS-1 co-transfection model. When a vector designed to induce trans-splicing with IgH pre-mRNA was co-transfected with a vector encoding the mouse IgM locus, the expression of V{sub H}-secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as well as Fab-SEAP were successfully expressed both in mRNA and protein levels. Especially, the vectors encoding complementary sequence to S{mu} as a binding domain was accurate and efficient, producing trans-spliced mRNA of up to 2% of cis-spliced one. Since S{mu} sequence should exist in every IgH pre-mRNA, our finding will lead to the rapid production and analysis of various antibody-enzyme fusions suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or antibody-dependent enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT).

  10. Eradication of Human Hepatic and Pulmonary Melanoma Metastases in SCID Mice by Antibody--Interleukin 2 Fusion Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Jurgen C.; Pancook, James D.; Gillies, Stephen D.; Mendelsohn, John; Reisfeld, Ralph A.

    1996-04-01

    Antibody--cytokine fusion proteins combine the unique targeting ability of antibodies with the multifunctional activity of cytokines. Here, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of such constructs for the treatment of hepatic and pulmonary metastases of different melanoma cell lines. Two antibody--interleukin 2 (IL-2) fusion proteins, ch225-IL2 and ch14.18-IL2, constructed by fusion of a synthetic sequence coding for human IL-2 to the carboxyl end of the Cγ 1 gene of the corresponding antibodies, were tested for their therapeutic efficacy against xenografted human melanoma in vivo. Tumorspecific fusion proteins completely inhibited the growth of hepatic and pulmonary metastases in C.B-17 scid/scid mice previously reconstituted with human lymphokine-activated killer cells, whereas treatment with combinations of the corresponding antibodies plus recombinant IL-2 only reduced the tumor load. Even when treatment with fusion proteins was delayed up to 8 days after inoculation of tumor cells, it still resulted in complete eradication of micrometastases that were established at that time point. Selection of tumor cell lines expressing or lacking the targeted antigen of the administered fusion protein proved the specificity of the observed antitumor effect. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated that the tumorspecific fusion protein accumulated not only in subcutaneous tumors but also in lungs and livers affected with micrometastases. Survival times of animals treated with the fusion protein were more than doubled as compared to those treated with the combination of the corresponding antibody plus IL-2. Our data demonstrate that an immunotherapeutic approach using cytokines targeted by antibodies to tumor sites has potent effects against disseminated human melanoma.

  11. Cathepsin L is involved in proteolytic processing of the Hendra virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2005-10-01

    Proteolytic processing of paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins is essential for the generation of a mature and fusogenic form of the F protein. Although many paramyxovirus F proteins are proteolytically processed by the cellular protease furin at a multibasic cleavage motif, cleavage of the newly emerged Hendra virus F protein occurs by a previously unidentified cellular protease following a single lysine at residue 109. We demonstrate here that the cellular protease cathepsin L is involved in converting the Hendra virus precursor F protein (F(0)) to the active F(1) + F(2) disulfide-linked heterodimer. To initially identify the class of protease involved in Hendra virus F protein cleavage, Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F or pCAGGS-SV5 F (known to be proteolytically processed by furin) were metabolically labeled and chased in the absence or presence of serine, cysteine, aspartyl, and metalloprotease inhibitors. Nonspecific and specific protease inhibitors known to decrease cathepsin activity inhibited proteolytic processing of Hendra virus F but had no effect on simian virus 5 F processing. We next designed shRNA oligonucleotides to cathepsin L which dramatically reduced cathepsin L protein expression and enzyme activity. Cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells transfected with pCAGGS-Hendra F demonstrated a nondetectable amount of cleavage of the Hendra virus F protein and significantly decreased membrane fusion activity. Additionally, we found that purified human cathepsin L processed immunopurified Hendra virus F(0) into F(1) and F(2) fragments. These studies introduce a novel mechanism for primary proteolytic processing of viral glycoproteins and also suggest a previously unreported biological role for cathepsin L.

  12. Putative sperm fusion protein IZUMO and the role of N-glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Naokazu; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2008-12-19

    IZUMO is the mouse sperm protein proven to be essential for fusion with eggs. It contains one immunoglobulin-like domain with a conserved glycosylation site within. In the present paper, we produced transgenic mouse lines expressing unglycosylated IZUMO (N204Q-IZUMO) in Izumo1 -/- background. The expression of N204Q-IZUMO rescued the infertile phenotype of IZUMO disrupted mice, indicating glycosylation is not essential for fusion-facilitating activity of IZUMO. The N204Q-IZUMO was produced in testis in comparable amounts to wild-type IZUMO, but the amount of N204Q-IZUMO on sperm was significantly decreased by the time sperm reached the cauda epididymis. These data suggest that glycosylation is not essential for the function of IZUMO, but has a role in protecting it from fragmentation in cauda epididymis.

  13. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  14. Characterization of Aggregation Propensity of a Human Fc-Fusion Protein Therapeutic by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Iacob, Roxana E.; Krystek, Stanley R.; Jin, Mi; Wei, Hui; Tao, Li; Das, Tapan K.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2016-08-01

    Aggregation of protein therapeutics has long been a concern across different stages of manufacturing processes in the biopharmaceutical industry. It is often indicative of aberrant protein therapeutic higher-order structure. In this study, the aggregation propensity of a human Fc-fusion protein therapeutic was characterized. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was applied to examine the conformational dynamics of dimers collected from a bioreactor. HDX-MS data combined with spatial aggregation propensity calculations revealed a potential aggregation interface in the Fc domain. This study provides a general strategy for the characterization of the aggregation propensity of Fc-fusion proteins at the molecular level.

  15. Transposon assisted gene insertion technology (TAGIT): a tool for generating fluorescent fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Becker, Eric C; Jung, James; Tuwatananurak, Ida; Pogliano, Kit

    2010-01-01

    We constructed a transposon (transposon assisted gene insertion technology, or TAGIT) that allows the random insertion of gfp (or other genes) into chromosomal loci without disrupting operon structure or regulation. TAGIT is a modified Tn5 transposon that uses Kan(R) to select for insertions on the chromosome or plasmid, beta-galactosidase to identify in-frame gene fusions, and Cre recombinase to excise the kan and lacZ genes in vivo. The resulting gfp insertions maintain target gene reading frame (to the 5' and 3' of gfp) and are integrated at the native chromosomal locus, thereby maintaining native expression signals. Libraries can be screened to identify GFP insertions that maintain target protein function at native expression levels, allowing more trustworthy localization studies. We here use TAGIT to generate a library of GFP insertions in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor (LacI). We identified fully functional GFP insertions and partially functional insertions that bind DNA but fail to repress the lacZ operon. Several of these latter GFP insertions localize to lacO arrays integrated in the E. coli chromosome without producing the elongated cells frequently observed when functional LacI-GFP fusions are used in chromosome tagging experiments. TAGIT thereby faciliates the isolation of fully functional insertions of fluorescent proteins into target proteins expressed from the native chromosomal locus as well as potentially useful partially functional proteins. PMID:20090956

  16. Antigen Binding and Site-Directed Labeling of Biosilica-Immobilized Fusion Proteins Expressed in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Hu, DeHong; Orr, Galya; Xiong, Yijia; Squier, Thomas C; Rorrer, Gregory L; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2016-03-18

    The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was genetically modified to express biosilica-targeted fusion proteins comprising either enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or single chain antibodies engineered with a tetracysteine tagging sequence. Of interest were the site-specific binding of (1) the fluorescent biarsenical probe AsCy3 and AsCy3e to the tetracysteine tagged fusion proteins and (2) high and low molecular mass antigens, the Bacillus anthracis surface layer protein EA1 or small molecule explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), to biosilica-immobilized single chain antibodies. Analysis of biarsenical probe binding using fluorescence and structured illumination microscopy indicated differential colocalization with EGFP in nascent and mature biosilica, supporting the use of either EGFP or bound AsCy3 and AsCy3e in studying biosilica maturation. Large increases in the lifetime of a fluorescent analogue of TNT upon binding single chain antibodies provided a robust signal capable of discriminating binding to immobilized antibodies in the transformed frustule from nonspecific binding to the biosilica matrix. In conclusion, our results demonstrate an ability to engineer diatoms to create antibody-functionalized mesoporous silica able to selectively bind chemical and biological agents for the development of sensing platforms.

  17. Structure and expression of the Drosophila ubiquitin-80-amino-acid fusion-protein gene.

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, R; del Arco, A; Cabrera, H L; Arribas, C

    1994-01-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila, as in all eukaryotes examined so far, some ubiquitin-coding sequences appear fused to unrelated open reading frames. Two of these fusion genes have been previously described (the homologues of UBI1-UBI2 and UBI4 in yeast), and we report here the organization and expression of a third one, the DUb80 gene (the homologue of UBI3 in yeast). This gene encodes a ubiquitin monomer fused to an 80-amino-acid extension which is homologous with the ribosomal protein encoded by the UB13 gene. The 5' regulatory region of DUb80 shares common features with another ubiquitin fusion gene, DUb52, and with the ribosomal protein genes of Drosophila, Xenopus and mouse. We also find helix-loop-helix protein-binding sequences (E-boxes). The DUb80 gene is transcribed to a 0.9 kb mRNA which is particularly abundant under conditions of high protein synthesis, such as in ovaries and exponentially growing cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8068011

  18. DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

  19. A Novel p19 Fusion Protein as a Delivery Agent for Short-interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Dana C; Sachrajda, Natalie; Wang, Wei; Filip, Roxana; Pezacki, John Paul

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the biological mechanism that allows targeted gene knockdown through the addition of exogenous short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to cells and organisms. RNAi has revolutionized cell biology and holds enormous potential for human therapy. One of the major challenges facing RNAi as a therapy is achieving efficient and nontoxic delivery of siRNAs into the cell cytoplasm, since their highly anionic character precludes their passage across the cell membrane unaided. Herein, we report a novel fusion protein between the tombusviral p19 protein, which binds siRNAs with picomolar affinity, and the “TAT” peptide (RKKRRQRRRR), which is derived from the transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus and acts as a cell-penetrating peptide. We demonstrate that this fusion protein, 2x-p19-TAT, delivers siRNAs into the cytoplasm of human hepatoma cells where they elicit potent and sustained gene knockdown activity without toxic effects. PMID:27045207

  20. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  1. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-12-19

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one.

  2. Preferential expression and immunogenicity of HIV-1 Tat fusion protein expressed in tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Karamatsu, Katsuo; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a major role in viral replication and is essential for AIDS development making it an ideal vaccine target providing that both humoral and cellular immune responses are induced. Plant-based antigen production, due to its cheaper cost, appears ideal for vaccine production. In this study, we created a plant-optimized tat and mutant (Cys30Ala/Lys41Ala) tat (mtat) gene and ligated each into a pBI121 expression vector with a stop codon and a gusA gene positioned immediately downstream. The vector construct was bombarded into tomato leaf calli and allowed to develop. We thus generated recombinant tomato plants preferentially expressing a Tat-GUS fusion protein over a Tat-only protein. In addition, plants bombarded with either tat or mtat genes showed no phenotypic difference and produced 2-4 microg Tat-GUS fusion protein per milligram soluble plant protein. Furthermore, tomato extracts intradermally inoculated into mice were found to induce a humoral and, most importantly, cellular immunity. PMID:20072815

  3. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  4. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one. PMID:26703574

  5. The evolutionary analysis reveals domain fusion of proteins with Frizzled-like CRD domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Jia, Haibo; Ma, Zhaowu; Ye, Huashan; Zhou, Mi; Su, Li; Liu, Jianfeng; Guo, An-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Frizzleds (FZDs) are transmembrane receptors in the Wnt signaling pathway and they play pivotal roles in developments. The Frizzled-like extracellular Cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) has been identified in FZDs and other proteins. The origin and evolution of these proteins with Fz-CRD is the main interest of this study. We found that the Fz-CRD exists in FZD, SFRP, RTK, MFRP, CPZ, CORIN, COL18A1 and other proteins. Our systematic analysis revealed that the Fz-CRD domain might have originated in protists and then fused with the Frizzled-like seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) to form the FZD receptors, which duplicated and diversified into about 11 members in Vertebrates. The SFRPs and RTKs with the Fz-CRD were found in sponge and expanded in Vertebrates. Other proteins with Fz-CRD may have emerged during Vertebrate evolution through domain fusion. Moreover, we found a glycosylation site and several conserved motifs in FZDs, which may be related to Wnt interaction. Based on these results, we proposed a model showing that the domain fusion and expansion of Fz-CRD genes occurred in Metazoa and Vertebrates. Our study may help to pave the way for further research on the conservation and diversification of Wnt signaling functions during evolution.

  6. Targeted codon optimization improves translational fidelity for an Fc fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Katariina M; Zhang, Zhongqi; Michaels, Mark Leo; Belouski, Ed; Hong, Robert W; Shah, Bhavana; Berge, Mark; Barkhordarian, Hedieh; Le, Eleanor; Smith, Steve; Winters, Dwight; Abroson, Frank; Hecht, Randy; Liu, Jennifer

    2012-11-01

    High levels of translational errors, both truncation and misincorporation in an Fc-fusion protein were observed. Here, we demonstrate the impact of several commercially available codon optimization services, and compare to a targeted strategy. Using the targeted strategy, only codons known to have translational errors are modified. For an Fc-fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the targeted strategy, in combination with appropriate fermentation conditions, virtually eliminated misincorporation (proteins produced with a wrong amino acid sequence), and reduced the level of truncation. The use of full optimization using commercially available strategies reduced the initial errors, but introduced different misincorporations. However, truncation was higher using the targeted strategy than for most of the full optimization strategies. This targeted approach, along with monitoring of translation fidelity and careful attention to fermentation conditions is key to minimizing translational error and ensuring high-quality expression. These findings should be useful for other biopharmaceutical products, as well as any other transgenic constructs where protein quality is important.

