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Sample records for albumin total bilirubin

  1. Antioxidant activity of albumin-bound bilirubin.

    PubMed Central

    Stocker, R; Glazer, A N; Ames, B N

    1987-01-01

    Bilirubin, when bound to human albumin and at concentrations present in normal human plasma, protects albumin-bound linoleic acid from peroxyl radical-induced oxidation in vitro. Initially, albumin-bound bilirubin (Alb-BR) is oxidized at the same rate as peroxyl radicals are formed and biliverdin is produced stoichiometrically as the oxidation product. On an equimolar basis, Alb-BR successfully competes with uric acid for peroxyl radicals but is less efficient in scavenging these radicals than vitamin C. These results show that 1 mol of Alb-BR can scavenge 2 mol of peroxyl radicals and that small amounts of plasma bilirubin are sufficient to prevent oxidation of albumin-bound fatty acids as well as of the protein itself. The data indicate a role for Alb-BR as a physiological antioxidant in plasma and the extravascular space. PMID:3475708

  2. Albumin-bound bilirubin in subchoroidal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, W K; Lee, P F; Ray, S; Feman, S; van Heuven, W A

    1979-01-01

    The most unique property of subchoroidal fluid was found to be the high bilirubin level. One distinct yellow band in the same position as albumin was observed when it was subjected to electrophoresis on agarose film. The yellow compound was very soluble in chloroform. Its identity to bilirubin was confirmed by its absorption maximum at 445 nm, and a positive reaction with Ehrlich's diazo reagent. Subretinal fluid and liquid vitreous often had a yellowish appearance after ocular hemorrhage. However, their bilirubin level was not elevated above that of serum. Our data indicated that the degradation of RBCs may be an important causative factor of persistant detachment. PMID:758891

  3. A spectroscopic study of the wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of bilirubins bound to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, Marina; Agati, Giovanni; Pratesi, Riccardo; Persico, Maurizio

    2005-12-01

    The wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of the asymmetric bilirubin BR-IXα and of the symmetric bilirubin-IIIα (BR-III) and mesobilirubin-XIIIα (MBR-XIII) bound to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution were analysed with the help of an exciton coupling model. The modelling was based on the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra (bisignate Cotton effect). Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) of the free BR-IX molecule suggested the presence of two main bands of exciton coupling character in the blue region of the spectrum, and other weaker bands of charge transfer character at longer wavelengths. These peculiarities were taken into account to fit the photoisomerization quantum yields in the blue-green region as functions of the wavelength, obtaining the bandshape of the exciton coupling bands from the experimental CD spectra. The other excitons were extracted from the decomposition of the band resulting from the difference between the absorption spectrum and the sum (normalized-to-absorption) of the two CD excitons. We expressed photoisomerization quantum yields in terms of the sum of the contributions to photon absorption deriving from all the exciton states normalized to total absorption. For all the reversible photoprocesses of bilirubins and for the irreversible one of BR-IXα in HSA (i.e. lumirubin formation), we give reliable mean values of the individual state excitation probabilities and photoisomerization efficiencies in the pigment protein complex.

  4. Effects of serum-isolated vs synthetic bilirubin-albumin complexes on dye-binding methods for estimating serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ihara, H; Nakamura, H; Aoki, Y; Aoki, T; Yoshida, M

    1991-07-01

    Bush and Reed reported (Clin Chem 1987;33:821-3) that the reaction of albumin with bromcresol purple but not with bromcresol green underestimated the concentration of albumin in synthetically obtained bilirubin-albumin (Bd) by 29%. Their unproven assumption was that chemically synthesized Bd behaved in a manner indistinguishable from the natural Bd in icteric serum. Here we verify that Bd, whether synthetically obtained or isolated from serum, causes an underestimation of albumin in the bromcresol purple but not in the bromcresol green method. The molar ratio of Bd from either source to underestimated albumin approximates 1.0, suggesting that one molecule of Bd would react equivalently to a molecule of albumin in the bromcresol purple method. This underestimation might falsely suggest hypoalbuminemia in patients with increased serum Bd. PMID:1855300

  5. A diazo-based dry film for determination of total bilirubin in serum.

    PubMed

    Dappen, G M; Sundberg, M W; Wu, T W; Babb, B E; Schaeffer, J R

    1983-01-01

    We have prepared a diazo-based dry film for use in determining total serum bilirubin. On a transparent support are a buffered gelatin layer containing a polymeric quaternary amine (the mordant) and a white, reflective spreading layer that contains all of the components necessary for detection of bilirubin. The method is based on the use of dyphylline and Triton X-100 surfactant to dissociate bilirubin from albumin and subsequent reaction of bilirubin with a diazonium salt [4-(N-carboxymethylsulfamyl)benzenediazonium hexafluorophosphate]. In the dry film, unconjugated, mono- and diconjugated, and strongly protein-linked (delta) bilirubin all react with the diazonium salt to produce azo dyes having absorption maxima at about 520 nm. With reflection densitometry and appropriate mathematical transformation, readings and bilirubin concentrations are linearly related to 260 mg/L. Results correlate well with those by the Jendrassik-Grof (Doumas modification) method (slope 0.994, intercept 1.1, correlation coefficient 0.993, Sy X x 4.0), and the method is precise (CV = 10.0% at Cav = 4.1 mg/L, 2.7% at Cav = 24.5 mg/L, 1.2% at Cav = 102 mg/L for patients' samples) and relatively free of interferences. PMID:6848278

  6. Circular dichroism study of the interaction between mutagens and bilirubin bound to different binding sites of serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Orlov, Sergey; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    2014-05-21

    Although recent investigations have shown that bilirubin not only has a negative role in the organism but also exhibits significant antimutagenic properties, the mechanisms of interactions between bilirubin and mutagens are not clear. In this study, interaction between bilirubin bound to different binding sites of mammalian serum albumins with structural analogues of the mutagens 2-aminofluorene, 2,7-diaminofluorene and mutagen 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone were investigated by circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy. Homological human and bovine serum albumins were used as chiral matrices, which preferentially bind different conformers of bilirubin in the primary binding sites and make it observable by circular dichroism. These molecular systems approximated a real system for the study of mutagens in blood serum. Differences between the interaction of bilirubin bound to primary and to secondary binding sites of serum albumins with mutagens were shown. For bilirubin bound to secondary binding sites with low affinity, partial displacement and the formation of self-associates were observed in all studied mutagens. The associates of bilirubin bound to primary binding sites of serum albumins are formed with 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. It was proposed that 2,7-diaminofluorene does not interact with bilirubin bound to primary sites of human and bovine serum albumins due to the spatial hindrance of the albumins binding domains. The spatial arrangement of the bilirubin bound to serum albumin along with the studied mutagens was modelled using ligand docking, which revealed a possibility of an arrangement of the both bilirubin and 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone in the primary binding site of human serum albumin.

  7. [Fractionated P-bilirubins].

    PubMed

    Schou, C S; Mortensen, H

    1989-08-14

    A diazo-based dry film technique for the estimation of different bilirubins in plasma is now available. This procedure separates bilirubins from icteric sera into three separate fractions: bilirubin (unconjugated), bilirubin-glucuronides (mono + diglucuronide) and bilirubin-albumin. In newborns with prolonged jaundice classification of hyperbilirubinemia is of importance for choice of treatment. While binding of bilirubin and bilirubin-glucuronides to albumin is non covalent, reversible, bilirubin-albumin appears to be firmly associated with albumin by covalent bonds. This causes delayed clearance of this bilirubin fraction from plasma as the half-life of albumin is approximately 18 days. Hence the substance concentration of bilirubin-albumin will decrease at a slower rate than will bilirubin and bilirubin-glucuronide, despite hepatobiliary recovery. Bilirubin-albumin may therefore prove of value in the differentiation between different clinical entities with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:2773134

  8. Photo-isomerization and oxidation of bilirubin in mammals is dependent on albumin binding.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Iryna; Jašprová, Jana; Vítek, Libor; Urbanová, Marie

    2015-12-01

    The bilirubin (BR) photo-conversion in the human body is a protein-dependent process; an effective photo-isomerization of the potentially neurotoxic Z,Z-BR as well as its oxidation to biliverdin in the antioxidant redox cycle is possible only when BR is bound on serum albumin. We present a novel analytical concept in the study of linear tetrapyrroles metabolic processes based on an in-depth mapping of binding sites in the structure of human serum albumin (HSA). A combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods was used for recognition of the binding site for BR, its derivatives (mesobilirubin and bilirubin ditaurate), and the products of the photo-isomerization and oxidation (lumirubin, biliverdin, and xanthobilirubic acid) on HSA. The CD spectra and fluorescent quenching of the Trp-HSA were used to calculate the binding constants. The results of the CD displacement experiments performed with hemin were interpreted together with the findings of molecular docking performed on the pigment-HSA complexes. We estimated that Z,Z-BR and its metabolic products bind on two independent binding sites. Our findings support the existence of a reversible antioxidant redox cycle for BR and explain an additional pathway of the photo-isomerization process (increase of HSA binding capacity; the excess free [unbound] BR can be converted and also bound to HSA).

  9. Analysis of binding ability of two tetramethylpyridylporphyrins to albumin and its complex with bilirubin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, Alexey V.; Shipitsyna, Maria K.; Vashurin, Arthur S.; Rumyantsev, Evgeniy V.; Timin, Alexander S.; Ivanov, Sergey P.

    2016-11-01

    An interaction between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(N-methyl-x-pyridyl)porphyrins, x = 2; 4 (TMPyPs) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and its bilirubin (BR) complex was investigated by UV-Viz and fluorescence spectroscopy under imitated physiological conditions involving molecular docking studies. The parameters of forming intermolecular complexes (binding constants, quenching rate constants, quenching sphere radius etc.) were determined. It was showed that the interaction between proteins and TMPyPs occurs via static quenching of protein fluorescence and has predominantly hydrophobic and electrostatic character. It was revealed that obtained complexes are relatively stable, but in the case of TMPyP4 binding with proteins occurs better than TMPyP2. Nevertheless, both TMPyPs have better binding ability with free protein compared to BRBSA at the same time. The influence of TMPyPs on the conformational changes in protein molecules was studied using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that there is no competition of BR with TMPyPs for binging sites on protein molecule and BR displacement does not occur. Molecular docking calculations have showed that TMPyPs can bind with albumin via tryptophan residue in the hydrophilic binding site of protein molecule but it is not one possible interaction way.

  10. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  11. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  12. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  13. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  14. 21 CFR 862.1113 - Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1113 Bilirubin (total and unbound) in the neonate test system....

  15. Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin Ratio Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio Share this ... Globulin Ratio; A/G Ratio Formal name: Total Protein; Albumin to Globulin Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Liver ...

  16. Characterization of erythrosine B binding to bovine serum albumin and bilirubin displacement.

    PubMed

    Mathavan, Vinodaran M K; Boh, Boon Kim; Tayyab, Saad

    2009-08-01

    The interaction of crythrosine B (ErB), a commonly used dye for coloring foods and drinks, with bovine scrum albumin (BSA) was investigated both in the absence and presence of bilirubin (BR) using absorption and absorption difference spectroscopy. ErB binding to BSA was reflected from a significant red shift of 11 nm in the absorption maximum of ErB (527 nm) with the change in absorbance at lamdamax. Analysis of absorption difference spectroscopic titration results of BSA with increasing concentrations of ErB3 using Benesi-Hildebrand equation gave the association constant, K as 6.9 x 10(4) M(-1). BR displacing action of ErB was revealed by a significant blue shift in the absorption maximum, accompanied by a decrease in absorbance difference at lamdamax in the difference spectrum of BR-BSA complex upon addition of increasing concentrations of ErB. This was further substantiated by fluorescence spectroscopy, as addition of increasing concentrations of ErB to BR-BSA complex caused a significant decrease in fluoresccnce at 510 nm. The results suggest that ErB binds to a site in the vicinity of BR binding site on BSA. Therefore, intake of ErB may increase the risk of hyperbilirubinemia in the healthy subjects. PMID:19788065

  17. Association between flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption and total serum bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Mahoney, Sara E

    2015-03-01

    Emerging work demonstrates that serum bilirubin is a novel biomarker implicated in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. However, we have a limited understanding of the influence of flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption on bilirubin levels, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination survey were used (n = 1783; 18-85 years of age), with analyses performed in 2014. Total serum bilirubin was measured from a blood sample. Using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), a flavonoid index variable was created summing the frequency of consumption of flavonoid-rich foods. After adjustments, greater consumption of flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables was positively associated with bilirubin levels. Our findings suggest an association between flavonoid-rich fruit and vegetable consumption and bilirubin levels. If confirmed by prospective and experimental studies, then regular consumption of flavonoid-rich fruits and vegetables should be promoted to increase levels of bilirubin.

  18. Serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease--Causal association or epiphenomenon?

    PubMed

    Kunutsor, Setor K

    2015-12-01

    Observational epidemiological evidence supports a linear inverse and independent association between serum total bilirubin levels and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but whether this association is causal remains to be ascertained. A Mendelian randomization approach was employed to test whether serum total bilirubin is causally linked to CHD. The genetic variant rs6742078--well known to specifically modify levels of serum total bilirubin and accounting for up to 20% of the variance in circulating serum total bilirubin levels--was used as an instrumental variable. In pooled analysis of estimates reported from published genome-wide association studies, every copy of the T allele of rs6742078 was associated with 0.42 standard deviation (SD) higher levels of serum total bilirubin (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.43). Based on combined data from the Coronary Artery Disease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analyses and the Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics Consortium involving a total of 36,763 CHD cases and 76,997 controls, the odds ratio for CHD per copy of the T allele was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.99 to 1.04). The odds ratio of CHD for a 1 SD genetically elevated serum total bilirubin level was 1.03 (95% confidence interval, 0.98 to 1.09). The current findings casts doubt on a strong causal association of serum total bilirubin levels with CHD. The inverse associations demonstrated in observational studies may be driven by biases such as unmeasured confounding and/or reverse causation. However, further research in large-scale consortia is needed. PMID:26408227

  19. [Haemolysis and turbidity influence on three analysis methods of quantitative determination of total and conjugated bilirubin on ADVIA 1650].

    PubMed

    Gobert De Paepe, E; Munteanu, G; Schischmanoff, P O; Porquet, D

    2008-01-01

    Plasma bilirubin testing is crucial to prevent the occurrence of neonatal kernicterus. Haemolysis may occur during sampling and interfere with bilirubin determination. Moreover, lipidic infusions may induce plasma lipemia and also interfere with bilirubin measurement. We evaluated the interference of haemolysis and lipemia with three methods of total and direct bilirubin measurement adaptated on an Advia 1650 analyser (Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics) : Synermed (Sofibel), Bilirubin 2 (Siemens) and Bilirubin Auto FS (Diasys). The measurement of total bilirubin was little affected by haemolysis with all three methods. The Bilirubin 2 (Siemens) method was the less sensitive to haemolysis even at low bilirubin levels. The measurement of conjugated bilirubin was significantly altered by low heamoglobin concentrations for Bilirubin Auto FS(R) (30 microM or 0,192 g/100 mL haemoglobin) and for Synermed (60 microM or 0,484 g/100 mL haemoglobin). In marked contrast, we found no haemoglobin interference with the Direct Bilirubin 2 reagent which complied with the method validation criteria from the French Society for Biological Chemistry. The lipemia up to 2 g/L of Ivelip did not affect neither the measurement of total bilirubin for all three methods nor the measurement of conjugated bilirubin with the Diasys and Siemens reagents. However, we observed a strong interference starting at 0,5 g/L of Ivelip with the Synermed reagent. Our data suggest that both Siemens and Diasys methods allow to measure accurately total and conjugated bilirubin in hemolytic and lipemic samples, nevertheless, the Siemens methodology is less affected by these interferences.

  20. Diazo-based assay for total bilirubin in a coated thin film evaluated.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J S; Sundberg, M W; Dappen, G M; Spayd, R W; Wu, T W; Jatlow, P; Seligson, D

    1984-08-01

    We compared results for total bilirubin as measured on a coated thin film and by the Evelyn-Malloy and Jendrassik-Gróf methods. We examined serum samples from patients and studied the effects of protein, hemoglobin, and lipids on bilirubin measurement. Results from the thin-film assay compared favorably with those of the other methods. Total and within-day precision (CV), assessed over a one-year period, were better than 6% and 3%, respectively, at all concentrations. Analytical recovery was 99 +/- 3%. Samples from individuals having a wide range of liver diseases demonstrated, by linear regression, good correlation between the thin-film method and the two wet-chemistry methods (correlation coefficients of 0.990 and 0.994). We conclude that the thin-film method offers a valid alternative assay for total bilirubin. PMID:6744577

  1. Bilirubin as an antioxidant in micelles and lipid bilayers: its contribution to the total antioxidant capacity of human blood plasma.

    PubMed

    MacLean, Patricia D; Drake, Emily C; Ross, L; Barclay, C

    2007-08-15

    The antioxidant capacities, antioxidant activities, k(inh), and stoichiometric factors, n, of water-soluble derivatives of bilirubin (BR), BR-human serum albumin (BR-HSA), and BR-ditaurate disodium conjugate (BRC) were determined in aqueous/lipid dispersions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles/methyl linoleate and in bilayers of dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) during initiation by water-soluble azo-bis-amidinopropane dihydrochloride (ABAP). The inhibition rate constants for BRC and BR-HSA were similar in micelles (k(inh) approximately 1.3 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), where n approximately 2, whereas the k(inh) for BR-HSA dropped by (1/2) in bilayers. The dimethyl ester of bilirubin (BRDE) gave a k(inh) only one-tenth that of the vitamin E analog, pentamethylhydroxychroman (PMHC) in SDS micelles/methyl linoleate when initiated by lipid-soluble azo-bis-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile (DMVN). Biliverdin hydrochloride (BVHCl) was NOT an effective peroxyl radical-trapping agent in the micellar phase during initiation by ABAP or DMVN containing methyl linoleate but it inhibited oxygen uptake in the aqueous phase. Both BRC and BR-HSA extended the total radical antioxidant parameter (TRAP) of human blood plasma and their contribution to TRAP was in the range of 5-10% of the natural TRAP of blood plasma, depending on the BR content determined in the blood plasma.

