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Sample records for albumin solutions implications

  1. Sodium chloride crystallization from drying drops of albumin-salt solutions with different albumin concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhno, T. A.

    2015-11-01

    The salt nature of crystalline structures resulting from drying albumin-salt solutions with a low (<1 wt %) and high (7 and 9 wt %) concentration of albumin and a NaCl concentration kept at a physiological level (0.9 wt %) is experimentally substantiated. Such a conclusion is drawn from the dynamics of phase transitions, morphological studies, and differences between the physicochemical properties of albumin and salt. Obtained data give a deeper insight into the albumin and salt distributions in drying liquids.

  2. Adsorption of albumin on prosthetic materials: implication for tribological behavior.

    PubMed

    Serro, A P; Gispert, M P; Martins, M C L; Brogueira, P; Colaço, R; Saramago, B

    2006-09-01

    The orthopedic prosthesis used to substitute damaged natural joints are lubricated by a pseudosynovial fluid that contains biological macromolecules with potential boundary lubrication properties. Proteins are some of those macromolecules whose role in the lubrication process is not yet completely understood. In a previous work, we investigated the influence of the presence of albumin, the major synovial protein, upon the tribological behavior of three of the most used pairs of artificial joint materials: ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against counterfaces of alumina, CoCrMo alloy, and 316L stainless steel. Albumin was found to cause a significant decrease in the friction coefficient when the counterfaces were metallic because transfer of UHMWPE was avoided, but this effect was much weaker in the case of alumina. The objective of the present work was to look for an explanation for these differences in tribological behavior in terms of albumin adsorption. With this goal, studies on adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the counterface materials, from a biological model fluid (Hanks' balanced salt solution), were carried out using radiolabeled albumin ((125)I-BSA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The conclusion from all techniques is that the driving force for albumin adsorption is higher on the metals than on alumina. These results confirm that the greater the amount of protein adsorbed on the counterface, the more efficient is the protection against the transfer of polymeric film to the counterface.

  3. Interaction between pirenoxine and bovine serum albumin in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhixi; Yu, Xianyong; Yao, Qing; Yi, Pinggui

    2014-08-01

    This work concerns the interaction of prenoxine sodium (PRX) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which was conducted by spectroscopic means: fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis) and circular dichroism spectra (CD spectra) in physiological conditions. The results revealed the PRX can quench the fluorescence of BSA remarkably in aqueous solution. The quench mechanism has been obtained after corrected the fluorescence intensities for inner filter effects. The binding constants (Ka) were calculated according to the relevant fluorescence data at different temperatures. Moreover, from a series of analyses, we have obtained the binding sites, the binding distance and binding force. The effect of PRX on the conformation of BSA has been analyzed using synchronous fluorescence under experimental conditions. In addition, the CD spectra proved that the secondary structure of BSA changed in the presence of PRX in aqueous solution.

  4. Interaction between pirenoxine and bovine serum albumin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhixi; Yu, Xianyong; Yao, Qing; Yi, Pinggui

    2014-08-14

    This work concerns the interaction of prenoxine sodium (PRX) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which was conducted by spectroscopic means: fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis) and circular dichroism spectra (CD spectra) in physiological conditions. The results revealed the PRX can quench the fluorescence of BSA remarkably in aqueous solution. The quench mechanism has been obtained after corrected the fluorescence intensities for inner filter effects. The binding constants (Ka) were calculated according to the relevant fluorescence data at different temperatures. Moreover, from a series of analyses, we have obtained the binding sites, the binding distance and binding force. The effect of PRX on the conformation of BSA has been analyzed using synchronous fluorescence under experimental conditions. In addition, the CD spectra proved that the secondary structure of BSA changed in the presence of PRX in aqueous solution.

  5. Stability of therapeutic albumin solutions used for molecular adsorbent recirculating system-based liver dialysis.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Tom; Meijers, Björn; Evenepoel, Pieter; Laub, Ruth; Willems, Ludo; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests beneficial effects of albumin dialysis-based liver support in patients suffering from acute-on-chronic liver failure. Molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) is a nonbiological liver support device, based on the exchange of albumin-bound toxins between the patient's blood and a 20% human serum albumin solution in a secondary circuit. Bound toxins are continuously removed from the circulating albumin by exposure to activated charcoal and an ion-exchange resin. The aim of the present in vitro study was to determine the impact of exposure to charcoal and resin on the ligand binding properties of albumins, containing various levels of stabilizers and obtained from different suppliers (Baxter, CAF-DCF [Red Cross], and Sigma-Aldrich). Albumin binding properties were assessed by measuring equilibrium binding properties of warfarin, diazepam, and salicylate before and after incubation (for up to 7 h) with adsorbing materials; albumin-associated esterase-like activities were also determined. Notable changes in albumin binding upon incubation with adsorbing materials were only observed when using warfarin as a ligand. Affinity of warfarin for the Baxter and Sigma albumins showed a pronounced decrease (higher K(d) ) after the 1-7-h exposure to charcoal or resin. In the absence of adsorbing materials, similar effects were found, indicating that incubation time per se affects albumin binding properties. Following exposure to resin, Baxter albumin binding capacity (B(max)) increased about twofold. For albumin obtained from CAF-DCF, binding affinity and capacity for warfarin were constant under all conditions tested. Esterase-like activities associated with these albumins were either maintained or enhanced (up to 2.5-fold in case of Sigma albumin) following 7-h incubations with adsorbing materials. Our data suggest limited direct influence of the presence of stabilizers in therapeutic albumin solutions on baseline binding properties of human

  6. Study of influence of millimeter range electromagnetic waves on water-saline solutions of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinyan, Mariam A.; Antonyan, Ara P.; Mikaelyan, Marieta S.; Vardevanyan, Poghos O.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the effect of electromagnetic waves of millimeter diapason (EMW MM) on both melting parameters of serum albumin from human blood and its solution density has been studied. It was shown that the irradiation of albumin solution results in protein denaturation at higher temperatures than in the case of nonirradiated samples, which indicates the increase of albumin packing degree. It was also shown that the enhancement of albumin solution density takes place which indicates the protein packing degree change as well. The obtained data show that the effect of EMW MM does not depend on frequency of these waves, because alterations are revealed at all studied frequencies — 41.8, 48 and 51.8GHz.

  7. Changes of protein solutions during storage: a study of albumin pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Cathrine; Skotland, Tore

    2010-03-05

    During the production of air-filled albumin microspheres, to be used as an ultrasound contrast agent, it was observed that some albumin lots could not be used owing to albumin precipitation. In order to understand the reason for these lot-to-lot variations, 24 lots of 5% (w/v) human albumin pharmaceutical preparations were analysed. The results revealed that the good albumin lots all contained <0.03 mol of free SH groups per mol of albumin. The precipitation observed with other lots was most probably due to higher amounts of free SH groups. The lower amount of free SH groups in the good lots correlated with: (i) a yellow colour of the solutions and a UV-visible spectrum similar to that observed for non-enzymatic glycosylation; (ii) a decreased fructosamine content; (iii) an increased mobility against the anode in isoelectric focusing; and (iv) an increased truncation of the two N-terminal amino acids. No, or only small, differences were observed for the amounts of albumin dimer, albumin aggregates and protein impurities, and these could not account for the albumin precipitation. The differences observed between the albumin lots were most probably due to varying storage times and/or storage conditions, and incubation experiments revealed changes in all parameters that differed between the good and bad lots. Increasing the storage temperature or exposing the solutions to light resulted in a faster decrease of free SH groups and increase of the yellow colouration. It is likely that at least some of the changes observed were due to reactive degradation products formed from the stabilizer N-acetyl-L-tryptophan. The results presented should also be of interest regarding the storage of monoclonal antibodies and other proteins used in pharmaceuticals.

  8. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of pristine C60 and serum albumins in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shufang; Sui, Yu; Guo, Kai; Yin, Zhijuan; Gao, Xibao

    2012-08-01

    The interaction of nanomaterials with biological macromolecules is an important foundation of the design and the biological safety assessments of nanomaterials. This work aims to investigate the interaction between pristine C60 and serum albumins (human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin) in solution. Stable aqueous dispersion of C60 was prepared by simple direct ultrasonic method and characterized by UV-vis spectrophotometry, transmission electronic microscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques, and spectroscopic methods (fluorescence spectroscopy, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy) were utilized for the investigation. It was found that the fluorescence of serum albumins could be quenched by C60 nanoparticles in a substantially similar way. Slight changes of the surrounding microenvironment of amino residues were observed, while little effects on the protein secondary structure occurred. The different effects of dispersion methods on the interaction of C60 nanoparticles with serum protein were also compared and discussed.

  9. Interaction of silicon nanoparticles with the molecules of bovine serum albumin in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Anenkova, K A; Sergeeva, I A; Petrova, G P; Fedorova, K V; Osminkina, L A; Timoshenko, Viktor Yu

    2011-05-31

    Using the method of photon-correlation spectroscopy, the coefficient of translational diffusion D{sub t} and the hydrodynamic radius R of the particles in aqueous solutions of the bovine serum albumin, containing silicon nanoparticles, are determined. The character of the dependence of these parameters on the concentration of the protein indicates the absence of interaction between the studied particles in the chosen range of albumin concentrations 0.2 - 1.0 mg mL{sup -1}. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  10. Albumin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Vega-Criollo, R.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.

    2011-02-01

    A Characterization is made with performance analysis of new photosensitive films of albumin to certain conditions for holographic recording based on interferometric array. We carried out the photo-oxidation of gallus gallus albumin albumin chemically combining powdered sugar (Glass ®) to an aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate. It was the analysis of the behavior of diffraction efficiency parameter through the intensity diffraction pattern produced by the gratings made with albumin.

  11. Arginine and lysine reduce the high viscosity of serum albumin solutions for pharmaceutical injection.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naoto; Takai, Eisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-05-01

    Therapeutic protein solutions for subcutaneous injection must be very highly concentrated, which increases their viscosity through protein-protein interactions. However, maintaining a solution viscosity below 50 cP is important for the preparation and injection of therapeutic protein solutions. In this study, we examined the effect of various amino acids on the solution viscosity of very highly concentrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) at a physiological pH. Among the amino acids tested, l-arginine hydrochloride (ArgHCl) and l-lysine hydrochloride (LysHCl) (50-200 mM) successfully reduced the viscosity of both BSA and HSA solutions; guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), NaCl, and other sodium salts were equally as effective, indicating the electrostatic shielding effect of these additives. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that BSA is in its native state even in the presence of ArgHCl, LysHCl, and NaCl at high protein concentrations. These results indicate that weakened protein-protein interactions play a key role in reducing solution viscosity. ArgHCl and LysHCl, which are also non-toxic compounds, will be used as additives to reduce the solution viscosity of concentrated therapeutic proteins.

  12. Posttranslational nitro-glycative modifications of albumin in Alzheimer's disease: implications in cytotoxicity and amyloid-β peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Tajes, Marta; Palomer, Ernest; Ill-Raga, Gerard; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Román-Dégano, Irene; Eraso-Pichot, Abel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Nuñez, Laura; Paez, Antonio; Alameda, Francesc; Fernández-Busquets, Xavier; Lleó, Alberto; Elosúa, Roberto; Boada, Mercé; Valverde, Miguel A; Muñoz, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Glycation and nitrotyrosination are pathological posttranslational modifications that make proteins prone to losing their physiological properties. Since both modifications are increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, we have studied their effect on albumin, the most abundant protein in cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Brain and plasmatic levels of glycated and nitrated albumin were significantly higher in AD patients than in controls. In vitro turbidometry and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that glycation and nitrotyrosination promote changes in albumin structure and biochemical properties. Glycated albumin was more resistant to proteolysis and less uptake by hepatoma cells occurred. Glycated albumin also reduced the osmolarity expected for a solution containing native albumin. Both glycation and nitrotyrosination turned albumin cytotoxic in a cell type-dependent manner for cerebral and vascular cells. Finally, of particular relevance to AD, these modified albumins were significantly less effective in avoiding Aβ aggregation than native albumin. In summary, nitrotyrosination and especially glycation alter albumin structural and biochemical properties, and these modifications might contribute for the progression of AD.

  13. Human serum albumin adsorption on TiO2 from single protein solutions and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S R; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Saramago, B; Melo, L Viseu; Barbosa, M A

    2004-10-26

    In the present work, the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on commercially pure titanium with a titanium oxide layer formed in a H(2)O(2) solution (TiO(2) cp) and on TiO(2) sputtered on Si (TiO(2) sp) was analyzed. Adsorption isotherms, kinetic studies, and work of adhesion determinations were carried out. HSA exchangeability was also evaluated. Surface characterization was performed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and wettability studies. The two TiO(2) surfaces have very distinct roughnesses, the TiO(2) sp having a mean R(a) value 14 times smaller than the one of TiO(2) cp. XPS analysis revealed consistent peaks representative of TiO(2) on sputtered samples as well as on Ti cp substrate after 48 h of H(2)O(2) immersion. Nitrogen was observed as soon as protein was present, while sulfur, present in disulfide bonds in HSA, was observed for concentrations of protein higher than 0.30 mg/mL. The work of adhesion was determined from contact angle measurements. As expected from the surface free energy values, the work of adhesion of HSA solution is higher for the TiO(2) cp substrate, the more hydrophilic one, and lower for the TiO(2) sp substrate, the more hydrophobic one. The work of adhesion between plasma and the substrates assumed even higher values for the TiO(2) cp surface, indicating a greater interaction between the surface and the complex protein solutions. Adsorption studies by radiolabeling of albumin ((125)I-HSA) suggest that rapid HSA adsorption takes place on both surfaces, reaching a maximum value after approximately 60 min of incubation. For the higher HSA concentrations in solution, a multilayer coverage was observed on both substrates. After the adsorption step from single HSA solutions, the exchangeability of adsorbed HSA molecules by HSA in solution was evaluated. The HSA molecules adsorbed on TiO(2) sp seem to be more easily exchanged by HSA itself than those adsorbed on TiO(2) cp after 24 h. In

  14. Intermolecular forces in bovine serum albumin solutions exhibiting solidlike mechanical behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Nishinari, K

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions were analyzed to gain information on intermolecular forces that stabilize the system under normal physiological conditions. BSA solutions showed unexpectedly large zero shear viscosity values under steady shear flows but responded like solids to sinusoidal linear strains: the storage shear moduli were always larger than the loss shear moduli in the frequency range 1-100 rad/s. These results suggest that BSA solutions are so-called colloidal crystals in which colloidal particles are ordered in an array due to strong repulsive forces among particles. However, the pair potential between BSA molecules predicted based on the conventional Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory failed to explain these remarkable mechanical properties of BSA solutions. Additional repulsive forces other than electrostatic must be introduced to explain stability of BSA aqueous dispersions.

  15. Comparison of human serum and bovine serum albumins on oxidation dynamics induced by talaporfin sodium photosensitization reaction with albumin rich conditions: solution experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurotsu, Mariko; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Mei; Ogawa, Emiyu; Arai, Tsunenori

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand extracellular-photosensitization reaction (PR) using talaporfin sodium, we studied comparison of oxidation dynamics of albumin and talaporfin sodium in solution system by visible and ultraviolet absorption spectrum measurements. Almost all talaporfin sodium particles may be bound to albumin in interstitial fluid, and this binding would affect the oxidation dynamics during this PR. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is commonly used in vitro study but its binding characteristics with talaporfin sodium are different from human serum albumin (HSA). PR was operated in a solution composed of 20 μg/ml talaporfin sodium and 1.3 mg/ml HSA or BSA to simulate myocardial extracellular PR condition. Laser radiation of 662 nm was irradiated to this solution with irradiance of 0.29 W/cm2. Absorption spectra of these solutions were measured during the PR. We estimated oxidized ratio by absorption difference around 240 nm before and after the PR. Talaporfin sodium was oxidized 100% with HSA and BSA by the PR of 100 J/cm2 in radiant exposure. On the other hand, HSA and BSA were oxidized 60% and 94%, respectively in this radiant exposure. Q-band absorption peak of talaporfin sodium with HSA was shifted to 1 nm longer wavelength increasing radiant exposure up to 100 J/cm2. This longer wavelength shift would mean binding ratio of non-oxidized talaporfin sodium to non-oxidized HSA was increased with increasing radiant exposure. Therefore it would be possible that PR with talaporfin sodium bound to HSA might present efficient PDT than PR bound to BSA.

  16. Self-assembling of poly(aspartic acid) with bovine serum albumin in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nita, L E; Chiriac, A P; Bercea, M; Asandulesa, M; Wolf, Bernhard A

    2017-02-01

    Macromolecular co-assemblies built up in aqueous solutions, by using a linear polypeptide, poly(aspartic acid) (PAS), and a globular protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), have been studied. The main interest was to identify the optimum conditions for an interpenetrated complex formation in order to design materials suitable for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery systems. BSA surface possesses several amino- and carboxylic groups available for covalent modification, and/or bioactive substances attachment. In the present study, mixtures between PAS and BSA were investigated at 37°C in dilute aqueous solution by viscometry, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential determination, as well as in solid state by AFM microscopy and dielectric spectroscopy. The experimental data have shown that the interpolymer complex formation occurs for a PAS/BSA molar ratio around 0.541.

  17. The conformation of serum albumin in solution: a combined phosphorescence depolarization-hydrodynamic modeling study.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, M L; Duchowicz, R; Carrasco, B; de la Torre, J G; Acuña, A U

    2001-01-01

    There is a striking disparity between the heart-shaped structure of human serum albumin (HSA) observed in single crystals and the elongated ellipsoid model used for decades to interpret the protein solution hydrodynamics at neutral pH. These two contrasting views could be reconciled if the protein were flexible enough to change its conformation in solution from that found in the crystal. To investigate this possibility we recorded the rotational motions in real time of an erythrosin-bovine serum albumin complex (Er-BSA) over an extended time range, using phosphorescence depolarization techniques. These measurements are consistent with the absence of independent motions of large protein segments in solution, in the time range from nanoseconds to fractions of milliseconds, and give a single rotational correlation time phi(BSA, 1 cP, 20 degrees C) = 40 +/- 2 ns. In addition, we report a detailed analysis of the protein hydrodynamics based on two bead-modeling methods. In the first, BSA was modeled as a triangular prismatic shell with optimized dimensions of 84 x 84 x 84 x 31.5 A, whereas in the second, the atomic-level structure of HSA obtained from crystallographic data was used to build a much more refined rough-shell model. In both cases, the predicted and experimental rotational diffusion rate and other hydrodynamic parameters were in good agreement. Therefore, the overall conformation in neutral solution of BSA, as of HSA, should be rigid, in the sense indicated above, and very similar to the heart-shaped structure observed in HSA crystals. PMID:11325741

  18. UW solution improved with high anti-apoptotic activity by S-nitrosated human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ishima, Yu; Shinagawa, Takuya; Yoneshige, Shinji; Kragh-Hansen, Ulrich; Ohya, Yuki; Inomata, Yukihiro; Kai, Toshiya; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2013-04-01

    S-Nitrosated human serum albumin (SNO-HSA) is useful in preventing liver ischemia/reperfusion injury, and SNO-HSA should thus be able to prevent cell injury during liver transplantation. However, the potential protective effect of SNO-HSA on a combination of cold and warm ischemia, which is obligatory when performing liver transplantation, has not been examined. Therefore, we evaluated the protective effect of SNO-HSA added to University of Wisconsin (UW) solution during cold or/and warm ischemia in situ and in vitro. First, we observed that apoptotic and necrotic cell death were increased during cold and warm ischemia, respectively. SNO-HSA, which possesses anti-apoptosis activity at low NO concentrations, can inhibit cold ischemia injury both in situ and in vitro. In contrast, SNO-HSA had no significant effect on warm liver ischemia injury which, however, can be reduced by UW solution. We also demonstrated that the cellular uptake of NO from SNO-HSA can occur during cold ischemia resulting in induction of heme oxygenase-1 within 3h of cold ischemia. Our results indicate that treatment with SNO-HSA or UW solution alone is not sufficient to inhibit liver injury during a period of both cold and warm ischemia. However, a combination of SNO-HSA and UW solution can be used to prevent the two types of ischemia. SNO-HSA-added UW solution could be very useful in transplantation, because the previously imposed constraints on preservation time can be removed. This is a great advantage in a situation as the present one with increased utilization of scarce donor organs for more recipients.

  19. Study of the interaction of C60 fullerene with human serum albumin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Zhao, Xiongce; Mo, Yiming; Cummings, Peter T; Heller, William T

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles, such as the prototypical nanomaterial C60 fullerene, continues to grow. While evidence continues to mount that C60 and its derivatives may pose health hazards, the specific molecular interactions of these particles with biological macromolecules require further investigation. To better understand the interaction of C60 with proteins, the protein human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in solution with C60 at C60:HSA molar ratios ranging from 1:2 to 4:1. HSA is the major protein component of blood plasma and plays a role in a variety of functions, such as the maintenance of blood pH and pressure. The C60-HSA interaction was probed by a combination of circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand C60-driven changes in the structure of HSA in solution. The CD spectroscopy demonstrates that the secondary structure of the protein decreases in -helical content in response to the presence of C60. Similarly, C60 produces subtle changes in the solution conformation of HSA, as evidenced by the SANS data and MD. The data do not indicate that C60 is causing a change in the oligomerization state of the protein. Taken together results demonstrate that C60 interacts with HSA, but it does not strongly perturb the structure of the protein by unfolding it or inducing aggregation, suggesting a mechanism for transporting C60 throughout the body to accumulate in various tissues.

  20. Broadband measurements of the frequency dependence of attenuation coefficient and velocity in amniotic fluid, urine and human serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prashant K; Humphrey, Victor F; Duck, Francis A

    2005-10-01

    The frequency dependence of attenuation coefficient in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% and 20% human serum albumin solutions over the frequency range 5 MHz to 25 MHz was measured at both room temperature and physiological temperature using a variable path length technique. A 15 MHz (13 mm diameter) transducer was used to produce a broadband single-cycle pulse and a 4 mm diameter bilaminar polyvinylidene difluoride membrane hydrophone was used to detect the attenuated pulse. Standard time-of-flight measurement techniques were used to measure the acoustic velocity in the same fluid samples. At physiological temperature, the attenuation coefficients in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% and 20% human albumin solution were found to be 0.0053 f(1.65), 0.0047 f(1.67), 0.019 f(1.57) and 0.167 f(1.27) dB cm(-1), respectively, where f is in MHz. The velocities in amniotic fluid, urine and 4.5% human albumin solution at physiological temperature were found to be 1541.1 m s(-1) +/- 1.3 m s(-1), 1551.3 m s(-1) +/- 1.3 ms(-1) and 1547.3 m s(-1) +/- 1.0 m s(-1), respectively. The results provide unique data over the diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasonic frequency range that can be used as input data for theoretical models that attempt to simulate nonlinear pressure fields and temperature rises from medical ultrasonic transducers.

  1. The albumin controversy.

    PubMed

    Uhing, Michael R

    2004-09-01

    There are relatively few studies of albumin use in neonates and children, with most showing no consistent benefit compared with the use of crystalloid solutions. Certainly, albumin treatment is not indicated for treatment of hypoalbuminemia alone. Studies also show that albumin is not indicated in neonates for the initial treatment of hypotension, respiratory distress, or partial exchange transfusions. In adults, albumin is not considered to be the initial therapy for hypovolemia, burn injury, or nutritional supplementation. Based on the evidence, albumin should be used rarely in the neonatal ICU. Albumin may be indicated in the treatment of hypovolemia only after crystalloid infusion has failed. In patients with acute hemorrhagic shock, albumin may be used with crystalloids when blood products are not available immediately. Inpatients with acute or continuing losses of albumin and normal capillary permeability and lymphatic function, such as during persistent thoracostomy tube or surgical site drainage, albumin supplementation will prevent the development of hypoalbuminemia, and possibly edema formation. This has not been studied systematically, however. In patients with hypoalbuminemia and increased capillary permeability, albumin supplementation often leads to greater albumin leakage across the capillary membrane, contributing to edema formation without improvement in outcome. As the disease process improves and capillary permeability normalizes, albumin supplementation may accelerate recovery, but long-term benefits of albumin treatment usually cannot be demonstrated. These patients will recover whether or not albumin is administered.

  2. Assessment of chemical exchange in tryptophan-albumin solution through (19)F multicomponent transverse relaxation dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping-Chang

    2015-06-01

    A number of NMR methods possess the capability of probing chemical exchange dynamics in solution. However, certain drawbacks limit the applications of these NMR approaches, particularly, to a complex system. Here, we propose a procedure that integrates the regularized nonnegative least squares (NNLS) analysis of multiexponential T2 relaxation into Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments to probe chemical exchange in a multicompartmental system. The proposed procedure was validated through analysis of (19)F T2 relaxation data of 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan in a two-compartment solution with and without bovine serum albumin. Given the regularized NNLS analysis of a T2 relaxation curve acquired, for example, at the CPMG frequency υ CPMG  = 125, the nature of two distinct peaks in the associated T2 distribution spectrum indicated 6-fluoro-DL-tryptophan either retaining the free state, with geometric mean */multiplicative standard deviation (MSD) = 1851.2 ms */1.51, or undergoing free/albumin-bound interconversion, with geometric mean */MSD = 236.8 ms */1.54, in the two-compartment system. Quantities of the individual tryptophan species were accurately reflected by the associated T2 peak areas, with an interconversion state-to-free state ratio of 0.45 ± 0.11. Furthermore, the CPMG relaxation dispersion analysis estimated the exchange rate between the free and albumin-bound states in this fluorinated tryptophan analog and the corresponding dissociation constant of the fluorinated tryptophan-albumin complex in the chemical-exchanging, two-compartment system.

  3. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of human serum albumin: conformational and functional changes. Implications in protein aging.

    PubMed

    Meucci, E; Mordente, A; Martorana, G E

    1991-03-15

    Mild oxidative stress, as elicited by ascorbate, oxygen, and trace metals, affects the binding properties of human serum albumin via purely conformational changes. In fact, no gross alteration can be observed in the electrophoretic and chromatographic patterns of albumin, whereas localized modifications are indicated by the changes in absorption and fluorescence spectra and in polarization degree. The oxidized protein presents a small increase of bityrosine production and a time-dependent increase in the content of carbonyl groups, whereas proteolytic susceptibility is unchanged. A higher affinity for cis-parinaric acid and a slight loss of solubility in high salt indicate a greater surface hydrophobicity. Pinpoint denaturation of the albumin molecule is also suggested by a decreased "esterase" activity in the presence of p-nitrophenyl acetate. Conformational stability evaluated through thermal shock and addition of moderate amounts of guanidine indicate that the oxidized protein is more heat-resistant, less flexible, and more rigid than the native one. Although limited, structural damages afforded by the oxidative stress cause alterations of albumin binding properties as documented by experiments with probes and physiological ligands. The loss of biological activity of human serum albumin induced by ascorbate system appears of medical relevance, because it can affect drug metabolism and particularly drug tolerance in the elderly.

  4. Redox balance mechanisms in Schistosoma mansoni rely on peroxiredoxins and albumin and implicate peroxiredoxins as novel drug targets.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Ahmed A; Cook, Shawna K; Williams, David L

    2006-06-23

    Schistosoma mansoni, a causative agent of schistosomiasis, resides in the hepatic portal circulation of their human host up to 30 years without being eliminated by the host immune attack. Production of an antioxidant "firewall," which would neutralize the oxidative assault generated by host immune defenses, is one proposed survival mechanism of the parasite. Schistosomes lack catalase, the main H2O2-neutralizing enzyme of many organisms, and their glutathione peroxidases are in the phospholipid class with poor reactivity toward H2O2. Evidence implicates peroxiredoxins (Prx) as providing the main enzymatic activity to reduce H2O2 in the parasite. Quantitative monitoring of Prx mRNAs during parasite life cycle indicated that Prx proteins are differentially expressed, with highest expression occurring in adult stages (oxidative resistant stages). Incubation of schistosomula with Prx1 double-stranded RNA knocked down total Prx enzymatic activity and resulted in lowered survival of cultured parasites compared with controls demonstrating that Prx are essential parasite proteins. These results represent the first report of lethal gene silencing in Schistosoma. Investigation of downstream effects of Prx silencing revealed an abrupt increase of lipid peroxides and the generation of several oxidized proteins. Using mass spectrometry, parasite albumin and actin were identified as the main oxidized proteins. Gene expression analysis showed that schistosome albumin was induced by oxidative stress. This study highlights Prx proteins as essential parasite proteins and potential new targets for anti-schistosome drug development and albumin as a novel, sacrificial oxidant scavenging protein in parasite redox regulation.

  5. The effect of methylamine on the solution structures of human and bovine serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdani, S.; Joly, D.; Carpentier, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.

    2009-11-01

    Serum albumins are the major soluble protein constituents of the circulatory system and have many physiological functions including transporting a variety of compounds. Methylamine, a monoamine with one positive charge complexes with protein and alters protein secondary structure. The aim of this study was to examine the interactions of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) with methylamine at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various monoamine concentrations. FTIR, UV-vis, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to analyse methylamine binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of monoamine on HSA and BSA stability and conformations. Structural analysis showed that methylamine binds HSA and BSA via hydrophilic (polypeptide and amine polar groups) and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of Kmet-HSA = 2.42 (±0.5) × 10 2 M -1 and Kmet-BSA = 1.34 (±0.3) × 10 3 M -1 with the number of bound methylamine around one molecule per protein. Methylamine complexation alters protein conformation by major reduction of α-helix and increase in random coil and turn structures indicating a partial protein unfolding.

  6. Radiation-induced chemical transformations of human serum albumin in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondakova, N.V.; Ripa, N.V.; Kuznetsova, N.V.

    1994-11-01

    A rate constant of the reaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with OH radicals was determined using the method of competing scavengers. Changes in the amino acid composition and some biochemical properties of HSA on radiolysis in a borate buffer (pH 7.4) saturated with N{sub 2}O or O{sub 2} were correlated quantitatively. It was found that the yield of peptide bonds that lost the ability to be cleaved by trypsin is higher than the total yield of arginine and lysine residues in HSA. The possibility of accumulation of modified HSA in blood upon irradiation was considered.

  7. Human albumin solution for patients with cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure: Beyond simple volume expansion

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Christopher; Theocharidou, Eleni; Davenport, Andrew; Agarwal, Banwari

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of the properties of human serum albumin (HSA), and to review the evidence for the use of human albumin solution (HAS) in critical illness, sepsis and cirrhosis. A MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “human albumin”, “critical illness”, “sepsis” and “cirrhosis”. The references of retrieved articles were reviewed manually. Studies published between 1980 and 2014 were selected based on quality criteria. Data extraction was performed by all authors. HSA is the main plasma protein contributing greatly to its oncotic pressure. HSA demonstrates important binding properties for endogenous and exogenous toxins, drugs and drug metabolites that account for its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In disease states, hypoalbuminaemia is secondary to decreased HSA production, increased loss or transcapillary leakage into the interstitial space. HSA function can be also altered in disease with reduced albumin binding capacity and increased production of modified isoforms. HAS has been used as volume expander in critical illness, but received criticism due to cost and concerns regarding safety. More recent studies confirmed the safety of HAS, but failed to show any survival benefit compared to the cheaper crystalloid fluids, therefore limiting its use. On the contrary, in cirrhosis there is robust data to support the efficacy of HAS for the prevention of circulatory dysfunction post-large volume paracentesis and in the context of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and for the treatment of hepato-renal syndrome and hypervolaemic hyponatraemia. It is likely that not only the oncotic properties of HAS are beneficial in cirrhosis, but also its functional properties, as HAS replaces the dysfunctional HSA. The role of HAS as the resuscitation fluid of choice in critically ill patients with cirrhosis, beyond the established indications for HAS use, should be addressed in future studies. PMID:26981172

  8. Structure and interparticle interactions of bovine serum albumin in solution studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bendedouch, D.; Chen, S.H.

    1983-04-28

    A series of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements were carried out on dilute and moderately concentrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions at two different pH values and at t = 35/sup 0/C. The amount of bound water to the protein was deduced from the zero-contrast point of dilute BSA solutions, in D/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/O solvent mixtures. Detailed analysis of the intensity spectrum from the most dilute BSA solution in D/sub 2/O yields a prolate ellipsoidal shape (a,b,b) of the protein molecule with a = 70 angstrom and b = 20 angstrom. At moderate concentrations, pH 7, with or without salt (LiCl) added, the intensity spectra can be fitted satisfactorily by taking into account both the ellipsoidal shape of the particle and an interparticle interference factor (S(Q)). Calculation of S(Q) assumes a model of equivalent charged hard spheres interacting through a repulsive potential. For moderately concentrated solutions at pH 5.1, S(Q) can be accounted for by introducing an attractive potential between the particles.

  9. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Gilmara C.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% ( n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l -1 albumin and 90 g l -1 total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l -1 albumin ( r=0.998) and total protein ( r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 μl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO 4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  10. The studies of density, apparent molar volume, and viscosity of bovine serum albumin, egg albumin, and lysozyme in aqueous and RbI, CsI, and DTAB aqueous solutions at 303.15 K.

    PubMed

    Singh, Man; Chand, Hema; Gupta, K C

    2005-06-01

    Density (rho), apparent molar volume (V(phi)), and viscosity (eta) of 0.0010 to 0.0018% (w/v) of bovine serum albumin (BSA), egg albumin, and lysozyme in 0.0002, 0.0004, and 0.0008 M aqueous RbI and CsI, and (dodecyl)(trimethyl)ammonium bromide (DTAB) solutions were obtained. The experimental data were regressed against composition, and constants are used to elucidate the conformational changes in protein molecules. With salt concentration, the density of proteins is found to decrease, and the order of the effect of additives on density is observed as CsI > RbI > DTAB. The trend of apparent molar volume of proteins is found as BSA > egg-albumin > lysozyme for three additives. In general, eta values of BSA remain higher for all compositions of RbI than that of egg-albumin for CsI and DTAB. These orders of the data indicate the strength of intermolecular forces between proteins and salts, and are helpful for understanding the denaturation of proteins.

  11. Analysis of albumin hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, M.; Villa-Manríquez, J. F.

    2012-03-01

    We present the characterizations of the photosensitive film made with albumins gallus gallus and callipepla cali, with the purpose to make holographic recording. Albumin was combined with propylene glycol, to build colloidal systems by adding the ammonium dichromate solution as photosensitive salt at certain concentrations. Hence, we conducted the photo-oxidation process with laser, λ=442nm. Obtaining holograms that allowed the analysis of the diffraction efficiency parameter. One of the objectives of this work was to obtain some mechanical and chemical stability of films made with albumin when prepared with propylene glycol. At once, experimental studies were performed to compare the results of the holographic recording films between chicken albumin and quail albumin film to prove the recording capabilities and to quantify the diffraction efficiency in holographic grating made with each kind of albumin.

  12. Direct measurement of interaction forces between bovine serum albumin and poly(ethylene oxide) in water and electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Sergio M; Bastías, José M; Toledo, Pedro G

    2017-01-01

    The net interaction between a probe tip coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and a flat substrate coated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) polymer was measured directly on approach in water and electrolyte solutions using AFM. The approach force curve between the two surfaces was monotonically repulsive in water and in electrolyte solutions. At pH ~5, slightly above the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA, and at large distances, the force was dominated by electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen atoms of the incoming protein with those belonging to the ether groups of PEO. Such repulsive force and range decreased in NaCl. Under physiological conditions, pH 6, BSA is definitely charged and the electrostatic repulsion with ether groups in PEO appears at larger separation distances. Interestingly, at pH 4, below the pI of BSA, the repulsion decreased because of an attractive, although weak, electrostatic force that appeared between the ether groups in PEO and the positively charged amino groups of BSA. However, for all solution conditions, once compression of PEO begun, the net repulsion was always dominated by short-range polymeric steric repulsion and repulsive enthalpy penalties for breaking PEO-water bonds. Results suggest that PEO in mushroom conformation may also be effective in reducing biofouling.

  13. Direct measurement of interaction forces between bovine serum albumin and poly(ethylene oxide) in water and electrolyte solutions

    PubMed Central

    Bastías, José M.; Toledo, Pedro G.

    2017-01-01

    The net interaction between a probe tip coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and a flat substrate coated with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) polymer was measured directly on approach in water and electrolyte solutions using AFM. The approach force curve between the two surfaces was monotonically repulsive in water and in electrolyte solutions. At pH ~5, slightly above the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA, and at large distances, the force was dominated by electrostatic repulsion between the oxygen atoms of the incoming protein with those belonging to the ether groups of PEO. Such repulsive force and range decreased in NaCl. Under physiological conditions, pH 6, BSA is definitely charged and the electrostatic repulsion with ether groups in PEO appears at larger separation distances. Interestingly, at pH 4, below the pI of BSA, the repulsion decreased because of an attractive, although weak, electrostatic force that appeared between the ether groups in PEO and the positively charged amino groups of BSA. However, for all solution conditions, once compression of PEO begun, the net repulsion was always dominated by short-range polymeric steric repulsion and repulsive enthalpy penalties for breaking PEO-water bonds. Results suggest that PEO in mushroom conformation may also be effective in reducing biofouling. PMID:28296940

  14. Study of twenty preparations of human albumin solution which failed in quality control testing due to elevated sodium content, a poor internal quality control at manufacturing unit.

    PubMed

    Prasad, J P; Madhu, Y; Singh, Surinder; Soni, G R; Agnihotri, N; Singh, Varsha; Kumar, Pradeep; Jain, Nidhi; Prakash, Anu; Singh, Varun

    2016-11-01

    Current study is conducted in our laboratory due to failure in quality control testing of twenty batches of Human Albumin solution in which sodium content is higher than the prescribed limit. These batches are received in short duration from indigenous manufacturer and is the first incident of failure of Human albumin preparation in sodium content of manufacturer. On request of manufacturer, study is conducted to rule out the cause. Repeat testing of each out of specification batch is conducted and a trend analysis is drawn between our findings and manufacturer's results, also study of trend analysis of manufacturer for the last one year. Trend analysis data indicated towards poor consistency of batches with major shift at various time intervals in sodium content of human albumin preparation. Further analysis rule out that non-traceable quality of standard used in the internal quality control testing by manufacturer is the root cause of the problem.

  15. Albumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be ordered to evaluate a person's nutritional status. ^ Back to top When is it ordered? An ... albumin test to check or monitor a person's nutritional status. However, since albumin concentrations respond to a variety ...

  16. Heterogeneity in Desiccated Solutions: Implications for Biostabilization

    PubMed Central

    Ragoonanan, Vishard; Aksan, Alptekin

    2008-01-01

    Biopreservation processes such as freezing and drying inherently introduce heterogeneity. We focused on exploring the mechanisms responsible for heterogeneity in isothermal, diffusively dried biopreservation solutions that contain a model protein. The biopreservation solutions used contained trehalose (a sugar known for its stabilization effect) and salts (LiCl, NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2). Performing Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis on the desiccated droplets, spatial distributions of the components within the dried droplet, as well as their specific interactions, were investigated. It was established that the formation of multiple thermodynamic states was induced by the spatial variations in the cosolute concentration gradients, directly affecting the final structure of the preserved protein. The spatial distribution gradients were formed by two competing flows that formed within the drying droplet: a dominant peripheral flow, induced by contact line pinning, and the Marangoni flow, induced by surface tension gradients. It was found that the changes in cosolute concentrations and drying conditions affected the spatial heterogeneity and stability of the product. It was also found that trehalose and salts had a synergistic stabilizing effect on the protein structure, which originated from destructuring of the vicinal water, which in turn mediated the interactions of trehalose with the protein. This interaction was observed by the change in the glycosidic CO, and the CH stretch vibrations of the trehalose molecule. PMID:18055531

  17. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical for neuronal death in Parkinson’s disease: a possible implication for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Moon, Jeongsik; Park, Hye-Jeong; Roshini, Arivazhagan; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Jo, Seung-Mook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), by inducing protein aggregation and cross-link, formation of Lewy body, and neuronal death. In this study, we observed that AGE-albumin, the most abundant AGE product in the human PD brain, is synthesized in activated microglial cells and accumulates in the extracellular space. AGE-albumin synthesis in human-activated microglial cells is distinctly inhibited by ascorbic acid and cytochalasin treatment. Accumulated AGE-albumin upregulates the receptor to AGE, leading to apoptosis of human primary dopamine (DA) neurons. In animal experiments, we observed reduced DA neuronal cell death by treatment with soluble receptor to AGE. Our study provides evidence that activated microglial cells are one of the main contributors in AGE-albumin accumulation, deleterious to DA neurons in human and animal PD brains. Finally, activated microglial AGE-albumin could be used as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker with high sensitivity for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD. PMID:27601894

  18. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  19. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: Benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Casey D.; Cohen, Thomas L.; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K.; Fortner, John D.; Mitra, Robi D.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly-L-lysine-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface crosslinking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus, producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date. PMID:23441808

  20. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Casey D; Cohen, Thomas L; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K; Fortner, John D; Mitra, Robi D; Elbert, Donald L

    2013-03-26

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface cross-linking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date.

  1. Synthesis of bovine serum albumin-protected high fluorescence Pt16-nanoclusters and their application to detect sulfide ions in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Na; Li, Hong-Wei; Yue, Yuan; Wu, Yuqing

    2016-10-01

    Highly fluorescent (quantum yield, QY = 17%) Pt16-nanoclusters (Pt16-NCs@BSA) have been prepared via a one-step ultrasonic-assistance method by using cheap and easily available ascorbic acid as reductant and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a stabilizing agent in aqueous solution. The fluorescence properties of the Pt-NCs@BSA can be easily controlled by optimizing conditions, and the products are extremely stable and could be used for the detection of sulfide ions (S2-) in solutions as a specific luminescence sensor. The present synthesis method is performed in one step, being cost-effective with a particularly short reaction time, which could be extended to the synthesis of other kinds of protein-protected Pt-NCs.

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit.

  3. Ion release and surface oxide composition of AISI 316L, Co-28Cr-6Mo, and Ti-6Al-4V alloys immersed in human serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Shima; Alfantazi, Akram M

    2014-07-01

    The long-term weight loss, ion release, and surface composition of 316L, Co-28Cr-6Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were investigated in a simulated body environment. The samples were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions with various human serum albumin (HSA) concentrations for 8, 14, and 22 weeks. The specimens initially lost weight up to 14 weeks and then slightly gained weight. The analysis of the released ions was performed by induced coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The results revealed that the precipitation of the dissolved Fe and Co could cause the weight gain of the 316L and Co-28Cr-6Mo alloys. The surface chemistry of the specimens was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS analysis of Co-28Cr-6Mo alloy showed that the interaction of Mo with HSA is different from Mo with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This was also observed for Na adsorption into the oxide layer of Ti-6Al-4V alloy in the presence of HSA and BSA.

  4. Nanotechnology in oncology: Characterization and in vitro release kinetics of cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticles: Implications in anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saikat; Jagan, Lavanya; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B.; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Nanotechnology is an empowering technology that holds promise in cancer therapeutics by increasing the ratio of tumor control probability to normal tissue complication probability. It can increase the bioavailability of the drug at the target site, reduce the frequency of administration and reach otherwise lesser-accessible sites. The present study shows the feasibility of the cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticle as a sustained delivery system. Aims: Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant disorders. Conventional cisplatin formulation given as intravenous infusion has low bioavailability to the target organ in addition to significant side-effects, like ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study was to develop a protein-based nanoparticulate system for sustained release of cisplatin. Materials and Methods: Nanoparticles were prepared by the coacervaton method of microcapsulation and chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Particle size was characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results and Conclusions: Using the coacervation method, nanoparticles of less than 70 nm diameter were produced. Drug encapsulation measured by ultraviolet spectroscopy varied from 30% to 80% for different ratios of cisplatin and protein. In vitro release kinetics shows that the nanoparticle-based formulation has biphasic release kinetics and is capable of sustained release compared with the free drug (80% release in 45 h). The study proves the feasibility of the albumin-based cisplatin nanoparticle formulation as a sustained release vehicle of cisplatin. PMID:21844995

  5. A study of the molecular sources of nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin solutions as a function of pH.

    PubMed

    Kanal, K M; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L

    1994-01-01

    The nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions was studied extensively by Scatchard and colleagues. The extent of pH- and salt-dependent nonideality changes are large and unexplained. In 1992, Fullerton et al. derived new empirical expressions to describe solution nonideal colligative properties including osmotic pressure (Fullerton et al. 1992. Biochem. Cell Biol. 70:1325-1331). These expressions are based on the concepts of volume occupancy and hydration force. Nonideality is accurately described by a solute/solvent interaction parameter I and an "effective" osmotic molecular weight Ae. This paper uses the interaction-corrected nonideal expressions for osmotic pressure to calculate the hydration I values and "effective" osmotic molecular weight of BSA, Ae, as a function of pH. Both factors vary in a predictable manner due to denaturing of the BSA molecule. Both contribute to an increase in osmotic pressure for the same protein concentration as the solution pH moves away from the isoelectric point. Increased nonideality is caused by larger hydration resulting from larger solvent-accessible surface areas and by the decrease in "effective" osmotic molecular weight, Ae, due to segmental motion of denatured (filamentous) molecules.

  6. A study of the molecular sources of nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin solutions as a function of pH.

    PubMed Central

    Kanal, K M; Fullerton, G D; Cameron, I L

    1994-01-01

    The nonideal osmotic pressure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions was studied extensively by Scatchard and colleagues. The extent of pH- and salt-dependent nonideality changes are large and unexplained. In 1992, Fullerton et al. derived new empirical expressions to describe solution nonideal colligative properties including osmotic pressure (Fullerton et al. 1992. Biochem. Cell Biol. 70:1325-1331). These expressions are based on the concepts of volume occupancy and hydration force. Nonideality is accurately described by a solute/solvent interaction parameter I and an "effective" osmotic molecular weight Ae. This paper uses the interaction-corrected nonideal expressions for osmotic pressure to calculate the hydration I values and "effective" osmotic molecular weight of BSA, Ae, as a function of pH. Both factors vary in a predictable manner due to denaturing of the BSA molecule. Both contribute to an increase in osmotic pressure for the same protein concentration as the solution pH moves away from the isoelectric point. Increased nonideality is caused by larger hydration resulting from larger solvent-accessible surface areas and by the decrease in "effective" osmotic molecular weight, Ae, due to segmental motion of denatured (filamentous) molecules. PMID:8130335

  7. Spectroscopic insight into the interaction of bovine serum albumin with imidazolium-based ionic liquids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Satish, Lakkoji; Millan, Sabera; Sahoo, Harekrushna

    2016-11-03

    The study of protein-ionic liquid interactions is very important because of the widespread use of ionic liquids as protein stabilizer in the recent years. In this work, the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with different imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) such as [1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium ethyl sulfate (EmimESO4 ), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (EmimCl) and 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (BmimCl)] has been investigated using different spectroscopic techniques. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA is quenched by ILs by the dynamic mechanism. The thermodynamic analysis demonstrates that very weak interactions exist between BSA and ILs. 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence and lifetime measurements reveal the formation of the compact structure of BSA in IL medium. The conformational changes of BSA were monitored by CD analysis. Temperature-dependent ultraviolet (UV) measurements were done to study the thermal stability of BSA. The thermal stability of BSA in the presence of ILs follows the trend EmimESO4  > EmimCl > BmimCl and in the presence of more hydrophobic IL, destabilization increases rapidly as a function of concentration.

  8. Debate: Albumin administration should not be avoided

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Simon P; Lobo, Dileep N

    2000-01-01

    The recent Cochrane report on albumin administration is analysed and criticised on the grounds of clinical methodology, content and interpretation. Although it is naïve and illogical to treat hypoalbuminaemia with albumin infusions, a more balanced view on the use of albumin for resuscitation in acute hypovolaemia is necessary. Once the acute phase of critical illness is past, interstitial volume is often expanded causing oedema, with a low plasma volume. We argue for the use of salt-poor albumin solutions in this situation and conclude that, on current evidence, the assertion that albumin should be avoided in all situations is irrational and untenable. PMID:11211855

  9. Implications of bioactive solute transfer from hosts to parasitic plants.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason D; Mescher, Mark C; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2013-08-01

    Parasitic plants--which make their living by extracting nutrients and other resources from other plants--are important components of many natural ecosystems; and some parasitic species are also devastating agricultural pests. To date, most research on plant parasitism has focused on nutrient transfer from host to parasite and the impacts of parasites on host plants. Far less work has addressed potential effects of the translocation of bioactive non-nutrient solutes-such as phytohormones, secondary metabolites, RNAs, and proteins-on the development and physiology of parasitic plants and on their subsequent interactions with other organisms such as insect herbivores. A growing number of recent studies document the transfer of such molecules from hosts to parasites and suggest that they may have significant impacts on parasite physiology and ecology. We review this literature and discuss potential implications for management and priorities for future research.

  10. Technical Solutions to Ensure Safe Yttrium-90 Radioembolization in Patients With Initial Extrahepatic Deposition of {sup 99m}Technetium-Albumin Macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Barentsz, M. W.; Vente, M. A. D.; Lam, M. G. E. H.; Smits, M. L. J.; Nijsen, J. F. W.; Seinstra, B. A.; Rosenbaum, C. E. N. M.; Verkooijen, H. M.; Zonnenberg, B. A.; Van den Bosch, M. A. A. J.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of extrahepatic deposition of technetium-99m-labeled albumin macroaggregates ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) after pretreatment angiography, before yttrium-90 radioembolizaton ({sup 90}Y-RE), and to report on technical solutions that can be used to ensure safe delivery of {sup 90}Y-microspheres in patients with initial extrahepatic deposition. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 26 patients with primary and secondary liver malignancies, who were scheduled for treatment with {sup 90}Y-RE in our institution in 2009, was performed. The angiograms and single-photon emission computed tomography images of all patients were reviewed by an interventional radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, respectively, to identify and localize extrahepatic deposition of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA when present. Subsequently, the technical solutions were used to successfully perform {sup 90}Y-RE in these patients were evaluated and described. Results: Extrahepatic deposition of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA was observed in 8 of 26 patients (31%). In 7 of 8 patients, a second pretreatment angiography was performed to detect the cause of extrahepatic deposition. The technical solutions to enable safe {sup 90}Y microspheres delivery included more distal placement of the microcatheter in the proper/right hepatic artery in 4 of 7 (57%) patients; (super)selective catheterization of multiple segmental branches in 2 of 7 (29%); and additional coiling of a newly detected branch in the remaining patient (14%). This was confirmed by a second MAA procedure. {sup 90}Y-RE was eventually performed in 25 of 26 (96%) patients. No procedure-related complications (<30 days) were observed. Conclusion: Extrahepatic deposition of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA after pretreatment angiography did occur in 8 of 26 (31%) patients. The technical solutions as presented allowed safe {sup 90}Y-RE delivery in 25 of 26 (96%) patients.

  11. [New recommendations on the use of human albumin solutions in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. A critical evaluation of the literature].

    PubMed

    Latour-Pérez, J

    2013-01-01

    The third edition of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines opens the door to the use of albumin for fluid resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. This recommendation is based on a recent meta-analysis that included studies with evidence of insufficient plasma expansion in the control group and studies performed in children with malaria with clear statistical heterogeneity (P for interaction=.02). After excluding pediatric studies, the confidence interval of the effect estimate was consistent with a mortality excess in the group treated with albumin (OR=.87 [95%CI: .71 to 1.07]). Two new randomized studies reported after publication of the meta-analysis found no benefit in patients treated with albumin. Given the uncertainty about the true effect of albumin (due to the existence of indirectness and imprecision) and its cost considerations, it is suggested not to use albumin in the initial resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock (GRADE2C).

  12. Evolutions and equilibrium parameters of foam films from individual solutions of Bovine serum albumin, n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside and from their mixed solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, Anelia Tsvetanova; Angarska, Jana Krumova; Tachev, Krasimir Dimov

    2017-03-01

    The evolutions of thinning of films from individual solutions of BSA, C12G2 and from their mixed solutions with molar ratios 1:1, 1:7.5, 1:50 and 1:100 with pH = 4.9 were recorded by modified (with video camera) interferometric method. Based on them the stages through which the film goes from its formation to the equilibrium state were distinguished. It was shown that: (i) the difference between the kinetic of drainage of films stabilized by high and low molecular surfactants is drastic; (ii) only the change of the pH solution under or above isoelectric point strongly retards the film drainage; (iii) the transition of the kinetic of thinning of films from mixed solutions from a kinetic typical for high molecular substances towards a kinetic for low substances depends on the molar ratio between the components in the solution. From the picture of film corresponding to its equilibrium state the type of film was determined. From the analysis of this picture the equilibrium thickness and contact angle were calculated. It was found that the criterion for Newtonium black films (based on the values of film thickness and contact angle) is not directly applicable for films from protein solutions or mixed solutions with the participation of proteins.

  13. Competitive interactions of ionic surfactants with salbutamol and bovine serum albumin: a molecular spectroscopy study with implications for salbutamol in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiulan; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2013-08-14

    The effect of ionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), on the interaction between β-agonist salbutamol (SAL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated with the use of fluorescence spectroscopy (FLS) and chemometrics methods [multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) and parallel factor analysis algorithm (PARAFAC)]. It was found that the binding constant of SAL to BSA in the presence of CTAB was much larger than that without this ligand. The ligand/BSA stoichiometry was 4:1, that is, (CTAB)4-BSA, and was 2:1 with the ligand, that is, (SAL)2-BSA. These results were obtained from the concentration profiles extracted by MCR-ALS for all three reactants. Quantitative information on the complex CTAB-BSA-SAL species was obtained with the resolution of the excitation-emission fluorescence three-way data matrices by PARAFAC. This research has implications for the analysis of SAL in food and might be performed in laboratories associated with organizations such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

  14. The high price of anticancer drugs: origins, implications, barriers, solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; De Jesús, Kevin; Mailankody, Sham

    2017-03-14

    Globally, annual spending on anticancer drugs is around US$100 billion, and is predicted to rise to $150 billion by 2020. In the USA, a novel anticancer drug routinely costs more than $100,000 per year of treatment. When adjusted for per capita spending power, however, drugs are most unaffordable in economically developing nations, such as India and China. Not only are launch prices high and rising, but individual drug prices are often escalated during exclusivity periods. High drug prices harm patients - often directly through increased out-of-pocket expenses, which reduce levels of patient compliance and lead to unfavourable outcomes - and harms society - by imposing cumulative price burdens that are unsustainable. Moreover, high drug prices are not readily explained by rational factors, including the extent of benefit patients are likely to derive, the novelty of the agents, or spending on research and development. Herein, we summarize the available empirical evidence on the costs of anticancer drugs, probe the origins and implications of these high costs, and discuss proposed solutions.

  15. Immobilization of bovine serum albumin as a sensitive biosensor for the detection of trace lead ion in solution by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Wei, Wanzhi; Liu, Xiaoying; Kong, Bo; Wu, Ling; Gong, Shuguo

    2007-01-01

    A biosensor based on bovine serum albumin (BSA) for the detection of lead (Pb(2+)) ion was developed and characterized. BSA was immobilized onto a colloidal Au-modified piezoelectric quartz crystal (PQC) as a biosensor for the detection of Pb(2+) ion by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance (PQCI). Calibration curves for the quantification of Pb(2+) ion showed excellent linearity throughout the concentration range from 1.0 x 10(-7) to 3.0 x 10(-9)mol/L. The interaction between the Pb(2+) ions and the sensor chip is influenced significantly by the pH of the reaction buffer, and the optimal pH for the experiment was 5.4. Under the optimal conditions, the detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-9)mol/L for Pb(2+) was obtained. Kinetic parameters of the Pb(2+)-BSA interactions were also determined by using this chip. The sensor chip could be regenerated for use by dipping in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution for approximately 2h, and the chip was used to detect Pb(2+) ion for eight times without obvious signal attenuation.

  16. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  17. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  18. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  19. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  20. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  1. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  2. Urine Albumin and Albumin/ Creatinine Ratio

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is present in high concentrations in the blood. Virtually no albumin is present in the urine when the kidneys ... on trying to determine if increased levels of albumin in the urine are also indicative of CVD risk in those who do not have diabetes or high blood pressure. ^ Back to ... Proudly sponsored by ... Learn ...

  3. Albumin - blood (serum) test

    MedlinePlus

    ... protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood. Albumin can also be measured in the urine . How ... Results Mean A lower-than-normal level of blood albumin may be a sign of: Kidney diseases Liver ...

  4. Evaluation of albumin structural modifications through cobalt-albumin binding (CAB) assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunyoung; Eom, Ji-Eun; Jeon, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Tae Hee; Kim, Eunnam; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-03-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the human body. HSA injections prepared by fractionating human blood have mainly covered the demand for albumin to treat hypoalbuminemia, the state of low concentration of albumin in blood. HSA in solution may exist in various forms such as monomers, oligomers, polymers, or as mixtures, and its conformational change and/or aggregation may occur easily. Considering these characteristics, there is a great chance of modification and polymer formation during the preparation processes of albumin products, especially injections. The albumin cobalt binding (ACB) test reported by Bar-Or et al. was originally designed to detect ischemia modified albumin (IMA), which contains the modified HSA N-terminal sequence by cleavage of the last two amino acids. In this study, we developed a cobalt albumin binding (CAB) assay to correct the flaws of the ACB test with improving the sensitivity and precision. The newly developed CAB assay easily detects albumin configuration alterations and may be able to be used in developing a quality control method for albumin and its pharmaceutical formulations including albumin injections.

  5. Observation of small cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions and its implications to solution viscosity.

    PubMed

    Yearley, Eric J; Godfrin, Paul D; Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Zhang, Hailiang; Falus, Peter; Porcar, Lionel; Nagao, Michihiro; Curtis, Joseph E; Gawande, Pradad; Taing, Rosalynn; Zarraga, Isidro E; Wagner, Norman J; Liu, Yun

    2014-04-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of biopharmaceuticals. It is hypothesized that some concentrated mAb solutions exhibit formation of a solution phase consisting of reversibly self-associated aggregates (or reversible clusters), which is speculated to be responsible for their distinct solution properties. Here, we report direct observation of reversible clusters in concentrated solutions of mAbs using neutron spin echo. Specifically, a stable mAb solution is studied across a transition from dispersed monomers in dilute solution to clustered states at more concentrated conditions, where clusters of a preferred size are observed. Once mAb clusters have formed, their size, in contrast to that observed in typical globular protein solutions, is observed to remain nearly constant over a wide range of concentrations. Our results not only conclusively establish a clear relationship between the undesirable high viscosity of some mAb solutions and the formation of reversible clusters with extended open structures, but also directly observe self-assembled mAb protein clusters of preferred small finite size similar to that in micelle formation that dominate the properties of concentrated mAb solutions.