  7. Probing the paramyxovirus fusion (F) protein-refolding event from pre- to postfusion by oxidative footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Poor, Taylor A.; Jones, Lisa M.; Sood, Amika; Leser, George P.; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Rempel, Don L.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Woods, Robert J.; Gross, Michael L.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    To infect a cell, the Paramyxoviridae family of enveloped viruses relies on the coordinated action of a receptor-binding protein (variably HN, H, or G) and a more conserved metastable fusion protein (F) to effect membrane fusion and allow genomic transfer. Upon receptor binding, HN (H or G) triggers F to undergo an extensive refolding event to form a stable postfusion state. Little is known about the intermediate states of the F refolding process. Here, a soluble form of parainfluenza virus 5 F was triggered to refold using temperature and was footprinted along the refolding pathway using fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP). Localization of the oxidative label to solvent-exposed side chains was determined by high-resolution MS/MS. Globally, metastable prefusion F is oxidized more extensively than postfusion F, indicating that the prefusion state is more exposed to solvent and is more flexible. Among the first peptides to be oxidatively labeled after temperature-induced triggering is the hydrophobic fusion peptide. A comparison of peptide oxidation levels with the values of solvent-accessible surface area calculated from molecular dynamics simulations of available structural data reveals regions of the F protein that lie at the heart of its prefusion metastability. The strong correlation between the regions of F that experience greater-than-expected oxidative labeling and epitopes for neutralizing antibodies suggests that FPOP has a role in guiding the development of targeted therapeutics. Analysis of the residue levels of labeled F intermediates provides detailed insights into the mechanics of this critical refolding event. PMID:24927585

  8. Effect of protein aggregates on characterization of FcRn binding of Fc-fusion therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bajardi-Taccioli, Adriana; Blum, Andrew; Xu, Chongfeng; Sosic, Zoran; Bergelson, Svetlana; Feschenko, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of antibodies and Fc containing therapeutic proteins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is known to prolong their persistence in the bloodstream. Fusion of Fc fragment of IgG1 to other proteins is one of the strategies to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Accurate measurement of Fc-FcRn binding provides information about the strength of this interaction, which in most cases correlates with serum half-life of the protein. It can also offer insight into functional integrity of Fc region. We investigated FcRn binding activity of a large set of Fc-fusion samples after thermal stress by the method based on AlphaScreen technology. An unexpected significant increase in FcR binding was found to correlate with formation of aggregates in these samples. Monomer purified from a thermally-stressed sample had normal FcRn binding, confirming that its Fc portion was intact. Experiments with aggregates spiked into a sample with low initial aggregation level, demonstrated strong correlation between the level of aggregates and FcRn binding. This correlation varied significantly in different methods. By introducing modifications to the assay format we were able to minimize the effects of aggregated species on FcRn binding, which should prevent masking functional changes of Fc-fusion protein. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was used as an alternative method to measure FcRn binding. Both optimized AlphaScreen- and BLI-based assays were sensitive to structural changes in Fc portion of the molecule, such as oxidation of methionines 252 and 428, and therefore suitable for characterization of FcRn binding.

  9. Mitochondrial remodeling following fission inhibition by 15d-PGJ2 involves molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Rekha; Mishra, Nandita; Singha, Prajjal K.; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A.; Saikumar, Pothana

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical inhibition of fission protein Drp1 leads to mitochondrial fusion. {yields} Increased fusion stimulates molecular changes in mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. {yields} Proteolysis of larger isoforms, new synthesis and ubiquitination of OPA1 occur. {yields} Loss of mitochondrial tubular rigidity and disorganization of cristae. {yields} Generation of large swollen dysfunctional mitochondria. -- Abstract: We showed earlier that 15 deoxy {Delta}{sup 12,14} prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) inactivates Drp1 and induces mitochondrial fusion . However, prolonged incubation of cells with 15d-PGJ2 resulted in remodeling of fused mitochondria into large swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structure. While initial fusion of mitochondria by 15d-PGJ2 required the presence of both outer (Mfn1 and Mfn2) and inner (OPA1) mitochondrial membrane fusion proteins, later mitochondrial changes involved increased degradation of the fusion protein OPA1 and ubiquitination of newly synthesized OPA1 along with decreased expression of Mfn1 and Mfn2, which likely contributed to the loss of tubular rigidity, disorganization of cristae, and formation of large swollen degenerated dysfunctional mitochondria. Similar to inhibition of Drp1 by 15d-PGJ2, decreased expression of fission protein Drp1 by siRNA also resulted in the loss of fusion proteins. Prevention of 15d-PGJ2 induced mitochondrial elongation by thiol antioxidants prevented not only loss of OPA1 isoforms but also its ubiquitination. These findings provide novel insights into unforeseen complexity of molecular events that modulate mitochondrial plasticity.

  10. Influence of silk-silica fusion protein design on silica condensation in vitro and cellular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Plowright, Robyn; Dinjaski, Nina; Zhou, Shun; Belton, David J.; Kaplan, David L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial design via genetic engineering can be utilized for the rational functionalization of proteins to promote biomaterial integration and tissue regeneration. Spider silk has been extensively studied for its biocompatibility, biodegradability and extraordinary material properties. As a protein-based biomaterial, recombinant DNA derived derivatives of spider silks have been modified with biomineralization domains which lead to silica deposition and potentially accelerated bone regeneration. However, the influence of the location of the R5 (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) silicifying domain fused with the spider silk protein sequence on the biosilicification process remains to be determined. Here we designed two silk-R5 fusion proteins that differed in the location of the R5 peptide, C- vs. N-terminus, where the spider silk domain consisted of a 15mer repeat of a 33 amino acid consensus sequence of the major ampullate dragline Spidroin 1 from Nephila clavipes (SGRGGLGGQG AGAAAAAGGA GQGGYGGLGSQGT). The chemical, physical and silica deposition properties of these recombinant proteins were assessed and compared to a silk 15mer control without the R5 present. The location of the R5 peptide did not have a significant effect on wettability and surface energies, while the C-terminal location of the R5 promoted more controlled silica precipitation, suggesting differences in protein folding and possibly different access to charged amino acids that drive the silicification process. Further, cell compatibility in vitro, as well as the ability to promote human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation were demonstrated for both variants of the fusion proteins. PMID:26989487

  11. Contraceptive efficacy of recombinant fusion protein comprising zona pellucida glycoprotein-3 fragment and gonadotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Arukha, Ananta Prasad; Minhas, Vidisha; Shrestha, Abhinav; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Contraceptive vaccines have been used for the management of wildlife population. In the present study, we have examined the contraceptive potential of Escherichia coli-expressed recombinant fusion protein comprising of 'promiscuous' T cell epitope of tetanus toxoid [TT; amino acid (aa) residues 830-844] followed by dilysine linker (KK), dog ZP3 fragment (aa residues 307-346), triglycine spacer (GGG), T cell epitope of bovine RNase (bRNase; aa residues 94-104), GnRH, T cell epitope of circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum (CSP; aa residues 362-383), and GnRH. SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified refolded protein revealed a dominant ∼12 kDa band, which in Western blot reacted with mouse polyclonal antibodies against dog ZP3 fragment and mouse monoclonal antibodies against GnRH. Immunization of female FvB/J mice following two booster schedule with the above recombinant protein supplemented with alum led to high antibody titres against the immunogen as well as ZP3 and GnRH as determined by ELISA. The immune sera reacted with zona pellucida of mouse oocyte and also inhibited in-vitro fertilization. The qRT-PCR studies showed decrease in the ovarian GnRH receptor in mice immunized with the recombinant fusion protein. Mating studies revealed high contraceptive efficacy of the recombinant protein as in two independent experiments, 90% of the immunized female mice failed to conceive. Following one booster immunization schedule, 50% of the immunized female mice failed to conceive. However, in adjuvanted controls, all the female mice became pregnant. To conclude, the recombinant protein described herein has a good potential to be developed as candidate contraceptive vaccine. PMID:26859695

  12. Prm3p is a pheromone-induced peripheral nuclear envelope protein required for yeast nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shu; Tobery, Cynthia E; Rose, Mark D

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear membrane fusion is the last step in the mating pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We adapted a bioinformatics approach to identify putative pheromone-induced membrane proteins potentially required for nuclear membrane fusion. One protein, Prm3p, was found to be required for nuclear membrane fusion; disruption of PRM3 caused a strong bilateral defect, in which nuclear congression was completed but fusion did not occur. Prm3p was localized to the nuclear envelope in pheromone-responding cells, with significant colocalization with the spindle pole body in zygotes. A previous report, using a truncated protein, claimed that Prm3p is localized to the inner nuclear envelope. Based on biochemistry, immunoelectron microscopy and live cell microscopy, we find that functional Prm3p is a peripheral membrane protein exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the outer nuclear envelope. In support of this, mutations in a putative nuclear localization sequence had no effect on full-length protein function or localization. In contrast, point mutations and deletions in the highly conserved hydrophobic carboxy-terminal domain disrupted both protein function and localization. Genetic analysis, colocalization, and biochemical experiments indicate that Prm3p interacts directly with Kar5p, suggesting that nuclear membrane fusion is mediated by a protein complex.

  13. 4-alkoxyethoxy-N-octadecyl-1,8-naphthalimide fluorescent sensor for human serum albumin and other major blood proteins: design, synthesis and solvent effect.

    PubMed

    Wei, Song; Sun, Yang; Tan, Chunlei; Yan, Sen; Guo, Ping; Hu, Xiaoyun; Fan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A series of 4-alkoxyethoxy-N-octadecyl-1,8-naphthalimides with intense blue fluorescence were designed and synthesized as polarity and spectrofluorimetric probes for the determination of proteins. In solvents of different polarities, the Stokes shifts of two dyes increased with increasing solvent polarity and fluorescence quantum yields decreased significantly, suggesting that electronic transiting from ground to excited states was π-π(*) in character. Dipole moment changes were estimated from solvent-dependent Stokes shift data using a solvatochromic method based on bulk solvent polarity functions and the microscopic solvent polarity parameter (E(T)N). These results were generally consistent with semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations and were found to be quite reliable based on the fact that the correlation of the solvatochromic Stokes shifts with E(T)N was superior to that obtained using bulk solvent polarity functions. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of human serum albumin (HSA) by dyes was the result of the formation of a Dye-HSA complex. The method was applied to the determination of total proteins (HSA + immunoglobulins) in human serum samples and results were in good agreement with those reported by the research institute.

  14. Subchronic toxicity study in vivo and allergenicity study in vitro for genetically modified rice that expresses pharmaceutical protein (human serum albumin).

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yao; Qi, Xiaozhe; Liu, Yifei; Guo, Mingzhang; Chen, Siyuan; He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2014-10-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops that express pharmaceutical proteins have become an important focus of recent genetic engineering research. Food safety assessment is necessary for the commercial development of these crops. Subchronic toxicity study in vivo and allergenicity study in vitro were designed to evaluate the food safety of the rice variety expressing human serum albumin (HSA). Animals were fed rodent diets containing 12.5%, 25.0% and 50.0% GM or non-GM rice for 90 days. The composition analysis of the GM rice demonstrated several significant differences. However, most of the differences remained within the ranges reported in the literature. In the animal study, a range of indexes including clinical observation, feed efficiency, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights and histopathology were examined. Random changes unrelated to the GM rice exposure, within the range of historical control values and not associated with any signs of illness were observed. The results of heat stability and in vitro digestion of HSA indicated no evidence of potential allergenicity of the protein. Overall, the results of these studies suggest that the GM rice appears to be safe as a dietary ingredient when it is used at up to 50% in the diet on a subchronic basis.

  15. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Silas, Sukrit; Mohr, Georg; Sidote, David J; Markham, Laura M; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-02-26

    CRISPR systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (spacers) from invasive elements. In several type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we showed that a RT-Cas1 fusion protein enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in a RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze the ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, which is followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  16. RESOLFT Nanoscopy of Fixed Cells Using a Z-Domain Based Fusion Protein for Labelling

    PubMed Central

    Kilisch, Markus; Hell, Stefan W.; Jakobs, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    RESOLFT super-resolution microscopy allows subdiffraction resolution imaging of living cells using low intensities of light. It relies on the light-driven switching of reversible switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs). So far, RESOLFT imaging was restricted to living cells, because chemical fixation typically affects the switching characteristics of RSFPs. In this study we created a fusion construct (FLASR) consisting of the RSFP rsEGFP2 and the divalent form of the antibody binding Z domain from protein A. FLASR can be used analogous to secondary antibodies in conventional immunochemistry, facilitating simple and robust sample preparation. We demonstrate RESOLFT super-resolution microscopy on chemically fixed mammalian cells. The approach may be extended to other super-resolution approaches requiring fluorescent proteins in an aqueous environment. PMID:26375606

  17. Rational Design of a Fusion Protein to Exhibit Disulfide-Mediated Logic Gate Behavior

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cellular logic gates are primarily built from gene circuits owing to their inherent modularity. Single proteins can also possess logic gate functions and offer the potential to be simpler, quicker, and less dependent on cellular resources than gene circuits. However, the design of protein logic gates that are modular and integrate with other cellular components is a considerable challenge. As a step toward addressing this challenge, we describe the design, construction, and characterization of AND, ORN, and YES logic gates built by introducing disulfide bonds into RG13, a fusion of maltose binding protein and TEM-1 β-lactamase for which maltose is an allosteric activator of enzyme activity. We rationally designed these disulfide bonds to manipulate RG13’s allosteric regulation mechanism such that the gating had maltose and reducing agents as input signals, and the gates could be toggled between different gating functions using redox agents, although some gates performed suboptimally. PMID:25144732

  18. Analysis of multi-site drug-protein interactions by high-performance affinity chromatography: Binding by glimepiride to normal or glycated human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-08-21

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used in a variety of formats to examine multi-site interactions between glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea drug, and normal or in vitro glycated forms of the transport protein human serum albumin (HSA). Frontal analysis revealed that glimepiride interacts with normal HSA and glycated HSA at a group of high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, or Ka, 9.2-11.8×10(5)M(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and a group of lower affinity regions (Ka, 5.9-16×10(3)M(-1)). Zonal elution competition studies were designed and carried out in both normal- and reversed-role formats to investigate the binding by this drug at specific sites. These experiments indicated that glimepiride was interacting at both Sudlow sites I and II. Allosteric effects were also noted with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I and with tamoxifen at the tamoxifen site on HSA. The binding at Sudlow site I had a 2.1- to 2.3-fold increase in affinity in going from normal HSA to the glycated samples of HSA. There was no significant change in the affinity for glimepiride at Sudlow site II in going from normal HSA to a moderately glycated sample of HSA, but a slight decrease in affinity was seen in going to a more highly glycated HSA sample. These results demonstrated how various HPAC-based methods can be used to profile and characterize multi-site binding by a drug such as glimepiride to a protein and its modified forms. The information obtained from this study should be useful in providing a better understanding of how drug-protein binding may be affected by glycation and of how separation and analysis methods based on HPAC can be employed to study systems with complex interactions or that involve modified proteins.