  2. Human serum albumin-stabilized gold nanoclusters act as an electron transfer bridge supporting specific electrocatalysis of bilirubin useful for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Mallesh; Chinnadayyala, Somasekhar R; Singh, Naveen K; Goswami, Pranab

    2016-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-stabilized Au18 nanoclusters (AuNCs) were synthesized and chemically immobilized on an Indium tin oxide (ITO) plate. The assembly process was characterized by advanced electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques. The bare ITO electrode generated three irreversible oxidation peaks, whereas the HSA-AuNC-modified electrode produced a pair of redox peaks for bilirubin at a formal potential of 0.27V (vs. Ag/AgCl). However, the native HSA protein immobilized on the ITO electrode failed to produce any redox peak for bilirubin. The results indicate that the AuNCs present in HSA act as electron transfer bridge between bilirubin and the ITO plate. Docking studies of AuNC with HSA revealed that the best docked structure of the nanocluster is located around the vicinity of the bilirubin binding site, with an orientation that allows specific oxidation. When the HSA-AuNC-modified electrode was employed for the detection of bilirubin using chronoamperometry at 0.3V (vs. Ag/AgCl), a steady-state current response against bilirubin in the range of 0.2μM to 7μM, with a sensitivity of 0.34μAμM(-1) and limit of detection of 86.32nM at S/N 3, was obtained. The bioelectrode was successfully applied to measure the bilirubin content in spiked serum samples. The results indicate the feasibility of using HSA-AuNC as a biorecognition element for the detection of serum bilirubin levels using an electrochemical technique.

  3. Prognostic value of total bilirubin in patients with angina pectoris undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hai-Mu; Shen, De-Liang; Zhao, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Tong-Wen; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Li, Ling; Zhao, Luo-Sha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant and previous studies have reported the relationship between low serum bilirubin concentration and atherosclerosis. Objective: To evaluate the prognostic value of serum total bilirubin (STB) in patients with angina pectoris undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: In total of 1419 patients (931 men, mean age 60.9±10.5 years) with angina pectoris who had undergone successfully percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were included in this study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median baseline STB (0.49 mg/dL in this cohort), which was measured before the PCI. Patients with a STB ≥0.49 mg/dL were classified into the high STB group and those with a STB <0.49 mg/dL were classified into the low STB group. Results: The incidence of in-hospital mortality and myocardial infraction was similar in the two groups. After a mean follow-up of 29.0±7.6 months, the incidence of death/myocardial infarction/stroke was significantly higher in low STB group compared with high STB group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that low STB was an independent predictor of death/myocardial infarction/stroke (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-2.41, P = 0.031). The cumulative survival rate free from death/myocardial infarction/stroke was lower in low STB group than in high STB group (P = 0.002). Conclusion: Low STB levels before PCI is an independent predictor of long-term adverse clinical outcomes in patients with angina pectoris. PMID:26629096

  4. High baseline bilirubin and low albumin predict liver decompensation and serious adverse events in HCV-infected patients treated with sofosbuvir-containing regimens.

    PubMed

    Perumalswami, P V; Patel, N; Bichoupan, K; Ku, L; Yalamanchili, R; Harty, A; Motamed, D; Khaitova, V; Chang, C; Grewal, P; Liu, L; Schiano, T D; Woodward, M; Dieterich, D T; Branch, A D

    2016-09-01

    To conduct surveillance and determine the safety profile of new hepatitis C virus treatments in real-world clinical practice. Hepatic decompensation and other serious adverse events were investigated in an observational cohort study of 511 patients treated with regimens containing sofosbuvir, December 2013-June 2014. Among 499 previously stable patients (no history of hepatic decompensation during the previous 12 months), a nested case-control study was performed to identify predictors of decompensation/serious adverse event. Cases and controls were matched 1:5 based on treatment regimen and duration. Matched conditional logistic regression was used for analysis. Providers scored the likelihood that events were treatment-related (scale = 0-4). The cumulative incidence of decompensation/events was 6.4% for the total cohort. Among 499 previously stable patients, the incidence of decompensation/events was 4.5%; the mortality rate was 0.6%. Sixteen of the 499 experienced one or more serious complications considered to be at least potentially treatment-related, and the sustained virological response rate was 7/16 (44%). Two cases, both on sofosbuvir/simeprevir (without interferon or ribavirin), had complications consistent with autoimmune events (score 3, 'likely treatment-related'), and one experienced a flare of autoimmune hepatitis. Compared to controls, cases had higher baseline median model for end-stage liver disease scores (14 vs 8, P < 0.01). Decompensation/events was independently associated with lower baseline albumin (OR = 0.12/g/dL, P = 0.01) and higher total bilirubin (OR = 4.31/mg/dL, P = 0.01). Reduced hepatic function at baseline increased the risk of liver decompensation/events.

  5. High baseline bilirubin and low albumin predict liver decompensation and serious adverse events in HCV-infected patients treated with sofosbuvir-containing regimens.

    PubMed

    Perumalswami, P V; Patel, N; Bichoupan, K; Ku, L; Yalamanchili, R; Harty, A; Motamed, D; Khaitova, V; Chang, C; Grewal, P; Liu, L; Schiano, T D; Woodward, M; Dieterich, D T; Branch, A D

    2016-09-01

    To conduct surveillance and determine the safety profile of new hepatitis C virus treatments in real-world clinical practice. Hepatic decompensation and other serious adverse events were investigated in an observational cohort study of 511 patients treated with regimens containing sofosbuvir, December 2013-June 2014. Among 499 previously stable patients (no history of hepatic decompensation during the previous 12 months), a nested case-control study was performed to identify predictors of decompensation/serious adverse event. Cases and controls were matched 1:5 based on treatment regimen and duration. Matched conditional logistic regression was used for analysis. Providers scored the likelihood that events were treatment-related (scale = 0-4). The cumulative incidence of decompensation/events was 6.4% for the total cohort. Among 499 previously stable patients, the incidence of decompensation/events was 4.5%; the mortality rate was 0.6%. Sixteen of the 499 experienced one or more serious complications considered to be at least potentially treatment-related, and the sustained virological response rate was 7/16 (44%). Two cases, both on sofosbuvir/simeprevir (without interferon or ribavirin), had complications consistent with autoimmune events (score 3, 'likely treatment-related'), and one experienced a flare of autoimmune hepatitis. Compared to controls, cases had higher baseline median model for end-stage liver disease scores (14 vs 8, P < 0.01). Decompensation/events was independently associated with lower baseline albumin (OR = 0.12/g/dL, P = 0.01) and higher total bilirubin (OR = 4.31/mg/dL, P = 0.01). Reduced hepatic function at baseline increased the risk of liver decompensation/events. PMID:26989855

  6. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1110 - Bilirubin (total or direct) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test... or serum. Measurements of the levels of bilirubin, an organic compound formed during the normal...

  11. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    PubMed

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950's, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26829016

  12. Gallbladder sludge on ultrasound is predictive of increased liver enzymes and total bilirubin in cats.

    PubMed

    Harran, Nathaniel; d'Anjou, Marc-André; Dunn, Marilyn; Beauchamp, Guy

    2011-09-01

    The purposes of this retrospective study were to assess the prevalence of gallbladder sludge (GBS) in a population of cats presented for abdominal ultrasound in a teaching hospital and to determine its association with increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and total bilirubin (TB). Gallbladder sludge was detected in 152 (14%) of the cats undergoing abdominal ultrasound between 2004 and 2008. This population was compared to a control group of 32 cats without GBS. Alanine aminotransferase, ALP, and TB mean values were significantly higher in cats with GBS than in controls (P ≤ 0.0005) and odds for increased values in cats with GBS were 4.2 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6 to 11.0], 9.5 (95% CI: 2.2 to 41.7), and 4.1 (95% CI: 1.5 to 11.5), respectively (P ≤ 0.007). In conclusion, GBS is an uncommon ultrasonographic finding in cats that is predictive of increased liver enzymes and TB. More studies are needed to establish potential links between GBS and hepatobiliary disease in cats.

  13. Bilirubin - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gallbladder Considerations Bilirubin can break down in light. That is why babies with jaundice are sometimes placed under blue fluorescent lamps. Alternative Names Conjugated bilirubin - urine; Direct bilirubin - ...

  14. Bilirubin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs ... Gilbert syndrome, due to low levels of the enzyme that produces conjugated bilirubin If conjugated (direct) bilirubin ...

  15. The Biological Effects of Bilirubin Photoisomers

    PubMed Central

    Jasprova, Jana; Dal Ben, Matteo; Vianello, Eleonora; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanova, Marie; Vyroubalova, Karolina; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Sticha, Martin; Cerna, Marcela; Vitek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Although phototherapy was introduced as early as 1950’s, the potential biological effects of bilirubin photoisomers (PI) generated during phototherapy remain unclear. The aim of our study was to isolate bilirubin PI in their pure forms and to assess their biological effects in vitro. The three major bilirubin PI (ZE- and EZ-bilirubin and Z-lumirubin) were prepared by photo-irradiation of unconjugated bilirubin. The individual photoproducts were chromatographically separated (TLC, HPLC), and their identities verified by mass spectrometry. The role of Z-lumirubin (the principle bilirubin PI) on the dissociation of bilirubin from albumin was tested by several methods: peroxidase, fluorescence quenching, and circular dichroism. The biological effects of major bilirubin PI (cell viability, expression of selected genes, cell cycle progression) were tested on the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. Lumirubin was found to have a binding site on human serum albumin, in the subdomain IB (or at a close distance to it); and thus, different from that of bilirubin. Its binding constant to albumin was much lower when compared with bilirubin, and lumirubin did not affect the level of unbound bilirubin (Bf). Compared to unconjugated bilirubin, bilirubin PI did not have any effect on either SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of genes involved in bilirubin metabolism or cell cycle progression, nor in modulation of the cell cycle phase. The principle bilirubin PI do not interfere with bilirubin albumin binding, and do not exert any toxic effect on human neuroblastoma cells. PMID:26829016

  16. High Total Bilirubin as a Protective Factor for Diabetes Mellitus: An Analysis of NHANES Data From 1999 - 2006

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyath, Pramil; Gorrepati, Venkata Subhash; Peters, Ian; Nookala, Vinod; Murphy, Megan E; Srouji, Nadine; Fischman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a rampantly growing epidemic in the United States, affecting nearly 10% of the adult population. Studies have shown that higher levels of Total Bilirubin (TBili) convey a protective effect with regard to cardiovascular risk. In this study, we will examine the relationship between TBili level and prevalence of DM to discern whether a similar relationship exists. Methods The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a comprehensive survey performed regularly to evaluate the overall health and nutrition status of the United States population. For the purpose of this study, we combined NHANES data collected between 1999 and 2006. Totally 15,876 eligible participants were selected after excluding all patients younger than twenty years, those with a history of abnormal liver function tests, or those who disclosed a history of liver disease. The data collected on these individuals was adjusted for demographic characteristics, as well as risk factors for DM, and was analyzed via multivariate logistic regression, using SAS proc survey methodology. Results After age adjustment, increased TBili was associated with 26% reduction in diabetes risk (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.64 - 0.88). Multivariate analysis, adjusting for all diabetes risk factors assessed, confirmed this association (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67 - 0.95). Conclusions Our results show that a higher level of serum TBili is associated with odds of having a lower incidence of DM. This finding supports the hypothesis that the antioxidant nature of TBili, demonstrating a protective effect with regard to the risk of stroke, atherosclerosis, and vasculitis in prior research, also extends to DM risk. Furthermore, research has shown that higher levels of TBili increase glucose mobilization into the cells, leading to more efficient, biologic glucose utilization. There is no doubt that the beneficial effect of TBili is multifactorial; thus further investigation is warranted. Keywords

  17. Higher serum total bilirubin concentration is associated with lower risk of renal insufficiency in an adult population

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ang-Tse; Wang, Ya-Yu; Lin, Shih-Yi; Liang, Jiin-Tsae; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Song, Yuh-Min; Chang, Wen-Dau

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic inflammation is proposed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and serum bilirubin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the association between serum total bilirubin (Tb) concentration and renal function in an adult population. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study and collected anthropometric measurements, fasting blood tests, lifestyle habits and medical history of 3876 subjects attending a health examination. Renal insufficiency was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 calculated by using the CKD-EPI equation. Results: Serum Tb concentrations were higher in subjects without renal insufficiency than in those with renal insufficiency. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that Tb concentration was positively associated with eGFR after adjusting for important CKD risk factors (P=0.04). Multivariable logistic regression analysis also revealed that higher Tb concentration (each increment of 1.71 μmol/L) (0.1 mg/dL) was associated with a reduced risk of renal insufficiency: odds ratios were 0.94 (P=0.005) for men and 0.90 (P=0.015) for women, respectively. When subjects were divided into quartiles of serum Tb, multivariable-adjusted odds ratios for renal insufficiency comparing the fourth to the first Tb quartile were 0.49 (P=0.001) for men and 0.35 (P=0.003) for women. A stepwise exclusion of subjects, first those with possible liver disease and second, those with CKD stage 4 and 5, showed consistent results. Conclusion: Higher serum Tb concentration was associated with lower risk of renal insufficiency, regardless of other conventional CKD risk factors. PMID:26770557

  18. Estimation of unconjugated, conjugated, and "delta" bilirubin fractions in serum by use of two coated thin films.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, M W; Lauff, J J; Weiss, J S; Dappen, G M; Wu, T W; Spayd, R W; Seligson, D

    1984-08-01

    We used two coated thin films to measure the concentrations of unconjugated, conjugated, and total bilirubin as well as bilirubin covalently bound to albumin ("delta" bilirubin) in more than 400 serum samples. We measured the unconjugated and conjugated species by determining their reflection densities at two wavelengths (400 and 460 nm) on a coating designed for the enhanced spectral measurement of bilirubin but which does not register the delta form. Total bilirubin was measured by use of a diazo-based thin film (Clin Chem 29: 37-41, 1983). We estimated the concentration of delta bilirubin by subtracting the sum of unconjugated and conjugated bilirubin from the concentration of total bilirubin. All measurements agree well with those by comparative methods, as shown by linear regression. Slopes ranged from 0.92 to 1.02, correlation coefficients from 0.935 and 0.998. Linear combinations of these values can also be used to compute other results; e.g., the sum of conjugated and delta bilirubin can be considered to be an estimate of "direct"-reacting bilirubin. PMID:6744578

  19. Bilirubin - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... bilirubin is not processed normally by the liver ( Gilbert disease ) The following problems with gallbladder or bile ... Choledocholithiasis Cirrhosis Crigler-Najjar syndrome Dubin-Johnson syndrome Gilbert disease Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency Hemoglobin Hemolytic ...

  20. Total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin levels in children with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sayar, Ersin; Özdem, Sebahat; Uzun, Gülbahar; İşlek, Ali; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    In our study, we aimed to investigate ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an oxidative stress marker, as well as other oxidant and antioxidant markers that have not been evaluated in children with celiac disease. A total of 37 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) and 29 healthy children were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the IMA, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, and advanced oxidation protein products in all of the subjects. We also compared the levels at the time of the diagnosis, and following a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the children with CD. While the IMA and the other oxidant marker levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group, the antioxidant marker levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group, compared to the control group. We also determined that the tissue transglutaminase IgA showed a highly positive correlation, and that the IMA showed a moderately positive correlation with the Marsh-Oberhuber histopathological stage. Additionally, the IMA and other oxidant marker levels were significantly lower, while the antioxidant marker levels were significantly higher after the GFD, compared to the pre-diet period. We detected that oxidative stress played a role in the pathogenesis of CD, and that this could be evaluated using oxidative stress markers, which would regress after the GFD. We also detected that IMA is a marker that shows a correlation with the histopathological stage, and may be used in the diagnosis. PMID:27411418

  1. Study of the effect of total serum protein and albumin concentrations on canine fructosamine concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Loste, A; Marca, M C

    1999-01-01

    The relationship among serum fructosamine concentration and total serum protein and albumin concentrations were evaluated in healthy and sick dogs (diabetics and dogs with insulinoma were not included). Fructosamine was determined using a commercial colorimetric nitroblue tetrazolium method applied to the Technicon RA-500 (Bayer). Serum fructosamine concentration was not correlated to total protein in normoproteinemic (r = 0.03) and hyperproteinemic dogs (r = 0.29), but there was a high correlation (r = 0.73) in hypoproteinemic dogs. Similar comparison between serum fructosamine and albumin concentrations showed middle correlation (r = 0.49) in normoalbuminemic dogs and high degree of correlation (r = 0.67) in hypoalbuminemic dogs. These results showed the importance of recognizing serum glucose concentration as well as total serum protein and albumin concentrations in the assay of canine serum fructosamine concentration. PMID:10369572

  2. Predictive Value of Total Serum Bilirubin within 6 Hour of Birth for the Development of Hyperbilirubinemia After 72 hours of Birth

    PubMed Central

    Vanaki, Raghavendra; Badakali, Ashok V.; Pol, Ramesh R; Yelamali, Bhuvaneshwari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal jaundice is benign and no intervention might be required, but jaundice can be associated with an underlying disease condition, which therefore warrants accurate and unbiased estimation of bilirubin. Total Serum Bilirubin (TSB) measurements (at discharge between 18 hours and 72 hours) can be used to predict the chances of developing severe hyperbilirubinemia. Materials and Methods The present hospital-based prospective study was undertaken to determine the predictive value of serum bilirubin before 6 hours of life for subsequent hyperbilirubinemia in healthy term neonates. One hundred and fifty healthy term newborns delivered during January 2013–December 2013 at Hanagal Shri Kumareshwara Hospital and Research Centre, S. Nijalingappa Medical College, Bagalkot Karnataka, India, were included in the study. Serum bilirubin levels were estimated twice, first, within 6 hours of life and second, after 72 hours of life. Bilirubin values were plotted on previously published nomograms. Sensitivity, specificity of the test was established. Results A measure of TSB levels (within 6 hours of life) across the study population, showed that maximum number of infants (70/150) had TSB level between 4.1 and 5.5 mg/dL and 16 infants had TSB level >5.6 mg/dL. The TSB levels (after 72 hours of life) showed that maximum newborns (83/150) had TSB levels between 12.8 and 15.3 mg/dL and 9 infants had TSB levels between 7.7 and 10.2mg/dL. Eighteen infants developed hyperbilirubinemia. Newborns with TSB value of >4.95mg/dL within 6hours of life had developed significant hyperbilirubinemia after 72 hours of life with sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 89% (p=0.0001), which was highly statistically significant. Conclusion A TSB level of >5 mg/dL within 6 hours of birth would serve as a predictor for risk of subsequent hyperbilirubinemia in the near future. PMID:27790538