  6. An electrochemical albumin-sensing system utilizing microfluidic technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-June; Lu, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Thong-Yueh; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2007-04-01

    This paper reports an integrated microfluidic chip capable of detecting the concentration of albumin in urine by using an electrochemical method in an automatic format. The integrated microfluidic chip was fabricated by using microelectromechanical system techniques. The albumin detection was conducted by using the electrochemical sensing method, in which the albumin in urine was detected by measuring the difference of peak currents between a bare reference electrode and an albumin-adsorption electrode. To perform the detection of the albumin in an automatic format, pneumatic microvalves and micropumps were integrated onto the microfluidic chip. The albumin sample and interference mixture solutions such as homovanillic acid, dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine were first stored in one of the three reservoirs. Then the solution comprising the albumin sample and interference solutions was transported to pass through the detection zone utilizing the pneumatic micropump. Experimental data showed that the developed system can successfully detect the concentration of the albumin in the existence of interference materials. When compared with the traditional albumin-sensing method, smaller amounts of samples were required to perform faster detection by using the integrated microfluidic chip. Additionally, the microfluidic chip integrated with pneumatic micropumps and microvalves facilitates the transportation of the samples in an automatic mode with lesser human intervention. The development of the integrated microfluidic albumin-sensing system may be promising for biomedical applications. Preliminary results of the current paper were presented at the 2nd International Meeting on Microsensors and Microsystems 2006 (National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan, 15-18 January).

  7. A review of albumin binding in CKD.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Björn K I; Bammens, Bert; Verbeke, Kristin; Evenepoel, Pieter

    2008-05-01

    Hypoalbuminemia is associated with excess mortality in patients with kidney disease. Albumin is an important oxidant scavenger and an abundant carrier protein for numerous endogenous and exogenous compounds. Several specific binding sites for anionic, neutral, and cationic ligands were described. Overall, the extent of binding depends on the ligand and albumin concentration, albumin-binding affinity, and presence of competing ligands. Chronic kidney disease affects all these determinants. This may result in altered pharmacokinetics and increased risk of toxicity. Renal clearance of albumin-bound solutes mainly depends on tubular clearance. Dialytic clearance by means of conventional hemodialysis/hemofiltration and peritoneal dialysis is limited. Other epuration techniques combining hemodialysis with adsorption have been developed. However, the benefit of these techniques remains to be proved.

  8. Segregation of solutes and gases in experimental freezing of dilute solutions: implications for natural glacial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killawee, J. A.; Fairchild, I. J.; Tison, J.-L.; Janssens, L.; Lorrain, R.

    1998-12-01

    Low ionic strength waters containing significant calcium and bicarbonate are common in nature, but little literature exists on their behaviour during freezing. Modelling indicates that freezing-induced concentration of solutes (in a closed-system) would lead to progressive increase in calcite saturation index, despite rising partial pressure of CO 2 (PCO 2), but the consequences of CaCO 3 precipitation for the distribution of matter between solid, liquid, and gas phases required experimental investigation. We studied the effects of variations in the rate of advance of an ice-water interface and in the initial degree of saturation for calcite on the behaviour of the system. Downward growth of ice in a 24-cm diameter cylindrical vessel was achieved at a constant linear rate of 3 or 8 mm/h by the progressive cooling of an overlying alcohol reservoir, and the expansion of volume accommodated by regular water sampling through side ports, together with a small expansion chamber. Initial air-saturated solutions (initial PCO 2 in the range 10 -3 to 10 -3.2) were prepared to reflect a range from strongly undersaturated to supersaturated for calcite. Comparative blank experiments were run using deionized water. Ice growth led to enrichment in solutes at the ice-water interface and the creation of a diffusive boundary layer, calculated to be 0.6 mm thick, truncated below by convecting fluid. The first-formed ice (stage 1), was relatively solute-rich because of initial rapid ice nucleation. Where solutions were not strongly supersaturated for calcite this was followed by formation of a solute-poor (stage 2) ice. Ice-interface water segregation coefficients of stage 2 ice were calculated to be 0.0004-0.003 for various solute ions. The relative magnitude of segregation coefficients (Mg 2+ > Ca 2+ > Sr 2+) is attributed to interstitial incorporation (coupled with HCO 3-) in the ice lattice, and controlled by ion size. Air bubbles nucleated once nitrogen supersaturation had

  9. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  10. Experimental investigation of the serum albumin fascia microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shcherbak, Yu. P.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of biological liquids are reported. Structural effects observed in fascias are considered with account of the molecular features of albumin and the concept of supramolecular organization of polymers. It is revealed that the morphology of human serum albumin fascias depends on the concentration and quality of the solvent. It is shown that the water-salt fascias of albumin are more structured than water solutions with the same concentration.

  11. Effects of pH and metal ions on the conformation of bovine serum albumin in aqueous solution An attenuated total reflection (ATR) FTIR spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Huai; Yanlin, He; Fenlin, Sheng; Zuyi, Tao

    1996-11-01

    The Hummel-Dreyer gel permeation technique has been applied to investigate the binding of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with Zn 2+ and Cd 2+, and has provided evidence for the existence of two different types of binding sites in the BSA molecule. The effects of pH and the presence of metal ions Zn 2- and Cd 2+ on the conformation of BSA were investigated using ATR FTIR Spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that there were different conformational states in BSA at pH 5.0 and 9.0. Furthermore, we observed the spectral changes of BSA in the amide I region and major metal ion (Zn 2+ and Cd 2+) binding sites which were CO and CN groups of BSA.

  12. C-peptide and zinc delivery to erythrocytes requires the presence of albumin: implications in diabetes explored with a 3D-printed fluidic device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueli; Chen, Chengpeng; Summers, Suzanne; Medawala, Wathsala; Spence, Dana M

    2015-05-01

    People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) must administer insulin exogenously due to the destruction of their pancreatic β-cells. Endogenous insulin is stored in β-cell granules along with C-peptide, a 31 amino acid peptide that is secreted from these granules in amounts equal to insulin. Exogenous co-administration of C-peptide with insulin has proven to reduce diabetes-associated complications in animals and humans. The exact mechanism of C-peptide's beneficial effects after secretion from the β-cell granules is not completely understood, thus hindering its development as an exogenously administered hormone. Monitoring tissue-to-tissue communication using a 3D-printed microfluidic device revealed that zinc and C-peptide are being delivered to erythrocytes by albumin. Upon delivery, erythrocyte-derived ATP increased by >50%, as did endothelium-derived NO, which was measured downstream in the 3D-printed device. Our results suggest that hormone replacement therapy in diabetes may be improved by exogenous administration of a C-peptide ensemble that includes zinc and albumin.

  13. Structure of Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Ho, Joseph X.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its availability, low cost, stability, and unusual ligand-binding properties, serum albumin has been one of the mst extensively studied and applied proteins in biochemistry. However, as a protein, albumin is far from typical, and the widespread interest in and application of albumin have not been balanced by an understanding of its molecular structure. Indeed, for more than 30 years structural information was surmised based solely on techniques such as hydrodynamics, low-angle X-ray scattering, and predictive methods.

  14. A New Application for Albumin Dialysis in Extracorporeal Organ Support: Characterization of a Putative Interaction Between Human Albumin and Proinflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and TNFα.

    PubMed

    Pfensig, Claudia; Dominik, Adrian; Borufka, Luise; Hinz, Michael; Stange, Jan; Eggert, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Albumin dialysis in extracorporeal organ support is often performed in the treatment of liver failure as it facilitates the removal of toxic components from the blood. Here, we describe a possible effect of albumin dialysis on proinflammatory cytokine levels in vitro. Initially, albumin samples were incubated with different amounts of cytokines and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Analysis of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels indicated that increased concentrations of albumin reduce the measureable amount of the respective cytokines. This led to the hypothesis that the used proinflammatory cytokines may interact with albumin. Size exclusion chromatography of albumin spiked with cytokines was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The corresponding fractions were evaluated by immunoblotting. We detected albumin and cytokines in the same fractions indicating an interaction of the small-sized cytokines IL-6 and TNFα with the larger-sized albumin. Finally, a two-compartment albumin dialysis in vitro model was used to analyze the effect of albumin on proinflammatory cytokines in the recirculation circuit during 6-h treatment. These in vitro albumin dialysis experiments indicated a significant decrease of IL-6, but not of TNFα, when albumin was added to the dialysate solution. Taken together, we were able to show a putative in vitro interaction of human albumin with the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6, but with less evidence for TNFα, and demonstrated an additional application for albumin dialysis in liver support therapy where IL-6 removal might be indicated.

  15. Smartphone based point-of-care detector of urine albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Svoboda, Ondrej; Koscova, Pavlina; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Albumin plays an important role in human body. Its changed level in urine may indicate serious kidney disorders. We present a new point-of-care solution for sensitive detection of urine albumin - the miniature optical adapter for iPhone with in-built optical filters and a sample slot. The adapter exploits smart-phone flash to generate excitation light and camera to measure the level of emitted light. Albumin Blue 580 is used as albumin reagent. The proposed light-weight adapter can be produced at low cost using a 3D printer. Thus, the miniaturized detector is easy to use out of lab.

  16. [Structure of fish serum albumins].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, A M

    2010-01-01

    Data are presented about the presence of serum albumins in fishes of different classes and orders inhabiting different ecological conditions, about structure of typical albumins and albumin-like proteins, and about the degree of homology of these proteins to mammalian albumins. There is shown a wide spectrum of structural diversity of albumins in Pisces due to their participation in osmotic, plastic, and transport functions under conditions of environment and of the organism internal media. Detection of similar motifs in the piscine and mammalian albumin genes allows uniting these genes into one superfamily and considering vertebrate albumins the homologous proteins.

  17. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-04

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride-HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure.

  18. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride–HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure. PMID:26742031

  19. Trauma-hemorrhagic shock mesenteric lymph from rat contains a modified form of albumin that is implicated in endothelial cell toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Vicki L; Sifri, Ziad C; Dikdan, George S; Berezina, Tamara; Zaets, Sergey; Lu, Qi; Xu, Da-Zhong; Deitch, Edwin A

    2005-05-01

    It has been proposed that factors originating from the gut after severe trauma/shock are introduced into the systemic circulation through the mesenteric lymphatics and are responsible for the cellular injury and inflammation that culminates in acute multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Indeed, it has been shown that lymph collected from shocked but not sham-shocked animals causes endothelial cell death, neutrophil activation, and bone marrow (BM) colony growth suppression in vitro. In an attempt to isolate the factor(s) in lymph responsible for endothelial cell toxicity, lymph from shock and sham animals was fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The separation of shock lymph by both methodologies yielded two fractions having major detectable toxicity to endothelial cells, whereas no toxicity was detected from sham lymph separations by either method. Subsequent analysis of each SPE toxic fraction by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry suggests the toxicity is associated with a modified form of rat serum albumin (mod-RSA) and multiple lipid-based factors. Therefore, we have been able to demonstrate by two different separation techniques that shock lymph contains two or more factors that may account for the toxicity to endothelial cells. Further investigations are needed to determine the type of RSA modification and the identity of the lipid factors and their role in MODS.

  20. Serum albumins - unusual allergens

    PubMed Central

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Mikolajczak, Katarzyna; Mank, Nicholas; Majorek, Karolina A.; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Minor, Wladek

    2015-01-01

    Background Albumins are multifunctional proteins present in the blood serum of animals. They can bind and transport a wide variety of ligands which they accommodate due to their conformational flexibility. Serum albumins are highly conserved both in amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. Several mammalian and avian serum albumins (SAs) are also allergens. Sensitization to one of the SAs coupled with the high degree of conservation between SAs may result in cross-reactive antibodies in allergic individuals. Sensitivity to SA generally begins with exposure to an aeroallergen, which can then lead to cross-sensitization to serum albumins present in food. Scope of Review This review focuses on the allergenicity of SAs presented in a structural context. Major Conclusions SA allergenicity is unusual taking into account the high sequence identity and similarity between SA from different species and human serum albumin. Cross-reactivity of human antibodies towards different SAs is one of the most important characteristics of these allergens. General Significance Establishing a relationship between sequence and structure of different SAs and their interactions with antibodies is crucial for understanding the mechanisms of cross-sensitization of atopic individuals. Structural information can also lead to better design and production of recombinant SAs to replace natural proteins in allergy testing and desensitization. Therefore, structural analyses are important for diagnostic and treatment purposes. PMID:23811341

  1. Binding of furosemide to albumin isolated from human fetal and adult serum.

    PubMed

    Viani, A; Cappiello, M; Silvestri, D; Pacifici, G M

    1991-01-01

    Albumin was isolated from pooled fetal serum from 58 placentas obtained at normal delivery at term and from pooled adult plasma from 8 individuals. Albumin isolation was carried out by means of PEG precipitation followed by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A 50 and then on SP-Sephadex C 50. The electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed only one spot that comigrated with commercial human albumin. Binding to albumin was measured by equilibrium dialysis of an aliquot of albumin solution (0.7 ml) against the same volume of 0.13 M sodium orthophosphate buffer (pH 7.4). At a total concentration of 2 micrograms/ml (therapeutic range), the unbound fraction of furosemide was 2.71% (fetal albumin) and 2.51% (adult albumin). Two classes of binding sites for furosemide were observed in fetal and adult albumin. The number of binding sites (moles of furosemide per mole of albumin) was 1.22 (fetal albumin) and 1.58 (adult albumin) for the high-affinity site and 2.97 (fetal albumin) and 3.25 (adult albumin) for the low-affinity site. The association constants (M-1) were 3.1 X 10(4) (fetal albumin) and 2.6 X 10(4) (adult albumin) for the high-affinity set of sites and 0.83 X 10(4) (fetal albumin) and 1.0 X 10(4) (adult albumin) low-affinity site. The displacement of furosemide from albumin was studied with therapeutic concentrations of several drugs. Valproic acid, salicylic acid, azapropazone and tolbutamide had the highest displacing effects which were significantly higher with fetal than with adult albumin.

  2. Schistosome albumin is of host, not parasite, origin.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Ricardo; Mathieson, William; Dillon, Gary P; Wilson, R Alan

    2007-09-01

    Recent work has implicated schistosome albumin as part of a mechanism for neutralizing the oxidative assault by host immune defenses and suggested that the gene had been acquired by horizontal transfer from the mammalian host. In the course of proteomic analyses of Schistosoma mansoni adult worm vomitus and eggs recovered from mice, we identified numerous peptides, largely derived from murine rather than parasite albumin. We therefore conjectured that the supposed S. mansoni albumin sequence deposited on GenBank might be the result of contamination rather than horizontal gene transfer. Based on phylogenetic analysis the most likely source was the Syrian (golden) hamster Mesocricetus auratus. Proteomic analysis of Syrian hamster albumin generated peptide identities to S. mansoni as the top hit, with a high ion score >1,500 and 63% coverage of the translated cDNA sequence. RT-PCR using specific primers permitted amplification of the M. auratus albumin transcript, which is identical to the deposited S. mansoni albumin sequence. PCR amplification of a fragment of the M. auratus albumin gene from genomic DNA suggests a homologous structure to the Mus musculus albumin gene. We were unable to find the S. mansoni albumin gene sequence by in silico searching on either version 3 of the S. mansoni genome assembly or the >3 million shotgun DNA reads. Finally, Southern blotting detected the albumin gene in M. auratus but not in S. mansoni genomic DNA, even when the latter was present in a 10-fold excess. Collectively, our data make the strongest case that the schistosome albumin protein described in previous reports is of host origin and all nucleotide-derived data are the result of contamination with host material. By analogy, we suggest that other reported examples of horizontal gene transfer to schistosomes might similarly be explained by complementary/genomic DNA contamination.

  3. Molecular spectroscopic study on the interaction of tetracyclines with serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Song, Daqian; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Zhongying; Zhang, Hanqi

    2005-02-01

    A molecular spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between tetracyclines antibiotics and human serum albumin or bovine serum albumin was reported. The influences of some metal ions on the interaction were also studied. When tetracyclines drugs were added into the solution containing serum albumins, the fluorescence intensity of serum albumins decreased with the increasing of the drugs concentrations, which is due to the formation of new non-fluorescence complexes of drug-serum albumin. The tetracyclines acted as quenchers and quenched the fluorescence of the serum albumins. The binding constants and the number of the binding sites of the reaction of tetracyclines and serum albumins were obtained. The main sorts of acting force between the drugs and serum albumins were found and the action distances and the energy transfer efficiencies between donor-acceptor were calculated based on the Föster energy transference.

  4. Intrarenal distribution of inorganic mercury and albumin after coadministration

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. ); Barfuss, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The renal disposition and the intrarenal distribution of albumin and mercury were studied simultaneously in rats co-injected with a 0.5-[mu]mol/kg dose of albumin and a 0.25-[mu]mol/kg dose of inorganic mercury at 2, 5, 30, and 180 min after injection. These studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that one of the mechanisms involved in the renal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury is cotransport with albumin. By the end of the first 2 min after injection, the ratio of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer strip of the outer medulla was approximately 2.6 and 1.6, respectively. Both the cortex and outer stripe contain segments of the proximal tubule, and it is these segments that have been shown to be principally involved in the renal tubular uptake of both albumin and inorganic mercury. The ration increased slightly in these two zones after 5 and 20 min after injection. These data demonstrate that there is a relatively close relationship in the renal content of inorganic mercury and albumin. However, the ratios are significantly greater than the ratio of inorganic mercury of albumin in the injection solution, which was 0.5. After 180 min following co-injection, the ratio increased to about 38 in the cortex and 15 in the outer stripe. This increase in the ratio is probably related to the metabolism of albumin. Based on the ratios of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla, it appears that some proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury occurs by mechanisms other than endocytotic cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin. However, since the ratios were small during the early times after injection, cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin cannot be excluded as one of the mechanisms involved in the proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury. 32 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Structures of bovine, equine and leporine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Bujacz, Anna

    2012-10-01

    Serum albumin first appeared in early vertebrates and is present in the plasma of all mammals. Its canonical structure supported by a conserved set of disulfide bridges is maintained in all mammalian serum albumins and any changes in sequence are highly correlated with evolution of the species. Previous structural investigations of mammalian serum albumins have only concentrated on human serum albumin (HSA), most likely as a consequence of crystallization and diffraction difficulties. Here, the crystal structures of serum albumins isolated from bovine, equine and leporine blood plasma are reported. The structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was determined at 2.47 Å resolution, two crystal structures of equine serum albumin (ESA) were determined at resolutions of 2.32 and 2.04 Å, and that of leporine serum albumin (LSA) was determined at 2.27 Å resolution. These structures were compared in detail with the structure of HSA. The ligand-binding pockets in BSA, ESA and LSA revealed different amino-acid compositions and conformations in comparison to HSA in some cases; however, much more significant differences were observed on the surface of the molecules. BSA, which is one of the most extensively utilized proteins in laboratory practice and is used as an HSA substitute in many experiments, exhibits only 75.8% identity compared with HSA. The higher resolution crystal structure of ESA highlights the binding properties of this protein because it includes several bound compounds from the crystallization solution that provide additional structural information about potential ligand-binding pockets.

  6. Piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance study of the Pb2+-induced precipitation of bovine serum albumin and its dissolution with EDTA in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Cai, Yan; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2002-07-01

    The piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance technique (QCI) was employed to monitor in situ the Pb2+-induced precipitation of BSA onto a gold electrode and the precipitate dissolution with EDTA in an aqueous solution. The critical precipitation concentration of Pb2+, at which the resonant frequency decreased significantly, was estimated to be 4.78 x 10(-4) mol/L. The saturated adherence of the precipitate on the electrode was observed when the concentration of Pb2+ was greater than 7.53 x 10(-2) mol/L. The frequency response was mainly caused by the mass effect of the precipitate adherence to the electrode, rather than the changes in the physico-chemical properties of the contacting liquid. An excess addition of Na2EDTA after the Pb2+-BSA dissolution led to new precipitation, probably due to the formation of an EDTA precipitate in this medium (pH approximately 3). The pH effect on the response of the resonant frequency was analyzed by using the sum of two exponential functions. A larger frequency response occurred at a pH greater than pI. These findings have been reasonably explained. Also, a decrease in the concentration of the background electrolyte increased the frequency response.

  7. Chicken albumin exhibits natural resistance to glycation.

    PubMed

    Zuck, Jessica; Borges, Chad R; Braun, Eldon J; Sweazea, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    Glycation of proteins and subsequent production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is a major contributor to the pathophysiology of diabetes. The objective of the present study was to compare the glycation of avian and human serum albumin to elucidate the mechanisms by which protein glycation in birds is prevented in the presence of naturally high plasma glucose concentrations. Solutions of purified chicken and human serum albumin (CSA and HSA) were prepared with four different glucose concentrations (0, 5.56, 11.1, and 22.2mM) and incubated at three temperatures (37.0, 39.8, and 41.4°C) for seven days. The solutions were sampled on Days 0, 3, and 7 and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for the presence of glycated albumin. Four-way repeated measures ANOVA (p=0.032) indicate that all independent variables (albumin type, glucose concentration, temperature and time) interacted to affect the degree of glycation. With increasing glucose concentration, the glycation of both HSA and CSA increased with time at all temperatures. In addition, HSA was glycated to a greater extent than CSA at the two higher glucose concentrations for all temperature conditions. Glycation was elevated with increasing temperatures for HSA but not CSA. The results suggest an inherent difference between human and chicken albumin that contributes to the observed differences in glycation. Further research is needed to characterize this inherent difference in an effort to elucidate mechanisms by which avian plasma protein is glycated to a lesser degree than that of mammals (humans).

  8. [Excess mortality in critically ill patients after treatment with human albumin].

    PubMed

    Offringa, M; Gemke, R J; Henny, C P

    1998-08-15

    According to the results of a systematic review of randomized clinical studies administration of human albumin to critically ill patients is associated with excess mortality, compared with withholding albumin or administration of crystalloid fluids. The study appears to be well done. Also, there are various explanatory pathophysiological mechanisms supporting the association. However, a favourable effect of albumin in certain patient groups cannot be excluded. Alternatives to albumin are available in most clinical situations, but unfortunately, they are not completely without drawbacks. The use of albumin has to be limited; it might only be abolished when a better effect of other fluids, such as synthetic solutions, is demonstrated.

  9. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Castro, Nathan J; Condon, Brian; Costable, Carmen; Goheen, Steven C

    2012-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatographic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressings is adsorption and accumulation of proteins like albumin at the solid-liquid interface of the biological fluid and wound dressing fiber. To better understand the effect of fiber charge and molecular modifications in cellulose-containing fibers on the binding of serum albumin as observed in protease sequestrant dressings, albumin binding to modified cotton fibers was compared with traditional and chromatographic isotherms. Modified cotton including carboxymethylated, citrate-crosslinked, dialdehyde and phosphorylated cotton, which sequester elastase and collagenase, were compared for their albumin binding isotherms. Albumin isotherms on citrate-cellulose, cross-linked cotton demonstrated a two-fold increased binding affinity over untreated cotton. A comparison of albumin binding between traditional, solution isotherms and chromatographic isotherms on modified cellulose yielded similar equilibrium constants. Application of the binding affinity of albumin obtained in the in vitro protein isotherm to the in vivo wound dressing uptake of the protein is discussed. The chromatographic approach to assessment of albumin isotherms on modified cellulose offers a more rapid approach to evaluating protein binding on modified cellulose over traditional solution approaches.

  10. A new application of micellar liquid chromatography in the determination of free ampicillin concentration in the drug-human serum albumin standard solution in comparison with the adsorption method.

    PubMed

    Stępnik, Katarzyna E; Malinowska, Irena; Maciejewska, Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    The determination of free drug concentration is a very important issue in the field of pharmacology because only the unbound drug fraction can achieve a pharmacological effect. Due to the ability to solubilize many different compounds in micellar aggregates, micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) can be used for direct determination of free drug concentration. Proteins are not retained on the stationary phase probably due to the formation of protein - surfactant complexes which are excluded from the pores of stationary phase. The micellar method is simple and fast. It does not require any pre-preparation of the tested samples for analysis. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate a completely new applicability of the analytical use of MLC concerning the determination of free drug concentration in the standard solution of human serum albumin. The well-known adsorption method using RP-HPLC and the spectrophotometric technique was applied as the reference method. The results show that the free drug concentration value obtained in the MLC system (based on the RP-8 stationary phase and CTAB) is similar to that obtained by the adsorption method: both RP-HPLC (95.83μgmL(-1), 79.86% of free form) and spectrophotometry (95.71μgmL(-1), 79.76%). In the MLC the free drug concentration was 93.98μgmL(-1) (78.3%). This indicates that the obtained results are within the analytical range of % of free ampicillin fraction and the MLC with direct sample injection can be treated like a promising method for the determination of free drug concentration.

  11. Implications of new GALLEX results for the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution of the solar neutrino problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelb, James M.; Kwong, Waikwok; Rosen, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    We compare the implications for Be-7 and pp neutrinos of the two Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein fits to the new GALLEX solar neutrino measurements. Small-mixing-angle solutions tend to suppress the former as electron neutrinos, but not the latter, and large-angle solutions tend to reduce both by about a factor of two. The consequences for BOREXINO and similar solar neutrino-electron scattering experiments are discussed.

  12. Albumin synthesis in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hülshoff, Ansgar; Schricker, Thomas; Elgendy, Hamed; Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Lattermann, Ralph

    2013-05-01

    Albumin plasma concentrations are being used as indicators of nutritional status and hepatic function based on the assumption that plasma levels reflect the rate of albumin synthesis. However, it has been shown that albumin levels are not reliable markers of albumin synthesis under a variety of clinical conditions including inflammation, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus, liver disease, and surgical tissue trauma. To date, only a few studies have measured albumin synthesis in surgical and critically ill patients. This review summarizes the findings from these studies, which used different tracer methodology in various surgical or critically ill patient populations. The results indicate that the fractional synthesis rate of albumin appears to decrease during surgery, followed by an increase during the postoperative phase. In the early postoperative phase, albumin fractional synthesis rate can be stimulated by perioperative nutrition, if enough amino acids are being provided and if nutrition is being initiated before the operation. The physiologic meaning of albumin synthesis after surgery, however, still needs to be further clarified.

  13. Rabbit serum albumin hydrolyzes the carbamate carbaryl.

    PubMed

    Sogorb, Miguel A; Carrera, Victoria; Benabent, Mónica; Vilanova, Eugenio

    2002-04-01

    One of the main detoxification processes of the carbamate insecticides is the hydrolysis of the carbamic ester bond. Carboxylesterases seem to play important roles in the metabolization of carbamates. This study performs a biochemical characterization of the capabilities of rabbit serum albumin (RSA) to hydrolyze the carbamate carbaryl. Rabbit serum albumin was able to hydrolyze carbaryl with a K(cat) of 7.1 x 10(-5) s(-1). The K(m) for this hydrolysis reaction was 240 microM. Human, chicken, and bovine serum albumins were also able to hydrolyze carbaryl. The divalent cation Cu(2+) at 1 mM concentration inhibited around 50% of the hydrolysis of carbaryl by RSA. Other mono- and divalent cations at 1 mM concentration and 5 mM EDTA exerted no significant effects on the hydrolysis of carbaryl by RSA. The inhibition of the carbaryl hydrolysis by sulfydril blocking agents suggests that a cysteine residue plays an important role in the active center of the catalytic activity. Both caprylic and palmitic acids were noncompetitive inhibitors of the carbaryl hydrolysis by RSA. The carboxyl ester p-nitrophenyl butyrate is a substrate of RSA and competitively inhibited the hydrolysis of carbaryl by this protein, suggesting that the hydrolysis of carbaryl and the hydrolysis of carboxyl esters occur in the same catalytic site and through a similar mechanism. This mechanism might be based on the carbamylation of a tyrosine residue of the RSA. Serum albumin is a protein universally present in nontarget species of insecticides; therefore, the capability of this protein to hydrolyze other carbamates must be studied because it might have important toxicological and ecotoxicological implications.

  14. Near Earth Objects and Cascading Effects from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. Further, NEO impacts are typically considered as discrete events, not as initial events in a dynamic cascading system. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks and multi-hazard impacts associated with these hazards. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH9.12 panel.

  15. Characterization of NEOs from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, E.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks associated with NEOs. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of several policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH004 panel.

  16. Thiophilic interaction chromatography of serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Bourhim, Mustapha; Rajendran, Anita; Ramos, Yanira; Srikrishnan, Thamarapu; Sulkowski, Eugene

    2008-07-01

    An investigation of the binding of native and recombinant human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin on three thiophilic gels, PyS, 2S, and 3S was performed. In addition to these proteins, we studied serum albumins from several species such as goat, rabbit, guinea pig, rat, hamster, baboon, and pig. Our results reveal that recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) binds completely to PyS whereas native human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin bind only partially to PyS. The binding affinities of rHSA, human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin to 2S and 3S gels are less than their binding to PyS. Serum albumins from goat, rabbit, guinea pig, rat, hamster, baboon, and pig bind much stronger to 3S gel than human and bovine serum albumins. The binding of pig and hamster serum albumins is stronger than that of rat, goat, baboon, and rabbit.

  17. Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Whish, Sophie C; Noor, Natassya M; Wheaton, Benjamin J; Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Traweger, Andreas; Bauer, Hannelore; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Saunders, Norman R

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of specialised

  18. Mineralisation of two phosphate ceramics in HBSS: role of albumin.

    PubMed

    Marques, P A A P; Serro, A P; Saramago, B J; Fernandes, A C; Magalhães, M C F; Correia, R N

    2003-02-01

    The role of albumin in the mineralisation process of commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp) and synthesised biphasic (HAp-tricalcium phosphate) ceramics in a bufferless simulated inorganic plasma (HBSS) was investigated by conventional in vitro tests and static and dynamic wettability measurements. Albumin was either pre-adsorbed or solubilised in HBSS. It was found that calcium complexation by albumin plays a key role in early mineralisation kinetics, so that mineralisation is favoured when albumin is pre-adsorbed and hindered when it is dissolved in HBSS. In the biphasic ceramic this picture is complicated by the fact that albumin, in solution, seems to promote the dissolution of tricalcium phosphate, and simultaneously compete for calcium with the ceramic. It also appears that albumin has a stabilising effect of octacalcium phosphate present in deposits on commercial HAp. The same effect may be present in the case of the biphasic ceramic, at earlier mineralisation times, when octacalcium phosphate appears as a precursor of HAp. Octacalcium phosphate formation on commercial apatite is accompanied by carbonate substitution in phosphate positions.

  19. Albumin reverses the echinocytic shape transformation of stored erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Sophie A; Schulzki, Thomas; Reinhart, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    The storage of red blood cells (RBCs) leads to storage lesions, which have a negative impact on the clinical outcome after transfusion. A hallmark of storage lesions is echinocytosis. Albumin may reverse this shape transformation, which was the topic of this study. Echinocytosis was generated by incubation of blood for 48 h at room temperature or in RBC units stored 48 days at 5°C. Human serum albumin was diluted in phosphate-buffered saline. RBCs were fixed in 1% glutaraldehyde and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. The degree of echinocytosis was quantified by calculating the morphological index. Incubation and storage of RBCs led to an echinocytic shape transformation, which was reversible upon incubation in albumin solutions. This process was time-, concentration- and hematocrit-dependent. Treating RBC units at the end of their shelf-life by adding 20% albumin or washing them in 0.2% albumin reversed all degrees of echinocytosis towards discocytosis. In conclusion, albumin has the capacity to reverse echinocytosis generated by RBC storage. This observation may improve the quality of RBC units stored for longer periods of time.

  20. Albumin administration in the acutely ill: what is new and where next?

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Russell, James A; Jacob, Matthias; Martin, Greg; Guidet, Bertrand; Wernerman, Jan; Ferrer, Ricard; Roca, Ricard Ferrer; McCluskey, Stuart A; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-07-16

    Albumin solutions have been used worldwide for the treatment of critically ill patients since they became commercially available in the 1940s. However, their use has become the subject of criticism and debate in more recent years. Importantly, all fluid solutions have potential benefits and drawbacks. Large multicenter randomized studies have provided valuable data regarding the safety of albumin solutions, and have begun to clarify which groups of patients are most likely to benefit from their use. However, many questions remain related to where exactly albumin fits within our fluid choices. Here, we briefly summarize some of the physiology and history of albumin use in intensive care before offering some evidence-based guidance for albumin use in critically ill patients.

  1. Albumin administration in the acutely ill: what is new and where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Albumin solutions have been used worldwide for the treatment of critically ill patients since they became commercially available in the 1940s. However, their use has become the subject of criticism and debate in more recent years. Importantly, all fluid solutions have potential benefits and drawbacks. Large multicenter randomized studies have provided valuable data regarding the safety of albumin solutions, and have begun to clarify which groups of patients are most likely to benefit from their use. However, many questions remain related to where exactly albumin fits within our fluid choices. Here, we briefly summarize some of the physiology and history of albumin use in intensive care before offering some evidence-based guidance for albumin use in critically ill patients. PMID:25042164

  2. Human albumin: old, new, and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Rozga, Jacek; Piątek, Tomasz; Małkowski, Piotr

    2013-05-10

    Human serum albumin has been widely used in an array of clinical settings for nearly 7 decades. Although there is no evidence to support the use of albumin rather than crystalloid in acute volume resuscitation, many clinicians continue to use albumin because it has other important physiologic effects besides the oncotic function. In keeping with the improved understanding of albumin physiology and pathophysiology of many acute and chronic diseases, use of albumin for medical applications has increased in recent years. This, along with increased costs of manufacturing and lower production volume of medical-grade albumin, has lead to an ongoing shortage and rapid increase in albumin prices. This review is based on the analysis of major publications, related to albumin chemistry, physiology, and medical uses including guidelines developed by professional and governmental organizations. Results reflect current knowledge about the role of albumin in health and disease and relevance of albumin therapy in specific clinical settings. Albumin therapy is currently recommended in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis with ascites, refractory ascites not responsive to diuretics, large-volume paracentesis, post-paracentesis syndrome, and the treatment of hepatorenal syndrome as an adjunct to vasoconstrictors. New indications for albumin therapy are linked to the antioxidant activity of albumin and its effects on capillary integrity. In recent years, large-pore hemofiltration and albumin exchange have emerged as promising liver support therapies for liver failure and other toxic syndromes. They are designed to remove a broad range of blood-borne toxins and to restore normal functions of the circulating albumin by replacing defective forms of albumin and albumin molecules saturated with toxins with normal albumin. In view of the ongoing worldwide shortage and high cost of human albumin (native and recombinant), new usage criteria, protocols, and guidelines for appropriate utilization

  3. Protection by albumin against ischaemia- and hypoxia-induced hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Strubelt, O; Younes, M; Li, Y

    1994-11-01

    In previous studies using isolated perfused rat livers, we have shown that reactive oxygen species are involved in hypoxic and ischaemic liver damage. Since albumin was shown to possess strong antioxidant properties we now investigated the capacity of albumin to prevent ischaemic and hypoxic damage in isolated perfused rat livers. Both, partial ischaemia and hypoxia/reoxygenation, resulted in marked hepatic injury as evidenced by an increased release of hepatic enzymes (GPT, LDH), by a strong decline of bile flow and by a decrease in hepatic GSH levels. With partial ischaemia, hepatic ATP depletion and calcium accumulation were also observed. Bovine serum albumin, added to the perfusate at concentrations of 0.1 or 1%, provided nearly complete protection against both types of liver injury. The same level of protection was also afforded by sulfhydryl-blocked and fatty acid-free bovine albumin preparations and by human albumin. In conclusion, the protective effect of albumin in our models of oxidative liver injury is neither due to the thiol moiety nor to the presence of oxidizable fatty acids in the albumin fraction. More likely, albumin provides protection by an unspecific binding of redox-active transition metal ions capable of catalyzing reactions which yield hydroxyl or hydroxyl-like radicals. Besides, unspecific sacrifice reactions of albumin with highly reactive oxygen species or other endogenous compounds may also be implicated.

  4. Does administering albumin to postoperative gastroschisis patients improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina A; Silva, Luanna M; Leal, Antonio José G; de Moraes, Augusto César F; Tannuri, Uenis

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Newborns who undergo surgery for gastroschisis correction may present with oliguria, anasarca, prolonged postoperative ileus, and infection. New postoperative therapeutic procedures were tested with the objective of improving postoperative outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred thirty-six newborns participated in one of two phases. Newborns in the first phase received infusions of large volumes of crystalloid solution and integral enteral formula, and newborns in the second phase received crystalloid solutions in smaller volumes, with albumin solution infusion when necessary and the late introduction of a semi-elemental diet. The studied variables were serum sodium and albumin levels, the need for albumin solution expansion, the occurrence of anasarca, the length of time on parenteral nutrition, the length of time before initiating an enteral diet and reaching a full enteral diet, orotracheal intubation time, length of hospitalization, and survival rates. RESULTS: Serum sodium levels were higher in newborns in the second phase. There was a correlation between low serum sodium levels and orotracheal intubation time; additionally, low serum albumin levels correlated with the length of time before the initiation of an oral diet and the time until a full enteral diet was reached. However, the discharge weights of newborns in the second phase were higher than in the first phase. The other studied variables, including survival rates (83.4% and 92.0%, respectively), were similar for both phases. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of an albumin solution to newborns in the early postoperative period following gastroschisis repair increased their low serum sodium levels but did not improve the final outcome. The introduction of a semi-elemental diet promoted an increase in body weight at the time of discharge. PMID:22358234

  5. THE REACTIONS OF IODINE AND IODOACETAMIDE WITH NATIVE EGG ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Anson, M. L.

    1940-01-01

    The following experimental results have been obtained. 1. Native egg albumin treated with iodine and then denatured no longer gives a nitroprusside test or reduces dilute ferricyanide in neutral Duponol PC solution. 2. More iodine is needed to abolish the ferricyanide reduction if the reaction between native egg albumin and iodine is carried out at pH 6.8 than if the reaction is carried out at pH 3.2. At pH 6.8 iodine reacts with tyrosine as well as with cysteine. 3. Cysteine and tryptophane are the only amino acids with reducing groups which are known to react with dilute iodine at pH 3.2 The reducing power of cysteine is abolished by the reaction with iodine, whereas the reducing power of tryptophane remains intact. Pepsin and chymotrypsinogen which contain tryptophane but not cysteine, do not react at all with dilute iodine at pH 3.2. 4. Native egg albumin treated with iodoacetamide at pH 9.0 and then denatured by Duponol PC reduces only 60 per cent as much dilute ferricyanide as egg albumin which has not been treated with iodoacetamide. 5. The SH group is the only protein reducing group which is known to react with iodoacetamide. The simplest explanation of the new observation that the SH groups of egg albumin can be modified by reactions with the native form of the protein is that the native egg albumin has free and accessible but relatively unreactive SH groups which can react with iodine and iodoacetamide despite the fact that they do not react with ferricyanide, porphyrindin, or nitroprusside. Preliminary experiments suggested by the results with egg albumin indicate that the tobacco mosaic virus is modified by iodine at pH 2.8 without being inactivated and that the tobacco mosaic and rabbit papilloma viruses are not inactivated by iodoacetamide at pH 8.0. PMID:19873158

  6. PRODUCTION OF UNIFORMLY SIZED SERUM ALBUMIN AND DEXTROSE MICROBUBBLES

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Michael J.; O’Brien, William D.; Bernock, Laura J.; Williams, Heather R.; Hamilton, Eric; Wu, Jonah; Oelze, Michael L.; Culp, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Uniformly-sized preparations with average microbubble (MB) diameters from 1 µm to 7 µm were produced reliably by sonicating decafluorobutane-saturated solutions of serum albumin and dextrose. Detailed protocols for producing and size-separating the MBs are presented, along with the effects that changing each production parameter (serum albumin concentration, sonication power, sonication time, etc.) had on MB size distribution and acoustic stability. These protocols can be used to produce MBs for experimental applications or serve as templates for developing new protocols that yield MBs with physical and acoustic properties better suited to specific applications. Size stability and ultrasonic performance quality control tests were developed to assure that successive MB preparations perform identically and to distinguish the physical and acoustic properties of identically sized MBs produced with different serum albumin-dextrose formulations and sonication parameters. MBs can be stored at 5°C for protracted periods (2 weeks to one year depending on formulation). PMID:21689961

  7. Industrial stabilizers caprylate and N-acetyltryptophanate reduce the efficacy of albumin in liver patients.

    PubMed

    Stange, Jan; Stiffel, Melanie; Goetze, Anne; Strube, Sabrina; Gruenert, Juliane; Klammt, Sebastian; Mitzner, Steffen; Koball, Sebastian; Liebe, Stefan; Reisinger, Emil

    2011-06-01

    Liver failure is associated with an accumulation of toxic molecules that exert an affinity to albumin. Some of them have vasoactive activity. So far, albumin has been used as a plasma expander to improve the available circulating blood volume. However, recent studies have suggested that albumin is more effective than starch for this indication. It has not been reported yet whether the industrial stabilizers octanoate and N-acetyltryptophanate, added to albumin, occupy binding sites for vasoactive substances. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of the industrial stabilizers octanoate and caprylate has an impact on the effect of the albumin-binding function or circulating blood volume in patients with cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and an indication for albumin. In 25 patients who received albumin via an inline infusion filter that depleted stabilizers, there was an improvement of albumin binding, and there was less deterioration of circulating blood volume and renal function in comparison with a control group. Further studies are needed to confirm the results and identify the potential socioeconomic side effects of industrial stabilizers in commercial albumin solutions.

  8. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  9. Biocompatibility of electrospun human albumin: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk, B H; Kowalczyk, T; Łyżniak, M; Zembrzycki, K; Mikułowski, G; Wysocki, J; Kawiak, J; Pojda, Z

    2015-03-02

    Albumin is rarely used for electrospinning because it does not form fibres in its native globular form. This paper presents a novel method for electrospinning human albumin from a solution containing pharmaceutical grade protein and 25% polyethylene oxide (PEO) used as the fibre-forming agent. After spontaneous cross-linking at body temperature, with no further chemicals added, the fibres become insoluble and the excess PEO can be washed out. Albumin deposited along the fibres retains its native characteristics, such as its non-adhesiveness to cells and its susceptibility for degradation by macrophages. To demonstrate this we evaluated the mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability of this novel product. After subcutaneous implantation in mice, albumin mats were completely resorbable within six days and elicited only a limited local inflammatory response. In vitro, the mats suppressed cell attachment and migration. As this product is inexpensive, produced from human pharmaceutical grade albumin without chemical modifications, retains its native protein properties and fulfils the specific requirements for anti-adhesive dressings, its clinical use can be expedited. We believe that it could specifically be used when treating paediatric patients with epidermolysis bullosa, in whom non-healing wounds occur after minor hand injuries which lead to rapid adhesions and devastating contractures.

  10. Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: Overview and Implications for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasher, Kitty L.

    2009-01-01

    Solution-focused brief therapy is a fairly new approach of counseling that has been found to be useful in various settings. The strategy's usefulness and limitations in a school setting will be examined in this article. Included in the article are the basic components of the solution-focused approach, questions significant to the strategy,…

  11. Solution-mediated phase transformation: significance during dissolution and implications for bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Greco, Kristyn; Bogner, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Solubility improvement of poorly soluble drug compounds is a key approach to ensuring the successful development of many new drugs. Methods used to improve the solubility of drug compounds include forming a salt, cocrystal, or amorphous solid. These methods of improving solubility can often lead to a phenomenon called solution-mediated phase transformation, a phase change that is facilitated through exposure to solution. Solution-mediated phase transformation occurs in three steps: dissolution to create a supersaturated solution followed by nucleation of less soluble phase and the growth of that phase. When the growth of the less soluble phase occurs on the surface of the metastable solid, this phenomenon can cause a marked decrease in dissolution rate during in vitro dissolution evaluation, and ultimately in vivo. Therefore, transformation to a less soluble solid during dissolution is an important aspect to consider when evaluating approaches to increase the solubility of a poorly soluble drug. Identification of solution-mediated phase transformation during dissolution is reviewed for powder dissolution, rotating disk method, and channel flow-through apparatus. Types of solution-mediated phase transformation are described in this report, including those involving salts, polymorphs, amorphous solids, and cocrystals. Many experimental examples are provided. Evidence of potential solution-mediated phase transformation in vivo is discussed to better understand the relationship between in vitro dissolution evaluation and in vivo performance.

  12. Transport of solutes through cartilage: permeability to large molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Maroudas, A

    1976-01-01

    A review of the transport of solutes through articular cartilage is given, with special reference to the effect of variations in matrix composition. Some physiological implications of our findings are discussed. Also, results of an experimental study of the permeability of articular cartilage to large globular proteins are presented. Because of the very low partition coefficients of large solutes between cartilage and an external solution new experimental techniques had to be devised, particularly for the study of diffusion. The partition coefficients of solutes were found to decrease very steeply with increase in size, up to serum albumin. There was, however, no further decrease for IGG. The diffusion coefficient of serum albumin in cartilage was relatively high (one quarter of the value in aqueous solution). These two facts taken together suggest that there may be a very small fraction of relatively large pores in cartilage through which the transport of large molecules is taking place. The permeability of cartilage to large molecules is extremely sensitive to variations in the glycosaminoglycan content: for a threefold increase in the latter there is a hundredfold decrease in the partition coefficient. For cartilage of fixed charge density around 0-19 m-equiv/g, there is no penetration at all of globular proteins of size equal to or larger than serum albumin. PMID:1002608

  13. Perceptions of injury causes and solutions in a Johannesburg township: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Butchart, A; Kruger, J; Lekoba, R

    2000-02-01

    As with other diseases, citizen perceptions of injury causes and solutions are important determinants of their response to the problem. This study explores qualitative responses to questions about the causes and solutions for injuries due to violence, transport, and unintentional burns, falls and other causes from 1,075 residents in six neighbourhoods of a low-income area in Johannesburg, South Africa. These included council houses, council apartment blocks and informal settlements. Data were analysed using content analytic procedures. Perceived causes of injury varied sharply between neighbourhoods. Violence was seen as an outcome of unemployment, socialisation, drug abuse and drug dealing in the formal housing areas, while in the informal settlements it was attributed to unemployment, poor housing and environmental conditions, and excessive alcohol consumption. In the formal housing areas, suggested solutions for violence emphasised increased policing and other repressive measures that contradicted the attribution of causes to environmental factors. In the informal areas, solutions were more congruent with perceived causes, emphasising housing development, education and employment. Perceived causes and solutions for transport injuries reflected the specific context of each neighbourhood, and indicated strong support for the implementation of environmental modifications to reduce the speed of motor vehicles and thus the number of pedestrian injuries. Where perceived causes and solutions for violence and transport-related injuries were located beyond the community in the broader environment, unintentional injuries due to other causes were seen as more in the sphere of potential personal control, except in the informal areas where electrification and formal housing provision were the most commonly suggested solutions. Popular constructions of the causes and solutions for major categories of injury are important in shaping injury prevention responses, and their

  14. Automated calibration of a stream solute transport model: Implications for interpretation of biogeochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Gooseff, M.N.; Bencala, K.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic processes of advection, dispersion, and transient storage are the primary physical mechanisms affecting solute transport in streams. The estimation of parameters for a conservative solute transport model is an essential step to characterize transient storage and other physical features that cannot be directly measured, and often is a preliminary step in the study of reactive solutes. Our study used inverse modeling to estimate parameters of the transient storage model OTIS (One dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage). Observations from a tracer injection experiment performed on Uvas Creek, California, USA, are used to illustrate the application of automated solute transport model calibration to conservative and nonconservative stream solute transport. A computer code for universal inverse modeling (UCODE) is used for the calibrations. Results of this procedure are compared with a previous study that used a trial-and-error parameter estimation approach. The results demonstrated 1) importance of the proper estimation of discharge and lateral inflow within the stream system; 2) that although the fit of the observations is not much better when transient storage is invoked, a more randomly distributed set of residuals resulted (suggesting non-systematic error), indicating that transient storage is occurring; 3) that inclusion of transient storage for a reactive solute (Sr2+) provided a better fit to the observations, highlighting the importance of robust model parameterization; and 4) that applying an automated calibration inverse modeling estimation approach resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the model results and the limitation of input data.

  15. Ligation activity of fragmented ribozymes in frozen solution: implications for the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Vlassov, Alexander V.; Johnston, Brian H.; Landweber, Laura F.; Kazakov, Sergei A.

    2004-01-01

    A vexing difficulty of the RNA world hypothesis is how RNA molecules of significant complexity could ever have evolved given their susceptibility to degradation. One way degradation might have been reduced is through low temperature. Here we report that truncated and fragmented derivatives of the hairpin ribozyme can catalyze ligation of a wide variety of RNA molecules to a given sequence in frozen solution despite having little or no activity under standard solution conditions. These results suggest that complex RNAs could have evolved in freezing environments on the early earth and perhaps elsewhere. PMID:15161960

  16. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  17. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  18. PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PCE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select physicochemical properties of aqueous solutions composed of surfactants, dye, and

    perchloroethylene (PCE) were evaluated through a response surface quadratic design

    model of experiment. Nine surfactants, which are conventionally used in the

    remediation...

  19. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  20. Gadofosveset-Based Biomarker of Tissue Albumin Concentration: Technical Validation in Vitro and Feasibility in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Owen C; Bane, Octavia; Scott, Marietta LJ; Tanner, Steven F; Waterton, John C; Sourbron, Steven P; Carroll, Timothy J; Buckley, David L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is currently no adequate method of mapping physiologic and pathophysiologic tissue albumin concentrations in human subjects. The objective of this study was to devise and evaluate a biomarker of regional albumin concentration using gadofosveset-enhanced MRI. Theory and Methods A binding and relaxation model was devised and evaluated in vitro in solutions of albumin at 3.0 Tesla (T) and 4.7T. The method was evaluated in the heart in seven volunteers at 3.0T. Results MRI-derived estimates of albumin concentration were in good agreement with true values over the range 0.1–1.0 mM (Pearson correlation coefficients of 0.85 and 0.88 for 3.0T and 4.7T, respectively). The mean calculated albumin concentration in the myocardium for the volunteers was 0.02 mM (range, 0.01–0.03 mM). Conclusion Accurate estimates of albumin concentration in vitro suggest this may be a viable noninvasive alternative to existing techniques. In the myocardium the MRI-derived estimates of albumin concentration indicate the practical feasibility of the technique but were below expected values. Gadofosveset-enhanced MR relaxometry has potential in providing biomarkers of regional albumin concentration; further evaluation is required before it can be used reliably in vivo. Magn Reson Med 73:244–253, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24515975

  1. Enantioselective sorption of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl on soil from non-racemic aqueous solutions: Environmental implications.

    PubMed

    Celis, Rafael; Gámiz, Beatriz; Facenda, Gracia; Hermosín, María C

    2015-12-30

    Mechanisms governing the enantioselectivity of the processes that determine the behavior of chiral pollutants in the environment need to be better understood. Understanding these mechanisms should help improve predictions of the hazards and risks chiral compounds can pose to people and the environment. We report the results of batch sorption experiments indicating that the sorption of the chiral fungicide metalaxyl on soil from non-racemic initial solutions was enantioselective. While from a racemic initial solution the two enantiomers of metalaxyl were sorbed on the soil to the same extent, increasing the fraction of R-enantiomer in the initial solution led to enhanced sorption of this enantiomer and to reduced sorption of the S-enantiomer. Considering the shape of the sorption isotherms (S-type) and the sorption behavior of model sorbents, we attributed this effect to molecular interactions between metalaxyl enantiomer species at the sorbed state, where R-R metalaxyl interactions appeared to be more favorable than R-S metalaxyl interactions. We discuss important environmental implications of the proposed mechanism, such as those related to the fact that the biological degradation of metalaxyl is known to be an enantioselective process that can yield non-racemic residues in soils shortly after application of the fungicide as a racemic mixture.

  2. Tolerability of Oral Xylitol Solution in Young Children: Implications for Otitis Media Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Vezina, Richard M.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Xylitol, given as two grams orally five times-a-day, significantly reduces the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) in children. A less frequent dosing schedule, if tolerable and efficacious, would promote the more widespread use of this treatment. We sought to determine the tolerability and acceptability in young children of oral xylitol solution at doses of 5 grams three times-a-day (TID) and 7.5 grams once daily (QD). Methods. The study was a three-month randomized placebo-controlled trial of the tolerability and acceptability of oral xylitol solution in 120 children 6-36 months of age performed in the SCOR Network. Results. Study withdrawals and unscheduled medical visits for gastrointestinal complaints did not differ significantly among the study groups. The proportions of subjects in the xylitol TID group who experienced excessive gas or diarrhea at months one, two, and three were 22.7%, 10.0%, and 14.3%, respectively, and in the xylitol QD group were 27.3%, 17.4%, and 14.3%, respectively, and these did not differ from the placebo groups. The proportions who accepted the study solution easily or with only minor difficulty at one, two, and three months in the xylitol TID group were 77.3%, 90.0%, and 90.5% and in the xylitol QD group, 77.3%, 82.6%, and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Oral xylitol solution at dosages of 5 grams TID and 7.5 grams QD is well-tolerated by young children. Given the potential for xylitol as a safe, inexpensive option for AOM prophylaxis, clinical trials using these dosages of xylitol can be conducted. PMID:17097152

  3. Complexation of serum albumins and triton X-100: Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and analysis of the rotational diffusion of complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Vlasov, A. A.; Saletskii, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The polarized and nonpolarized fluorescence of bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin in Triton X-100 solutions is studied at different pH values. Analysis of the constants of fluorescence quenching for BSA and HSA after adding Triton X-100 and the hydrodynamic radii of BSA/HSA-detergent complexes show that the most effective complexation between both serum albumins and Triton X-100 occurs at pH 5.0, which lies near the isoelectric points of the proteins. Complexation between albumin and Triton X-100 affects the fluorescence of the Trp-214 residing in the hydrophobic pockets of both BSA and HSA.

  4. The effects of haemodilution with albumin on coagulation in vitro as assessed by rotational thromboelastometry.

    PubMed

    Pathirana, S; Wong, G; Williams, P; Yang, K; Kershaw, G; Dunkley, S; Kam, P C A

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the in vitro viscoelastic changes of progressive haemodilution with 4% albumin compared with normal saline (NS) using rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®), Pentapharm Co., Munich, Germany). Whole blood samples obtained from 20 healthy volunteers were diluted in vitro with 4% albumin or NS by 10%, 20% and 40%. Fibrinogen concentration and ROTEM(®) (EXTEM [screening test for the extrinsic haemostasis system], FIBTEM [EXTEM-based assay for the fibrin part of the clot]) variables including coagulation time, clot formation time (CFT), α-angle, maximum clot firmness and lysis index were measured in the undiluted sample and at each degree of haemodilution. There was no significant difference in fibrinogen concentration at equivalent haemodilutions with normal saline and 4% albumin solutions. Forty percent haemodilution with albumin significantly prolonged coagulation time (EXTEM P=0.007, FIBTEM P=0.0001) and significantly decreased lysis index (FIBTEM P=0.009) compared with NS. A significant decrease in maximum clot firmness from undiluted measurements (P=0.05) was observed at lower haemodilutions with albumin (20% with EXTEM, 10% with FIBTEM) compared with NS (40% with EXTEM and FIBTEM). The adverse effects of large degrees of haemodilution with 4% albumin solution are in excess of what can be explained by haemodilution alone. This study suggests that large degrees of haemodilution with albumin impair fibrinogen activity to a greater extent than equivalent degrees of haemodilution with NS.

  5. Exploration of DGVM Parameter Solution Space Using Simulated Annealing: Implications for Forecast Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. R.; Kim, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    Parameters in dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are thought to be weakly constrained and can be a significant source of errors and uncertainties. DGVMs use between 5 and 26 plant functional types (PFTs) to represent the average plant life form in each simulated plot, and each PFT typically has a dozen or more parameters that define the way it uses resource and responds to the simulated growing environment. Sensitivity analysis explores how varying parameters affects the output, but does not do a full exploration of the parameter solution space. The solution space for DGVM parameter values are thought to be complex and non-linear; and multiple sets of acceptable parameters may exist. In published studies, PFT parameters are estimated from published literature, and often a parameter value is estimated from a single published value. Further, the parameters are "tuned" using somewhat arbitrary, "trial-and-error" methods. BIOMAP is a new DGVM created by fusing MAPSS biogeography model with Biome-BGC. It represents the vegetation of North America using 26 PFTs. We are using simulated annealing, a global search method, to systematically and objectively explore the solution space for the BIOMAP PFTs and system parameters important for plant water use. We defined the boundaries of the solution space by obtaining maximum and minimum values from published literature, and where those were not available, using +/-20% of current values. We used stratified random sampling to select a set of grid cells representing the vegetation of the conterminous USA. Simulated annealing algorithm is applied to the parameters for spin-up and a transient run during the historical period 1961-1990. A set of parameter values is considered acceptable if the associated simulation run produces a modern potential vegetation distribution map that is as accurate as one produced by trial-and-error calibration. We expect to confirm that the solution space is non-linear and complex, and that

  6. Crystals of Serum Albumin for Use in Genetic Engineering and Rational Drug Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Serum albumin crystal forms have been produced which exhibit superior x-ray diffraction quality. The crystals are produced from both recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, canine, and baboon serum albumin and allow the performance of drug-binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies. The crystals are grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol or ammonium sulphate within prescribed limits during growth times from one to several weeks and include the following space groups: P2(sub 1), C2, P1.