  19. Analysis of multi-site drug-protein interactions by high-performance affinity chromatography: Binding by glimepiride to normal or glycated human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S

    2015-08-21

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used in a variety of formats to examine multi-site interactions between glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea drug, and normal or in vitro glycated forms of the transport protein human serum albumin (HSA). Frontal analysis revealed that glimepiride interacts with normal HSA and glycated HSA at a group of high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, or Ka, 9.2-11.8×10(5)M(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and a group of lower affinity regions (Ka, 5.9-16×10(3)M(-1)). Zonal elution competition studies were designed and carried out in both normal- and reversed-role formats to investigate the binding by this drug at specific sites. These experiments indicated that glimepiride was interacting at both Sudlow sites I and II. Allosteric effects were also noted with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I and with tamoxifen at the tamoxifen site on HSA. The binding at Sudlow site I had a 2.1- to 2.3-fold increase in affinity in going from normal HSA to the glycated samples of HSA. There was no significant change in the affinity for glimepiride at Sudlow site II in going from normal HSA to a moderately glycated sample of HSA, but a slight decrease in affinity was seen in going to a more highly glycated HSA sample. These results demonstrated how various HPAC-based methods can be used to profile and characterize multi-site binding by a drug such as glimepiride to a protein and its modified forms. The information obtained from this study should be useful in providing a better understanding of how drug-protein binding may be affected by glycation and of how separation and analysis methods based on HPAC can be employed to study systems with complex interactions or that involve modified proteins. PMID:26189669

  20. Analysis of Multi-Site Drug-Protein Interactions by High-Performance Affinity Chromatography: Binding by Glimepiride to Normal or Glycated Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Xiwei; Hage, David S.

    2015-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used in a variety of formats to examine multi-site interactions between glimepiride, a third-generation sulfonylurea drug, and normal or in vitro glycated forms of the transport protein human serum albumin (HSA). Frontal analysis revealed that glimepiride interacts with normal HSA and glycated HSA at a group of high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, or Ka, 9.2–11.8 × 105 M−1 at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and a group of lower affinity regions (Ka, 5.9–16.2 × 103 M−1). Zonal elution competition studies were designed and carried out in both normal- and reversed-role formats to investigate the binding by this drug at specific sites. These experiments indicated that glimepiride was interacting at both Sudlow sites I and II. Allosteric effects were also noted with R-warfarin at Sudlow site I and with tamoxifen at the tamoxifen site on HSA. The binding at Sudlow site I had a 2.1- to 2.3-fold increase in affinity in going from normal HSA to the glycated samples of HSA. There was no significant change in the affinity for glimepiride at Sudlow site II in going from normal HSA to a moderately glycated sample of HSA, but a slight decrease in affinity was seen in going to a more highly glycated HSA sample. These results demonstrated how various HPAC-based methods can be used to profile and characterize multi-site binding by a drug such as glimepiride to a protein and its modified forms. The information obtained from this study should be useful in providing a better understanding of how drug-protein binding may be affected by glycation and of how separation and analysis methods based on HPAC can be employed to study systems with complex interactions or that involve modified proteins. PMID:26189669

  1. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  2. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  3. Efficient killing of CD22{sup +} tumor cells by a humanized diabody-RNase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Juergen . E-mail: juergen.krauss@uni-essen.de; Arndt, Michaela A.E.; Vu, Bang K.; Newton, Dianne L.; Seeber, Siegfried; Rybak, Susanna M.

    2005-06-03

    We report on the generation of a dimeric immunoenzyme capable of simultaneously delivering two ribonuclease (RNase) effector domains on one molecule to CD22{sup +} tumor cells. As targeting moiety a diabody derived from the previously humanized scFv SGIII with grafted specificity of the murine anti-CD22 mAb RFB4 was constructed. Further engineering the interface of this construct (V{sub L}36{sub Leu{yields}}{sub Tyr}) resulted in a highly robust bivalent molecule that retained the same high affinity as the murine mAb RFB4 (K{sub D} 0.2 nM). A dimeric immunoenzyme comprising this diabody and Rana pipiens liver ribonuclease I (rapLRI) was generated, expressed as soluble protein in bacteria, and purified to homogeneity. The dimeric fusion protein killed several CD22{sup +} tumor cell lines with high efficacy (IC{sub 50} = 3-20 nM) and exhibited 9- to 48-fold stronger cytotoxicity than a monovalent rapLRI-scFv counterpart. Our results demonstrate that engineering of dimeric antibody-ribonuclease fusion proteins can markedly enhance their biological efficacy.

  4. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells derived heat shock protein70-peptide complex has enhanced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Zhang, Yong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Yunyan; Luo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived heat shock protein70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Tu) have shown great promise in tumor immunotherapy due to numerous advantages. However, large-scale phase III clinical trials showed that the limited immunogenicity remained to be enhanced. In previous research, we demonstrated that heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes (HSP70.PC-Fc) derived from dendritic cell (DC)-tumor fusions exhibit enhanced immunogenicity compared with HSP70.PCs from tumor cells. However, the DCs used in our previous research were obtained from healthy donors and not from the patient population. In order to promote the clinical application of these complexes, HSP70.PC-Fc was prepared from patient-derived DC fused directly with patient-derived tumor cells in the current study. Our results showed that compared with HSP70.PC-Tu, HSP70.PC-Fc elicited much more powerful immune responses against the tumor from which the HSP70 was derived, including enhanced T cell activation, and CTL responses that were shown to be antigen specific and HLA restricted. Our results further indicated that the enhanced immunogenicity is related to the activation of CD4+ T cells and increased association with other heat shock proteins, such as HSP90. Therefore, the current study confirms the enhanced immunogenicity of HSP70.PC derived from DC-tumor fusions and may provide direct evidence promoting their future clinical use.

  5. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  6. Refolding and purification of non-fusion HPT protein expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Qin; Piao, Jian-hua; Wang, Rui; Yang, Xiao-guang

    2005-05-01

    The gene encoding hygromycin B phosphotransferase (hpt) is a widely used selectable marker in the production of genetically engineered crops. To facilitate the safety assessment of this protein, the non-fusion hpt expression plasmid was constructed and introduced into Escherichia coli to produce enough quantity of the HPT protein. High level expressed HPT was achieved but most of the expressed protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The inclusion bodies were washed, separated from the cells, and solubilized by 0.3% Sarkosyl. The protein was renatured by dilution and dialysis, and then purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The activity is 8 U/mg protein and the purity is about 95%. Further studies showed that the microbially produced HPT protein had comparable molecular weight, immuno-reactivities, N-terminal amino acid sequences, and biological activities with those of the HPT produced by transgenic rice harboring hpt gene. All these results demonstrated the validity of utilizing the microbially produced HPT to assess the safety of the HPT protein produced in genetically engineered rice.

  7. Evaluation of a Novel Methacrylate-Based Protein A Resin for the Purification of Immunoglobulins and Fc-Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, Tyler R; Koepf, Edward K; Conley, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Protein A affinity chromatography is a central part of most commercial monoclonal antibody and Fc-fusion protein purification processes. In the last couple years an increasing number of new Protein A technologies have emerged. One of these new Protein A technologies consists of a novel, alkaline-tolerant, Protein A ligand coupled to a macroporous polymethacrylate base matrix that has been optimized for immunoglobulin (Ig) G capture. The resin is interesting from a technology perspective because the particle size and pore distribution of the base beads are reported to have been optimized for high IgG binding and fast mass transfer, while the Protein A ligand has been engineered for enhanced alkaline tolerance. This resin was subjected to a number of technical studies including evaluating dynamic and static binding capacities, alkaline stability, Protein A leachate propensity, impurity clearance, and pressure–flow behavior. The results demonstrated similar static binding capacities as those achieved with industry standard agarose Protein A resins, but marginally lower dynamic binding capacities. Removal of impurities from the process stream, particularly host cell proteins, was molecule dependent, but in most instances matched the performance of the agarose resins. This resin was stable in 0.1 M NaOH for at least 100 h with little loss in binding capacity, with Protein A ligand leakage levels comparable to values for the agarose resins. Pressure–flow experiments in lab-scale chromatography columns demonstrated minimal resin compression at typical manufacturing flow rates. Prediction of resin compression in manufacturing scale columns did not suggest any pressure limitations upon scale up. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 30:1125–1136, 2014 PMID:25045034

  8. Design and analysis of post-fusion 6-helix bundle of heptad repeat regions from Newcastle disease virus F protein.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jieqing; Li, Pengyun; Wu, Tinghe; Gao, Feng; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Catherine W-H; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F; Tien, Po

    2003-05-01

    Fusion of paramyxovirus to the cell involves receptor binding of the HN glycoprotein and a number of conformational changes of F glycoprotein. The F protein is expressed as a homotrimer on the virus surface. In the present model, there are at least three conformations of F protein, i.e. native form, pre-hairpin intermediate and the post-fusion state. In the post-fusion state, the two highly conserved heptad repeat (HR) regions of F protein form a stable 6-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure is known for this state for the Newcastle disease virus, although the crystal structure of the F protein native form has been solved recently. Here we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to engineer this 6-helix bundle by fusion of either the two HR regions (HR1, linker and HR2) or linking the 6-helix [3 x (HR1, linker and HR2)] together as a single chain. Subsequently, both of them form a stable 6-helix bundle in vitro judging by gel filtration and chemical cross-linking and the proteins show salient features of an alpha-helix structure. Crystals diffracting X-rays have been obtained from both protein preparations and the structure determination is under way. This method could be used for crystallization of the post-fusion state HR structures of other viruses.

  9. Production of Hev b5 as a fluorescent biotin-binding tripartite fusion protein in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nordlund, Henri R. . E-mail: henri.nordlund@uta.fi; Laitinen, Olli H.; Uotila, Sanna T.H.; Kulmala, Minna; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Kulomaa, Markku S.

    2005-10-14

    The presented green fluorescent protein and streptavidin core-based tripartite fusion system provides a simple and efficient way for the production of proteins fused to it in insect cells. This fusion protein forms a unique tag, which serves as a multipurpose device enabling easy optimization of production, one-step purification via streptavidin-biotin interaction, and visualization of the fusion protein during downstream processing and in applications. In the present study, we demonstrate the successful production, purification, and detection of a natural rubber latex allergen Hev b5 with this system. We also describe the production of another NRL allergen with the system, Hev b1, which formed large aggregates and gave small yields in purification. The aggregates were detected at early steps by microscopical inspection of the infected insect cells producing this protein. Therefore, this fusion system can also be utilized as a fast indicator of the solubility of the expressed fusion proteins and may therefore be extremely useful in high-throughput expression approaches.

  10. Mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the fusion peptide of Helicoverpa armigera single nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus F protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Manli; Yin, Feifei; Deng, Fei; Liu, Maili; Hu, Zhihong; Wang, Hualin

    2008-08-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells is normally mediated by fusion between viral and cellular membranes, in which the fusion peptide plays a crucial role. The fusion peptides of group II nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) F proteins are quite conserved, with a hydrophobic region located at the N terminal of the F(1) fragment. For this report, we used mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study the structure and function of the fusion peptide of the Helicoverpa armigera single-nucleocapsid NPV (HearNPV) F protein (HaF). Five mutations in the fusion peptide of HaF, N(1)G, N(1)L, I(2)N, G(3)L, and D(11)L, were generated separately, and the mutated f genes were transformed into the f-null HearNPV bacmid. The mutations N(1)L, I(2)N, and D(11)L were found to completely abolish the ability of the recombinant bacmids to produce infectious budded virus, while the mutations N(1)G and G(3)L did not. The low-pH-induced envelope fusion assay demonstrated that the N(1)G substitution increased the fusogenicity of HaF, while the G(3)L substitution reduced its fusogenicity. NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of a synthetic fusion peptide of HaF in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles at pH 5.0. The fusion peptide appeared to be an amphiphilic structure composed of a flexible coil in the N terminus from N(1) to N(5), a 3(10)-helix from F(6) to G(8), a turn at S(9), and a regular alpha-helix from V(10) to D(19). The data provide the first NMR structure of a baculovirus fusion peptide and allow us to further understand the relationship of structure and function of the fusion peptide.

  11. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  12. A mature and fusogenic form of the Nipah virus fusion protein requires proteolytic processing by cathepsin L

    SciTech Connect

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Craft, Willie Warren; Patch, Jared; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2006-03-15

    The Nipah virus fusion (F) protein is proteolytically processed to F{sub 1} + F{sub 2} subunits. We demonstrate here that cathepsin L is involved in this important maturation event. Cathepsin inhibitors ablated cleavage of Nipah F. Proteolytic processing of Nipah F and fusion activity was dramatically reduced in cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells. Additionally, Nipah virus F-mediated fusion was inhibited in cathepsin L-deficient cells, but coexpression of cathepsin L restored fusion activity. Both purified cathepsin L and B could cleave immunopurified Nipah F protein, but only cathepsin L produced products of the correct size. Our results suggest that endosomal cathepsins can cleave Nipah F, but that cathepsin L specifically converts Nipah F to a mature and fusogenic form.

  13. The human ubiquitin-52 amino acid fusion protein gene shares several structural features with mammalian ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, R T; Board, P G

    1991-01-01

    Complementary DNA clones encoding ubiquitin fused to a 52 amino acid tail protein were isolated from human placental and adrenal gland cDNA libraries. The deduced human 52 amino acid tail protein is very similar to the homologous protein from other species, including the conservation of the putative metal-binding, nucleic acid-binding domain observed in these proteins. Northern blot analysis with a tail-specific probe indicated that the previously identified UbA mRNA species most likely represents comigrating transcripts of the 52 amino acid tail (UbA52) and 80 amino acid tail (UbA80) ubiquitin fusion genes. The UbA52 gene was isolated from a human genomic library and consists of five exons distributed over 3400 base pairs. One intron is in the 5' non-coding region, two interrupt the single ubiquitin coding unit, and the fourth intron is within the tail coding region. Several members of the Alu family of repetitive DNA are associated with the gene. The UbA52 promoter has several features in common with mammalian ribosomal protein genes, including its location in a CpG-rich island, initiation of transcription within a polypyrimidine tract, the lack of a consensus TATA motif, and the presence of Sp1 binding sites, observations that are consistent with the recent identification of the ubiquitin-free tail proteins as ribosomal proteins. Thus, in spite of its unusual feature of being translationally fused to ubiquitin, the 52 amino acid tail ribosomal protein is expressed from a structurally typical ribosomal protein gene. Images PMID:1850507

  14. Different sets of ER-resident J-proteins regulate distinct polar nuclear-membrane fusion events in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masaya; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2014-11-01

    Angiosperm female gametophytes contain a central cell with two polar nuclei. In many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, the polar nuclei fuse during female gametogenesis. We previously showed that BiP, an Hsp70 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), was essential for membrane fusion during female gametogenesis. Hsp70 function requires partner proteins for full activity. J-domain containing proteins (J-proteins) are the major Hsp70 functional partners. A. thaliana ER contains three soluble J-proteins, AtERdj3A, AtERdj3B, and AtP58(IPK). Here, we analyzed mutants of these proteins and determined that double-mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A or AtERdj3B were defective in polar nuclear fusion. Electron microscopy analysis identified that polar nuclei were in close contact, but no membrane fusion occurred in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3A. The polar nuclear outer membrane appeared to be connected via the ER remaining at the inner unfused membrane in mutant ovules lacking AtP58(IPK) and AtERdj3B. These results indicate that ER-resident J-proteins, AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3A and AtP58(IPK)/AtERdj3B, function at distinct steps of polar nuclear-membrane fusion. Similar to the bip1 bip2 double mutant female gametophytes, the aterdj3a atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the outer polar nuclear membrane displayed aberrant endosperm proliferation after fertilization with wild-type pollen. However, endosperm proliferated normally after fertilization of the aterdj3b atp58(ipk) double mutant female gametophytes defective in fusion of the inner membrane. Our results indicate that the polar nuclear fusion defect itself does not cause an endosperm proliferation defect.