  3. TOTAL LYMPHOCYTE COUNT AND SERUM ALBUMIN AS PREDICTORS OF NUTRITIONAL RISK IN SURGICAL PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    ROCHA, Naruna Pereira; FORTES, Renata Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early detection of changes in nutritional status is important for a better approach to the surgical patient. There are several nutritional measures in clinical practice, but there is not a complete method for determining the nutritional status, so, health professionals should only choose the best method to use. Aim: To evaluate the total lymphocyte count and albumin as predictors of identification of nutritional risk in surgical patients. Methods: Prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 69 patients undergoing surgery of the gastrointestinal tract. The assessment of nutritional status was evaluated by objective methods (anthropometry and biochemical tests) and subjective methods (subjective global assessment). Results: All parameters used in the nutritional assessment detected a high prevalence of malnutrition, with the exception of BMI which detected only 7.2% (n=5). The albumin (p=0.01), the total lymphocytes count (p=0.02), the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds (p<0.002) and the subjective global assessment (p<0.001) proved to be useful as predictors of risk of postoperative complications, since the smaller the values of albumin and lymphocyte count and higher the score the subjective global assessment were higher risks of surgical complications. Conclusions: A high prevalence of malnutrition was found, except for BMI. The use of albumin and total lymphocyte count were good predictor for the risk of postoperative complications and when used with other methods of assessing the nutritional status, such as the subjective global assessment and the percentage of adequacy of skinfolds, can be useful for identification of nutritional risk and postoperative complications. PMID:26537145

  4. Significance of Total Protein, Albumin, Globulin, Serum Effusion Albumin Gradient and LDH in the Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Effusion Secondary to Tuberculosis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish; Das, Biswajit; Mallick, Ayaz K; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer and Pulmonary tuberculosis are two major public health problems associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide particularly in low and middle income countries like India. Wrong diagnosis of lung cancer cases as pulmonary tuberculosis in primary health care system delays the onset of anti-cancer chemotherapy as well as initiation of DOTS thus increasing complication and mortality rate in malignancy patients. In this context easy, cost effective diagnostic tool at primary level must be the priority and need of hour. Aim To study and evaluate any significance of biochemical parameters (total protein, albumin, globulin, serum effusion albumin gradient, LDH) in serum and pleural effusion secondary to tuberculosis and lung cancer. Materials and Methods A case control study was carried out on patients attending OPD and IPD, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, RMCH. Hundred cases of Tuberculosis effusion, 50 cases of Malignant effusion and 100 age and sex matched apparently healthy controls were taken for correlation of biochemical parameters (total protein, albumin, globulin, serum effusion albumin gradient, LDH) and statistically evaluated to find any significance between tuberculosis, lung cancer and control group. Blood and pleural fluid samples were collected and then subjected to assessment of parameters (total protein, albumin, LDH) by using EM360 Autoanalyser and kits were supplied by Transasia diagnostics. Globulin and Serum Effusion Albumin Gradient (SEAG) was calculated mathematically. Statistical Analysis Data is presented as mean ± SD. Comparison of serum and pleural fluid levels (of taken parameters) were done in TB, Lung Cancer and Control groups by ANOVA and students t-test. The p-value <0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Results We found serum-total protein, albumin, globulin to be significantly higher in TB group than lung cancer group but serum LDH was higher in lung cancer group (in all parameters p

  5. Simple and sensitive method for the quantification of total bilirubin in human serum using 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride as a chromogenic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Avinash, Krishnegowda; Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Dinesh, Rangappa; Shrestha, Ashwinee Kumar

    2010-11-01

    We here describe a new spectrophotometric method for measuring total bilirubin in serum. The method is based on the cleavage of bilirubin giving formaldehyde which further reacts with diazotized 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone hydrochloride giving blue colored solution with maximum absorbance at 630 nm. Sensitivity of the developed method was compared with Jendrassik-Grof assay procedure and its applicability has been tested with human serum samples. Good correlation was attained between both methods giving slope of 0.994, intercept 0.015, and R2 = 0.997. Beers law obeyed in the range of 0.068-17.2 μM with good linearity, absorbance y = 0.044 Cbil + 0.003. Relative standard deviation was 0.006872, within day precision ranged 0.3-1.2% and day-to-day precision ranged 1-6%. Recovery of the method varied from 97 to 102%. The proposed method has higher sensitivity with less interference. The obtained product was extracted and was spectrally characterized for structural confirmation with FT-IR, 1H NMR.

  6. Quantitative assessment of the multiple processes responsible for bilirubin homeostasis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Serum bilirubin measurements are commonly obtained for the evaluation of ill patients and to screen for liver disease in routine physical exams. An enormous research effort has identified the multiple mechanisms involved in the production and metabolism of conjugated (CB) and unconjugated bilirubin (UB). While the qualitative effects of these mechanisms are well understood, their expected quantitative influence on serum bilirubin homeostasis has received less attention. In this review, each of the steps involved in bilirubin production, metabolism, hepatic cell uptake, and excretion is quantitatively examined. We then attempt to predict the expected effect of normal and defective function on serum UB and CB levels in health and disease states including hemolysis, extra- and intrahepatic cholestasis, hepatocellular diseases (eg, cirrhosis, hepatitis), and various congenital defects in bilirubin conjugation and secretion (eg, Gilbert's, Dubin-Johnson, Crigler-Najjar, Rotor syndromes). Novel aspects of this review include: 1) quantitative estimates of the free and total UB and CB in the plasma, hepatocyte, and bile; 2) detailed discussion of the important implications of the recently recognized role of the hepatic OATP transporters in the maintenance of CB homeostasis; 3) discussion of the differences between the standard diazo assay versus chromatographic measurement of CB and UB; 4) pharmacokinetic implications of the extremely high-affinity albumin binding of UB; 5) role of the enterohepatic circulation in physiologic jaundice of newborn and fasting hyperbilirubinemia; and 6) insights concerning the clinical interpretation of bilirubin measurements. PMID:25214800

  7. Early postoperative albumin level following total knee arthroplasty is associated with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Koh, Won-Uk; Kim, Sae-Gyeol; Park, Hyeok-Seong; Song, Jun-Gol; Ro, Young-Jin; Yang, Hong-Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoalbuminemia has been reported to be an independent risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI). However, little is known about the relationship between the albumin level and the incidence of AKI in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of our study was to assess incidence and risk factors for AKI and to evaluate the relationship between albumin level and AKI following TKA. The study included a retrospective review of medical records of 1309 consecutive patients who underwent TKA between January 2008 and December 2014. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the lowest serum albumin level within 2 postoperative days (POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL vs ≥3.0 g/dL). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for AKI. A comparison of incidence of AKI, hospital stay, and overall mortality in the 2 groups was performed using propensity score analysis. Of 1309 patients, 57 (4.4%) developed AKI based on Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Factors associated with AKI included age (odds ratio [OR] 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.09; P = 0.030), diabetes (OR 3.12; 95% CI 1.65–5.89; P < 0.001), uric acid (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.26–1.82; P < 0.001), beta blocker use (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.48–4.73; P = 0.001), diuretics (OR 16.42; 95% CI 3.08–87.68; P = 0.001), and POD2_alb level < 3.0 g/dL (OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.09–3.37; P = 0.023). After propensity score analysis, POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was associated with AKI occurrence (OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.03–3.24, P = 0.041) and longer hospital stay (P = 0.001). In this study, we demonstrated that POD2_alb level<3.0 g/dL was an independent risk factor for AKI and lengthened hospital stay in patients undergoing TKA. PMID:27495094

  8. Efficacy of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells on Neonatal Bilirubin Encephalopathy in Rats.

    PubMed

    Amini, Naser; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hadjighassem, Mahmoudreza; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Mousavi, Neda; Safakheil, Hosein; Jafari, Leila; Sarveazad, Arash; Yari, Abazar; Ramezani, Sara; Faghihi, Faezeh; Joghataei, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-05-01

    Kernicterus is a neurological syndrome associated with indirect bilirubin accumulation and damages to the basal ganglia, cerebellum and brain stem nuclei particularly the cochlear nucleus. To mimic haemolysis in a rat model such that it was similar to what is observed in a preterm human, we injected phenylhydrazine in 7-day-old rats to induce haemolysis and then infused sulfisoxazole into the same rats at day 9 to block bilirubin binding sites in the albumin. We have investigated the effectiveness of human adiposity-derived stem cells as a therapeutic paradigm for perinatal neuronal repair in a kernicterus animal model. The level of total bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, brain bilirubin and brain iron was significantly increased in the modelling group. There was a significant decreased in all severity levels of the auditory brainstem response test in the two modelling group. Akinesia, bradykinesia and slip were significantly declined in the experience group. Apoptosis in basal ganglia and cerebellum were significantly decreased in the stem cell-treated group in comparison to the vehicle group. All severity levels of the auditory brainstem response tests were significantly decreased in 2-month-old rats. Transplantation results in the substantial alleviation of walking impairment, apoptosis and auditory dysfunction. This study provides important information for the development of therapeutic strategies using human adiposity-derived stem cells in prenatal brain damage to reduce potential sensori motor deficit.

  9. The usefulness of serum C-reactive protein and total bilirubin levels for distinguishing between dengue fever and malaria in returned travelers.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Satoshi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Takeshita, Nozomi; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2014-03-01

    The clinical manifestations of dengue fever (DF) and malaria are similar. Specific diagnostic tests are not always available. A retrospective study to compare the laboratory results of malaria and DF was conducted at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in Japan from January of 2005 to March of 2013. Febrile returned travelers from overseas diagnosed with malaria or DF were included; 86 malaria and 85 DF cases were identified. C-reactive protein (CRP) and total bilirubin (T-bil) had high area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (> 0.9). A cutoff value of CRP > 2.4 mg/dL to predict malaria as opposed to DF had a sensitivity of 91.9% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 83.9-96.7%) and specificity of 90.6% (95% CI = 82.3-95.8%). A cutoff value of T-bil > 0.9 mg/dL to predict malaria as opposed to DF had a sensitivity of 73.8% (95% CI = 62.7-83%) and a specificity of 95.1% (95% CI = 88-98.6%). CRP and T-bil are useful to distinguish between DF and malaria in returned travelers.

  10. Serum Bilirubin and Disease Progression in Mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Apperley, Scott; Park, Hye Yun; Holmes, Daniel T.; Wise, Robert A.; Connett, John E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: COPD is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with oxidative stress. Serum bilirubin has potent antioxidant actions, and higher concentrations have been shown to protect against oxidative stress. The relation between serum bilirubin and COPD progression is unknown. METHODS: Serum bilirubin was measured in 4,680 smokers aged 35 to 60 years old with mild to moderate airflow limitation. The relationship of serum bilirubin to postbronchodilator FEV1 and rate of FEV1 decline over 3 to 9 years was determined using regression modeling. Total and disease-specific mortality were also ascertained. RESULTS: Serum bilirubin was positively related to FEV1 (P < .001). Serum bilirubin was also negatively related to the annual decline in FEV1 when adjusted for baseline demographics, pack-years smoked, and baseline measures of lung function (P = .01). Additionally, serum bilirubin was negatively associated with risk of death from coronary heart disease (P = .03); however, the relationships between bilirubin and other mortality end points were not statistically significant (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: Bilirubin is inversely related to COPD disease severity and progression. Higher serum bilirubin concentration was associated with a higher FEV1 and less annual decline in FEV1. Bilirubin was also associated with less coronary heart disease mortality. These data support the hypothesis that bilirubin has a protective effect on COPD disease progression, possibly through its antioxidant actions. Bilirubin may prove useful as an easily accessible and readily available blood-based COPD biomarker. PMID:25539285

  11. Biology of Bilirubin Photoisomers.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Thor Willy Ruud

    2016-06-01

    Phototherapy is the main treatment for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In acute treatment of extreme hyperbilirubinemia, intensive phototherapy may have a role in 'detoxifying' the bilirubin molecule to more polar photoisomers, which should be less prone to crossing the blood-brain barrier, providing a 'brain-sparing' effect. This article reviews the biology of bilirubin isomers. Although there is evidence supporting the lower toxicity of bilirubin photoisomers, there are studies showing the opposite. There are methodologic weaknesses in most studies and better-designed experiments are needed. In an infant acutely threatened by bilirubin-induced brain damage, intensified phototherapy should be used expediently and aggressively.

  12. Newborn Jaundice Technologies: Unbound Bilirubin and Bilirubin Binding Capacity In Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Lamola, Angelo A.

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal jaundice (hyperbilirubinemia), extremely common in neonates, can be associated with neurotoxicity. A safe level of bilirubin has not been defined in either premature or term infants. Emerging evidence suggest that the level of unbound (or “free”) bilirubin has a better sensitivity and specificity than total serum bilirubin for bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. Although recent studies suggest the usefulness of free bilirubin measurements in managing high-risk neonates including premature infants, there currently exists no widely available method to assay the serum free bilirubin concentration. To keep pace with the growing demand, in addition to reevaluation of old methods, several promising new methods are being developed for sensitive, accurate, and rapid measurement of free bilirubin and bilirubin binding capacity. These innovative methods need to be validated before adopting for clinical use. We provide an overview of some promising methods for free bilirubin and binding capacity measurements with the goal to enhance research in this area of active interest and apparent need. PMID:21641486

  13. Inherited Disorders of Bilirubin Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-01-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective 1) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, 2) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g. Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), 3) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or 4) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  14. Inherited disorders of bilirubin clearance.

    PubMed

    Memon, Naureen; Weinberger, Barry I; Hegyi, Thomas; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2016-03-01

    Inherited disorders of hyperbilirubinemia may be caused by increased bilirubin production or decreased bilirubin clearance. Reduced hepatic bilirubin clearance can be due to defective (i) unconjugated bilirubin uptake and intrahepatic storage, (ii) conjugation of glucuronic acid to bilirubin (e.g., Gilbert syndrome, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, breast milk jaundice), (iii) bilirubin excretion into bile (Dubin-Johnson syndrome), or (iv) conjugated bilirubin re-uptake (Rotor syndrome). In this review, the molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of these conditions are described, as well as current approaches to diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26595536

  15. Ibuprofen augments bilirubin toxicity in rat cortical neuronal culture.

    PubMed

    Berns, Monika; Toennessen, Margit; Koehne, Petra; Altmann, Rodica; Obladen, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Premature infants are at risk for bilirubin-associated brain damage. In cell cultures bilirubin causes neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. Ibuprofen is used to close the ductus arteriosus, and is often given when hyperbilirubinemia is at its maximum. Ibuprofen is known to interfere with bilirubin-albumin binding. We hypothesized that bilirubin toxicity to cultured rat embryonic cortical neurons is augmented by coincubation with ibuprofen. Incubation with ibuprofen above a concentration of 125 microg/mL reduced cell viability, measured by methylthiazole tetrazolium reduction, to 68% of controls (p < 0.05). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release increased from 29 to 38% (p < 0.01). The vehicle solution did not affect cell viability. Coincubation with 10 microM unconjugated bilirubin (UCB)/human serum albumin in a molar ratio of 3:1 and 250 microg/mL ibuprofen caused additional loss of cell viability and increased LDH release (p < 0.01), DNA fragmentation, and activated caspase-3. Preincubation with the pan-caspase inhibitor z-val-ala-asp-fluoromethyl ketone abolished ibuprofen- and UCB-induced DNA fragmentation. The study demonstrates that bilirubin in low concentration of 10 microM reduces neuron viability and ibuprofen increases this effect. Apoptosis is the underlying cell death mechanism.

  16. Inaccurate values for direct bilirubin with some commonly used direct bilirubin procedures.

    PubMed

    Chan, K M; Scott, M G; Wu, T W; Clouse, R E; Calvin, D R; Koenig, J; Lichti, D A; Ladenson, J H

    1985-09-01

    We compared five methods for the determination of total and direct bilirubins in serum samples from normal controls, subjects with Gilbert's syndrome, and serum pools containing about 50 and 150 mg of total bilirubin per liter. The Kodak Ektachem method and a diazotized sulfanilic acid method with 0.15 mmol/L sodium nitrite concentrations are the only methods that gave accurate direct bilirubin values, as judged by liquid-chromatographic results. The aca method that involved p-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate and another diazotized sulfanilic acid method with a higher concentration of sodium nitrite (0.8 mmol/L) yielded falsely high values for direct bilirubin, which could lead to clinical confusion. The more recently introduced diazotized sulfanilic acid method of the aca gave substantially better results than the p-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate method but was still inaccurate. Systematic investigation of these procedures revealed that the overestimation of direct bilirubin by the diazotized sulfanilic acid method was related to the amount of unconjugated bilirubin present and its ability to react as direct bilirubin in the presence of higher concentrations of sodium nitrite. Inherent properties of p-nitrobenzene diazonium tetrafluoroborate appeared to be responsible for inaccuracies in that method, which could not be corrected by varying reagent concentration or the reaction conditions.

  17. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Gilmara C.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% ( n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l -1 albumin and 90 g l -1 total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l -1 albumin ( r=0.998) and total protein ( r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 μl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO 4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  18. Simultaneous photometric determination of albumin and total protein in animal blood plasma employing a multicommutated flow system to carried out on line dilution and reagents solutions handling.