  7. Binding interactions of pefloxacin mesylate with bovine lactoferrin and human serum albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ji-cai; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Yun; Fan, Cheng-ping; Shang, Zhi-cai

    2006-01-01

    The binding of pefloxacin mesylate (PFLX) to bovine lactoferrin (BLf) and human serum albumin (HSA) in dilute aqueous solution was studied using fluorescence spectra and absorbance spectra. The binding constant K and the binding sites n were obtained by fluorescence quenching method. The binding distance r and energy-transfer efficiency E between pefloxacin mesylate and bovine lactoferrin as well as human serum albumin were also obtained according to the mechanism of Förster-type dipole-dipole nonradiative energy-transfer. The effects of pefloxacin mesylate on the conformations of bovine lactoferrin and human serum albumin were also analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:16691639

  8. Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Thangarajan, Ramya

    2015-06-01

    In this work, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) species were compared between solution culture and soil system. Firstly, the adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was compared using a number of non-allophanic and allophanic soils. Secondly, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were examined using germination, phytoavailability, earthworm, and soil microbial activity tests. Both As-spiked soils and As-contaminated sheep dip soils were used to test bioavailability and ecotoxicity. The sheep dip soil which contained predominantly As(V) species was subject to flooding to reduce As(V) to As(III) and then used along with the control treatment soil to compare the bioavailability between As species. Adsorption of As(V) was much higher than that of As(III), and the difference in adsorption between these two species was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. In the solution culture, there was no significant difference in bioavailability and ecotoxicity, as measured by germination and phytoavailability tests, between these two As species. Whereas in the As-spiked soils, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were higher for As(III) than As(V), and the difference was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. Bioavailability of As increased with the flooding of the sheep dip soils which may be attributed to the reduction of As(V) to As(III) species. The results in this study have demonstrated that while in solution, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity do not vary between As(III) and As(V), in soils, the latter species is less bioavailable than the former species because As(V) is more strongly retained than As(III). Since the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of As depend on the nature of As species present in the environment, risk-based remediation approach should aim at controlling the dynamics of As transformation.

  9. The ubiquitous nature of accessory calcite in granitoid rocks: Implications for weathering, solute evolution, and petrogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Lowenstern, J. B.; Vivit, D.V.; Bullen, T.D.

    2005-01-01

    Calcite is frequently cited as a source of excess Ca, Sr and alkalinity in solutes discharging from silicate terrains yet, no previous effort has been made to assess systematically the overall abundance, composition and petrogenesis of accessory calcite in granitoid rocks. This study addresses this issue by analyzing a worldwide distribution of more than 100 granitoid rocks. Calcite is found to be universally present in a concentration range between 0.028 to 18.8 g kg-1 (mean = 2.52 g kg-1). Calcite occurrences include small to large isolated anhedral grains, fracture and cavity infillings, and sericitized cores of plagioclase. No correlation exists between the amount of calcite present and major rock oxide compositions, including CaO. Ion microprobe analyses of in situ calcite grains indicate relatively low Sr (120 to 660 ppm), negligible Rb and 87Sr/86Sr ratios equal to or higher than those of coexisting plagioclase. Solutes, including Ca and alkalinity produced by batch leaching of the granitoid rocks (5% CO2 in DI water for 75 d at 25??C), are dominated by the dissolution of calcite relative to silicate minerals. The correlation of these parameters with higher calcite concentrations decreases as leachates approach thermodynamic saturation. In longer term column experiments (1.5 yr), reactive calcite becomes exhausted, solute Ca and Sr become controlled by feldspar dissolution and 87Sr/ 86Sr by biotite oxidation. Some accessory calcite in granitoid rocks is related to intrusion into carbonate wall rock or produced by later hydrothermal alteration. However, the ubiquitous occurrence of calcite also suggests formation during late stage (subsolidus) magmatic processes. This conclusion is supported by petrographic observations and 87Sr/86Sr analyses. A review of thermodynamic data indicates that at moderate pressures and reasonable CO2 fugacities, calcite is a stable phase at temperatures of 400 to 700??C. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Organics Produced by Irradiation of Frozen and Liquid HCN Solutions: Implications for Chemical Evolution Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), an important precursor of organic compounds, is widely present in extraterrestrial environments. HCN is also readily synthesized in prebiotic simulation experiments. To gain insight into the radiation chemistry of one of the most important and highly versatile constituents of cometary ices, we examined the behavior of over-irradiated frozen and liquid HCN solutions under ionizing radiation. The samples were exposed to gamma radiation at a dose range from 0 up to 419 kGy. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to follow the process. The analyses confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation of liquid HCN solutions generates several organic products. Many of them are essential to life; we verified the presence of carboxylic acids (some of them members of the Krebs cycle) as well as free amino acids and urea. These are the first studies to reveal the presence of these compounds in experiments performed at low temperatures and bulk irradiation. Organic material was produced even at low temperatures and low radiation doses. This work strongly supports the presumption that, as a parent molecule, HCN played a central essential role in the process of chemical evolution on early Earth, comets, and other extraterrestrial environments.

  11. Experimental calibration of Mg isotope fractionation between dolomite and aqueous solution and its geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L.; Li, Chengxiang; Xu, Huifang; Johnson, Clark M.

    2015-05-01

    Hydrothermal experiments at 220, 160, and 130 °C were performed to calibrate the Mg isotope fractionation factor between dolomite and aqueous Mg. Hydrothermal experiments included synthesis of dolomite using different starting materials, as well as exchange experiments that used poorly-ordered proto-dolomite. The morphology of synthesized dolomite was dependent on starting mineralogy, suggesting that dolomite was synthesized by different pathways. Hydrothermally synthesized dolomite was initially fine-grained disordered or poorly-ordered dolomite that, with time, recrystallized to coarser-grained ordered dolomite. Isotopic exchange was monitored using 87Sr/86Sr ratios and 25Mg tracers, and these indicated near-complete isotope exchange between dolomite and aqueous solutions at the end of most hydrothermal experiments. The Mg isotope fractionation factor between dolomite and aqueous solution obtained from synthesis and exchange experiments converged with time and was independent of dolomite morphology, suggesting attainment of isotopic equilibrium. Combining results from synthesis and exchange experiments, the temperature dependent Mg isotope fractionation factor for ordered dolomite is:

  12. Megalin mediates transepithelial albumin clearance from the alveolar space of intact rabbit lungs.

    PubMed

    Buchäckert, Yasmin; Rummel, Sebastian; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Gabrielli, Nieves M; Grzesik, Benno A; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2012-10-15

    The alveolo-capillary barrier is effectively impermeable to large solutes such as proteins. A hallmark of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome is the accumulation of protein-rich oedema fluid in the distal airspaces. Excess protein must be cleared from the alveolar space for recovery; however, the mechanisms of protein clearance remain incompletely understood. In intact rabbit lungs 29.8 ± 2.2% of the radio-labelled alveolar albumin was transported to the vascular compartment at 37°C within 120 min, as assessed by real-time measurement of 125I-albumin clearance from the alveolar space. At 4°C or 22°C significantly lower albumin clearance (3.7 ± 0.4 or 16.2 ± 1.1%, respectively) was observed. Deposition of a 1000-fold molar excess of unlabelled albumin into the alveolar space or inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement or clathrin-dependent endocytosis largely inhibited the transport of 125I-albumin to the vasculature, while administration of unlabelled albumin to the vascular space had no effect on albumin clearance. Furthermore, albumin uptake capacity was measured as about 0.37 mg ml−1 in cultured rat lung epithelial monolayers, further highlighting the (patho)physiological relevance of active alveolar epithelial protein transport. Moreover, gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of the multi-ligand receptor megalin resulted in significantly decreased albumin binding and uptake in monolayers of primary alveolar type II and type I-like and cultured lung epithelial cells. Our data indicate that clearance of albumin from the distal air spaces is facilitated by an active, high-capacity, megalin-mediated transport process across the alveolar epithelium. Further understanding of this mechanism is of clinical importance, since an inability to clear excess protein from the alveolar space is associated with poor outcome in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  13. Freezing of sulfuric and nitric acid solutions: Implications for polar stratospheric cloud formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Gonzalez, Dara

    2000-12-01

    Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) play an important role in ozone chemistry during the polar winter. The magnitude of their effect depends on their phase, composition and formation mechanism, which are not fully understood yet. In order to understand how liquid PSCs freeze, two apparatus were designed to study the freezing behavior of small drops using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and an optical microscope. Sulfuric acid aqueous drops with composition of 10 to 50 wt % were studied with the FTIR apparatus. The surface on which the drops stand caused heterogeneous nucleation of ice, but not of the sulfuric acid hydrates. The more concentrated solutions (>40 wt %) supercooled to 130 K without freezing. Below 150 K these solutions formed an amorphous solid, which liquefied upon warming. Drops with composition of 40 to 64 wt % HNO3 were prepared and their phase transitions were detected with the optical microscope apparatus. Freezing temperatures of the drops were determined and homogeneous nucleation rates of nitric acid dihydrate (JNAD) and nitric acid trihydrate (JNAT) between 170 and 190 K were calculated. JNAT and JNAD depend predominantly on the saturation of the solid in the liquid solution: higher saturation ratios correspond to higher nucleation rates. Classical nucleation theory was used to parameterize this relation. Since the saturation ratios of NAD and NAT vary with temperature and composition in different ways, NAT or NAD can form preferentially under different conditions. Evidence was found that NAD catalyzes the nucleation of NAT below ~183 K. Mullite, cristobalite and alumina were tested as possible heterogeneous nuclei of volcanic origin for PSCs. They catalyze freezing of NAD and NAT at temperatures below 179 K, which are too low to be stratospherically important. The results suggest that the largest drops in a PSC will freeze homogeneously if the stratospheric temperature remains below the NAT condensation temperature for more

  14. Mechanistic and conformational studies on the interaction of a platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug, levetiracetam, with bovine serum albumin by optical spectroscopic techniques in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Hadidi, Saba

    2015-02-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with circular dichroism (CD) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy were employed to investigate the binding of a new platinum(II) complex containing an antiepileptic drug "Levetiracetam" to bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the physiological conditions. In the mechanism discussion, it was proved that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by Pt(II) complex is a result of the formation of Pt(II) complex-BSA complex. The thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS at different temperatures (283, 298, and 310 K) were calculated, and the negative value for ΔH and ΔS indicate that the hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in Pt(II) complex-BSA association. Binding studies concerning the number of binding sites (n~1) and apparent binding constant K b were performed by fluorescence quenching method. The site marker competitive experiments indicated that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA primarily took place in site II. Based on the Förster's theory, the average binding distance between Pt(II) complex and BSA was obtained (r = 5.29 nm). Furthermore, UV-vis, CD, and synchronous fluorescence spectrum were used to investigate the structural change of BSA molecules with addition of Pt(II) complex. These results indicate that the binding of Pt(II) complex to BSA causes apparent change in the secondary structure of BSA and do affect the microenvironment around the tryptophan residue.

  15. Albumin modulates S1P delivery from red blood cells in perfused microvessels: mechanism of the protein effect.

    PubMed

    Adamson, R H; Clark, J F; Radeva, M; Kheirolomoom, A; Ferrara, K W; Curry, F E

    2014-04-01

    Removal of plasma proteins from perfusates increases vascular permeability. The common interpretation of the action of albumin is that it forms part of the permeability barrier by electrostatic binding to the endothelial glycocalyx. We tested the alternate hypothesis that removal of perfusate albumin in rat venular microvessels decreased the availability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is normally carried in plasma bound to albumin and lipoproteins and is required to maintain stable baseline endothelial barriers (Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 303: H825-H834, 2012). Red blood cells (RBCs) are a primary source of S1P in the normal circulation. We compared apparent albumin permeability coefficients [solute permeability (Ps)] measured using perfusates containing albumin (10 mg/ml, control) and conditioned by 20-min exposure to rat RBCs with Ps when test perfusates were in RBC-conditioned protein-free Ringer solution. The control perfusate S1P concentration (439 ± 46 nM) was near the normal plasma value at 37 °C and established a stable baseline Ps (0.9 ± 0.4 × 10(-6) cm/s). Ringer solution perfusate contained 52 ± 8 nM S1P and increased Ps more than 10-fold (16.1 ± 3.9 × 10(-6) cm/s). Consistent with albumin-dependent transport of S1P from RBCs, S1P concentrations in RBC-conditioned solutions decreased as albumin concentration, hematocrit, and temperature decreased. Protein-free Ringer solution perfusates that used liposomes instead of RBCs as flow markers failed to maintain normal permeability, reproducing the "albumin effect" in these mammalian microvessels. We conclude that the albumin effect depends on the action of albumin to facilitate the release and transport of S1P from RBCs that normally provide a significant amount of S1P to the endothelium.

  16. Comparative Study of Laterite and Bentonite Based Organoclays: Implications of Hydrophobic Compounds Remediation from Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Nafees, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Khan, Abdur Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well. PMID:24302867

  17. Comparative study of laterite and bentonite based organoclays: implications of hydrophobic compounds remediation from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nafees, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Khan, Abdur Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well.

  18. Concentration gradients at the mineral-solution interface: implications for understanding dissolution mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Patiño-López, Luis David; Putnis, Christine V.; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Dissolution is a key process in fluid-rock interactions, such as in chemical weathering, CO2 carbonation reactions, metasomatism, and metamorphism. Many multicomponent rock-forming minerals are reported to dissolve incongruently, because the elemental molar ratios, measured in the fluid during dissolution experiments, that differ from those in the solid. This frequently results in the formation of chemically and structurally altered zones at the fluid-solid interface of varying thickness that are depleted in some elements relative to the bulk mineral composition. Although the mechanisms of the formation of these altered layers is still a matter of debate (see e.g. Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2012 and Schott et al. 2012), recent AFM studies on the dissolution of two multicomponent minerals, dolomite, Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3 (Urosevic et al. 2012), and wollastonite, CaSiO3 (Ruiz-Agudo et al. 2012), provide experimental evidence showing that these layers are formed in a two-step process: (i) stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and (ii) precipitation of a secondary phase. This occurs despite the fact that the bulk solution is undersaturated with respect to such a phase. It has been suggested that after stoichiometric dissolution of the mineral, a boundary layer of fluid in contact with the surface becomes supersaturated with respect to a secondary phase that then precipitates. Here we present in situ observations of the evolution of the fluid composition at the interface during dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 1.5) of dolomite and wollastonite using real-time phase-shift interferometry. We show that immediately when the sparingly soluble dolomite or wollastonite crystals are in contact with the solution, the refractive index of the solution at the crystal surface sharply increases. A steep refractive index gradient (i.e., concentration gradient) develops as a consequence of mineral dissolution producing an interfacial fluid with a different composition to the

  19. Hierarchical simulation of aquifer heterogeneity: implications of different simulation settings on solute-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, Alessandro; De Micheli, Leonardo; Lazzati, Claudio; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    The fine-scale heterogeneity of porous media affects the large-scale transport of solutes and contaminants in groundwater and it can be reproduced by means of several geostatistical simulation tools. However, including the available geological information in these tools is often cumbersome. A hierarchical simulation procedure based on a binary tree is proposed and tested on two real-world blocks of alluvial sediments, of a few cubic meters volume, that represent small-scale aquifer analogs. The procedure is implemented using the sequential indicator simulation, but it is so general that it can be adapted to various geostatistical simulation tools, improving their capability to incorporate geological information, i.e., the sedimentological and architectural characterization of heterogeneity. When compared with a standard sequential indicator approach on bi-dimensional simulations, in terms of proportions and connectivity indicators, the proposed procedure yields reliable results, closer to the reference observations. Different ensembles of three-dimensional simulations based on different hierarchical sequences are used to perform numerical experiments of conservative solute transport and to obtain ensembles of equivalent pore velocity and dispersion coefficient at the scale length of the blocks (meter). Their statistics are used to estimate the impact of the variability of the transport properties of the simulated blocks on contaminant transport modeled on bigger domains (hectometer). This is investigated with a one-dimensional transport modeling based on the Kolmogorov-Dmitriev theory of branching stochastic processes. Applying the proposed approach with diverse binary trees and different simulation settings provides a great flexibility, which is revealed by the differences in the breakthrough curves.

  20. Effect of encapsulation in the anion receptor pocket of sub-domain IIA of human serum albumin on the modulation of pKa of warfarin and structurally similar acidic guests: a possible implication on biological activity.

    PubMed

    Datta, Shubhashis; Halder, Mintu

    2014-01-05

    Supramolecular and bio-supramolecular host assisted pKa shift of biologically relevant acidic guests, warfarin and coumarin 343, has been monitored using both steady-state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The anion receptors present in sub-domain IIA of human serum albumin (HSA) stabilize the anionic form of the guest and thereby shift pKa towards acidic range. On the other hand, the preferential binding of the neutral form of guests in the non-polar hydrophobic cavity of β-cyclodextrin results in up-shifted pKa. This shifting of pKa of drugs like warfarin, etc., whose therapeutic activity depends on the position of the acid-base equilibrium in human system, is of great importance in pharmacokinetics. The release of the active form of such drugs from macrocyclic carrier and subsequent distribution through the carrier protein should depend on the modulation of the overall pKa window brought about by the encapsulation in these hosts. Present work also suggests that properly optimized encapsulation in appropriate receptor pocket can enhance the bioavailability of drugs. This work also opens up the possibility to use HSA as encapsulator, instead of traditional cyclodextrins or other polymeric hosts, since such system may overcome toxicity as well as biocompatibility issues.

  1. Antioxidant flavonoids bind human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakis, C. D.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Diamantoglou, S.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.

    2006-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and prevent DNA damage. The antioxidative protections are related to their binding modes to DNA duplex and complexation with free radicals in vivo. However, flavonoids are known to inhibit the activities of several enzymes such as calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, tyrosine protein kinase from rat lung, phosphorylase kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and DNA topoisomerases that exhibit the importance of flavonoid-protein interaction. This study was designed to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with quercetin (que), kaempferol (kae) and delphinidin (del) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration of 0.25 mM (final) and various drug contents of 1 μM-1 mM. FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyphenolic binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of flavonoid complexation on protein secondary structure. The spectroscopic results showed that flavonoids are located along the polypeptide chains through H-bonding interactions with overall affinity constant of Kque = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1, Kkae = 2.6 × 10 5 M -1 and Kdel = 4.71 × 10 5 M -1. The protein secondary structure showed no alterations at low pigment concentration (1 μM), whereas at high flavonoid content (1 mM), major reduction of α-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 42-46% and increase of β-sheet from 15% (free HSA) to 17-19% and β-anti from 7% (free HSA) to 10-20% occurred in the flavonoid-HSA adducts. The major reduction of HSA α-helix is indicative of a partial protein unfolding upon flavonoid interaction.

  2. Overview of Albumin and Its Purification Methods

    PubMed Central

    Raoufinia, Ramin; Mota, Ali; Keyhanvar, Neda; Safari, Fatemeh; Shamekhi, Sara; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    As the most frequent plasma protein, albumin constitutes more than 50% of the serum proteins in healthy individuals. It has a key role in oncotic pressure maintenance and it is known as a versatile protein carrier for transportation of various endogenous and exogenous ligands. Reduced amounts of albumin in the body will lead to different kinds of diseases such as hypovolemia and hypoproteinemia. It also has various indications in shocks, burns, cardiopulmonary bypass, acute liver failure and etc. Further applications in research consist of cell culture supplement, drug delivery carrier and protein/drug stabilizer. So, the demand for albumin increased annually worldwide. Due to different applications of albumin, many efforts have been accomplished to achieve albumin during a long period of time. In this review, an overview of serum albumin and different purification methods are summarized. PMID:28101456

  3. Solubility of HOBr in Acidic Solution and Implications for Liberation of Halogens Via Aerosol Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Rammer, T. A.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Halogen species are known to catalytically destroy ozone in several regions of the atmosphere. In addition to direct catalytic losses, bromine compounds can indirectly enhance ozone loss through coupling to other radical families. Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species in the linkage of BrOx to ClOx and HOx. The aqueous- phase coupling reaction HOBr + HCI (right arrow) BrCl + H2O may provide a pathway for chlorine activation on sulfate aerosols at temperatures warmer than those required for polar stratospheric cloud formation. We have measured t h e solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol dm(exp -3) atm(exp -1). The expected inverse dependence of H* on temperature was observed, but only a weak dependence on acidity was found. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that equilibrium concentrations of HOBr could equal or exceed those of HBr in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols. Despite the high solubility of HOBr, aerosol volumes are not large enough to sequester a significant fraction of inorganic bromine from the gas phase. Our measurements of HOBr uptake in aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases show the evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  4. Fatty acid binding sites of human and bovine albumins: Differences observed by spin probe ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muravsky, Vladimir; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Berezenko, Stephen; Schnurr, Kerstin; Gurachevsky, Andrey

    2009-09-01

    Bovine and human serum albumins and recombinant human albumin, all non-covalently complexed with 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acids, were investigated by ESR spectroscopy in solution over a range of pH values (5.5-8.0) and temperatures (25-50 °C), with respect to the allocation and mobility of fatty acid (FA) molecules bound to the proteins and conformation of the binding sites. In all proteins bound FA undergo a permanent intra-albumin migration between the binding sites and inter-domain residence. Nature identity of the recombinant human albumin to its serum-derived analog was observed. However, the binding sites of bovine albumin appeared shorter in length and wider in diameter than those of human albumin. Presumably, less tightly folded domains in bovine albumin allow better penetration of water molecules in the interior of the globule that resulted in higher activation energy of FA dissociation from the binding site. Thus, the sensitive technique based on ESR non-covalent spin labeling allowed quantitative analysis and reliable comparison of the fine features of binding proteins.

  5. Frequencies of plasmodesmata in Allium cepa L. roots: implications for solute transport pathways.

    PubMed

    Ma, F; Peterson, C A

    2001-05-01

    Plasmodesmatal frequencies (PFs) were analysed in Allium cepa L. roots with a mature exodermis (100 mm from the tip). For all interfaces within the root, the numbers of plasmodesmata (PD) microm(-2) wall surface (Fw) were calculated from measurements of 60 walls on ultrathin sections. For tissues ranging from the epidermis up to the stelar parenchyma, the frequencies were also expressed as total PD numbers mm(-1) root length (Fn), which is most instructive for considering the radial transport of ions and photosynthates (because the tissues were arranged in concentric cylinders). The Fn values were constantly high at the interfaces of exodermis-central cortex, central cortex-endodermis and endodermis-pericycle (4.05x10(5), 5.13x10(5), and 5.64x10(5), respectively). If the plasmodesmata are functional, a considerable symplastic transport pathway exists between the exodermis and pericycle. Two interfaces had especially low PFs: epidermis-exodermis (Fn=8.96x10(4)) and pericycle-stelar parenchyma (Fn=6.44x10(4)). This suggests that there is significant membrane transport across the interface of epidermis-exodermis (through short cells) and direct transfer of ions from pericycle to protoxylem vessels. In the phloem, the highest PF was detected at the metaphloem sieve element-companion cell interface (Fw=0.42), and all other interfaces had much lower PFs (around 0.10). In the pericycle, the radial walls had a high PF (Fw=0.75), a feature that could permit lateral circulation of solutes, thus facilitating ion (inward) and photosynthate (outward) delivery.

  6. Efficient solution of large-scale electromagnetic Eigenvalue problems using the implicity restarted Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Koning, J

    1999-10-21

    The authors are interested in determining the electromagnetic fields within closed perfectly conducting cavities that may contain dielectric or magnetic materials. The vector Helmholtz equation is the appropriate partial differential equation for this problem. It is well known that the electromagnetic fields in a cavity can be decomposed into distinct modes that oscillate in time at specific resonant frequencies. These modes are referred to as eigenmodes, and the frequencies of these modes are referred to as eigenfrequencies. The authors' present application is the analysis of linear accelerator components. These components may have a complex geometry; hence numerical methods are require to compute the eigenmodes and the eigenfrequencies of these components. The Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method (IRAM) is a robust and efficient method for the numerical solution of the generalized eigenproblem Ax = {lambda}Bx, where A and B are sparse matrices, x is an eigenvector, and {lambda} is an eigenvalue. The IRAM is an iterative method for computing extremal eigenvalues; it is an extension of the classic Lanczos method. The mathematical details of the IRAM are too sophisticated to describe here; instead they refer the reader to [1]. A FORTRAN subroutine library that implements various versions of the IRAM is freely available, both in a serial version named ARPACK and parallel version named PARPACK. In this paper they discretize the vector Helmholtz equation using 1st order H(curl) conforming edge elements (also known as Nedelec elements). This discretization results in a generalized eigenvalue problem which can be solved using the IRAM. The question of so-called spurious modes is discussed, and it is shown that applying a spectral transformation completely eliminates these modes, without any need for an additional constraint equation. Typically they use the IRAM to compute a small set (n < 30) of eigenvalues and eigenmodes for a very large systems (N > 100,000).

  7. [Urinary albumin fragmentation and immunoreactivity].

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yuriko; Nishimaki, Junichi; Nakajima, Toshie; Ida, Takashi; Shiba, Kiyoko

    2009-02-01

    Urinary albumin (ALB) has been measured as a marker for the early detection of diabetic nephropathy. In 2004, Comper et al. developed a gel-filtration high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the determination of urinary ALB. They demonstrated the presence in its albumin fraction of non immunoreactive ALB with the total molecular weight of a monomeric ALB that was non-reactive with the existing anti-ALB antibody, and reported that the level of urinary non-immunoreactive ALB was higher in diabetic patients than in normal subjects. In this study, we isolated urinary ALB from diabetic patients using an anti-ALB antibody-coupled affinity column to test its immunoreactivity. In some diabetic patients, the results of HPLC and turbidimetric immunoassay for urinary ALB were discrepant. Western blot analysis showed that ALB samples from such patients were contaminated with proteins other than ALB, and contained ALB, whose molecular weight became lower using a reductive procedure. In addition, the reactivity of ALB with anti-ALB antibody differed depending on whether it was in a reduced or non-reduced state. These results indicate that ALB in such patients is susceptible to structural changes due to disease-induced urinary factors and, thus, their urine contains ALB with an altered reactivity to antibody.

  8. Raman microspectroscopy of nanodiamond-induced structural changes in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlakova, Anastasiya S.; Brandt, Nikolay N.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Chikishev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising agents for theranostic applications due to reported low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which is still being extensively tested on cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is presumed that for experimental and future clinical applications, NDs will be administered into the organism via the blood circulation system. In this regard, the interaction of NDs with blood components needs to be thoroughly studied. We studied the interaction of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) with albumin, one of the major proteins of blood plasma. After 2-h long in vitro incubation in an aqueous solution of the protein, 100-nm cNDs were dried and the dry samples were studied with the aid of Raman microspectroscopy. The spectroscopic data indicate significant conformational changes that can be due to cND-protein interaction. A possible decrease in the functional activity of albumin related to the conformational changes must be taken into account in the in vivo applications.

  9. Raman microspectroscopy of nanodiamond-induced structural changes in albumin.

    PubMed

    Svetlakova, Anastasiya S; Brandt, Nikolay N; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Chikishev, Andrey Yu

    2015-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising agents for theranostic applications due to reported low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which is still being extensively tested on cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is presumed that for experimental and future clinical applications, NDs will be administered into the organism via the blood circulation system. In this regard, the interaction of NDs with blood components needs to be thoroughly studied. We studied the interaction of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) with albumin, one of the major proteins of blood plasma. After 2-h long in vitro incubation in an aqueous solution of the protein, 100-nm cNDs were dried and the dry samples were studied with the aid of Raman microspectroscopy. The spectroscopic data indicate significant conformational changes that can be due to cND–protein interaction. A possible decrease in the functional activity of albumin related to the conformational changes must be taken into account in the in vivo applications.

  10. [Sero-ascitic gradient of albumin: usefulness and diagnostic limitations].

    PubMed

    Alba, D; Torres, E; Vázquez, J J

    1995-08-01

    The serum-ascites albumin (SAA) gradient has been defined as the serum albumin concentration minus the ascitic fluid albumin concentration. The SAA gradient is superior to the exudate-transudate concept to classify ascites, being a exact portal hypertension (PH) marker. An elevated SAA gradient (1.1 g/L or greater) correlates with PH, whereas a low gradient indicates no PH. The SAA gradient correlates well with PH in cirrhotic patients. It is also of particular utility to differentiate between congestive heart failure and malignant ascites without liver metastases (both of them with elevated ascites fluid proteins -AFP-). However, a low SAA gradient do not differentiate between tuberculous and malignant ascites. Consequently, there are still need for tests a cytology, culture for mycobacteria or ascites fluid polymorphonuclear cell count in some cases. The level of AFP, apart from the exudate-transudate concept, has some value for certain cases (a low level of AFP implicates a high risk of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis). The SAA gradient should replace the AFP concentration as the initial test to classify ascites.

  11. [Spectral and fluorescent study of the interaction of squarylium dyes, derivatives of 3H-indolium, with albumins].

    PubMed

    Tatikolov, A S; Panova, I G; Ishchenko, A A; Kudinova, M A

    2010-01-01

    Noncovalent interactions of intraionic squarylium dyes, derivatives of 3H-indolium, as well as the structurally analogous ionic indodicarbocyanine dye with serum albumins (human, bovine, rat) and, for comparison, with ovalbumin has been studied by spectral and fluorescent methods. The hydrophilic squarylium dye with sulfonate groups was found to interact with albumins more efficiently, which is probably due to the double negative charge on the dye molecule at the expense of the sulfonate groups and the ability to form hydrogen bonds with albumin. The hydrophilic indodicarbocyanine dye without the squarylium group in its structure binds to albumins much more weaker than the structurally analogous squarylium dye. The dyes bind to ovalbumin less efficiently than to serum albumins. Along with the binding of monomeric dye molecules, the aggregation of the dyes on albumins is also observed. The hydrophobic squarylium dye without sulfonate groups tends to form aggregates in aqueous solutions, which partially decompose upon the introduction of albumin into the solution. The hydrophilic squarylium dye with sulfonate groups can be recommended for tests as a spectral-fluorescent probe for serum albumins in extracellular media of living organisms.

  12. Evaluation of the influence of albumin on the mineralization of a glass by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Paiva, A O; Costa, N; Cachinho, S C P; Fernandes, M H V

    2007-04-01

    Bioactive glasses have been used as a graft material that can stimulate the formation of a new bone. In vitro tests usually give sensible indications about the potential bioactivity of these glasses. In the present work the influence of egg albumin on the formation of a Ca-P precipitate on a glass of the system SiO(2)-CaO-MgO-P(2)O(5) was evaluated. The samples were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) that simulates the composition of human plasma, with and without albumin. After immersion in this solution for 7 and 14 days, the glass was characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). AFM results of the samples after immersion in SBF with albumin show the development of a precipiate formed from the solution/substrate reaction. Glasses immersed in albumin-free SBF exhibit the formation of a thin layer easily detached from the substrate. XRD results indicate that the precipitate is essentially amorphous, evolving to octacalcium phosphate. As the formation of an adherent precipitate on the glass samples only occurred when the substrate was immersed in SBF with albumin, it is suggested that albumin improves the mineralization on the glasses.

  13. Ultrasonic frequency analysis for estimating pH in albumin-rich biofluids.

    PubMed

    Rackov, Andrien A; Burns, David H

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is known as a non-invasive imaging modality capable of propagating through highly scattering media such as tissue, blood, and other biological fluids, yet currently provides little chemical information. We have developed a straightforward and rapid methodology for estimating pH in albumin-rich biofluids based on analysis of ultrasonic frequencies. Albumin is the most abundant protein in serum and undergoes conformational changes with pH. It was shown that when ultrasound propagated through albumin solutions, the attenuation of collected ultrasound signals increased with pH. By measuring the ultrasound frequency spectra at several albumin concentrations and pH values, the pH of the solutions could be determined by multilinear regression. Differences in absolute protein content contributed to signal differences in the frequency profiles and were minimized through normalization of each spectrum by the sum of all its frequency intensities. This strategy was applied to human serum samples from multiple donors, for which a multilinear regression model was developed with a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.93 and a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 0.08 pH units. The use of albumin as a pH indicator opens the doors for estimations in other albumin-rich media, such as amniotic fluid and cerebrospinal fluid.

  14. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, N G; Maksimov, E G; Arutyunyan, A M; Fadeev, V V; Shirshin, E A

    2017-03-05

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  15. Tyrosine fluorescence probing of conformational changes in tryptophan-lacking domain of albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanova, N. G.; Maksimov, E. G.; Arutyunyan, A. M.; Fadeev, V. V.; Shirshin, E. A.

    2017-03-01

    We addressed the possibility of using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence for monitoring conformational changes of proteins which are undetectable via tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence. The model objects, human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumins, contain one and two Trp residues, respectively, while Tyr is more uniformly distributed over their structure. The results of the investigation of albumins interaction with ethanol using intrinsic Trp and Tyr steady-state and time-resolved picosecond fluorescence indicated the presence of an intermediate at 10% (v/v) of ethanol in solution, that was supported by the results of extrinsic fluorescence measurements with the Nile Red dye. Based on the comparison of HSA and BSA Trp and Tyr fluorescence, it was suggested that conformational changes at low ethanol concentration are located in the domain III of albumins, which lacks tryptophan residues. The sensitivity of Tyr fluorescence to domain III alterations was further verified by studying albumins interaction with GdnHCl.

  16. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  17. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  18. Cubilin is an albumin binding protein important for renal tubular albumin reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Birn, H; Fyfe, J C; Jacobsen, C; Mounier, F; Verroust, P J; Orskov, H; Willnow, T E; Moestrup, S K; Christensen, E I

    2000-05-01

    Using affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analysis, we have identified cubilin, a 460-kDa receptor heavily expressed in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells, as an albumin binding protein. Dogs with a functional defect in cubilin excrete large amounts of albumin in combination with virtually abolished proximal tubule reabsorption, showing the critical role for cubilin in the uptake of albumin by the proximal tubule. Also, by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry we show that previously identified low-molecular-weight renal albumin binding proteins are fragments of cubilin. In addition, we find that mice lacking the endocytic receptor megalin show altered urinary excretion, and reduced tubular reabsorption, of albumin. Because cubilin has been shown to colocalize and interact with megalin, we propose a mechanism of albumin reabsorption mediated by both of these proteins. This process may prove important for understanding interstitial renal inflammation and fibrosis caused by proximal tubule uptake of an increased load of filtered albumin.

  19. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-ΔG) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -ΔG values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -ΔG>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of α-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -ΔG on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -ΔG values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  20. Investigation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) Attachment onto Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) Using Combinatorial Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE).

    PubMed

    Phan, Hanh T M; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Rodenhausen, Keith B; Schubert, Mathias; Bartz, Jason C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption kinetics to surfaces is of importance for various environmental and biomedical applications. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin to various self-assembled monolayer surfaces including neutral and charged hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was investigated using in-situ combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin varied as a function of surface properties, bovine serum albumin concentration and pH value. Charged surfaces exhibited a greater quantity of bovine serum albumin adsorption, a larger bovine serum albumin layer thickness, and increased density of bovine serum albumin protein compared to neutral surfaces at neutral pH value. The quantity of adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein increased with increasing bovine serum albumin concentration. After equilibrium sorption was reached at pH 7.0, desorption of bovine serum albumin occurred when pH was lowered to 2.0, which is below the isoelectric point of bovine serum albumin. Our data provide further evidence that combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry is a sensitive analytical tool to evaluate attachment and detachment of adsorbed proteins in systems with environmental implications.

  1. Investigation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) Attachment onto Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) Using Combinatorial Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE)

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Hanh T. M.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Rodenhausen, Keith B.; Schubert, Mathias; Bartz, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption kinetics to surfaces is of importance for various environmental and biomedical applications. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin to various self-assembled monolayer surfaces including neutral and charged hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was investigated using in-situ combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin varied as a function of surface properties, bovine serum albumin concentration and pH value. Charged surfaces exhibited a greater quantity of bovine serum albumin adsorption, a larger bovine serum albumin layer thickness, and increased density of bovine serum albumin protein compared to neutral surfaces at neutral pH value. The quantity of adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein increased with increasing bovine serum albumin concentration. After equilibrium sorption was reached at pH 7.0, desorption of bovine serum albumin occurred when pH was lowered to 2.0, which is below the isoelectric point of bovine serum albumin. Our data provide further evidence that combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry is a sensitive analytical tool to evaluate attachment and detachment of adsorbed proteins in systems with environmental implications. PMID:26505481

  2. Protease Inhibition by Oleic Acid Transfer From Chronic Wound Dressings to Albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel M.; Mashchak, Andrew D.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds. These levels can inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid (18:1) is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor with some potential for redressing the imbalance of elastase activity found in chronic wounds. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of 18:1 by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. 18:1-treated cotton was examined for its ability to bind and release the fatty acid in the presence of albumin. The mechanism of 18:1 uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-18:1 complexes under liquid-liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-18:1 complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:18:1. Cotton chromatography under liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of 18:1 per mole albumin. Cotton was contrasted with hydrogel, and hydrocolloid wound dressing for its comparative ability to lower elastase activity. Each dressing material evaluated was found to release 18:1 in the presence of albumin with significant inhibition of elastase activity. The 18:1-formulated wound dressings lowered elastase activity in a dose dependent manner in the order cotton gauze > hydrogel > hydrocolloid. In contrast the cationic serine protease Cathepsin G was inihibited by 18:1 within a narrow range of 18:1-cotton formulations. Four per cent Albumin solutions were most effective in binding cotton bound-18:1. However, 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of 18:1 necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Formulations with 128 mg 18:1/g cotton gauze had equivalent elastase lowering with 1 - 4% albumin. 18:1 bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the

  3. Human serum albumin crystals and method of preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) crystals are provided in the form of tetragonal plates having the space groups P42(sub 1)2, the crystals being grown to sizes in excess of 0.5 mm in two dimensions and a thickness of 0.1 mm. Growth of the crystals is carried out by a hanging drop method wherein a precipitant solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a phosphate buffer is mixed with an HSA solution, and a droplet of mixed solution is suspended over a well of precipitant solution. Crystals grow to the desired size in 3 to 7 days. Concentration of reagents, pH and other parameters are controlled within prescribed limits. The resulting crystals exhibit a size and quality such as to allow performance of x ray diffraction studies and enable the conduct of drug binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies.

  4. Review: Glycation of human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Matsuda, Ryan; Barnaby, Omar S.; Joseph, K.S.; Wa, Chunling; DeBolt, Erin; Koke, Michelle; Hage, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Glycation involves the non-enzymatic addition of reducing sugars and/or their reactive degradation products to amine groups on proteins. This process is promoted by the presence of elevated blood glucose concentrations in diabetes and occurs with various proteins that include human serum albumin (HSA). This review examines work that has been conducted in the study and analysis of glycated HSA. The general structure and properties of HSA are discussed, along with the reactions that can lead to modification of this protein during glycation. The use of glycated HSA as a short-to-intermediate term marker for glycemic control in diabetes is examined, and approaches that have been utilized for measuring glycated HSA are summarized. Structural studies of glycated HSA are reviewed, as acquired for both in vivo and in vitro glycated HSA, along with data that have been obtained on the rate and thermodynamics of HSA glycation. In addition, this review considers various studies that have investigated the effects of glycation on the binding of HSA with drugs, fatty acids and other solutes and the potential clinical significance of these effects. PMID:23891854

  5. Resveratrol binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    N' soukpoe-Kossi, C N; St-Louis, C; Beauregard, M; Subirade, M; Carpentier, R; Hotchandani, S; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2006-12-01

    Resveratrol (Res), a polyphenolic compound found largely in the skin of red grape and wine, exhibits a wide range of pharmaceutical properties and plays a role in prevention of human cardiovascular diseases [Pendurthi et al., Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 19, 419-426 (1999)]. It shows a strong affinity towards protein binding and used as inhibitor for cyclooxygenase and ribonuclease reductase. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of resveratrol with human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using a constant protein concentration (0.3 mM) and various pigment contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-Visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine the resveratrol binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of pigment complexation on protein secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that resveratrol bind non-specifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with overall binding constant of K(Res) = 2.56 x 10(5) M(-1). The protein secondary structure, analysed by CD spectroscopy, showed no major alterations at low resveratrol concentrations (0.125 mM), whereas at high pigment content (1 mM), major increase of alpha-helix from 57% (free HSA) to 62% and a decrease of beta-sheet from 10% (free HSA) to 7% occurred in the resveratrol-HSA complexes. The results indicate a partial stabilization of protein secondary structure at high resveratrol content.

  6. Albumin for end-stage liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, June Sung

    2012-03-01

    Albumin has been widely used in patients with cirrhosis in an attempt to improve circulatory and renal functions. The benefits of albumin infusions in preventing the deterioration in renal function associated with large-volume paracentesis, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and established hepatorenal syndrome in conjunction with a vasoconstrictor are well established. While some of these indications are supported by the results of randomized studies, others are based only on clinical experience and have not been proved in prospective studies. The paucity of well-designed trials, the high cost of albumin, the lack of a clear-cut survival benefit, and fear of transmitting unknown infections make the use of albumin controversial. The recent development of the molecular adsorbent recirculating system, an albumin dialysis, is an example of the capacity of albumin to act by mechanisms other than its oncotic effect. Efforts should be made to define the indications for albumin use, the dose required, and predictors of response, so that patients gain the maximum benefit from its administration.

  7. In vitro inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by oleic acid albumin formulations from derivatized cotton wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Vincent; Howley, Phyllis; Cohen, I Kelman

    2004-10-13

    Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) is elevated in chronic wounds. Oleic acid albumin formulations that inhibit HNE may be applicable to treatment modalities for chronic wounds. Oleic acid/albumin formulations with mole ratios of 100:1, 50:1, and 25:1 (oleic acid to albumin) were prepared and found to have dose response inhibition properties against HNE. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations were 0.029-0.049 microM. Oleic acid/albumin (BSA) formulations were bound to positively and negatively charged cotton wound dressings and assessed for elastase inhibition using a fiber bound formulation in an assay designed to mimic HNE inhibition in the wound. Cotton derivatized with both carboxylate and amine functional groups were combined with oleic acid/albumin formulations at a maximum loading of 0.030 mg oleic acid + 0.14 mg BSA/mg fiber. The IC50 values for inhibition of HNE with oleic acid/albumin formulations bound to derivatized cotton were 0.26-0.42 microM. Release of the oleic acid/albumin formulation from the fiber was measured by measuring oleic acid levels with quantitative GC analysis. Approximately, 35-50% of the fiber bound formulation was released into solution within the first 15 min of incubation. Albumin was found to enhance the rate of elastase hydrolysis of the substrate within a concentration range of 0.3-50 g/L. The acceleration of HNE substrate hydrolysis by albumin required increased concentration of inhibitor in the formulation to obtain complete inhibition of HNE. Oleic acid formulations prepared with albumin enable transport, solubility and promote dose response inhibition of HNE from derivatized cotton fibers under aqueous conditions mimicking the chronic wound.

  8. Fusion to a highly stable consensus albumin binding domain allows for tunable pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Steven A; Gibbs, Alan C; Conk, Michelle; Yi, Fang; Maguire, Diane; Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn T

    2015-10-01

    A number of classes of proteins have been engineered for high stability using consensus sequence design methods. Here we describe the engineering of a novel albumin binding domain (ABD) three-helix bundle protein. The resulting engineered ABD molecule, called ABDCon, is expressed at high levels in the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli and is highly stable, with a melting temperature of 81.5°C. ABDCon binds human, monkey and mouse serum albumins with affinity as high as 61 pM. The solution structure of ABDCon is consistent with the three-helix bundle design and epitope mapping studies enabled a precise definition of the albumin binding interface. Fusion of a 10 kDa scaffold protein to ABDCon results in a long terminal half-life of 60 h in mice and 182 h in cynomolgus monkeys. To explore the link between albumin affinity and in vivo exposure, mutations were designed at the albumin binding interface of ABDCon yielding variants that span an 11 000-fold range in affinity. The PK properties of five such variants were determined in mice in order to demonstrate the tunable nature of serum half-life, exposure and clearance with variations in albumin binding affinity.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Munson, Sibyl H.; Twigg, Pamela D.; Gernert, Kim M.; Broom, M. Beth; Miller, Teresa Y.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been solved at 6.0 A resolution by the method of multiple isomorphous replacement. Crystals were grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol in the infrequently observed space group P42(1)2 and diffracted X-rays to lattice d-spacings of less than 2.9 A. The electron density maps are of high quality and revealed the structure as a predominantly alpha-helical globin protein in which the course of the polypeptide can be traced. The binding loci of several organic compounds have been determined.

  10. Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  11. [Modified albumin in harp seal blood serum].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, I A

    1999-01-01

    The content of modified albumin (Am) in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandica Erxleben, 1777) blood serum was studied. Am was determined by paper electrophoresis by means of re-precipitation in the trichloroacetic acid-ethanol system. Modified albumin content in normal seal pups' blood serum increased from 1990 to 1994. The Am level in undernourished pups was stable from year to year and higher than in normal pups. In oceanarium investigations it was revealed a low albumin resistance to denaturation and the dependence of Am content on the animals' physiological state. Thus there is a possibility to regard modified albumin content as one of the significant parameters in biomonitoring of harp seal population and, moreover, as a supplementary criterion for estimation of seals' health state in captivity.

  12. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  13. Portal copper transport in rats by albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.T.; Leinart, A.S.; Cousins, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    The distribution of newly absorbed copper among serum proteins obtained from the portal circulation of rats was examined by conventional and high-performance gel filtration chromatography, affinity chromatography, and Western blotting. Within 10-30 min after being administered by gavage or directly into the intestine, /sup 67/Cu and /sup 64/Cu, respectively, were recovered in the albumin fraction. By 8 h after administration of the radionuclides, virtually all of the radioactivity was found with ceruloplasmin. Affigel blue fractionation and subsequent Superose-6 chromatography further demonstrated that all of the copper in the albumin-containing fractions was in fact bound to this protein rather than high molecular weight moieties. Vascular perfusion of the isolated rat intestine, where /sup 64/Cu was infused into the lumen, showed that newly absorbed /sup 64/Cu in the vascular perfusate collected from the cannulated portal vein was associated with albumin. Uptake of radioactivity by isolated rat liver parenchymal cells from medium containing rat serum with /sup 67/Cu bound to albumin was demonstrated. In vitro binding of /sup 64/Cu to serum proteins that were transferred to nitrocellulose by Western blotting techniques showed that albumin is essentially the only protein that binds appreciable amounts of copper. The data suggest that albumin is the plasma protein that is responsible for the initial transport of copper after absorption.

  14. Expulsion of bovine serum albumin from the air/water interface by a sparingly soluble lecithin lipid.

    PubMed

    Phang, Tze-Lee; Franses, Elias I

    2004-07-15

    Dynamic surface tensiometry, ellipsometry, and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) were used to study the dynamic adsorption and surface tensions of dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Results show that the equilibrium adsorbed layers consist mostly of DLPC, which can produce dynamic surface tensions (1 mN/m) as low as the more successful lung surfactant replacement formulations. When the aqueous surface expands and contracts sinusoidally, BSA can coadsorb and lead to slightly higher dynamic surface tensions than when DLPC is alone. Similar results were obtained with BSA and sodium myristate [McClellan and Franses, Colloids Surf. B 30 (2003) 1]. Expulsion of the BSA in the layer by DLPC can take from 5 to 15 min, depending on relative concentrations and history of solute addition. This is shown by tensiometry measurements on mixtures, and also by injecting aqueous DLPC underneath adsorbed BSA layers and probing the surface layer with ellipsometry and IRRAS. Albumin layers from buffer solutions aged up to 30 h can be expelled by DLPC. In pure water, there is an initial enhancement in protein adsorption after the DLPC is injected. This can be explained by the hypothesis that DLPC molecules bind with BSA molecules to form a hydrophobic lipoprotein complex, which is more hydrophobic than the protein itself. Since DLPC produces lower surface energy than BSA and--being slightly soluble--adsorbs to the surface by a molecular mechanism, it fulfills the thermodynamic and dynamic requirements for expelling the BSA from the surface. The results have implications for minimizing lung surfactant inhibition by serum proteins, as it occurs in the cases of adult or acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Lungfish albumin is more similar to tetrapod than to teleost albumins: purification and characterisation of albumin from the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Victoria J; George, Peter M; Brennan, Stephen O

    2007-07-01

    Lobe-finned fish, particularly lungfish, are thought of as the closest extant relatives to tetrapods. Albumin, the major vertebrate plasma protein, has been well studied in tetrapods, but there exists no comparative study of the presence and characteristics of albumin in lobe-finned fish versus other vertebrates. There is a controversy over the presence of albumin in fish, although it is present in salmonids and lamprey. The presence of albumin in lungfish has also recently been documented. We identified albumin in plasma of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, using a combination of agarose gel electrophoresis, [(14)C]palmitic acid binding and SDS-PAGE. Lungfish albumin was purified using DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, and has a mass of 67 kDa, is present at approximately 8 g/L in plasma and like other fish albumins, does not bind nickel. However, like tetrapod albumins, it is not glycosylated. N-terminal and internal peptide sequencing generated 101 amino acids of sequence, which showed a high degree of identity with tetrapod albumins. Despite the similarity in sequence but congruent with the evolutionary distances separating them, lungfish albumin did not cross-react with anti-chicken or anti-tuatara A albumin antisera. Lungfish albumin has characteristics more akin with tetrapod albumin and less like those of other fish.

  16. A step toward simplified detection of serum albumin on SDS-PAGE using an environment-sensitive flavone sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Pang, Yi; Bouhenni, Rachida; Duah, Ernest; Paruchuri, Sailaja; McDonald, Lucas

    2015-07-14

    In this study, we report a series of novel flavone-based sensors that exhibit a superior fluorescence response when interacting with serum albumin in real serum samples and in acrylamide gels. The detection limit of probe 4 for serum albumin solution is 0.09 μg mL(-1), and the detectable volume for monkey serum reaches as low as 0.03 μL.

  17. A step toward simplified detection of serum albumin on SDS-PAGE using an environment-sensitive flavone sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Bouhenni, Rachida; Duah, Ernest; Paruchuri, Sailaja; McDonald, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report a series of novel flavone-based sensors that exhibit superior fluorescence response when interacting with serum albumin in real serum samples and in acrylamide gel. The detection limit of probe 4 for serum albumin solution is 0.09 μg/mL, and the detectable volume for monkey serum reaches as low as 0.03 μL. PMID:26068596

  18. Modification of continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration with single-pass albumin dialysate allows for removal of serum bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Georgescu, Florin; Abell, Bruce; Seneff, Michael G; Kimmel, Paul L

    2005-03-01

    A 53-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with ischemic colitis and underwent a subtotal colectomy. She developed acute renal failure, severe hyperbilirubinemia, and intense pruritus resistant to medical treatment. Extracorporeal albumin dialysis using a Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS; Gambro Co, Lund, Sweden) has been used to treat liver failure and reduce total serum bilirubin (SB) levels. A trial of extracorporeal albumin dialysis with continuous renal replacement therapy (RRT) was instituted to achieve net removal of SB. A 25% albumin solution was mixed with conventional dialysate to yield a dialysate concentration of 1.85% or 5.0% albumin. The patient underwent 2 continuous RRT sessions using extracorporeal albumin dialysis (1.85% and 5.0% albumin dialysate). Pretreatment and posttreatment SB levels were determined, and total bilirubin concentration (TB) also was measured in each of the collection bags during conventional and albumin dialysis. Pretreatment and posttreatment SB levels were 50.4 mg/dL (862 micromol/L) and 39.0 mg/dL (667 micromol/L) with 1.85% albumin dialysate and 47.1 mg/dL (805 micromol/L) and 39.7 mg/dL (679 micromol/L) with 5.0% albumin dialysate, respectively. The collected dialysate TB level was 0.3 mg/dL (5 micromol/L) during nonalbumin RRT and increased to 1.37 +/- 0.06 mg/dL (23 +/- 1 micromol/L) with 1.85% albumin dialysis. The collected dialysate fluid TB level was 0.3 mg/dL (5 micromol/L) during the nonalbumin RRT and increased to 1.38 +/- 0.15 mg/dL (24 +/- 3 micromol/L) during 5.0% albumin RRT. Single-pass albumin dialysis with continuous RRT cleared SB better than standard continuous RRT. Single-pass albumin dialysis with continuous RRT is feasible and may be a viable alternative in centers that do not have access to MARS therapy. This modality merits additional evaluation for its efficacy in clearing albumin-bound serum toxins.

  19. Polyamine analogues bind human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, R; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Thomas, T J; Thomas, T; Carpentier, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2007-10-01

    Polyamine analogues show antitumor activity in experimental models, and their ability to alter activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer is well documented. Association of polyamines with nucleic acids and protein is included in their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with several polyamine analogues, such as 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333), in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant protein concentration and various polyamine contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind nonspecifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with binding constants of K333 = 9.30 x 10(3) M(-1), KBE-333 = 5.63 x 10(2) M(-1), and KBE-3333 = 3.66 x 10(2) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed major alterations with a reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free protein) to 43-50% and an increase of beta-sheet from 17% (free protein) to 29-36% in the 333, BE-333, and BE-3333 complexes, indicating partial protein unfolding upon polyamine interaction. HSA structure was less perturbed by polyamine analogues compared to those of the biogenic polyamines.

  20. Bromophenol blue binding to mammalian albumins and displacement of albumin-bound bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Kim, B Boon; Abdul Kadir, H; Tayyab, S

    2008-10-15

    Interaction of bromophenol blue (BPB) with serum albumins from different mammalian species, namely, human (HSA), bovine (BSA), goat (GSA), sheep (SSA), rabbit (RbSA), porcine (PSA) and dog (DSA) was studied using absorption and absorption difference spectroscopy. BPB-albumin complexes showed significant differences in the spectral characteristics, i.e., extent of bathochromic shift and hypochromism relative to the spectral features of free BPB. Absorption difference spectra of these complexes also showed variations in the position of maxima and absorption difference (deltaAbs.) values. Absorption difference spectra of different bilirubin (BR)-albumin complexes showed a significant blue shift accompanied by decrease in deltaAbs. values in presence of BPB which were indicative of the displacement of bound BR from its binding site in BR-albumin complexes. These changes in the difference spectral characteristics of BR-albumin complexes were more marked at higher BPB concentration. However, the extent of these changes was different for different BR-albumin complexes. Taken together, all these results suggest that BPB partially shares BR binding site on albumin and different mammalian albumins show differences in the microenvironment of the BR/BPB binding site.

  1. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  2. Proximal Tubules Have the Capacity to Regulate Uptake of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark C; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Flores, Brittany; Lai, Xianyin; Myslinski, Jered; Pandit, Sweekar; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Wei, Yuan; Satlin, Lisa M; Wiggins, Roger C; Witzmann, Frank A; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from multiple studies supports the concept that both glomerular filtration and proximal tubule (PT) reclamation affect urinary albumin excretion rate. To better understand these roles of glomerular filtration and PT uptake, we investigated these processes in two distinct animal models. In a rat model of acute exogenous albumin overload, we quantified glomerular sieving coefficients (GSC) and PT uptake of Texas Red-labeled rat serum albumin using two-photon intravital microscopy. No change in GSC was observed, but a significant decrease in PT albumin uptake was quantified. In a second model, loss of endogenous albumin was induced in rats by podocyte-specific transgenic expression of diphtheria toxin receptor. In these albumin-deficient rats, exposure to diphtheria toxin induced an increase in albumin GSC and albumin filtration, resulting in increased exposure of the PTs to endogenous albumin. In this case, PT albumin reabsorption was markedly increased. Analysis of known albumin receptors and assessment of cortical protein expression in the albumin overload model, conducted to identify potential proteins and pathways affected by acute protein overload, revealed changes in the expression levels of calreticulin, disabled homolog 2, NRF2, angiopoietin-2, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that a regulated PT cell albumin uptake system can respond rapidly to different physiologic conditions to minimize alterations in serum albumin level.

  3. Bioactivity of albumins bound to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mariam, Jessy; Sivakami, S; Kothari, D C; Dongre, P M

    2014-06-01

    The last decade has witnessed a tremendous rise in the proposed applications of nanomaterials in the field of medicine due to their very attractive physiochemical properties and novel actions such as the ability to reach previously inaccessible targets such as brain. However biological activity of functional molecules bound to nanoparticles and its physiological consequences is still unclear and hence this area requires immediate attention. The functional properties of Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) bound to silver nanoparticles (~60 nm) have been studied under physiological environment. Esterase activity, binding of drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen), antioxidant activity and copper binding by albumins was evaluated. The catalytic efficiencies of HSA and BSA diminished upon binding to silver nanoparticles. Perturbation in binding of warfarin and ibuprofen, loss of free sulphydryls, antioxidant activity and enhancement of copper binding were observed in albumins bound to nanoparticles. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound albumins which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  4. Thermal effects of carbonated hydroxyapatite modified by glycine and albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerk, S. A.; Golovanova, O. A.; Kuimova, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this work calcium phosphate powders were obtained by precipitation method from simulated solutions of synovial fluid containing glycine and albumin. X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy determined that all samples are single-phase and are presented by carbonate containing hydroxyapatite (CHA). The thermograms of solid phases of CHA were obtained and analyzed; five stages of transformation in the temperature range of 25-1000°C were marked. It is shown that in this temperature range dehydration, decarboxylation and thermal degradation of amino acid and protein connected to the surface of solid phase occur. The tendency of temperature lowering of the decomposition of powders synthesized from a medium containing organic substances was determined. Results demonstrate a direct dependence between the concentration of the amino acid in a model solution and its content in the solid phase.

  5. Preliminary crystallographic studies of four crystal forms of serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. C.; Chang, B.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Krishnasami, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Several crystal forms of serum albumin suitable for three-dimensional structure determination have been grown. These forms include crystals of recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, baboon serum albumin, and canine serum albumin. The intrinsic limits of X-ray diffraction for these crystals are in the range 0.28-0.22 nm. Two of the crystal forms produced from human and canine albumin include incorporated long-chain fatty acids. Molecular replacement experiments have been successfully conducted on each crystal form using the previously determined atomic coordinates of human serum albumin illustrating the conserved tertiary structure.