  15. Identification of canine helper T-cell epitopes from the fusion protein of canine distemper virus

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Souravi; Walker, John; Jackson, David C

    2001-01-01

    The fusion protein of canine distemper virus (CDV-F), a 662 amino-acid envelope protein, was used as the target molecule for identification of canine T helper (Th) epitopes. A library of 94 peptides, each 17 residues in length overlapping by 10 residues and covering the entire sequence of CDV-F, was screened using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from dogs inoculated with canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine. Initially we observed low and inconsistent proliferation of PBMC in response to these peptides, even when using cells obtained from dogs that had received multiple doses of CDV. Subsequently, the use of expanded cell populations derived by in vitro stimulation of canine PBMC with pools of peptides allowed the identification of a number of putative canine Th-epitopes within the protein sequence of CDV-F. There were two major clusters of Th-epitopes identified close to the cleavage site of the F0 fusion protein, while some others were scattered in both the F1 and F2 fragments of the protein. Some of these peptides, in particular peptide 35 (p35), were stimulatory in dogs of different breeds and ages. The identification of such promiscuous canine Th-epitopes encouraged us to assemble p35 in tandem with luteinising hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) a 10 amino-acid residue synthetic peptide representing a B-cell epitope which alone induces no antibody in dogs. The totally synthetic immunogen was able to induce the production of very high titres of antibodies against LHRH in all dogs tested. These results indicate that p35 could be an ideal candidate for use as a Th-epitope for use in outbred dogs. PMID:11576221

  16. HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND THE ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH MODIFIED PROTEINS: BINDING OF GLICLAZIDE WITH GLYCATED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to examine the binding of gliclazide (i.e., a sulfonylurea drug used to treat diabetes) with the protein human serum albumin (HSA) at various stages of modification due to glycation. Frontal analysis conducted with small HPAC columns was first used to estimate the number of binding sites and association equilibrium constants (Ka) for gliclazide with normal HSA and glycated HSA. Both normal and glycated HSA interacted with gliclazide according to a two-site model, with a class of high affinity sites (average Ka, 7.1-10 × 104 M−1) and a group of lower affinity sites (average Ka, 5.7-8.9 × 103 M−1) at pH 7.4 and 37°C. Competition experiments indicated that Sudlow sites I and II of HSA were both involved in these interactions, with the Ka values for gliclazide at these sites being 1.9 × 104 M−1 and 6.0 × 104 M−1, respectively, for normal HSA. Two samples of glycated HSA had similar affinities to normal HSA for gliclazide at Sudlow site I, but one sample had a 1.9-fold increase in affinity at this site. All three glycated HSA samples differed from normal HSA in their affinity for gliclazide at Sudlow site II. This work illustrated how HPAC can be used to examine both the overall binding of a drug with normal or modified proteins and the site-specific changes that can occur in these interactions as a result of protein modification. PMID:21922305

  17. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigating protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.

  18. Structure and function of photosystem I–[FeFe] hydrogenase protein fusions: An all-atom molecular dynamics study

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, Bradley J.; Cheng, Xiaolin; Frymier, Paul

    2015-12-15

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to study the solution dynamics and protein protein interactions of protein fusions of photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and an [FeFe]-hydrogenase (FeFe H2ase) from Clostridium pasteurianum, a unique complex capable of photocatalytic hydrogen production. This study involved fusions of these two proteins via dithiol linkers of different length including decanedithiol, octanedithiol, and hexanedithiol, for which experimental data had previously been obtained. Evaluation of root-mean-squared deviations (RMSDs) relative to the respective crystal structures of PSI and the FeFe H2ase shows that these fusion complexes approach stable equilibrium conformations during the MD simulations. Investigatingmore » protein mobility via root-mean-squared fluctuations (RMSFs) reveals that tethering via the shortest hexanedithiol linker results in increased atomic fluctuations of both PSI and the hydrogenase in these fusion complexes. Furthermore, evaluation of the inter- and intraprotein electron transfer distances in these fusion complexes indicates that the structural changes in the FeFe H2ase arising from ligation to PSI via the shortest hexanedithiol linker may hinder electron transport in the hydrogenase, thus providing a molecular level explanation for the observation that the medium-length octanedithiol linker gives the highest hydrogen production rate.« less

  19. Structural and kinetic analysis of the unnatural fusion protein 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase::stilbene synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yechun; Yi, Hankuil; Wang, Melissa; Yu, Oliver; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-10-24

    To increase the biochemical efficiency of biosynthetic systems, metabolic engineers have explored different approaches for organizing enzymes, including the generation of unnatural fusion proteins. Previous work aimed at improving the biosynthesis of resveratrol, a stilbene associated a range of health-promoting activities, in yeast used an unnatural engineered fusion protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress) 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase (At4CL1) and Vitis vinifera (grape) stilbene synthase (VvSTS) to increase resveratrol levels 15-fold relative to yeast expressing the individual enzymes. Here we present the crystallographic and biochemical analysis of the 4CL::STS fusion protein. Determination of the X-ray crystal structure of 4CL::STS provides the first molecular view of an artificial didomain adenylation/ketosynthase fusion protein. Comparison of the steady-state kinetic properties of At4CL1, VvSTS, and 4CL::STS demonstrates that the fusion protein improves catalytic efficiency of either reaction less than 3-fold. Structural and kinetic analysis suggests that colocalization of the two enzyme active sites within 70 {angstrom} of each other provides the basis for enhanced in vivo synthesis of resveratrol.

  20. Recombinant albumins containing additional peptide sequences smaller than barbourin retain the ability of barbourin-albumin to inhibit platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Wilson, Brianna; Eltringham-Smith, Louise J; Gataiance, Sharon; Bhakta, Varsha

    2005-05-01

    The previously described fusion protein BLAH(6) (Marques JA et al.,Thromb Haemost 2001; 86: 902-8) is a recombinant protein that combines the small disintegrin barbourin with hexahistidine-tagged rabbit serumalbumin (RSA) produced in Pichia pastoris yeast. We sought to determine: (1) if BLAH(6) was immunogenic; and (2) if its barbourin domain could be productively replaced with smaller peptides. Purified BLAH(6) was injected into rabbits, and anti-barbourin antibodies were universally detected in plasma 28 days later; BLAH(6) was, however, equally effective in reducing platelet aggregation in both naive and pre-treated rabbits. Thrombocytopenia was not observed, and complexing BLAH(6) to alpha(IIb)beta(3) had no effect on antibody detection. The barbourin moiety of BLAH(6) was replaced with each of four sequences: Pep I (VCKGDWPC); PepII (VCRGDWPC); PepIII (bar-bourin 41-54); and PepIV (LPSPGDWR). The corresponding fusion proteins were tested for their ability to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation. PepIII-LAH(6) inhibited neither rabbit nor human platelets. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIV-LAH(6) inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation as effectively as BLAH(6), but PepIV-LAH(6) did not inhibit human platelet aggregation. PepI-LAH(6) and PepIILAH(6) inhibited human platelet aggregation with IC(50)s 10- and 20-fold higher than BLAH(6). Cross-immunoprecipitation assays with human platelet lysates confirmed that all proteins and peptides interacted with the platelet integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), but with greatly varying affinities. Our results suggest that the antiplatelet activity of BLAH(6) can be retained in albumin fusion proteins in which smaller peptides replace the barbourin domain; these proteins may be less immunogenic than BLAH(6).

  1. Complications of Anterior Cervical Fusion using a Low-dose Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Sunil; Ahmed, Osama I; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are several reports, which documented a high incidence of complications following the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in anterior cervical fusions (ACFs). The objective of this study is to share our experience with low-dose rhBMP-2 in anterior cervical spine. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 197 patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion (ACF) with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) during 2007-2012. A low-dose rhBMP-2 (0.7mg/level) sponge was placed exclusively within the cage. In 102 patients demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was filled around the BMP sponge. Incidence and severity of dysphagia was determined by 5 points SWAL-QOL scale. Results Two patients had prolonged hospitalization due to BMP unrelated causes. Following the discharge, 13.2%(n=26) patients developed dysphagia and 8.6%(n=17) patients complained of neck swelling. More than half of the patients (52.9%, n=9) with neck swelling also had associated dysphagia; however, only 2 of these patients necessitated readmission. Both of these patients responded well to the intravenous dexamethasone. The use of DBM did not affect the incidence and severity of complications (p>0.05). Clinico-radiological evidence of fusion was not observed in 2 patients. Conclusion A low-dose rhBMP-2 in ACFs is not without risk. However, the incidence and severity of complications seem to be lower with low-dose BMP placed exclusively inside the cage. Packing DBM putty around the BMP sponge does not affect the safety profile of rhBMP-2 in ACFs. PMID:26217385

  2. Penetrable silica microspheres for immobilization of bovine serum albumin and their application to the study of the interaction between imatinib mesylate and protein by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyun; Li, Jing; Zhao, Juan; Liao, Han; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, novel featured silica, named penetrable silica, simultaneously containing macropores and mesopores, was immobilized with bovine serum albumin (BSA) via Schiff base method. The obtained BSA-SiO2 was employed as the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) stationary phase. Firstly, D- and L-tryptophan were used as probes to investigate the chiral separation ability of the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase. An excellent enantioseparation factor was obtained up to 4.3 with acceptable stability within at least 1 month. Next, the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase was applied to study the interaction between imatinib mesylate (IM) and BSA by frontal affinity chromatography. A single type of binding site was found for IM with the immobilized BSA, and the hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals interactions were expected to be contributing interactions based on the thermodynamic studies, and this was a spontaneous process. Compared to the traditional silica for HPLC stationary phase, the proposed penetrable silica microsphere possessed a larger capacity to bond more BSA, minimizing column overloading effects and enhancing enantioseparation ability. In addition, the lower running column back pressure and fast mass transfer were meaningful for the column stability and lifetime. It was a good substrate to immobilize biomolecules for fast chiral resolution and screening drug-protein interactions.

  3. Penetrable silica microspheres for immobilization of bovine serum albumin and their application to the study of the interaction between imatinib mesylate and protein by frontal affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyun; Li, Jing; Zhao, Juan; Liao, Han; Xu, Li; Shi, Zhi-guo

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, novel featured silica, named penetrable silica, simultaneously containing macropores and mesopores, was immobilized with bovine serum albumin (BSA) via Schiff base method. The obtained BSA-SiO2 was employed as the high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) stationary phase. Firstly, D- and L-tryptophan were used as probes to investigate the chiral separation ability of the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase. An excellent enantioseparation factor was obtained up to 4.3 with acceptable stability within at least 1 month. Next, the BSA-SiO2 stationary phase was applied to study the interaction between imatinib mesylate (IM) and BSA by frontal affinity chromatography. A single type of binding site was found for IM with the immobilized BSA, and the hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals interactions were expected to be contributing interactions based on the thermodynamic studies, and this was a spontaneous process. Compared to the traditional silica for HPLC stationary phase, the proposed penetrable silica microsphere possessed a larger capacity to bond more BSA, minimizing column overloading effects and enhancing enantioseparation ability. In addition, the lower running column back pressure and fast mass transfer were meaningful for the column stability and lifetime. It was a good substrate to immobilize biomolecules for fast chiral resolution and screening drug-protein interactions. PMID:26573171

  4. ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH MODIFIED PROTEINS BY HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY: BINDING OF GLIBENCLAMIDE TO NORMAL AND GLYCATED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Joseph, K.S.; Hage, David S.