    PubMed

    Luca, Gilmara C; Reis, Boaventura F

    2004-02-01

    An automatic flow procedure for the simultaneous determination of albumin and total protein in blood plasma samples is proposed. The flow network comprised a set of three-way solenoid valves assembled to implement the multicommutation. The flow set up was controlled by means of a computer equipped with an electronic interface card which running a software wrote in QUICKBASIC 4.5 performed on line programmed dilution to allow the determination of both albumin and total protein in blood plasma. The photometric methods based on Bromocresol Green and Biuret reagents were selected for determination of albumin and total protein, respectively. Two LEDs based photometers coupled together the flow cells were employed as detector. After the adjustment of the operational parameters the proposed system presented the following features: an analytical throughput of 45 sample processing per hour for two analytes; relative standard deviations of 1.5 and 0.8% (n=10) for a typical sample presenting 34 g l(-1) albumin and 90 g l(-1) total protein, respectively; linear responses ranging from 0 to 15 g l(-1) albumin (r=0.998) and total protein (r=0.999); sample and reagents consumption, 140 microl serum solution, 0.015 mg VBC and 0.432 mg CuSO4 per determination, respectively. Applying the paired t-test between results obtained using the proposed system and reference methods no significant difference at 95 and 90% confidence level for albumin and total protein, respectively, were observed.

  19. Contribution of delta bilirubin to the interpretation of hyperbilirubinemia in the horse - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, J H; Jacobs, R M; Physick-Sheard, P

    1991-03-01

    A study was conducted to examine the relationship of delta bilirubin to traditional bilirubin fractions to determine if delta bilirubin might assist in differentiating causes of hyperbilirubinemia in the horse. A recently introduced thin-film method was used for delta bilirubin determination. Thin-film and the traditional diazo methods were used for determining total, unconjugated, and conjugated bilirubin fractions. Sera from 38 healthy and 85 sick horses were examined.Thin-film serum delta bilirubin determination does not appear to assist in differentiating causes of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in horses. There was good correlation between thin-film and diazo-determined total bilirubin and bilirubin fractions. Only small changes in reference limits would appear to be necessary for clinical application of the thin-film bilirubin methods used in this study. PMID:17423755

  20. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns.

  1. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns. PMID:26311600

  2. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-11-09

    A transcutaneous bilirubin detector is designed comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient. 6 figures.

  3. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    A transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  4. Optical transcutaneous bilirubin detector

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-03-04

    This invention consists of a transcutaneous bilirubin detector comprising a source of light having spectral components absorbable and not absorbable by bilirubin, a handle assembly, electronic circuitry and a fiber optic bundle connecting the assembly to the light source and circuitry. Inside the assembly is a prism that receives the light from one end of the fiber optic bundle and directs it onto the skin and directs the reflected light back into the bundle. The other end of the bundle is trifucated, with one end going to the light source and the other two ends going to circuitry that determines how much light of each kind has been reflected. A relatively greater amount absorbed by the skin from the portion of the spectrum absorbable by bilirubin may indicate the presence of the illness. Preferably, two measurements are made, one on the kneecap and one on the forehead, and compared to determine the presence of bilirubin. To reduce the impact of light absorption by hemoglobin in the blood carried by the skin, pressure is applied with a plunger and spring in the handle assembly, the pressure limited by points of a button slidably carried in the assembly that are perceived by touch when the pressure applied is sufficient.

  5. Quantification of total content of non-esterified fatty acids bound to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pavićević, Ivan D; Jovanović, Vesna B; Takić, Marija M; Aćimović, Jelena M; Penezić, Ana Z; Mandić, Ljuba M

    2016-09-10

    Non-esterified fatty acids bound to the human serum albumin (HSA) contribute to several HSAs properties of special concern in pathologies, for instance to the reactivity of the free HSA-Cys34 thiol group (important antioxidative thiol pool in plasma), and to the affinity for binding of molecules and ions (for example cobalt as a prominent biomarker in heart ischemia). Therefore, the method for determination of FAs bound to HSA was developed. FAs were released from HSA (previously isolated from serum by ammonium sulfate precipitation) using acidic copper(II) sulfate in phosphoric acid, extracted by n-heptane-chloroform (4:1, v/v) mixture, spotted on TL silica-gel and then developed with n-heptane-chloroform-acetic acid (5:3:0.3, v/v/v). Common office flatbed scanner and software solution for densitometric image analysis, developed in R, were used. The linearity of calibration curve in concentration range from 0.1 to 5.0mmol/L stearic acid was achieved. The method was proved to be precise (with RSD of 1.4-4.7%) and accurate. Accuracy was examined by standard addition method (recoveries 97.2-102.5%) and by comparison to results of GC. The method is sample saving, technically less demanding, and cheap, and therefore suitable for determination of FAs/HSA ratio when elevated concentrations of free FAs are reliable diagnostic/risk parameter of pathological states.

  6. Quantification of total content of non-esterified fatty acids bound to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pavićević, Ivan D; Jovanović, Vesna B; Takić, Marija M; Aćimović, Jelena M; Penezić, Ana Z; Mandić, Ljuba M

    2016-09-10

    Non-esterified fatty acids bound to the human serum albumin (HSA) contribute to several HSAs properties of special concern in pathologies, for instance to the reactivity of the free HSA-Cys34 thiol group (important antioxidative thiol pool in plasma), and to the affinity for binding of molecules and ions (for example cobalt as a prominent biomarker in heart ischemia). Therefore, the method for determination of FAs bound to HSA was developed. FAs were released from HSA (previously isolated from serum by ammonium sulfate precipitation) using acidic copper(II) sulfate in phosphoric acid, extracted by n-heptane-chloroform (4:1, v/v) mixture, spotted on TL silica-gel and then developed with n-heptane-chloroform-acetic acid (5:3:0.3, v/v/v). Common office flatbed scanner and software solution for densitometric image analysis, developed in R, were used. The linearity of calibration curve in concentration range from 0.1 to 5.0mmol/L stearic acid was achieved. The method was proved to be precise (with RSD of 1.4-4.7%) and accurate. Accuracy was examined by standard addition method (recoveries 97.2-102.5%) and by comparison to results of GC. The method is sample saving, technically less demanding, and cheap, and therefore suitable for determination of FAs/HSA ratio when elevated concentrations of free FAs are reliable diagnostic/risk parameter of pathological states. PMID:27394177

  7. Bilirubin measurements in neonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Gregory J.

    2000-04-01

    Infant Jaundice is a physiologic condition of elevated bilirubin in the tissue that affects nearly 60 percent of all term newborns and virtually 100 percent of premature infants. The high production of bilirubin in the newborn circulatory system and the inability of the immature liver to process and eliminate it case the condition. When the bilirubin levels rise, it starts to deposit in the baby's skin and in the brain. The deposits in the brain can cause neurologic impairment and death. The BiliCheck is a handheld, battery-powered device that measures the level of jaundice non-invasively using BioPhotonics at the point of care. The result is displayed on an LCD screen immediately, so physicians can now make treatment decision without waiting for results to return from the lab. The BiliCheck System has been marketed worldwide since April of 1998 and has received FDA clearance for use in the USA on pre-photo therapy infants in March of 1999.

  8. Studies on the interaction of total saponins of panax notoginseng and human serum albumin by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Xie, Meng-Xia; Kang, Juan; Zheng, Dong

    2003-10-01

    Total saponins of panax notoginseng (TPNS), isolated from the roots of panax notoginseng (Burk) F.H. Chen, have been considered as the main active components of San-Chi and have various therapeutical actions. Their interactions with human serum albumin have been investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectrometry and fluorescence methods. The results showed that TPNS combined with HSA through C=O and CN groups of polypeptide chain. The drug-protein combination caused the significant loss of α-helix structure and the microenvironment changes of the tyrosine residues in protein at higher drug concentration. Combining the curve-fitting results of amide I and amide III bands, the alterations of protein secondary structure after drug complexation were quantitatively determined. The α-helix structure has a decrease of ≈6%, from 55 to 49% and the β-sheet increased ≈3%, from 23 to 26% at high drug concentration. However, no major alterations were observed for the β-turn and random coil structures up on drug-protein binding.

  9. Selective targeting of magnetic albumin microspheres containing low-dose doxorubicin: total remission in Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Widder, K J; Morris, R M; Poore, G A; Howard, D P; Senyei, A E

    1983-01-01

    Magnetically responsive albumin microspheres containing doxorubicin hydrochloride were selectively localized in Yoshida sarcoma tumors. Tumors were implanted subcutaneously in the tail of Holtzman rats and allowed to grow to at least 200 mm2 size before initiation of experimental treatment. Drug-bearing microspheres at a dose level of either 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg were infused proximal to the tumor via the ventral caudal artery. A bipolar permanent magnet was placed adjacent to the tumor during the infusion to effect localization. Control animals were treated with free doxorubicin infused intra-arterially at 5.0 mg/kg or 0.5 mg/kg. In other test groups animals received placebo microspheres localized in the tumor via influence of the external magnetic field, or drug-containing microspheres were infused without utilization of the magnet to effect localization. Of the 22 animals receiving magnetically localized doxorubicin microspheres 17 had total histological remission of the tumor. The remaining animals demonstrated marked tumor regression representing as much as 500-600 mm2 decrease in tumor size. While no deaths or metastases occurred in the groups receiving localized drug, animals treated with free doxorubicin, placebo microspheres or non-localized doxorubicin microspheres exhibited a significant increase in tumor size with metastases and subsequent death in 90-100% of the animals. No significant differences were noted in tumor regression/remission data between the 0.5 and 2.5 mg/kg dose levels of magnetically localized doxorubicin spheres. These results represent a significant advance in targeted chemotherapy in that 77% of the animals in the magnetically localized doxorubicin microsphere treatment groups exhibited total remission after only one regimen of drug therapy. PMID:6682771

  10. Bilirubin present in diverse angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Pirone, Cary; Johnson, Jodie V.; Quirke, J. Martin E.; Priestap, Horacio A.; Lee, David

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Bilirubin is an orange-yellow tetrapyrrole produced from the breakdown of heme by mammals and some other vertebrates. Plants, algae and cyanobacteria synthesize molecules similar to bilirubin, including the protein-bound bilins and phytochromobilin which harvest or sense light. Recently, we discovered bilirubin in the arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the White Bird of Paradise Tree, which was the first example of this molecule in a higher plant. Subsequently, we identified bilirubin in both the arils and the flowers of Strelitzia reginae, the Bird of Paradise Flower. In the arils of both species, bilirubin is present as the primary pigment, and thus functions to produce colour. Previously, no tetrapyrroles were known to generate display colour in plants. We were therefore interested in determining whether bilirubin is broadly distributed in the plant kingdom and whether it contributes to colour in other species. Methodology In this paper, we use HPLC/UV and HPLC/UV/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/UV/ESI-MS/MS) to search for bilirubin in 10 species across diverse angiosperm lineages. Principal results Bilirubin was present in eight species from the orders Zingiberales, Arecales and Myrtales, but only contributed to colour in species within the Strelitziaceae. Conclusions The wide distribution of bilirubin in angiosperms indicates the need to re-assess some metabolic details of an important and universal biosynthetic pathway in plants, and further explore its evolutionary history and function. Although colour production was limited to the Strelitziaceae in this study, further sampling may indicate otherwise. PMID:22476078

  11. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  12. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  13. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness.

  14. Association of bilirubin and malondialdehyde levels with retinopathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Apoorva; Kalra, Pramila; Gowda, B. H. Rakshitha; Krishnaswamy, Malavika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilirubin as an antioxidant and malondialdehyde (MDA) as an oxidant have been shown to be associated with various complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Aims and Objectives: The aim was to measure the levels of serum bilirubin and MDA in type 2 DM patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR) and to correlate them with severity of DR. Materials and Methods: A total number of 120 subjects out of which 40 were controls without type 2 DM and the rest 80 were type 2 DM patients were included in the study. Of those 80 diabetics, 44 patients did not have DR and 36 patients had DR. Results: The total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin were higher in controls as compared to cases (P = 0.017, 0.033, 0.024). Serum MDA levels were found to be higher in diabetics as compared to controls (P = 0.00). The values of all the three parameters, that is, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin were lower in patients with retinopathy as compared to those without retinopathic changes (P = 0.00, 0.020, and 0.007). Subjects were assigned to quartiles based on serum total bilirubin concentration. The prevalence of DR was significantly lower among persons with the highest bilirubin quartile compared to those with the lowest quartile. The severity of DR was inversely proportional to the total bilirubin levels (P = 0.001). The multiple logistic regression analysis showed total bilirubin to be associated with prevalence of DR (P = 0.035). Conclusions: The levels of total bilirubin were significantly lower in patients with DR and also in the late stages of retinopathy as compared to those without retinopathy and in controls but MDA levels did not show any association with DR. PMID:25932393

  15. Effects of aluminum chloride on serum proteins, bilirubin, and hepatic trace elements in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ben; Zhu, Yanzhu; Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Liming; Li, Guojiang; Song, Yongli; Li, Yanfei

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal the effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on the hepatic metabolism function and trace elements' distribution. Two hundred healthy male chickens (1 day old) were intraperitoneally administered with AlCl3 (0, 18.31, 27.47, and 36.62 mg kg(-1) day(-1) of Al(3+)) consecutively for 3 days. Then the chickens were allowed to rest for 1 day. The cycle lasted four days. The cycle was repeated 15 times (60 days). The contents of serum total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (TBI), direct bilirubin (DBI), hepatic aluminum (Al), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn) were examined. The results showed that the contents of serum TP and ALB and hepatic Fe and Zn decreased and the contents of serum TBI and DBI and hepatic Al and Cu increased in the chickens with AlCl3 This indicates that chronic administration of AlCl3 impairs the hepatic metabolism function and disorders the hepatic trace elements' distribution. PMID:25896954

  16. Acute Alcohol Consumption Elevates Serum Bilirubin, an Endogenous Antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Wu, Ran; Jatlow, Peter I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Moderate alcohol consumption has been associated with both negative and favorable effects on health. The mechanisms responsible for reported favorable effects remain unclear. Higher (not necessarily elevated) concentrations of serum bilirubin, an antioxidant, have also been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. This study tests the hypothesis that single dose alcohol consumption elevates bilirubin providing a potential link between these observations. Methods 18 healthy individuals (8 cigarette smokers) were administered alcohol, calibrated to achieve blood concentrations of 20, 80 and 120 mg/dL, in random order in 3 laboratory sessions separated by a week. Each session was preceded by and followed by 5–7 days of alcohol abstinence. Serum bilirubin was measured at 7:45 am prior to drinking, at 2 pm, and at 7:45 the next morning. Mixed effects regression models compared baseline and 24 hr. post-drinking bilirubin concentrations. Results Total serum bilirubin (sum of indirect and direct) concentration increased significantly after drinking from baseline to 24 hours in non-smokers (from Mean=0.38, SD=0.24 to Mean=0.51 SD=0.30, F(1, 32.2) =24.24, p<.0001) but not in smokers (from Mean=0.25, SD=0.12 to Mean=0.26, SD=0.15, F(1, 31.1) =0.04, p=0.84). In nonsmokers the indirect bilirubin concentration and the ratio of indirect (unconjugated) to direct (conjugated) bilirubin also increased significantly. Conclusions Alcohol consumption leads to increases in serum bilirubin in nonsmokers. Considering the antioxidant properties of bilirubin, our findings suggest one possible mechanism for the reported association between alcohol consumption and reduced risk of some disorders that could be tested in future longitudinal studies. PMID:25707709

  17. Low Serum Albumin Level, Male Sex, and Total Gastrectomy Are Risk Factors of Severe Postoperative Complications in Elderly Gastric Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sung Chan; Kim, Hyun Il

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is well known that old age is a risk factor for postoperative complications. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the risk factors for poor postoperative surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Materials and Methods Between January 2006 and December 2015, 247 elderly gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were reviewed. In this study, an elderly patient was defined as a patient aged ≥65 years. All possible variables were used to explore the risk factors for poor early surgical outcomes in elderly gastric cancer patients. Results Based on multivariate analyses of preoperative risk factors, preoperative low serum albumin level (<3.5 g/dl) and male sex showed statistical significance in predicting severe postoperative complications. Additionally, in an analysis of surgery-related risk factors, total gastrectomy was a risk factor for severe postoperative complications. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that low serum albumin level, male sex, and total gastrectomy could be risk factors of severe postoperative complications in elderly gastric cancer patients. Therefore, surgeons should work carefully in cases of elderly gastric cancer patients with low preoperative serum albumin level and male sex. We believe that efforts should be made to avoid total gastrectomy in elderly gastric cancer patients. PMID:27104026

  18. Photodamage of the cells in culture sensitized with bilirubin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenkova, O. A.; Plavskaya, L. G.; Mikulich, A. V.; Leusenko, I. A.; Tretyakova, A. I.; Plavskii, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that exposure to radiation of LED sources of light with an emission band maximum at about 465 and 520 nm having substantially identical damaging effects on animal cells in culture, that are in a logarithmic growth phase and preincubated with pigment. Photobiological effect is caused by photodynamic processes involving singlet oxygen generated by triplet excited sensitizer. Mono-exponential type dependence of cell survival on the energy dose indicates that it is bilirubin that acts as a sensitizer but not its photoproducts. The inclusion of bilirubin in the cells, where it is primarily localized in the mitochondria cells, it is accompanied by multiple amplification photochemical stability compared to pigment molecules bound with albumin

  19. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. PMID:26017184

  20. Bilirubin Increases Insulin Sensitivity by Regulating Cholesterol Metabolism, Adipokines and PPARγ Levels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinfeng; Dong, Huansheng; Zhang, Yong; Cao, Mingjun; Song, Lili; Pan, Qingjie; Bulmer, Andrew; Adams, David B.; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Obesity can cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Moderate elevations in bilirubin levels have anti-diabetic effects. This study is aimed at determining the mechanisms by which bilirubin treatment reduces obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. DIO mice were treated with bilirubin or vehicle for 14 days. Body weights, plasma glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were performed prior to, immediately, and 7 weeks post-treatment. Serum lipid, leptin, adiponectin, insulin, total and direct bilirubin levels were measured. Expression of factors involved in adipose metabolism including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP-1), insulin receptor (IR), and PPARγ in liver were measured by RT-PCR and Western blot. Compared to controls, bilirubin-treated mice exhibited reductions in body weight, blood glucose levels, total cholesterol (TC), leptin, total and direct bilirubin, and increases in adiponectin and expression of SREBP-1, IR, and PPARγ mRNA. The improved metabolic control achieved by bilirubin-treated mice was persistent: at two months after treatment termination, bilirubin-treated DIO mice remained insulin sensitive with lower leptin and higher adiponectin levels, together with increased PPARγ expression. These results indicate that bilirubin regulates cholesterol metabolism, adipokines and PPARγ levels, which likely contribute to increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in DIO mice. PMID:26017184