  6. Bovine Serum Albumin binding to CoCrMo nanoparticles and the influence on dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, T. A.; Brown, A. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    CoCrMo alloys exhibit good mechanical properties, excellent biocompatibility and are widely utilised in orthopaedic joint replacements. Metal-on-metal hip implant degradation leads to the release of metal ions and nanoparticles, which persist through the implant's life and could be a possible cause of health complications. This study correlates preferential binding between proteins and metal alloy nanoparticles to the alloy's corrosion behaviour and the release of metal ions. TEM images show the formation of a protein corona in all particles immersed in albumin containing solutions. Only molybdenum release was significant in these tests, suggesting high dissolution of this element when CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles are produced as wear debris in the presence of serum albumin. The same trend was observed during extended exposure of molybdenum reference nanoparticles to albumin.

  7. Polymerized soluble venom--human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.; Suszko, I.M.; Grammer, L.C.

    1985-03-01

    Extensive previous studies have demonstrated that attempts to produce polymers of Hymenoptera venoms for human immunotherapy resulted in insoluble precipitates that could be injected with safety but with very limited immunogenicity in allergic patients. We now report soluble polymers prepared by conjugating bee venom with human serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The bee venom-albumin polymer (BVAP) preparation was fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 to have a molecular weight range higher than catalase. /sup 125/I-labeled bee venom phospholipase A was almost completely incorporated into BVAP. Rabbit antibody responses to bee venom and bee venom phospholipase A were induced by BVAP. Human antisera against bee venom were absorbed by BVAP. No new antigenic determinants on BVAP were present as evidenced by absorption of antisera against BVAP by bee venom and albumin. BVAP has potential immunotherapeutic value in patients with anaphylactic sensitivity to bee venom.

  8. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation.

  9. Synthetic nanoparticles of bovine serum albumin with entrapped salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Bronze-Uhle, ES; Costa, BC; Ximenes, VF; Lisboa-Filho, PN

    2017-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is highly water soluble and binds drugs or inorganic substances noncovalently for their effective delivery to various affected areas of the body. Due to the well-defined structure of the protein, containing charged amino acids, albumin nanoparticles (NPs) may allow electrostatic adsorption of negatively or positively charged molecules, such that substantial amounts of drug can be incorporated within the particle, due to different albumin-binding sites. During the synthesis procedure, pH changes significantly. This variation modifies the net charge on the surface of the protein, varying the size and behavior of NPs as the drug delivery system. In this study, the synthesis of BSA NPs, by a desolvation process, was studied with salicylic acid (SA) as the active agent. SA and salicylates are components of various plants and have been used for medication with anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. However, when administered orally to adults (usual dose provided by the manufacturer), there is 50% decomposition of salicylates. Thus, there has been a search for some time to develop new systems to improve the bioavailability of SA and salicylates in the human body. Taking this into account, during synthesis, the pH was varied (5.4, 7.4, and 9) to evaluate its influence on the size and release of SA of the formed NPs. The samples were analyzed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, zeta potential, and dynamic light scattering. Through fluorescence, it was possible to analyze the release of SA in vitro in phosphate-buffered saline solution. The results of chemical morphology characterization and in vitro release studies indicated the potential use of these NPs as drug carriers in biological systems requiring a fast release of SA. PMID:28096662

  10. Characterization of isomeric VX nerve agent adducts on albumin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saeidian, Hamid; Mirkhani, Valioallah; Mousavi Faraz, Sajjad; Taghi Naseri, Mohammad; Babri, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    This study includes the characterization of isomeric VX organophosphorus adducts on albumin in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). VX or its structural isomers were spiked into a vial containing plasma in order to obtain phosphorylated albumin. After pronase and trypsin digestion, the resulting solutions were analyzed to confirm adduct formation with the amino acid tyrosine on the albumin in human plasma. The LC-MS/MS experiments show that VX and its isomers can be attached to tyrosine on the albumin in human blood. Mass spectrometric studies revealed some interesting fragmentation pathways during the ionization process, such as ethylene, formic acid and ammonia elimination and an intermolecular electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction. The proposed mechanisms for the formation of the fragments were confirmed through the analysis of fragments of deuterated adducts.

  11. Albumin modulates lateral assembly of fibrin polymers: evidence of enhanced fine fibril formation and of unique synergism with fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Galanakis, D.K.; Lane, B.P.; Simon, S.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors identified a new property of human albumin. It enhances formation of fine fibril (or leptofibril) structure during fibrin gelation, and by nephelometric and electron microscopic measurements, this property is independent of and synergistic with that of fibrinogen. They examined fibrin aggregation using physiologic temperatures and pH and albumin:fibrin concentration ratios below those at which the known accelerating effect on fibrin aggregation occurs. An albumin concentration dependent decrease in gel turbidity maxima was consistently demonstrable in buffers containing or lacking (2-5 mM) CaCl/sub 2/. Electron microscopic measurements of cross-sectional fibril widths, performed on sections of glutaraldehyde-fixed gels, disclosed differences between albumin-containing and control gels which were significant. Spin-labeled albumin displayed no change in electron (para) magnetic spin resonance spectral measurements during its inhibition of fibrin, indicating no perturbation on albumin conformation in the vicinities of Cys-34 and of fatty acid binding sites. Certain fibrinogen:albumin ratios designed to induce maximal inhibition yet permit gelation in the presence of either alone prevented gelation of buffer-diluted fibrin monomers. Aliquots from these which were dried and negatively stained on formvar-coated grids disclosed strands of 5-17 nm width, most displaying a 60-250-nm approximate length. The amounts of /sup 131/I-labeled coagulable fibrin which remained soluble in fibrinogen solutions were increased by albumin. They conclude that albumin enhances formation of leptofibril-rich gel domains when other plasma factors favor formation of such structures. Available evidence indicating decreased permeability implies that such gel domains limit efflux rates from the intrathrombus environment and from intra- to extravascular space.

  12. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (kq) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  13. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-Ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (k(q)) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  14. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the reagents used to measure by immunochemical techniques the albumin (a plasma protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases....

  15. Capillary-based instrument for the simultaneous measurement of solution viscosity and solute diffusion coefficient at pressures up to 2000 bar and implications for ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Theodore J; Thompson, J Will; Mellors, J Scott; Jorgenson, James W

    2009-04-15

    An instrument based on the Poiseuille flow principle capable of measuring solution viscosities at high pressures has been modified to observe UV-absorbent analytes in order to allow for the simultaneous measurement of analyte diffusivity. A capillary time-of-flight (CTOF) instrument was used to measure the viscosity of acetonitrile-water mixtures in all decade volume percent increments and the corresponding diffusion coefficients of small aromatic molecules in these solvent mixtures from atmospheric pressure to 2000 bar (approximately 30,000 psi) at 25 degrees C. The instrument works by utilizing a relatively small pressure drop (<100 bar) across a fused-silica capillary which has both the inlet and outlet pressurized so that the average column pressure can be significantly elevated (up to 2000 bar). Measurements with this instrument agree with high-pressure viscosity data collected previously using a CTOF viscometer, as well as with literature values obtained with falling-body viscometers of the Bridgman design. It has been further determined that, for the small molecules included in this study, trends in solute diffusivity with respect to pressure follow the predictions of the Stokes-Einstein equation when the solvent viscosity is corrected as a function of pressure. Because the instrument described herein determines viscosity and diffusivity independently, the effect of pressure on analyte hydrodynamic radius can also be monitored. An analysis of ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) data was performed using the pressure-corrected diffusion coefficient of hydroquinone to demonstrate the effect of this phenomenon on the analysis of chromatographic performance.

  16. Albumin-Based Nanodevices as Drug Carriers.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology to medicine, is being increasingly used to improve and exploit the advantages of efficient drug delivery. Different nanodevices have been developed in recent years, among them protein-based nanoparticles which have gained considerable interest. Albumin is a versatile protein carrier with several characteristics that make it an ideal candidate for drug delivery, such as its availability, its biocompatibility, its biodegradability, and its lack of toxicity and immunogenicity. This review embodies an overview of different methods available for production of albumin-based nanoparticles, with focus on high-energy emulsification methods. A comparison between production by using sonication, which involves acoustic cavitation, and the high pressure homogenization method, where occurs hydrodynamic cavitation, is presented. Taking into account important properties of nanoparticles required for intravenous administration, the use of poloxamers, tri-block copolymer surfactants is discussed as it improves blood circulation time and bioavailability of nanoparticles. Thus, nanoparticles can be engineered to provide adequate features to therapeutic applications, in which can be included surface functionalization with targeting agents. Different albumin-based formulations and their therapeutic applications are presented in this review, with emphasis on applications in cancer therapy, where albumin-based strategies are promising for targeted drug delivery in innovative clinical strategies.

  17. [Current role of albumin in critical care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Puig, P; Orallo Morán, M A; Pereira Matalobos, D; Prieto Requeijo, P

    2014-11-01

    The use of colloids in fluid therapy has been, and still continues to be a controversial topic, particularly when referring to the critical patient. The choice of the fluid that needs to be administered depends on several factors, many of which are theoretical, and continue being an object of debate. The interest in the clinical use of the albumin has emerged again, immediately after recent publications in the search of the most suitable colloid. It is the most abundant protein in the plasma, being responsible for 80% of the oncotic pressure. It regulates the balance between the intra- and extra-vascular volumes. Recent multicenter studies question the supposed lack of safety that was previously assigned to it. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrate other important actions besides oncotic, for example neutralization of free radicals, and exogenous (drugs) and endogenous substances (bile pigments, cholesterol). Being aware of these secondary properties of albumin, and evaluating the pathophysiology of the critical patient (in particular, sepsis), to maintain plasma albumin levels within the normal range, could be of great importance. Based on the most recent publications, the aim of this review is to briefly analyze the pathophysiology of albumin, as well as to discuss its possible indications in the critical patient.

  18. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-12-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with /sup 125/I or /sup 131/I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return.

  19. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Poór, Miklós; Lemli, Beáta; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3) and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I). In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions. PMID:26633504

  20. Albumin and Ricinus communis agglutinin decrease endothelial permeability via interactions with matrix.

    PubMed

    Qiao, R; Siflinger-Birnboim, A; Lum, H; Tiruppathi, C; Malik, A B

    1993-08-01

    We studied the effects of albumin and the lectin Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) on hydraulic conductivity (Lp) of bovine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell monolayers (BPMVEC) because of the evidence that albumin and RCA can interfere with transendothelial albumin permeability (Siflinger-Birnboim, A., J. Schnitzer, H. Lum, F. Blumenstock, C. Shen, P. Del Vecchio, and A. Malik. J. Cell. Physiol. 149: 575-584, 1991). BPMVEC were seeded on microporous polycarbonate filters, and the liquid flux was measured by collecting effluent into a tubing of known inner diameter at transendothelial hydrostatic pressures (P) ranging from 5 to 20 cmH2O. Lp was calculated as the slope of the relationship of liquid flux per unit surface area (Jv) vs. P. Addition of RCA (50 micrograms/ml) or albumin (5 mg/ml) to the endothelial cell medium containing albumin-free Hanks' balanced saline solution (HBSS) decreased total Lp (expressed x 10(-6) cm.s-1 x cmH2O-1) from 17.2 +/- 3.6 during HBSS to 4.7 +/- 0.9 during albumin and 5.7 +/- 1.6 during RCA (P < 0.01 for both). The RCA effect, but not that of albumin, was prevented by the addition of D-galactose (0.1 M) (the cognate hapten monosaccharide of RCA). We determined the contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in decreasing the Lp by obtaining ECM after treatment of the monolayers with 0.025 M NH4OH to detach endothelial cells from the ECM. Basal ECM Lp (expressed x 10(-6) cm.s-1 x cmH2O-1) was 57.0 +/- 15.3, and it decreased to 19.7 +/- 4.3 and 17.5 +/- 2.9 during RCA and albumin, respectively (P < 0.01 for both). In contrast, RCA and albumin did not alter the filter Lp values. Another lectin, Ulex europaeus agglutinin, and the protein immunoglobulin G had no effect on Lp values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Glycine exists mainly as monomers, not dimers, in supersaturated aqueous solutions: implications for understanding its crystallization and polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Stringfellow, Thomas C; Yu, Lian

    2008-10-22

    Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is described as existing as hydrogen-bonded cyclic dimers in supersaturated aqueous solutions and, as a result, crystallizing in a centrosymmetric polymorph (polymorph alpha) for which the dimer can be viewed as the building unit, in favor of other polymorphs of polar structures. In exhibiting this relation between polymorphic selectivity and self-association in solution, glycine is thought to illustrate a general principle. We measured the freezing-point depression of glycine-water up to 30% supersaturation and found that glycine exists mainly as monomers, not dimers, and that the dimer stability constant K D is smaller than 0.1 kg of H 2O/mol if the observed osmotic abnormality is attributed to dimerization. We also revisited a report cited as evidence for glycine dimerization: the slowdown of glycine diffusion with solution age. Pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy was used in place of the previous method of Gouy interferometry to avoid perturbations to sloution structure caused by the interdiffusion between two solutions of different concentrations. No aging effect was observed on glycine diffusion up to 24% supersaturation after five days. The solute size calculated from diffusivity, viscosity, and the Stokes-Einstein relation showed no increase with concentration or solution age. We conclude that glycine exists in supersaturated aqueous solutions mainly as monomers, not dimers, and remains so upon aging. This result does not invalidate the theories of how pH and additives affect glycine's polymorphic preference, because they begin with the assumption that alpha glycine is the preferred polymorph under normal conditions, but requires a new explanation for that assumption itself.

  2. Pseudo-esterase Activity of Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Oksana; Xue, Weihua; Gaydess, Andrea; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ding, Shi-Jian; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Masson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Human albumin is thought to hydrolyze esters because multiple equivalents of product are formed for each equivalent of albumin. Esterase activity with p-nitrophenyl acetate has been attributed to turnover at tyrosine 411. However, p-nitrophenyl acetate creates multiple, stable, acetylated adducts, a property contrary to turnover. Our goal was to identify residues that become acetylated by p-nitrophenyl acetate and determine the relationship between stable adduct formation and turnover. Fatty acid-free human albumin was treated with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 5 min to 2 weeks, or with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 48 h to 2 weeks. Aliquots were digested with pepsin, trypsin, or GluC and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify labeled residues. Only Tyr-411 was acetylated within the first 5 min of reaction with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate. After 0.5–6 h there was partial acetylation of 16–17 residues including Asp-1, Lys-4, Lys-12, Tyr-411, Lys-413, and Lys-414. Treatment with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate resulted in acetylation of 59 lysines, 10 serines, 8 threonines, 4 tyrosines, and Asp-1. When Tyr-411 was blocked with diisopropylfluorophosphate or chlorpyrifos oxon, albumin had normal esterase activity with β-naphthyl acetate as visualized on a nondenaturing gel. However, after 82 residues had been acetylated, esterase activity was almost completely inhibited. The half-life for deacetylation of Tyr-411 at pH 8.0, 22 °C was 61 ± 4 h. Acetylated lysines formed adducts that were even more stable. In conclusion, the pseudo-esterase activity of albumin is the result of irreversible acetylation of 82 residues and is not the result of turnover. PMID:18577514

  3. Relationship of two lacustrine ostracode species to solute composition and salinity: implications for paleohydrochemistry ( Limnocythere sappaensis/staplini).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Examination of the solute composition and salinities of the lakes where Limnocythere sappaensis and L. staplini live reveals that solute composition and not salinity is the most critical factor that controls their occurrence. L. sappaensis lives in water that is enriched in Na-HCO3-CO3 and depleted in Ca. L. staplini lives in water that is enriched in various combinations of Na-Mg-Ca-SO4-Cl and is depleted in HCO3. These taxa may be used as reliable paleohydrochemical indicators. -from Author

  4. Albumin oxidation leads to neutrophil activation in vitro and inaccurate measurement of serum albumin in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Regina; Kristal, Batya; Zeitun, Teuta; Shapiro, Galina; Fridman, Yoav; Geron, Ronit; Sela, Shifra

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies suggest that oxidative modifications of serum albumin lead to underestimation of albumin concentrations using conventional assays. In addition, oxidation of serum albumin may cause neutrophil activation and further oxidation of albumin, which may result in a series of reciprocal cyclical processes. Because hypoalbuminemia, systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress are common in diabetic nephropathy patients, the aim of this study was to show that albumin modifications and neutrophil activation underlie these reciprocal systemic processes. Blood samples from a cohort of 19 patients with diabetic nephropathy and 15 healthy controls were used for albumin separation. An oxidation-dependent "albumin detection index," representing the detection efficacy of the universal bromocresol green assay, was determined for each subject. This index was correlated with serum albumin levels, various markers of oxidative stress or inflammation, and kidney function. Activation of separated neutrophils by glycoxidized albumin was assessed by the release of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The albumin detection index of diabetic nephropathy patients was significantly lower compared to that of controls, correlating positively with serum levels of albumin and kidney function and negatively with albumin glycoxidation and inflammatory markers. Glycoxidized albumin had a direct role in neutrophil activation, resulting in NGAL and MPO release. The hypoalbuminemia observed in patients with diabetic nephropathy partially results from underestimation of modified/oxidized albumin using the bromocresol green assay. However, modified or oxidized albumin may lead to a cycle of accelerated oxidative stress and inflammation involving neutrophil activation. We suggest that the albumin detection index, a new marker of oxidative stress, may also serve as a biomarker of diabetic nephropathy severity and its progression.

  5. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  6. Exact Solution of a Faraday's Law Problem that Includes a Nonlinear Term and Its Implication for Perturbation Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Lewis P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an exact solution to the nonlinear Faraday's law problem of a rod sliding on frictionless rails with resistance. Compares the results with perturbation calculations based on the methods of Poisson and Pincare and of Kryloff and Bogoliuboff. (Author/GA)

  7. Implications of Stream Gains and Losses for Hydrologic Turnover and Solute Retention/Transport at the Stream Network Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; McGlynn, B. L.; Mallard, J.

    2010-12-01

    The exchange of water between streams and groundwater can influence streamwater quality, hydrologic mass balances, and attenuate solute export from watersheds. We used conservative tracer injections (chloride, Cl-) across 10 stream reaches to investigate streamwater gains and losses at larger spatial and temporal scales than typically associated with hyporheic exchanges. We found strong relationships between reach discharge, median tracer velocity, and gross hydrologic loss across a broad range of stream types and sizes in the 11.7 km2 Bull Trout Watershed of central ID. We used these empirical relationships to constrain a network model that simulates streamwater gains and losses and subsequent fractional hydrologic turnover across the stream network. We found that variable gains and losses can influence solute signatures across stream networks and lead to increasing dissolved solute concentration inertia moving downstream. These results also elucidate the proportional influence and distance support to stream discharge and solute signatures from runoff generation locations across the stream network and can provide insight into the internal mechanisms that partially control the hydrologic and biogeochemical signals observed at watershed outlets.

  8. Water activity and mobility in solutions of glycerol and small molecular weight sugars: Implication for cryo- and lyopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoming; Fowler, Alex; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-10-01

    In this study, the free volume models, originally developed for large molecular weight polymer-solvent systems, were used to study the water activity and mobility in solutions of four small molecular weight cryo-/lyoprotectants, viz., glycerol, a monosaccharide (fructose), and two disaccharides (sucrose and trehalose). The free volume model parameters were determined by fitting the models to available experimental data using a nonlinear optimization procedure. It was found that free volume models could accurately predict the available experimental data, which suggests that the free volume models might be generally applicable to aqueous solutions of small molecular weight cryo-/lyoprotectants. Furthermore, several models for estimating the mutual diffusion coefficient were tested using available experimental data for aqueous solutions of glycerol and a better method to estimate the mutual diffusion coefficient was proposed. Free volume models were used to predict and analyze the water activity and mobility in solutions of four cryo-/lyoprotectants under conditions frequently encountered in cryo-/lyopreservation applications. It was found that the water mobility in the glassy state of the above four solutions is essentially negligible in the case of cryopreservation with storage temperature lower than -110°C. However, the water mobility in a glass at higher temperature (>-80°C) may be significant. As a result, a subcooling of up to 50°C may be necessary for the long-term cryo-/lyopreservation of biomaterials depending on the water content and the type of cryo-/lyoprotectants. It was further shown that trehalose might be the best of the four protectants studied for lyopreservation (water mass fraction ⩽0.1) when the storage temperature is above the room temperature. The results from this study might be useful for the development of more effective protocols for both cryopreservation and lyopreservation of living cells and other biomaterials.

  9. Hydrophobic conjugated microporous polymers for sorption of human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunli; Du, Miaomiao; Feng, Shanshan; Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; He, Chi; Zhang, TianCheng; Wang, Qiaorui; Wei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigated the sorption of human serum albumin (HSA) from water by three kinds of conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) with surface hydrophobicity and intrinsic porosity. It was found that the three CMPs captured HSA with fast sorption kinetics and good working capacity. Equilibrium was obtained at 80 min for all the tests, and the maximum sorption quantity (qm) ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 mg/mg. With the increase in the particle external surface area of the CMPs, a greater extent of HSA sorption was achieved. Moreover, promoting the dispersion of CMPs in HSA aqueous solution was also beneficial to the extraction. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy verified the interactions between the CMPs and the Nsbnd H, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd N groups of HSA. This paper might provide fundamental guidance for the practical application of CMPs to proteins separation and recovery.

  10. Differential modulation in binding of ketoprofen to bovine serum albumin in the presence and absence of surfactants: spectroscopic and calorimetric insights.

    PubMed

    Misra, Pinaki P; Kishore, Nand

    2013-07-01

    Surfactants have long been implicated in the unique static and dynamic effect on the structure and function of serum albumins. However, there is very little information on the mode of interactions of drugs to serum albumins in presence of surfactants. The importance of such studies lay in the fact that apart from binding to serum albumins, surfactants are known to radically influence the solvents' micro environment and protein structure. Thus, we have studied the binding of the racemic form of ketoprofen with bovine serum albumin at pH 7.4 in the presence and absence of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, sodium dodecyl sulfate, Triton X-100, and NaCl. The structural studies of ketoprofen with bovine serum albumin as investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a significant stabilization of bovine serum albumin. However, the combined presence of the surfactants, NaCl and ketoprofen, demonstrated an extremely erratic behavior in terms of stabilization. Further the values of Stern-Volmer and dynamic quenching constant suggested the binding site of ketoprofen to be scattered in the region of domain I B and II A, close to Trp 134. The results of differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the binding of ketoprofen to bovine serum albumin leads to its temperature-dependent separation into two units. The binding parameters of bovine serum albumin obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry in the combined presence of ketoprofen and surfactants/NaCl correlate well with the differential scanning calorimetry studies further confirming the localization of ketoprofen in domain I B and II A. In the combined presence of surfactants, NaCl and ketoprofen, the binding of ketoprofen to bovine serum albumin exhibited altered binding parameters far different from the binding of ketoprofen alone. Overall, the experimental findings strongly indicated positive as well as negative modulation in the binding of ketoprofen to bovine serum albumin in the presence of

  11. A Dual Electrochemical Sensor Based on a Test-strip Assay for the Quantitative Determination of Albumin and Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kiba, Yuya; Mizutani, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A dual-electrochemical sensor based on a test-strip assay with immunochemistry and enzyme reactions has been developed for the determination of albumin and creatinine. Each nitrocellulose membrane with an immobilization area of an anti-albumin antibody or three enzymes was prepared in the device with three working electrodes for measuring albumin, creatinine, and ascorbic acid, as well as an Ag/AgCl electrode used as a counter/pseudo-reference electrode. The reactions of three enzymes were initiated by flowing a solution containing creatinine to detect an oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide. A sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed by albumin and antibody labeled with glucose oxidase (GOx). Captured GOx catalyzed the reduction of Fe(CN)6(3-) to Fe(CN)6(4-), which was oxidized electrochemically to determine the captured albumin. The responses for creatinine and albumin increased with the concentrations in millimolar order and over the range 18.75 - 150 μg mL(-1), respectively. The present sensor would be a distinct demonstration for producing quantitative dual-assays for various biomolecules used for clinical diagnoses.

  12. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-02

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere.

  13. Urinary clearance of albumin is critically determined by its tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Clavant, Steven P; Comper, Wayne D

    2003-12-01

    The excretion of serum albumin in the urine is considered the net result of renal glomerular filtration and tubular uptake. During routine experiments, we observed that a batch of tritium-labeled albumin yielded anomalous results, being excreted in the urine of isolated perfused kidneys at 10 times the rate of normal tritiated albumin. This anomalous albumin, when simultaneously studied with normal carbon 14-labeled albumin, exhibited 10 times greater excretion than normal [(14)C]albumin. Anomalous albumin could not be reversed to normal albumin by means of conditioning with blood. In vivo clearances of anomalous albumin could not be quantitated because anomalous albumin is degraded during circulation. Anomalous albumin appeared to have the same molecular size (as determined with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and gel chromatography) and isoelectric-point profile (2-dimensional electrophresis) as normal albumin. Normal albumin could be transformed to anomalous albumin with alkali/heat treatment. Reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of fragments from tryptic digests of anomalous albumin, alkali/heat-treated albumin, and normal albumin suggest that anomalous albumin and alkali/heat-treated albumin have altered tertiary structure, possibly as a result of denaturation and disulfide exchange. These studies show that the tertiary structure of albumin, beyond simple size and charge, is a critical determinant for albumin processing by the kidney and suggest that a specific albumin-recognition event by the kidneys is critical to normal renal handling of albumin.

  14. Fluorescent holograms with albumin-acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    We describe fluorescent holograms were made with photosensitive films of albumin (protein) quail, used as modified matrices. Albumin is mixed with acrylamide and eosin Y. Therefore, prepare a photosensitive emulsion and solid hydrated with the ability to phase transmission holograms and volume (VPH). Eosin Y is a fluorescent agent that acts as a photo-sensitizing dye which stimulates the polymerization of acrylamide. To record the interference pattern produced by two waves superimposed on the modified matrix, we use a He-Cd laser. To reconstruct the diffraction pattern is observed with He- Ne laser, λ = 632.8nm, the material is self-developing properties. Measure the diffraction efficiency of the diffracted orders (η[-1, +1]) as a function of exposure energy. We work with various thicknesses and measure the variation of the refractive index using the coupled wave theory of Kogelnik, the holographic gratings meet Bragg condition.

  15. Pyrogen reactions to human serum albumin during plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Pool, M; McLeod, B C

    1995-01-01

    Reactions to human serum albumin (HSA) in therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) are rare. Nevertheless, older literature describes possible adverse effects, including specific immune responses to albumin or other proteins, and reactions due to contaminating organisms or pyrogen. During an eight day period three patients in our unit had unusual reactions after infusion of 1.5-2 L of HSA. Patient 1 had trembling that persisted for 20 min. Patient 2 had shaking for 40 min despite calcium gluconate infusion, and fever to 100.8 degrees F. Patient 3 had severe rigors that subsided after 90 min when meperidine was finally given, and fever to 103.5 degrees F. Record reviews revealed that all three patients had received HSA from the same lot, and that only one other TPE patient had received HSA from that lot. Neither our pharmacy nor the manufacturer was aware of other reactions associated with that lot. Material from a bottle only partially infused to patient 3 was negative in culture and was negative for pyrogen when retested by the manufacturer. Nevertheless, because patients 1 and 2 had each had multiple previous uneventful TPEs and because all three patients tolerated subsequent TPEs without incident when another brand of HSA was used, we conclude that these patients had pyrogen reactions to the implicated HSA lot. This experience illustrates the value of cluster recognition in arousing suspicion of unusual reactions to HSA and the value of recorded lot numbers in pursuing such suspicions. Apheresis personnel should be aware of the potential for pyrogen reactions with HSA and should record lot numbers of all fluids infused during TPE.

  16. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  17. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  18. Calcium inhibits diacylglycerol uptake by serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ahyayauch, Hasna; Arana, Gorka; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2009-03-01

    Serum albumin is an abundant protein in blood plasma, that is well-known for its ability to transport hydrophobic biomolecules and drugs. Recent hypotheses propose that serum albumin plays a role in the regulation of lipid metabolism in addition to its lipid transport properties. The present work explores the capacity of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to extract diacylglycerols (DAG) from phospholipid bilayers, and the inhibition of such interaction by divalent cations. Quantitative measurements using radioactive DAG and morphological evidence derived from giant unilamellar vesicles examined by confocal microscopy provide concurrent results. BSA extracts DAG from vesicles consisting of phosphatidylinositol/DAG. Long, saturated DAG species are incorporated more readily than the shorter-chain or unsaturated ones. Divalent cations hinder DAG uptake by BSA. For Ca(2+), the concentration causing half-maximal inhibition is approximately 10 muM; 90% inhibition is caused by 100 muM Ca(2+). Sr(2+) requires concentrations one order of magnitude higher, while Mg(2+) has virtually no effect. As an example on how DAG uptake by BSA, and its inhibition by Ca(2+), could play a regulating role in lipid metabolism, a PI-specific phospholipase C has been assayed in the presence of BSA and/or Ca(2+). BSA activates the enzyme by removing the end-product DAG, but the activation is reverted by Ca(2+) that inhibits DAG uptake.

  19. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  20. Universal fractal scaling in stream chemistry and its implications for solute transport and water quality trend detection.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, James W; Neal, Colin

    2013-07-23

    The chemical dynamics of lakes and streams affect their suitability as aquatic habitats and as water supplies for human needs. Because water quality is typically monitored only weekly or monthly, however, the higher-frequency dynamics of stream chemistry have remained largely invisible. To illuminate a wider spectrum of water quality dynamics, rainfall and streamflow were sampled in two headwater catchments at Plynlimon, Wales, at 7-h intervals for 1-2 y and weekly for over two decades, and were analyzed for 45 solutes spanning the periodic table from H(+) to U. Here we show that in streamflow, all 45 of these solutes, including nutrients, trace elements, and toxic metals, exhibit fractal 1/f(α) scaling on time scales from hours to decades (α = 1.05 ± 0.15, mean ± SD). We show that this fractal scaling can arise through dispersion of random chemical inputs distributed across a catchment. These 1/f time series are non-self-averaging: monthly, yearly, or decadal averages are approximately as variable, one from the next, as individual measurements taken hours or days apart, defying naive statistical expectations. (By contrast, stream discharge itself is nonfractal, and self-averaging on time scales of months and longer.) In the solute time series, statistically significant trends arise much more frequently, on all time scales, than one would expect from conventional t statistics. However, these same trends are poor predictors of future trends-much poorer than one would expect from their calculated uncertainties. Our results illustrate how 1/f time series pose fundamental challenges to trend analysis and change detection in environmental systems.

  1. Complexation of bovine serum albumin and sugar beet pectin: stabilising oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Phillips, Glyn O; Jiang, Fatang

    2012-12-15

    In a previous study (Langmuir 28 (2012) 10164-10176.), we investigated the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with sugar beet pectin (SBP). A pH-composition phase diagram was established and structural transitions in relation to the phase diagram during complexation were identified. The present study examines the implications of these interactions on the emulsifying performance of BSA/SBP mixtures. Middle-chain triglycerides (MCTs) in water emulsions were prepared using conditions corresponding to different regions of the phase diagram. At high pHs and in the stable region of mixed individual soluble polymers where complexation is absent, there is no improved emulsifying performance, compared with the individual protein and polysaccharide. For these mixtures, the emulsion characteristics are controlled by the major component in the solutions, as determined by the competitive adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. At low pHs and low BSA/SBP ratios, and so mainly within the stable region of intramolecular soluble complexes, BSA/SBP mixtures greatly improve the stability of emulsions. Here, stabilisation is controlled by the cooperative adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. Through electrostatic complexation BSA promotes the adsorption of SBP on to interfaces to form a thick steric layer around emulsion droplets and thus providing better stability. At low pHs and high BSA/SBP ratios, that is, mainly within the unstable region of intermolecular insoluble complexes, emulsions prepared are extremely unstable due to bridging flocculation between emulsion droplets.

  2. Megalin/Cubulin-Lysosome-mediated Albumin Reabsorption Is Involved in the Tubular Cell Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome and Tubulointerstitial Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Wen, Yi; Tang, Tao-Tao; Lv, Lin-Li; Tang, Ri-Ning; Liu, Hong; Ma, Kun-Ling; Crowley, Steve D; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2015-07-17

    Albuminuria contributes to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease by inducing tubulointerstitial inflammation (TI) and fibrosis. However, the exact mechanisms of TI in response to albuminuria are unresolved. We previously demonstrated that NLRP3 and inflammasomes mediate albumin-induced lesions in tubular cells. Here, we further investigated the role of endocytic receptors and lysosome rupture in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. A murine proteinuric nephropathy model was induced by albumin overload as described previously. The priming and activation signals for inflammasome complex formation were evoked simultaneously by albumin excess in tubular epithelial cells. The former signal was dependent on a albumin-triggered NF-κB pathway activation. This process is mediated by the endocytic receptor, megalin and cubilin. However, the silencing of megalin or cubilin inhibited the albumin-induced NLRP3 signal. Notably, subsequent lysosome rupture and the corresponding release of lysosomal hydrolases, especially cathepsin B, were observed in tubular epithelial cells exposed to albumin. Cathepsin B release and distribution are essential for NLRP3 signal activation, and inhibitors of cathepsin B suppressed the NLRP3 signal in tubular epithelial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that megalin/cubilin and lysosome rupture are involved in albumin-triggered tubular injury and TI. This study provides novel insights into albuminuria-induced TI and implicates the active control of albuminuria as a critical strategy to halt the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  3. [Preparation of Human Serum Albumin Micro/Nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Pei-pei; Guo, Yan-li; Niu, Ai-hua; Kang, Xiao-feng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, protein micro/nanotubes were fabricated by alternate layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of human serum albumin (HSA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) into polycarbonate (PC) membranes. The experimental conditions of pH values, ionic strength, the depositions cycles and the diameter of porous membrane were discussed. The morphology and composition of tubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that pH and ionic strength of the solution are the key factors that influence the effect of assembly. Micro/nanotubes with good opening hollow tubular structure were obtained when pH 7.4 HSA solution and pH 10.3 PEI solution without NaCl were used in synthesis procedure. The outer diameter of tube was dependent on the PC template, thus the micro/nanotubes size was controlled by the wall thickness, which can be adjusted by the number of layers of the HSA and PEI deposited along the pore walls. To avoid the thin wall being damaged in dissolving the template and vacuum drying, the PEI/HSA bilayer number should not be less than 3. The polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) can dissolve PC template to release the micro/nanotubes.

  4. Photoreactions of macrocyclic dyes bound to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Davila, J; Harriman, A

    1990-01-01

    The photophysical properties of tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (H2TSPP), its tin (IV) complex (SnTSPP), aluminium(III) trisulfonatophthalocyanine (AIPCS), and the corresponding zinc(II) complex (ZnPCS), have been measured in H2O, D2O, and upon binding to human serum albumin (HSA). The triplet excited states of the various macrocyclic dyes generate singlet molecular oxygen, O2(1 delta g) in high quantum yield upon illumination in O2-saturated solution, even in the presence of HSA. The triplet states also abstract an electron from 4-aminophenol, forming the radical anion of the macrocycle. Quenching rate constants and quantum yields have been measured for the various processes in the presence and absence of HSA. It is found that HSA binds all the dyes at nonspecific sites close to the interface in such a manner that the dyes remain accessible to species residing in the solution phase. Dyes that do not possess axial ligands complexed to the central cation (e.g. H2TSPP, ZnPCS) are able to bind also at a deeper, more specific site on the protein where they are protected from species in solution. Under such conditions, triplet quenching by 4-aminophenol is restricted to long-distance electron tunnelling, for which the rate is relatively slow.

  5. Determination of the distribution of selenium between selenoprotein P, glutathione peroxidase and albumin in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Whanger, P.D.; Butler, J.A.; Deagen, J.T. )

    1991-03-11

    A chromatographic method was developed to determine the distribution of selenium between selenoprotein P, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and albumin, using two small columns of heparin-Sepharose CL-6B (white) and Reactive Blue 2-Sepharose CL-6B (blue) linked together in tandem. One ml of plasma was diluted to 10 ml with 0.02 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, the equilibration buffer, and applied to the white column. This was eluted at flow rate of 30 ml per hour. GSHp-Px was not retained by either column but selenoprotein P was retained by the white column and albumin by the blue column. After the two columns were separated, selenoprotein P was eluted for 90 min from the white column with a solution containing 500 units of heparin per ml. The albumin was eluted for 55 min from the blue column with 1.4 M NaCl. This method indicated that over 50% of the selenium in plasma from rats, monkeys, humans and sheep was with selenoprotein P, even during deficiency. From 15 to 22% of the selenium was associated with GSH-Px. The percentage of selenium with albumin was dependent upon the selenomethionine content of the diet.

  6. Binding of volatile anesthetics to serum albumin: measurements of enthalpy and solvent contributions.

    PubMed

    Sawas, Abdul H; Pentyala, Srinivas N; Rebecchi, Mario J

    2004-10-05

    This study directly examines the enthalpic contributions to binding in aqueous solution of closely related anesthetic haloethers (desflurane, isoflurane, enflurane, and sevoflurane), a haloalkane (halothane), and an intravenous anesthetic (propofol) to bovine and human serum albumin (BSA and HSA) using isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding to serum albumin is exothermic, yielding enthalpies (DeltaH(obs)) of -3 to -6 kcal/mol for BSA with a rank order of apparent equilibrium association constants (K(a) values): desflurane > isoflurane approximately enflurane > halothane >or= sevoflurane, with the differences being largely ascribed to entropic contributions. Competition experiments indicate that volatile anesthetics, at low concentrations, share the same sites in albumin previously identified in crystallographic and photo-cross-linking studies. The magnitude of the observed DeltaH increased linearly with increased reaction temperature, reflecting negative changes in heat capacities (DeltaC(p)). These -DeltaC(p) values significantly exceed those calculated for burial of each anesthetic in a hydrophobic pocket. The enhanced stabilities of the albumin/anesthetic complexes and -DeltaC(p) are consistent with favorable solvent rearrangements that promote binding. This idea is supported by substitution of D(2)O for H(2)O that significantly reduces the favorable binding enthalpy observed for desflurane and isoflurane, with an opposing increase of DeltaS(obs). From these results, we infer that solvent restructuring, resulting from release of water weakly bound to anesthetic and anesthetic-binding sites, is a dominant and favorable contributor to the enthalpy and entropy of binding to proteins.

  7. A structurally driven analysis of thiol reactivity in mammalian albumins.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Ottavia; Summa, Domenico; Cirri, Simone; Bernini, Andrea; Venditti, Vincenzo; De Chiara, Matteo; Priora, Raffaella; Frosali, Simona; Margaritis, Antonios; Di Giuseppe, Danila; Di Simplicio, Paolo; Niccolai, Neri

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the structural basis of protein redox activity is still an open question. Hence, by using a structural genomics approach, different albumins have been chosen to correlate protein structural features with the corresponding reaction rates of thiol exchange between albumin and disulfide DTNB. Predicted structures of rat, porcine, and bovine albumins have been compared with the experimentally derived human albumin. High structural similarity among these four albumins can be observed, in spite of their markedly different reactivity with DTNB. Sequence alignments offered preliminary hints on the contributions of sequence-specific local environments modulating albumin reactivity. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on experimental and predicted albumin structures reveal that thiolation rates are influenced by hydrogen bonding pattern and stability of the acceptor C34 sulphur atom with donor groups of nearby residues. Atom depth evolution of albumin C34 thiol groups has been monitored during Molecular Dynamic trajectories. The most reactive albumins appeared also the ones presenting the C34 sulphur atom on the protein surface with the highest accessibility. High C34 sulphur atom reactivity in rat and porcine albumins seems to be determined by the presence of additional positively charged amino acid residues favoring both the C34 S⁻ form and the approach of DTNB.

  8. An Analytical Solution for Depletion-induced Principal Stress Rotations In 3D and its Implications for Fault Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Depletion-induced faulting in hydrocarbon reservoirs has mostly been attributed to poroelastic effects: in-situ stresses are coupled with a pore pressure change according to a stress path. As a result, for a fault of certain orientation, the shear stress and normal stress resolved on the fault increase in a manner such that the stress state exceeds the shear failure envelop. An underlying assumption associated with this mechanism is that homogeneous pore pressure depletion occurs on both sides of the fault. This study addresses an additional mechanism for depletion-induced faulting in cases where the pore pressure reduction is bounded by a hydraulically impermeable fault. We assume that the overburden and shear stresses are decoupled from pore pressure, while the two horizontal principal stresses are coupled with pore pressure by their respective stress paths (we show that the poroelastic coupling effect is anisotropic). Unbalanced pore pressure changes on the two sides of the fault, in conjunction with the poroelastic response, cause redistribution of the stress state. Given a fault that is arbitrarily oriented with respect to the original stress field, we derive a generalized 3D analytical solution for the new state of stress after depletion. We then quantify the magnitude change and the rotation of the three principal stresses. Finally, we compare the corresponding Coulomb Failure Functions and Mohr circles before and after depletion. For demonstration purposes, we determine the stress path tensor using poroelastic plane strain solutions in conjunction with frictional equilibrium for three different stress regimes. Our hypothetical case studies show that, for bounded reservoirs, depletion-induced principal stress rotation and magnitude changes have a significant impact on fault stability, and are a complex function of fault orientation, the original in-situ stress state and pore pressure, the degree of depletion, and the degree of poroelastic coupling.

  9. Cu(II) Bis(thiosemicarbazone) Radiopharmaceutical Binding to Serum Albumin: Further Definition of Species-Dependence and Associated Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Basken, Nathan E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Cu-PTSM (pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) and Cu-ATSM (diacetyl bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related Cu-ETS (ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceutical appears to only exhibit non-specific binding to human and animal serum albumins. Methods To further probe the structural basis for the species-dependence of this albumin binding interaction, protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals was examined in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat, elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species-dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate. PMID:19520290

  10. Can biofuels be a solution to climate change? The implications of land use change-related emissions for policy

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Madhu; Crago, Christine L.; Black, Mairi

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels have gained increasing attention as an alternative to fossil fuels for several reasons, one of which is their potential to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector. Recent studies have questioned the validity of claims about the potential of biofuels to reduce GHG emissions relative to the liquid fossil fuels they are replacing when emissions owing to direct (DLUC) and indirect land use changes (ILUC) that accompany biofuels are included in the life cycle GHG intensity of biofuels. Studies estimate that the GHG emissions released from ILUC could more than offset the direct GHG savings by producing biofuels and replacing liquid fossil fuels and create a ‘carbon debt’ with a long payback period. The estimates of this payback period, however, vary widely across biofuels from different feedstocks and even for a single biofuel across different modelling assumptions. In the case of corn ethanol, this payback period is found to range from 15 to 200 years. We discuss the challenges in estimating the ILUC effect of a biofuel and differences across biofuels, and its sensitivity to the assumptions and policy scenarios considered by different economic models. We also discuss the implications of ILUC for designing policies that promote biofuels and seek to reduce GHG emissions. In a first-best setting, a global carbon tax is needed to set both DLUC and ILUC emissions to their optimal levels. However, it is unclear whether unilateral GHG mitigation policies, even if they penalize the ILUC-related emissions, would increase social welfare and lead to optimal emission levels. In the absence of a global carbon tax, incentivizing sustainable land use practices through certification standards, government regulations and market-based pressures may be a viable option for reducing ILUC. PMID:22482030

  11. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  12. Investigation of Cu(II) Binding to Bovine Serum Albumin by Potentiometry with an Ion Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jie Liu

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory project that investigates Cu(II) bind to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in an aqueous solution is developed to assist undergraduate students in gaining better understanding of the interaction of ligands with biological macromolecule. Thus, students are introduced to investigation of Cu(II) binding to BSA by potentiometry with the Cu(II)…

  13. Biogenic and synthetic polyamines bind bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Dubeau, S; Bourassa, P; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2010-06-14

    Biogenic polyamines are found to modulate protein synthesis at different levels, while polyamine analogues have shown major antitumor activity in multiple experimental models, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with biogenic polyamines, spermine and spermidine, and polyamine analogues 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane x 4 HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane x 5 HCl (BE-3333) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. FTIR, UV-visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind BSA via both hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Stronger polyamine-protein complexes formed with biogenic than synthetic polyamines with overall binding constants of K(spm) = 3.56 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1), K(spmd) = 1.77 (+/-0.4) x 10(5) M(-1), K(BE-333) = 1.11 (+/-0.3) x 10(4) M(-1) and K(BE-3333) = 3.90 (+/-0.7) x 10(4) M(-1) that correlate with their positively charged amino group contents. Major alterations of protein conformation were observed with reduction of alpha-helix from 63% (free protein) to 55-33% and increase of turn 12% (free protein) to 28-16% and random coil from 6% (free protein) to 24-17% in the polyamine-BSA complexes, indicating a partial protein unfolding. These data suggest that serum albumins might act as polyamine carrier proteins in delivering polyamine analogues to target tissues.

  14. Extreme hemodilution with PEG-hemoglobin vs. PEG-albumin.

    PubMed

    Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G; Winslow, Robert M; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2005-12-01

    Isovolemic hemodilution to 11% systemic hematocrit was performed in the hamster window chamber model using 6% dextran 70 kDa (Dx 70) and 5% human serum albumin (HSA). Systemic and microvascular effects of these solutions were compared with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated 5% albumin (MPA) and PEG-conjugated 4.2% Hb (MP4). These studies were performed for the purpose of comparing systemic and microvascular responses of PEG vs. non-PEG plasma expanders and similar oxygen-carrying vs. noncarrying blood replacement fluids. Mean arterial blood pressure was statistically significantly reduced for all groups compared with baseline (P < 0.05), HSA, MPA, and MP4 higher than Dx 70 (P < 0.05). MP4 and MPA had a significantly higher cardiac index than HSA and Dx 70, in addition to a positive base excess. Microvascular blood flow and capillary perfusion were significantly higher for the PEG compounds compared with HSA and Dx 70. Intravascular PO2 for MP4 and MPA was higher in arterioles (P < 0.05) compared with HSA and Dx 70, but there was no difference in either tissue or venular PO2 between groups. Total Hb in the MP4 group was 4.8 +/- 0.4 g/dl, whereas the remaining groups had a range of 3.6-3.8 g/dl. The hemodilution results showed that PEG compounds maintained microvascular conditions with lower concentrations than conventional plasma expanders. Furthermore, microvascular oxygen delivery and extraction in the window chamber tissue were significantly higher for the PEG compounds. MP4 was significantly higher than MPA (P < 0.05) and was not statistically different from baseline, an effect due to the additional oxygen release to the tissue by the Hb MP4.

  15. Properties of CO2 clathrate hydrates formed in the presence of MgSO4 solutions with implications for icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, E.; Thompson, S. P.; Evans, A.; Day, S. J.; Murray, C. A.; Parker, J. E.; Baker, A. R.; Oliveira, J. M.; van Loon, J. Th.

    2017-04-01

    Context. There is evidence to suggest that clathrate hydrates have a significant effect on the surface geology of icy bodies in the solar system. However the aqueous environments believed to be present on these bodies are likely to be saline rather than pure water. Laboratory work to underpin the properties of clathrate hydrates in such environments is generally lacking. Aims: We aim to fill this gap by carrying out a laboratory investigation of the physical properties of CO2 clathrate hydrates produced in weak aqueous solutions of MgSO4. Methods: We use in situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction to investigate clathrate hydrates formed at high CO2 pressure in ice that has formed from aqueous solutions of MgSO4 with varying concentrations. We measure the thermal expansion, density and dissociation properties of the clathrates under temperature conditions similar to those on icy solar system bodies. Results: We find that the sulphate solution inhibits the formation of clathrates by lowering their dissociation temperatures. Hysteresis is found in the thermal expansion coefficients as the clathrates are cooled and heated; we attribute this to the presence of the salt in solution. We find the density derived from X-ray powder diffraction measurements is temperature and pressure dependent. When comparing the density of the CO2 clathrates to that of the solution in which they were formed, we conclude that they should sink in the oceans in which they form. We also find that the polymorph of ice present at low temperatures is Ih rather than the expected Ic, which we tentatively attribute to the presence of the MgSO4. Conclusions: We (1) conclude that the density of the clathrates has implications for their behaviour in satellite oceans as their sinking and floating capabilities are temperature and pressure dependent; (2) conclude that the presence of MgSO4 inhibits the formation of clathrates and in some cases may even affect their structure and (3) report the dominance

  16. Albumin regeneration in liver support-comparison of different methods.

    PubMed

    Mitzner, Steffen; Klammt, Sebastian; Stange, Jan; Schmidt, Reinhart

    2006-04-01

    Albumin is the most abundant human plasma protein. Among many other functions it is an important transporter of hydrophobic internal and external substances such as intermediate and end products of metabolism and drugs. In liver failure the albumin binding capacity is decreased because of a disproportion between available albumin molecules caused by decreased hepatic synthesis and hydrophobic toxins because of decreased hepatic clearance. The resulting increase in plasma and tissue concentrations of these substances is associated with multiple organ dysfunctions frequently seen in severe liver failure. The scope of the present article is to compare different liver support strategies with regard to their ability to regenerate the patients albumin pool by removing albumin-bound toxins. Most prominent technique in this group is the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS). It will be compared with single pass albumin dialysis (SPAD), fractionated plasma separation and adsorption system (FPSA, Prometheus), and plasma perfusion/bilirubin adsorption with special regard to efficacy and selectivity.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of 2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid albumin.

    PubMed

    Bauer, H H; Ehmig, S; Engels, J W; Voelcker, G

    1998-06-01

    Autoimmune patients treated with ifosfamide (CAS 3778-73-2) and mesna (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid, CAS 3375-50-6) in some cases suffered from severe allergic reactions that were proposed to be due to mesna linked to serum albumin by a disulfide bond. To prove the existence of the hypothetic mesna albumin adduct in vivo it was synthesized: The free thiol group of albumin (molecular mass determined by MALDI spectroscopy: 67009 Da) was converted to S-phenylsulfonyl albumin and reacted with mesna to albumin mesna (molecular mass: 67159 Da). In an alternative synthesis albumin was incubated with mesna at pH 8, 40 degrees C (molecular mass of the adduct: 67166 Da).

  18. Routes of drug delivery into the nail apparatus: Implications for the efficacy of topical nail solutions in onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Simpson, Fiona C

    2016-01-01

    The route of antifungal drug entry into the nail plate and the underlying nail bed plays an important role in determining the efficacy of therapy. Oral antifungal agents reach the nail bed and nail plate by being ingested and achieving antifungal levels in the blood stream that are well in excess of the minimum inhibitory concentration. The reticular circulation at the distal end of the digit enables the drug to reach the nail bed, the proximal matrix and the lateral nail folds. The drug then diffuses into the proximal, ventral and lateral nail plate. The primary route of drug delivery for topical lacquers is transungual, with drug applied to the dorsal aspect of the nail plate and penetrating to the underlying nail bed. The new topical agents approved in the US for the treatment of onychomycosis are solutions with lower viscosity and increased nail penetration characteristics; therefore, these agents penetrate through the transungual route, but also through the space between the nail plate and the nail bed. This subungual route is an important method of drug delivery and is able to in part circumvent the thickness of the nail plate.

  19. African American Participation in Oncology Clinical Trials--Focus on Prostate Cancer: Implications, Barriers, and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Tyler, Robert; Sartor, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, the incidence and mortality rates of many cancers, especially prostate cancer, are disproportionately high among African American men compared with Caucasian men. Recently, mortality rates for prostate cancer have declined more rapidly in African American versus Caucasian men, but prostate cancer is still the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in African American men in the United States. Compared with Caucasian men, prostate cancer occurs at younger ages, has a higher stage at diagnosis, and is more likely to progress after definitive treatments in African American men. Reasons for racial discrepancies in cancer are multifactorial and potentially include socioeconomic, cultural, nutritional, and biologic elements. In addition to improving access to novel therapies, clinical trial participation is essential to adequately establish the risks and benefits of treatments in African American populations. Considering the disproportionately high mortality rates noted in these groups, our understanding of the natural history and responses to therapies is limited. This review will explore African American underrepresentation in clinical trials with a focus on prostate cancer, and potentially effective strategies to engage African American communities in prostate cancer research. Solutions targeting physicians, investigators, the community, and health care systems are identified. Improvement of African American participation in prostate cancer clinical trials will benefit all stakeholders.

  20. Self-assembly behaviour of colistin and its prodrug colistin methanesulfonate: implications for solution stability and solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie J.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.; Prankerd, Richard J.; Velkov, Tony; Boyd, Ben J.

    2010-01-01

    Colistin is an amphiphilic antibiotic that has re-emerged into clinical use due to the increasing prevalence of difficult-to-treat Gram-negative infections. The existence of self-assembling colloids in solutions of colistin and its derivative prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) was investigated. Colistin and CMS reduced the air-water interfacial tension, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the existence of 2.07 ± 0.3 nm aggregates above 1.5 mM for colistin, and of 1.98 ± 0.36 nm aggregates for CMS above 3.5 mM (mean ± SD). Above the respective critical micelle concentrations (CMC) the solubility of azithromycin, a hydrophobic antibiotic, increased approximately linearly with increasing surfactant concentration (5:1 mol ratio colistin:azithromycin), suggestive of hydrophobic domains within the micellar cores. Rapid conversion of CMS to colistin occurred below the CMC (60 % over 48 hr), while conversion above the CMC was less than 1 %. The formation of colistin and CMS micelles demonstrated in this study is the proposed mechanism for solubilization of azithromycin and the concentration-dependent stability of CMS. PMID:20302384

  1. [Characteristics of serum albumin in patients with intracerebral hemorrhagic stroke].

    PubMed

    Martynov, M Iu; Koplik, E V; Shchukin, I A; Smolina, N V; Kapel'nitskiĭ, P V; Chubykin, V I; Glukhareva, A P; Makarov, A N; Sudakov, K V

    2012-01-01

    Authors studied the influence of the psychoemotional stress preceding the stroke on the dynamics of neurological symptoms (Glasgo coma scale, Scandinavian stroke scale and Barthel index) and on the conformational changes of albumin in 59 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage due to arterial hypertension. The psychoemotional stress was associated with less favorable clinical course and outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage. Conformational properties of albumin were changed in all patients with intracerebral hemorrhage compared to controls. Psychoemotional stress preceding stroke aggravated changes in albumin molecule.

  2. Establishment and implications of a characterization method for magnetic nanoparticle using cell tracking velocimetry and magnetic susceptibility modified solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huading; Moore, Lee R; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P Stephen; Margel, Shlomo; Chalmers, Jeffrey J

    2005-04-01

    Magnetic micro and nanoparticles conjugated to affinity labels have become a significant, commercial reagent. It has been demonstrated that the performance of cell separation systems using magnetic labels is a function of the magnitude of the magnetic force that can be generated through labeling. This magnetic force is proportional to the number of magnetic particles bound to the cell, the magnetic energy gradient, and the particle-field interaction parameter. This particle-field interaction parameter, which is the product of the relative volumetric, magnetic susceptibility and the volume of the micro or nanoparticle, is a fundamental parameter which can be used to characterize the magnetic particles. An experimental technique is presented which measures the volumetric magnetic susceptibility of particles through the use of susceptibility modified solutions and an experimental instrument, Cell Tracking Velocimetry, CTV. Experimental studies were conducted on polystyrene microspheres alone and those bound to four different magnetic nanoparticles. The experimentally determined values of the magnetic susceptibility of the polystyrene microspheres are consistent with values found from literature. Consequently, magnetic susceptibility measurements of these polystyrene microspheres bound with the magnetic nanoparticles combined with particle size measurements using commercial dynamic light scattering instrument allowed estimates of the particle-field interaction parameter to be made for four commercial, magnetic nanoparticles. The value found for MACS beads is close to what is reported from an independent study. The values for MACS beads and Imag beads are found to agree with what is observed from experiments. Finally, an experimental demonstration of the impact that differences in this field interaction parameter has on the labeling of human lymphocytes is presented.

  3. Ligand-dependent conformational equilibria of serum albumin revealed by tryptophan fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed Central

    Chadborn, N; Bryant, J; Bain, A J; O'Shea, P

    1999-01-01

    Ligand-dependent structural changes in serum albumin are suggested to underlie its role in physiological solute transport and receptor-mediated cellular selection. Evidence of ligand-induced (oleic acid) structural changes in serum albumin are shown in both time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence quenching and anisotropy measurements of tryptophan 214 (Trp214). These studies were augmented with column chromatography separations. It was found that both the steady-state and time-resolved Stern-Volmer collisional quenching studies of Trp214 with acrylamide pointed to the existence of an oleate-dependent structural transformation. The bimolecular quenching rate constant of defatted human serum albumin, 1.96 x 10(9) M-1 s-1, decreased to 0.94 x 10(9) M-1 s-1 after incubation with oleic acid (9:1). Furthermore, Stern-Volmer quenching studies following fractionation of the structural forms by hydrophobic interaction chromatography were in accordance with this interpretation. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements of the Trp214 residue yielded information of motion within the protein together with the whole protein molecule. Characteristic changes in these motions were observed after the binding of oleate to albumin. The addition of oleate was accompanied by an increase in the rotational diffusion time of the albumin molecule from approximately 22 to 33.6 ns. Within the body of the protein, however, the rotational diffusion time for Trp214 exhibited a slight decrease from 191 to 182 ps and was accompanied by a decrease in the extent of the angular motion of Trp214, indicating a transition after oleate binding to a more spatially restricted but less viscous environment. PMID:10096914

  4. [Microalbuminuria and urinary albumin excretion in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Rodrigo; González, Fernando; Acevedo, Mónica

    2012-06-01

    Microalbuminuria is a new tool in the management of patients with diabetes mellitus or hypertension. Microalbuminuria is an easily measured biomarker in a urine sample. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in first morning urine sample correlates with 24 hours urinary albumin excretion, but it is easier to obtain, and can identify hypertensive or diabetic patients with high risk for cardiovascular events. Therapeutic interventions such as renin angiotensin system blockade have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing urinary albumin excretion in clinical studies. It would be advisable to incorporate urinary albumin to creatinine ratio to the routine clinical monitoring of patients with cardiovascular risk, such as those with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  5. Development of an albumin copper binding (ACuB) assay to detect ischemia modified albumin.