    2012-01-01

    High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was used to examine the changes in binding that occur for the sulfonylurea drug glibenclamide with human serum albumin (HSA) at various stages of glycation for HSA. Frontal analysis on columns containing normal HSA or glycated HSA indicated glibenclamide was interacting through both high affinity sites (association equilibrium constant, Ka, 1.4–1.9 × 106 M−1 at pH 7.4 and 37°C) and lower affinity sites (Ka, 4.4–7.2 × 104 M−1). Competition studies were used to examine the effect of glycation at specific binding sites of HSA. An increase in affinity of 1.7- to 1.9-fold was seen at Sudlow site I with moderate to high levels of glycation. An even larger increase of 4.3- to 6.0-fold in affinity was noted at Sudlow site II for all of the tested samples of glycated HSA. A slight decrease in affinity may have occurred at the digitoxin site, but this change was not significant for any individual glycated HSA sample. These results illustrate how HPAC can be used as tool for examining the interactions of relatively non-polar drugs like glibenclamide with modified proteins and should lead to a more complete understanding of how glycation can alter the binding of drugs in blood. PMID:23092871

  5. AcrB-AcrA Fusion Proteins That Act as Multidrug Efflux Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Kimie; Yamasaki, Seiji; Nishino, Kunihiko

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli is an intrinsic RND-type multidrug efflux transporter that functions as a tripartite complex of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the outer membrane channel TolC, and the adaptor protein AcrA. Although the crystal structures of each component of this system have been elucidated, the crystal structure of the whole complex has not been solved. The available crystal structures have shown that AcrB and TolC function as trimers, but the number of AcrA molecules in the complex is now under debate. Disulfide chemical cross-linking experiments have indicated that the stoichiometry of AcrB-AcrA-TolC is 1:1:1; on the other hand, recent cryo-electron microscopy images of AcrAB-TolC suggested a 1:2:1 stoichiometry. In this study, we constructed 1:1-fixed AcrB-AcrA fusion proteins using various linkers. Surprisingly, all the 1:1-fixed linker proteins showed drug export activity under both acrAB-deficient conditions and acrAB acrEF double-pump-knockout conditions regardless of the lengths of the linkers. Finally, we optimized a shorter linker lacking the conformational freedom imparted by the AcrB C terminus. These results suggest that a complex with equal amounts of AcrA and AcrB is sufficient for drug export function. IMPORTANCE The structure and stoichiometry of the RND-type multidrug exporter AcrB-AcrA-TolC complex are still under debate. Recently, electron microscopic images of the AcrB-AcrA-TolC complex have been reported, suggesting a 1:2:1 stoichiometry. However, we report here that the AcrB-AcrA 1:1 fusion protein is active for drug export under acrAB-deficient conditions and also under acrAB acrEF double-deficient conditions, which eliminate the aid of free AcrA and its close homolog AcrE, indicating that the AcrB-AcrA 1:1 stoichiometry is enough for drug export function. In addition, the AcrB-AcrA fusion protein can function without the aid of free AcrA. We believe that these results are very important for

  6. Feeding transgenic plants that express a tolerogenic fusion protein effectively protects against arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Charlotta; Schön, Karin; Kalbina, Irina; Strid, Åke; Andersson, Sören; Bokarewa, Maria I; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-04-01

    Although much explored, oral tolerance for treatment of autoimmune diseases still awaits the establishment of novel and effective vectors. We investigated whether the tolerogenic CTA1(R7K)-COL-DD fusion protein can be expressed in edible plants, to induce oral tolerance and protect against arthritis. The fusion protein was recombinantly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana plants, which were fed to H-2(q) -restricted DBA/1 mice to assess the preventive effect on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). The treatment resulted in fewer mice exhibiting disease and arthritis scores were significantly reduced. Immune suppression was evident in treated mice, and serum biomarkers for inflammation as well as anticollagen IgG responses were reduced. In spleen and draining lymph nodes, CD4(+) T-cell responses were reduced. Concomitant with a reduced effector T-cell activity with lower IFNγ, IL-13 and IL-17A production, we observed an increase in IL-10 production to recall antigen stimulation in vitro, suggesting reduced Th1, Th2 and Th17 activity subsequent to up-regulated IL-10 and regulatory T-cell (Treg) functions. This study shows that edible plants expressing a tolerogen were effective at stimulating CD4 T-cell tolerance and in protecting against CIA disease. Our study conveys optimism as to the potential of using edible plants for oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26403330

  7. Coexpression of cellulases in Pichia pastoris as a self-processing protein fusion.

    PubMed

    de Amorim Araújo, Juliana; Ferreira, Túlio César; Rubini, Marciano Régis; Duran, Ana Gilhema Gomez; De Marco, Janice Lisboa; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2015-12-01

    The term cellulase refers to any component of the enzymatic complex produced by some fungi, bacteria and protozoans which act serially or synergistically to catalyze the cleavage of cellulosic materials. Cellulases have been widely used in many industrial applications ranging from food industry to the production of second generation ethanol. In an effort to develop new strategies to minimize the costs of enzyme production we describe the development of a Pichia pastoris strain able to coproduce two different cellulases. For that purpose the eglII (endoglucanase II) and cbhII (cellobiohydrolase II) genes from Trichoderma reesei were fused in-frame separated by the self-processing 2A peptide sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus. The protein fusion construct was placed under the control of the strong inducible AOX1 promoter. Analysis of culture supernatants from methanol-induced yeast transformants showed that the protein fusion was effectively processed. Enzymatic assay showed that the processed enzymes were fully functional with the same catalytic properties of the individual enzymes produced separately. Furthermore, when combined both enzymes acted synergistically on filter paper to produce cellobiose as the main end-product. Based on these results we propose that P. pastoris should be considered as an alternative platform for the production of cellulases at competitive costs.

  8. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by a CD4-VH3-IgG1 fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Meyuhas, Ronit; Noy, Hava; Fishman, Sigal; Margalit, Alon; Montefiori, David C.; Gross, Gideon

    2009-08-21

    HIV-1 gp120 is an alleged B cell superantigen, binding certain VH3+ human antibodies. We reasoned that a CD4-VH3 fusion protein could possess higher affinity for gp120 and improved HIV-1 inhibitory capacity. To test this we produced several human IgG1 immunoligands harboring VH3. Unlike VH3-IgG1 or VH3-CD4-IgG1, CD4-VH3-IgG1 bound gp120 considerably stronger than CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 exhibited {approx}1.5-2.5-fold increase in neutralization of two T-cell laboratory-adapted strains when compared to CD4-IgG1. CD4-VH3-IgG1 improved neutralization of 7/10 clade B primary isolates or pseudoviruses, exceeding 20-fold for JR-FL and 13-fold for Ba-L. It enhanced neutralization of 4/8 clade C viruses, and had negligible effect on 1/4 clade A pseudoviruses. We attribute this improvement to possible pairing of VH3 with CD4 D1 and stabilization of an Ig Fv-like structure, rather than to superantigen interactions. These novel findings support the current notion that CD4 fusion proteins can act as better HIV-1 entry inhibitors with potential clinical implications.

  9. Coexpression of cellulases in Pichia pastoris as a self-processing protein fusion.

    PubMed

    de Amorim Araújo, Juliana; Ferreira, Túlio César; Rubini, Marciano Régis; Duran, Ana Gilhema Gomez; De Marco, Janice Lisboa; de Moraes, Lidia Maria Pepe; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves

    2015-12-01

    The term cellulase refers to any component of the enzymatic complex produced by some fungi, bacteria and protozoans which act serially or synergistically to catalyze the cleavage of cellulosic materials. Cellulases have been widely used in many industrial applications ranging from food industry to the production of second generation ethanol. In an effort to develop new strategies to minimize the costs of enzyme production we describe the development of a Pichia pastoris strain able to coproduce two different cellulases. For that purpose the eglII (endoglucanase II) and cbhII (cellobiohydrolase II) genes from Trichoderma reesei were fused in-frame separated by the self-processing 2A peptide sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus. The protein fusion construct was placed under the control of the strong inducible AOX1 promoter. Analysis of culture supernatants from methanol-induced yeast transformants showed that the protein fusion was effectively processed. Enzymatic assay showed that the processed enzymes were fully functional with the same catalytic properties of the individual enzymes produced separately. Furthermore, when combined both enzymes acted synergistically on filter paper to produce cellobiose as the main end-product. Based on these results we propose that P. pastoris should be considered as an alternative platform for the production of cellulases at competitive costs. PMID:26698316

  10. Recombinant GDNF: Tetanus toxin fragment C fusion protein produced from insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Celia, Samuel A.; Kashi, Brenda B.; Tamrazian, Eric; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Remington, Mary P.; Pepinsky, R. Blake; Fishman, Paul S.; Brown, Robert H.; Francis, Jonathan W.

    2009-07-31

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival-promoting effects on CNS motor neurons in experimental animals. Its therapeutic efficacy in humans, however, may have been limited by poor bioavailability to the brain and spinal cord. With a view toward improving delivery of GDNF to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we generated a recombinant fusion protein comprised of rat GDNF linked to the non-toxic, neuron-binding fragment of tetanus toxin. Recombinant GDNF:TTC produced from insect cells was a soluble homodimer like wild-type GDNF and was bi-functional with respect to GDNF and TTC activity. Like recombinant rat GDNF, the fusion protein increased levels of immunoreactive phosphoAkt in treated NB41A3-hGFR{alpha}-1 neuroblastoma cells. Like TTC, GDNF:TTC bound to immobilized ganglioside GT1b in vitro with high affinity and selectivity. These results support further testing of recombinant GDNF:TTC as a non-viral vector to improve delivery of GDNF to brain and spinal cord in vivo.

  11. Chemokines, costimulatory molecules and fusion proteins for the immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Melissa G; Russell, Sarah M; Bass, Rikki S; Epstein, Alan L

    2011-11-01

    In this article, the role of chemokines and costimulatory molecules in the immunotherapy of experimental murine solid tumors and immunotherapy used in ongoing clinical trials are presented. Chemokine networks regulate physiologic cell migration that may be disrupted to inhibit antitumor immune responses or co-opted to promote tumor growth and metastasis in cancer. Recent studies highlight the potential use of chemokines in cancer immunotherapy to improve innate and adaptive cell interactions and to recruit immune effector cells into the tumor microenvironment. Another critical component of antitumor immune responses is antigen priming and activation of effector cells. Reciprocal expression and binding of costimulatory molecules and their ligands by antigen-presenting cells and naive lymphocytes ensures robust expansion, activity and survival of tumor-specific effector cells in vivo. Immunotherapy approaches using agonist antibodies or fusion proteins of immunomodulatory molecules significantly inhibit tumor growth and boost cell-mediated immunity. To localize immune stimulation to the tumor site, a series of fusion proteins consisting of a tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis and chemokines or costimulatory molecules were generated and tested in tumor-bearing mice. While several of these reagents were initially shown to have therapeutic value, combination therapies with methods to delete suppressor cells had the greatest effect on tumor growth. In conclusion, a key conclusion that has emerged from these studies is that successful immunotherapy will require both advanced methods of immunostimulation and the removal of immunosuppression in the host.

  12. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  13. Large fragments of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Geisow, M J; Beaven, G H

    1977-03-01

    Large fragments of human serum albumin were produced by treatment of the native protein with pepsin at pH3.5. Published sequences of human albumin [Behrens, Spiekerman & Brown (1975) Fed. Proc. Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol. 34, 591; Meloun, Moravek & Kostka (1975) FEBSLett.58, 134-137]were used to locate the fragments in the primary structure. The fragments support both the sequence and proposed disulphide-linkage pattern (Behrens et al., 1975). As the pH of a solution of albumin is lowered from pH4 to pH3.5, the protein undergoes a reversible conformational change known as the N-F transition. The distribution of large fragments of human albumin digested with pepsin in the above pH region was critically dependent on pH. It appeared that this distribution was dependent on the conformation of the protein at low pH, rather than the activity of pepsin. The yields of the large fragments produced by peptic digestion at different values of pH suggested that the C-terminal region of albumin unfolds or separates from the rest of the molecule during the N-F transition. The similarity of peptic fragments of human and bovine albumin produced under identical conditions supports the proposed similar tertiary structure of these molecules.

  14. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse-transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Sidote, David J.; Markham, Laura M.; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat) systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in Type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (“spacers”) from invasive elements. In several Type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we show that an RT-Cas1 fusion enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in an RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  15. Matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus blocks autophagosome fusion with lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gannagé, Monique; Schmid, Dorothee; Albrecht, Randy; Dengjel, Jörn; Torossi, Tania; Rämer, Patrick C.; Lee, Monica; Strowig, Till; Arrey, Frida; Conenello, Gina; Pypaert, Marc; Andersen, Jens; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Münz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus is an important human pathogen causing significant morbidity and mortality every year and threatening the human population with epidemics and pandemics. Therefore, it is important to understand the biology of this virus to develop strategies to control its pathogenicity. Here we demonstrate that live influenza A virus infection causes accumulation of autophagosomes by blocking their fusion with lysosomes. Matrix protein 2 is sufficient and necessary for this inhibition of autophagosome degradation. Macroautophagy inhibition compromises cell survival of influenza virus infected cells, but does not influence viral replication. We propose that influenza A virus, which also encodes pro-apoptotic proteins, is able to determine the death of its host cell by inducing apoptosis and blocking macroautophagy. PMID:19837376

  16. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as ‘enhancers’ and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  17. A designed recombinant fusion protein for targeted delivery of siRNA to the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohamed Mohamed; Dar, Ghulam Hassan; Jeyalakshmi, Durga; Venkatraman, Uthra; Saba, Kamal; Rangaraj, Nandini; Patel, Anant Bahadur; Gopal, Vijaya

    2016-04-28

    RNA interference represents a novel therapeutic approach to modulate several neurodegenerative disease-related genes. However, exogenous delivery of siRNA restricts their transport into different tissues and specifically into the brain mainly due to its large size and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To overcome these challenges, we developed here a strategy wherein a peptide known to target specific gangliosides was fused to a double-stranded RNA binding protein to deliver siRNA to the brain parenchyma. The designed fusion protein designated as TARBP-BTP consists of a double-stranded RNA-binding domain (dsRBD) of human Trans Activation response element (TAR) RNA Binding Protein (TARBP2) fused to a brain targeting peptide that binds to monosialoganglioside GM1. Conformation-specific binding of TARBP2 domain to siRNA led to the formation of homogenous serum-stable complex with targeting potential. Further, uptake of the complex in Neuro-2a, IMR32 and HepG2 cells analyzed by confocal microscopy and fluorescence activated cell sorting, revealed selective requirement of GM1 for entry. Remarkably, systemic delivery of the fluorescently labeled complex (TARBP-BTP:siRNA) in ΑβPP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) led to distinctive localization in the cerebral hemisphere. Further, the delivery of siRNA mediated by TARBP-BTP led to significant knockdown of BACE1 in the brain, in both ΑβPP-PS1 mice and wild type C57BL/6. The study establishes the growing importance of fusion proteins in delivering therapeutic siRNA to brain tissues. PMID:26948382

  18. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Antignani, Antonella; Mathews Griner, Lesley; Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J; Thomas, Craig J

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as 'enhancers' and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  19. Recombinant Flagellin-Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Cap Fusion Protein Promotes Protective Immune Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunyan; Zhu, Shanshan; Wei, Li; Yan, Xu; Wang, Jing; Quan, Rong; She, Ruiping; Hu, Fengjiao; Liu, Jue

    2015-01-01

    The Cap protein of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) that serves as a major host-protective immunogen was used to develop recombinant vaccines for control of PCV2-associated diseases. Growing research data have demonstrated the high effectiveness of flagellin as an adjuvant for humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, a recombinant protein was designed by fusing a modified version of bacterial flagellin to PCV2 Cap protein and expressed in a baculovirus system. When administered without adjuvant to BALB/c mice, the flagellin-Cap fusion protein elicited stronger PCV2-specific IgG antibody response, higher neutralizing antibody levels, milder histopathological changes and lower viremia, as well as higher secretion of cytokines such as TNF-α and IFN-γ that conferred better protection against virus challenge than those in the recombinant Cap alone-inoculated mice. These results suggest that the recombinant Cap protein when fused to flagellin could elicit better humoral and cellular immune responses against PCV2 infection in a mouse model, thereby acting as an attractive candidate vaccine for control of the PCV2-associated diseases. PMID:26070075

  20. Identification and immunogenic potential of B cell epitopes of outer membrane protein OmpF of Aeromonas hydrophila in translational fusion with a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mahima; Dixit, Aparna

    2015-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila, a ubiquitous and virulent bacterial pathogen, affects a variety of fishes, including Labeo rohita. Existing treatment strategies comprise antibiotic therapies and attenuated bacterial strain-based vaccines. No functional subunit vaccine has been available until now. Given their key role in determining pathogenicity, outer membrane proteins have been successfully explored as potential vaccine candidates. We have devised a direct strategy for eliminating non-specific responses by selectively aiming the immune response against specific immunodominant epitopes of the outer membrane protein F (OmpF) of A. hydrophila (AhOmpF). Five putative epitopes of AhOmpF predicted in silico were genetically conjugated with heat labile enterotoxin chain B of E. coli (LTB). Recombinant fusion proteins expressed in E. coli were purified from solubilized inclusion bodies and refolded. The fusion protein retained GM1 ganglioside receptor binding activity of LTB, indicating proper folding. Four of the five fusion proteins were found to be highly immunogenic. Of the four proteins, antisera against the fusion protein (anti-rEpiF1) harboring 66-80 amino acid residues of the OmpF gave maximum cross-reactivity with the targeted rOmpF in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and was able to recognize both fusion partners-rOmpF and rLTB-in Western blot. Antibody isotyping of the antisera and cytokine array analysis of the culture supernatants of splenocytes from sensitized mice manifested a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response with a bias toward Th2. Anti-rEpiF1 antibodies were able to bind to the cell membrane of live A. hydrophila cells and agglutinate them. Our results thus suggest that the OmpF epitope (66-80) in fusion with a carrier protein is a promising vaccine candidate against A. hydrophila.