  1. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  2. Bilirubin Glucuronidation Revisited: Proper Assay Conditions to Estimate Enzyme Kinetics with Recombinant UGT1A1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Bilirubin, an end product of heme catabolism, is primarily eliminated via glucuronic acid conjugation by UGT1A1. Impaired bilirubin conjugation, caused by inhibition of UGT1A1, can result in clinical consequences, including jaundice and kernicterus. Thus, evaluation of the ability of new drug candidates to inhibit UGT1A1-catalyzed bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro has become common practice. However, the instability of bilirubin and its glucuronides presents substantial technical challenges to conduct in vitro bilirubin glucuronidation assays. Furthermore, because bilirubin can be diglucuronidated through a sequential reaction, establishment of initial rate conditions can be problematic. To address these issues, a robust high-performance liquid chromatography assay to measure both bilirubin mono- and diglucuronide conjugates was developed, and the incubation conditions for bilirubin glucuronidation by human embryonic kidney 293-expressed UGT1A1 were carefully characterized. Our results indicated that bilirubin glucuronidation should be assessed at very low protein concentrations (0.05 mg/ml protein) and over a short incubation time (5 min) to assure initial rate conditions. Under these conditions, bilirubin total glucuronide formation exhibited a hyperbolic (Michaelis-Menten) kinetic profile with a Km of ∼0.2 μM. In addition, under these initial rate conditions, the relative proportions between the total monoglucuronide and the diglucuronide product were constant across the range of bilirubin concentration evaluated (0.05–2 μM), with the monoglucuronide being the predominant species (∼70%). In conclusion, establishment of appropriate incubation conditions (i.e., very low protein concentrations and short incubation times) is necessary to properly characterize the kinetics of bilirubin glucuronidation in a recombinant UGT1A1 system. PMID:20668247

  3. Comparison in different species of biliary bilirubin-IX alpha conjugates with the activities of hepatic and renal bilirubin-IX alpha-uridine diphosphate glycosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, J; Van de Vijver, M; Michiels, R; Heirwegh, K P

    1977-01-01

    The bilrubin-IXalpha conjugates in bile and the activities of bilirubin-IX alpha--UDP-glycosyltransferases in liver and kidney were determined for ten species of mammals and for the chicken. 1. In the mammalian species, bilirubin-IX alpha glucuronide was the predominant bile pigment. Excretion of neutral glycosides was unimportant, except in the cat, the mouse, the rabbit and the dog, where glucose and xylose represented 12--41% of total conjugating groups bound to bilirubin-IX alpha. In chicken bile, glucoside and glucuronide conjugates were of equal importance. They probably represent only a small fraction of the total bile pigment. 2. The transferase activities in liver showed pronounced species variation. This was also apparent with regard to activation by digitonin, pH optimum and relative activities of transferases acting on either UDP-glucuronic acid or neutral UDP-sugars. 3. Man, the dog, the cat and the rat excrete bilirubin-IX alpha largely as diconjugated derivatives. In general, diconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha could also be synthesized in vitro with liver homogenate, bilirubin-IX alpha and UDP-sugar. In contrast, for the other species examined, bilirubin pigments consisted predominantly of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. Synthesis in vitro with UDP-glucuronic acid, UDP-glucose or UDP-xylose as the sugar donor led exclusively to the formation of monoconjugated bilirubin-IX alpha. 4. The transferase activities in the kidney were restricted to the cortex and were important only for the rat and the dog. No activity at all could be detected for several species, including man. 5. Comparison of the transferase activities in liver with reported values of the maximal rate of excretion in bile suggests a close linkage between conjugation and biliary secretion of bilirubin-IX alpha. PMID:407905

  4. Unconjugated Bilirubin and an Increased Proportion of Bilirubin Monoconjugates in the Bile of Patients with Gilbert's Syndrome and Crigler-Najjar Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, Johan; Blanckaert, Norbert; Heirwegh, Karel P. M.; Préaux, Anne-Marie; Berthelot, Pierre

    1977-01-01

    Bilirubin pigments were studied in the bile of 20 normal adults, 25 patients with Gilbert's syndrome, 9 children with Crigler-Najjar disease, and 6 patients with hemolysis, to determine how a deficiency of hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase would affect the end products of bilirubin biotransformation. In the bile from patients with Gilbert's syndrome, a striking increase was found in the proportion of bilirubin monoconjugates (48.6±9.8% of total conjugates) relative to that in normal bile (27.2±7.8%). This increase was even more pronounced in children with Crigler-Najjar disease, in whom, even in the most severe cases, glucuronide could always be demonstrated in the bile. Furthermore, unconjugated bilirubin-IXα was unquestionably present in the bile of these children and amounted to 30-57% of their total bilirubin pigments (<1% in the controls). It was not possible to predict from the biliary bilirubin composition whether a child would respond to phenobarbital therapy or not. Bile composition was normal in patients with hemolysis, except when there was associated deficiency of hepatic glucuronosyltransferase. Therefore, the observed alterations were not a simple consequence of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The present findings suggest that Crigler-Najjar disease represents a more pronounced expression than Gilbert's syndrome of a common biochemical defect. Hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase deficiency leads to decreased formation of diconjugates with an ensuing increase in the proportion of bilirubin monoconjugates in bile; in the most severe cases, an elevated content of biliary unconjugated bilirubin is also found. PMID:409736

  5. Molecular biology of bilirubin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jansen, P L; Bosma, P J; Chowdhury, J R

    1995-01-01

    As the genes encoding the glucuronidating enzymes are discovered, it is evident that glucuronidation is a magnificent example of how in evolution, man became adapted to his "intoxicating" environment. A superfamily of genes is necessary to dispose of the toxins and carcinogens that are encountered by inhalation and ingestion. The enzymes that glucuronidate endogenous compounds are members of this large family. For the clinician, it is important to remember that jaundice may sometimes be the result of interactions at the level of bilirubin glucuronidation. When jaundice results from inactivation of members of the UGT1 family, conjugation of certain phenols, such as the anesthetic propofol, or synthetic estrogens, such as ethinylestradiol, can also be impaired. In the case of severe bilirubin glucuronidation deficiencies, such as the Crigler Najjar syndrome type I, there are exciting prospects for a possible cure by gene therapy. PMID:9224500

  6. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Stec, David E; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W; Baum, Justin; Hinds, Terry D

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  7. Bilirubin Binding to PPARα Inhibits Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Stec, David E.; John, Kezia; Trabbic, Christopher J.; Luniwal, Amarjit; Hankins, Michael W.; Baum, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Numerous clinical and population studies have demonstrated that increased serum bilirubin levels protect against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant, and the beneficial actions of moderate increases in plasma bilirubin have been thought to be due to the antioxidant effects of this bile pigment. In the present study, we found that bilirubin has a new function as a ligand for PPARα. We show that bilirubin can bind directly to PPARα and increase transcriptional activity. When we compared biliverdin, the precursor to bilirubin, on PPARα transcriptional activation to known PPARα ligands, WY 14,643 and fenofibrate, it showed that fenofibrate and biliverdin have similar activation properties. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with biliverdin suppressed lipid accumulation and upregulated PPARα target genes. We treated wild-type and PPARα KO mice on a high fat diet with fenofibrate or bilirubin for seven days and found that both signal through PPARα dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the effect of bilirubin on lowering glucose and reducing body fat percentage was blunted in PPARα KO mice. These data demonstrate a new function for bilirubin as an agonist of PPARα, which mediates the protection from adiposity afforded by moderate increases in bilirubin. PMID:27071062

  8. Peritoneal Albumin Dialysis as a Novel Approach for Liver Support: Study in a Porcine Model of Acute Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Defterevos, Georgios; Nastos, Constantinos; Papalois, Apostolos; Kalimeris, Konstantinos; Margelos, Vassileios; Fragulidis, George; Pafiti, Agathi; Mikrovas, Aggeliki; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial liver support gained considerable interest in recent years due to the development of various albumin dialysis systems, which prolong survival of some patients with acute liver failure (ALF). Τhis study aims to examine the role of peritoneal albumin dialysis in a postoperative ALF model. ALF was induced in 14 female Landrace pigs by a combination of major liver resection (70-75% of total parenchyma) and ischemic-reperfusion injury on the liver remnant. Animals were randomly divided in two groups (n = 7 each). Both were monitored for 12 h of reperfusion and received peritoneal dialysis for 6 h, beginning 6 h after reperfusion. The albumin group received an albumin-rich solution and the control group received albumin-free solution. The control group gradually developed intracranial hypertension, whereas, in the albumin group, rise in the intracranial pressure was substantially attenuated (P < 0.01, t = 12 h). Albumin-treated animals had significantly lower levels of ammonia (P < 0.01), total bile acids (P < 0.01), free fatty acids (P < 0.05), lactate (P < 0.01), and total bilirubin (P < 0.05). Liver malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl were significantly reduced (P = 0.007 and P = 0.001 at t = 12 h) after albumin dialysis. Results suggest that this method may become a useful adjunct in the management of ALF, thus, justifying further study. PMID:27094211

  9. Albumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a variety of conditions in addition to malnutrition , a decrease in albumin needs to be evaluated ... can also be seen in inflammation , shock, and malnutrition . They may be seen with conditions in which ...

  10. In vitro xanthine oxidase and albumin denaturation inhibition assay of Barringtonia racemosa L. and total phenolic content analysis for potential anti-inflammatory use in gouty arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Nurul Izzati; Sidik, Norrizah Jaafar; Awal, Asmah; Adam, Nurul Athirah Mohamad; Rezali, Nur Inani

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities and total phenolic content (TPC) of methanolic extracts of infloresence axes, endosperms, leaves, and pericarps of Barringtonia racemosa L. Methods: The anti-inflammatory study was conducted by assessing the potential through xanthine oxidase (XO) and albumin denaturation inhibition assays. Meanwhile, the TPC in the extracts were assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Results: In the XO inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract was found to exert the highest inhibition capacity at 0.1% (w/v) with 59.54 ± 0.001% inhibition followed by leaves (58.82 ± 0.001%), pericarps (57.99 ± 0.003%), and endosperms (57.20 ± 0.003%) extracts. Similarly in the albumin denaturation inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract had shown the greatest inhibition capacity with 70.58 ± 0.004% inhibition followed by endosperms (66.80 ± 0.024%), leaves (65.29 ± 0.006%), and pericarps extracts (43.33 ± 0.002%). Meanwhile, for TPC analysis, leaves extract was found to have the highest phenolic content (53.94 ± 0.000 mg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/g DW) followed by infloresence axes (31.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), endosperms (22.63 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), and the least was found in pericarps (15.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW). Conclusion: The results indeed verified the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of B. racemosa and supported its potential to be used in alleviating gouty arthritis and XO-related diseases. PMID:27757263

  11. Alteration in bilirubin excretion in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zavala, A; Del Razo, L M; Aguilar, C; García-Vargas, G G; Borja, V H; Cebrián, M E

    1998-10-15

    We have studied hepatic function in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We studied 51 individuals living in three villages exposed to As in water. Nazareno (0.014 mgAs/l), Santa Ana (0.1 mgAs/l) and Benito Juárez (0.3 mgAs/l). We determined the serum activity of aspartate aminotransferase (SAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) as indicators of hepatocellular injury and that of gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as indicators of cholestasic injury. Serum bilirubin was used as an indicator of organic conjugated anion transport. Total proteins, albumin and globulin fraction in serum were used as indicators of biosynthetic liver capacity. The main findings of this study were the predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and increased serum ALP activity which were related to the concentration of total arsenic (TAs) in urine, suggesting the presence of cholestasis in As-exposed individuals. No significant changes were observed in the other parameters studied.

  12. Adeno-associated virus vector serotypes mediate sustained correction of bilirubin UDP glucuronosyltransferase deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Seppen, Jurgen; Bakker, Conny; de Jong, Berry; Kunne, Cindy; van den Oever, Karin; Vandenberghe, Kristin; de Waart, Rudi; Twisk, Jaap; Bosma, Piter

    2006-06-01

    Crigler-Najjar (CN) patients have no bilirubin UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1A1) activity and suffer brain damage because of bilirubin toxicity. Vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 2 transduce liver cells with relatively low efficiency. Recently, AAV serotypes 1, 6, and 8 have been shown to be more efficient for liver cell transduction. We compared AAV serotypes 1, 2, 6, and 8 for correction of UGT1A1 deficiency in the Gunn rat model of CN disease. Adult Gunn rats were injected with CMV-UGT1A1 AAV vectors. Serum bilirubin was decreased over the first year by 64% for AAV1, 16% for AAV2, 25% for AAV6, and 35% for AAV8. Antibodies to UGT1A1 were detected after injection of all AAV serotypes. An AAV1 UGT1A1 vector with the liver-specific albumin promoter corrected serum bilirubin levels but did not induce UGT1A1 antibodies. Two years after injection of AAV vectors all animals had large lipid deposits in the liver. These lipid deposits were not seen in age-matched control animals. AAV1 vectors are promising candidates for CN gene therapy because they can mediate a reduction in serum bilirubin levels in Gunn rats that would be therapeutic in humans. PMID:16581301

  13. Relation of Pre-anthracycline Serum Bilirubin Levels to Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Trinity; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Jordan, Jennifer H.; Whitlock, Matthew C.; Meléndez, Giselle C.; Lamar, Zanetta S.; Porosnicu, Mercedes; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Poole, Leslie B.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial injury because of oxidative stress manifesting through reductions in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) may occur after the administration of anthracycline-based chemotherapy (A-bC). We hypothesized that bilirubin, an effective endogenous antioxidant, may attenuate the reduction in LVEF that sometimes occurs after receipt of A-bC. We identified 751 consecutively treated patients with cancer who underwent a pre-A-bC LVEF measurement, exhibited a serum total bilirubin level <2 mg/dl, and then received a post-A-bC LVEF assessment because of symptomatology associated with heart failure. Analysis of variance, Tukey’s Studentized range test, and chi-square tests were used to evaluate an association between bilirubin and LVEF changes. The LVEF decreased by 10.7 ± 13.7%, 8.9 ± 11.8%, and 7.7 ± 11.5% in group 1 (bilirubin at baseline ≤0.5 mg/dl), group 2 (bilirubin 0.6 to 0.8 mg/dl), and group 3 (bilirubin 0.9 to 1.9 mg/dl), respectively. More group 1 patients experienced >15% decrease in LVEF compared with those in group 3 (p = 0.039). After adjusting for age, coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hematocrit, and the use of cardioactive medications, higher precancer treatment bilirubin levels and lesser total anthracycline doses were associated with LVEF preservation (p =0.047 and 0.011, respectively). In patients treated with anthracyclines who subsequently develop symptoms associated with heart failure, pre-anthracycline treatment serum bilirubin levels inversely correlate with subsequent deterioration in post-cancer treatment LVEF. In conclusion, these results suggest that increased levels of circulating serum total bilirubin, an intrinsic antioxidant, may facilitate preservation of LVEF in patients receiving A-bC for cancer. PMID:26433273

  14. Serum albumin levels in burn people are associated to the total body surface burned and the length of hospital stay but not to the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; de Haro-Padilla, Jesús M; Rioja, Luis F; DeRosier, Leo C; de la Torre, Jorge I

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Serum albumin levels have been used to evaluate the severity of the burns and the nutrition protein status in burn people, specifically in the response of the burn patient to the nutrition. Although it hasn’t been proven if all these associations are fully funded. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the relationship of serum albumin levels at 3-7 days after the burn injury, with the total body surface area burned (TBSA), the length of hospital stay (LHS) and the initiation of the oral/enteral nutrition (IOEN). Subject and methods: It was carried out with the health records of patients that accomplished the inclusion criteria and were admitted to the burn units at the University Hospital of Reina Sofia (Córdoba, Spain) and UAB Hospital at Birmingham (Alabama, USA) over a 10 years period, between January 2000 and December 2009. We studied the statistical association of serum albumin levels with the TBSA, LHS and IOEN by ANOVA one way test. The confidence interval chosen for statistical differences was 95%. Duncan’s test was used to determine the number of statistically significantly groups. Results: Were expressed as mean±standard deviation. We found serum albumin levels association with TBSA and LHS, with greater to lesser serum albumin levels found associated to lesser to greater TBSA and LHS. We didn’t find statistical association with IOEN. Conclusion: We conclude that serum albumin levels aren’t a nutritional marker in burn people although they could be used as a simple clinical tool to identify the severity of the burn wounds represented by the total body surface area burned and the lenght of hospital stay. PMID:23875122

  15. Albumin receptor effect may be due to a surface-induced conformational change in albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.G.; Burrington, C.M.

    1989-06-15

    To determine whether equilibrium binding between albumin and hepatocytes involves a cell surface receptor for albumin, we incubated freshly isolated rat hepatocytes with /sup 125/I-albumin and determined the amount of albumin associated with the cells as a function of the total albumin concentration. The resulting two-phase binding curve showed the rat albumin-hepatocyte interaction to consist of a saturable binding interaction with a dissociation constant of 1.1 microM and 2 X 10(6) sites/cell in addition to a weak, nonsaturable binding interaction. However, the saturable binding of albumin to hepatocytes did not appear to result from the presence of an albumin receptor on the cell surface; the interaction was the same for different species of albumin, for chemically modified albumins, and for fragments of albumin representing mutually exclusive domains of the molecule. The saturable binding was, instead, found to involve a subpopulation of albumin with an enhanced affinity for the cell surface. We show that this subpopulation of albumin is generated upon contact with either solid surfaces or cell surfaces and can be transferred from one surface to another. We propose that the two-phase Scatchard binding curve and the ''albumin receptor effect'' reflect two populations of albumin that bind to the cell surface with different affinities rather than one population of albumin that binds to two classes of binding sites.