    PubMed

    Eom, Ji-Eun; Lee, Eunyoung; Jeon, Kyung-Hwa; Sim, Jeongeun; Suh, Minah; Jhon, Gil-Ja; Kwon, Youngjoo

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia (MI) induces many changes in the body, including pH decrease and electrolyte imbalance. No obvious symptoms of MI appear until irreversible cellular injuries occur. Since early treatment is critical for recovery from ischemia, the development of reliable diagnostic tool is demanded to detect the early ischemic status. Ischemia modified albumin (IMA), formed by cleavage of the last two amino acids of the human serum albumin (HSA) N-terminus, has been considered so far as the most trustworthy and accurate marker for the investigation of ischemia. IMA levels are elevated in plasma within a few minutes of ischemic onset, and may last for up to 6 h. In the present study, we developed a novel assay for the examination of IMA levels to ameliorate the known albumin cobalt binding (ACB) test established previously. We observed a stronger copper ion bound to the HSA N-terminal peptide than cobalt ion by HPLC and ESI-TOF mass spectrometric analyses. The copper ion was employed with lucifer yellow (LY), a copper-specific reagent to develop a new albumin copper binding (ACuB) assay. The parameters capable of affecting the assay results were optimized, and the finally-optimized ACuB assay was validated. The result of the IMA level measurement in normal versus stroke rat serum suggests that the ACuB assay is likely to be a reliable and sensitive method for the detection of ischemic states.

  6. Bovine serum albumin promotes IL-1beta and TNF-alpha secretion by N9 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tian-zhi; Xia, Yong-zhi; Li, Lan; Li, Jian; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Shi; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiang-kai

    2009-10-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is generally used in biomedical experiments. In the solution of some reagents, BSA is necessary to maintain the stability and concentration of the effective component. Therefore, the potential impact of BSA on experimental results should not be neglected when BSA is used. In this study, we observed that BSA induced significant upregulation of mRNA expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha, by N9 microglial cells. Our results suggest that the effects of BSA should be taken into account in experiments on microglia or the central nervous system when BSA is used. In light of the high similarity and homology among mammalian albumins, our findings also indicate that serum albumin may be a potent trigger of cytokine release by microglia.

  7. Influence of albumin and inorganic ions on electrochemical corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium for surgical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Lin, Xiao; Tan, LiLi; Li, Lugee; Li, WeiRong; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are of great interest for biodegradable metallic devices. However, the degradation behavior and mechanisms of magnesium treated with coating in physiological environment in the presence of organic compound such as albumin have not been elucidated. In this study, the plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium immersed in four different simulated body fluids: NaCl, PBS and with the addition of albumin to investigate the influence of protein and inorganic ions on degradation behavior by electrochemical methods. The results of electrochemical tests showed that aggressive corrosion took place in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution; whereas albumin can act as an inhibitor, its adsorption impeded further dissolution of the coating. The mechanism was attributed to the synergistic effect of protein adsorption and precipitation of insoluble salts.

  8. Interactions of aptamers with sera albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Célia Martins; Silva, Dilson; Silva, Camila M. C.; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2012-09-01

    The interactions of two short aptamers to human and bovine serum albumins were studied by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Intrinsic fluorescence of BSA and HSA were measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan residues. Gradual quenching was observed by titration of both proteins with aptamers. Aptamers are oligonucleic acid or peptide molecules that bind a specific target and can be used for both biotechnological and clinical purposes, since they present molecular recognition properties like that commonly found in antibodies. Two aptamers previously selected against the MUC1 tumour marker were used in this study, one selected for the protein core and one for the glycosylated MUC1. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Plots obtained from experiments carried out at 25 °C and 37 °C showed the quenching of fluorescence of by aptamers to be a collisional phenomenon. Stern-Volmer constants estimated for HSA quenched by aptamer A were 1.68 × 105 (±5 × 103) M-1 at 37 °C, and 1.37 × 105 (±103) M-1 at 25 °C; and quenched by aptamer B were 1.67 × 105 (±5 × 103) M-1 at 37 °C, and 1.32 × 105 (±103) M-1 at 25 °C. Results suggest that the primary binding site for aptamers on albumin is close to tryptophan residues in sub domain IIA.

  9. Photodynamic effect occurance in photosensitizer mixtures with albumin or blood serum, or hemoglobin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torshina, Nadezgda L.; Posypanova, Anna M.; Volkova, Anna I.

    1996-05-01

    Under laser irradiation of different photosensitizers (PS) mixtures with pure albumin or without hemolysis blood serum the photodynamic effect (PE) is scarcely to be manifested. The coupling of PS with albumins prevents the interactions of dissolved oxygen molecules with PS molecules and formation of active oxygen forms. In order to promote the PE it is necessary to add the solution of hemoglobin. The PE is readily recognized in mixtures of PS with the blood. Such mixing leads to the erythrocytes' destruction and yields uncombined hemoglobin in blood plasma. The irradiation of hemoglobin mixtures with PS leads to the destruction of hemoglobin. In this case the direct combination of oxygen molecules with hemoglobin is important for PE performance (the deoxy hemoglobin can not promote PE otherwise).

  10. Immobilization of Bovine Serum Albumin Upon Multiwall Carbon Nanotube for High Speed Humidity Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sankhya; Sasmal, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-speed humidity sensor based on immobilization of bovine serum albumin upon multiwall carbon nanotube (IBC). A simple and versatile drop casting technique was employed to make the humidity sensor using novel material IBC at room temperature. IBC was synthesized using easy solution process technique. The working principle of the IBC humidity sensor depends upon the variation of output current or conductance with the exposure of different humidity level. Humidity sensing properties of our device is explained on the basis of charge transfer from water molecules to IBC and bovine serum albumin to multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Our sensor exhibits faster response time around 1.2 s and recovery time 1.5 s respectively.

  11. Spectral Fluorescence Properties of an Anionic Oxacarbocyanine Dye in Complexes with Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronkin, P. G.; Tatikolov, A. S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral fluorescence properties of the anionic oxacarbocyanine dye 3,3'-di-(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-diphenyl-9-ethyloxacarbocyanine betaine (OCC) were studied in solutions and in complexes with human serum albumin (HSA). Interaction with HSA leads to a significant increase in the fluorescence of the dye. We studied quenching of the fluorescence of OCC in a complex with HSA by ibuprofen and warfarin. Data on quenching of fluorescence by ibuprofen indicate binding of the dye to binding site II of subdomain IIIA in the HSA molecule. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of human serum albumin in the presence of OCC showed that complexation with OCC does not lead to appreciable rearrangement of the protein molecule at the binding site.

  12. Potentiation of alpha7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by select albumins.

    PubMed

    Conroy, William G; Liu, Qing-Song; Nai, Qiang; Margiotta, Joseph F; Berg, Darwin K

    2003-02-01

    Nicotinic receptors containing alpha7 subunits are ligand-gated ion channels widely distributed in the nervous system; they influence a diverse array of events because of their high relative calcium permeability. We show here that nicotine-induced whole-cell responses generated by such receptors can be dramatically potentiated in a rapidly reversible manner by some but not all albumins. The potentiation involves increases both in potency and efficacy with no obvious differences in rise and fall times of the response. The potentiation is not reduced by removing absorbed components; it is abolished by proteolysis, suggesting that the albumin protein backbone is essential. The fact that some albumins are ineffective indicates that minor differences in amino acid sequence may be critical. Experiments with open channel blockers indicate that the potentiation involves increased responses from active receptors rather than recruitment of receptors from a previously silent pool. Single channel recordings reveal that the potentiation correlates with increased single channel opening probability, reflected in increased frequency of channel opening and increased mean channel open time. The potentiation can be exploited to overcome blockade by noncompetitive inhibitors such as beta-amyloid peptide. The results raise the possibility that endogenous compounds use the site to modulate receptor function in vivo, and suggest that the receptors may represent useful targets for therapeutic intervention in cases where they have been implicated in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  14. Detergents as probes of hydrophobic binding cavities in serum albumin and other water-soluble proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U; Hellec, F; de Foresta, B; le Maire, M; Møller, J V

    2001-01-01

    As an extension of our studies on the interaction of detergents with membranes and membrane proteins, we have investigated their binding to water-soluble proteins. Anionic aliphatic compounds (dodecanoate and dodecylsulfate) were bound to serum albumin with high affinity at nine sites; related nonionic detergents (C12E8 and dodecylmaltoside) were bound at seven to eight sites, many in common with those of dodecanoate. The compounds were also bound in the hydrophobic cavity of beta-lactoglobulin, but not to ovalbumin. In addition to the generally recognized role of the Sudlow binding region II of serum albumin (localized at the IIIA subdomain) in fatty acid binding, quenching of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan-214 by 7,8-dibromododecylmaltoside and 12-bromododecanoate also implicate the Sudlow binding region I (subdomain IIA) as a locus for binding of aliphatic compounds. Our data document the usefulness of dodecyl amphipathic compounds as probes of hydrophobic cavities in water-soluble proteins. In conjunction with recent x-ray diffraction analyses of fatty acid binding as the starting point we propose a new symmetrical binding model for the location of nine high-affinity sites on serum albumin for aliphatic compounds. PMID:11371462

  15. Calorimetric investigation of diclofenac drug binding to a panel of moderately glycated serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Indurthi, Venkata S K; Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2014-08-01

    Glycation alters the drug binding properties of serum proteins and could affect free drug concentrations in diabetic patients with elevated glycation levels. We investigated the effect of bovine serum albumin glycation by eight physiologically relevant glycation reagents (glucose, ribose, carboxymethyllysine, acetoin, methylglyoxal, glyceraldehyde, diacetyl and glycolaldehyde) on diclofenac drug binding. We used this non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac as a paradigm for acidic drugs with high serum binding and because of its potential cardiovascular risks in diabetic patients. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that glycation reduced the binding affinity Ka of serum albumin and diclofenac 2 to 6-fold by reducing structural rigidity of albumin. Glycation affected the number of drug binding sites in a glycation reagent dependent manner and lead to a 25% decrease for most reagent, expect for ribose, with decreased by 60% and for the CML-modification, increased the number of binding sites by 60%. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry we derived the complete thermodynamic characterization of diclofenac binding to all glycated BSA samples. Our results suggest that glycation in diabetic patients could significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of the widely used over-the-counter NSDAI drug diclofenac and with possibly negative implications for patients.

  16. Reversible exposure of hydrophobic residues on albumin as a novel strategy for formulation of nanodelivery vehicles for taxanes

    PubMed Central

    Garro, AG; Beltramo, DM; Alasino, RV; Leonhard, V; Heredia, V; Bianco, ID

    2011-01-01

    Background: We report herein a novel strategy for the preparation of protein-based nanode-livery vehicles for hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Methods: The procedure consisted of three steps, ie, exposure of hydrophobic residues of a protein to a pH-induced partial unfolding: interaction between hydrophobic residues on the protein and the hydrophobic active pharmaceutical ingredient, and a final step where the structure of the protein was reversed to a native-like state by returning to neutral pH. As proof of concept, the interaction of paclitaxel with partially unfolded states of human serum albumin was evaluated as a potential method for the preparation of water-soluble complexes of the taxane with albumin. Results: We found that paclitaxel readily binds to pH-induced partially unfolded albumin, leading to the formation of optically clear water-soluble complexes. The complexes thus formed were more stable in solution when the albumin native state was at least partially restored by neutralization of the solution to a pH around 7. It was also observed that the hydrodynamic radius of human serum albumin was only slightly increased after the cycle of pH changes, remaining in a monomeric state with a size according to paclitaxel binding. Furthermore, paclitaxel binding did not affect the overall exposure of charged groups of human serum albumin, as evaluated by its interaction with an ionic exchange resin. Conclusion: The in vitro biological activity of the complexes formed was qualitatively equivalent to that of a Cremophor®-based formulation. PMID:21822381

  17. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M. N.; Williams, Jan M.; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A.; Savin, Virginia J.; Roman, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models. PMID:26447220

  18. Albumin binds self-assembling dyes as specific polymolecular ligands.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Barbara; Rybarska, Janina; Drozd, Anna; Konieczny, Leszek; Król, Marcin; Lisowski, Marek; Piekarska, Barbara; Roterman, Irena; Spólnik, Paweł; Zemanek, Grzegorz

    2006-12-15

    Self-assembling dyes with a structure related to Congo red (e.g. Evans blue) form polymolecular complexes with albumin. The dyes, which are lacking a self-assembling property (Trypan blue, ANS) bind as single molecules. The supramolecular character of dye ligands bound to albumin was demonstrated by indicating the complexation of dye molecules outnumbering the binding sites in albumin and by measuring the hydrodynamic radius of albumin which is growing upon complexation of self-assembling dye in contrast to dyes lacking this property. The self-assembled character of Congo red was also proved using it as a carrier introducing to albumin the intercalated nonbonding foreign compounds. Supramolecular, ordered character of the dye in the complex with albumin was also revealed by finding that self-assembling dyes become chiral upon complexation. Congo red complexation makes albumin less resistant to low pH as concluded from the facilitated N-F transition, observed in studies based on the measurement of hydrodynamic radius. This particular interference with protein stability and the specific changes in digestion resulted from binding of Congo red suggest that the self-assembled dye penetrates the central crevice of albumin.

  19. Effects of glycation on meloxicam binding to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trynda-Lemiesz, Lilianna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna

    2011-05-01

    The current study reports a binding of meloxicam a pharmacologically important new generation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to glycated form of the human serum albumin (HSA). The interaction of the meloxicam with nonglycated and glycated albumin has been studied at pH 7.4 in 0.05 M sodium phosphate buffer with 0.1 M NaCl, using fluorescence quenching technique and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results of the present study have shown that the meloxicam could bind both forms of albumin glycated and nonglycated at a site, which was close to the tryptophan residues. Similarly, how for native albumin glycated form has had one high affinity site for the drug with association constants of the order of 10 5 M -1. The glycation process of the HSA significantly has affected the impact of the meloxicam on the binding of other ligands such as warfarin and bilirubin. The affinity of the glycated albumin for bilirubin as for native albumin has been reduced by meloxicam but observed effect was weaker by half (about 20%) compared with nonglycated albumin. In contrast to the native albumin meloxicam binding to glycated form of the protein only slightly affected the binding of warfarin. It seemed possible that the effects on warfarin binding might be entirely attributable to the Lys 199 modification which was in site I.

  20. Interaction of coffee compounds with serum albumins. Part II: Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Guercia, Elena; Forzato, Cristina; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Cafestol and 16-O-methylcafestol are diterpenes present in coffee, but whilst cafestol is found in both Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC) was reported to be specific of only C. canephora. The interactions of such compounds, with serum albumins, have been studied. Three albumins have been considered, namely human serum albumin (HSA), fatty acid free HSA (ffHSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The proteins interact with the diterpenes at the interface between Sudlow site I and the fatty acid binding site 6 in a very peculiar way, leading to a significant change in the secondary structure. The diterpenes do not displace reference binding drugs of site 2, but rather they enhance the affinity of the site for the drugs. They, therefore, may alter the pharmacokinetic profile of albumin - bound drugs.

  1. Platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D L; Atwood, A I; Andrade, J D

    1976-11-01

    Ex vivo platelet retention by albuminated glass and polystyrene beads has been evaluated as a function of flow rate, bead surface area, blood exposure time and albumin treatment. The stability of the albumin coatings as well as scanning electron microscopy of the various surfaces before and after blood exposure has also been included. Results indicate that platelet retention is sensitive to changes in the above parameters and that albumin pretreatment of different substrates can decrease platelet retention. This decrease is substrate dependent in that platelet retention is different for the albuminated glass and polystyrene substrates. Chemical analysis of the substrate materials by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as bulk chemical analysis is also reported.

  2. Serum albumin induces osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial cells.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Silvana; Wurm, Antje; Kutzera, Franziska; Pannicke, Thomas; Krügel, Katja; Linnertz, Regina; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2010-03-04

    Edema in the ischemic neural tissue develops by increased vascular permeability associated with extravasation of albumin, and by glial swelling. Here, we show that bovine serum albumin acutely administered to slices of the rat retina causes swelling of glial somata under hypoosmotic conditions. The effect of albumin was dose-dependent, with half-maximal and maximal effects at 10 nM and 1 microM, respectively, and was mediated by activation of transforming growth factor-beta receptor type II, oxidative stress, and the production of arachidonic acid and prostaglandins. Albumin-induced glial swelling was prevented by glutamate and purinergic receptor agonists. The data suggest that serum albumin may induce glial swelling in the presence of osmotic gradients.

  3. Interaction of sulpiride and serum albumin: Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We have applied the fluorescence quenching modeling to study the process of interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine (BSA). Albumin is more abundant protein in blood and it emits fluorescence when excited by 260-295 nm. Sulpiride is an atypical antipsychotic used in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. As sulpiride is fluorescent, we developed a mathematical model to analyzing the interaction of two fluorescent substances. This model was able to separate the albumin fluorescence from the quencher fluorescence. Results have shown that sulpiride quenches the fluorescence of both albumins by a static process, due to the complex formation drugalbumin. The association constants calculated for sulpiride-HSA was 2.20 (± 0.08) × 104 M-1 at 37° C, and 5.46 (± 0.20) × 104 M-1, 25 ° C, and the primary binding site to sulpiride in the albumin is located closer to the subdomain IB.

  4. Ghrelin binding to serum albumin and its biological impact.

    PubMed

    Lufrano, Daniela; Trejo, Sebastián A; Llovera, Ramiro E; Salgueiro, Mariano; Fernandez, Gimena; Martínez Damonte, Valentina; González Flecha, F Luis; Raingo, Jesica; Ermácora, Mario R; Perelló, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone that plays a key role in the regulation of the body weight and glucose homeostasis. In plasma, ghrelin circulates bound to larger proteins whose identities are partially established. Here, we used size exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry and isothermal titration microcalorimetry to show that ghrelin interacts with serum albumin. Furthermore, we found that such interaction displays an estimated dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range and involves albumin fatty-acid binding sites as well as the octanoyl moiety of ghrelin. Notably, albumin-ghrelin interaction reduces the spontaneous deacylation of the hormone. Both in vitro experiments-assessing ghrelin ability to inhibit calcium channels-and in vivo studies-evaluating ghrelin orexigenic effects-indicate that the binding to albumin affects the bioactivity of the hormone. In conclusion, our results suggest that ghrelin binds to serum albumin and that this interaction impacts on the biological activity of the hormone.

  5. Low molecular weight silicones particularly facilitate human serum albumin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Nayef, Lamees M; Khan, Madiha F; Brook, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    There is a market trend towards the administration of therapeutic proteins using sterilized, pre-filled glass syringes lubricated with silicone oil. It has been widely reported that initially clear solutions of proteins can become turbid during transport and storage, with unclear outcomes with respect to bioefficacy. While the basic processes of interactions of proteins with hydrophobic entities, leading to denaturation and aggregation, are increasingly well understood, the apparently random occurrence of such processes in syringes is not. To better understand the parameters that may be responsible for this change, we report the systematic examination of a series of factors that can affect the behavior of the protein human serum albumin (HSA) when in contact with silicone oil in water. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that greater mixing times and greater concentrations of silicones (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)), especially lower molecular weight hydrophobic silicones like octamethyltetracyclosiloxane (D4), were associated with increased protein denaturation. The turbidity of HSA solutions, due to the formation both of silicone oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and protein aggregates, was also facilitated by the presence of D4. A series of mixtures of silicone oils, all of which exhibited a viscosity of 1000 cSt but which were comprised of different silicone constituents, clearly showed a correlation between the presence of lower molecular silicones and enhanced solution turbidity. While the addition of a non-ionic silicone-polyether surfactant led to greater turbidity by increasing the number of stabilized oil droplets, it was not accompanied by protein denaturation. These results are consistent with HSA denaturation and subsequent aggregation as a consequence of contact particularly with low molecular weight, hydrophobic silicones that are more mobile, leading to more efficient protein/silicone contact.

  6. Foam fractionation of binary mixtures of lysozyme and albumin.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, C E; Jay, M; Bummer, P M

    2000-06-01

    A nitrogen gas-based foam fractionation method was employed to separate model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme, from each other. Fractionation was characterized by the separation ratio and by recovery of proteins in the retentate as a function of the nominal pore size of the gas dispersion frit and solution conditions (pH and ionic strength). For binary mixtures of the proteins at pH 7.4, and ionic strength (mu) of 0.18 M, the recovery of lysozyme and the separation ratio were both dependent on the frit size employed to generate the foam. At low ionic strength (mu = 0.01 M), separation was only somewhat greater with the small pore size frits, although at values significantly lower than those found for high ionic strength. The diminished separations appear to be due to the only slight changes in recoveries observed for BSA and lysozyme.%Separation ratios of lysozyme from BSA in solutions either of high or low ionic strength were maximal at pH values equal to or less than the isoelectric point (pI) of BSA. Separation ratios were lower when foaming was carried out under low compared with high ionic strength. The recovery of lysozyme was enhanced by foaming from solutions of low pH and high ionic strength. Recoveries of BSA were greatest when the molecule was negatively charged. Electrical interactions between the positively charged lysozyme and negatively charged BSA may explain the diminished separation ratios and enhanced recoveries. Enzyme activity studies of lysozyme remaining in the retentate showed no change from prefoam activity.

  7. Thrombin-induced increase in albumin permeability across the endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.G.; Siflinger-Birnboim, A.; Bizios, R.; Del Vecchio, P.J.; Fenton, J.W. 2d.; Malik, A.B.

    1986-07-01

    We studied the effect of thrombin on albumin permeability across the endothelial monolayer in vitro. Bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were grown on micropore membranes. Morphologic analysis confirmed the presence of a confluent monolayer with interendothelial junctions. Albumin permeability was measured by the clearance of 125I-albumin across the endothelial monolayer. The control 125I-albumin clearance was 0.273 +/- 0.02 microliter/min. The native enzyme, alpha-thrombin (10(-6) to 10(-10) M), added to the luminal side of the endothelium produced concentration-dependent increases in albumin clearance (maximum clearance of 0.586 +/- 0.08 microliter/min at 10(-6) M). Gamma (gamma) thrombin (10(-6) M and 10(-8) M), which lacks the fibrinogen recognition site, also produced a concentration-dependent increase in albumin clearance similar to that observed with alpha-thrombin. Moreover, the two proteolytically inactive forms of the native enzyme, i-Pr2 P-alpha-thrombin and D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH2-alpha-thrombin, increased the 125I-albumin clearance (0.610 +/- 0.09 microliter/min and 0.609 +/- 0.02 microliter/min for i-Pr2 P-alpha-thrombin and D-Phe-Pro-Arg-CH2-alpha-thrombin at 10(-6) M, respectively). Since the modified forms of thrombin lack the fibrinogen recognition and active serine protease sites, the results indicate that neither site is required for increased albumin permeability. The increase in albumin clearance with alpha-thrombin was not secondary to endothelial cell lysis because lactate dehydrogenase concentration in the medium following thrombin was not significantly different from baseline values. There was also no morphological evidence of cell lysis. Moreover, the increase in 125I-albumin clearance induced by alpha-thrombin was reversible by washing thrombin from the endothelium.

  8. Cubilin maintains blood levels of HDL and albumin.

    PubMed

    Aseem, Obaidullah; Smith, Brian T; Cooley, Marion A; Wilkerson, Brent A; Argraves, Kelley M; Remaley, Alan T; Argraves, W Scott

    2014-05-01

    Cubilin is an endocytic receptor highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it mediates uptake of albumin and filtered forms of apoA-I/HDL. Cubilin deficiency leads to urinary loss of albumin and apoA-I; however, the consequences of cubilin loss on the homeostasis of blood albumin and apoA-I/HDL have not been studied. Using mice heterozygous for cubilin gene deletion (cubilin HT mice), we show that cubilin haploinsufficiency leads to reduced renal proximal tubular uptake of albumin and apoA-I and significantly increased urinary loss of albumin and apoA-I. Moreover, cubilin HT mice displayed significantly decreased blood levels of albumin, apoA-I, and HDL. The levels of albumin and apoA-I protein or mRNA expressed in the liver, kidney, or intestine of cubilin HT mice did not change significantly. The clearance rate of small HDL3 particles (density>1.13 g/ml) from the blood increased significantly in cubilin HT mice. In contrast, the rate of clearance of larger HDL2 particles from the blood did not change significantly, indicating a decreased half-life for HDL particles capable of filtering through the glomerulus. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that cubilin deficiency reduces renal salvage and delivery back to the blood of albumin and apoA-I, which decreases blood levels of albumin and apoA-I/HDL. These findings raise the possibility that therapeutic increase of renal cubilin expression might reduce proteinuria and increase blood levels of albumin and HDL.

  9. Cubilin Maintains Blood Levels of HDL and Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Aseem, Obaidullah; Smith, Brian T.; Cooley, Marion A.; Wilkerson, Brent A.; Argraves, Kelley M.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    Cubilin is an endocytic receptor highly expressed in renal proximal tubules, where it mediates uptake of albumin and filtered forms of apoA-I/HDL. Cubilin deficiency leads to urinary loss of albumin and apoA-I; however, the consequences of cubilin loss on the homeostasis of blood albumin and apoA-I/HDL have not been studied. Using mice heterozygous for cubilin gene deletion (cubilin HT mice), we show that cubilin haploinsufficiency leads to reduced renal proximal tubular uptake of albumin and apoA-I and significantly increased urinary loss of albumin and apoA-I. Moreover, cubilin HT mice displayed significantly decreased blood levels of albumin, apoA-I, and HDL. The levels of albumin and apoA-I protein or mRNA expressed in the liver, kidney, or intestine of cubilin HT mice did not change significantly. The clearance rate of small HDL3 particles (density>1.13 g/ml) from the blood increased significantly in cubilin HT mice. In contrast, the rate of clearance of larger HDL2 particles from the blood did not change significantly, indicating a decreased half-life for HDL particles capable of filtering through the glomerulus. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that cubilin deficiency reduces renal salvage and delivery back to the blood of albumin and apoA-I, which decreases blood levels of albumin and apoA-I/HDL. These findings raise the possibility that therapeutic increase of renal cubilin expression might reduce proteinuria and increase blood levels of albumin and HDL. PMID:24357674

  10. Laboratory reporting of urine protein and albumin.

    PubMed

    Jones, Graham Rd

    2011-05-01

    Communication between pathology laboratories and clients involves more than just a result. There may be advice on recommended specimen type as well as the units and reference intervals used to report results. Between-laboratory variability in these factors has the potential to cause unnecessary confusion and even to lead to variation in interpretation for samples sent to different laboratories. A survey of Australian and New Zealand laboratories covering sample recommendations, specimens received, units and reference intervals for urine albumin and urine protein was conducted through the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Program (RCPA QAP). The results confirm earlier findings of wide between-laboratory variability in all these factors. It is proposed that only recommendations developed by relevant professional societies and adopted by all laboratories can lead to reduction in this variability.

  11. An artificially evolved albumin binding module facilitates chemical shift epitope mapping of GA domain interactions with phylogenetically diverse albumins.

    PubMed

    He, Yanan; Chen, Yihong; Rozak, David A; Bryan, Philip N; Orban, John

    2007-07-01

    Protein G-related albumin-binding (GA) modules occur on the surface of numerous Gram-positive bacterial pathogens and their presence may promote bacterial growth and virulence in mammalian hosts. We recently used phage display selection to evolve a GA domain, PSD-1 (phage selected domain-1), which tightly bound phylogenetically diverse albumins. With respect to PSD-1's broad albumin binding specificity, it remained unclear how the evolved binding epitope compared to those of naturally occurring GA domains and whether PSD-1's binding mode was the same for different albumins. We investigate these questions here using chemical shift perturbation measurements of PSD-1 with rabbit serum albumin (RSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) and put the results in the context of previous work on structure and dynamics of GA domains. Combined, these data provide insights into the requirements for broad binding specificity in GA-albumin interactions. Moreover, we note that using the phage-optimized PSD-1 protein significantly diminishes the effects of exchange broadening at the binding interface between GA modules and albumin, presumably through stabilization of a ligand-bound conformation. The employment of artificially evolved domains may be generally useful in NMR structural studies of other protein-protein complexes.

  12. Albumin infusion may deleteriously promote extracellular fluid overload without improving circulating hypovolemia in patients of advanced cirrhosis with diabetes mellitus and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kumar, Sachin; Lata, Suman

    2013-04-01

    In patients with liver cirrhosis, albumin is given to improve relative hypovolemia caused by marked splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. However, the volume effect of albumin is not predictable and depends also on capillary permeability, hydrostatic pressure and lymphatic ability to re-circulate albumin from interstitium to plasma. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, the capillary permeability is increased, hydrostatic pressure is higher, and the lymphatics functions are deficient. Hence the albumin molecules are more likely to be extravasated rapidly into the interstitium and are subsequently less likely to be re-circulated back into the plasma. This would not only fail to correct circulating hypovolemia, the purpose for which it is given, but also would favor development of reverse colloid oncotic pressure and fluid movement out of the capillaries leading to development of edema. Thus, anything else which could further increase capillary permeability or hydrostatic pressure in cirrhotic patients might create more problems with albumin infusion. An increased capillary permeability is the hallmark of diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus may worsen immunodepression in cirrhotic patients thus increasing the incidence of severe infections which may further have a deleterious effect on hemodynamics and capillary permeability. A diabetic patient with advanced cirrhosis and sepsis usually has markedly increased capillary permeability, high hydrostatic pressure due to hyperdynamic circulation, and compromised lymphatic drainage capacity. Hence, using albumin infusion in them would not only fail to improve relative hypovolemia, but also would deleteriously promote extravascular accumulation of fluid, which might impair the functions of many vital organs. However, the efficacy and safety of albumin infusion in diabetic patients with advanced cirrhosis and sepsis is not known. Such data can have a great clinical implication and would necessitate search of

  13. Study of the cross-reaction between rabbit anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies and equine serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, H.

    1965-01-01

    Cross-reactions between bovine serum albumin and equine serum albumin were studied using heterologous soluble complexes and specifically purified cross-reacting antibody. Experiments with soluble complexes showed that homologous antigen can displace heterologous antigen specifically bound to antibody but heterologous antigen cannot displace homologous antigen. On gel precipitation tests a specific precipitation resulted when heterologous soluble complex reacted with homologous antigen. By using equine serum albumin conjugated to polyaminopolystyrene the cross-reacting antibodies from anti-bovine serum albumin imune sera could be isolated. These are divalent 7S, γ-globulin antibodies. A figure of cross-reaction was obtained when these purified antibodies were tested by double diffusion in agar with bovine and equine serum albumins. The results obtained both with soluble complexes and with purified antibody support the view that cross-reacting antibody is more avid for the homologous than for the heterologous antigen. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:14245318

  14. Elevation of CSF albumin in old sheep: relations to CSF turnover and albumin extraction at blood-CSF barrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruo-Li; Chen, Carl Pai-Chu; Preston, Jane Elizabeth

    2010-06-01

    Albumin is the most abundant protein in both CSF and plasma, and albumin quotient is often used to assess the functions of brain barriers especially that of the blood-CSF barrier [i.e. the choroid plexus (CP) which also secretes CSF]. In this study, we took albumin as a model molecule to investigate ageing-related alterations in the CSF-CP system in sheep. We found significant ageing-related increases in the weight of lateral CP [122.4 +/- 14.0 mg in the young, 198.6 +/- 35.4 mg in the middle aged, 286.1 +/- 25.1 mg in the old (p < 0.05)], in the CSF albumin as well as the albumin quotient. Albumin protein spots in old CSF displayed wider on 2D western immunoblotting images, and had higher densities on images of 2D large gels stained with Pro-Q Emerald 488 compared to the young samples, suggesting ageing-related post-translational modification in the albumin. CSF secretion was reduced with age: 0.148 +/- 0.013 mL/min/g in the young, 0.092 +/- 0.02 mL/min/g in the middle aged, 0.070 +/- 0.013 mL/min/g in the old (p < 0.05). The (125)I-BSA extraction was not different among the sheep groups, nor was altered by temperature reduction, monensin, nocodazole, anti-transforming growth factor beta receptor II antibody, as well as unlabelled albumins. In conclusion, elevation of albumin in old CSF is associated with reduced CSF secretion by the CP, which size increases with age. (125)I-BSA extract, reflecting the extracellular space rather than the active albumin uptake in the CP, is not different between ages. These early changes in health ageing may result in the accumulation and modifications of CSF proteins leading to neurotoxicity.

  15. [Effect of tobacco combustion on the immunochemical properties of albumin].

    PubMed

    Martínez, R D; Chávez, R

    1997-01-01

    During tobacco burning smoker to run up substances to contain smoke as far as pulmonary tissue that is damage. In cigarette 600 degrees C are in ignition extreme, but in the other side, in contact with edge of the mouth smoker, the temperature is lower. Smoke could be delivery tobacco products until respiratory tract when temperature gradients occur in cigarette burn. For demonstration of the immunoreactive substances in tobacco smoke condense (TSC) we used a model with two cigarette arrangements: several concentrations of bovine seric albumin (BSA) applied to experimental group of cigarettes and phosphate-saline solution (PBS), 0.15 M pH 7.5 without protein to control cigarettes. Both series, experimental and control, remained at 20 degrees C during 48 h, soon afterward TSC was obtained. Higher protein concentration was observe in the experimental TSC of cigarettes expose to more elevated quantities of BSA, this was identify with polyclonal antibodies toward BSA employing counter-immunoelectrophoresis, immunoelectrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion and hemagglutination inhibition test. In summary: TSC of treat cigarettes had a little quantity of protein (BSA), but immunochemical properties of BSA in TSC were preserve because polyclonal antibodies against BSA bind to this protein. In habitual smoker some compounds present in cigarette smoke could be induce an immune response due to immunogen in tobacco substances.

  16. Virus-Enabled Biosensor for Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Alana F; Edgar, Joshua M; Majumdar, Sudipta; Briggs, Jeffrey S; Patterson, Shae V; Tan, Ming X; Kudlacek, Stephan T; Schneider, Christine A; Weiss, Gregory A; Penner, Reginald M

    2017-01-17

    The label-free detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous buffer is demonstrated using a simple, monolithic, two-electrode electrochemical biosensor. In this device, both millimeter-scale electrodes are coated with a thin layer of a composite containing M13 virus particles and the electronically conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene) or PEDOT. These virus particles, engineered to selectively bind HSA, serve as receptors in this biosensor. The resistance component of the electrical impedance, Zre, measured between these two electrodes provides electrical transduction of HSA binding to the virus-PEDOT film. The analysis of sample volumes as small as 50 μL is made possible using a microfluidic cell. Upon exposure to HSA, virus-PEDOT films show a prompt increase in Zre within 5 s and a stable Zre signal within 15 min. HSA concentrations in the range from 100 nM to 5 μM are detectable. Sensor-to-sensor reproducibility of the HSA measurement is characterized by a coefficient-of-variance (COV) ranging from 2% to 8% across this entire concentration range. In addition, virus-PEDOT sensors successfully detected HSA in synthetic urine solutions.

  17. Interactions of human serum albumin with doxorubicin in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, Vladimir M.; Turov, Vladimir V.; Krupska, Tetyana V.; Tsapko, Magdalina D.

    2017-02-01

    Interactions of human serum albumin (10 wt% H2O and 0.3 wt% sodium caprylate) with doxorubicin hydrochloride (1 wt%) were studied alone or with addition of HCl (3.6 wt% HCl) using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A model of hydrated HSA/12DOX was calculated using PM7 method with COSMO showing large variations in the binding constant depending on structural features of DOX/HSA complexes. DOX molecules/ions displace bound water from narrow intramolecular voids in HSA that leads to diminution of freezing-melting point depression of strongly bound water (SBW). Structure of weakly bound water (WBW) depends much weaker on the presence of DOX than SBW because a major fraction of DOX is bound to adsorption sites of HSA. Addition of HCl results in strong changes in structure of macromolecules and organization of water in hydration shells of HSA (i.e., mainly SBW) and in the solution (i.e., WBW + non-bound bulk water).

  18. Size exclusion chromatographic analysis of polyphenol-serum albumin complexes.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Tsutomu; Hori, Mami; Hemingway, Richard W; Yoshida, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    Formation of water-soluble polyphenol-protein complexes was investigated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The combination of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), which did not form a precipitate after the solutions were mixed, showed an SEC peak due to complex formation 2-24 h after mixing. Peak size of the complex varied with time, suggesting slow change of the conformation of the protein accompanied by complexation. Formation of the complex was substantiated by ultrafiltration of the mixture; the complex did not pass through a membrane with a 100,000 nominal molecular weight limit (NMWL). The SEC profile varied with the combination of compounds. The peaks due to the complexes showed that the apparent value of the number average molecular weight (M(n)) of the EGCG-BSA complex was 2.8x10(5), while that of a pentagalloylglucose (PGG)-BSA complex was 9.5x10(5) under the conditions used. Dimeric hydrolyzable tannins, oenothein B and cornusiin A, also caused changes in the SEC profile of BSA, although the combinations did not show peaks attributable to formation of such large complexes observed for EGCG and PGG. Procyanidin B3 and (+)-catechin did not cause changes in the SEC profile of BSA. With cytochrome c, EGCG did not show any chromatographic changes.

  19. Bilirubin-albumin binding, bilirubin/albumin ratios, and free bilirubin levels: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Hulzebos, Christian V; Dijk, Peter H

    2014-11-01

    Treatment for unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia is predominantly based on one parameter, i.e., total serum bilirubin (TSB) levels. Yet, overt kernicterus has been reported in preterm infants at relatively low TSB levels, and it has been repeatedly shown that free unconjugated bilirubin (freeUCB) levels, or bilirubin/albumin (B/A) ratios for that matter, are more closely associated with bilirubin neurotoxicity. In this article, we review bilirubin-albumin binding, UCBfree levels, and B/A ratios in addition to TSB levels to individualize and optimize treatment especially in preterm infants. Methods to measure bilirubin-albumin binding or UCBfree are neither routinely performed in Western clinical laboratories nor incorporated in current management guidelines on unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. For bilirubin-albumin binding, this seems justified because several of these methods have been challenged, and sufficiently powered prospective trials on the clinical benefits are lacking. Technological advances in the measurement of UCBfree may provide a convenient means for integrating UCBfree measurements into routine clinical management of jaundiced infants. A point-of-care method, as well as determination of UCBfree levels in various newborn populations, is desirable to learn more about variations in time and how various clinical pathophysiological conditions affect UCBfree levels. This will improve the estimation of approximate UCBfree levels associated with neurotoxicity. To delineate the role of UCBfree in the management of jaundiced (preterm) infants, trials are needed using UCBfree as treatment parameter. The additional use of the B/A ratio in jaundiced preterms has been evaluated in the Bilirubin Albumin Ratio Trial (BARTrial; Clinical Trials: ISRCTN74465643) but failed to demonstrate better neurodevelopmental outcome in preterm infants <32 weeks assigned to the study group. Awaiting a study in which infants are assigned to be managed solely on the basis of their B

  20. Gene families encoding isoforms of two major sesame seed storage proteins, 11S globulin and 2S albumin.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Eric S L; Lin, Li-Jen; Li, Feng-Yin; Wang, Miki M C; Liao, Ming-Yuan; Tzen, Jason T C

    2006-12-13

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed has been recognized as a nutritional protein source owing to its richness in methionine. Storage proteins have been implicated in allergenic responses to sesame consumption. Two abundant storage proteins, 11S globulin and 2S albumin, constitute 60-70 and 15-25% of total sesame proteins, respectively. Two gene families separately encoding four 11S globulin and three 2S albumin isoforms were identified in a database search of 3328 expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from maturing sesame seeds. Full-length cDNA sequences derived from these two gene families were completed by PCR using a maturing sesame cDNA library as the template. The amino acid compositions of these deduced storage proteins revealed that the richness in methionine is attributed mainly to two 2S albumin isoforms and partly to one 11S globulin isoform. The presence of four 11S globulin and three 2S albumin isoforms resolved in SDS-PAGE was confirmed by MALDI-MS analyses. The abundance of these isoforms was in accord with the occurrence frequency of their EST sequences in the database. A comprehensive understanding of these storage proteins at the molecular level may also facilitate the identification of allergens in crude sesame products that have caused severe allergic reactions increasingly reported in the past decade.

  1. Uptake and Reactions of Formaldehyde, Acetaldehyde, Acetone, Propanal and Ethanol in Sulfuric Acid solutions at 200-240 K: Implications for upper tropospheric aerosol composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Williams, M. B.; Axson, J.; Michelsen, R.

    2007-12-01

    The production of light absorbing, organic material in aerosol that is normally considered to be transparent in the UV and visible wavelength regions has significant implications for biogeochemical cycling and climate modelling. Production mechanisms likely involve carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde and propanal that are present in significant quantities in the upper troposphere (UT). In this study, we have performed experiments focusing on a class of acid catalyzed carbonyl reactions, the formation of acetals. R2C=O + 2R'OH --> R2C(OR')2 + H2O Using a Knudsen cell apparatus, we have measured the rate of uptake of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, and ethanol into sulfuric acid solutions ranging between 40-70 wt% of acid, containing 0-0.1 M of ethanol, acetone or formaldehyde at temperatures of 220-250 K. For all reactant pairs, the aldol condensation path, including self reaction, should be insignificant at the acidities studied. Evidence for reaction between organics was observed for all pairs, except those involving propanal which were likely limited by the very low solubility. We attribute enhanced uptake to the formation of acetals, such as 1,1-diethoxyethane and 2,2- diethoxypropane, among others. Enhanced uptake was observed to proceed on timescales > 1 hour and sometimes shows complex dependence on acidity that is likely related to speciation of the individual carbonyls in acidic solution. The acetal products do not absorb in the visible but are less volatile than parent molecules, allowing for accumulation in sulfuric acid particles, and enhanced uptake. Cross reactions of carbonyls with alcohols in sulfuric acid medium have not been previously measured, yet methanol and ethanol show high solubility and are present at significant concentrations in the UT. Thus even at slow reaction rates, the acetal reaction has ample starting material and proceeds under conditions common to the UT. We will present results for the

  2. Nephroprotective Potential of Human Albumin Infusion: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, Christian J.; Joannidis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Albumin infusion improves renal function in cirrhosis; however, mechanisms are incompletely understood. In clinical practice, human albumin is used in various intensive care unit indications to deal with a wide range of problems, from volume replacement in hypovolemic shock, or sepsis, to treatment of ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Against the background of the results of recent studies on the use of human albumin in septic patients, the importance of the natural colloid in these critically ill patients is being redefined. In addition to the hemodynamic effects of administration of human albumin impacting on sympathetic tone, attention is being paid to other effects in which its pharmacodynamics is associated with the physiological importance of endogenous albumin. The morbidity and mortality data discussed in this paper support the importance of both the hemodynamic and the pharmacological effects of the administration of human albumin in various indications. The contribution that human albumin could make towards the maintenance of renal function in the course and treatment of severe sepsis and cirrhosis of the liver is the subject of this narrative review. PMID:26136776

  3. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  4. Albumin, steroid hormones and the origin of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Baker, M E

    2002-10-01

    Albumin, the major serum protein, binds a wide variety of lipophilic compounds including steroids, other lipophilic hormones and various phytochemicals and xenobiotics that bind to receptors for steroids and other lipophilic hormones. Despite albumin's low affinity (K(d) approximately 10(-4) M to 10(-6) M) for these lipophilic compounds, the high concentration of albumin in serum makes this protein a major carrier of steroids and lipophilic hormones and a regulator of their access to receptors. Albumin also functions as a sink for xenobiotics, diminishing the binding of xenobiotics to hormone receptors and other cellular proteins. This protects animals from endocrine disruption by xenobiotics. We propose that these properties of albumin were important in protochordates and primitive vertebrates, such as jawless fish, about 600 to 530 million years ago, just before and during the Cambrian period. It is at that time that the ancestral receptors of adrenal and sex steroids - androgens, estrogens, glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, and progestins - arose in multicellular animals. Albumin regulated access of steroids to their receptors, as well as protecting animals from endocrine disruptors, such as phytochemicals, fungal chemicals and phenolics, and other chemicals formed at hydrothermal vents by geochemical processes. Thus, animals in which albumin expression was high had a selective advantage in regulating the steroid response and avoiding endocrine disruption by xenobiotics.

  5. Transport of nitrated albumin across continuous vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Dan; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B

    2002-10-15

    Because modification of plasma albumin on tyrosine residues generates nitrated albumin (NOA) that may function as a mechanism of nitrogen monoxide clearance from microcirculation, we investigated biochemicaly and morphologically the cell surface binding and the transendothelial transport of NOA. An electron microscopic study was carried out with mouse lungs and hearts perfused in situ with NOA and NOA-Au complexes. The results indicate that NOA-Au can bind to the endothelial cell surface, and its binding can be blocked by albumin plus nitrotyrosine (NO-tyrosine) or abolished by excess NOA. We detected NOA-Au into perivascular spaces as early as 30 sec after the beginning of its perfusion. NOA, unlike native albumin, leaves the vascular lumina via both endothelial caveolae and open junctions. By cross-linking and ligand blotting analysis, we showed that NOA interacted with the same albumin binding proteins of 16-18, 30-32, 60, and 74 kDa as native albumin. ELISA performed on tissue homogenates obtained from the same specimens showed that NOA transport was 2- to 4-fold greater than native albumin. The augmented transendothelial transport of NOA reflects its transcytosis as well as its exit from the microcirculation via open junctions. The increased transport of NOA may serve as an important mechanism that protects a vascular bed against the damaging effects of nitrogen monoxide and peroxynitrite.

  6. Chlorpromazine interactions to sera albumins. A study by the quenching of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Célia M.; Louro, Sônia R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Binding of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and hemin (Hmn) to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumin was studied by fluorescence quenching technique. Intrinsic fluorescences of BSA and HSA were measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan residues. Gradual quenching was observed by titration of both proteins with CPZ and Hmn. CPZ is a widely used anti-psychosis drug that causes severe side effects and strongly interacts with biomembranes, both in its lipidic and proteic regions. CPZ also interacts with blood components, influences bioavailability, and affects the function of several biomolecules. Albumin plays an important role in the transport and storage of hormones, ions, fatty acids and others substances, including CPZ, affecting the regulation of their plasmatic concentration. Hmn is an important ferric residue of hemoglobin that binds within the hydrophobic region of albumin with great specificity. Hmn added to HSA and BSA solutions at a molar ratio of 1:1 quenched about half of their fluorescence. Stern-Volmer plots obtained from experiments carried out at 25 and 35 °C showed the quenching of fluorescence of HSA and BSA by CPZ to be a collisional phenomenon. Hmn quenches fluorescence by a static process, which specifically indicates the formation of a complex. Our results suggest the prime binding site for CPZ and Hmn on both HSA and BSA to be near tryptophan residues.

  7. Cationized bovine serum albumin with pendant RGD groups forms efficient biocoatings for cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jeck Fei; Weil, Tanja; Jaenicke, Stephan

    2011-11-01

    Cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA-147) has been modified by attaching the cyclic pentapeptide cRGDfK to its surface through linkers of different length. Coatings of these bioconjugates on glass surfaces were studied for their ability to stimulate cell adhesion. These chemically modified albumins combine a high number of positive charges which facilitate the initial cell adhesion to the surface with multiple Arg-Gly-Asp groups which enable focal adhesion of fibroblast cells by specific interactions with cell-surface receptors. The biocoatings are easily prepared within a few minutes by simple incubation from a dilute solution of the modified albumin. This constitutes a convenient approach for preparing surfaces for cell adhesion. Excellent focal adhesion of NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells on the biocoatings was observed. About 75% of the seeded cells attached to the cRGDfK-cBSA-147 coated surfaces, and 97% of them underwent focal adhesion. Adhering cells were able to grow and proliferate on the coated surfaces, confirming the outstanding biocompatibility of these biocoatings.

  8. Preparation of albumin preferential surfaces on poly(vinyl chloride) membranes via surface self-segregation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jian; Feng, Linxian; Shen, Jiacong; Barbosa, M A

    2002-08-01

    Poly(vinyl chlorides)-graft-[omega-stearyl-poly(ethylene oxide)] (PVC-g-SPEO), which has a poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) backbone, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) side chain, and stearyl end groups, has been synthesized. Self-organizing blends of the amphiphilic comb polymer in poly(vinyl chlorides) have been examined as a means to create albumin preferential surfaces on polymer films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates substantial surface segregation of the PVC-g-SPEO. A surface concentration of 59.9 EO wt % is achieved by the solution casting and heat treatment of a film with a bulk concentration of only 3.78 EO wt %. In the aqueous environment, the surface rearrangement of PVC-g-SPEO/PVC blend film is limited and presents a high interfacial energy and high depolar component of interfacial energy due to the "tail-like" SPEO side chain. Protein adsorption tests confirm that PVC-g-SPEO/PVC blend films absorb high levels of albumin and dramatically resist fibrinogen adsorption. Surfaces to attract and reversibly bind albumin, which might diminish the occurrence of thrombosis, inflammation, and infection, are developed by self-organizing blends of the amphiphilic comb polymer in poly(vinyl chlorides).

  9. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A.; Cistola, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by TC NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted (1- TC)oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles, the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The TC NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  10. Serum albumin concentrations and oedema in the newborn.

    PubMed Central

    Cartlidge, P H; Rutter, N

    1986-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration was measured in 195 infants of 25 to 42 weeks' gestation during the neonatal period. Concentrations were significantly lower in preterm infants, rising from a mean of 19 g/l at 26 weeks to 31 g/l at term. There was a 15% increase in albumin concentrations in the first three weeks of life. Oedema in the early and late neonatal period was common in preterm infants but correlated poorly with hypoalbuminaemia. Measurement of serum albumin concentrations in preterm infants either routinely or because of oedema is not clinically useful. PMID:3740904

  11. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  12. Genetic variants of serum albumin in Americans and Japanese

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Watkins, S.; Davis, E.; Putnam, F.W. ); Arai, Kunio ); Feld, R.D. ); Kyle R.A. ); Matsuda, Yuhichi; Amaki, Itta )

    1991-11-01

    A collaborative search for albumin genetic variants (alloalbumins) was undertaken by cellulose acetate and agarose electrophoresis at pH 8.6 of the sera of patients at two major medical centers in the United States and of nearly 20,000 blood donors in Japan. Seventeen instances of alloalbuminemia were ascertained, and seven different alloalbumin types were characterized by structural study. Two previously unreported alloalbumin types were identified. All of the variants characterized in this study are point mutants, and the sites are spread throughout the albumin gene. However, about one-fourth of all known albumin mutations are clustered in the sequence segment from position 354 through 382.

  13. Preparation and characterization of albumin nanoparticles encapsulating curcumin intended for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jithan, AV; Madhavi, K; Madhavi, M; Prabhakar, K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: For the real-time clinical utilization of curcumin (an ayurvedic natural product) to treat breast cancer, its dissolution, rate limited solubility, poor tissue absorption, and extensive in vivo metabolism that leads to its poor systemic bioavailability should be overcome. A polymer-based nanoparticle formulation using bovine serum albumin can increase its aqueous solubility and can achieve protected, sustained, and targeted therapy in breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Desolvation technique was optimized for the preparation of albumin nanoparticles. Particle size, drug release, encapsulation efficiency, drug polymer interaction were the in vitro properties that were determined. Cell culture studies, in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats were used for biological characterization of the formulation. Results: The formulations were successfully prepared using 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 drug: polymer ratios and the percent entrapment was found to be 74.76%, 91.01%, 85.36%, 86.42%, respectively, and particle size determined by zetasizer was found to be 225.1, 223.5, 226.3, 228.7 nm, respectively, and in vitro release was sustained for at least one month with drug release of 75.74%, 65.97%, 64.42%, 54%, respectively. The dissolution rate and aqueous solubility of curcumin was enhanced with this formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies demonstrated that the drug was not changed in the formulation during the fabrication process. The proliferation assays in MDA-MB-231 tumor cell lines indicated more effectiveness of the formulation compared to its solution form. In rats, albumin nanoparticles sustained drug release, demonstrated more bioavailability, improved pharmacokinetic properties, and enhanced tissue targetability of the drug. Conclusions: An effective curcumin-albumin nanoparticle formulation was successfully developed using a desolvation technique. PMID:23071931

  14. Polynitroxyl albumin and albumin therapy after pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest: effects on cerebral blood flow and neurologic outcome.

    PubMed

    Manole, Mioara D; Kochanek, Patrick M; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T Kevin; Bayır, Hülya; Alexander, Henry; Garman, Robert; Ma, Li; Hsia, Carleton J C; Ho, Chien; Clark, Robert S B

    2012-03-01

    Postresuscitation cerebral blood flow (CBF) disturbances and generation of reactive oxygen species likely contribute to impaired neurologic outcome after pediatric cardiac arrest (CA). Hence, we determined the effects of the antioxidant colloid polynitroxyl albumin (PNA) versus albumin or normal saline (NS) on CBF and neurologic outcome after asphyxial CA in immature rats. We induced asphyxia for 9 minutes in male and female postnatal day 16 to 18 rats randomized to receive PNA, albumin, or NS at resuscitation from CA or sham surgery. Regional CBF was measured serially from 5 to 150 minutes after resuscitation by arterial spin-labeled magnetic resonance imaging. We assessed motor function (beam balance and inclined plane), spatial memory retention (water maze), and hippocampal neuronal survival. Polynitroxyl albumin reduced early hyperemia seen 5 minutes after CA. In contrast, albumin markedly increased and prolonged hyperemia. In the delayed period after resuscitation (90 to 150 minutes), CBF was comparable among groups. Both PNA- and albumin-treated rats performed better in the water maze versus NS after CA. This benefit was observed only in males. Hippocampal neuron survival was similar between injury groups. Treatment of immature rats with PNA or albumin resulted in divergent acute changes in CBF, but both improved spatial memory retention in males after asphyxial CA.

  15. Carbon nanotubes induce secondary structure changes of bovine albumin in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man; Meng, Jie; Mao, Xiaobo; Yang, Yang; Cheng, Xuelian; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2010-11-01

    Interaction of nanomaterials to protein molecules is one of the most important issues to deeply understand the influences of the nanomaterials upon physiological processes and protein functions. So far most of investigations focused on the protein molecules adsorbed on the nanomaterials surface, less is known about those in the aqueous phase (not absorbed). In this work, luminescent spectroscopy analysis, circular dichroism measurement, atomic force microscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry, isoelectric focusing and sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were used to investigate the influence of oxidized water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT) dispersing in aqueous solution upon the structures of bovine serum albumin (BSA) through co-incubation. We focused on BSA molecules that stayed in the aqueous phase instead of those adsorbed by CNT. Experimental results show that the fractions of beta-sheet decreased from 33.3% to 29.8% and beta-turn increased from 2% to 5% in reference with native BSA. There was a slight increase of alpha-helix and a slight reduction of random coil. BSA molecules that had been encountered with CNT and were left in the solution formed a loose and flatten morphology on graphite substrates instead of their native tight and round morphology observed by AFM. The value of isoelectric point for BSA after exposed to CNT moved towards to a higher pH position compared with native BSA. All together, it was concluded that the oxidized water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes not only adsorb bovine serum albumin molecules to their surface, but also induces albumin molecules in the aqueous solution undergo secondary structure changes, which lead to a conformation change.

  16. Structural basis of transport of lysophospholipids by human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shihui; Shi, Xiaoli; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Bian, Chuanbing; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-10-08

    Lysophospholipids play important roles in cellular signal transduction and are implicated in many biological processes, including tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, immunity, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cancer and neuronal survival. The intracellular transport of lysophospholipids is through FA (fatty acid)-binding protein. Lysophospholipids are also found in the extracellular space. However, the transport mechanism of lysophospholipids in the extracellular space is unknown. HSA (human serum albumin) is the most abundant carrier protein in blood plasma and plays an important role in determining the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs. In the present study, LPE (lysophosphatidylethanolamine) was used as the ligand to analyse the interaction of lysophospholipids with HSA by fluorescence quenching and crystallography. Fluorescence measurement showed that LPE binds to HSA with a K{sub d} (dissociation constant) of 5.6 {micro}M. The presence of FA (myristate) decreases this binding affinity (K{sub d} of 12.9 {micro}M). Moreover, we determined the crystal structure of HSA in complex with both myristate and LPE and showed that LPE binds at Sudlow site I located in subdomain IIA. LPE occupies two of the three subsites in Sudlow site I, with the LPE acyl chain occupying the hydrophobic bottom of Sudlow site I and the polar head group located at Sudlow site I entrance region pointing to the solvent. This orientation of LPE in HSA suggests that HSA is capable of accommodating other lysophospholipids and phospholipids. The study provides structural information on HSA-lysophospholipid interaction and may facilitate our understanding of the transport and distribution of lysophospholipids.

  17. Triplet-triplet energy transfer between luminescent probes bound to albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'Nikov, A. G.; Saletskii, A. M.; Kochubey, V. I.; Pravdin, A. B.; Kurchatov, I. S.; Mel'Nikov, G. V.

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of polar and nonpolar luminescent probes with human blood serum albumins is studied by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. It is found that the probes (polar eosin and nonpolar anthracene) can efficiently bind to proteins. The radii of the quenching spheres of energy-donor (eosin) triplet states in the presence of an acceptor (anthracene) in the process of the triplet-triplet energy transfer in proteins are determined for homogeneous and inhomogeneous distributions of acceptor molecules over the solution volume. It is shown that a decrease in the radius of the quenching sphere observed upon the addition of sodium dodecylsulfate surfactant is caused by structural changes in the protein.

  18. On the interaction of luminol with human serum albumin: Nature and thermodynamics of ligand binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism and thermodynamic parameters for the binding of luminol (LH 2) with human serum albumin was explored by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that out of two possible LH 2 conformers present is solution, only one is accessible for binding with HSA. The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) change corresponding to the ligand binding process were also estimated by performing the experiment at different temperatures. The ligand replacement experiment with bilirubin confirms that LH 2 binds into the sub-domain IIA of the protein.

  19. EPR study of the effect of terahertz radiation on the albumin conformation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Eugenia F.; Cherkasova, Olga P.; Fedorov, Vyacheslav I.

    2010-09-01

    Effect of the preliminary irradiation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the terahertz spectral range on the conformation changes revealed with the help of EPR spectroscopy was investigated using the spin probing technique. The formation of the spin probe occurs directly in the aqueous solution of BSA from a nitrone compound (dihydropyrazine dioxide). It was shown that irradiation causes changes in the parameters of the EPR spectrum of the spin probe. An approach to linking the observed changes with the structural characteristics of reaction centres - the functional groups of amino acids comprising BSA - was outlined.