  1. HaloPROTACS: Use of Small Molecule PROTACs to Induce Degradation of HaloTag Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Dennis L; Raina, Kanak; Darricarrere, Nicole; Hines, John; Gustafson, Jeffrey L; Smith, Ian E.; Miah, Afjal H; Harling, John D; Crews, Craig M

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule-induced protein degradation is an attractive strategy for the development of chemical probes. One method for inducing targeted protein degradation involves the use of PROTACs, heterobifunctional molecules that can recruit specific E3 ligases to a desired protein of interest. PROTACs have been successfully used to degrade numerous proteins in cells, but the peptidic E3 ligase ligands used in previous PROTACs have hindered their development into more mature chemical probes or therapeutics. We report the design of a novel class of PROTACs that incorporate small molecule VHL ligands to successfully degrade HaloTag7 fusion proteins. These HaloPROTACs will inspire the development of future PROTACs with more drug-like properties. Additionally, these HaloPROTACs are useful chemical genetic tools, due to their ability to chemically knockdown widely used HaloTag7 fusion proteins in a general fashion. PMID:26070106

  2. Differential localisation of GFP fusions to cytoskeleton-binding proteins in animal, plant, and yeast cells. Green-fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Timmers, A C J; Niebel, A; Balagué, C; Dagkesamanskaya, A

    2002-10-01

    The structure and functioning of the cytoskeleton is controlled and regulated by cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Fused to the green-fluorescent protein (GFP), these proteins can be used as tools to monitor changes in the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living cells and tissues in different organisms. Since the localisation of a specific cytoskeleton protein may indicate a particular function for the associated cytoskeletal element, studies of cytoskeleton-binding proteins fused to GFP may provide insight into the organisation and functioning of the cytoskeleton. In this article, we focused on two animal proteins, human T-plastin and bovine tau, and studied the distribution of their respective GFP fusions in animal COS cells, plant epidermal cells (Allium cepa), and yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Plastin-GFP localised preferentially to membrane ruffles, lamellipodia and focal adhesion points in COS cells, to the actin filament cytoskeleton within cytoplasmic strands in onion epidermal cells, and to cortical actin patches in yeast cells. Thus, in these 3 very different types of cells plastin-GFP associated with mobile structures in which there are high rates of actin turnover. Chemical fixation was found to drastically alter the distribution of plastin-GFP. Tau-GFP bound to microtubules in COS cells and onion epidermal cells but failed to bind to yeast microtubules. Thus, animal and plant microtubules appear to have a common tau binding site which is absent in yeast. We conclude that the study of the distribution patterns of microtubule- and actin-filament-binding proteins fused to GFP in heterologous systems should be a valuable tool in furthering our knowledge about cytoskeleton function in eukaryotic cells. PMID:12417938

  3. Photoacids as a new fluorescence tool for tracking structural transitions of proteins: following the concentration-induced transition of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Amdursky, Nadav

    2015-12-21

    Spectroscopy-based techniques for assessing structural transitions of proteins follow either an intramolecular chromophore, as in absorption-based circular dichroism (CD) or fluorescence-based tryptophan emission, or an intermolecular chromophore such as fluorescent probes. Here a new fluorescent probe method to probe the structural transition of proteins by photoacids is presented, which has a fundamentally different photo-physical origin to that of common fluorescent probes. Photoacids are molecules that release a proton upon photo-excitation. By following the steady-state and time-resolved emission of the protonated and de-protonated species of the photoacid we probe the environment of its binding site in bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a wide range of weight concentrations (0.001-8%). We found a unique concentration-induced structural transition of BSA at pH2 and at concentrations of >0.75%, which involves the exposure of its hydrophobic core to the solution. We confirm our results with the common tryptophan emission method, and show that the use of photoacids can result in a much more sensitive tool. We also show that common fluorescent probes and the CD methodologies have fundamental restrictions that limit their use in a concentration-dependent study. The use of photoacids is facile and requires only a fluorospectrometer (and preferably, but not mandatorily, a time-resolution emission system). The photoacid can be either non-covalently (as in this study) or covalently attached to the molecule, and can be readily employed to follow the local environment of numerous (bio-)systems. PMID:26573990

  4. Construct design, biophysical, and biochemical characterization of the fusion core from mouse hepatitis virus (a coronavirus) spike protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhui; Cole, David K; Lou, Zhiyong; Liu, Yiwei; Qin, Lan; Li, Xu; Bai, Zhihong; Yuan, Fang; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F

    2004-11-01

    Membrane fusion between virus and host cells is the key step for enveloped virus entry and is mediated by the viral envelope fusion protein. In murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), the spike (S) protein mediates this process. Recently, the formation of anti-parallel 6-helix bundle of the MHV S protein heptad repeat (HR) regions (HR1 and HR2) has been confirmed, implying coronavirus has a class I fusion protein. This bundle is also called fusion core. To facilitate the solution of the crystal structure of this fusion core, we deployed an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system to express the HR1 and HR2 regions linked together by a flexible linker as a single chain (named 2-helix). This 2-helix polypeptide subsequently assembled into a typical 6-helix bundle. This bundle has been analyzed by a series of biophysical and biochemical techniques and confirmed that the design technique can be used for coronavirus as we successfully used for members of paramyxoviruses.

  5. Construction of hpaA gene from a clinical isolate of Helicobacter pylori and identification of fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ya-Fei; Yan, Jie; Li, Li-Wei; Li, Shu-Ping

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To clone hpaA gene from a clinical strain of Helicobacter pylori and to construct the expression vector of the gene and to identify immunity of the fusion protein. METHODS: The hpaA gene from a clinical isolate Y06 of H. pylori was amplified by high fidelity PCR. The nucleotide sequence of the target DNA amplification fragment was sequenced after T-A cloning. The recombinant expression vector inserted with hpaA gene was constructed. The expression of HpaA fusion protein in E.coli BL21(DE3) induced by IPTG at different dosages was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blot with commercial antibody against whole cell of H. pylori as well as immunodiffusion assay with self-prepared rabbit antiserum against HpaA fusion protein were applied to determine immunity of the fusion protein. ELISA was used to detect the antibody against HpaA in sera of 125 patients infected with H. pylori and to examine HpaA expression of 109 clinical isolates of H. pylori. RESULTS: In comparison with the reported corresponding sequences, the homologies of nucleotide and putative amino acid sequences of the cloned hpaA gene were from 94.25%-97.32% and 95.38%-98.46%, respectively. The output of HpaA fusion protein in its expression system of pET32a-hpaA-BL21(DE3) was approximately 40% of the total bacterial proteins. HpaA fusion protein was able to combine with the commercial antibody against whole cell of H. pylori and to induce rabbit producing specific antiserum with 1:4 immunodiffusion titer after the animal was immunized with the fusion protein. 81.6% of the serum samples from 125 patients infected with H. pylori (102/125) were positive for HpaA antibody and all of the tested isolates of H. pylori (109/109) were detectable for HpaA. CONCLUSION: A prokaryotic expression system with high efficiency of H. pylori hpaA gene was successfully established. The HpaA expressing fusion protein showed satisfactory immunoreactivity and antigenicity. High frequencies of HpaA expression in different H

  6. Investigation of bovine serum albumin glycation by THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, Olga P.; Nazarov, Maxim M.; Shkurinov, Alexander P.

    2016-04-01

    Protein glycation is accelerated under hyperglycemic conditions resulting to loss in the structure and biological functions of proteins. The transmission THz spectroscopy has been used for measuring of bovine serum albumin glycation dynamics. It was found that amplitude of albumin THz absorption depends on type of sugars and incubation time.

  7. An alternative easy method for antibody purification and analysis of protein-protein interaction using GST fusion proteins immobilized onto glutathione-agarose.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, L; Alonso, C A I; De Castro, R E; Cesari, A

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of small proteins designed to perform protein-protein assays can be a difficult task. Often, the modification of reactive residues necessary for the interaction between the immobilized protein and the matrix compromises the interaction between the protein and its target. In these cases, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is a valuable tag providing a long arm that makes the bait protein accessible to the mobile flow phase of the chromatography. In the present report, we used a GST fusion version of the 8-kDa protein serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 3 (SPINK3) as the bait to purify anti-SPINK3 antibodies from a rabbit crude serum. The protocol for immobilization of GST-SPINK3 to glutathione-agarose beads was modified from previously reported protocols by using an alternative bifunctional cross-linker (dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate)) in a very simple procedure and by using simple buffers under physiological conditions. We concluded that the immobilized protein remained bound to the column after elution with low pH, allowing the reuse of the column for alternative uses, such as screening for other protein-protein interactions using SPINK3 as the bait.

  8. Different activities of the reovirus FAST proteins and influenza hemagglutinin in cell-cell fusion assays and in response to membrane curvature agents

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, Eileen K.; Barry, Chris; Ciechonska, Marta; Duncan, Roy

    2010-02-05

    The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins evolved to induce cell-cell, rather than virus-cell, membrane fusion. It is unclear whether the FAST protein fusion reaction proceeds in the same manner as the enveloped virus fusion proteins. We now show that fluorescence-based cell-cell and cell-RBC hemifusion assays are unsuited for detecting lipid mixing in the absence of content mixing during FAST protein-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, membrane curvature agents that inhibit hemifusion or promote pore formation mediated by influenza hemagglutinin had no effect on p14-induced cell-cell fusion, even under conditions of limiting p14 concentrations. Standard assays used to detect fusion intermediates induced by enveloped virus fusion proteins are therefore not applicable to the FAST proteins. These results suggest the possibility that the nature of the fusion intermediates or the mechanisms used to transit through the various stages of the fusion reaction may differ between these distinct classes of viral fusogens.

  9. Control systems for membrane fusion in the ancestral eukaryote; evolution of tethering complexes and SM proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koumandou, V Lila; Dacks, Joel B; Coulson, Richard MR; Field, Mark C

    2007-01-01

    Background In membrane trafficking, the mechanisms ensuring vesicle fusion specificity remain to be fully elucidated. Early models proposed that specificity was encoded entirely by SNARE proteins; more recent models include contributions from Rab proteins, Syntaxin-binding (SM) proteins and tethering factors. Most information on membrane trafficking derives from an evolutionarily narrow sampling of model organisms. However, considering factors from a wider diversity of eukaryotes can provide both functional information on core systems and insight into the evolutionary history of the trafficking machinery. For example, the major Qa/syntaxin SNARE families are present in most eukaryotic genomes and likely each evolved via gene duplication from a single ancestral syntaxin before the existing eukaryotic groups diversified. This pattern is also likely for Rabs and various other components of the membrane trafficking machinery. Results We performed comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses, when relevant, on the SM proteins and components of the tethering complexes, both thought to contribute to vesicle fusion specificity. Despite evidence suggestive of secondary losses amongst many lineages, the tethering complexes are well represented across the eukaryotes, suggesting an origin predating the radiation of eukaryotic lineages. Further, whilst we detect distant sequence relations between GARP, COG, exocyst and DSL1 components, these similarities most likely reflect convergent evolution of similar secondary structural elements. No similarity is found between the TRAPP and HOPS complexes and the other tethering factors. Overall, our data favour independent origins for the various tethering complexes. The taxa examined possess at least one homologue of each of the four SM protein families; since the four monophyletic families each encompass a wide diversity of eukaryotes, the SM protein families very likely evolved before the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA

  10. Identification and Characterization of LFD-2, a Predicted Fringe Protein Required for Membrane Integrity during Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Zhao, Jiuhai; Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Starr, Trevor L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during somatic cell fusion in eukaryotic species are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, somatic cell fusion occurs between genetically identical germinated asexual spores (germlings) and between hyphae to form the interconnected network characteristic of a filamentous fungal colony. In N. crassa, two proteins have been identified to function at the step of membrane fusion during somatic cell fusion: PRM1 and LFD-1. The absence of either one of these two proteins results in an increase of germling pairs arrested during cell fusion with tightly appressed plasma membranes and an increase in the frequency of cell lysis of adhered germlings. The level of cell lysis in ΔPrm1 or Δlfd-1 germlings is dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. An available transcriptional profile data set was used to identify genes encoding predicted transmembrane proteins that showed reduced expression levels in germlings cultured in the absence of extracellular calcium. From these analyses, we identified a mutant (lfd-2, for late fusion defect-2) that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. lfd-2 encodes a protein with a Fringe domain and showed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane localization. The deletion of an additional gene predicted to encode a low-affinity calcium transporter, fig1, also resulted in a strain that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. Genetic analyses showed that LFD-2 and FIG1 likely function in separate pathways to regulate aspects of membrane merger and repair during cell fusion. PMID:25595444

  11. Kinetics independent spectrometric analysis using non-linear calibration modelling and exploitation of concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch system for albumin and total protein determination in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Souza, Margarida C; Martins, Valdomiro L; Almeida, Luciano F; Pessoa Neto, Osmundo D; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Araujo, Mario Cesar U