  16. Albumin dialysis in artificial liver support systems: open-loop or closed-loop dialysis mode?

    PubMed

    Pei, Yingying; Sun, Yize; Sun, Sijie; Gao, Dayong; Ding, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In artificial liver support systems, the open-loop albumin dialysis mode (OLM) is usually used to remove protein-bound toxins from the blood of patients with liver failure. However, there is still interest in the closed-loop albumin dialysis mode (CLM) because this mode may enable not only the regeneration and reuse of albumin but also the miniaturization of artificial liver systems. In this article, we compared the two modes under a fixed amount of albumin in dialysate experimentally and theoretically. The results show that according to the detoxification efficiency in the 3 hour dialysis for removing albumin-bound bilirubin, CLM is better than OLM. The usage efficiency of albumin in CLM is also higher. Moreover, the advantage of CLM is more significant when the concentration of bilirubin in blood is lower. Under a given amount of albumin in dialysate, if the concentration of bilirubin in blood is high, one may further increase the performance of CLM by means of increasing the flow rate of the albumin dialysate or using the highly concentrated albumin dialysate.

  17. Bilirubin glucuronidation by intact Gunn rat fibroblasts expressing bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Seppen, J; Tada, K; Hellwig, S; Bakker, C T; Prasad, V R; Roy Chowdhury, N; Roy Chowdhury, J; Bosma, P J; Oude Elferink, R P

    1996-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar (CN) disease is an inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism. The disease is caused by a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (B-UGT). Patients with CN disease have high serum levels of the toxic compound, unconjugated bilirubin. The only defect in bilirubin metabolism of CN patients is the absence of B-UGT activity. The transplantation of cells able to glucuronidate bilirubin should therefore lower serum bilirubin levels. The Gunn rat is the animal model of CN disease. Primary Gunn rat fibroblasts (GURF) were transduced with a recombinant retrovirus, capable of transferring B-UGT cDNA. A cell line was obtained expressing B-UGT at a level comparable to hepatocytes. Bilirubin added to the culture medium of these cells was glucuronidated and excreted. The B-UGT activities of transduced GURF and freshly isolated Wistar hepatocytes were compared at different bilirubin concentrations. The specific B-UGT activities of these two cell types were comparable when physiological bilirubin concentrations (5-10 microM) were present in the culture media. At higher bilirubin concentrations (20-80 microM) the hepatocytes were more active than the transduced GURF. We conclude that with the addition of only one enzyme (B-UGT) fibroblasts can perform the complete set of reactions necessary for bilirubin glucuronidation. The difference in B-UGT activity between transduced GURF and hepatocytes at 20-80 microM bilirubin can be explained by lower UDP-glucuronic acid and glutathione S-transferase levels in GURF. Our findings also indicate that these cells could be used to develop extrahepatic gene therapy for CN disease. PMID:8670060

  18. Animal pigment bilirubin discovered in plants.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Cary; Quirke, J Martin E; Priestap, Horacio A; Lee, David W

    2009-03-01

    The bile pigment bilirubin-IXalpha is the degradative product of heme, distributed among mammals and some other vertebrates. It can be recognized as the pigment responsible for the yellow color of jaundice and healing bruises. In this paper we present the first example of the isolation of bilirubin in plants. The compound was isolated from the brilliant orange-colored arils of Strelitzia nicolai, the white bird of paradise tree, and characterized by HPLC-ESMS, UV-visible, (1)H NMR, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy, as well as comparison with an authentic standard. This discovery indicates that plant cyclic tetrapyrroles may undergo degradation by a previously unknown pathway. Preliminary analyses of related plants, including S. reginae, the bird of paradise, also revealed bilirubin in the arils and flowers, indicating that the occurrence of bilirubin is not limited to a single species or tissue type. PMID:19206232

  19. [Albumin in sepsis].

    PubMed

    Tamion, F

    2010-09-01

    Human serum albumin is a small (66kD) globular protein representing over 60 % of the total plasma protein content. It is made up of 585 amino 6 acids and contains 35 cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges that contribute to its overall tertiary structure. It has a free cysteine-derived thiol group at Cys-34, which accounts for 80 % of its redox activity. Physiologically, serum albumin exists in a reduced form with a free thiol contributing to its antioxidant properties. It is synthesized primarily in the liver and is an acute-phase protein. It is a multifunctional plasma protein ascribed ligand-binding and transport properties as well as antioxidants and enzymatic functions. It maintains colloid osmotic pressure, modulates inflammatory response and may influence oxidative damage. Hypoalbuminemia is common in the intensive care unit and may be due to decreased synthesis by the liver and/or to increased losses or increased proteolysis and clearance. Although albumin was long used to control vascular collapse in critically ill patients, the evidence suggests that it does not offer a benefit over crystalloid solutions in vascular collapse. However, human serum albumin is an important circulating antioxidant and it may be beneficial in critically ill patients to limit oxidative damage. A number of studies suggest that in specific groups of hypoalbuminemic critically ill patients, albumin administration may have beneficial effects on organ function, although the exact mechanisms remain undefined. Further trials are needed to confirm theses observations and to clearly demonstrate whether albumin should be administered in critically ill patients with hypoalbuminemia. PMID:20675098

  20. Influence of glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) on the intermembrane transfer of bilirubin. Implications for the intracellular transport of nonsubstrate ligands in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, S D; Goessling, W; Ransil, B J; Gollan, J L

    1995-01-01

    To examine the hypothesis that glutathione S-transferases (GST) play an important role in the hepatocellular transport of hydrophobic organic anions, the kinetics of the spontaneous transfer of unconjugated bilirubin between membrane vesicles and rat liver glutathione S-transferase B (ligandin) was studied, using stopped-flow fluorometry. Bilirubin transfer from glutathione S-transferase B to phosphatidylcholine vesicles was best described by a single exponential function, with a rate constant of 8.0 +/- 0.7 s-1 (+/- SD) at 25 degrees C. The variations in transfer rate with respect to acceptor phospholipid concentration provide strong evidence for aqueous diffusion of free bilirubin. This finding was verified using rhodamine-labeled microsomal membranes as acceptors. Bilirubin transfer from phospholipid vesicles to GST also exhibited diffusional kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters for bilirubin dissociation from GST were similar to those for human serum albumin. The rate of bilirubin transfer from rat liver basolateral plasma membranes to acceptor vesicles in the presence of glutathione S-transferase B declined asymptotically with increasing GST concentration. These data suggest that glutathione S-transferase B does not function as an intracellular bilirubin transporter, although expression of this protein may serve to regulate the delivery of bilirubin, and other nonsubstrate ligands, to sites of metabolism within the cell. Images PMID:7560084

  1. Association of Serum Bilirubin with SYNTAX Score and Future Cardiovascular Events in Patients Undergoing Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Chin; Hsu, Chien-Yi; Huang, Po-Hsun; Chiang, Chia-Hung; Huang, Shao-Sung; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background Bilirubin has emerged as an important endogenous antioxidant molecule, and increasing evidence shows that bilirubin may protect against atherosclerosis. The SYNTAX score has been developed to assess the severity and complexity of coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether serum bilirubin levels are associated with SYNTAX scores and whether they could be used to predict future cardiovascular events in patients undergoing coronary intervention. Methods Serum bilirubin levels and other blood parameters in patients with at least 12-h fasting states were determined. The primary endpoint was any composite cardiovascular event within 1 year, including death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and target-vessel revascularization. Results In total, 250 consecutive patients with stable coronary artery disease (mean age 70 ± 13) who had received coronary intervention were enrolled. All study subjects were divided into two groups: group 1 was defined as high SYNTAX score (> 22), and group 2 was defined as low SYNTAX score (≤ 22). Total bilirubin levels were significantly lower in the high SYNTAX score group than in the low SYNTAX score group (0.51 ± 0.22 vs. 0.72 ± 0.29 mg/dl, p < 0.001). By multivariate analysis, serum total bilirubin levels were identified as an independent predictor for high SYNTAX score (adjusted odds ratio: 0.28, 95% confidence interval 0.04-0.42; p = 0.004). Use of the Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a significant difference in 1-year cardiovascular events between high (> 0.8 mg/dl), medium (> 0.5, ≤ 0.8 mg/dl), and low (≤ 0.5 mg/dl) bilirubin levels (log-rank test p = 0.011). Conclusions Serum bilirubin level is associated with SYNTAX score and predicts future cardiovascular events in patients undergoing coronary intervention. PMID:27471354

  2. Sensitizing effect of Z,Z-bilirubin IXα and its photoproducts on enzymes in model solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavskii, V. Yu.; Mostovnikov, V. A.; Tret'yakova, A. I.; Mostovnikova, G. R.

    2008-05-01

    In model systems, we have studied side effects which may be induced by light during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia (jaundice) in newborn infants, with the aim of reducing the Z,Z-bilirubin IXα (Z,Z-BR IXα) level. We have shown that the sensitizing effect of Z,Z-BR IXα, localized at strong binding sites of the human serum albumin (HSA) macromolecule, is primarily directed at the amino acid residues of the carrier protein and does not involve the molecules of the enzyme (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)) present in the buffer solution. The detected photodynamic damage to LDH is due to sensitization by bilirubin photoisomers, characterized by lower HSA association constants and located (in contrast to native Z,Z-BR IXα) on the surface of the HSA protein globule. Based on study of the spectral characteristics of the photoproducts of Z,Z-BR IXα and comparison of their accumulation kinetics in solution and the enzyme photo-inactivation kinetics, we concluded that the determining role in sensitized damage to LDH is played by lumirubin. The photosensitization effect depends on the wavelength of the radiation used for photoconversion of bilirubin. When (at the beginning of exposure) we make sure that identical numbers of photons are absorbed by the pigment in the different spectral ranges, the side effect is minimal for radiation corresponding to the long-wavelength edge of the bilirubin absorption band. We have shown that for a bilirubin/HSA concentration ratio >2 (when some of the pigment molecules are sorbed on the surface of the protein globule), the bilirubin can act as a photosensitizing agent for the enzyme present in solution. We discuss methods for reducing unfavorable side effects of light on the body of newborn infants during phototherapy of hyperbilirubinemia.

  3. Intermolecular interactions in the bilirubin-cholate-silica system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Golovkova, L. P.; Severinovskaya, O. V.

    2007-06-01

    Bilirubin-cholate interactions in aqueous solutions were studied. The constants of binding of bilirubin with taurocholate dimers and taurodeoxycholate trimers were calculated. The adsorption of bilirubin and cholates on the surface of highly dispersed silica was studied. It was shown that taurine-conjugated cholates are poorly adsorbed from micellar solutions on the silica surface, the specific amount of bilirubin adsorbed decreases with increasing concentration of cholates in the solution, the affinity of free bilirubin for the silica surface is independent of the nature of the cholic acid, and that the affinity of cholate-bilirubin complexes for the silica surface is lower than the affinity of free bilirubin.

  4. Association between bilirubin and risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease based on a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianbo; Zhong, Rong; Liu, Cheng; Tang, Yuhan; Gong, Jing; Chang, Jiang; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Gong, Yajie; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Peiyi; Yu, Xiao; Xiao, Lin; Du, Min; Yang, Ling; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Wei, Sheng; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the association between total, direct, and indirect bilirubin and nonalcoholic fatty live disease (NAFLD) risk given its high prevalence and serious clinical prognosis. Among 27,009 subjects who participated in a healthy screening program from the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study in 2008, 8189 eligible subjects (aged 35-86 years; males, 43.95%) were ultimately enrolled. The incidence rates of NAFLD in 2013 were compared with respect to baseline bilirubin levels among subjects free of NAFLD, and the effect sizes were estimated by logistic regression analysis. During 5 years follow-up, we observed 1956 cases of newly developed NAFLD with the overall incidence of 23.88%. Direct bilirubin was presented to inversely associate with NAFLD risk. Compared with quartile 1 of direct bilirubin, the multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for NAFLD of quartile 2 to 4 were 1.104 (0.867-1.187), 0.843 (0.719-0.989), and 0.768 (0.652-0.905), respectively, P for trend 0.002). Similarly, inverse effects of direct bilirubin on NAFLD incidence were also observed when stratified by sex and BMI. However, no significant associations were found between total, and indirect bilirubin and NAFLD risk. Direct bilirubin reduced NAFLD risk independent of possible confounders among middle-aged and elderly Chinese population, probably based on the endogenous antioxidation of bilirubin. PMID:27484402

  5. Association between bilirubin and risk of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease based on a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jianbo; Zhong, Rong; Liu, Cheng; Tang, Yuhan; Gong, Jing; Chang, Jiang; Lou, Jiao; Ke, Juntao; Li, Jiaoyuan; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Ying; Gong, Yajie; Xu, Yanyan; Liu, Peiyi; Yu, Xiao; Xiao, Lin; Du, Min; Yang, Ling; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie; Chen, Weihong; Wei, Sheng; Liang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaomin; He, Meian; Wu, Tangchun; Yao, Ping; Miao, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the association between total, direct, and indirect bilirubin and nonalcoholic fatty live disease (NAFLD) risk given its high prevalence and serious clinical prognosis. Among 27,009 subjects who participated in a healthy screening program from the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study in 2008, 8189 eligible subjects (aged 35–86 years; males, 43.95%) were ultimately enrolled. The incidence rates of NAFLD in 2013 were compared with respect to baseline bilirubin levels among subjects free of NAFLD, and the effect sizes were estimated by logistic regression analysis. During 5 years follow-up, we observed 1956 cases of newly developed NAFLD with the overall incidence of 23.88%. Direct bilirubin was presented to inversely associate with NAFLD risk. Compared with quartile 1 of direct bilirubin, the multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for NAFLD of quartile 2 to 4 were 1.104 (0.867–1.187), 0.843 (0.719–0.989), and 0.768 (0.652–0.905), respectively, P for trend 0.002). Similarly, inverse effects of direct bilirubin on NAFLD incidence were also observed when stratified by sex and BMI. However, no significant associations were found between total, and indirect bilirubin and NAFLD risk. Direct bilirubin reduced NAFLD risk independent of possible confounders among middle-aged and elderly Chinese population, probably based on the endogenous antioxidation of bilirubin. PMID:27484402

  6. Kinetics independent spectrometric analysis using non-linear calibration modelling and exploitation of concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch system for albumin and total protein determination in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Souza, Margarida C; Martins, Valdomiro L; Almeida, Luciano F; Pessoa Neto, Osmundo D; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Araujo, Mario Cesar U

    2010-08-15

    An automatic method for kinetics independent spectrometric analysis is proposed in this study. It uses a non-linear calibration model that explores concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch analyser (FBA) for the samples, dye, and the single standard solution. The procedure for obtaining the gradients of the dye and standard solution is performed once at the beginning of analysis. The same procedure is applied thereafter for each sample. For illustration, the proposed automatic methodology was applied to determine total protein and albumin in blood serum by using the Biuret and Bromocresol Green (BCG) methods. The measurements were made by using a laboratory-made photometer based on a red and green bicolour LED (Light-Emitting Diode) and a phototransistor, coupled to a "Z" form flow cell. The sample throughput was about 50 h(-1) for albumin and 60 h(-1) for total protein, consuming about 7 microL of sample, 2.6 mL of BCG and 1.2 mL of biuret reagents for each determination. Applying the paired t-test for results from the proposed analyser and the reference method, no statistic differences at 95% confidence level were found. The absolute standard deviation was usually smaller than 0.2 g dL(-1). The proposed method is valuable for the determination of total protein and albumin; and can also be used in other determinations where kinetic effects may or may not exist. PMID:20678663

  7. Kinetics independent spectrometric analysis using non-linear calibration modelling and exploitation of concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch system for albumin and total protein determination in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Souza, Margarida C; Martins, Valdomiro L; Almeida, Luciano F; Pessoa Neto, Osmundo D; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Araujo, Mario Cesar U

    2010-08-15

    An automatic method for kinetics independent spectrometric analysis is proposed in this study. It uses a non-linear calibration model that explores concentration gradients generated by a flow-batch analyser (FBA) for the samples, dye, and the single standard solution. The procedure for obtaining the gradients of the dye and standard solution is performed once at the beginning of analysis. The same procedure is applied thereafter for each sample. For illustration, the proposed automatic methodology was applied to determine total protein and albumin in blood serum by using the Biuret and Bromocresol Green (BCG) methods. The measurements were made by using a laboratory-made photometer based on a red and green bicolour LED (Light-Emitting Diode) and a phototransistor, coupled to a "Z" form flow cell. The sample throughput was about 50 h(-1) for albumin and 60 h(-1) for total protein, consuming about 7 microL of sample, 2.6 mL of BCG and 1.2 mL of biuret reagents for each determination. Applying the paired t-test for results from the proposed analyser and the reference method, no statistic differences at 95% confidence level were found. The absolute standard deviation was usually smaller than 0.2 g dL(-1). The proposed method is valuable for the determination of total protein and albumin; and can also be used in other determinations where kinetic effects may or may not exist.