  20. Enantiomeric separations using bovine serum albumin immobilized on ion-exchange stationary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, S.C.; Guiochon, G. |

    1992-07-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) can be readily immobilized on ion-exchange stationary phases by frontal analysis of a proper solution. This provides a simple means of adjusting the amount of BSA contained in the column and of measuring it accurately. Although the immobilization is ionic and not covalent, the columns are stable for extensive periods of time. If needed, they can be easily regenerated by the same frontal analysis procedure. Results for the separation of various organic compounds on these columns are reported. 11 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Photophysical investigations of squaraine and cyanine dyes and their interaction with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikiran, M.; Sato, D.; Pandey, S. S.; Kato, T.

    2016-04-01

    A model far-red sensitive symmetrical squaraine dye (SQ-3) and unsymmetrical near infra-red sensitive cyanine dye (UCD-1) bearing direct-COOH functionalized indole ring were synthesized, characterized and subjected to photophysical investigations including their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein in phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Both of the dyes exhibit strong interaction with BSA in phosphate buffer with high apparent binding constant. A judicious tuning of hydrophobic main backbone with reactive functionality for associative interaction with active site of BSA has been found to be necessary for BSA detection in PBS.

  2. Distribution of chylomicrons and albumin in dog kidney

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, G. G.

    1967-01-01

    1. Under specified experimental conditions the distribution space of labelled chylomicrons in the kidney was 13·8 ± 0·9 ml./100 g. tissue. The assumption is supported that this provides a measure for the quantity of intravascular plasma constituents. 2. Values for red blood cells and albumin distribution spaces were 5·2 ± 0·6 and 20·2 ± 1·0 ml./100 g tissue, respectively, in the whole kidney. The ratio of tissue haematocrit over simultaneous arterial haematocrit averaged 0·56. The extravascular albumin fraction amounted to about 31·0% of the total albumin in the whole kidney. 3. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between osmotic urine/plasma (U/P) ratios (within the approximate limits of 0·6-1·8) and quantities of extravascular albumin in the medulla. PMID:6059001

  3. Dielectric properties of albumin and yolk of avian egg.

    PubMed

    Lokhande, M P; Arbad, B R; Landge, M G; Mehrotra, S C

    1996-04-01

    The dielectric properties of albumin and yolk of eggs of hen and duck have been investigated using the time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in the frequency range 10 MHz to 10 GHz at room temperature. The conductivity and pH values were also measured. It has been found that the values of dielectric constant (epsilon s) is lower, while the values of relaxation time tau(ps) are higher than that of pure water possibly due to the bound water present in the yolk and albumin of the avian egg. The dielectric constant for albumin is more than that for yolk of eggs, while reverse is found with the values of relaxation time. Also albumin shows approximately three times higher conductivity than that of yolk. In the case of relatively older (by 2 days) eggs, the dielectric parameters tend to be slightly increased.

  4. 99M-technetium labeled macroaggregated human serum albumin pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Winchell, Harry S.; Barak, Morton; Van Fleet, III, Parmer

    1977-05-17

    A reagent comprising macroaggregated human serum albumin having dispersed therein particles of stannous tin and a method for instantly making a labeled pharmaceutical therefrom, are disclosed. The labeled pharmaceutical is utilized in organ imaging.

  5. Preparation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) nanoparticles by desolvation using a membrane contactor: a new tool for large scale production.

    PubMed

    Yedomon, B; Fessi, H; Charcosset, C

    2013-11-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are attractive drug delivery systems as they can be prepared under soft conditions and incorporate several kinds of molecules. The aim of this study was to upscale the desolvation process for preparing Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) nanoparticles using a membrane contactor. At a first step, the BSA nanoparticles were prepared at small scale using a syringe pump. BSA nanoparticles of 139 nm in size, with a polydispersity index of 0.046, were obtained at the optimal conditions: pH 8.2, 100 mg mL(-1) BSA albumin solution (2 mL), and 1 mL min(-1) flow rate of ethanol addition (8 mL). The upscaling with a membrane contactor was achieved by permeating ethanol through the pores of a Shirasu Porous Glass (SPG Technology Co., Japan) membrane and circulating the aqueous phase tangentially to the membrane surface. By increasing the pressure of the ethanol from 1 to 2.7 bars, a progressive decrease in nanoparticle size was obtained with a high nanoparticles yield (around 94-96%). In addition, the flow rate of the circulating phase did not affect the BSA nanoparticle characteristics. At the optimal conditions (pH 8.2, 100 mg mL(-1) BSA albumin solution, pressure of ethanol 2.7 bars, flow rate of the circulating phase 30.7 mL s(-1)), the BSA nanoparticles showed similar characteristics to those obtained with the syringe pump. Large batches of BSA nanoparticles were prepared up to 10 g BSA. The BSA nanoparticles were stable at least during 2 months at 4 °C, and their characteristics were reproducible. It was then concluded that the membrane contactor technique could be a suitable method for the preparation of albumin nanoparticles at large scale with properties similar to that obtained at small scale.

  6. Albumin leakage in online hemodiafiltration, more convective transport, more losses?

    PubMed

    Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Abad, Soraya; Aragoncillo, Inés; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; López-Gómez, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) has now demonstrated some benefits in reducing mortality. It seems that rising convective volumes improve the outcomes, but the risks of it, such as albumin leakage, are not well defined yet. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the albumin leakage using two different filters with 20 and 30 L of post-dilution OL-HDF. In this cross-sectional study, 20 prevalent patients receiving post-dilution OL-HDL were included. We analyzed two dialyzers: FX1000, FMC and Polyflux 210H, Gambro. During four consecutive dialysis sessions, monitors were programmed using control-volume to obtain 20 or 30 L with both dialyzers. We collected albumin samples of the effluent at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min and performed area under the curve (AUC) determinations for evaluating the losses. Mean patient age was 60 ± 9 years, and 70% were men. Albumin leakage was significant higher with Polyflux 210H when compared to FX 1000 FMC. A convective volume of 30 L produced greater albumin leakage than 20 L with both filters, though only with the FX 1000 FMC was it significant (minimum albumin leakage during first hour with FX 1000 FMC 20 L: 79.2 [0.0-175.7] mg; 30 liters: 403.3 [63.5-960.7] mg; with PF 210 Gambro 20 L: 869.1 [420.0-3214.7] mg; 30 L: 1841.7 [443.8-3417.5] mg). During OL-HDF, convective transport causes albumin leakage at least during the first hour. The albumin concentration in the effluent differs according to the type of filter used and the convective volume.

  7. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  8. Peptide-derivatized albumins that inhibit fibrin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joseph W; Doolittle, Russell F

    2011-11-15

    Synthetic peptides patterned on sequences that appear during thrombin proteolysis of fibrinogen are known to influence fibrin formation in very different ways. A-Knob sequences (GPR-) inhibit polymerization, but B-knob sequences (GHR-) can actually enhance the process. We now report that when such peptides are attached to albumin carriers, both knob conjugates inhibit fibrin formation. In contrast, the 2-aminoethylthiol-albumin conjugate control enhances the polymerization to the same degree as albumin. The peptide AHRPam, which is known to bind exclusively to the βC holes of fibrinogen/fibrin, nullifies the inhibitory effects of the GHRPYGGGCam-albumin conjugate on fibrin polymerization, indicating that the inhibition was exclusively due to interactions with βC holes. AHRPam was much less effective in countering inhibition by the GPRPGGGGCam-albumin conjugate, suggesting that the observed effects with this conjugate involve mainly the γC holes of fibrin/fibrinogen. This study demonstrates that peptides modeled on fibrin polymerization knobs tethered to albumin retain their capacity to interact with fibrinogen/fibrin and may prove useful as inhibitors of clotting in vivo.

  9. Identification of albumin-binding proteins in capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Isolated fat tissue microvessels and lung, whose capillary endothelia express in situ specific binding sites for albumin, were homogenized and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis and electroblotting. The nitrocellulose strips were incubated with either albumin-gold (Alb-Au) and directly visualized, or with [125I]albumin (monomeric or polymeric) and autoradiographed. The extracts of both microvascular endothelium and the lung express albumin-binding proteins (ABPs) represented by two pairs of polypeptides with major components of molecular mass 31 and 18 kD. The ABP peptides have pIs 8.05 to 8.75. Rabbit aortic endothelium, used as control, does not express detectable amounts of ABPs. The ABPs subjected to electrophoresis bind specifically and with high affinity (Kd = approximately 60 X 10(-9)M) both monomeric and polymeric albumin: the binding is saturable at approximately 80 nM concentration and 50% inhibition is reached at 5.5 micrograms/ml albumin concentration. Sulfhydryl-reducing agents beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol do not markedly affect the ABPs electrophoretic mobility and binding properties. As indicated by cell surface iodination of isolated capillary endothelium followed by electroblotting, autoradiography, and incubation with Alb-Au, the bands specifically stained by this ligand are also labeled with radioiodine. PMID:2839518

  10. Gemcitabine-loaded magnetic albumin nanospheres for cancer chemohyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongbo; Ke, Fei; An, Yanli; Hou, Xinxin; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Mei; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-03-01

    Eliminating cancer without harming normal body tissue remains a longstanding challenge in medicine. Toward this goal, we prepared nanosized magnetic albumin nanospheres encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) and antitumor drugs (Gemcitabine, GEM). Magnetic albumin nanospheres (average size ≈ 224 nm) had good magnetic responsiveness upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field even though Fe3O4 was encased in nanospheres. Thermodynamic test showed that Fe3O4 could serve as a heating source under AMF and lead the nanospheres to reach their steady temperature (45 °C). The release results in vitro indicated that nanospheres had an obvious effect of sustained release of GEM. The result of cytotoxicity assay showed that the toxicity of this material was classified as grade 1, which belongs to no cytotoxicity. The antitumor efficacy of the GEM/Fe3O4 albumin nanospheres combined with magnetic fluid hyperthermia on non-small lung cancer cell line GlC-82 was examined by MTT assay and flow cytometry assay. Compared with nanospheres entrapping GEM group, nanospheres entrapping Fe3O4 combined with MFH group, and GEM/Fe3O4 albumin nanospheres without MFH group, the GEM/Fe3O4 albumin nanospheres exhibited enhanced antitumor efficacy. Thus, the GEM/Fe3O4 albumin nanospheres have promising applications in cancer treatment.

  11. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R. )

    1989-10-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. {sup 125}I- and/or {sup 131}I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. {sup 99m}Tc-labeled DTPA and {sup 51}Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h.

  12. Plasma protein loss during surgery: beneficial effects of albumin substitution.

    PubMed

    Horstick, G; Lauterbach, M; Kempf, T; Ossendorf, M; Kopacz, L; Heimann, A; Lehr, H A; Bhakdi, S; Horstick, M; Meyer, J; Kempski, O

    2001-07-01

    Plasma protein loss during abdominal surgery is a known phenomenon, but its possible pathophysiological relevance has remained unknown. The present study evaluates the effects of albumin substitution on systemic and local hemodynamics and cellular interactions in the mesenteric microcirculation. Rats underwent median laparotomy and exteriorization of an ileal loop for intravital microscopy of the mesenteric microcirculation. Plasma protein concentrations, systemic and local hemodynamics were recorded during the follow up period, with or without albumin substitution. Depending on the time course of plasma protein loss in control experiments, 80% of the calculated protein loss was infused during the first 2 h of surgery, and the other 20% over the following 5 h of intravital microscopy. The control group received a continuous infusion of normal saline. Plasma protein loss was mainly due to loss of albumin. A significant increase in adherent and rolling leukocytes was observed during the course of mesenteric exteriorization, which was almost entirely reversed by albumin replacement. Albumin substitution led to stabilisation of mean arterial pressure and abdominal blood flow and also attenuated reductions in arterial base excess. Albumin infusions to replace plasma protein loss may be a simple and effective measure to attenuate microcirculatory disturbances and may be of benefit in patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  13. Novel routes of albumin passage across the glomerular filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Castrop, H; Schießl, I M

    2017-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney diseases of various aetiologies and an unambiguous symptom of the compromised integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that albuminuria per se aggravates the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. This review covers new aspects of the movement of large plasma proteins across the glomerular filtration barrier in health and disease. Specifically, this review focuses on the role of endocytosis and transcytosis of albumin by podocytes, which constitutes a new pathway of plasma proteins across the filtration barrier. Thus, we summarize what is known about the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis by podocytes and address the fate of the endocytosed albumin, which is directed to lysosomal degradation or transcellular movement with subsequent vesicular release into the urinary space. We also address the functional consequences of overt albumin endocytosis by podocytes, such as the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which might eventually result in a deterioration of podocyte function. Finally, we consider the diagnostic potential of podocyte-derived albumin-containing vesicles in the urine as an early marker of a compromised glomerular barrier function. In terms of new technical approaches, the review covers how our knowledge of the movement of albumin across the glomerular filtration barrier has expanded by the use of new intravital imaging techniques.

  14. The 2012 Ferrara seismic sequence: from a 1D reliable crustal structure for moment tensor solutions to strong implications for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttinelli, M.; Malagnini, L.; Herrmann, R. B.; Munafò, I.; Anselmi, M.; Akinci, A.; Boschi, E.

    2012-12-01

    On May 20 2012, an event of ML 5.9 (MW 5.6) struck the southern edge of the Po river plain (Pianura Padana). The earthquake was preceded by a foreshock of ML 4.1 (MW 3.8), less than 3 hours before the MW 5.6 main. Hypocentral depths were 6.3 km for both events. Centroid depths were 5 and 6 km, respectively. The activated fault was a reverse one, dipping to the south. Then a complex seismic sequence started, in which more than six earthquakes with ML greater than 5 struck the area, the last one on June 3, 2012. Aftershocks delineated a 50 km-long and 10-15 km-wide zone, approximately elongated in the WE direction. More than 2100 events were located between May 19 and June 25 2012 by the INGV National Seismic Network, 80 of them with ML greater than 3.5. The damage due to the ML 5+ earthquakes was widespread, as they severely hit historical towns and industrial infrastructures. However, a striking inconsistency exists between the relatively small moment magnitudes and the corresponding high level of damage. In order to define a velocity structure for the crust beneath the Pianura Padana, to be used for waveform inversion of moment tensors, we gathered all the geophysical and geological information available for the area. The model is characterized by very thick and shallow Quaternary sediments, to be used for the inversion of broadband waveforms for moment tensor (MT) solutions, in the frequency band between 0.02-0.1 Hz. We calculated moment tensors for 20 events down to MW~3.2. We demonstrate how surface waves dominate the seismograms in the region, which may have played a major role in enhancing the damage to industrial structures observed in the epicentral area. Synthetic seismograms computed using the developed model well reproduced the anomalous durations of the ground motion observed in Pianura Padana, also highlighting important implications for the seismic hazard in the entire area. The present seismic hazard assessment as well as the size of the historical

  15. Three-dimensionally porous graphene: A high-performance adsorbent for removal of albumin-bonded bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun Fang; Gao, Qiang; Xia, Kai Sheng; Huang, Zhi Yuan; Han, Bo; Zhou, Cheng Gang

    2017-01-01

    The development of bilirubin adsorbents with high adsorption efficiencies towards albumin-bonded bilirubin is still a considerable challenge. In this work, a three-dimensionally porous graphene (3D-pGR) has been fabricated through a simple carbon dioxide (CO2) activation of thermally exfoliated graphite oxide (EGO). Intriguingly, the resultant 3D-pGR material showed hierarchically micro-meso-macroporous structure, high specific surface area of up to 843m(2)g(-1), and large pore volume as high as 2.71cm(3)g(-1). Besides, the large planar π-configuration structure of 3D-pGR made it possible to compete effectively with albumin for bilirubin binding. Taking advantages of these fantastic characteristics, the 3D-pGR was demonstrated to be extraordinarily efficient for bilirubin removal from a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-rich solution. Under optimized conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity of 3D-pGR for BSA-bonded bilirubin was up to 126.1mgg(-1), which is not only significantly higher than the adsorption capacities of currently available adsorbents towards albumin-bonded bilirubin, but also superior to those of many reported adsorbents towards free bilirubin. In addition, the hemolysis assay of 3D-pGR indicated that this material had negligible hemolysis effect. Findings from this study may open up important new possibilities for removal of protein-bonded toxins.

  16. Drug binding to human serum albumin: abridged review of results obtained with high-performance liquid chromatography and circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Ascoli, Giorgio A; Domenici, Enrico; Bertucci, Carlo

    2006-09-01

    The drug binding to plasma and tissue proteins are fundamental factors in determining the overall pharmacological activity of a drug. Human serum albumin (HSA), together with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), are the most important plasma proteins, which act as drug carriers, with drug pharmacokinetic implications, resulting in important clinical impacts for drugs that have a relatively narrow therapeutic index. This review focuses on the combination of biochromatography and circular dichroism as an effective approach for the characterization of albumin binding sites and their enantioselectivity. Furthermore, their applications to the study of changes in the binding properties of the protein arising by the reversible or covalent binding of drugs are discussed, and examples of physiological relevance reported. Perspectives of these studies reside in supporting the development of new drugs, which require miniaturization to facilitate the screening of classes of compounds for their binding to the target protein, and a deeper characterization of the mechanisms involved in the molecular recognition processes.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  18. Sulforhodamine B interacts with albumin to lower surface tension and protect against ventilation injury of flooded alveoli.

    PubMed

    Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2015-02-01

    In the acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar flooding by proteinaceous edema liquid impairs gas exchange. Mechanical ventilation is used as a supportive therapy. In regions of the edematous lung, alveolar flooding is heterogeneous, and stress is concentrated in aerated alveoli. Ventilation exacerbates stress concentrations and injuriously overexpands aerated alveoli. Injury degree is proportional to surface tension, T. Lowering T directly lessens injury. Furthermore, as heterogeneous flooding causes the stress concentrations, promoting equitable liquid distribution between alveoli should, indirectly, lessen injury. We present a new theoretical analysis suggesting that liquid is trapped in discrete alveoli by a pressure barrier that is proportional to T. Experimentally, we identify two rhodamine dyes, sulforhodamine B and rhodamine WT, as surface active in albumin solution and investigate whether the dyes lessen ventilation injury. In the isolated rat lung, we micropuncture a surface alveolus, instill albumin solution, and obtain an area with heterogeneous alveolar flooding. We demonstrate that rhodamine dye addition lowers T, reduces ventilation-induced injury, and facilitates liquid escape from flooded alveoli. In vitro we show that rhodamine dye is directly surface active in albumin solution. We identify sulforhodamine B as a potential new therapeutic agent for the treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  19. Formulation and Characterization of Bovine Serum Albumin-Loaded Niosome.

    PubMed

    Moghassemi, Saeid; Hadjizadeh, Afra; Omidfar, Kobra

    2017-01-01

    Niosomal vesicle, as a unique novel drug delivery system, is synthesized by non-ionic surfactants. Both hydrophilic and lipophilic drugs and also biomacromolecular agents, such as peptides and proteins can be encapsulated in this vesicular particle. Regarding polypeptide-based component loading, and delivery potential of the niosome, some valuable studies have been conducted in recent years. However, exploring the full potential of this approach requires fine tuned optimization and characterization approaches. Therefore, this study was conducted to achieve the following two goals. First, formulation and optimization of bovine serum albumin (BSA) load and release behavior as a function of cholesterol (CH) to sorbitan monostearate (Span 60) molar ratio. Second, investigating a cost- and time-effective polypeptide detecting method via methyl orange (MO) dye. To this aim, BSA-loaded niosomes were prepared by reversed-phase evaporation technique. The effect of CH to Sorbitan monostearate (Span 60) molar ratio on noisome entrapment efficiency (EE%) and release profile of BSA was studied using a ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer technique (NanoDrop 2000/2000c).Niosome with a 60% CH content showed the highest BSA EE% and release behavior. Then, BSA was dyed using MO in an acidic solution and used in BSA-niosome formulation. The MO-colored protein, loaded into the vesicles, was successfully assessed by an inverted light microscope, in order to observe the protein location in the vesicle. The results obtained in this study can be useful for various applications in different fields, including pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and drug delivery in biomedical and tissue engineering.

  20. Human serum albumin complexes with chlorophyll and chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Ouameur, A Ahmed; Marty, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2005-02-15

    Porphyrins and their metal derivatives are strong protein binders. Some of these compounds have been used for radiation sensitization therapy of cancer and are targeted to interact with cellular DNA and protein. The presence of several high-affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it possible target for many organic and inorganic molecules. Chlorophyll a and chlorophyllin (a food-grade derivative of chlorophyll), the ubiquitous green plant pigment widely consumed by humans, are potent inhibitors of experimental carcinogenesis and interact with protein and DNA in many ways. This study was designed to examine the interaction of HSA with chlorophyll (Chl) and chlorophyllin (Chln) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the pigment binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of porphyrin complexation on protein secondary structure. Spectroscopic results showed that chlorophyll and chlorophyllin are located along the polypeptide chains with no specific interaction. Stronger protein association was observed for Chl than for Chln, with overall binding constants of K(Chl) = 2.9 x 10(4)M(-1) and K(Chln) = 7.0 x 10(3)M(-1). The protein conformation was altered (infrared data) with reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 41-40% and increase of beta-structure from 22% (free HSA) to 29-35% in the pigment-protein complexes. Using the CDSSTR program (CD data) also showed major reduction of alpha-helix from 66% (free HSA) to 58 and 55% upon complexation with Chl and Chln, respectively.

  1. Effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Mochidzuki, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Hiraide, Hatsue; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added to filter paper during the hydrolysis of cellulase. Adding BSA before the addition of the cellulase enhances enzyme activity in the solution, thereby increasing the conversion rate of cellulose. After 48 h of BSA treatment, the BSA adsorption quantities are 3.3, 4.6, 7.8, 17.2, and 28.3 mg/g substrate, each with different initial BSA concentration treatments at 50 °C; in addition, more cellulase was adsorbed onto the filter paper at 50 °C compared with 35 °C. After 48 h of hydrolysis, the free-enzyme activity could not be measured without the BSA treatment, whereas the remaining activity of the filter paper activity was approximately 41 % when treated with 1.0 mg/mL BSA. Even after 96 h of hydrolysis, 25 % still remained. Meanwhile, after 48 h of incubation without substrate, the remaining enzyme activities were increased 20.7 % (from 43.7 to 52.7 %) and 94.8 % (from 23.3 to 45.5 %) at 35 and 50 °C, respectively. Moreover, the effect of the BSA was more obvious at 35 °C compared with 50 °C. When using 15 filter paper cellulase units per gram substrate cellulase loading at 50 °C, the cellulose conversion was increased from 75 % (without BSA treatment) to ≥90 % when using BSA dosages between 0.1 and 1.5 mg/mL. Overall, these results suggest that there are promising strategies for BSA treatment in the reduction of enzyme requirements during the hydrolysis of cellulose.

  2. Protein-bound uremic retention solutes.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Philippe; Dou, Laetitia; Cerini, Claire; Berland, Yvon

    2003-10-01

    Protein-bound uremic retention solutes are molecules with low molecular weight (MW) but should be considered middle or high MW substances. This article describes the best known substances of this group, which include p-cresol, indoxyl sulfate, hippuric acid, 3-carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furan-propionic acid (CMPF), and homocysteine. At concentrations encountered during uremia, p-cresol inhibits phagocyte function and decreases leukocyte adhesion to cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells. CMPF has been implicated in anemia and neurologic abnormalities of uremia. CMPF could alter the metabolism of drugs of inhibiting their binding to albumin and their tubular excretion. Indoxyl sulfate administrated to uremic rats increases the rate of progression of renal failure. Hippuric acid inhibits glucose utilization in the muscle, and its serum concentration is correlated with neurologic symptoms of uremia. Homocysteine predisposes uremic patients to cardiovascular disease through impairment of endothelial and smooth muscle cell functions. The removal of protein-bound compounds by conventional hemodialysis is low. Other strategies to decrease their concentrations include increase in dialyze pore size, daily hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, reduction of production or acceleration of degradation, and preservation of residual renal function.

  3. Real-timely monitoring the interaction between bovine serum albumin and drugs in aqueous with terahertz metamaterial biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fangrong; Guo, Enze; Xu, Xin; Li, Peng; Xu, Xinlong; Yin, Shan; Wang, Yuee; Chen, Tao; Yin, Xianhua; Zhang, Wentao

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a metamaterial (MM) resonator used as a sensitive biosensor is designed and fabricated for monitoring the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and four kinds of drug solutions in real time. The transmission spectra of the resonator are simulated and measured with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system where the distinct resonance frequency shifts are observed. The experimental results indicate that the interactions between BSA and every kind of solution are violent before the reaction reaches equilibrium, and the reaction solutions manifest varying permittivity. Moreover, different reaction solutions show different frequency shifts and reaction times. The MM resonator worked as an effective biosensor achieves to monitor the interaction between BSA and drug solutions in real time, which is very useful for the development of novel drugs and other biomedical applications.

  4. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns.

  5. Viscoelastic behavior and microstructure of protein solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty percent solutions of calcium caseinate (CC), egg albumin (EA), fish protein isolate (FPI), soy protein isolate (SPI), wheat gluten (WG), and whey protein isolate (WPI) were examined during heating by small amplitude oscillatory shear measurements, which provided an indication of protein behav...

  6. Apatite deposition on titanium surfaces--the role of albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Serro, A P; Fernandes, A C; Saramago, B; Lima, J; Barbosa, M A

    1997-07-01

    Titanium implant surfaces are known to spontaneously nucleate apatite layers when in contact with simulated body fluids. However, adsorption of proteins may influence the process of apatite layer formation. In this study the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption in the process of apatite deposition on titanium substrates is investigated. Deposition of calcium phosphate was induced by immersing titanium substrates in a Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) for times ranging from 1 to 23 days. The resulting substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), wettability measurements and electrochemical impedance determinations. All these methods indicate the presence of a calcium phosphate layer. The same procedure was repeated substituting HBSS with a solution of BSA in HBSS. Although SEM, EDS and electrochemical impedance spectra do not reveal the presence of an apatite layer, XPS analysis strongly indicates that the inhibition of apatite formation by BSA is only partial. The competition between BSA adsorption and apatite deposition seems to lead to a mixed film where the protein co-exists with calcium phosphate. Wettability studies suggest that this surface film is heterogeneous and porous, similar to the thicker films formed in albumin-free HBSS.

  7. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21 H,23 H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4″,4‴-[21 H,23 H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, 1H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with β-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  8. Aggregation of two carboxylic derivatives of porphyrin and their affinity to bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yao-Bing; Wang, Yi-Nong; Ma, Jian-Biao

    2006-07-01

    Aggregation of two porphyrin derivatives with carboxylic groups, 4-oxo-4-((4-(10,15,20-triphenyl-21H,23H-porphin-5-yl)phenyl)amino)butanoic acid (MAC) and 4,4',4'',4'''-[21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(4,1-phenyleneimino)]tetrakis(4-oxo-butanoic acid) (TA4C), and their affinity to bovine serum albumin were investigated via absorption spectrometry, (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectrometry. MAC and its complexes with beta-cyclodextrin could form aggregates in an aqueous solution while TA4C was self-associated loosely. From the absorbance profiles of MAC in the titration of bovine serum albumin, hypochromicity was observed without any shift of the maximum absorbance wavelength. In both absorption spectra of TA4C in aqueous solutions and in solid state, three Q bands appeared in the visible region. In the measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra upon titration of BSA, some spectral changes of TA4C were observed. The whole procedure of titration could be divided into three successive stages. The three-banded profiles of TA4C might be explained according to a loose dimer model.

  9. Albumin Kinetics in Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Segersvärd, Ralf; Wernerman, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background The drop in plasma albumin concentration following surgical trauma is well known, but the temporal pattern of the detailed mechanisms behind are less well described. The aim of this explorative study was to assess changes in albumin synthesis and transcapillary escape rate (TER) following major surgical trauma, at the time of peak elevations in two well-recognized markers of inflammation. Methods This was a clinical trial of radiolabeled human serum albumin for the study of TER and plasma volume. Ten patients were studied immediately preoperatively and on the 2nd postoperative day after major pancreatic surgery. Albumin synthesis rate was measured by the flooding dose technique employing incorporation of isotopically labelled phenylalanine. Results Fractional synthesis rate of albumin increased from 11.7 (95% CI: 8.9, 14.5) to 15.0 (11.7, 18.4) %/day (p = 0.027), whereas the corresponding absolute synthesis rate was unchanged, 175 (138, 212) versus 150 (107, 192) mg/kg/day (p = 0.21). TER was unchanged, 4.9 (3.1, 6.8) %/hour versus 5.5 (3.9, 7.2) (p = 0.63). Plasma volume was unchanged but plasma albumin decreased from 33.5 (30.9, 36.2) to 22.1 (19.8, 24.3) g/L. (p<0.001). Conclusion Two days after major abdominal surgery, at the time-point when two biomarkers of generalised inflammation were at their peak and the plasma albumin concentration had decreased by 33%, we were unable to show any difference in the absolute synthesis rate of albumin, TER and plasma volume as compared with values obtained immediately pre-operatively. This suggests that capillary leakage, if elevated postoperatively, had ceased at that time-point. The temporal relations between albumin kinetics, capillary leakage and generalised inflammation need to be further explored. Trial Registration clinicaltrialsregister.eu: EudraCT 2010-08529-21 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01194492 PMID:26313170

  10. Albumin transfer across the choroid plexus of South American opossum (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed Central

    Knott, G W; Dziegielewska, K M; Habgood, M D; Li, Z S; Saunders, N R

    1997-01-01

    1. Blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transfer of various exogenous albumins has been investigated in developing Monodelphis domestica (South American grey short-tailed opossum) and compared with the steady-state CSF: plasma ratios for endogenous (Monodelphis) albumin. Ratios for Monodelphis albumin and human albumin were similar and were the highest at postnatal day 5 (P5) (48.2 +/- 4.4 and 40.6 +/- 4.5%, respectively). The ratio for bovine albumin was similar to the steady-state ratio for Monodelphis albumin at P7-8 but became consistently lower than the Monodelphis albumin ratio at all other ages until P32-36 when all albumins tested attained a similar low ratio. The CSF:plasma ratio of chemically modified (succinylated) bovine albumin was always significantly lower than that of other albumins, except at the oldest age examined (P32-36). 2. Immunocytochemistry showed that within the brain, albumin was confined to the lumen and endothelial cells of blood vessels. In the choroid plexus only a small proportion (0.2-1.7% of the total cell number) of epithelial cells was positive for albumin, both endogenous and exogenous, at all ages studied (except the 3rd ventricle where cells were only positive from P8). The CSF was strongly positive for all albumins. The peak proportion of positive cells and of albumin concentrations in CSF occurred at P8. These findings suggest that the primary route for penetration of albumin into CSF is directly across the choroid plexus rather than via the brain. 3. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry revealed that the same epithelial cells contained both endogenous (Monodelphis) and exogenous (human) albumin. In contrast, for succinylated albumin, at P7 only about 35% (lateral ventricle) and 50% (4th ventricle) of Monodelphis albumin-positive cells were also positive for succinylated albumin, but by P30 this proportion increased to 90% at both sites. 4. Thus the developing choroid plexus distinguishes between different albumins. Chemical

  11. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-07

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×10(9) MBs ml(-1) using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C(3)F(8)) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd(3+) ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T(2)*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T(1)-, T(2)- and T(2)*-weighted MR images. The r(1) and r(2) relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s(-1)mM(-1), respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T(1)-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual

  12. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×109 MBs ml-1 using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C3F8) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd3+ ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T2*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MR images. The r1 and r2 relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s-1mM-1, respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T1-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual-modality contrast agent for

  13. Specific albumin binding to microvascular endothelium in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Schnitzer, J.E.; Carley, W.W.; Palade, G.E. )

    1988-03-01

    The specific binding of rat serum albumin (RSA) to confluent microvascular endothelial cells in culture derived from the vasculature of the rat epididymal fat pad was studied at 4{degree}C by radioassay and immunocytochemistry. Radioiodinated RSA ({sup 125}I-RSA) binding to the cells reached equilibrium at {approximately} 20 min incubation. Albumin binding was a slowly saturating function over concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 50 mg/ml. Specific RSA binding with a moderate apparent affinity constant of 1.0 mg/ml and with a maximum binding concentration of 90 ng/cm{sup 2} was immunolocalized with anti-RSA antibody to the outer (free) side of the enothelium. Scatchard analysis of the binding yielded a nonlinear binding curve with a concave-upward shape. Dissociation rate analysis supports negative cooperativity of albumin binding, but multiple binding sites may also be present. Albumin binding fulfilled many requirements for ligand specificity including saturability, reversibility, competibility, and dependence on both cell type and cell number. The results are discussed in terms of past in situ investigations on the localization of albumin binding to vascular endothelium and its effect on transendothelial molecular transport.

  14. Interaction of mycotoxin zearalenone with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Poór, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Gerner, Zsófia; Lemli, Beáta

    2017-03-27

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a mycotoxin produced mainly by Fusarium species. Fungal contamination of cereals and plants can result in the formation of ZEN, leading to its presence in different foods, animal feeds, and drinks. Because ZEN is an endocrine disruptor, it causes reproductive disorders in farm animals and hyperoestrogenic syndromes in humans. Despite toxicokinetic properties of ZEN were studied in more species, we have no information regarding the interaction of ZEN with serum albumin. Since albumin commonly plays an important role in the toxicokinetics of different toxins, interaction of ZEN with albumin has of high biological importance. Therefore the interaction of ZEN with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using spectroscopic methods, ultrafiltration, and molecular modeling studies. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies demonstrate that ZEN forms complex with HSA. Binding constant (K) of ZEN-HSA complex was quantified with fluorescence quenching technique. The determined binding constant (logK=5.1) reflects the strong interaction of ZEN with albumin suggesting the potential biological importance of ZEN-HSA complex formation. Based on the results of the investigations with site markers as well as docking studies, ZEN occupies a non-conventional binding site on HSA. Considering the above listed observations, we should keep in mind this interaction if we would like to precisely understand the toxicokinetic behavior of ZEN.

  15. Quantification of osmotic water transport in vivo using fluorescent albumin.

    PubMed

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Vertommen, Didier; Jamar, François; Rippe, Bengt; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane is applied during peritoneal dialysis to remove the excess water accumulated in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery of aquaporin water channels and the generation of transgenic animals have stressed the need for novel and accurate methods to unravel molecular mechanisms of water permeability in vivo. Here, we describe the use of fluorescently labeled albumin as a reliable indicator of osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane in a well-established mouse model of peritoneal dialysis. After detailed evaluation of intraperitoneal tracer mass kinetics, the technique was validated against direct volumetry, considered as the gold standard. The pH-insensitive dye Alexa Fluor 555-albumin was applied to quantify osmotic water transport across the mouse peritoneal membrane resulting from modulating dialysate osmolality and genetic silencing of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Quantification of osmotic water transport using Alexa Fluor 555-albumin closely correlated with direct volumetry and with estimations based on radioiodinated ((125)I) serum albumin (RISA). The low intraperitoneal pressure probably accounts for the negligible disappearance of the tracer from the peritoneal cavity in this model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the appropriateness of pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 555-albumin as a practical and reliable intraperitoneal volume tracer to quantify osmotic water transport in vivo.

  16. Purification and Characterization of Bovine Serum Albumin Using Chromatographic Method

    PubMed Central

    Balkani, Sanaz; Shamekhi, Sara; Raoufinia, Ramin; Parvan, Reza; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Albumin is an abundant protein of blood and has many biopharmaceutical applications. The aim of this study was to purify bovine serum albumin (BSA) using produced rabbit anti-BSA antibody. Methods: The polyclonal antibody was produced against the BSA in rabbits. Then, the pure BSA was injected to three white New Zealand rabbits. ELISA test was done to evaluate antibody production. After antibody purification,the purified antibody was attached to CNBr-activated sepharose and finally it was used for purification of albumin from bovine serum. Western blotting analysis was used for functional assessment of immunoaffinity purified BSA. Results: The titer of anti-bovine albumin determined by ELISA was obtained 1: 256000. The SDS-PAGE showed up to 98% purity of isolated BSA and western blotting confirmed the BSA functionality. Purified bovine serum albumin by affinity chromatography showed a single band with molecular weight of 66 KDa. Conclusion: Affinity chromatography using produced rabbit anti-BSA antibody would be an economical and safe method for purification of BSA. PMID:28101473

  17. Regional differences in pleural lymphatic albumin concentration in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Schultz, E.L.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Staub, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    We used quantitative reflectance autoradiography to compare the concentration of albumin in visceral pleural lymphatics at the cranial and caudal ends of the sheep's lung in the vertical (60 degrees head-up) and horizontal (supine) positions. Twelve to fourteen hours after injecting 125I-albumin intravenously we placed four anesthetized sheep in the vertical position to establish a microvascular hydrostatic pressure gradient along the vertical height of the lung. We placed two anesthetized sheep in the horizontal position. Four hours later, we fixed the left lung and removed visceral pleural tissue blocks from the cranial and caudal ends, separated by a 15-cm distance, along the costovertebral margin. We measured the silver grain density in the pleural lymphatic autoradiograms by dark-field reflectance microspectrophotometry. In the vertical position, the lymph albumin concentration at the cranial end (top) of the lung averaged 2.5 +/- 0.4 g/dl compared with the caudal end (bottom), which averaged 1.8 +/- 0.3 g/dl. The difference (42% greater at the top than the bottom) is significant (P less than 0.05). The computed gradient in perimicrovascular interstitial albumin osmotic pressure was 0.26 +/- 0.13 cmH2O/cm lung height. There were no differences between the cranial and caudal lymphatic groups in the two horizontal sheep. We conclude that in the sheep lung there is a gradient in perimicrovascular albumin concentration due to the vertical gradient in microvascular hydrostatic pressure.

  18. Multiple Factors Influence Glomerular Albumin Permeability in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Ruben M.; Wagner, Mark C.; Patel, Monica; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B.; Rhodes, George J.; Wang, Exing; Wean, Sarah E.; Clendenon, Sherry S.

    2012-01-01

    Different laboratories recently reported incongruous results describing the quantification of albumin filtration using two-photon microscopy. We investigated the factors that influence the glomerular sieving coefficient for albumin (GSCA) in an effort to explain these discordant reports and to develop standard operating procedures for determining GSCA. Multiple factors influenced GSCA, including the kidney depth of image acquisition (10–20 μm was appropriate), the selection of fluorophore (probes emitting longer wavelengths were superior), the selection of plasma regions for fluorescence measurements, the size and molecular dispersion characteristics of dextran polymers if used, dietary status, and the genetic strain of rat. Fasting reduced the GSCA in Simonsen Munich Wistar rats from 0.035±0.005 to 0.016±0.004 (P<0.01). Frömter Munich Wistar rats had a much lower GSCA in both the fed and the fasted states. Finally, we documented extensive albumin transcytosis with vesicular and tubular delivery to and fusion with the basolateral membrane in S1 proximal tubule cells. In summary, these results help explain the previously conflicting microscopy and micropuncture data describing albumin filtration and highlight the dynamic nature of glomerular albumin permeability. PMID:22223875

  19. Effect of human serum albumin on the kinetics of 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N-N'-N″ Triacetylchitotrioside hydrolysis catalyzed by hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Cristian; Abuin, Elsa; Lissi, Eduardo; Montecinos, Rodrigo

    2011-08-01

    The effect of human serum albumin (HSA) addition on the rate of hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N-N'-N″ triacetylchitotrioside ((NAG)(3)-MUF) catalyzed by hen egg white lysozyme has been measured in aqueous solution (citrate buffer 50 mM pH = 5.2 at 37 °C). The presence of HSA leads to a decrease in the rate of the process. The reaction follows a Michaelis-Menten mechanism under all the conditions employed. The catalytic rate constant decreases tenfold when the albumin concentration increases, while the Michaelis constant remains almost constant in the albumin concentration range employed. Ultracentrifugation experiments indicate that the main origin of the observed variation in the kinetic behavior is related to the existence of an HSA-lysozyme interaction. Interestingly, the dependence of the catalytic rate constant with albumin concentration parallels the decrease of the free enzyme concentration. We interpret these results in terms of the presence in the system of two enzyme populations; namely, the HSA associated enzyme which does not react and the free enzyme reacting as in the absence of albumin. Other factors such as association of the substrate to albumin or macromolecular crowding effects due to the presence of albumin are discarded. Theoretical modeling of the structure of the HSA-lysozyme complex shows that the Glu35 and Asp52 residues located in the active site of lysozyme are oriented toward the HSA surface. This conformation will inactivate lysozyme molecules bound to HSA.

  20. Binding of human serum albumin to N-(p-ethoxy-phenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl)thiourea and synchronous fluorescence determination of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fengling; Wang, Junli; Cui, Yanrui; Li, Jianping; Lu, Yan; Fan, Jing; Yao, Xiaojun

    2007-06-01

    The binding of N-(p-ethoxy-phenyl)-N'-(1-naphthyl)thiourea (EPNT) to human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated under simulative physiological conditions by fluorescence spectra in combination with UV absorption spectroscopy and a molecular modeling method. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of EPNT to HSA was observed, and the quenching mechanism was suggested to be static quenching according to the Stern-Volmer equation. The binding constants (K) at different temperatures as well as thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (DeltaH) and entropy change (DeltaS), were calculated according to relevant fluorescent data and the vant' Hoff equation. This indicated that a hydrophobic interaction was a predominant intermolecular force for stabilizing the complex, which is in agreement with the results of molecule modeling study. The effects of energy transfer and other ions on the binding constant were considered. In addition, synchronous fluorescence technology was successfully applied to the determination of HSA added into the EPNT solution.

  1. Correlation between the osmotic second virial coefficient and solubility for equine serum albumin and ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Demoruelle, Kristen; Guo, Bin; Kao, Shangming; McDonald, Heather M; Nikic, Dragan B; Holman, Steven C; Wilson, W William

    2002-10-01

    The Haas - Drenth - Wilson (HDW) (Haas et al., 1999) theoretical model was used to correlate osmotic second virial coefficient (B) values with solubility (S) values for equine serum albumin (ESA) and ovalbumin for corresponding solution conditions. The best fit from the theoretical model was compared to experimental S versus B data. B values were experimentally measured using static light scattering. Solubilities of ESA were estimated using a sitting drop method. When the experimental data for S versus B were plotted, an excellent fit for ESA was obtained according to the HDW model. The results showed that the coordination number (z) in the crystal lattice was 6, and the adjustable parameter (A) was 0.072. For ovalbumin, previously reported solubility data in aqueous ammonium sulfate solutions were utilized. The solubility data for ovalbumin were correlated with the measured B values obtained in our laboratory. The resulting best fit from the HDW model showed that z = 6 and A = 0.084.

  2. Long-term oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation does not improve serum albumin levels in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Giungi, Stefania; Tazza, Luigi; Luciani, Giovanna

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a frequent event in hemodialysis patients, has been implicated as a potential cause of protein-energy malnutrition. Unfortunately, correction of metabolic acidosis by means of high bicarbonate concentration in the dialysate does not seem to lead to significant changes in nutritional parameters. The project was a single-arm, open-label, 12-month pilot study at a university-based tertiary care center aimed at evaluating whether correction of metabolic acidosis through long-term oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation improves serum albumin levels and other nutritional parameters in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Twenty highly acidotic hemodialysis patients patients were invited to consume an oral supplementation of sodium bicarbonate (1 g, thrice daily), for 12 months. Patients were followed at baseline and every month, until month 12. At each follow-up visit, dry body weight, BMI, blood pressure, presence of edema, venous bicarbonate, and serum albumin were measured. Total lymphocyte count, fasting total cholesterol and C-reactive protein were assessed every 2 months. At baseline and at 12 months, the subjective global assessment of nutritional status and the protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance normalized to actual body weight were determined. Plasma bicarbonate level rose from 18.1 +/- 2.7 to 22.1 +/- 4.5 mmol/l after 10 months (p = 0.001). Mean serum albumin levels were 3.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dl at baseline and 3.9 +/- 0.2 at the end of the study. Repeated measure ANOVA showed that there was no significant effect of bicarbonate treatment on serum albumin levels (p = 0.29), dry weight (p = 0.1), serum total cholesterol (p = 0.97), total lymphocyte count (p = 0.69), or C-reactive protein (p = 0.85). Mean subjective global assessment score was 4.53 +/- 0.37 at baseline and 4.58 +/- 0.54 at 12 months (p = 0.1). Mean nPNA (g/kg/day) was 0.86 +/- 0.05 at baseline and 0.85 +/- 0.08 at month 12. The present study demonstrates that long

  3. Removal of bovine serum albumin using solid-phase extraction with in-situ polymerized stationary phase in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Zoo; Huh, Yun Suk; Jun, Young-Si; Won, Hyo Jin; Hong, Yeon Ki; Park, Tae Jung; Lee, Sang Yup; Hong, Won Hi

    2008-04-11

    Serum albumin, one of the most abundant serum proteins, blocks the expression of other important biomarkers. The objective of this study is to remove serum albumin effectively by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) in microfluidic devices. Photo-polymerized adsorbent as a stationary phase of SPE was used to remove bovine serum albumin (BSA). The adsorption capacity was examined with the effect of pH and concentration in BSA solution, and adjustment of monomer concentration such as hydrophilic 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid and acrylamide in the adsorbent. The effect of hydrophobic butyl methacylate on BSA adsorption was also studied. Selective removal in a bicomponent with BSA and bovine gamma-globulin was performed by adjusting the pH as required.

  4. Mechanism of binding of the radiosensitizers metronidazole and misonidazole (RO-07-0582) to bovine and human serum albumin: a proton NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkowska, A.; Lubas, B.; Wilczok, T.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution proton NMR spectra of the radiosensitizer metronidazole and its derivative misonidazole (RO-07-0582) were measured in D/sub 2/O at resonance frequency 60 MHz and interpreted in the aliphatic and aromatic regions. The linewidths of the NMR peaks attributed to individual fragments of nitroimidazole molecules were then analyzed in the presence of bovine and human serum albumin. With increasing concentration of serum albumin, a selectively larger broadening of the lines attributable to the protons of the aliphatic moieties than of those of the imidazole rings was observed for both compounds. This broadening for misonidazole strongly depends on the ionic strength of the solution. The results indicate a specific immobilization of the molecules of both radiosensitizers during their interaction with serum albumin and the involvement of the aliphatic chains of misonidazole and metronidazole as the primary binding sites.

  5. Experimental study of albumin and lysozyme adsorption onto acrylic acid (AA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Omid; Modarress, Hamid; Noroozi, Mehdi

    2004-03-01

    Many commercial soft contact lenses are based on poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylic acid (AA) hydrogels. The adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on such contact lens surfaces may cause problems in their applications. In this work the adsorption of proteins, albumin and lysozyme, on hydrogel surfaces, AA and HEMA, was investigated as a function of concentration of protein. Also the effects of pH and ionic strength of protein solution on the adsorption of protein were examined. The obtained results indicated that the degree of adsorption of protein increased with the concentration of protein, and the adsorption of albumin on HEMA surface at the studied pHs (6.2-8.6) was higher than AA surface, whereas the adsorption of lysozyme on AA surface at the same pHs was higher than HEMA. The change in ionic strength of protein solution affected the proteins adsorption on both AA and HEMA surfaces. Also, the amount of sodium ions deposited on the AA surface was much higher than HEMA surface. This effect can be related to the negative surface charge of AA and its higher tendency for adsorption of sodium ions compared to the HEMA surface.

  6. Unraveling the Interaction between FcRn and Albumin: Opportunities for Design of Albumin-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Kine Marita Knudsen; Bern, Malin; Nilsen, Jeannette; Noordzij, Hanna Theodora; Sandlie, Inger; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) was first found to be responsible for transporting antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class from the mother to the fetus or neonate as well as for protecting IgG from intracellular catabolism. However, it has now become apparent that the same receptor also binds albumin and plays a fundamental role in homeostatic regulation of both IgG and albumin, as FcRn is expressed in many different cell types and organs at diverse body sites. Thus, to gain a complete understanding of the biological function of each ligand, and also their distribution in the body, an in-depth characterization of how FcRn binds and regulates the transport of both ligands is necessary. Importantly, such knowledge is also relevant when developing new drugs, as IgG and albumin are increasingly utilized in therapy. This review discusses our current structural and biological understanding of the relationship between FcRn and its ligands, with a particular focus on albumin and design of albumin-based therapeutics. PMID:25674083

  7. Adherence of platelets to in situ albumin-binding surfaces under flow conditions: role of surface-adsorbed albumin.

    PubMed

    Guha Thakurta, Sanjukta; Miller, Robert; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Surfaces that preferentially bind human serum albumin (HSA) were generated by grafting albumin-binding linear peptide (LP1) onto silicon surfaces. The research aim was to evaluate the adsorption pattern of proteins and the adhesion of platelets from platelet-poor plasma and platelet-rich plasma, respectively, by albumin-binding surfaces under physiological shear rate (96 and 319 s(-1)) conditions. Bound proteins were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A ratio of ∼1000:100:1 of adsorbed HSA, human immunoglobulin (HIgG) and human fibrinogen (HFib) was noted, respectively, on LP1-functionalized surfaces, and a ratio of ∼5:2:1 of the same was noted on control surfaces, as confirmed by ELISAs. The surface-adsorbed von Willebrand factor was undetectable by sensitive ELISAs. The amount of adhered platelets correlated with the ratio of adsorbed HSA/HFib. Platelet morphology was more rounded on LP1-functionalized surfaces when compared to control surfaces. The platelet adhesion response on albumin-binding surfaces can be explained by the reduction in the co-adsorption of other plasma proteins in a surface environment where there is an excess of albumin molecules, coupled with restrictions in the conformational transitions of other surface-adsorbed proteins into hemostatically active forms.

  8. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated degradation of protein: different oxidation modes of copper- and iron-dependent hydroxyl radicals on the degradation of albumin.

    PubMed

    Kocha, T; Yamaguchi, M; Ohtaki, H; Fukuda, T; Aoyagi, T

    1997-02-08

    Cupric ions (Cu2+) added to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were found to generate hydroxyl radicals (HO) capable of benzoate hydroxylation. Although ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) ions, when added to H2O2, resulted in very little production of HO, the addition of EDTA to the reaction mixture markedly increased their catalytic activity. In the absence of albumin, catalase (a H2O2 scavenger) and mannitol (an HO radical scavenger) effectively inhibited the formation of HO in H2O2/Cu2+ and H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation systems. On analysis using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, catalase was shown to prevent the degradation of albumin by both oxidation systems, whereas mannitol was an effective scavenger of the H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation system but not of the H2O2/Cu2+ oxidation system. Furthermore, the effect of alteration of benzoate hydroxylation and H2O2 consumption on the H2O2/Cu2+ and H2O2/Fe2+/EDTA oxidation systems resulted in opposite behavior that was dependent upon the presence or absence of albumin. These observations suggest that copper ions bind to albumin and induce site-specific degradation by HO generated at the copper-binding site, whereas the Fe2+/EDTA-catalyzed oxidation system induces non-specific degradation of albumin by HO generated by the Fenton reaction between H2O2 and free Fe2+/EDTA in solution.

  10. Properties of aqueous solutions in THz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, O.; Nazarov, M.; Shkurinov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy has been used for measuring of bovine serum albumin and glucose solutions response. The transmission and the attenuated total internal reflection geometries have been combined for analyzing the dielectric properties of aqueous solutions spectra at 0.07-3.2 THz.

  11. Modeling the accessibility of the interaction of clonazepan to albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdez, Ethel Celene Narvaez; Paulino, Erica Tex; de Morais e Coura, Carla Patrícia; Cortez, Celia Martins; da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz

    2016-12-01

    This paper shows results obtained from the clonazepam (CNZP) interaction with human and bovine serum albumin study, seeking data on the pharmacokinetics and the binding site for the anxiolytic by comparing the responses of these two proteins to this drug. The quenching response of this experiment show a huge interaction between CNZP and the albumins, that confirm the literature information relative to the high affinity of CNZP with the plasma protein, a long plasma half-life and that the single binding site for this drug can be found in or close to subdomain IB of HSA and BSA.

  12. Spatial frequency study of holograms with albumins material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.

    2013-03-01

    We present the analysis of holographic recording in photosensitive films using albumin matrixs: gallus gallus and Callipepla cali, exposed to a λ=442nm, with ammonium dichromate, (NH4)2Cr2O7, as a photo-oxidant agent. These simultaneously were performed holographic diffraction gratings with different spatial frequencies. Getting high diffraction efficiencies of holographic gratings as a function of spatial frequency (lines/mm), known as modulo of the transfer function (MTF). We made a comparison of the experimental results between the different bird albumins.

  13. Interaction of VO2+ ion with human serum transferrin and albumin.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Daniele; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni

    2009-04-01

    The complexation of VO(2+) ion with the high molecular mass components of the blood serum, human serum transferrin (hTf) and albumin (HSA), has been re-examined using EPR spectroscopy. In the case of transferrin, the results confirm those previously obtained, showing that VO(2+) ion occupies three different binding sites, A, B(1) and B(2), distinguishable in the X-band anisotropic spectrum recorded in D(2)O. With albumin the results show that a dinuclear complex (VO)(2)(d)HSA is formed in equimolar aqueous solutions or with an excess of protein; in the presence of an excess of VO(2+), the multinuclear complex (VO)(x)(m)HSA is the prevalent species, where x=5-6 indicates the equivalents of metal ion coordinated by HSA. The structure of the dinuclear species is discussed and the donor atoms involved in the metal coordination are proposed on the basis of the measured EPR parameters. Two different binding modes of albumin can be distinguished varying the pH, with only one species being present at the physiological value. The results show that the previously named "strong" site is not the N-terminal copper binding site, and some hypothesis on the metal coordination is discussed, with the (51)V A(z) values for the proposed donor sets obtained by DFT (density functional theory) calculations. Finally, preliminary results obtained in the ternary system VO(2+)/hTf/HSA are shown in order to determine the different binding strength of the two proteins. Due to the low VO(2+) concentration used, the recording of the EPR spectra through the repeated acquisition of the weak signals is essential to obtain a good signal to noise ratio in these systems.

  14. Spectrofluorimetric determination of human serum albumin using terbium-danofloxacin probe.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Amir M; Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2012-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for the determination of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using terbium-danofloxacin (Tb(3+)-Dano) as a fluorescent probe. These proteins remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Tb(3+)-Dano complex at 545 nm, and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb(3+)-Dano is proportional to the concentration of proteins (HSA and BSA). Optimum conditions for the determination of HSA were investigated and found that the maximum response was observed at: pH = 7.8, [Tb(3+)] = 8.5 × 10(-5) mol L(-1), [Dano] = 1.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1). The calibration graphs for standard solutions of BSA, HSA, and plasma samples of HSA were linear in the range of 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1.4 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), respectively. The detection limits (S/N = 3) for BSA, HSA, and plasma sample of HSA were 8.7 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), 6.2 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), and 8.1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The applicability of the method was checked using a number of real biological plasma samples and was compared with the UV spectrometric reference method. The results was showed that the method could be regarded as a simple, practical, and sensitive alternative method for determination of albumin in biological samples.

  15. Fatty Acid Saturation of Albumin Used in Resuscitation Fluids Modulates Cell Damage in Shock: In Vitro Results Using a Novel Technique to Measure Fatty Acid Binding Capacity.

    PubMed

    Penn, Alexander H; Dubick, Michael A; Torres Filho, Ivo P

    2017-03-21

    The use of albumin for resuscitation has not proven as beneficial in human trials as expected from numerous animal studies. One explanation could be the practice of adding fatty acid (FA) during manufacture of pharmaceutical albumin. During ischemia, unbound free FAs (FFA) in the circulation could potentially induce cellular damage. We hypothesized that albumins with higher available binding capacities (ABC) for FFAs may prevent that damage. Therefore, we developed a technique to measure ABC, determined if pharmaceutical human serum albumin (HSA) has decreased ABC compared to FA-free bovine serum albumin (BSA), and if binding capacity would affect hemolysis when blood is mixed with exogenous FFA at levels similar to those observed in shock. The new assay used exogenous oleic acid (OA), glass fiber filtration, and a FFA assay kit. RBC hemolysis was determined by mixing 0-5 mM OA with PBS, HSA, FA-free BSA, or FA-saturated BSA and measuring plasma hemoglobin after incubation with human blood. 5% HSA contained 4.7±0.2 mM FFA, leaving an ABC of 5.0 ± 0.6 mM, compared to FA-free BSA's ABC of 7.0 ± 1.3 mM (P < 0.024). Hemolysis after OA was reduced with FA-free BSA but increased with FA-saturated BSA. HSA provided intermediate results. 25% solutions of FA-free BSA and HSA were more protective, while 25% FA-saturated BSA was more damaging than 5% solutions. These findings suggest that increased FA saturation may reverse albumin's potential benefit to lessen cellular damage and may explain, at least in part, its failure in human trauma studies.

  16. Neuronal uptake of serum albumin is associated with neuron damage during the development of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zanhua; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Suping; Liu, Sibo; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that brain blood barrier dysfunction following the onset of seizures may lead to serum albumin extravasation into the brain. However, the effect of albumin extravasation on the development of epilepsy is yet to be fully elucidated. Previous studies have predominantly focused on the effect of albumin absorption by astrocytes; however, the present study investigated the effects of neuronal uptake of albumin in vitro and in kainic acid-induced Sprague-Dawley rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, electroencephalogram recordings were conducted to record seizure onset, Nissl and Evans blue staining were used to detect neuronal damage and albumin extravasation, respectively, and double immunofluorescence was used to explore neuronal absorption of albumin. Cell counting was also conducted in vitro to determine whether albumin contributes to neuronal death. The results of the present study indicated that extravasated serum albumin was absorbed by neurons, and the neurons that had absorbed albumin died and were dissolved 28 days after seizure onset in vivo. Furthermore, significant neuronal death was detected after albumin absorption in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggested that albumin may be absorbed by neurons following the onset of seizures. Furthermore, the results indicated that neuronal albumin uptake may be associated with neuronal damage and death in epileptic seizures. Therefore, attenuating albumin extravasation following epileptic seizures may reduce brain damage and slow the development of epilepsy. PMID:27446263

  17. REPORT ON THE GEOELECTRICAL DETECTION OF SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION OF PCE: PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select physicochemical properties of nine surfactants which are conventionally used in the remediation of perchloroethylene (PCE, a.k.a. tetrachloroethene) were evaluated with varying concentrations of PCE and indicator dyes in aqueous solutions using a response surface quadrati...