    2010-08-15

    An automatic method for kinetics independent spectrometric analysis is proposed in this study. It uses a non-linear calibration model that explores concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch analyser (FBA) for the samples, dye, and the single standard solution. The procedure for obtaining the gradients of the dye and standard solution is performed once at the beginning of analysis. The same procedure is applied thereafter for each sample. For illustration, the proposed automatic methodology was applied to determine total protein and albumin in blood serum by using the Biuret and Bromocresol Green (BCG) methods. The measurements were made by using a laboratory-made photometer based on a red and green bicolour LED (Light-Emitting Diode) and a phototransistor, coupled to a "Z" form flow cell. The sample throughput was about 50 h(-1) for albumin and 60 h(-1) for total protein, consuming about 7 microL of sample, 2.6 mL of BCG and 1.2 mL of biuret reagents for each determination. Applying the paired t-test for results from the proposed analyser and the reference method, no statistic differences at 95% confidence level were found. The absolute standard deviation was usually smaller than 0.2 g dL(-1). The proposed method is valuable for the determination of total protein and albumin; and can also be used in other determinations where kinetic effects may or may not exist. PMID:20678663

  12. Kinetics independent spectrometric analysis using non-linear calibration modelling and exploitation of concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch system for albumin and total protein determination in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Souza, Margarida C; Martins, Valdomiro L; Almeida, Luciano F; Pessoa Neto, Osmundo D; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Araujo, Mario Cesar U

    2010-08-15

    An automatic method for kinetics independent spectrometric analysis is proposed in this study. It uses a non-linear calibration model that explores concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch analyser (FBA) for the samples, dye, and the single standard solution. The procedure for obtaining the gradients of the dye and standard solution is performed once at the beginning of analysis. The same procedure is applied thereafter for each sample. For illustration, the proposed automatic methodology was applied to determine total protein and albumin in blood serum by using the Biuret and Bromocresol Green (BCG) methods. The measurements were made by using a laboratory-made photometer based on a red and green bicolour LED (Light-Emitting Diode) and a phototransistor, coupled to a "Z" form flow cell. The sample throughput was about 50 h(-1) for albumin and 60 h(-1) for total protein, consuming about 7 microL of sample, 2.6 mL of BCG and 1.2 mL of biuret reagents for each determination. Applying the paired t-test for results from the proposed analyser and the reference method, no statistic differences at 95% confidence level were found. The absolute standard deviation was usually smaller than 0.2 g dL(-1). The proposed method is valuable for the determination of total protein and albumin; and can also be used in other determinations where kinetic effects may or may not exist.

  13. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  14. Charge-surrounded pockets and electrostatic interactions with small ions modulate the activity of retroviral fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Daniel; Schüttelkopf, Alexander W; van Aalten, Daan M F; Brighty, David W

    2011-02-03

    Refolding of viral class-1 membrane fusion proteins from a native state to a trimer-of-hairpins structure promotes entry of viruses into cells. Here we present the structure of the bovine leukaemia virus transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) and identify a group of asparagine residues at the membrane-distal end of the trimer-of-hairpins that is strikingly conserved among divergent viruses. These asparagines are not essential for surface display of pre-fusogenic envelope. Instead, substitution of these residues dramatically disrupts membrane fusion. Our data indicate that, through electrostatic interactions with a chloride ion, the asparagine residues promote assembly and profoundly stabilize the fusion-active structures that are required for viral envelope-mediated membrane fusion. Moreover, the BLV TM structure also reveals a charge-surrounded hydrophobic pocket on the central coiled coil and interactions with basic residues that cluster around this pocket are critical to membrane fusion and form a target for peptide inhibitors of envelope function. Charge-surrounded pockets and electrostatic interactions with small ions are common among class-1 fusion proteins, suggesting that small molecules that specifically target such motifs should prevent assembly of the trimer-of-hairpins and be of value as therapeutic inhibitors of viral entry.

  15. Immune responses to a recombinant Rv0057-Rv1352 fusion protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yourong; Feng, Jindong; Zhang, Junxian; Zhao, Weiguo; Liu, Yu; Liang, Yan; Bai, Xuejuan; Wang, Lan; Wu, Xueqiong

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis help in understanding the mechanisms of protective immunity and in improving diagnostic methods for TB. Rv0057 and Rv1352 proteins are new T-cell antigens, found to play roles in TB infection. In this study, a recombinant fusion protein Rv0057-Rv1352 was made and analyzed for its immunological characteristics and potential utility. It showed good immunoreactivity with serum from TB patients by western blotting. The antibody levels against Rv0057-Rv1352 were significantly higher in sera from 69 TB patients than in sera from 60 patients with non-TB respiratory diseases (P<0.001). The sensitivities of a diagnostic ELISA test based on detecting Rv0057-Rv1352 antibody (60.3%) or 38 kDa-16 kDa antibody (58.8%) were comparable to commercial rapid test B (75.4%), and significantly higher (p<0.001) than bacteriological methods (15.9%), rapid test A (20.3%), or rapid test C (29.0%). The specificities of Rv0057-Rv1352 (93.3%) or 38 kDa-16 kDa antibody tests (93.3%) were equivalent to the rapid tests A (93.3%) and C (86.7%), and significantly higher than rapid test B (63.3%, p<0.001). When 38 kDa-16 kDa was used together with Rv0057-Rv1352, the test sensitivity reached 85.5%, and its specificity remained high (86.7%). The test was as sensitive with bacterium-positive TB patients as with bacterium-negative. In an ELISPOT assay for cellular immunity, Rv0057-Rv1352 stimulated T lymphocytes to produce fewer spots secreting IFN-γ than CFP10-ESAT6 fusion protein did (p>0.05). These results suggest that Rv0057-Rv1352 has potential for the serodiagnosis of active pulmonary TB. PMID:25696009

  16. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  17. Optimization of Landscape Phage Fusion Protein-Modified Polymeric PEG-PE Micelles for Improved Breast Cancer Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic landscape phage fusion proteins with high affinity and selectivity towards breast cancer MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) cells self-assemble with polymeric PEG-PE conjugates to form mixed micelles (phage-micelles) capable of cancer cell-targeted delivery of poorly-soluble drugs. While the PEG corona provides the stability and longevity to the micelles, its presence is a potential steric difficulties for the interaction of phage fusion protein with cell surface targets. We attempted to address this problem by controlling the length of the PEG block and the phage fusion protein quantity, selecting the optimal ones to produce a reasonable retention of the targeting affinity and selectivity of the MCF-7-specific phage fusion protein. Three PEG-PE conjugates with different PEG lengths were used to construct phage- and plain-micelles, followed by FACS analysis of the effect of the PEG length on their binding affinity and selectivity towards target MCF-7 cells using either a MCF-7 cell monoculture or a cell co-culture model composed of target cancer MCF-7 cells and non-target, non-cancer C166 cells expressing GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein). Both, the length of PEG and quantity of phage fusion protein had a profound impact on the targetability of the phage-micelles. Phage-micelles prepared with PEG2k-PE achieved a desirable binding affinity and selectivity. Incorporation of a minimal concentration of phage protein, up to 0.5%, produced maximal targeting efficiency towards MCF-7 cells. Overall, phage-micelles with PEG2k-PE and 0.5% of phage protein represent the optimal formulation for targeting towards breast cancer cells. PMID:26451274

  18. Antioxidant activity of albumin-bound bilirubin.

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, R; Glazer, A N; Ames, B N

    1987-01-01

    Bilirubin, when bound to human albumin and at concentrations present in normal human plasma, protects albumin-bound linoleic acid from peroxyl radical-induced oxidation in vitro. Initially, albumin-bound bilirubin (Alb-BR) is oxidized at the same rate as peroxyl radicals are formed and biliverdin is produced stoichiometrically as the oxidation product. On an equimolar basis, Alb-BR successfully competes with uric acid for peroxyl radicals but is less efficient in scavenging these radicals than vitamin C. These results show that 1 mol of Alb-BR can scavenge 2 mol of peroxyl radicals and that small amounts of plasma bilirubin are sufficient to prevent oxidation of albumin-bound fatty acids as well as of the protein itself. The data indicate a role for Alb-BR as a physiological antioxidant in plasma and the extravascular space. PMID:3475708

  19. Molecular evolution of the fusion protein gene in human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Nagasawa, Koo; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Lay Myint; Tanaka, Ryota; Ishii, Haruyuki; Shimojo, Naoki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ryo, Akihide

    2016-09-01

    We studied the molecular evolution of the fusion protein (F) gene in the human respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A (HRSV-A). We performed time-scaled phylogenetic analyses using the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We also conducted genetic distance (p-distance), positive/negative selection, and Bayesian skyline plot analyses. Furthermore, we mapped the amino acid substitutions of the protein. The MCMC-constructed tree indicated that the HRSV F gene diverged from the bovine RSV (BRSV) gene approximately 550years ago and had a relatively low substitution rate (7.59×10(-4) substitutions/site/year). Moreover, a common ancestor of HRSV-A and -B diverged approximately 280years ago, which has since formed four distinct clusters. The present HRSV-A strains were assigned six genotypes based on F gene sequences and attachment glycoprotein gene sequences. The present strains exhibited high F gene sequence similarity values and low genetic divergence. No positive selection sites were identified; however, 50 negative selection sites were identified. F protein amino acid substitutions at 17 sites were distributed in the F protein. The effective population size of the gene has remained relatively constant, but the population size of the prevalent genotype (GA2) has increased in the last 10years. These results suggest that the HRSV-AF gene has evolved independently and formed some genotypes. PMID:27291709

  20. PCR-mediated gene modification strategy for construction of fluorescent protein fusions in Candida parapsilosis.

    PubMed

    Gonia, Sara; Larson, Britta; Gale, Cheryl A

    2016-02-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a common cause of invasive candidiasis, especially in premature infants, even surpassing Candida albicans as the most frequently identified Candida species in some newborn intensive care units. Whereas many molecular tools are available to facilitate the study of C. albicans, relatively few have been developed for C. parapsilosis. In this study, we show that plasmids harbouring green, yellow and mCherry fluorescent protein sequences, previously developed for expression in C. albicans, can be used to construct fluorescent fusion proteins in C. parapsilosis by PCR-mediated gene modification. Further, the strategy can be used in clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis, which are typically prototrophic, because the plasmids include NAT1, a dominant selectable trait that confers resistance to the antibiotic nourseothricin. Overall, these tools will be useful to yeast researchers who require the ability to visualize C. parapsilosis directly, e.g. in in vitro and in vivo infection models. In addition, this strategy can be used to generate fluorescence in other C. parapsilosis clinical isolates and to tag sequences of interest for protein localization studies. Lastly, the ability to express up to three different fluorescent proteins will allow researchers to visualize and differentiate C. parapsilosis and/or C. albicans clinical isolates from each other in mixed infection models.

  1. MitoTimer probe reveals the impact of autophagy, fusion, and motility on subcellular distribution of young and old mitochondrial protein and on relative mitochondrial protein age

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Andrew W; Trudeau, Kyle; Zik, Eden; Benador, Ilan Y; Twig, Gilad; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Shirihai, Orian S

    2013-01-01

    To study mitochondrial protein age dynamics, we targeted a time-sensitive fluorescent protein, MitoTimer, to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial age was revealed by the integrated portions of young (green) and old (red) MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial protein age was dependent on turnover rates as pulsed synthesis, decreased import, or autophagic inhibition all increased the proportion of aged MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial fusion promotes the distribution of young mitochondrial protein across the mitochondrial network as cells lacking essential fusion genes Mfn1 and Mfn2 displayed increased heterogeneity in mitochondrial protein age. Experiments in hippocampal neurons illustrate that the distribution of older and younger mitochondrial protein within the cell is determined by subcellular spatial organization and compartmentalization of mitochondria into neurites and soma. This effect was altered by overexpression of mitochondrial transport protein, RHOT1/MIRO1. Collectively our data show that distribution of young and old protein in the mitochondrial network is dependent on turnover, fusion, and transport. PMID:24149000

  2. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S protein is necessary for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and cell-cell fusion but not interaction with M protein

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Corrin E.; Machamer, Carolyn E.

    2010-09-15

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that generally cause mild disease in humans. However, the recently emerged coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) is the most pathogenic human coronavirus discovered to date. The SARS-CoV spike (S) protein mediates virus entry by binding cellular receptors and inducing fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane. Coronavirus S proteins are palmitoylated, which may affect function. Here, we created a non-palmitoylated SARS-CoV S protein by mutating all nine cytoplasmic cysteine residues. Palmitoylation of SARS-CoV S was required for partitioning into detergent-resistant membranes and for cell-cell fusion. Surprisingly, however, palmitoylation of S was not required for interaction with SARS-CoV M protein. This contrasts with the requirement for palmitoylation of mouse hepatitis virus S protein for interaction with M protein and may point to important differences in assembly and infectivity of these two coronaviruses.

  3. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jonathan D.; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K.; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion. PMID:26082488

  4. Electrostatic Architecture of the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) Core Fusion Protein Illustrates a Carboxyl-Carboxylate pH Sensor.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jonathan D; Soto-Montoya, Hazel; Korpela, Markus K; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2015-07-24

    Segment 5, ORF 1 of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) genome, encodes for the ISAV F protein, which is responsible for viral-host endosomal membrane fusion during a productive ISAV infection. The entry machinery of ISAV is composed of a complex of the ISAV F and ISAV hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins in an unknown stoichiometry prior to receptor engagement by ISAV HE. Following binding of the receptor to ISAV HE, dissociation of the ISAV F protein from HE, and subsequent endocytosis, the ISAV F protein resolves into a fusion-competent oligomeric state. Here, we present a 2.1 Å crystal structure of the fusion core of the ISAV F protein determined at low pH. This structure has allowed us to unambiguously demonstrate that the ISAV entry machinery exhibits typical class I viral fusion protein architecture. Furthermore, we have determined stabilizing factors that accommodate the pH-dependent mode of ISAV transmission, and our structure has allowed the identification of a central coil that is conserved across numerous and varied post-fusion viral glycoprotein structures. We then discuss a mechanistic model of ISAV fusion that parallels the paramyxoviral class I fusion strategy wherein attachment and fusion are relegated to separate proteins in a similar fashion to ISAV fusion.