  8. Transcutaneous bilirubin measurement in healthy Saudi term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Alsaedi, Saad A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) measurement in healthy, jaundiced Saudi term newborns. Methods: This prospective, cohort study was carried out from January 2009 to December 2012 on jaundiced, term infants admitted at the King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Paired TcB and total serum bilirubin (TSB) from healthy jaundiced term newborns were obtained. The correlation and the mean difference between the 2 methods were calculated, and Bhutani nomogram for prediction of TSB by TcB was used. Any bilirubin level at low and above the intermediate risk zone was considered significant. Results: We obtained 665 paired TcB and TSB measurements from 665 newborns. The mean age at bilirubin measurement was 44.2 ± 21 hour. Mean TSB was 147 ± 45 µmol/L, and TcB was 156 ± 50 µmol/L. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between TcB and TSB (r: 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.82-0.86; p<0.001). The TcB tends to overestimate TSB. The mean difference between paired TcB and TSB was 17 µmol /L with a 95% CI of 40 ± 77 µmol/L. The TcB was sensitive, but less specific. The TcB sensitivity was 83% and specificity was 71% to predict TSB during the first 72 hours of life for the whole study group. The positive predictive value was 63%, and negative predictive value was 87%. Conclusion: As found in this study, among the jaundiced healthy term Saudi newborns, TcB measurement provided accurate estimates of TSB values. The TcB measurements can be used effectively to screen newborns for significant jaundice. PMID:26837395

  9. Association between Serum Bilirubin and Acute Intraoperative Hyperglycemia Induced by Prolonged Intermittent Hepatic Inflow Occlusion in Living Liver Donors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangbin; Jin, Sang-Man; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Kim, Young Ri; Gwak, Mi Sook; Son, Hee Jeong; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Gaab Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent hepatic inflow occlusion (IHIO) is associated with acute hyperglycemia during living donor hepatectomy when the ischemia is prolonged. Bilirubin is a potent antioxidant to play an important role for maintaining insulin sensitivity and preventing hyperglycemia. Thus, we aimed to test whether serum bilirubin level is associated with prolonged IHIO-induced intraoperative hyperglycemia. Methods Seventy-five living liver donors who underwent a prolonged IHIO with a >30 minute cumulative ischemia were included. The association between preoperative serum bilirubin concentrations and the risk of intraoperative hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration >180 mg/dl) was analyzed using binary logistic regression with adjusting for potential confounders including age and steatosis. Results The number of donors who underwent 3, 4, 5, and 6 rounds of IHIO was 41, 22, 7, and 5, respectively. Twenty-nine (35%) donors developed intraoperative hyperglycemia. Total bilirubin concentration was inversely associated with hyperglycemia risk (odds ratio [OR] 0.033, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.004–0.313, P = 0.003). There was an interaction between age and total bilirubin concentration: the effect of lower serum total bilirubin (≤0.7 mg/dl) on the development of hyperglycemia was greater in older donors (>40 years) than in younger donors (P = 0.0.028 versus P = 0.212). Both conjugated bilirubin (OR 0.001 95% CI 0.001–0.684) and unconjugated bilirubin (OR 0.011 95% CI 0.001–0.246) showed an independent association with hyperglycemia risk. Conclusions Lower preoperative serum bilirubin was associated with greater risk of prolonged IHIO-induced hyperglycemia during living donor hepatectomy particularly in older donors. Thus, more meticulous glycemic management is recommended when prolonged IHIO is necessary for surgical purposes in old living donors with lower serum bilirubin levels. PMID:27367602

  10. PPARα: A Master Regulator of Bilirubin Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Jenny; El Husseini, Diala; Rudkowska, Iwona; Verreault, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    Hypolipidemic fibrates activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α to modulate lipid oxidation and metabolism. The present study aimed at evaluating how 3 PPARα agonists, namely, fenofibrate, gemfibrozil, and Wy14,643, affect bilirubin synthesis and metabolism. Human umbilical vein epithelial cells (HUVEC) and coronary artery smooth muscle cells (CASMC) were cultured in the absence or presence of the 3 activators, and mRNA, protein, and/or activity levels of the bilirubin synthesizing heme oxygenase- (HO-) 1 and biliverdin reductase (BVR) enzymes were determined. Human hepatocytes (HH) and HepG2 cells sustained similar treatments, except that the expression of the bilirubin conjugating UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 enzyme and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 transporter was analyzed. In HUVECs, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, and Wy14,643 upregulated HO-1 mRNA expression without affecting BVR. Wy14,643 and fenofibrate also caused HO-1 protein accumulation, while gemfibrozil and fenofibrate favored the secretion of bilirubin in cell media. Similar positive regulations were also observed with the 3 PPARα ligands in CASMCs where HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were increased. In HH and HepG2 cells, both UGT1A1 and MRP2 transcripts were also accumulating. These observations indicate that PPARα ligands activate bilirubin synthesis in vascular cells and metabolism in liver cells. The clinical implications of these regulatory events are discussed. PMID:25147562

  11. FT-IR Study On Calcium Ion Binding To Bilirubin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jin-Guang; Soloway, Roger D.; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Martini, D. K.; Wagner, A. J.

    1989-12-01

    After formation of either the acid or neutral salt of calcium bilirubinate, decrease or disappearance of bands indicated that calcium is coordinated to bilirubin via its carboxyl oxygens and pyrrole nitrogens, changing the conjugated structure of the molecule.

  12. Can Excess Bilirubin Levels Cause Learning Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretorius, E.; Naude, H.; Becker, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined learning problems in South African sample of 7- to 14-year-olds whose mothers reported excessively high infant bilirubin shortly after the child's birth. Found that this sample had lowered verbal ability with the majority also showing impaired short-term and long-term memory. Findings suggested that impaired formation of astrocytes…

  13. Binding of bilirubin and its structural analogues to hepatic microsomal bilirubin UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Vanstapel, F.; Blanckaert, N.

    1987-09-22

    Hepatic glucuronidation of the asymmetrical natural bilirubin molecule results in formation of two different positional isomers, bilirubin C-8 monoglucuronide and bilirubin C-12 monoglucuronide. In view of the existence of multiple isoforms of UDPglucuronyltransferase, which is the microsomal enzyme system responsible for bilirubin esterification, the authors performed kinetic analysis of microsomal glucuronidation of bilirubin and a number of its structural congeners to determine whether synthesis of the two monoglucuronide isomers involved two distinct substrate-binding sites or reflected two different modes of binding to a single catalytic site. Both isomers were found in all tested species (man, rat, guinea pig, sheep), but there were marked species differences in the C-8/C-12 ratio of monoglucuronide found in bile or formed by liver microsomes. Correspondence between in vivo and in vitro results for such regioselectivity of glucuronidation was excellent in each species. On the basis of these results of kinetic analysis of bilirubin esterification at variable pigment substrate concentrations and inhibition studies with alternative substrates, the authors postulate that both natural monoglucuronide isomers are synthesized at a single binding site. Possible mechanisms responsible for the markedly regioselective esterification of bilirubin by rat and sheep liver were investigated by study of glucuronidation of selected structural analgoues of the pigment. Collectively, their findings suggest that the molecular from(s) of bilirubin able to engage in catalytically effective binding to UDPglucuronyltransferase does (do) not correspond with intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded conformers and that the nature of the ..beta..-substituents of the outer pyrromethenone rings is a key determinant of glucuronidation rate.

  14. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  15. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Capetanaki, Y.G.; Flytzanis, C.N.; Alonso, A.

    1982-03-01

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin (/sup 32/P)cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements.

  16. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity and bilirubin conjugation in the bullfrog.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, K D; Little, G H

    1983-01-01

    Bile pigments of bile and serum of Rana catesbeiana were investigated by means of high-pressure liquid chromatography. The major pigment in both bile and serum was bilirubin IX alpha. Bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity was found in the livers of all animals examined, but no conjugated bilirubin was detectable in the bile. Frog bile was found to contain large amounts of beta-glucuronidase. When the beta-glucuronidase inhibitor saccharo-1,4-lactone was introduced into the gall bladder followed by an exogenous bilirubin load, bilirubin glucuronide appeared in the bile. PMID:6411065

  17. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  18. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  19. Bilirubin adsorption on amine/methyl bifunctionalized SBA-15 with platelet morphology.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Li, Xiaoan; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Sun, Yuhan; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng

    2011-06-01

    To remove bilirubin from human plasma, amine/methyl bifunctionalized SBA-15 materials were directly synthesized from the co-condensation of 3-aminopropylmethyldiethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane with an amphiphilic block copolymer P123 as template. XRD, N(2) sorption analysis, FTIR and (29)Si MAS NMR were used to identify their well-ordered mesostructure and the grafting of amine and methyl groups on the surface of as-synthesized materials. Both SEM and TEM indicated that the bifunctionalized SBA-15 possessed platelet morphology. This might be attributed to the charge repulsion brought by protonated amine groups and the diminution of hydroxyl groups on the end of silicate-micelles, which passivated the end-to-end anchoring of silicate-micelles along the longitudinal axis. Such a material was investigated as the adsorbent for selective bilirubin removal from human plasma, which showed a high bilirubin clearance of 51.4% within 1.5 h with a little amount of albumin adsorption. The results of hemolysis assay suggested that the bifunctionalized SBA-15 caused serious hemolysis of red blood cells. However, in practical application, plasma separation technique could avoid direct contact between the adsorbent and red blood cells. The further hemeolysis assay proved that the plasma after contacting with the bifunctionalized SBA-15 could not lead to the hemolysis of red blood cells. Thus, the bifunctionalized SBA-15 is expected to be a potential candidate as a clinical hemoperfusion material. PMID:21382700

  20. Hepatocyte cotransport of taurocholate and bilirubin glucuronides: Role of microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, J.M.; Gollan, J.L. )

    1988-07-01

    Modulation of bile pigment excretion by bile salts has been attributed to modification of canalicular membrane transport or a physical interaction in bile. Based on the observation that a microtubule-dependent pathway is involved in the hepatocellular transport of bile salts, the authors investigated the possibility that bilirubin glucuronides are associated with bile salts during intracellular transport. Experiments were conducted in intact rats (basal) or after overnight biliary diversion and intravenous reinfusion of taurocholate (depleted/reinfused). All rats were pretreated with intravenous low-dose colchicine or its inactive isomer lumicolchicine. Biliary excretion of radiolabeled bilirubin glucuronides derived from tracer ({sup 14}C)bilirubin-({sup 3}H)bilirubin monoglucuronide (coinjected iv) was unchanged in basal rats but was consistently delayed in depleted/reinfused rats. This was accompanied by a significant shift toward bilirubin diglucuronide formation from both substrates. In basal Gunn rats, with deficient bilirubin glucuronidation, biliary excretion of intravenous ({sup 14}C)bilirubin monoglucuronide-({sup 3}H)bilirubin diglucuronide was unaffected by colchicine but was retarded in depleted/reinfused Gunn rats. Colchicine had no effect on the rate of bilirubin glucuronidation in vitro in rat liver microsomes. They conclude that a portion of the bilirubin glucuronides generated endogenously in hepatocytes or taken up directly from plasma may be cotransported with bile salts to the bile canalicular membrane via a microtubule-dependent mechanism.

  1. Human podocytes perform polarized, caveolae-dependent albumin endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Okamura, Kayo; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Doctor, R Brian; Blaine, Judith

    2014-05-01

    The renal glomerulus forms a selective filtration barrier that allows the passage of water, ions, and small solutes into the urinary space while restricting the passage of cells and macromolecules. The three layers of the glomerular filtration barrier include the vascular endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and podocyte epithelium. Podocytes are capable of internalizing albumin and are hypothesized to clear proteins that traverse the GBM. The present study followed the fate of FITC-labeled albumin to establish the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis and processing by podocytes. Confocal imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of immortalized human podocytes showed FITC-albumin endocytosis occurred preferentially across the basal membrane. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis demonstrated that the majority of FITC-albumin entered podocytes through caveolae. Once internalized, FITC-albumin colocalized with EEA1 and LAMP1, endocytic markers, and with the neonatal Fc receptor, a marker for transcytosis. After preloading podocytes with FITC-albumin, the majority of loaded FITC-albumin was lost over the subsequent 60 min of incubation. A portion of the loss of albumin occurred via lysosomal degradation as pretreatment with leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, partially inhibited the loss of FITC-albumin. Consistent with transcytosis of albumin, preloaded podocytes also progressively released FITC-albumin into the extracellular media. These studies confirm the ability of podocytes to endocytose albumin and provide mechanistic insight into cellular mechanisms and fates of albumin handling in podocytes.

  2. Conjugated and unconjugated bilirubins in bile of humans and rhesus monkeys. Structure of adult human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins compared with dog bilirubins.

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, S G; Taggart, D B; Ikeda, R; Ruebner, B; Bergstrom, D E

    1977-01-01

    1. Bilirubin-IXalpha, -IXalpha diglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucuronide, -IXalpha monoglucoside -IXalpha monoxyloside, a bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugate containing glucose and another unknown compound, and bilirubin-IXbeta are present in gall-bladder bile of adult human, rhesus monkey and dog. Dog bile normally also contains other bilirubin-IXalpha diconjugates, i.e. compounds containing two conjugating sugars such as glucuronic acid and glucose, glucuronic acid and xylose and glucose xylose. 2. Azopigments alphaF, alphaO, alpha2, alpha3, betax and delta derived from human and rhesus-monkey bilirubins are identical in their chemical composition with those obtained from the dog. 3. Azopigments alphaF and betax found in diazotized biles of adult humans, rhesus monkeys and dogs are products of unconjugated bilirubin-IXbeta. 4. Technical modifications of previously published procedures [Heirwegh, Fevery, Michiels, Van Hees & Compernolle, (1975) Biochem. J. 145, 185-199] were introduced which make it possible to separate the bilirubins, diazotize the separated bilirubins, extract the azopigments and chromatograph them in one working day (6-8h). Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:414741

  3. Protein-encapsulated bilirubin: paving the way to a useful probe for singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Frederico M; Jensen, Jan K; Etzerodt, Michael; Ogilby, Peter R

    2015-04-01

    When dissolved in a bulk solvent, bilirubin efficiently removes singlet molecular oxygen, O2(a(1)Δg), through a combination of chemical reactions and by promoting the O2(a(1)Δg)→O2(X(3)Σg(-)) nonradiative transition to populate the ground state of oxygen. To elucidate how such processes can be exploited in the development of a biologically useful fluorescent probe for O2(a(1)Δg), pertinent photophysical and photochemical parameters of bilirubin encapsulated in a protein were determined. The motivation for studying a protein-encapsulated system reflects the ultimate desire to (a) use genetic engineering to localize the probe at a specific location in a living cell, and (b) provide a controlled environment around the chromophore/fluorophore. Surprisingly, explicit values of oxygen- and O2(a(1)Δg)-dependent parameters that characterize the behavior of a given chromophore/fluorophore encased in a protein are not generally available. To the end of quantifying the effects of such an encasing protein, a recently discovered bilirubin-binding protein isolated from a Japanese eel was used. The data show that this system indeed preferentially responds to O2(a(1)Δg) and not to the superoxide ion. However, this protein not only shields bilirubin such that the rate constants for interaction with O2(a(1)Δg) decrease relative to what is observed in a bulk solvent, but the fraction of the total O2(a(1)Δg)-bilirubin interaction that results in a chemical reaction between O2(a(1)Δg) and bilirubin also decreases appreciably. The rate constants thus obtained provide a useful starting point for the general design and development of reactive protein-encased fluorescent probes for O2(a(1)Δg).

  4. Preliminary development of a fiber optic sensor for measuring bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Babin, Steven M; Sova, Raymond M

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary development of a fiber optic bilirubin sensor is described, where an unclad sensing portion is used to provide evanescent wave interaction of the transmitted light with the chemical environment. By using a wavelength corresponding to a bilirubin absorption peak, the Beer-Lambert Law can be used to relate the concentration of bilirubin surrounding the sensing portion to the amount of absorbed light. Initial testing in vitro suggests that the sensor response is consistent with the results of bulk absorption measurements as well as the Beer-Lambert Law. In addition, it is found that conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin have different peak absorption wavelengths, so that two optical frequencies may potentially be used to measure both types of bilirubin. Future development of this device could provide a means of real-time, point-of-care monitoring of intravenous bilirubin in critical care neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:25057239

  5. Preliminary Development of a Fiber Optic Sensor for Measuring Bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Babin, Steven M; Sova, Raymond M

    2014-01-01

    Preliminary development of a fiber optic bilirubin sensor is described, where an unclad sensing portion is used to provide evanescent wave interaction of the transmitted light with the chemical environment. By using a wavelength corresponding to a bilirubin absorption peak, the Beer–Lambert Law can be used to relate the concentration of bilirubin surrounding the sensing portion to the amount of absorbed light. Initial testing in vitro suggests that the sensor response is consistent with the results of bulk absorption measurements as well as the Beer–Lambert Law. In addition, it is found that conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin have different peak absorption wavelengths, so that two optical frequencies may potentially be used to measure both types of bilirubin. Future development of this device could provide a means of real-time, point-of-care monitoring of intravenous bilirubin in critical care neonates with hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:25057239

  6. Isolation and characterization of serum albumin from Camelus dromedarius

    PubMed Central

    MALIK, AJAMALUDDIN; AL-SENAIDY, ABDULRAHMAN; SKRZYPCZAK-JANKUN, EWA; JANKUN, JERZY

    2013-01-01

    Serum albumin constitutes 35–50 mg/ml of plasma proteins and performs various physiological activities including the regulation of osmotic pressure on blood, maintaining buffering of the blood pH, carrying different fatty acids and other small molecules, such as bilirubin, hormones, drugs and metal ions, as well as participating in immunological responses. Serum albumin is an extensively used protein in biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. The camel (Camelus dromedarius) is well tailored to successfully survive in extremely hot and dry climates. Plasma osmolality in the camel increases during water-deprived conditions. In such circumstances serum albumin is crucial in the regulation of blood pressure. The study of biochemical, biophysical and immunological aspects of camel serum albumin (CSA) are likely to provide molecular insights into camel physiology and may render it an alternative to human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in all cases. However, these proteins are currently not available or cannot be utilized due to a variety of considerations. In this study, 12 mg of highly pure CSA was obtained from 1 ml plasma. Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining of SDS-PAGE yielded one band and RP-HPLC results revealed a single sharp peak, indicating homogenous preparation of the CSA. The charge/mass ratio and surface hydrophobicity of the CSA was similar to that of BSA. Mass spectrometry analysis of the purified protein confirmed the identity of CSA. PMID:24137219

  7. Chirality inversion in the bilirubin molecular exciton.

    PubMed

    Boiadjiev, S E; Lightner, D A

    2001-05-15

    The bichromophoric pigment bilirubin acts as a molecular exciton in its UV-visible and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. In both polar and nonpolar solvents, an optically active analog, (beta R,beta 'R)-dimethylmesobilirubin-XIII alpha (1), exhibits intense bisignate CD Cotton effects in the region of its long wavelength UV-vis absorption near 400 nm: Delta epsilon(434)(max) + 337, Delta epsilon(389)(max) - 186 (CHCl(3)), and Delta epsilon(431)(max) + 285, Delta epsilon(386)(max) - 177 (CH(3)OH). However, introduction of an amine into a CHCl(3) solution of 1 causes the Cotton effect signs to become inverted, e.g., after addition of NH(3), Delta epsilon(433)(max) - 345, Delta epsilon(389)(max) + 243, and after addition of ethylene diamine, Delta epsilon(435)(max) - 420, Delta epsilon(390)(max) + 299. The sign inversions imply inversion of molecular chirality of the bilirubin and the phenomenon appears to be general for amines, including alpha,omega-diamines. 1,8-Diaminooctane was found to be more effective than longer or shorter chain analogs in producing CD sign inversion.