  18. Microheterogeneity in Frozen Protein Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-01-01

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyoprotectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyoprotectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (−20 < TF < 0°C) on the MH generated within a frozen formulation in only a few experiments. The freezing experiments conducted with a model system (albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10 wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20 wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (−16 < TF < −10°C). In the 30 wt% trehalose solutions, freezing within a much more narrow range (−12 < TF < −10°C) was needed to ensure a fairly homogeneous FCL. The method developed here will be helpful for the development of uniformly frozen and stable formulations and freezing protocols for biological as MH is presumed to directly impact stability. PMID:25888798

  19. Microheterogeneity in frozen protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Alan; Kurata, Kosaku; Nagare, Yutaka; Takamatsu, Hiroshi; Aksan, Alptekin

    2015-06-20

    In frozen and lyophilized systems, the biological to be stabilized (e.g. therapeutic protein, biomarker, drug-delivery vesicle) and the cryo-/lyo-protectant should be co-localized for successful stabilization. During freezing and drying, many factors cause physical separation of the biological from the cryo-/lyo-protectant, called microheterogeneity (MH), which may result in poor stabilization efficiency. We have developed a novel technique that utilized confocal Raman microspectroscopy in combination with counter-gradient freezing to evaluate the effect of a wide range of freezing temperatures (-20albumin and trehalose) showed the presence of different degrees of MH in the freeze-concentrated liquid (FCL) in all solutions tested. Mainly, albumin tended to accumulate near the ice interface, where it was physically separated from the cryoprotectant. In frozen 10wt% trehalose solutions, heterogeneity in FCL was relatively low at any TF. In frozen 20wt% trehalose solutions, the optimum albumin to trehalose ratio in the FCL can only be ensured if the solution was frozen within a narrow range of temperatures (-16solutions, freezing within a much more narrow range (-12

  20. Ischemia-Modified Albumin as a Marker of Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Case for Revising the Concept of "N-Terminal Modification" to "Fatty Acid Occupation" of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Oran, Ismail; Oran, Bulent

    2017-01-01

    Ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) is assumed "N-terminal modified" albumin which is generated immediately following myocardial ischemia. The diagnosis of IMA is based on reduced cobalt binding affinity to albumin which is attributed mainly to incapability of cobalt to bind at albumin's modified N-terminus. Although the albumin cobalt binding test was accepted as a potentially powerful marker for discriminating acute coronary syndrome from nonischemic chest pain, its usefulness has been brought into question in recent years. Patients with acutely ischemic myocardium exhibit a rapid increase in serum levels of fatty acids (FAs). Almost all released FAs are strongly bound to albumin which create conformational changes in the protein with resultant reduced cobalt binding affinity. There is a clear metabolic and temporal relationship between IMA measured via albumin cobalt binding testing and serum levels of FAs. In line with what has been suggested recently in the literature, we conclude that a shift from the concept of "N-terminal modified" to "FA-occupied" albumin is required, as this better describes IMA in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We also offer "oxidation modified albumin, OMA," which is conceptually different from the "FA-occupied" IMA, to describe modification of albumin in chronic disease associated with increased oxidative stress.

  1. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  2. Screening major binding sites on human serum albumin by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Seung; Austin, John; Hage, David S

    2004-01-01

    A screening method is described for determining whether a drug or small solute has significant interactions at the two major binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA). This method uses affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) to perform a mobility shift assay, where the solute of interest is injected in both the presence of pH 7.4, 0.067 M phosphate buffer, and the same buffer containing a known concentration of HSA. Dextran is also used in the running buffer to adjust the mobility of HSA. Two types of modified HSA are used in this assay. The first is modified with 2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzyl bromide (HNB), which selectively blocks HSA's warfarin-azapropazone site. The second type of HSA is modified with tetranitromethane (TNM), which decreases binding at the indole-benzodiazepine site. By comparing the mobility of a solute in the presence of these two modified forms of HSA vs normal HSA, it is possible to detect solute interactions at these binding sites. This approach is illustrated using warfarin and ibuprofen as examples of test solutes.

  3. Impact of Albumin on Coagulation Competence and Hemorrhage During Major Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Højskov, Michael; Johansson, Pär I; Kridina, Irina; Kistorp, Thomas; Salling, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Henning B; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Pedersen, Tom; Secher, Niels H

    2016-03-01

    For patients exposed to a massive blood loss during surgery, maintained coagulation competence is important. It is less obvious whether coagulation competence influences bleeding during elective surgery where patients are exposed to infusion of a crystalloid or a colloid. This randomized controlled trial evaluates whether administration of 5% human albumin (HA) or lactated Ringer solution (LR) affects coagulation competence and in turn blood loss during cystectomy due to bladder cancer. Forty patients undergoing radical cystectomy were included to receive either 5% HA (n = 20) or LR (n = 20). Nineteen patients were analyzed in the HA group and 20 patients in the lactated Ringer group. Blinded determination of the blood loss was similar in the 2 groups of patients: 1658 (800-3300) mL with the use of HA and 1472 (700-4330) mL in the lactated Ringer group (P = 0.45). Yet, by thrombelastography (TEG) evaluated coagulation competence, albumin affected clot growth (TEG-angle 69 ± 5 vs 74° ± 3°, P < 0.01) and strength (TEG-MA: 59 ± 6 vs 67 ± 6 mm, P < 0.001) more than LR. Furthermore, by multivariate linear regression analyses reduced TEG-MA was independently associated with the blood loss (P = 0.042) while administration of albumin was related to the changes in TEG-MA (P = 0.029), aPPT (P < 0.022), and INR (P < 0.033). This randomized controlled trial demonstrates that administration of HA does not affect the blood loss as compared to infusion of LR. Also the use of HA did not affect the need for blood transfusion, the incidence of postoperative complications, or the hospital in-stay. Yet, albumin decreases coagulation competence during major surgery and the blood loss is related to TEG-MA rather than to plasma coagulation variables.

  4. Planetary Resources and Astroecology. Planetary Microcosm Models of Asteroid and Meteorite Interiors: Electrolyte Solutions and Microbial Growth- Implications for Space Populations and Panspermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mautner, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain >3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 × 105 algae and 6 × 106 bacteria and fungi for long periods (>8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 1018 kg, comprising 1032 microorganisms and a human population of 1014. The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  5. Bovine serum albumin-sodium alkyl sulfates bioconjugates as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Benkő, M; Varga, N; Sebők, D; Bohus, G; Juhász, Á; Dékány, I

    2015-06-01

    Precipitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by anionic surfactants with alkyl chains of increasing lengths (octyl, decyl, dodecyl sulfates) was studied at room temperature, at pH 3.0, in isotonic sodium chloride solution. The particle size of albumin, the zeta potential, the surface charge and fluorescent properties of BSA-surfactant composites were investigated concerning addition of increasing amount of surfactant. The thermal stability of the systems was monitored by calorimetric analysis (DSC). The formation of the well-ordered structure in the self-assembly process in liquid phase was studied by XRD measurement. The structure of the precipitated BSA-surfactant nanocomposites was characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Finally, ibuprofen (IBU) molecules were enclosed in BSA-surfactant bioconjugate systems and the release properties of the drug were investigated. It has been found out that, as a consequence to the increasing number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chains of the surfactant, the structure and the fluorescent properties of the aggregates formed can be controlled due to the increase in the hydrophobicity of BSA-surfactant composites. The bioconjugates are well applicable as carrier to realize controlled release of drug molecules.

  6. Human serum albumin binding to silica nanoparticles--effect of protein fatty acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Ang, Joo Chuan; Henderson, Mark J; Campbell, Richard A; Lin, Jhih-Min; Yaron, Peter N; Nelson, Andrew; Faunce, Thomas; White, John W

    2014-06-07

    Neutron reflectivity shows that fatted (F-HSA) and defatted (DF-HSA) versions of human serum albumin behave differently in their interaction with silica nanoparticles premixed in buffer solutions although these proteins have close to the same surface excess when the silica is absent. In both cases a silica containing film is quickly established at the air-water interface. This film is stable for F-HSA at all relative protein-silica concentrations measured. This behaviour has been verified for two small silica nanoparticle radii (42 Å and 48 Å). Contrast variation and co-refinement have been used to find the film composition for the F-HSA-silica system. The film structure changes with protein concentration only for the DF-HSA-silica system. The different behaviour of the two proteins is interpreted as a combination of three factors: increased structural stability of F-HSA induced by the fatty acid ligand, differences in the electrostatic interactions, and the higher propensity of defatted albumin to self-aggregate. The interfacial structures of the proteins alone in buffer are also reported and discussed.

  7. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  8. Albumin induced cytokine expression in porcine adipose tissue explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin has historically been included in medium designed for use with adipose tissue when evaluating metabolism, gene expression or protein secretion. However, recent studies with mouse adipocytes (Ruan et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278:47585-47593, 2003) and human adipose tissue (Schlesinger et al., Ame...

  9. Physico-chemical properties of South American iguanid albumins.

    PubMed

    Higgins, P J

    1980-12-15

    Except for a markedly reduced anodal electrophoretic mobility, the serum of the Galapagos marine iguana was physico-chemically identical to that of terrestrial iguanids. Reduction in albumin net charge may have facilitated the adaptation of this species to a semi-aquatic environment.

  10. Separation of Albumin, Ceruloplasmin, and Transferrin from Human Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Grady; Frieden, Earl

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are provided for separating the principal metalloproteins (albumin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin) from plasma using column chromatographic techniques. The experiment can be completed in two separate three-hour laboratory periods during which column chromatography is illustrated and the effect of pH on charge and affinity of a protein…

  11. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  16. 2S Albumin Storage Proteins: What Makes them Food Allergens?

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F. Javier; Clemente, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    2S albumin storage proteins are becoming of increasing interest in nutritional and clinical studies as they have been reported as major food allergens in seeds of many mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. This review describes the main biochemical, structural and functional properties of these proteins thought to play a role in determining their potential allergenicity. 2S albumins are considered to sensitize directly via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The high stability of their intrinsic protein structure, dominated by a well-conserved skeleton of cysteine residues, to the harsh conditions present in the GIT suggests that these proteins are able to cross the gut mucosal barrier to sensitize the mucosal immune system and/or elicit an allergic response. The flexible and solvent-exposed hypervariable region of these proteins is immunodominant and has the ability to bind IgE from allergic patients´ sera. Several linear IgE-binding epitopes of 2S albumins spanning this region have been described to play a major role in allergenicity; the role of conformational epitopes of these proteins in food allergy is far from being understood and need to be investigated. Finally, the interaction of these proteins with other components of the food matrix might influence the absorption rates of immunologically reactive 2S albumins but also in their immune response. PMID:18949071

  17. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  18. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  19. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  1. The role of nanoparticles in the albumin-cytarabine and albumin-methotrexate interactions.

    PubMed

    Pentak, Danuta; Maciążek-Jurczyk, Małgorzata; Zawada, Zygmunt H

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the interactions which occur between nanomaterials and biomolecules is one of the most important issues in nanotechnology. Determining the properties of nanoparticles obtained through the use of novel methods and defining the scope of their application as drug carriers has important practical significance. Nanoparticles containing methotrexate and cytarabine obtained by a modified reverse-phase evaporation method (mREV) were characterized through the use of the UV/Vis and NMR methods. Obtained results confirmed high degree of analysed drugs encapsulation. The encapsulation efficiencies of cytarabine (AraC) and methotrexate (MTX) in LDPPC/AraC/MTX were found to be 86.30% (AraC) and 86.00% (MTX). The increased permeability of the phospholipid membranes, resulting from physico-chemical properties and the location of the drug, as well as from the physico-chemical properties of the phospholipids themselves, has been confirmed by increase in the length of the T1 relaxation time of protons in the N(+)(CH3)3 group. The study of analysed drugs release process from the liposomes has been made for bovine serum albumin, both in the absence (dBSA) and in the presence of fatty acid (BSA). Moreover two types of kinetic models (Bhaskar equation and Rigter-Peppas equation) have been used. Based on the study it has been concluded that mathematical modelling of drug release can be very helpful in speeding up product development and in better understanding the mechanisms controlling drug release from advanced delivery systems.

  2. On the absence of turbulence in exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation and implications of a quantum interpretation of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriel, Amador

    2017-01-01

    There have been several papers published which show exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation. None of the solutions admit any possibility of turbulence. It is strongly suggested that the Navier-Stokes equation is not the correct problem definition for turbulence. Yet, by contrast, in a simple example, it s shown that turbulence can result quite directly by using two or more species of fluids. The species are in fact identical atoms with different quantum states, provoking the strong suggestion that a plausible explanation for the origin of turbulence is quantum mechanical. This suggestion is heavily supported by actual modern pipe flow experiments [Muriel, Quantum Theory of Turbulence, Harvard Book Store (2011),which may be downloaded from (Muriel, ResearchGate)] The most general exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation will be displayed. In addition, experiments supporting a quantum interpretation will be reviewed.

  3. Albumin: pathophysiologic basis of its role in the treatment of cirrhosis and its complications.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martinez, Rita; Caraceni, Paolo; Bernardi, Mauro; Gines, Pere; Arroyo, Vicente; Jalan, Rajiv

    2013-11-01

    Since the introduction of human serum albumin as a plasma expander in the 1940s, considerable research has allowed a better understanding of its biochemical properties and potential clinical benefits. Albumin has a complex structure, which is responsible for a variety of biological functions. In disease, the albumin molecule is susceptible to modifications that may alter its biological activity. During the last decades, different methods to measure albumin function have been developed. Recent studies have shown that not only albumin concentration but also albumin function is reduced in liver failure. This observation led to the concept of effective albumin concentration, which represents the fact that plasma albumin concentration does not reflect its function. Indeed, in liver disease albumin function is several times less than its concentration. In patients with cirrhosis, albumin infusion reduces mortality in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and improves outcome following large volume paracentesis. In combination with vasoconstrictors, albumin is useful in the management of patients with hepatorenal syndrome. Its role is being investigated in a large number of indications, which rely on its volume and nonvolume expansion functions such as stroke, severe sepsis, Alzheimer's disease, malaria, burns, and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. This review explores the above concepts, reviews the available evidence for the use of albumin in liver diseases, defines therapeutic limitations, and explores the challenges that should be addressed in future research.

  4. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  5. Interaction of human serum albumin and its clinically relevant modification with oligoribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yuliya V; Erchenko, Irina A; Shakirov, Makhmut M; Godovikova, Tatyana S

    2008-08-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) was shown to mediate oligoribonucleotide cleavage. Nonenzymatic glycation of HSA decreased the ribonuclease-like activity of the protein. According to (31)P NMR data, both native and glycated albumins induced hydrolysis of RNA molecule through 2',3'-cyclophosphate intermediates. A feasible mechanism of RNA hydrolysis by native albumin and its clinically relevant modification was discussed.

  6. Role of bovine serum albumin in the nutrition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, M; Wilson, A R; Solotorovsky, M

    1979-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin promotes the growth of small inocula of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in media containing unesterified fatty acids. Albumin binds fatty acids present in concentrations toxic for the organisms. In the present study, additional roles of albumin were investigated. When present in a basal medium, fatty acid-free albumin could be utilized by M. tuberculosis as a sole source of carbon. Since albumin could not substitute for the amino acids in basal medium as a nitrogen source, it was concluded that the protein component in albumin was not utilized as a nutrient by the organisms. An ether extract of fatty acid-free albumin supported a small but significant amount of growth. Analysis of the lipids in fatty acid-free albumin by gas chromatography revealed the presence of 686 microgram of fatty acid per g of albumin. Although a small amount of growth occurred when a lipid extract of albumin was present in the medium, growth stimulation was dependent in major part on the presence of undenatured albumin in the medium. Lipids, when bound to albumin, can serve as a nontoxic source of carbon and energy. PMID:120697

  7. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  9. Albumin testing in urine using a smart-phone.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Nagi, Richie; Sadeghi, Kayvon; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-11-07

    We demonstrate a digital sensing platform, termed Albumin Tester, running on a smart-phone that images and automatically analyses fluorescent assays confined within disposable test tubes for sensitive and specific detection of albumin in urine. This light-weight and compact Albumin Tester attachment, weighing approximately 148 grams, is mechanically installed on the existing camera unit of a smart-phone, where test and control tubes are inserted from the side and are excited by a battery powered laser diode. This excitation beam, after probing the sample of interest located within the test tube, interacts with the control tube, and the resulting fluorescent emission is collected perpendicular to the direction of the excitation, where the cellphone camera captures the images of the fluorescent tubes through the use of an external plastic lens that is inserted between the sample and the camera lens. The acquired fluorescent images of the sample and control tubes are digitally processed within one second through an Android application running on the same cellphone for quantification of albumin concentration in the urine specimen of interest. Using a simple sample preparation approach which takes ~5 min per test (including the incubation time), we experimentally confirmed the detection limit of our sensing platform as 5-10 μg mL(-1) (which is more than 3 times lower than the clinically accepted normal range) in buffer as well as urine samples. This automated albumin testing tool running on a smart-phone could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney disease or for monitoring of chronic patients, especially those suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and/or cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Effects of Gold Salt Speciation and Structure of Human and Bovine Serum Albumin on the Synthesis and Stability of Gold Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Érica; Tofanello, Aryane; Brito, Adrianne; Lopes, David; Giacomelli, Fernando; Albuquerque, Lindomar; Costa, Fanny; Ferreira, Fabio; Araujo-Chaves, Juliana; de Castro, Carlos; Nantes, Iseli

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of albumin structure and gold speciation on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The strategy of synthesis was the addition of HAuCl4 solutions at different pH values (3-12) to solutions of human and bovine serum albumins (HSA and BSA) at the same corresponding pH values. Different pH values influence the GNP synthesis due to gold speciation. Besides the inherent effect of pH on the native structure of albumins, the use N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA provided additional insights about the influence of protein structure, net charge, and thiol group approachability on the GNP synthesis. NEM treatment, heating, and the extreme values of pH promoted loss of the native albumin structure. The formation of GNPs indicated by the appearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands became detectable from fifteen days of the synthesis processes that were carried out with native, NEM-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA, exclusively at pH 6 and 7. After two months of incubation, SPR band was also detected for all synthesis carried out at pH 8.0. The mean values of the hydrodynamic radius (RH) were 24 and 34 nm for GNPs synthesized with native HSA and BSA, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed crystallites of 13 nm. RH, XRD, and zeta potential values were consistent with GNP capping by the albumins. However, the GNPs produced with NEM-treated and heat-denaturated albumins exhibited loss of protein capping by lowering the ionic strength. This result suggests a significant contribution of non-electrostatic interactions of albumins with the GNP surface, in these conditions. The denaturation of proteins exposes hydrophobic groups to the solvent, and these groups could interact with the gold surface. In these conditions, the thiol blockage or oxidation, the latter probably favored upon heating, impaired the formation of a stable capping by thiol coordination

  11. Planetary resources and astroecology. Planetary microcosm models of asteroid and meteorite interiors: electrolyte solutions and microbial growth--implications for space populations and panspermia.

    PubMed

    Mautner, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain > 3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 x 10(5) algae and 6 x 10(6) bacteria and fungi for long periods (> 8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 10(18) kg, comprising 10(32) microorganisms and a human population of 10(14). The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  12. Surface-bound bovine serum albumin carrier protein as present in recombinant cytokine preparations amplifies T helper 17 cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lei; Helmke, Alexandra; Waisman, Ari; Haller, Hermann; Pich, Andreas; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of T helper 17 lineage (TH17) polarization has been significantly promoted by cell culture experiments that reduce the complexity of the in vivo environment. We here investigated TH17 amplification by coating of cytokine preparations. Cytokine preparations coated to the surface compared to the same amount given in solution significantly enhanced TH17 polarization assessed by flow cytometry and interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-17F and RORγt mRNA expression. T cell proliferation and TH1 polarization were similarly enhanced while TREG polarization was impeded. TH17 amplification was replicated by coating the plate with low amounts of FCS or albumin as used as carrier protein for cytokines (0.5 μl 0.1%). It was unaltered by filtration, protein digestion and arylhydrocarbon receptor blockade, not replicated by LPS and independent of integrin stimulation. TH17 amplification required anti-CD3 stimulation and was T cell intrinsic. Supernatants of CD4+ cells polarized on coated cytokine preparations with carrier albumin conferred amplification to fresh splenocytes. Coating markedly elevated CD4+ IL-22 mRNA expression and IL-22 blockade significantly reduced TH17 amplification. Our data show TH17 amplification by coated albumin in the low amounts present in recombinant cytokine preparations. This unexpected adjuvant like effect underscores the need for controls also for temporal and spatial factors in cell culture. PMID:27808281

  13. Photoabsorption of acridine yellow and proflavin bound to human serum albumin studied by means of quantum mechanics/molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Aidas, Kęstutis; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans

    2013-02-21

    Attempting to unravel mechanisms in optical probing of proteins, we have performed pilot calculations of two cationic chromophores-acridine yellow and proflavin-located at different binding sites within human serum albumin, including the two primary drug binding sites as well as a heme binding site. The computational scheme adopted involves classical molecular dynamics simulations of the ligands bound to the protein and subsequent linear response polarizable embedding density functional theory calculations of the excitation energies. A polarizable embedding potential consisting of point charges fitted to reproduce the electrostatic potential and isotropic atomic polarizabilities computed individually for every residue of the protein was used in the linear response calculations. Comparing the calculated aqueous solution-to-protein shifts of maximum absorption energies to available experimental data, we concluded that the cationic proflavin chromophore is likely not to bind albumin at its drug binding site 1 nor at its heme binding site. Although agreement with experimental data could only be obtained in qualitative terms, our results clearly indicate that the difference in optical response of the two probes is due to deprotonation, and not, as earlier suggested, to different binding sites. The ramifications of this finding for design of molecular probes targeting albumin or other proteins is briefly discussed.

  14. Renal type a intercalated cells contain albumin in organelles with aldosterone-regulated abundance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells.

  15. Renal Type A Intercalated Cells Contain Albumin in Organelles with Aldosterone-Regulated Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells. PMID:25874770

  16. Adsorption of proteins at physiological concentrations on pegylated surfaces and the compatibilizing role of adsorbed albumin with respect to other proteins according to optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS).

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Laurent; Modena, Enrico; Vert, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In literature, contacts between pegylated compounds and blood proteins are generally discussed in terms of excluded volume-related repulsions although adsorption and compatibility have been reported for some of these proteins occasionally. The major problem to investigate the behavior of blood in contact with pegylated surfaces is the complexity of the medium and especially the presence of albumin in large excess. In a model approach, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS) was used to monitor the fate of albumin, fibrinogen, and γ-globulins at physiological concentrations in pH = 7.4 isotonic HEPES buffer after contact with SiTiO2 chips coated with diblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)s and triblock poly(DL-lactic acid)-block-poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(DL-lactic acid) copolymers. Corresponding homopolymers were used as controls. The three protein systems were investigated separately, as a mixture and when added successively according to different orders of addition. OWLS gave access to the mass and the thickness of adhering protein layers that resist washing with HEPES buffer. Protein depositions were detected regardless of the presence of poly(ethylene glycol) segments on surfaces. Adsorption depended on the protein, on the surface and also on the presence of the other proteins. Unexpectedly any surface coated with a layer of adsorbed albumin prevented deposition of other proteins, including albumin itself. This outstanding finding suggests that it was the presence of albumin adsorbed on a surface, pegylated or not, that made that surface compatible with other proteins. As a consequence, dipping a device to be in contact with the blood of a patient in a solution of albumin could be a very simple means to avoid further protein deposition and maybe platelets adhesion after in vivo implantation.

  17. Binding of diazepam, salicylic acid and digitoxin to albumin isolated from fetal and adult serum.

    PubMed

    Viani, A; Cappiello, M; Pacifici, G M

    1991-01-01

    Albumin was isolated from pooled fetal serum obtained at normal delivery at term and from pooled adult plasma. Albumin isolation was carried out by means of PEG precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A 50 and then on SP-Sephadex C 50. The binding of diazepam (1 microM), salicylic acid (2 mM) and digitoxin (6 nM) to albumin (40 g/l) was measured by equilibrium dialysis at 37 degrees C. The unbound fraction (mean +/- SD) for fetal and adult albumin of diazepam was 1.86 +/- 0.24 and 1.82 +/- 0.15% (NS), that of digitoxin was 3.18 +/- 0.27 and 3.36 +/- 0.04% (NS) and that of salicylic acid was 11.65 +/- 0.99 and 9.47 +/- 0.75% (p less than 0.05), respectively. With both fetal and adult albumin, a single class of binding sites was observed for diazepam and digitoxin, whereas two classes of binding sites were observed for salicylic acid. The number of binding sites (n, moles of drug per mole of albumin) for fetal and adult albumin was 0.83 and 1.02 for diazepam and 0.014 and 0.018 for digitoxin, respectively. For salicylic acid, n was 1.45 (fetal albumin) and 1.55 (adult albumin) for the higher affinity site, and 3.06 (fetal albumin) and 3.27 (adult albumin) for the lower affinity site. The association constant (Ka, M-1) for diazepam was 1.36 x 10(5) (fetal albumin) and 1.00 x 10(5) (adult albumin) and that for digitoxin was 4.12 x 10(6) (fetal albumin) and 2.7 x 10(6) (adult albumin). For salicylic acid, Ka was 38.4 x 10(3) (fetal albumin) and 35.8 x 10(3) (adult albumin) for the higher affinity site, and 2.7 x 10(3) (fetal albumin) and 4.3 x 10(3) (adult albumin) for the lower affinity site. This work shows that fetal and adult albumin have similar binding properties and corroborates our previous findings with furosemide.

  18. A monoclonal IgM protein with antibody-like activity for human albumin.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, S; Tomasi, T B

    1974-03-01

    The serum of a patient (L'ec) with an IgM lambda monoclonal protein was noted to bind albumin on immunoelectrophoresis. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the L'ec serum demonstrated 23S and 12S peaks, but no 4S (albumin) boundary. Immunologically identical 20S and 9S IgM proteins were isolated from the serum and the addition in vitro of either the patient's albumin or albumin isolated from normal serum was shown to reconstitute the 23S and 12S boundaries. The binding of high molecular weight IgM to albumin was demonstated by Sephadex G200 chromatography with (125)I-labeled albumin and isolated IgM. Immunoelectrophoresis of the L'ec IgM developed with aggregated albumin (reverse immunoelectrophoresis) also demonstrated the binding of albumin to IgM. That all of the patient's IgM complexed with albumin was shown by affinity chromatography employing an aggregated albumin-immunoadsorbent column. Binding was shown to be of the noncovalent type by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 8 M urea. With hot trypsin proteolysis, Fabmu and Fcmu5 fragments were isolated, and monomer albumin was shown to complex only with the Fabmu fragment by both analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular sieve chromatogaphy employing (125)I-labeled Fab fragments. 1 mol of Fabmu fragment bound 1 mol of monomer albumin. Polymers of human albumin, produced by heat aggregation, precipitated with the isolated L'ec protein on gel diffusion analysis and, when coated on sheep red blood cells, gave a hemagglutination titer greater than 1 million with the whole L'ec serum. 50 additional monoclonal IgM, 33 IgA, and 80 IgG sera failed to show precipitation or hemagglutination with aggregated albumin. Native monomer albumin inhibited precipitation only at high concentrations (> 50 mg/ml); dimer albumin or fragments of albumin produced by trypsin digestion inhibited at low concentrations (0.4 mg/ml). No reactivity occurred with the albumin of five other mammalian species, including bovine. The L

  19. Vanillin restrains non-enzymatic glycation and aggregation of albumin by chemical chaperone like function.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-01

    Vanillin a major component of vanilla bean extract is commonly used a natural flavoring agent. Glycation is known to induce aggregation and fibrillation of globular proteins such as albumin, hemoglobin. Here we report the inhibitory potential of vanillin toward early and advanced glycation modification and amyloid like aggregation of albumin based on the determination of both early and advanced glycation and conformational changes in albumin using circular dichroism. Inhibition of aggregation and fibrillation of albumin was determined based on amyloid specific dyes i.e., Congo red and Thioflavin T and microscopic imaging. It was evident that vanillin restrains glycation of albumin and exhibits protective effect toward its native conformation.

  20. [Influence of direct electric current on hydrodynamic diameter of human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Korpan, M I; Gorchev, V F; Chekman, I S; Gun'ko, V M; Fialko-Moser, V

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the weak electric current (2 mA/cm2) on structural characteristics (hydrodynamic diameter and molecular weight) of the human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). The average diameter of initial HSA globule is approximately 7 nm (66.8 kDa). After electric current treatment during 2-5 min the diameter of HSA monomer increases to 7.5 nm. The duration of electric current treatment being increased to 20 min the size of HSA monomers decreases to 6.4 nm. The behaviour of HSA oligomers is close to that of monomers. Consequently, changes in the sizes of monomers and oligomers of HSA under the electric current treatment are caused by the change in the charge density stimulating change of tertiary structure of molecules and possible addition of ions from the buffer solution to them.

  1. Spectrometry researches on interaction and sonodynamic damage of riboflavin (RF) to bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiu; Li, Jushi; Wang, Jun; Zou, Mingming; Wang, Siyu; Li, Ying; Kong, Yumei; Xia, Lixin

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, the riboflavin (RF) was used to study the interaction and sonodynamic damage to bovine serum albumin (BSA) by fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy. The results showed that the RF could efficiently bind to BSA in aqueous solution. Under ultrasonic irradiation, the RF could obviously damage the BSA. In addition, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the RF showed more accessible to tryptophan (Trp) residues than to tyrosine (Tyr) residues. Also, it damaged Trp residues more seriously than Tyr residues under ultrasonic irradiation. At last, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sonodynamic process was estimated by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OES). And then, several radical scavengers were used to determine the kind of ROS. It was found that at least the singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) and hydroxyl radicals (*OH) were generated.

  2. Effect of magnetic field on the ultrafiltration of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Vardanega, Renata; Tres, Marcus V; Mazutti, Marcio A; Treichel, Helen; de Oliveira, Débora; Di Luccio, Marco; Oliveira, J Vladimir

    2013-08-01

    This work evaluates the effects of a static magnetic field on the permeation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in a tangential ultrafiltration membrane module. Experimental tests were carried out at different pHs using a poly(sulfone) membrane with molecular weight cut off of 60 kDa under the influence of a 0.4 T neodymium-iron-boron magnetic field. Results showed an increase in the permeate flux of water after the cleaning procedures of the new and reused membranes in the presence of the magnetic field. The elusive mechanism of magnetic memory is also shown to take place for the water fluxes fully recovered after the cleaning procedures when the magnetic field was applied to the system before the permeation. When the magnetic field was applied during permeation, the water fluxes presented lower percent of recuperation after the cleaning procedures, thus suggesting that the BSA solution may have somewhat been influenced by magnetic memory.

  3. Fluorescence study on the interaction of human serum albumin with Butein in liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprak, Mahmut

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of Butein with human serum albumin in L-egg lecithin phosphatidycholine (PC) liposome has been investigated by fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The results of the fluorescence measurement indicated that Butein effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA via static quenching. The Stern-Volmer plots in all the liposome solutions showed a positive deviation from the linearity. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the hydrophobic interactions appeared be the major interaction forces between Butein and HSA. The effect of Butein on the conformation of HSA was also investigated by the synchronous fluorescence under the same experimental conditions. In addition, the partition coefficient of the Butein in the PC liposomes was also determined by using the fluorescence quenching process. The obtained results can be of biological significance in pharmacology and clinical medicine.

  4. A Comparative Interaction between Copper Ions with Alzheimer's β Amyloid Peptide and Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Behbehani, G Rezaei; Barzegar, L; Mohebbian, M; Saboury, A A

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(2+) with the first 16 residues of the Alzheimer's amyliod β peptide, Aβ(1-16), and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.2 and 310 K in aqueous solution. The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model indicate that HSA is involved in the transport of copper ion. Complexes between Aβ(1-16) and copper ions have been proposed to be an aberrant interaction in the development of Alzheimer's disease, where Cu(2+) is involved in Aβ(1-16) aggregation. The indexes of stability indicate that HSA removed Cu(2+) from Aβ(1-16), rapidly, decreased Cu-induced aggregation of Aβ(1-16), and reduced the toxicity of Aβ(1-16) + Cu(2+) significantly.

  5. A Comparative Interaction between Copper Ions with Alzheimer's β Amyloid Peptide and Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Behbehani, G. Rezaei; Barzegar, L.; Mohebbian, M.; Saboury, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of Cu2+ with the first 16 residues of the Alzheimer's amyliod β peptide, Aβ(1–16), and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied in vitro by isothermal titration calorimetry at pH 7.2 and 310 K in aqueous solution. The solvation parameters recovered from the extended solvation model indicate that HSA is involved in the transport of copper ion. Complexes between Aβ(1–16) and copper ions have been proposed to be an aberrant interaction in the development of Alzheimer's disease, where Cu2+ is involved in Aβ(1–16) aggregation. The indexes of stability indicate that HSA removed Cu2+ from Aβ(1–16), rapidly, decreased Cu-induced aggregation of Aβ(1–16), and reduced the toxicity of Aβ(1–16) + Cu2+ significantly. PMID:22844264

  6. Spectroscopic identification of interactions of Pb2+ with bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yihong; Zhang, Lijun; Liu, Rutao; Zhang, Pengjun

    2012-01-01

    The effect of Pb(2+) targeted to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in vitro was investigated by fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, UV absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The characteristic fluorescence of BSA was quenched, which indicated that Pb(2+) changed the skeleton of BSA and caused the gradual exposure of aromatic amino acid residues (Trp, Tyr, Phe) in the internal hydrophobic region of BSA. When the concentration of Pb(2+) was higher than 1 × 10(-4) mol/L, the BSA was completely denatured. The excess lead ion interacted with the aromatic amino acid residues of BSA exposed to the solution, which decreased the fluorescence of BSA further. According to the experiment results, we found that a lead-BSA complex was formed following static quenching and the binding site was calculated approximately equal to 1. This work reflected the interaction mechanism of BSA and Pb(2+) from the perspective of spectroscopy.

  7. FTIR study of secondary structure of bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrosimova, K. V.; Shulenina, O. V.; Paston, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    Proteins structure is the critical factor for their functioning. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides a possibility to obtain information about secondary structure of proteins in different states and also in a whole biological samples. Infrared spectra of egg white from the untreated and hard-boiled hen's egg, and also of chicken ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin in lyophilic form and in aqueous solution were studied. Lyophilization of investigated globular proteins is accompanied by the decrease of a-helix structures and the increase in amount of intermolecular β-sheets. Analysis of infrared spectrum of egg white allowed to make an estimation of OVA secondary structure and to observe α-to-β structural transformation as a result of the heat denaturation.

  8. Copper Selenide Nanosnakes: Bovine Serum Albumin-Assisted Room Temperature Controllable Synthesis and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Herein we firstly reported a simple, environment-friendly, controllable synthetic method of CuSe nanosnakes at room temperature using copper salts and sodium selenosulfate as the reactants, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as foaming agent. As the amounts of selenide ions (Se2−) released from Na2SeSO3 in the solution increased, the cubic and snake-like CuSe nanostructures were formed gradually, the cubic nanostructures were captured by the CuSe nanosnakes, the CuSe nanosnakes grew wider and longer as the reaction time increased. Finally, the cubic CuSe nanostructures were completely replaced by BSA–CuSe nanosnakes. The prepared BSA–CuSe nanosnakes exhibited enhanced biocompatibility than the CuSe nanocrystals, which highly suggest that as-prepared BSA–CuSe nanosnakes have great potentials in applications such as biomedical engineering. PMID:20672034

  9. Copper Selenide Nanosnakes: Bovine Serum Albumin-Assisted Room Temperature Controllable Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Peng; Kong, Yifei; Li, Zhiming; Gao, Feng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-06-01

    Herein we firstly reported a simple, environment-friendly, controllable synthetic method of CuSe nanosnakes at room temperature using copper salts and sodium selenosulfate as the reactants, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as foaming agent. As the amounts of selenide ions (Se2-) released from Na2SeSO3 in the solution increased, the cubic and snake-like CuSe nanostructures were formed gradually, the cubic nanostructures were captured by the CuSe nanosnakes, the CuSe nanosnakes grew wider and longer as the reaction time increased. Finally, the cubic CuSe nanostructures were completely replaced by BSA-CuSe nanosnakes. The prepared BSA-CuSe nanosnakes exhibited enhanced biocompatibility than the CuSe nanocrystals, which highly suggest that as-prepared BSA-CuSe nanosnakes have great potentials in applications such as biomedical engineering.

  10. Copper selenide nanosnakes: bovine serum albumin-assisted room temperature controllable synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Kong, Yifei; Li, Zhiming; Gao, Feng; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-04-03

    Herein we firstly reported a simple, environment-friendly, controllable synthetic method of CuSe nanosnakes at room temperature using copper salts and sodium selenosulfate as the reactants, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as foaming agent. As the amounts of selenide ions (Se2-) released from Na2SeSO3 in the solution increased, the cubic and snake-like CuSe nanostructures were formed gradually, the cubic nanostructures were captured by the CuSe nanosnakes, the CuSe nanosnakes grew wider and longer as the reaction time increased. Finally, the cubic CuSe nanostructures were completely replaced by BSA-CuSe nanosnakes. The prepared BSA-CuSe nanosnakes exhibited enhanced biocompatibility than the CuSe nanocrystals, which highly suggest that as-prepared BSA-CuSe nanosnakes have great potentials in applications such as biomedical engineering.

  11. An In-vitro Investigation of Swelling Controlled Delivery of Insulin from Egg Albumin Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Mahobia, Swati; Bajpai, Jaya; Bajpai, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and characterize biopolymer nanocarriers and evaluate their suitability in possible oral delivery of insulin. The egg albumin biopolymer was used to prepare nanoparticles which were further characterized by Fourier transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), zeta potential, Dynamic Light scattering (DLS) and cytotoxicity. From the characterization studies the size of the nanoparticles washemoly found to lie in the range 20-80 nm with surface charge of -23 mV and also offering extremely fair biocompatibility.. The in-vitro biocompatibility of the prepared nanocarriers was judged by BSA adsorption test and haemolysis assay. The in vitro release kinetics of the insulin loaded nanoparticles was studied in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution, and the influence of various factors such as pH, temperature and simulated physiological fluids was studied on the controlled release of insulin. PMID:28243266

  12. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  13. A Comparison of the Segmental Analysis of Sodium Reabsorption during Ringer's and Hyperoncotic Albumin Infusion in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jay H.; Osgood, Richard W.; Boonjarern, Sampanta; Ferris, Thomas F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies were designed to compare the segmental analysis of sodium reabsorption along the nephron during volume expansion with either 10% body weight Ringer's or 0.6% body weight hyperoncotic albumin. Total kidney and nephron glomerular filtration rate increased similarly with both, but urinary sodium excretion (12.7 vs. 4.0 μeq/min, P < 0.001) and fractional sodium excretion (5.0 vs. 1.6%, P < 0.001) increased to a greater extent with Ringer's. Fractional reabsorption of sodium in the proximal tubule was diminished in both groups but to a significantly greater extent during Ringer's (P < 0.005). Absolute reabsorption was inhibited only in the Ringer's group. Delivery of filtrate out of the proximal tubule was greater in the Ringer's studies, 45 vs. 37 nl/min (P < 0.001). However, both fractional and absolute sodium delivery to the early and late distal tubule were not significantly different in the two groups. Fractional reabsorption in the collecting duct decreased from 96% in hydropenia to 31% during Ringer's but fell only slightly to 80% in the albumin studies. Absolute collecting duct reabsorption was also greater in the albumin studies, 0.55 vs. 0.21 neq/min (P < 0.001), which could totally account for the difference in urinary sodium excretion between the two groups. 22Na recovery in the final urine after end distal microinjections was 71% during Ringer's infusion and 34% during albumin (P < 0.001). From these data we conclude that: (a) Ringer's solution has a greater inhibitory effect on proximal tubular sodium reabsorption, and (b) in spite of this effect, differences in mucosal to serosal collecting duct sodium transport are primarily responsible for the greater natriuresis during Ringer's infusion. PMID:4727461

  14. The solution structures of native and patient monomeric human IgA1 reveal asymmetric extended structures: implications for function and IgAN disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Gar Kay; Wright, David W.; Vennard, Owen L.; Rayner, Lucy E.; Pang, Melisa; Yeo, See Cheng; Gor, Jayesh; Molyneux, Karen; Barratt, Jonathan; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Native IgA1, for which no crystal structure is known, contains an O-galactosylated 23-residue hinge region that joins its Fab and Fc regions. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. Because IgA1 in IgAN often has a poorly O-galactosylated hinge region, the solution structures of monomeric IgA1 from a healthy subject and three IgAN patients with four different O-galactosylation levels were studied. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that all four IgA1 samples were monomeric with similar sedimentation coefficients, s020,w. X-ray scattering showed that the radius of gyration (Rg) slightly increased with IgA1 concentration, indicating self-association, although their distance distribution curves, P(r), were unchanged with concentration. Neutron scattering indicated similar Rg values and P(r) curves, although IgA1 showed a propensity to aggregate in heavy water buffer. A new atomistic modelling procedure based on comparisons with 177000 conformationally-randomized IgA1 structures with the individual experimental scattering curves revealed similar extended Y-shaped solution structures for all four differentially-glycosylated IgA1 molecules. The final models indicated that the N-glycans at Asn263 were folded back against the Fc surface, the C-terminal tailpiece conformations were undefined and hinge O-galactosylation had little effect on the solution structure. The solution structures for full-length IgA1 showed extended hinges and the Fab and Fc regions were positioned asymmetrically to provide ample space for the functionally-important binding of two FcαR receptors to its Fc region. Whereas no link between O-galactosylation and the IgA1 solution structure was detected, an increase in IgA1 aggregation with reduced O-galactosylation may relate to IgAN. PMID:26268558

  15. Spectroscopic approach of the interaction study of amphiphilic drugs with the serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-ud Din

    2011-10-15

    The interaction of the amphiphilic drugs, i.e., amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT) and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT), with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), has been examined by the various spectroscopic techniques, like fluorescence, UV-vis, and circular dichroism (CD). Fluorescence results indicate that in case of HSA-drug complexes the quenching of fluorescence intensity at 280 nm is less effective as compared to at 295 nm while in case of BSA-drug complexes both have almost same effect and for most of drug-serum albumin complexes there is only one independent class of binding. For all drug-serum albumin complexes the quenching rate constant (K(q)) values suggest the static quenching procedure. The UV-vis results show that the change in protein conformation of PMT-serum albumin complexes was more prominent as compared to AMT-serum albumin complexes. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with drugs. The increase in α-helical structure for AMT-serum albumin complexes is found to be more as compared to PMT-serum albumin complexes. Hence, the various spectroscopic techniques provide a quantitative understanding of the binding of amphiphilic drugs with serum albumins.

  16. Comparison of albumin receptors expressed on bovine and human group G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, R; Otten, R A; Boyle, M D

    1991-01-01

    The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G streptococci was extracted and affinity purified. The protein was characterized for species reactivity, and monospecific antibodies were prepared to the purified receptor. The bovine group G albumin receptor was compared functionally, antigenically, and for DNA homology with the albumin-binding protein expressed by human group G streptococci. In agreement with previous reports, the albumin-binding activity of human strains was mediated by a unique domain of the type III immunoglobulin G-Fc-binding molecule, protein G. The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G strains was found to lack any immunoglobulin G-binding potential but displayed a wider profile of species albumin reactivity than protein G. Both albumin receptors could inhibit the binding of the other to immobilized human serum albumin, and each displayed similar binding properties. Antigenic comparison of the two albumin receptors demonstrated a low level of cross-reactivity; however comparison at the DNA level, using an oligonucleotide probe specific for the albumin-binding region of protein G, demonstrated that the two albumin receptors expressed by human and bovine group G streptococcal strains do not display significant homology. Images PMID:1846128

  17. Impaired Albumin Uptake and Processing Promote Albuminuria in OVE26 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Y. S.; Zheng, S.; Kralik, P. M.; Benz, F. W.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of proximal tubules dysfunction to diabetic albuminuria is uncertain. OVE26 mice have the most severe albuminuria of all diabetic mouse models but it is not known if impaired tubule uptake and processing are contributing factors. In the current study fluorescent albumin was used to follow the fate of albumin in OVE26 and normal mice. Compared to normal urine, OVE26 urine contained at least 23 times more intact fluorescent albumin but only 3-fold more 70 kD fluorescent dextran. This indicated that a function other than size selective glomerular sieving contributed to OVE26 albuminuria. Imaging of albumin was similar in normal and diabetic tubules for 3 hrs after injection. However 3 days after injection a subset of OVE26 tubules retained strong albumin fluorescence, which was never observed in normal mice. OVE26 tubules with prolonged retention of injected albumin lost the capacity to take up albumin and there was a significant correlation between tubules unable to eliminate fluorescent albumin and total albuminuria. TUNEL staining revealed a 76-fold increase in cell death in OVE26 tubules that retained fluorescent albumin. These results indicate that failure to process and dispose of internalized albumin leads to impaired albumin uptake, increased albuminuria, and tubule cell apoptosis. PMID:27822483

  18. SMALL VOLUME RESUSCITATION FROM HEMORRHAGIC SHOCK WITH POLYMERIZED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    PubMed Central

    Messmer, Catalina; Yalcin, Ozlem; Palmer, Andre F.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is used as a plasma expander (PE); however, albumin is readily eliminated from the intravascular space. The objective of this study was to establish the effects of various sized polymerized HSAs (PolyHSAs) during small volume resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock on systemic parameters, microvascular hemodynamics and functional capillary density (FCD) in the hamster window chamber model. PolyHSA size was controlled by varying the cross-link density (i.e. molar ratio of glutaraldehyde to HSA). Hemorrhage was induced by controlled arterial bleeding of 50% of the animal’s blood volume (BV) and hypovolemic shock maintained for 1 h. Resuscitation was implemented in two phases, first by infusion of 3.5% of the BV of hypertonic saline (HTS, 7.5 wt% NaCl), followed by infusion of 10% of BV of each PolyHSAs. Resuscitation provided rapid recovery of blood pressure, blood gas parameters and microvascular perfusion. PolyHSA at a glutaraldehyde to HSA molar ratio of 60:1 (PolyHSA60:1) provided superior recovery of blood pressure, microvascular blood flow and FCD, and acid-base balance, with sustained volume expansion in relation to the volume infused. The high molecular weigh of PolyHSA60:1 increased hydrodynamic radius and solution viscosity. Pharmacokinetic analysis of PolyHSA60:1 indicates reduced clearance and increased circulatory half-life compared to monomeric HSA and other PolyHSA formulations. In conclusion, HSA molecular size and solution viscosity affects central hemodynamics, microvascular blood flow, volume expansion and circulation persistence during small volume resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Additionally, PolyHSA can be an alternative to HSA in situations with compromised vascular permeability. PMID:22100469

  19. Ellipsometric studies of synthetic albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives and selected blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    This dissertation summarizes work on the synthesis of chitosan-derivatives and the development of ellipsometric methods to characterize materials of biological origin. Albumin-binding chitosan-derivatives were synthesized via addition reactions that involve amine groups naturally present in chitosan. These surfaces were shown to have an affinity towards human serum albumin via ELISA, UV spectroscopy and SDS PAGE. Modified surfaces were characterized with IR ellipsometry at various stages of their synthesis using appropriate optical models. It was found that spin cast chitosan films were anisotropic in nature. All optical models used for characterizing chitosan-derivatives were thus anisotropic. Chemical signal dependence on molecular structure and composition was illustrated via IR spectroscopic ellipsometry (IRSE). An anisotropic optical model of an ensemble of Lorentz oscillators were used to approximate material behavior. The presence of acetic acid in spin-cast non-neutralized chitosan samples was thus shown. IRSE application to biomaterials was also demonstrated by performing a step-wise chemical characterizations during synthesis stages. Protein adsorbed from single protein solutions on these modified surfaces was monitored by visible in-situ variable wavelength ellipsometry. Based on adsorption profiles obtained from single protein adsorption onto silicon surfaces, lumped parameter kinetic models were developed. These models were used to fit experimental data of immunoglobulin-G of different concentrations and approximate conformational changes in fibrinogen adsorption. Biomaterial characterization by ellipsometry was further extended to include characterization of individual protein solutions in the IR range. Proteins in an aqueous environment were characterized by attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) IR ellipsometry using a ZnSe prism. Parameterized dielectric functions were created for individual proteins using Lorentz oscillators. These

  20. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Kamal R.; Dhand, Navneet K.; Whittington, Richard J.; Plain, Karren M.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne’s disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne’s test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne’s disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples. PMID:28210245

  1. PCR Inhibition of a Quantitative PCR for Detection of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis DNA in Feces: Diagnostic Implications and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Kamal R; Dhand, Navneet K; Whittington, Richard J; Plain, Karren M

    2017-01-01

    Molecular tests such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are increasingly being applied for the diagnosis of Johne's disease, a chronic intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Feces, as the primary test sample, presents challenges in terms of effective DNA isolation, with potential for PCR inhibition and ultimately for reduced analytical and diagnostic sensitivity. However, limited evidence is available regarding the magnitude and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition for the detection of MAP in feces. This study aimed to investigate the presence and diagnostic implications of PCR inhibition in a quantitative PCR assay for MAP (High-throughput Johne's test) to investigate the characteristics of samples prone to inhibition and to identify measures that can be taken to overcome this. In a study of fecal samples derived from a high prevalence, endemically infected cattle herd, 19.94% of fecal DNA extracts showed some evidence of inhibition. Relief of inhibition by a five-fold dilution of the DNA extract led to an average increase in quantification of DNA by 3.3-fold that consequently increased test sensitivity of the qPCR from 55 to 80% compared to fecal culture. DNA extracts with higher DNA and protein content had 19.33 and 10.94 times higher odds of showing inhibition, respectively. The results suggest that the current test protocol is sensitive for herd level diagnosis of Johne's disease but that test sensitivity and individual level diagnosis could be enhanced by relief of PCR inhibition, achieved by five-fold dilution of the DNA extract. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative parameters derived from absorbance measures of DNA extracts could be useful for prediction of inhibitory fecal samples.

  2. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression.

  3. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  4. Hepatic FcRn regulates albumin homeostasis and susceptibility to liver injury.

    PubMed

    Pyzik, Michal; Rath, Timo; Kuo, Timothy T; Win, Sanda; Baker, Kristi; Hubbard, Jonathan J; Grenha, Rosa; Gandhi, Amit; Krämer, Thomas D; Mezo, Adam R; Taylor, Zachary S; McDonnell, Kevin; Nienaber, Vicki; Andersen, Jan Terje; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Blumberg, Laurence; Purohit, Shalaka; Jones, Susan D; Christianson, Greg; Lencer, Wayne I; Sandlie, Inger; Kaplowitz, Neil; Roopenian, Derry C; Blumberg, Richard S

    2017-04-04

    The neonatal crystallizable fragment receptor (FcRn) is responsible for maintaining the long half-life and high levels of the two most abundant circulating proteins, albumin and IgG. In the latter case, the protective mechanism derives from FcRn binding to IgG in the weakly acidic environment contained within endosomes of hematopoietic and parenchymal cells, whereupon IgG is diverted from degradation in lysosomes and is recycled. The cellular location and mechanism by which FcRn protects albumin are partially understood. Here we demonstrate that mice with global or liver-specific FcRn deletion exhibit hypoalbuminemia, albumin loss into the bile, and increased albumin levels in the hepatocyte. In vitro models with polarized cells illustrate that FcRn mediates basal recycling and bidirectional transcytosis of albumin and uniquely determines the physiologic release of newly synthesized albumin into the basal milieu. These properties allow hepatic FcRn to mediate albumin delivery and maintenance in the circulation, but they also enhance sensitivity to the albumin-bound hepatotoxin, acetaminophen (APAP). As such, global or liver-specific deletion of FcRn results in resistance to APAP-induced liver injury through increased albumin loss into the bile and increased intracellular albumin scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Further, protection from injury is achieved by pharmacologic blockade of FcRn-albumin interactions with monoclonal antibodies or peptide mimetics, which cause hypoalbuminemia, biliary loss of albumin, and increased intracellular accumulation of albumin in the hepatocyte. Together, these studies demonstrate that the main function of hepatic FcRn is to direct albumin into the circulation, thereby also increasing hepatocyte sensitivity to toxicity.

  5. Recent Topics in Chemical and Clinical Research on Glycated Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The measuring method for glycated albumin (GA) has been developed as a new glycemic control marker since the beginning of the 21st century. Since GA has an advantage in reflecting glycemic status over a shorter period than hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), much research and many reviews have been reported. However, so far there have been few reports on glycation sites based on the tertiary structure of human serum albumin (HSA) and the comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c in detail. The present review discusses how the glycation sites of lysine residues in HSA are modified with glucose, whereas the glycation sites of lysine residues are located inside of HSA as well as the direct comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c using human blood. Moreover, the most recent clinical researches on GA are described. PMID:25614014

  6. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Guangming; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Wu, Rongchun; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)-curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA-CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA-CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA-CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes.

  7. Tamoxifen and curcumin binding to serum albumin. Spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Maliszewska, M.; Pożycka, J.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Góra, A.; Sułkowska, A.

    2013-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TMX) is widely used for the breast cancer treatment and is known as chemopreventive agent. Curcumin (CUR) is natural phenolic compound with broad spectrum of biological activity e.g. anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal and chemopreventive. Combination of tamoxifen and curcumin could be more effective with lower toxicity than each agent alone in use for the treatment or chemoprevention of breast cancer. Binding of drugs to serum albumin is an important factor, which determines toxicity and therapeutic dosage of the drugs. When two drugs are administered together the competition between them for the binding site on albumin can result in a decrease in bound fraction and an increase in the concentration of free biologically active fraction of drug.

  8. Recent advancements in erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin as delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Ruju; Wang, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been applied to enhance the efficacy of therapeutics and to alleviate negative effects through the controlled delivery of targeting and releasing agents. However, few drug carriers can achieve high targeting efficacy, even when targeting modalities and surface markers are introduced. Immunological problems have also limited their wide applications. Biological drug delivery systems, such as erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin, have been extensively investigated because of their unique properties. In this review, erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin are described as efficient drug delivery systems. Their properties, applications, advantages, and limitations in disease treatment are explained. This review confirms that these systems can be used to facilitate a specific, biocompatible, and smart drug delivery. PMID:27274282

  9. Interactive association of drugs binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Hong

    2014-02-27

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is an abundant plasma protein, which attracts great interest in the pharmaceutical industry since it can bind a remarkable variety of drugs impacting their delivery and efficacy and ultimately altering the drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Additionally, HSA is widely used in clinical settings as a drug delivery system due to its potential for improving targeting while decreasing the side effects of drugs. It is thus of great importance from the viewpoint of pharmaceutical sciences to clarify the structure, function, and properties of HSA-drug complexes. This review will succinctly outline the properties of binding site of drugs in IIA subdomain within the structure of HSA. We will also give an overview on the binding characterization of interactive association of drugs to human serum albumin that may potentially lead to significant clinical applications.

  10. Muscle beta-actinin is not chicken serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, K; Kimura, S

    1981-08-01

    Recently, Heizmann et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S. 78, 74-77 (1981)) reported that muscle beta-actinin and serum albumin of the chicken are indistinguishable by physicochemical and immunological criteria. It should, however, be stated that the protein the above authors called beta-actinin was entirely different from genuine muscle beta-actinin (Maruyama et. al. (1977) J. Biochem 81, 215-232). In the present study, it was experimentally shown that chicken serum albumin does not have any of the actions of beta-actinin: inhibition of reassociation of F-actin fragments, retardation of depolymerization of F-actin, instability of F-actin, acceleration of polymerization of G-actin, and formation of Mg polymer. The role of muscle beta-actinin, a heterodimer of 37,000 and 34,000 daltons, in the regulation of myofibrillar structure is summarized.

  11. Absorptive-mediated endocytosis of cationized albumin and a beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide by isolated brain capillaries. Model system of blood-brain barrier transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, A.K.; Eisenberg, J.B.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1987-11-05

    Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

  12. Zeta potential of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria and Ca adsorption at the cell surface: possible implications for cell protection from CaCO3 precipitation in alkaline solutions.

    PubMed

    Bundeleva, Irina A; Shirokova, Liudmila S; Bénézeth, Pascale; Pokrovsky, Oleg S; Kompantseva, Elena I; Balor, Stephanie

    2011-08-01

    Electrophoretic mobility measurements and surface adsorption of Ca on living, inactivated, and heat-killed haloalkaliphilic Rhodovulum steppense, A-20s, and halophilic Rhodovulum sp., S-17-65 anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (APB) cell surfaces were performed to determine the degree to which these bacteria metabolically control their surface potential equilibria. Zeta potential of both species was measured as a function of pH and ionic strength, calcium and bicarbonate concentrations. For both live APB in 0.1M NaCl, the zeta potential is close to zero at pH from 2.5 to 3 and decreases to -30 to -40 mV at pH of 5-8. In alkaline solutions, there is an unusual increase of zeta potential with a maximum value of -10 to -20 mV at a pH of 9-10.5. This increase of zeta potential in alkaline solutions is reduced by the presence of NaHCO(3) (up to 10 mM) and only slightly affected by the addition of equivalent amount of Ca. At the same time, for inactivated (exposure to NaN(3), a metabolic inhibitor) and heat-killed bacteria cells, the zeta potential was found to be stable (-30 to -60 mV, depending upon the ionic strength) between pH 5 and 11 without any increase in alkaline solutions. Adsorption of Ca ions on A-20s cells surface was more significant than that on S-17-65 cells and started at more acidic pHs, consistent with zeta potential measurements in the presence of 0.001-0.01 mol/L CaCl(2). Overall, these results indicate that APB can metabolically control their surface potential to electrostatically attract nutrients at alkaline pH, while rejecting/avoiding Ca ions to prevent CaCO(3) precipitation in the vicinity of cell surface and thus, cell incrustation.