  5. 5-Fluorocytosine combined with Fcy-hEGF fusion protein targets EGFR-expressing cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Keng-Hsueh; Shih, Yi-Sheng; Chang, Cheng Allen; Yen, Sang-Hue; Lan, Keng-Li

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-expressing epithelial cancers account for significant portion of cancer deaths. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGF-EGFR signaling pathway is validated as an important anticancer drug target. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGF and Fcy fusion protein (Fcy-hEGF) can bind to EGFR and convert 5-FC to 5-FU. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fcy-hEGF combined with 5-FC preferentially inhibits EGFR-expressing cells viability. -- Abstract: Human epithelial cancers account for approximately 50% of all cancer deaths. This type of cancer is characterized by excessive activation and expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The EGFR pathway is critical for cancer cell proliferation, survival, metastasis and angiogenesis. The EGF-EGFR signaling pathway has been validated as an important anticancer drug target. Increasing numbers of targeted therapies against this pathway have been either approved or are currently under development. Here, we adopted a prodrug system that uses 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and human EGF (hEGF) fused with yeast cytosine deaminase (Fcy) to target EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells and to convert 5-FC to a significantly more toxic chemotherapeutic, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We cloned and purified the Fcy-hEGF fusion protein from Pichia pastoris yeast. This fusion protein specifically binds to EGFR with a similar affinity as hEGF, approximately 10 nM. Fcy-hEGF binds tightly to A431 and MDA-MB-468 cells, which overexpress EGFR, but it binds with a lower affinity to MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7, which express lower levels of EGFR. Similarly, the viability of EGFR-expressing cells was suppressed by Fcy-hEGF in the presence of increasing concentrations of 5-FC, and the IC{sub 50} values for A431 and MDA-MB-468 were approximately 10-fold lower than those of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. This novel prodrug system, Fcy-hEGF/5-FC, might represent a promising addition to the available class of inhibitors that specifically target EGFR

  6. Brief Report: Human Perivascular Stem Cells and Nel-Like Protein-1 Synergistically Enhance Spinal Fusion in Osteoporotic Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soonchul; Zhang, Xinli; Shen, Jia; James, Aaron W; Chung, Choon G; Hardy, Reef; Li, Chenshuang; Girgius, Caroline; Zhang, Yulong; Stoker, David; Wang, Huiming; Wu, Benjamin M; Peault, Bruno; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2015-10-01

    Autologous bone grafts (ABGs) are considered as the gold standard for spinal fusion. However, osteoporotic patients are poor candidates for ABGs due to limited osteogenic stem cell numbers and function of the bone microenvironment. There is a need for stem cell-based spinal fusion of proven efficacy under either osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of human perivascular stem cells (hPSCs), a population of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from adipose tissue, in the presence and absence of NELL-1, an osteogenic protein, for spinal fusion in the osteoporosis. Osteogenic differentiation of hPSCs with and without NELL-1 was tested in vitro. The results indicated that NELL-1 significantly increased the osteogenic potential of hPSCs in both osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic donors. Next, spinal fusion was performed by implanting scaffolds with regular or high doses of hPSCs, with or without NELL-1 in ovariectomized rats (n = 41). Regular doses of hPSCs or NELL-1 achieved the fusion rates of only 20%-37.5% by manual palpation. These regular doses had previously been shown to be effective in nonosteoporotic rat spinal fusion. Remarkably, the high dose of hPSCs+NELL-1 significantly improved the fusion rates among osteoporotic rats up to approximately 83.3%. Microcomputed tomography imaging and quantification further confirmed solid bony fusion with high dose hPSCs+NELL-1. Finally, histologically, direct in situ involvement of hPSCs in ossification was shown using undecalcified samples. To conclude, hPSCs combined with NELL-1 synergistically enhances spinal fusion in osteoporotic rats and has great potential as a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoporotic patients.

  7. Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Among Patients Undergoing Fusion for Degenerative Diagnoses in the United States, 2002–2012

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Deyo, Richard A.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Farrokhi, Farrokh Reza; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Context Use of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) as an adjunct to spinal fusion surgery proliferated following Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2002. Major safety concerns emerged in 2008. Purpose To examine whether published concerns about the safety of BMP altered clinical practice. Study Design/Setting Analysis of the National Inpatient Sample from 2002 through 2012. Patient Sample Adults (age >20) undergoing an elective fusion operation for common degenerative diagnoses, identified using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revisions, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Outcome Measures Proportion of cervical and lumbar fusion operations, over time, that involved BMP. Methods We aggregated the data into a monthly time series and reported the proportion of cervical and lumbar fusion operations, over time, that involved BMP. Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average, a regression model for time series data, was used to test whether there was a statistically significant change in the overall rate of BMP use following a FDA Public Health Notification in 2008. The study was funded by federal research grants, and no investigator had any conflict of interests. Results Use of BMP in spinal fusion procedures increased rapidly until 2008, involving up to 45.2% of lumbar and 13.5% of cervical fusions. BMP use significantly decreased following the 2008 FDA Public Health Notification and revelations of financial payments to surgeons involved in the pivotal FDA approval trials. For lumbar fusion, the average annual increase was 7.9 percentage points per year from 2002 to 2008, followed by an average annual decrease of 11.7 percentage points thereafter (p = <0.001). Use of BMP in cervical fusion increased 2.0% per year until the FDA Notification, followed by a 2.8% per year decrease (p = 0.035). Conclusions Use of BMP in spinal fusion surgery declined subsequent to published safety concerns and revelations of financial conflicts

  8. Residues in the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain are critical for endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Andreea; Carter, James R; Smith, Stacy E; Hellman, Lance; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus classified as a biosafety level four agent. The fusion (F) protein of Hendra virus is critical for promoting viral entry and cell-to-cell fusion. To be fusogenically active, Hendra virus F must undergo endocytic recycling and cleavage by the endosomal/lysosomal protease cathepsin L, but the route of Hendra virus F following internalization and the recycling signals involved are poorly understood. We examined the intracellular distribution of Hendra virus F following endocytosis and showed that it is primarily present in Rab5- and Rab4-positive endosomal compartments, suggesting that cathepsin L cleavage occurs in early endosomes. Hendra virus F transmembrane domain (TMD) residues S490 and Y498 were found to be important for correct Hendra virus F recycling, with the hydroxyl group of S490 and the aromatic ring of Y498 important for this process. In addition, changes in association of isolated Hendra virus F TMDs correlated with alterations to Hendra virus F recycling, suggesting that appropriate TMD interactions play an important role in endocytic trafficking.

  9. Different tissue distribution properties for glycosylation variants of fusion proteins containing the p40 subunit of murine interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Bootz, F; Venetz, D; Ziffels, B; Neri, D

    2016-10-01

    Antibody-based fusion proteins are gaining increasing importance for therapeutic applications, but the impact of glycosylation on in vivo biopharmaceutical performance is not always completely understood. In this article, we have analyzed biochemical and pharmaceutical properties of fusion proteins, consisting of the F8 antibody (specific to the EDA domain of fibronectin, a marker of tissue remodeling and of angiogenesis) and of the p40 subunit of interleukin-12, an inhibitor of inflammation. The corresponding fusion protein (F8-IL12p40), which inhibits colitis development in mice, is a glycosylated protein with suboptimal disease targeting properties in vivo Since the protein was extensively glycosylated, as evidenced by PNGase F treatment and mass spectrometric analysis, we mutated four asparagine residues in various combinations. The corresponding proteins exhibited similar biochemical and antigen-binding properties, but differences in thermal stability and bioactivity. Asparagine mutations did not lead to recovery of disease targeting performance in vivo, as evidenced by quantitative biodistribution studies with radioiodinated protein preparations in tumor-bearing mice. By contrast, an almost complete recovery of targeting was achieved with an enzymatically deglycosylated protein preparation. These findings reinforce the concept that different glycostructures can have an impact on tissue distribution properties.

  10. Recombinant fusion protein and DNA vaccines against foot and mouth disease virus infection in guinea pig and swine.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Yang, Z; Xu, Q; Sheng, Z; Xie, Y; Yan, W; You, Y; Sun, L; Zheng, Z

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we provide evidence that a recombinant fusion protein containing beta-galactosidase and a tandem repeat peptide of immunogenic dominant epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) VP1 protein elicits high levels of neutralizing antibody and protects both guinea pigs and swine against infection. Vaccination with this fusion protein induced a FMDV-specific proliferative T-cell response and a neutralizing antibody response. The immunized guinea pigs and swine were protected against FMD type O virus infection. Two DNA plasmids expressing genes of foot-and-mouth disease were constructed. Both plasmids pBO1 and pCO1 contain a signal sequence of the swine immunoglobulin G (IgG) gene and fusion protein gene of pXZ84. The signal sequence and fusion protein gene were under the control of a metallothionein promoter in the case of the pBO1 plasmid and under the control of a cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter in the case of pCO1 plasmid. When pBO1 and pCO1 were inoculated intramuscularly into guinea pigs, both plasmids elicited a neutralizing antibody response and spleen cell proliferation increased following stimulation with FMDV antigen, but animals were not protected from viral challenge. PMID:10333237

  11. Site-specific modification of genome with cell-permeable Cre fusion protein in preimplantation mouse embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Kim, Hwain; Lee, Daekee

    2009-10-09

    Site-specific recombination (SSR) by Cre recombinase and its target sequence, loxP, is a valuable tool in genetic analysis of gene function. Recently, several studies reported successful application of Cre fusion protein containing protein transduction peptide for inducing gene modification in various mammalian cells including ES cell as well as in the whole animal. In this study, we show that a short incubation of preimplantation mouse embryos with purified cell-permeable Cre fusion protein results in efficient SSR. X-Gal staining of preimplantation embryos, heterozygous for Gtrosa26{sup tm1Sor}, revealed that treatment of 1-cell or 2-cell embryos with 3 {mu}M of Cre fusion protein for 2 h leads to Cre-mediated excision in 70-85% of embryos. We have examined the effect of the concentration of the Cre fusion protein and the duration of the treatment on embryonic development, established a condition for full term development and survival to adulthood, and demonstrated the germ line transmission of excised Gtrosa26 allele. Potential applications and advantages of the highly efficient technique described here are discussed.

  12. Vsl1p cooperates with Fsv1p for vacuolar protein transport and homotypic fusion in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Akira; Higuchi, Yujiro; Yagi, Satoshi; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Members of the SNARE protein family participate in the docking-fusion step of several intracellular vesicular transport events. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vam7p was identified as a SNARE protein that acts in vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion. However, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, there have been no reports regarding the counterpart of Vam7p. Here, we found that, although the SPCC594.06c gene has low similarity to Vam7p, the product of SPCC594.06c has a PX domain and SNARE motif like Vam7p, and thus we designated the gene Sch. pombe vsl1(+) (Vam7-like protein 1). The vsl1Δ cells showed no obvious defect in vacuolar protein transport. However, cells of the vsl1Δ mutant with a deletion of fsv1(+), which encodes another SNARE protein, displayed extreme defects in vacuolar protein transport and vacuolar morphology. Vsl1p was localized to the vacuolar membrane and prevacuolar compartment, and its PX domain was essential for proper localization. Expression of the fusion protein GFP-Vsl1p was able to suppress ZnCl2 sensitivity and the vacuolar protein sorting defect in the fsv1Δ cells. Moreover, GFP-Vsl1p was mislocalized in a pep12Δ mutant and in cells overexpressing fsv1(+). Importantly, overexpression of Sac. cerevisiae VAM7 could suppress the sensitivity to ZnCl2 of vsl1Δ cells and the vacuolar morphology defect of vsl1Δfsv1Δ cells in Sch. pombe. Taken together, these data suggest that Vsl1p and Fsv1p are required for vacuolar protein transport and membrane fusion, and they function cooperatively with Pep12p in the same membrane-trafficking step.

  13. Analysis of the selective advantage conferred by a C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Claudia; Tzeng, W.-P.; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Frey, Teryl K.

    2007-12-05

    During serial passaging of rubella virus (RUB) in cell culture, the dominant species of defective-interfering RNA (DI) generated contains an in-frame deletion between the capsid protein (C) gene and E1 glycoprotein gene resulting in production of a C-E1 fusion protein that is necessary for the maintenance of the DI [Tzeng, W.P., Frey, T.K. (2006). C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage. Virology 356 198-207.]. A BHK cell line stably expressing the RUB structural proteins was established which was used to package DIs into virus particles following transfection with in vitro transcripts from DI infectious cDNA constructs. Packaging of a DI encoding an in-frame C-GFP-E1 reporter fusion protein corresponding to the C-E1 fusion protein expressed in a native DI was only marginally more efficient than packaging of a DI encoding GFP, indicating that the C-E1 fusion protein did not function by enhancing packaging. However, infection with the DI encoding the C-GFP-E1 fusion protein (in the absence of wt RUB helper virus) resulted in formation of clusters of GFP-positive cells and the percentage of GFP-positive cells in the culture following infection remained relatively constant. In contrast, a DI encoding GFP did not form GFP-positive clusters and the percentage of GFP-positive cells declined by roughly half from 2 to 4 days post-infection. Cluster formation and sustaining the percentage of infected (GFP-positive) cells required the C part of the fusion protein, including the downstream but not the upstream of two arginine clusters (both of which are associated with RNA binding and association with mitochondrial p32 protein) and the E1 part through the transmembrane sequence, but not the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Among a collection of mutant DI constructs, cluster formation and sustaining infected cell percentage correlated with maintenance during serial passage with wt RUB. We hypothesize that cluster formation and

  14. Is the pre-Tg DSC endotherm observed with solid state proteins associated with the protein internal dynamics? Investigation of bovine serum albumin by solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    DSC thermograms of solid state pure proteins often show a distinct endotherm at a temperature far below the glass transition temperature of the system (Tg). We hypothesized this endotherm represents enthalpy recovery associated with an internal mobility transition of the protein molecule. Although the existence of an internal transition has been postulated, whether this endotherm is associated with such a transition has not previously been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of the pre-Tg endotherm in lyophilized bovine serum albumin (BSA). Due to strong glass behavior, the system Tg was determined by extrapolating Tg data of disaccharide/BSA formulations to zero saccharide. A small pre-Tg endotherm around 40-60 °C was observed in amorphous BSA equilibrated at 11%RH. The apparent activation energy suggested the endotherm was "α-mobility"-related. A solid state hydrogen/deuterium exchange study using FTIR was conducted over a temperature range spanning the endotherm. We found a fast phase, followed by essentially a plateau level which is highly temperature dependent in the 40-60 °C range, suggesting enhanced internal protein motion as the system passes through the temperature range of the endotherm. These results suggest the pre-Tg endotherm is associated with a protein internal mobility transition.

  15. Exploration and Validation of C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio as a Novel Inflammation-Based Prognostic Marker in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Liu, Xu; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Tang, Ling-Long; Liu, Qing; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prognostic value of C-reactive protein/albumin ratio (CRP/Alb), a novel inflammation-based marker, remains unknown in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 1572 consecutive patients with non-metastatic NPC. Patients were randomly divided into a training set (n = 514) and validati