  13. The role of nano-sized manganese coatings on bone char in removing arsenic(V) from solution: Implications for permeable reactive barrier technologies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Lile; Dong, Faqin; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A

    2016-06-01

    Although the removal of arsenic(V) (As(V)) from solution can be improved by forming metal-bearing coatings on solid media, there has been no research to date examining the relationship between the coating and As(V) sorption performance. Manganese-coated bone char samples with varying concentrations of Mn were created to investigate the adsorption and desorption of As(V) using batch and column experiments. Breakthrough curves were obtained by fitting the Convection-Diffusion Equation (CDE), and retardation factors were used to quantify the effects of the Mn coatings on the retention of As(V). Uncoated bone char has a higher retention factor (44.7) than bone char with 0.465 mg/g of Mn (22.0), but bone char samples with between 5.02 mg/g and 14.5 mg/g Mn have significantly higher retention factors (56.8-246). The relationship between retardation factor (Y) and Mn concentration (X) is Y = 15.1 X + 19.8. Between 0.2% and 0.6% of the sorbed As is desorbed from the Mn-coated bone char at an initial pH value of 4, compared to 30% from the uncoated bone char. The ability of the Mn-coated bone char to neutralize solutions increases with increased amounts of Mn on the char. The results suggest that using Mn-coated bone char in Permeable Reactive Barriers would be an effective method for remediating As(V)-bearing solutions such as acid mine drainage.

  14. The effect of priming solutions and storage time on plasticizer migration in different PVC tubing types--implications for wet storage of ECMO systems.

    PubMed

    Horne, David C; Torrance, Ida; Modine, Thomas; Gourlay, Terence

    2009-12-01

    The wet priming of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation systems and storage of these systems for rapid deployment is common practice in many clinical centers. This storage policy is, however, seen by many to be controversial due to the potential adverse effects associated with the migration of the di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate plasticizer (DEHP) from the polyvinyl chloride (PVC) circuit tubing and issues surrounding the maintenance of sterility. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of both short and long-term storage and priming fluid type on plasticizer migration from four commonly used PVC tubes in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy circuits. The four tubes incorporating three plasticizers, two DEHP, one tri(2-ethylhexyl) trimellitate (TOTM), and one dioctyl adipate (DOA) were exposed to each of the three priming fluids for a period of 28 days. Samples were taken at time intervals of 1, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours, followed by samples at 7, 14, and 28 days. Each sample was processed using a spectrophotomer and the concentration of plasticizer leaching into each solution at each time-point determined. There was a time dependent increase in plasticizer leached from each tube. The migration was greatly affected by both the priming fluid and tubing type. The migration of DEHP was higher than that of TOTM and DOA over both the short and long-term exposure levels. Plasticizer migration occurs from all of the tubes tested over the long term. The TOTM and DOA tubes performed better than the DEHP counterparts in the short term. Selection of priming fluid has a major bearing on plasticizer migration with significant lipid and protein containing fluids promoting higher migration than simple sodium chloride .9% solution prime. The results suggest that DOA tubing and sodium chloride. 9% solution priming fluid should be selected if wet primed perfusion circuits are to be used over short terms of storage.

  15. Reactions of trimethylphosphine analogues of auranofin with bovine serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Isab, A.A.; Shaw, C.F. III; Hoeschele, J.D.; Locke, J.

    1988-10-05

    The reactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with (trimethylphosphine)(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-thio-..beta..-D-glucopyranosato-S)gold(I), Me/sub 3/PAuSAtg, and its chloro analogue, Me/sub 3/PAuCl, were studied to develop insights into the role of the phosphine ligand in the serum chemistry of the related antiarthritic drug auranofin (triethylphosphine)(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-1-thio-..beta..-D-glucopyranosato-S)gold(I). /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy, protein modification, and gel-exclusion chromatography methods were employed. Comparison of the reactions of the methyl derivatives to the previously reported reactions of auranofin and Et/sub 3/PAuCl with BSA demonstrated that similar chemical species are formed but revealed three major differences. Despite these differences, the results for the methyl analogues provide important confirmation for previously developed chemical models of auranofin reactions in serum. Me/sub 3/PO was not observed in reaction mixtures lacking tetraacetylthioglucose (AtgSH); this result affirms the role of AtgSH, displaced by the reaction of Me/sub 3/PAuSAtg at Cys-34, in the generation of the phosphine oxide (an important metabolite in vivo). The weak binding sites on albumin react with Me/sub 3/PAuCl, but not Me/sub 3/PAuSAtg, demonstrating the importance of the strength and reactivity of the anionic ligand-gold bond on the reactions of auranofin analogues. The gold binding capacity of albumin is enhanced after Me/sub 3/PO is formed, consistent with reductive cleavage of albumin disulfide bonds by trimethylphosphine. 24 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Increased regional vascular albumin permeation in the rat during anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Leng, W.; Chang, K.; Williamson, J.R.; Jakschik, B.A.

    1989-03-15

    The changes in vascular albumin permeation induced by systemic anaphylaxis were studied simultaneously in 21 different tissues of the same animal. Before Ag challenge sensitized rats were injected i.v. with 125I-albumin (test tracer), 51Cr-RBC (vascular space marker) and 57Co-EDTA (extravascular space marker). The index of vascular permeation used was the tissue to blood isotope ratio (tbir), which was obtained by dividing the ratio of 125I/51Cr counts in each tissue by the ratio of the same isotopes in the arterial blood sample. After Ag challenge, the increase in the tbir varied considerably among the different tissues. The most pronounced increase was noted in the lymph node (ninefold) followed by the aorta and mesentery (six- to sevenfold) and the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract (four- to sixfold). In the skin less than skeletal muscle less than lung less than liver and eye two- to fourfold increases occurred. Relatively minor increases in albumin permeation (less than twofold) were observed in the brain less than kidney less than heart and less than spleen. The testis was the only organ in which no significant change occurred. For some of the tissues there was also an increase in the tbir for 57Co/51Cr (an index of the extracellular fluid space) suggesting edema formation. The highest increase was noted in the aorta (fourfold). Minor increases occurred in the atrium of the heart, stomach, duodenum, and lymph nodes. There was also a 36% increase in hematocrit. Therefore, systemic anaphylaxis caused extensive extravasation of albumin and hemoconcentration.

  17. Enzymatic activity of albumin shown by coelenterazine chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Vassel, N; Cox, C D; Naseem, R; Morse, V; Evans, R T; Power, R L; Brancale, A; Wann, K T; Campbell, A K

    2012-01-01

    Bioluminescence, the emission of light from live organisms, occurs in 18 phyla and is the major communication system in the deep sea. It has appeared independently many times during evolution but its origins remain unknown. Coelenterazine bioluminescence discovered in luminous jellyfish is the most common chemistry causing bioluminescence in the sea, occurring in seven phyla. Sequence similarities between coelenterazine luciferases and photoproteins from different phyla are poor (often < 5%). The aim of this study was to examine albumin that binds organic substances as a coelenterazine luciferase to test the hypothesis that the evolutionary origin of a bioluminescent protein was the result of the formation of a solvent cage containing just a few key amino acids. The results show for the first time that bovine and human albumin catalysed coelenterazine chemiluminescence consistent with a mono-oxygenase, whereas gelatin and haemoglobin, an oxygen carrier, had very weak activity. Insulin also catalysed coelenterazine chemiluminescence and was increased by Zn(2+). Albumin chemiluminescence was heat denaturable, exhibited saturable substrate characteristics and was inhibited by cations that bound these proteins and by drugs that bind to human albumin drug site I. Molecular modelling confirmed the coelenterazine binding site and identified four basic amino acids: lys195, arg222, his242 and arg257, potentially important in binding and catalysis similar to naturally occurring coelenterazine bioluminescent proteins. These results support the 'solvent cage' hypothesis for the evolutionary origin of enzymatic coelenterazine bioluminescent proteins. They also have important consequences in diseases such as diabetes, gut disorders and food intolerance where a mono-oxygenase could affect cell surface proteins.

  18. Albumin-conjugated C34 Peptide HIV-1 Fusion Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Cheryl A.; Nault, Geneviève; Galkina, Sofiya A.; Thibaudeau, Karen; Bakis, Peter; Bousquet-Gagnon, Nathalie; Robitaille, Martin; Bellomo, Maryanne; Paradis, Véronique; Liscourt, Patricia; Lobach, Alexandra; Rivard, Marie-Ève; Ptak, Roger G.; Mankowski, Marie K.; Bridon, Dominique; Quraishi, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Entry inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) have been the focus of much recent research. C34, a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the HR2 region of gp41, was engineered into a 1:1 human serum albumin conjugate through stable covalent attachment of a maleimido-C34 analog onto cysteine 34 of albumin. This bioconjugate, PC-1505, was designed to require less frequent dosing and less peptide than T-20 and was assessed for its antifusogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo in the SCID-hu Thy/Liv mouse model. PC-1505 was essentially equipotent to the original C34 peptide and to T-20 in vitro. In HIV-1-infected SCID-hu Thy/Liv mice, T-20 lost activity with infrequent dosing, whereas the antiviral potency of PC-1505 was sustained, and PC-1505 was active against T-20-resistant (“DIV”) virus with a G36D substitution in gp41. The in vivo results are the direct result of a significantly improved pharmacokinetic profile for the C34 peptide following albumin conjugation. Contrary to previous reports that the gp41 NHR trimer is poorly accessible to C34 fused to protein cargoes of increasing size (Hamburger, A. E., Kim, S., Welch, B. D., and Kay, M. S. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 12567–12572), these results are the first demonstration of the capacity for a large, endogenous serum protein to gain unobstructed access to the transient gp41 intermediates that exist during the HIV fusion process, and it supports further development of albumin conjugation as a promising approach to inhibit HIV-1 entry. PMID:18809675

  19. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  20. Binding sites of retinol and retinoic acid with serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Belatik, A; Hotchandani, S; Bariyanga, J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2012-02-01

    Retinoids are effectively transported in the bloodstream via serum albumins. We report the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with retinol and retinoic acid at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various retinoid contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were used to analyze retinoid binding site, the binding constant and the effects of complexation on BSA stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that retinoids bind BSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions with overall binding constants of K(Ret)(-BSA) = 5.3 (±0.8) × 10(6) M(-1) and K(Retac-BSA) = 2.3 (±0.4) × 10(6) M(-1). The number of bound retinoid molecules (n) was 1.20 (±0.2) for retinol and 1.8 (±0.3) for retinoic acid. Molecular modeling showed the participation of several amino acids in retinoid-BSA complexes stabilized by H-bonding network. The retinoid binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix from 61% (free BSA) to 36% (retinol-BSA) and 26% (retinoic acid-BSA) with an increase in turn and random coil structures indicating a partial protein unfolding. The results indicate that serum albumins are capable of transporting retinoids in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  2. Albumin extravasation rates in tissues of anesthetized and unanesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Renkin, E.M.; Joyner, W.L.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Plopper, G.; Sibley, L.

    1989-05-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I was injected intravenously in chronically prepared, unanesthetized rats and into pentobarbital-anesthetized rats that had received 2 ml 5% BSA to help sustain plasma volume. Initial uptake rates (clearances) in skin, skeletal muscles, diaphragm, and heart (left ventricle) were measured over 1 h. BSA labeled with /sup 125/I was injected terminally to correct for intravascular /sup 131/I-BSA. Observed clearances were in the following order in both groups of animals: heart much greater than diaphragm approximately equal to skin greater than resting skeletal muscles. Differences between unanesthetized and anesthetized animals were small and inconsistently directed. Our results suggest that the lower albumin clearances reported in the literature for anesthetized rats are not the result of their immobility or any direct effect of anesthesia on albumin transport in these tissues. The lower transport rates appear to result indirectly from changes produced by anesthesia and/or surgery in controllable parameters such as plasma volume and intravascular protein mass.

  3. Immunodetection of Serum Albumin Adducts as Biomarkers for Organophosphorus Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sigeng; Zhang, Jun; Lumley, Lucille

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in organophosphate (OP) research has been the identification and utilization of reliable biomarkers for the rapid, sensitive, and efficient detection of OP exposure. Although Tyr 411 OP adducts to human serum albumin (HSA) have been suggested to be one of the most robust biomarkers in the detection of OP exposure, the analysis of HSA-OP adduct detection has been limited to techniques using mass spectrometry. Herein, we describe the procurement of two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-HSA-GD and mAb-HSA-VX) that recognized the HSA Tyr 411 adduct of soman (GD) or S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX), respectively, but did not recognize nonphosphonylated HSA. We showed that mAb-HSA-GD was able to detect the HSA Tyr 411 OP adduct at a low level (i.e., human blood plasma treated with 180 nM GD) that could not be detected by mass spectrometry. mAb-HSA-GD and mAb-HSA-VX showed an extremely low-level detection of GD adducted to HSA (on the order of picograms). mAb-HSA-GD could also detect serum albumin OP adducts in blood plasma samples from different animals administered GD, including rats, guinea pigs, and monkeys. The ability of the two antibodies to selectively recognize nerve agents adducted to serum albumin suggests that these antibodies could be used to identify biomarkers of OP exposure and provide a new biologic approach to detect OP exposure in animals. PMID:23192655

  4. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  5. Structural changes during the unfolding of Bovine serum albumin in the presence of urea: A small-angle neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Chitra, R.; Choudhury, R. R.; Ramanadham, M.

    2004-08-01

    The native form of serum albumin is the most important soluble protein in the body plasma. In order to investigate the structural changes of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) during its unfolding in the presence of urea, a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study was performed. The scattering curves of dilute solutions of BSA with different concentrations of urea in D2O at pH 7.2+/-0.2 were measured at room temperature. The scattering profile was fitted to a prolate ellipsoidal shape (a, b, b) of the protein with a = 52.2 Å and b = 24.2 Å. The change in the dimensions of the protein as it unfolds was found to be anisotropic. The radius of gyration of the compact form of the protein in solution decreased as the urea concentration was increased.

  6. Experimental rock-water interactions at temperatures to 300/sup 0/C: implications for fluid flow, solute transport, and silicate mineral zoning in crustal geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly occur in permeable volcanic rock (rhyolite, andesite, basalt) or sedimentary (sandstone) strata at temperatures below 300/sup 0/C. Knowledge of how these reservoirs develop chemically and physically has been based almost entirely on field studies. Four types of experiments were conducted to supplement available data on the chemistry, mineralogy, and fluid flow aspects of hydrothermal processes occurring in crustal geothermal systems: (1) agitated rock-water experiments; (2) high temperature flow through experiments; (3) low temperature permeability experiments; and (4) corrosion monitoring experiments. Initial experiments reacted rhyolite glass and holocrystalline basalt with water-NaCl solutions at 300/sup 0/C in agitated hydrothermal equipment. Concentrations of components in solution depend on initial salinity, rock type, and particle size. The secondary phases consist of zeolites, clay, and feldspar minerals and the alteration assemblage is dependent on both initial salinity, rock type, and duration of the experiment. A second set of experiments were conducted at 300/sup 0/C using the rhyolite glass in a flow through type of apparatus. Compositions of outlet fluids show a dependence of fluid flow rate and core length.

  7. Differences in soil solution chemistry between soils amended with nanosized CuO or Cu reference materials: implications for nanotoxicity tests.

    PubMed

    McShane, Heather V A; Sunahara, Geoffrey I; Whalen, Joann K; Hendershot, William H

    2014-07-15

    Soil toxicity tests for metal oxide nanoparticles often include micrometer-sized oxide and metal salt treatments to distinguish between toxicity from nanometer-sized particles, non-nanometer-sized particles, and dissolved ions. Test result will be confounded if each chemical form has different effects on soil solution chemistry. We report on changes in soil solution chemistry over 56 days-the duration of some standard soil toxicity tests-in three soils amended with 500 mg/kg Cu as nanometer-sized CuO (nano), micrometer-sized CuO (micrometer), or Cu(NO3)2 (salt). In the CuO-amended soils, the log Cu2+ activity was initially low (minimum -9.48) and increased with time (maximum -5.20), whereas in the salt-amended soils it was initially high (maximum -4.80) and decreased with time (minimum -6.10). The Cu2+ activity in the nano-amended soils was higher than in the micrometer-amended soils for at least the first 11 days, and lower than in the salt-amended soils for at least 28 d. The pH, and dissolved Ca and Mg concentrations in the CuO-amended soils were similar, but the salt-amended soils had lower pH for at least 14 d, and higher Ca and Mg concentrations throughout the test. Soil pretreatments such as leaching and aging prior to toxicity tests are suggested.

  8. Simulations of monomeric amyloid β-peptide (1-40) with varying solution conditions and oxidation state of Met35: implications for aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Lemkul, Justin A; Schaum, Nicholas; Bevan, David R

    2014-03-01

    The amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is a 40-42 residue peptide that is the principal toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The oxidation of methionine-35 (Met35) to the sulfoxide form (Met35(ox)) has been identified as potential modulator of Aβ aggregation. The role Met35(ox) plays in Aβ neurotoxicity differs among experimental studies, which may be due to inconsistent solution conditions (pH, buffer, temperature). We applied atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a means to probe the dynamics of the monomeric 40-residue alloform of Aβ (Aβ40) containing Met35 or Met35(ox) in an effort to resolve the conflicting experimental results. We found that Met35 oxidation decreases the β-strand content of the C-terminal hydrophobic region (residues 29-40), with a specific effect on the secondary structure of residues 33-35, thus potentially impeding aggregation. Further, there is an important interplay between oxidation state and solution conditions, with pH and salt concentration augmenting the effects of oxidation. The results presented here serve to rationalize the conflicting results seen in experimental studies and provide a fundamental biophysical characterization of monomeric Aβ40 dynamics in both reduced and oxidized forms, providing insight into the biochemical mechanism of Aβ40 and oxidative stress related to AD.

  9. The solution structure of the outer membrane lipoprotein OmlA from Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri reveals a protein fold implicated in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Vanini, Marina Marques Teixeira; Spisni, Alberto; Sforça, Maurício Luis; Pertinhez, Thelma Aguiar; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2008-06-01

    The outer membrane lipoprotein A (OmlA) belongs to a family of bacterial small lipoproteins widely distributed across the beta and gamma proteobacteria. Although the role of numerous bacterial lipoproteins is known, the biological function of OmlA remains elusive. We found that in the citrus canker pathogen, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. citri), OmlA is coregulated with the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) and their expression is enhanced when X. citri is grown on citrus leaves, suggesting that these proteins are involved in plant-pathogen interaction. To gain insights into the function of OmlA, its conformational and dynamic features were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein has highly flexible N- and C- termini and a structurally well defined core composed of three beta-strands and two small alpha-helices, which pack against each other forming a two-layer alpha/beta scaffold. This protein fold resembles the domains of the beta-lactamase inhibitory protein BLIP, involved in protein-protein binding. In conclusion, the structure of OmlA does suggest that this protein may be implicated in protein-protein interactions required during X. citri infection.

  10. Thermal transitions in serum amyloid A in solution and on the lipid: implications for structure and stability of acute-phase HDL.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Shobini; Haupt, Christian; Gursky, Olga

    2015-08-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute-phase protein that circulates mainly on plasma HDL. SAA interactions with its functional ligands and its pathogenic deposition in reactive amyloidosis depend, in part, on the structural disorder of this protein and its propensity to oligomerize. In vivo, SAA can displace a substantial fraction of the major HDL protein, apoA-I, and thereby influence the structural remodeling and functions of acute-phase HDL in ways that are incompletely understood. We use murine SAA1.1 to report the first structural stability study of human plasma HDL that has been enriched with SAA. Calorimetric and spectroscopic analyses of these and other SAA-lipid systems reveal two surprising findings. First, progressive displacement of the exchangeable fraction of apoA-I by SAA has little effect on the structural stability of HDL and its fusion and release of core lipids. Consequently, the major determinant for HDL stability is the nonexchangeable apoA-I. A structural model explaining this observation is proposed, which is consistent with functional studies in acute-phase HDL. Second, we report an α-helix folding/unfolding transition in SAA in the presence of lipid at near-physiological temperatures. This new transition may have potentially important implications for normal functions of SAA and its pathogenic misfolding.

  11. Non-enzymatic glucosylation induced neo-epitopes on human serum albumin: A concentration based study

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km; Arif, Zarina; Ahmad, Jamal; Alam, Khursheed

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia induced non enzymatic glycation is accelerated in diabetic patients and aggressively involved in diabetes progression. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in blood circulation. In hyperglycaemia, it undergoes fast glycation and results in the impairment of structure. Our previous study has demonstrated structural alterations in Amadori-albumin modified with different glucose concentrations from physiological to pathophysiological range. Here, we focused on immunological characterization of Amadori-albumin. Immunogenicity of Amadori-albumin was analysed by direct binding and competitive ELISA. Amadori-albumin was found to be highly immunogenic (expect albumin modified with 5mM) and induced high titre antibodies depending upon the extent of modification. Very high titre antibodies were obtained with albumin modified with 75mM glucose as compared to native albumin. Anti-Amadori-albumin-IgG from rabbit sera exhibited increased recognition of Amadori-albumin than native albumin in competitive immunoassay. Alteration induced in albumin after glucosylation has made it highly immunogenic. Induced antibodies were quite specific for respective immunogens but showed cross-reaction with other Amadori/native proteins. It suggests that glucosylation has generated highly immunogenic epitopes on albumin. Formation of high molecular weight immune complex with retarded mobility further supports specificity of anti-Amadori-albumin-IgG towards Amadori-albumin. It may be concluded that due to early glycation, an array of modification occurred in HSA structure. Such gross structural changes might favour polymerization of most of the native epitopes into potent immunogenic neo-epitopes, but some original epitopes were still active and has contributed in the immunogenicity. It could be concluded that induction of anti-Amadori-albumin antibodies may be due to protection of glucose modified albumin from protiolytic breakdown. We assumed that this type of

  12. Release of bovine serum albumin from a hydrogel-cored biodegradable polymer fiber.

    PubMed

    Crow, B B; Nelson, K D

    2006-04-15

    We have developed a novel biodegradable, polymeric fiber construct that is coextruded using a wet-spinning process into a core-sheath format with a polysaccharide pre-hydrogel solution as the core fluid and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the sheath. The biodegradable, biocompatible fibers were extruded from polymeric emulsions comprised of solutions of various molecular weights of PLLA dissolved in chloroform and containing dispersed, protein-free aqueous phases comprising up to 10% of the emulsion volume. Biologically sensitive agents can be loaded via a dispersed aqueous phase in the polymer, and/or directly into the polysaccharide. We show that this core-sheath fiber format will load a model protein that can be delivered for extended periods in vitro. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was loaded into the fiber core as a model protein. We have shown that the greater the volume of the protein-free aqueous phase dispersed into the polymeric continuous-phase emulsion, the greater the total release of BSA encapsulated by a core gel comprised of 1% sodium alginate solution. We conclude this fiber format provides a promising vehicle for in vivo delivery of biological molecules. Its biocompatibility and biodegradability also allow for its use as a possible substrate for tissue engineering applications.

  13. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; ...

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implicationsmore » for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.« less

  14. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans.

  15. Albumin binding as a potential biomarker of exposure to moderately low levels of organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Tarhoni, Mabruka H; Lister, Timothy; Ray, David E; Carter, Wayne G

    2008-06-01

    We have evaluated the potential of plasma albumin to provide a sensitive biomarker of exposure to commonly used organophosphorus pesticides in order to complement the widely used measure of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Rat or human plasma albumin binding by tritiated-diisopropylfluorophosphate ((3)H-DFP) was quantified by retention of albumin on glass microfibre filters. Preincubation with unlabelled pesticide in vitro or dosing of F344 rats with pesticide in vivo resulted in a reduction in subsequent albumin radiolabelling with (3)H-DFP, the decrease in which was used to quantify pesticide binding. At pesticide exposures producing approximately 30% inhibition of AChE, rat plasma albumin binding in vitro by azamethiphos (oxon), chlorfenvinphos (oxon), chlorpyrifos-oxon, diazinon-oxon and malaoxon was reduced from controls by 9+/-1%, 67+/-2%, 56+/-2%, 54+/-2% and 8+/-1%, respectively. After 1 h of incubation with 19 microM (3)H-DFP alone, the level of binding to rat or human plasma albumins reached 0.011 or 0.039 moles of DFP per mole of albumin, respectively. This level of binding could be further increased by raising the concentration of (3)H-DFP, increasing the (3)H-DFP incubation time, or by substitution of commercial albumins for native albumin. Pesticide binding to albumin was presumed covalent since it survived 24 h dialysis. After dosing rats with pirimiphos-methyl (dimethoxy) or chlorfenvinphos (oxon) (diethoxy) pesticides, the resultant albumin binding were still significant 7 days after dosing. As in vitro, dosing of rats with malathion did not result in significant albumin binding in vivo. Our results suggest albumin may be a useful additional biomonitor for moderately low-level exposures to several widely used pesticides, and that this binding differs markedly between pesticides.

  16. Albumin nanoshell encapsulation of near-infrared-excitable rare-Earth nanoparticles enhances biocompatibility and enables targeted cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Naczynski, Dominik J; Andelman, Tamar; Pal, David; Chen, Suzie; Riman, Richard E; Roth, Charles M; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2010-08-02

    The use of traditional fluorophores for in vivo imaging applications is limited by poor quantum yield, poor tissue penetration of the excitation light, and excessive tissue autofluorescence, while the use of inorganic fluorescent particles that offer a high quantum yield is frequently limited due to particle toxicity. Rare-earth-doped nanoparticles that utilize near-infrared upconversion overcome the optical limitations of traditional fluorophores, but are not typically suitable for biological application due to their insolubility in aqueous solution, lack of functional surface groups for conjugation of biomolecules, and potential cytotoxicity. A new approach to establish highly biocompatible and biologically targetable nanoshell complexes of luminescent rare-earth-doped NaYF(4) nanoparticles (REs) excitable with 920-980 nm near-infrared light for biomedical imaging applications is reported. The approach involves the encapsulation of NaYF(4) nanoparticles doped with Yb and Er within human serum albumin nanoshells to create water-dispersible, biologically functionalizable composite particles. These particles exhibit narrow size distributions around 200 nm and are stable in aqueous solution for over 4 weeks. The albumin shell confers cytoprotection and significantly enhances the biocompatibility of REs even at concentrations above 200 microg REs mL(-1). Composite particles conjugated with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) specifically target both human glioblastoma cell lines and melanoma cells expressing alpha(v)beta(3) integrin receptors. These findings highlight the promise of albumin-encapsulated rare-earth nanoparticles for imaging cancer cells in vitro and the potential for targeted imaging of disease sites in vivo.

  17. In situ observations of liquid-liquid phase separation in aqueous ZnSO4 solutions at temperatures up to 400 °C: Implications for Zn2+-SO42- association and evolution of submarine hydrothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin; Wan, Ye; Hu, Wenxuan; Chou, I.-Ming; Cao, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Meng; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-liquid immiscibility is gaining recognition as an important process in hydrothermal fluid activity. However, studies of this complex process are relatively limited. We examined liquid-liquid immiscibility in aqueous ZnSO4 solutions at temperatures above ∼266.5 °C and at vapor-saturation pressures. The homogeneous aqueous ZnSO4 solution separated into ZnSO4-rich (L1) and ZnSO4-poor (L2) liquid phases coexisting with the vapor phase. The L1-L2 phase separation temperature decreased with increasing ZnSO4 concentration up to 1.0 mol/kg, and then increased at greater ZnSO4 concentrations, showing a typical lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of ∼266.5 °C. Gunningite (ZnSO4·H2O) precipitated in 2.0 mol/kg ZnSO4 solution at 360 °C. The L1-L2 phase separation resulted mainly from the strong Zn2+-SO42- association at high temperatures. The major results of this study are: (1) the discovery of the LCST in these systems, a macroscale property associated with polymeric mixtures; (2) analyses of the peak area ratios of the v1(SO42-) and OH stretching bands, which suggest that the sulfate concentration increases with increasing temperature in L1, especially above 375 °C; (3) a new Raman v1(SO42-) mode at ∼1005 cm-1 observed only in the L1 phase, whose fraction increases with increasing temperature; and (4) the shape of the OH Raman stretching band, which indicates that water molecules and solute interact much more strongly in L1 than in the coexisting L2 phase, suggesting that water molecules fit into the framework formed by various Zn2+-SO42- pairs and chain structures in L1. These results have potential implications for understanding transport and reduction of seawater-derived sulfate in submarine hydrothermal systems. The formation of an immiscible sulfate-rich liquid phase can favor the circulation of sulfate within mid-ocean ridge basalt because the sulfate-rich liquid density is higher than that of the coexisting fluid. The reduction of sulfate

  18. Effects of proteoliposome composition and draw solution types on separation performance of aquaporin-based proteoliposomes: implications for seawater desalination using aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Li, Xuesong; Hélixnielsen, Claus; Vissing, Thomas; Torres, Jaume; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2013-02-05

    Aquaporins are a large family of water transport proteins in cell membranes. Their high water permeability and solute rejection make them potential building blocks for high-performance biomimetic membranes for desalination. In the current study, proteoliposomes were prepared using AquaporinZ from Escherichia coli cells, and their separation properties were characterized by stopped-flow measurements. The current study systematically investigated the effect of proteoliposome composition (lipid type, protein-to-lipid ratio (PLR), and the addition of cholesterol) on water permeability and NaCl retention. Among the various lipids investigated, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)-based proteoliposomes were found to have excellent osmotic water permeability and NaCl reflection coefficient values. Increasing the PLR of DOPC proteoliposomes up to 1:200 increased their osmotic water permeability. However, further increase in the PLR reduced the osmotic water permeability probably due to the occurrence of defects in the proteoliposomes, whereas the addition of cholesterol improved their osmotic water permeation likely due to defects sealing. The current study also investigated the effect of major dissolved ions in seawater (e.g., Mg(2+) and SO(4)(2-)) on the stability of proteoliposomes, and design criteria for aquaporin-based biomimetic membranes are proposed in the context of desalination.

  19. Comparative study of the enological potential of different winemaking byproducts: implications in the antioxidant activity and color expression of red wine anthocyanins in a model solution.

    PubMed

    Jara-Palacios, M José; Gordillo, Belén; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Hernanz, Dolores; Escudero-Gilete, M Luisa; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-07-23

    Different white winemaking byproducts (pomace, skins, seeds, and stems) were compared as natural sources of phenolic compounds having biological and sensory properties of enological interest. Antioxidant and copigmentation effects of these byproducts were studied in a wine-like model solution. RRLC-DAD was used to establish differences in the phenolic composition, and the ABTS method was used to compare the antioxidant activities. Spectrophotometric and colorimetric analyses were performed to assess the magnitude of copigmentation and the changes induced in the color expression of red wine anthocyanins. Antioxidant and copigmentation properties significantly varied depending on the type of byproduct, which was related to their qualitative and quantitative phenolic composition. Seeds and pomace showed the highest antioxidant potential, whereas skins and pomace led to the strongest and visually perceptible color effects on red wine anthocyanins by multiple copigmentation (darker, more saturated, and vivid bluish colors). Results open the possibility of technological applications for the wine industry based on reusing winemaking byproducts to improve the biological value and color characteristics of red wines.

  20. Influence of the Compatible Solute Ectoine on the Local Water Structure: Implications for the Binding of the Protein G5P to DNA.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Solomun, Tihomir; Wellhausen, Robert; Hermann, Sabrina; Seitz, Harald; Meyer, Susann; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Zeman, Johannes; Uhlig, Frank; Smiatek, Jens; Sturm, Heinz

    2015-12-10

    Microorganisms accumulate molar concentrations of compatible solutes like ectoine to prevent proteins from denaturation. Direct structural or spectroscopic information on the mechanism and about the hydration shell around ectoine are scarce. We combined surface plasmon resonance (SPR), confocal Raman spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the local hydration shell around ectoine and its influence on the binding of a gene-5-protein (G5P) to a single-stranded DNA (dT25). Due to the very high hygroscopicity of ectoine, it was possible to analyze the highly stable hydration shell by confocal Raman spectroscopy. Corresponding molecular dynamics simulation results revealed a significant change of the water dielectric constant in the presence of a high molar ectoine concentration as compared to pure water. The SPR data showed that the amount of protein bound to DNA decreases in the presence of ectoine, and hence, the protein-DNA dissociation constant increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the Raman spectra in terms of the amide I region revealed large changes in the protein secondary structure. Our results indicate that ectoine strongly affects the molecular recognition between the protein and the oligonucleotide, which has important consequences for osmotic regulation mechanisms.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, and energetics of solid solution along the dolomite-ankerite join, and implications for the stability of ordered CaFe(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, L.; Navrotsky, A.

    1996-09-01

    Samples along the dolomite-ankerite join were synthesized using a piston-cylinder apparatus and the double-capsule method. Some of the ankerite samples may be disordered. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction showed that all samples can be completely decomposed to uniquely defined products under calorimetric conditions (770 {degrees}C, O{sub 2}), and a well-constrained thermodynamic cycle was developed to determine the enthalpy of formation. The energetics of ordered and disordered ankerite solid solutions were estimated using data from calorimetry, lattice-energy calculations, and phase equilibria. The enthalpies of formation of ordered dolomite and disordered end-member ankerite from binary carbonates, determined by calorimetry, are -9.29 {+-} 1.97 and 6.98 {+-} 2.08 kJ/mol, respectively. The enthalpy of formation of ordered ankerite appears to become more endothermic with increasing Fe content, whereas the enthalpy of formation of disordered ankerite becomes more exothermic with increasing Fe content, whereas the enthalpy of formation of disordered ankerite becomes more exothermic with increasing Fe content. The enthalpy of disordering in dolomite (approximately 25 kJ/mol) is much larger than that in pure ankerite, CaFe(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (approximately 10 kJ/mol), which may explain the nonexistence of ordered CaFe(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. The 29 September 2009 Samoa Islands Tsunami: Simulations Based on the First Focal Mechanism Solutions and Implications on Tsunami Early Warning Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonini, Roberto; Armigliato, Alberto; Tinti, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    The tsunamigenic earthquake (Mw = 8.1) that occurred on 29 September 2009 at 17:48 UTC offshore of the Samoa archipelago east of the Tonga trench represents an example of the so-called "outer-rise" earthquakes. The areas most affected were the south coasts of Western and American Samoa, where almost 200 people were killed and run-up heights were measured in excess of 5 m at several locations along the coast. Moreover, tide gauge records showed a maximum peak-to-peak height of about 3.5 m near Pago Pago (American Samoa) and of 1.5 m offshore of Apia (Western Samoa). In this work, different fault models based on the focal mechanism solutions proposed by Global CMT and by USGS immediately after the 2009 Samoan earthquake are tested by comparing the near-field recorded signals (three offshore DART buoys and two coastal tide gauges) and the synthetic signals provided by the numerical simulations. The analysis points out that there are lights and shadows, in the sense that none of the computed tsunamis agrees satisfactorily with all the considered signals, although some of them reproduce some of the records quite well. This "partial agreement" and "partial disagreement" are analysed in the perspective of tsunami forecast and of Tsunami Early Warning System strategy.

  3. An inhibitor to rubella hemagglutination present in bovine albumin preparations: its removal by treatment with kaolin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J B; Ellins, M L; Tasios, C

    1977-07-18

    Certain commercial preparations of bovine albumin, fraction V, show inhibitory activity in the rubella hemagglutination (HA) and hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) tests. This does not appear to be due to albumin per se, but instead to a contaminant (or contaminants) with the properties of a lipoprotein. All inhibitory activity can be removed from albumin preparations by treatment with kaolin, gel filtration, or flotation ultracentrifugation. We have found that, even when there was no inhibition of HA titers, kaolin treatment of the albumins prior to their incorporation into the test diluent resulted in more clearly defined agglutination patterns. Reasons for and against including albumin in the test diluent are discussed. It is concluded that, although not essential, it is a worthwhile additive. Our data suggest, however, that each batch of albumin used for this purpose should be checked for the presence of inhibitor, and that treatment with kaolin might be considered as a routine step prior to its incorporation into the test diluent.

  4. Decreased level of albumin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Tae; Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the phenotypic level of albumin in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. A specific reduction of albumin was identified by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Decreased albumin content was also confirmed by immunoblotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Since albumin is a major and predominant antioxidant in plasma, the PBMC albumin may also contribute to their antioxidant activity. By measuring the amount of H2O2, lipid peroxidation and the redox form of glutathione, it was found that the production of the oxidative stress was elevated in STZ-diabetic rats compared to that of normal control. We suggest, therefore, that decreased albumin content may lead to the decreased antioxidant activity in the PBMC of type 1 diabetic rats.

  5. Characterization of anticancer, DNase and antifungal activity of pumpkin 2S albumin.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Prabhat Pratap Singh; Nikhil, Kumar; Singh, Anamika; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Roy, Partha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-06-13

    The plant 2S albumins exhibit a spectrum of biotechnologically exploitable functions. Among them, pumpkin 2S albumin has been shown to possess RNase and cell-free translational inhibitory activities. The present study investigated the anticancer, DNase and antifungal activities of pumpkin 2S albumin. The protein exhibited a strong anticancer activity toward breast cancer (MCF-7), ovarian teratocarcinoma (PA-1), prostate cancer (PC-3 and DU-145) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cell lines. Acridine orange staining and DNA fragmentation studies indicated that cytotoxic effect of pumpkin 2S albumin is mediated through induction of apoptosis. Pumpkin 2S albumin showed DNase activity against both supercoiled and linear DNA and exerted antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum. Secondary structure analysis by CD showed that protein is highly stable up to 90°C and retains its alpha helical structure. These results demonstrated that pumpkin 2S albumin is a multifunctional protein with host of potential biotechnology applications.

  6. Aging-associated oxidized albumin promotes cellular senescence and endothelial damage

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Carlos; Alique, Matilde; Navalmoral, Estefanía; Noci, Maria-Victoria; Bohorquez-Magro, Lourdes; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidized proteins with aging have been considered a cardiovascular risk factor. However, it is unclear whether oxidized albumin, which is the most abundant serum protein, induces endothelial damage. The results of this study indicated that with aging processes, the levels of oxidized proteins as well as endothelial microparticles release increased, a novel marker of endothelial damage. Among these, oxidized albumin seems to play a principal role. Through in vitro studies, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin exhibited an increment of endothelial damage markers such as adhesion molecules and apoptosis levels. In addition, albumin oxidation increased the amount of endothelial microparticles that were released. Moreover, endothelial cells with increased oxidative stress undergo senescence. In addition, endothelial cells cultured with oxidized albumin shown a reduction in endothelial cell migration measured by wound healing. As a result, we provide the first evidence that oxidized albumin induces endothelial injury which then contributes to the increase of cardiovascular disease in the elderly subjects. PMID:27042026

  7. Thermodynamics of aqueous solutes at high temperatures and pressures: Application of the hydration theory and implications for fluid-mediated mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulak, M.; Dolejs, D.

    2012-04-01

    Magmatic activity and prograde devolatilization of subducting or underplating lithologies release large quantities of aqueous fluids that act as mass and heat transfer agents in the planetary interiors. Understanding of mineral-melt-fluid interactions is essential for evaluating the effects of fluid-mediated mass transport in subduction zones, collisional orogens as well as in igneous provinces. The thermodynamic properties of aqueous species were frequently described by the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state [1] but its utility is limited by inavailability of the solvent dielectric properties at high pressures and temperatures, and by decoupling of species-solvent mechanical and electrostatic interactions that cannot be separated within the Born theory. Systematic description of the hydration process in a Born-Haber cycle leads to the following thermochemical contributions: (i) thermodynamic properties of an unhydrated species, (ii) the pressure-volume work required to create a cavity within the solvent to accommodate the species, described by the scaled particle theory, (iii) entropic contribution related to changes in the solute's and the solvent's kinetic degrees of freedom, and (iv) contribution from the solute-solvent molecular interactions and corresponding rearrangement of the solvent molecules to form the hydration shell. Application of the spatial correlation functions [2, 3] results in apparent Gibbs energy of aqueous species, ΔaGi = a + bT + cTlnT + dP + eTlnρ + fTρlnρ, where athrough f represent constants related to standard thermodynamic properties of aqueous species (ΔfH, S, V, cP) and to solvent volumetric properties at 298.15 K and 1 bar (ρ, α, β etc.). In phase equilibrium calculations, the number of required parameters often reduces to four (c = f = 0) while noting that H2O density as the only solvent-related property is accurately known to extreme temperatures and pressures. The equation of state parameters were calibrated for 30

  8. Effects of Gold Salt Speciation and Structure of Human and Bovine Serum Albumins on the Synthesis and Stability of Gold Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Érica G A; Tofanello, Aryane; Brito, Adrianne M M; Lopes, David M; Albuquerque, Lindomar J C; de Castro, Carlos E; Costa, Fanny N; Giacomelli, Fernando C; Ferreira, Fabio F; Araújo-Chaves, Juliana C; Nantes, Iseli L

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of albumin structure and gold speciation on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The strategy of synthesis was the addition of HAuCl4 solutions at different pH values (3-12) to solutions of human and bovine serum albumins (HSA and BSA) at the same corresponding pH values. Different pH values influence the GNP synthesis due to gold speciation. Besides the inherent effect of pH on the native structure of albumins, the use N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA provided additional insights about the influence of protein structure, net charge, and thiol group approachability on the GNP synthesis. NEM treatment, heating, and the extreme values of pH promoted loss of the native albumin structure. The formation of GNPs indicated by the appearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands became detectable from 15 days of the synthesis processes that were carried out with native, NEM-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA, exclusively at pH 6 and 7. After 2 months of incubation, SPR band was also detected for all synthesis carried out at pH 8.0. The mean values of the hydrodynamic radius (RH) were 24 and 34 nm for GNPs synthesized with native HSA and BSA, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed crystallites of 13 nm. RH, XRD, and zeta potential values were consistent with GNP capping by the albumins. However, the GNPs produced with NEM-treated and heat-denaturated albumins exhibited loss of protein capping by lowering the ionic strength. This result suggests a significant contribution of non-electrostatic interactions of albumins with the GNP surface, in these conditions. The denaturation of proteins exposes hydrophobic groups to the solvent, and these groups could interact with the gold surface. In these conditions, the thiol blockage or oxidation, the latter probably favored upon heating, impaired the formation of a stable capping by thiol coordination with the

  9. Effects of Gold Salt Speciation and Structure of Human and Bovine Serum Albumins on the Synthesis and Stability of Gold Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Érica G. A.; Tofanello, Aryane; Brito, Adrianne M. M.; Lopes, David M.; Albuquerque, Lindomar J. C.; de Castro, Carlos E.; Costa, Fanny N.; Giacomelli, Fernando C.; Ferreira, Fabio F.; Araújo-Chaves, Juliana C.; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of albumin structure and gold speciation on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). The strategy of synthesis was the addition of HAuCl4 solutions at different pH values (3–12) to solutions of human and bovine serum albumins (HSA and BSA) at the same corresponding pH values. Different pH values influence the GNP synthesis due to gold speciation. Besides the inherent effect of pH on the native structure of albumins, the use N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA provided additional insights about the influence of protein structure, net charge, and thiol group approachability on the GNP synthesis. NEM treatment, heating, and the extreme values of pH promoted loss of the native albumin structure. The formation of GNPs indicated by the appearance of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands became detectable from 15 days of the synthesis processes that were carried out with native, NEM-treated and heat-denaturated forms of HSA and BSA, exclusively at pH 6 and 7. After 2 months of incubation, SPR band was also detected for all synthesis carried out at pH 8.0. The mean values of the hydrodynamic radius (RH) were 24 and 34 nm for GNPs synthesized with native HSA and BSA, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed crystallites of 13 nm. RH, XRD, and zeta potential values were consistent with GNP capping by the albumins. However, the GNPs produced with NEM-treated and heat-denaturated albumins exhibited loss of protein capping by lowering the ionic strength. This result suggests a significant contribution of non-electrostatic interactions of albumins with the GNP surface, in these conditions. The denaturation of proteins exposes hydrophobic groups to the solvent, and these groups could interact with the gold surface. In these conditions, the thiol blockage or oxidation, the latter probably favored upon heating, impaired the formation of a stable capping by thiol coordination with

  10. Moniliophthora perniciosa Necrosis- and Ethylene-Inducing Protein 2 (MpNep2) as a Metastable Dimer in Solution: Structural and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Pereira, Elen G.; Dias, Cristiano V.; Souza, Theo L. F.; Ferretti, Giulia D. S.; Cordeiro, Yraima; Camillo, Luciana R.; Almeida, Fabio C.; Valente, Ana Paula; Silva, Jerson L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how Nep-like proteins (NLPs) behave during the cell cycle and disease progression of plant pathogenic oomycetes, fungi and bacteria is crucial in light of compelling evidence that these proteins play a role in Witches` Broom Disease (WBD) of Theobroma cacao, one of the most important phytopathological problems to afflict the Southern Hemisphere. The crystal structure of MpNep2, a member of the NLP family and the causal agent of WBD, revealed the key elements for its activity. This protein has the ability to refold after heating and was believed to act as a monomer in solution, in contrast to the related homologs MpNep1 and NPP from the oomyceteous fungus Phytophthora parasitica. Here, we identify and characterize a metastable MpNep2 dimer upon over-expression in Escherichia coli using different biochemical and structural approaches. We found using ultra-fast liquid chromatography that the MpNep2 dimer can be dissociated by heating but not by dilution, oxidation or high ionic strength. Small-angle X-ray scattering revealed a possible tail-to-tail interaction between monomers, and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements identified perturbed residues involved in the putative interface of interaction. We also explored the ability of the MpNep2 monomer to refold after heating or chemical denaturation. We observed that MpNep2 has a low stability and cooperative fold that could be an explanation for its structure and activity recovery after stress. These results can provide new insights into the mechanism for MpNep2′s action in dicot plants during the progression of WBD and may open new avenues for the involvement of NLP- oligomeric species in phytopathological disorders. PMID:23029140

  11. Solubility of acetic acid and trifluoroacetic acid in low-temperature (207-245 k) sulfuric acid solutions: implications for the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mads P Sulbaek; Axson, Jessica L; Michelsen, Rebecca R H; Nielsen, Ole John; Iraci, Laura T

    2011-05-05

    The solubility of gas-phase acetic acid (CH(3)COOH, HAc) and trifluoroacetic acid (CF(3)COOH, TFA) in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was measured in a Knudsen cell reactor over ranges of temperature (207-245 K) and acid composition (40-75 wt %, H(2)SO(4)). For both HAc and TFA, the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, is inversely dependent on temperature. Measured values of H* for TFA range from 1.7 × 10(3) M atm(-1) in 75.0 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 242.5 K to 3.6 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 40.7 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 207.8 K. Measured values of H* for HAc range from 2.2 × 10(5) M atm(-1) in 57.8 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 245.0 K to 3.8 × 10(8) M atm(-1) in 74.4 wt % H(2)SO(4) at 219.6 K. The solubility of HAc increases with increasing H(2)SO(4) concentration and is higher in strong sulfuric acid than in water. In contrast, the solubility of TFA decreases with increasing sulfuric acid concentration. The equilibrium concentration of HAc in UT/LS aerosol particles is estimated from our measurements and is found to be up to several orders of magnitude higher than those determined for common alcohols and small carbonyl compounds. On the basis of our measured solubility, we determine that HAc in the upper troposphere undergoes aerosol partitioning, though the role of H(2)SO(4) aerosol particles as a sink for HAc in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will only be discernible under high atmospheric sulfate perturbations.

  12. Structures and solution properties of two novel periplasmic sensor domains with c-type heme from chemotaxis proteins of Geobacter sulfurreducens : implications for signal transduction.

    SciTech Connect

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Pessanha, M.; Londer, Y. Y.; Wood, S. J.; Duke, N. E. C.; Wilton, R.; Catarino, T.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M.; Biosciences Division; Univ.Nova de Lisboa; Insti. de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica

    2008-04-11

    Periplasmic sensor domains from two methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins from Geobacter sulfurreducens (encoded by genes GSU0935 and GSU0582) were expressed in Escherichia coli. The sensor domains were isolated, purified, characterized in solution, and their crystal structures were determined. In the crystal, both sensor domains form swapped dimers and show a PAS-type fold. The swapped segment consists of two helices of about 45 residues at the N terminus with the hemes located between the two monomers. In the case of the GSU0582 sensor, the dimer contains a crystallographic 2-fold symmetry and the heme is coordinated by an axial His and a water molecule. In the case of the GSU0935 sensor, the crystals contain a non-crystallographic dimer, and surprisingly, the coordination of the heme in each monomer is different; monomer A heme has His-Met ligation and monomer B heme has His-water ligation as found in the GSU0582 sensor. The structures of these sensor domains are the first structures of PAS domains containing covalently bound heme. Optical absorption, electron paramagnetic resonance and NMR spectroscopy have revealed that the heme groups of both sensor domains are high-spin and low-spin in the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively, and that the spin-state interconversion involves a heme axial ligand replacement. Both sensor domains bind NO in their ferric and ferrous forms but bind CO only in the reduced form. The binding of both NO and CO occurs via an axial ligand exchange process, and is fully reversible. The reduction potentials of the sensor domains differ by 95 mV (-156 mV and -251 mV for sensors GSU0582 and GSU0935, respectively). The swapped dimerization of these sensor domains and redox-linked ligand switch might be related to the mechanism of signal transduction by these chemotaxis proteins.

  13. Importance of albumin in cross-reactivity among cat, dog and horse allergens.

    PubMed

    Cabañas, R; López-Serrano, M C; Carreira, J; Ventas, P; Polo, F; Caballero, M T; Contreras, J; Barranco, P; Moreno-Ancillo, A

    2000-01-01

    Different allergenic proteins have been involved in cross-reactivity among animals. Albumins seem to be cross-sensitizing allergenic components. The aim of this study was to assess the importance of albumin as a cross-reactive allergen in patients sensitized to cat, dog and horse. One hundred and seventeen patients sensitized to cat were tested for IgE reactivity using skin prick tests and RAST assays with cat, dog and horse hair/dander extracts and their purified albumin extracts. RAST-inhibition studies were carried out to assess cross-reactivity among cat, dog and horse and among their purified albumins. It was found that 22% of patients exhibited specific IgE to cat albumin; 41% of patients sensitized to cat were also sensitized to dog and horse. Out of these patients, 21% had IgE to three albumins and 17% to two. Reciprocal inhibitions were observed among cat, dog and horse albumins and also among cat, dog and horse hair/dander extracts, using in the latter experiment sera from patients not sensitized to albumins. IgE binding to horse extract was inhibited 30% by its homologous albumin and IgE binding to cat and dog extracts in almost 15% by their respective albumins. It was concluded that albumins from these three animals share some epitopes that account for the cross-reactivity observed in around one-third of patients sensitized to cat, dog and horse. Nevertheless, more than 50% of specific IgE that cross-reacts among these three animals is directed to allergens other than albumin.

  14. Ocular Albumin Fluorophotometric Quantitation of Endotoxin-Induced Vascular Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Rosenbaum, James T.; Guss, Robert B.; Egbert, Peter R.

    1982-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) is known to alter systemic vascular permeability, but this effect is difficult to monitor and quantitate in vivo. The ocular vessels of the rabbit are particularly sensitive to LPS. Using a slit lamp equipped with a fluorophotometer, we have adapted a method to quantitate endotoxin-induced ocular vascular permeability by measuring the accumulation of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated albumin into the anterior chamber of the eye. After intravenous administration of Salmonella typhimurim LPS, the anterior chamber fluorescence and blood fluorescence were measured at intervals of 15 min and 1 h, respectively, over 4 h. In controls, maximal fluorescence in the anterior chamber was 3.1 ± 0.8% of blood fluorescence. Doses of LPS as low as 0.25 μg/kg produced an ocular/serum fluorescence ratio of 17.6 ± 4.9. A dose of 2.5 μg of LPS per kg tended to produce a higher ratio (68.0 ± 7.1) than a larger dose of 50 μg/kg (30.5 ± 16.6). Permeability changes began within 30 min after LPS, and the rate of dye accumulation varied over time, with maximal leakage usually occurring 90 min after LPS, but occasionally occurring much later. Repeated doses produced tolerance. By conjugating albumin to rhodamine and utilizing a second filter with the slit lamp to measure accumulation of this dye, we demonstrated the persistence of marked permeability during a period when intraocular fluorescein isothiocyanate and albumin levels were relatively constant. This methodology indicates that extremely low doses of LPS induce ocular permeability changes and that neither the time course nor the dose response of this effect is linear. Ocular fluorophotometry is a sensitive, noninvasive technique to study the dynamics and pharmacology of LPS-induced permeability changes. PMID:6806194

  15. Biomolecular Interaction Study of Cyclolinopeptide A with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Ben; Gui, Bo; Maley, Jason; Reaney, Martin; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics, energetics, and structure of Cyclolinopeptide A binding with Human Serum Albumin were investigated with surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism. The complex is formed through slow recognition kinetics that is temperature sensitive in the range of 20°C–37°C. The overall reaction was observed to be endothermic (ΔH = 204 kJ mol−1) and entropy driven (ΔS = 746 J mol−1K−1) with overall small changes to the tertiary structure. PMID:21436992

  16. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  17. Photoexcited riboflavin induces oxidative damage to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Yoshioka, Takuto

    2015-08-01

    Photoexcited riboflavin induced damage of human serum albumin (HSA), a water soluble protein, resulting in the diminishment of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue. Because riboflavin hardly photosensitized singlet oxygen generation and sodium azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, did not inhibit protein damage, electron transfer-mediated oxidation of HSA was speculated. Fluorescence lifetime of riboflavin was not affected by HSA, suggesting that the excited triplet state of riboflavin is responsible for protein damage through electron transfer. In addition, the preventive effect of xanthone derivatives, triplet quenchers, on photosensitized protein damage could be evaluated using this photosensitized reaction system of riboflavin and HSA.

  18. Solute fluxes from Tacaná volcano-hydrothermal system, Mexico-Guatemala. Implications for estimation of geothermal potential of the deep aquifer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collard, N.; Taran, Y.; Jácome Paz, M. P.; Campion, R.

    2014-12-01

    Tacaná (4100 m asl) is the northernmost volcano of the Central America Volcanic Arc. The volcano hosts a volcano-hydrothermal system that is manifested as a low-temperature fumarolic field at 3600 m asl and several groups of thermal springs principally located at the northwestern slopes of the volcanic edifice, at altitudes 1500 - 2000 m asl. These thermal springs discharge SO4-HCO3-enriched water (up to 1 g/kg of each one) with temperatures in the 25-63°C range. There are two distinct groups of springs with a different chloride-temperature and chloride-sulfate correlations but with the same 87Sr/86Sr ratio (~0.7046±0.0002) indicating the same wall rock composition for different aquifers. On April 2014, we found a cold spring (Manantial Nuevo), located at an elevation ~500 m lower than the others and with a different chemical composition, that discharges Na-Cl-type water with Cl concentration of 1.4 g/l and Na+K concentration up to 1.5 g/l. This new spring forms a fourth group, representing a stratified geothermal aquifer. Each thermal spring feeds a thermal stream that flows into the main drainage of the area, Río Coatán. Solute and heat fluxes from thermal springs of Tacaná volcano are estimated by the chloride-inventory method. The total observed chloride discharge from the thermal springs is estimated as 14.8 g/s and the total measured heat output of ~9.5 MW. Considering a deep fluid temperature of 250°C, the corresponding advective heat transport from the deep reservoirs that feed these springs may be estimate as 26 MW. However, the total chloride output measured in the main drainage (Coatán river) is 4 times higher (~59 g/s) than the measured Cl output of all known thermal springs. This means that other, undiscovered, thermal discharges exist in the area and that the natural heat output through thermal springs at Tacaná is significantly higher and depends on the Cl content and temperatures of the unknown thermal water discharges. If chloride

  19. A quick solution structure determination of the fully oxidized double mutant K9-10A cytochrome c7 from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans and mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Michael; Bertini, Ivano; Turano, Paola; Bruschi, Mireille; Durand, Marie-Claire; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Dolla, Alain

    2002-02-01

    Lysines 9 and 10 in Desulfuromonas acetoxidans cytochrome c7, which could be involved in the interaction mechanism with the redox partners, have been replaced by alanine residues using site-directed mutagenesis. The solution structure of the fully oxidized form of K9-10A cytochrome c7, which is paramagnetic with three paramagnetic centers, has been determined via 1H NMR. The assignment of the spectra has been performed through an automatic program whose algorithm and strategy are here described. The assignment of the NOESY spectra has been further extended by back calculating the NOESY maps. The final number of meaningful NOE-based upper distance limits was 1186. In the Restrained Energy Minimization calculations, 147 pseudocontact shift constraints were also included, which showed consistency with NOE-based constraints and therefore further contribute to validate the structure quality. A final family of 35 conformers was calculated with RMSD values with respect to the mean structure of 0.69 +/- 0.17 A and 1.05 +/- 0.14 A for the backbone and heavy atoms, respectively. The overall fold of the molecule is maintained with respect to the native protein. The loop present between heme III and heme IV results to be highly disordered also in the present structure although its overall shape mainly resembles that of the oxidized native protein, and the two strands which give rise to the short beta-sheet present at the N-terminus and connected by a turn containing the mutated residues, are less clearly defined. If this loop is neglected, the RMSD values are 0.52 +/- 0.07 A and 0.92 +/- 0.06 A for the backbone and heavy atoms, respectively, which represent a reasonable resolution. The relative distances and orientations of the three hemes are maintained, as well as the orientation of the imidazole rings of the axial histidine ligands, with the only exception of heme IV. Such difference probably reflects minor conformational changes due to the substitution of the vicinal Lys

  20. Serum albumin and health in older people: Review and meta analysis.

    PubMed

    Cabrerizo, Sonia; Cuadras, Daniel; Gomez-Busto, Fernando; Artaza-Artabe, Iñaki; Marín-Ciancas, Fernando; Malafarina, Vincenzo

    2015-05-01

    Albumin is the most abundant plasmatic protein. It is only produced by the liver and the full extent