  8. Functionalized Magnetic Fe3O4-β-Cyclodextran Nanoparticles for Efficient Removal of Bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Han, Lulu; Chu, Simin; Wei, Houliang; Ren, Jun; Xu, Li; Jia, Lingyun

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin (BR), as a lipophilic toxin, can binds and deposits in various tissues, especially the brain tissue, leading to hepatic coma and even death. Magnetic nanoparticles adsorbent modified by β-cyclodextran (Fe3O4-β-CD) was developed to remove the BR from the plasma. Fe3O4-β-CD nanoparticles was prepared through Schiff base reaction between the polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified Fe3O4 and aldehyde-functionalized β-CD, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Under optimized conditions, the Fe3O4-β-CD adsorbent could adsorb 225.6 mg/g free BR in PBS and reach the adsorption equilibrium within 90 min mainly through hydrophobic interaction; Moreover, the adsorbent displayed better adsorption capability in a dialysis system for BSA-bound bilirubin, plasma bilirubin and total bile acid, and the removal rates of those were 66%, 31% and 41% respectively. Because of the advantages of fast separation and purification process, low preparation cost, good adsorption capability for plasma bilirubin, Fe3O4-β-CD may become an economical and promising absorbent of BR for clinical applications. PMID:27427594

  9. Weak chemiluminescence of bilirubin and its stimulation by aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Usa, M; Kobayashi, M; Agatsuma, S; Inaba, H

    1992-01-01

    Bilirubin in an alkaline solution exhibits a weak chemiluminescence (CL) under aerobic conditions. This spontaneous CL was markedly enhanced by the addition of various aldehydes. The fluorescent emission spectrum of bilirubin, excited by weak intensity light at 350 nm, coincided with its CL emission spectrum (peak at 670 nm). CL emission from bilirubin was not quenched by active oxygen scavengers. This suggests that triplet oxygen reacts with bilirubin, and forms an oxygenated intermediate (hydroperoxide) as a primary emitter (oxidative scission of tetrapyrrole bonds in bilirubin is not involved in this CL). The Ehrlich reaction (test for monopyrroles) and hydrolsulphite reaction (test for dipyrroles) on the CL reaction mixture and unreacted bilirubin showed no differences. When the CL was initiated by singlet oxygen, rather than superoxide anion, monopyrrole, was detected in the reaction products by gel chromatography. The inhibitory effect of a scavenger of singlet oxygen on CL was eliminated in the presence of formaldehyde. Therefore, triplet carbonyl, formed by singlet oxygen through the dioxetane structure in bilirubin, is not an emitter. The reaction mechanism of bilirubin CL and the formation of a hydroperoxide intermediate is discussed in relation to the chemical structure of luciferin molecules from bioluminescent organisms.

  10. Induction of bilirubin clearance by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR).

    PubMed

    Huang, Wendong; Zhang, Jun; Chua, Steven S; Qatanani, Mohammed; Han, Yunqing; Granata, Riccarda; Moore, David D

    2003-04-01

    Bilirubin clearance is one of the numerous important functions of the liver. Defects in this process result in jaundice, which is particularly common in neonates. Elevated bilirubin levels can be decreased by treatment with phenobarbital. Because the nuclear hormone receptor constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) mediates hepatic effects of this xenobiotic inducer, we hypothesized that CAR could be a regulator of bilirubin clearance. Activation of the nuclear hormone receptor CAR increases hepatic expression of each of five components of the bilirubin-clearance pathway. This induction is absent in homozygous CAR null mice but is observed in mice expressing human CAR instead of mouse CAR. Pretreatment with xenobiotic inducers markedly increases the rate of clearance of an exogenous bilirubin load in wild-type but not CAR knockout animals. Bilirubin itself can also activate CAR, and mice lacking CAR are defective in clearing chronically elevated bilirubin levels. Unexpectedly, CAR expression is very low in livers of neonatal mice and humans. We conclude that CAR directs a protective response to elevated bilirubin levels and suggest that a functional deficit of CAR activity may contribute to neonatal jaundice. PMID:12644704

  11. Bilirubin Nanoparticles as a Nanomedicine for Anti-inflammation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yonghyun; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Sukmo; Lee, Jinju; Park, Jinho; Jon, Sangyong

    2016-06-20

    Despite the high potency of bilirubin as an endogenous anti-inflammatory compound, its clinical translation has been hampered because of its insolubility in water. Bilirubin-based nanoparticles that may overcome this critical issue are presented. A polyethylene glycol compound (PEG) was covalently attached to bilirubin, yielding PEGylated bilirubin (PEG-BR). The PEG-BR self-assembled into nanoscale particles with a size of approximately 110 nm, termed bilirubin nanoparticles (BRNPs). BRNPs are highly efficient hydrogen peroxide scavengers, thereby protecting cells from H2 O2 -induced cytotoxicity. In a murine model of ulcerative colitis, intravenous injection of BRNPs showed preferential accumulation of nanoparticles at the sites of inflammation and significantly inhibited the progression of acute inflammation in the colon. Taken together, BRNPs show potential for use as a therapeutic nanomedicine in various inflammatory diseases.

  12. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  13. Bilirubin Nanoparticles as a Nanomedicine for Anti-inflammation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yonghyun; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Sukmo; Lee, Jinju; Park, Jinho; Jon, Sangyong

    2016-06-20

    Despite the high potency of bilirubin as an endogenous anti-inflammatory compound, its clinical translation has been hampered because of its insolubility in water. Bilirubin-based nanoparticles that may overcome this critical issue are presented. A polyethylene glycol compound (PEG) was covalently attached to bilirubin, yielding PEGylated bilirubin (PEG-BR). The PEG-BR self-assembled into nanoscale particles with a size of approximately 110 nm, termed bilirubin nanoparticles (BRNPs). BRNPs are highly efficient hydrogen peroxide scavengers, thereby protecting cells from H2 O2 -induced cytotoxicity. In a murine model of ulcerative colitis, intravenous injection of BRNPs showed preferential accumulation of nanoparticles at the sites of inflammation and significantly inhibited the progression of acute inflammation in the colon. Taken together, BRNPs show potential for use as a therapeutic nanomedicine in various inflammatory diseases. PMID:27144463

  14. Enzymatic polymerization of dihydroquercetin using bilirubin oxidase.

    PubMed

    Khlupova, M E; Vasil'eva, I S; Shumakovich, G P; Morozova, O V; Chertkov, V A; Shestakova, A K; Kisin, A V; Yaropolov, A I

    2015-02-01

    Dihydroquercetin (or taxifolin) is one of the most famous flavonoids and is abundant in Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). The oxidative polymerization of dihydroquercetin (DHQ) using bilirubin oxidase as a biocatalyst was investigated and some physicochemical properties of the products were studied. DHQ oligomers (oligoDHQ) with molecular mass of 2800 and polydispersity of 8.6 were obtained by enzymatic reaction under optimal conditions. The oligomers appeared to be soluble in dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, and methanol. UV-visible spectra of oligoDHQ in dimethylsulfoxide indicated the presence of highly conjugated bonds. The synthesized oligoDHQ was also characterized by FTIR and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of NMR spectra of oligoDHQ with DHQ monomer and the parent flavonoids revealed irregular structure of a polymer formed via the enzymatic oxidation of DHQ followed by nonselective radical polymerization. As compared with the monomer, oligoDHQ demonstrated higher thermal stability and high antioxidant activity.

  15. Lower Serum Bilirubin and Uric Acid Concentrations in Patients with Parkinson's Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Ling; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Sun, Li; Hao, Meng-Wei; Hu, Zhao-Ting

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate the correlation between bilirubin and uric acid (UA) concentrations and symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Chinese population. A total of 425 PD patients and 460 controls were included in the current study. Patients were diagnosed by a neurologist and assessed using the Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) scale. Venous blood samples were collected, and bilirubin and UA concentrations were analyzed. Compared to controls, indirect bilirubin (IBIL) and UA concentrations were lower in PD patients (P IBIL = 0.015, P UA = 0.000). Serum IBIL in different age subgroups and H&Y stage subgroups were also lower compared to the control group (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) but were not significantly different among these subgroups. Females in the control group had significantly lower serum IBIL and UA concentrations than males (P IBIL = 0.000, P UA = 0.000) and the PD group (P IBIL = 0.027, P UA = 0.000). In early PD (patients with <2-year medical history and no treatment), serum IBIL and UA concentrations were also lower than the controls (P IBIL = 0.013, P UA = 0.000). Although IBIL concentration was positively correlated with UA concentration in controls (R IBIL = 0.229, P IBIL = 0.004), this positive association was not observed in the PD group (R IBIL = -0.032, P IBIL = 0.724). Decreased levels of serum IBIL and UA were observed in PD patients. It is possible that individuals with decreased serum bilirubin and UA concentrations lack the endogenous defense system to prevent peroxynitrite and other free radicals from damaging and destroying dopaminergic cells in the substantia nigra. Our results provide a basis for further investigation into the role of bilirubin in PD.

  16. Profile of minocycline neuroprotection in bilirubin-induced auditory system dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rice, Ann C; Chiou, Victoria L; Zuckoff, Sarah B; Shapiro, Steven M

    2011-01-12

    Excessive hyperbilirubinemia in human neonates can cause permanent dysfunction of the auditory system, as assessed with brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs). Jaundiced Gunn rat pups (jjs) exhibit similar BAEP abnormalities as hyperbilirubinemic neonates. Sulfadimethoxine (sulfa) administration to jjs, which displaces bilirubin from serum albumin into tissues including brain, exacerbates acute toxicity. Minocycline administered prior to sulfa in jjs protects against BAEP abnormalities. This study evaluates the neuroprotective capabilities of minocycline HCl (50 mg/kg) administered 30 or 120 min after sulfa (200 mg/kg) in 16 days old jjs. BAEPs are recorded at 6 or 24 h post-sulfa. Abnormal BAEP waves exhibit increased latency and decreased amplitude. The sulfa/saline treated jjs exhibited a significantly increased interwave interval between waves I and II (I-II IWI) and significantly decreased amplitudes of waves II and III compared to the saline/saline jjs. The minocycline 30 min post-sulfa (sulfa/mino+30) group was not significantly different from the saline/saline control group, indicating neuroprotection. The minocycline 120 min post-sulfa (sulfa/mino+120) group had a significantly decreased amplitude of wave III at both 6 and 24h. These studies indicate that minocycline has a graded neuroprotective effect when administered after acute bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  17. Influence of assessment site in measuring transcutaneous bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    da Conceição, Cristiane Maria; Dornaus, Maria Fernanda Pellegrino da Silva; Portella, Maria Aparecida; Deutsch, Alice D'Agostini; Rebello, Celso Moura

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the influence of the site of measurement of transcutaneous bilirubin (forehead or sternum) in reproducibility of results as compared to plasma bilirubin. Methods: A cohort study including 58 term newborns with no hemolytic disease. Transcutaneous measurements were performed on the forehead (halfway between the headline and the glabella, from the left toward the right side, making consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) and the sternum (five measurements, from the suprasternal notch to the xiphoid process with consecutive determinations, one-centimeter apart) using Bilicheck® (SpectRx Inc, Norcross, Georgia, USA). The correlation and agreement between both methods and plasma bilirubin were calculated. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between both determinations of serum bilirubin at the forehead and sternum (r=0.704; p<0.01 and r=0.653; p<0.01, respectively). There was correspondence of the mean values of transcutaneous bilirubin measured on the sternum (9.9±2.2mg/dL) compared to plasma levels (10.2±1.7mg/dL), but both differ from the values measured on the forehead (8.6±2.0mg/dL), p<0.05. Conclusion: In newborn term infants with no hemolytic disease, measuring of transcutaneous bilirubin on the sternum had higher accuracy as compared to serum bilirubin measurement on the forehead. PMID:24728239

  18. Substantial Effect of Efavirenz Monotherapy on Bilirubin Levels in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Ingrid F.; Quigg, Troy C.; Epstein, Noam; Aregbe, Abdulateef O.; Thong, Nancy; Callaghan, John T.; Flockhart, David A.; Nguyen, Anne T.; Stevens, Colleen K.; Gupta, Samir K.; Desta, Zeruesenay

    2014-01-01

    Background Efavirenz exhibits multiple interactions with drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, and for this reason efavirenz-based HIV therapy is associated with altered pharmacokinetics of coadministered drugs. Probably by the same mechanism, efavirenz-based HIV therapy affects the disposition of endogenous compounds, but this effect is difficult to directly link with efavirenz because it is used in combination with other drugs. Objectives To explore the effect of efavirenz monotherapy on biochemical laboratory values in a clinical trial of healthy volunteers. Methods Men and women (aged 18–49 years) with body mass index ≤32 who were assessed to be healthy based on medical history, physical examination, and standard laboratory screening received a single (600 mg) and multiple doses (600 mg/d for 17 days) of efavirenz orally. This trial was designed to determine the pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of efavirenz. As part of this study, analysis of serum chemistries that were measured at study entry (screening) and 1 week after completion of the multiple dose study (exit) is reported. Results Data from 60 subjects who fully completed and 13 subjects who partially completed the study are presented. Total bilirubin was substantially reduced at exit (by ~30%, with large intersubject variability) compared with screening values (P < 0.0001). The percent changes were in part explained by the intersubject differences in baseline total bilirubin because there was a significant correlation between baseline (screening) values and percent change at exit (r = 0.50; P < 0.0001). Hemoglobin and absolute neutropenia were also substantially decreased at exit compared with screening, but this may be due to intensive blood sampling rather than direct effect of efavirenz on these parameters. No significant correlation was found between percent change in hemoglobin versus percent change in bilirubin, indicating the effect of efavirenz on bilirubin is independent of its

  19. Structure of Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Ho, Joseph X.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its availability, low cost, stability, and unusual ligand-binding properties, serum albumin has been one of the mst extensively studied and applied proteins in biochemistry. However, as a protein, albumin is far from typical, and the widespread interest in and application of albumin have not been balanced by an understanding of its molecular structure. Indeed, for more than 30 years structural information was surmised based solely on techniques such as hydrodynamics, low-angle X-ray scattering, and predictive methods.

  20. Composition And Coordination Of Non-Stoichiometric Calcium Bilirubinate***

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhanlan; Soloway, Roger D.; Weng, Shifu; Wang, Jiafu; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wu, Jin-Guang

    1989-12-01

    Since calcium bilirubinate (CaBR) and its acid salt (CaHBR) were considered to be the main components of human pigment gallstone, these compounds were synthesized and investigated chemically, crystallographically and spectroscopically by several authors. In recent years, we found that the chemical compositions of these compounds varied from sample to sample, and the protonated carboxyl group of these samples was much more reactive than for bilirubin. It resembles the characteristics of human pigment gallstone. In order to enhance our understanding of the structure of gallstone, an investigation on the composition and coordination of calcium bilirubinate has been carried out. A series of CaHBR samples were prepared by reacting diluted pyridine solutions of bilirubin and

  1. [Relationship of bilirubin to diseases caused by increased oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Vítek, L

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress contributes importantly to pathogenesis of numerous civilization diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, as well as autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions. Bilirubin is the major product of the heme catabolic pathway in the intravascular compartment. For long time, bilirubin was considered to be only a waste product, however, recent data from the last 2 decades have proved its important antioxidant properties, which contributes to defense against increased oxidative stress. Numerous experimental as well as clinical studies have demonstrated association between low bilirubin concentrations and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, certain cancers, autoimunne diseases, such as lupus erythematodes, or rheumatoid arthritis or neurological psychiatric disorders, such as schizofrenia. On the other hand, subjects with mildly elevated blood bilirubin levels, typical for Gilbert syndrome, have decreased risk of these diseases. PMID:23909269

  2. Albumin - blood (serum) test

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions for which the test may be performed: Burns (widespread) Wilson disease If you are receiving large amounts of intravenous fluids, the result of this test may be inaccurate. Albumin will be decreased during pregnancy.

  3. Longitudinal Blood Pressure Control, Long-Term Mortality, and Predictive Utility of Serum Liver Enzymes and Bilirubin in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Linsay; Panniyammakal, Jeemon; Hastie, Claire E.; Hewitt, Jonathan; Patel, Rajan; Jones, Gregory C.; Muir, Scott; Walters, Matthew; Sattar, Naveed; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    There is accruing evidence from general population studies that serum bilirubin and liver enzymes affect blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular risk, but it is unclear whether these have an impact on hypertensive patients in terms of long-term survival or BP control. We analyzed 12 000 treated hypertensive individuals attending a tertiary care clinic followed up for 35 years for association between baseline liver function tests and cause-specific mortality after adjustment for conventional cardiovascular covariates. Generalized estimating equations were used to study the association of liver tests and follow-up BP. The total time at risk was 173 806 person years with median survival 32.3 years. Follow-up systolic BP over 5 years changed by −0.4 (alanine transaminase and bilirubin), +2.1(alkaline phosphatase), +0.9(γ-glutamyl transpeptidase) mm Hg for each standard deviation increase. Serum total bilirubin and alanine transaminase showed a significant negative association with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, whereas alkaline phosphatase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase showed a positive association and aspartate transaminase showed a U-shapedassociation. Serum bilirubin showed an incremental improvement of continuous net reclassification improvement by 8% to 26% for 25 year and 35 year cardiovascular mortality, whereas all liver markers together improved continuous net reclassification improvement by 19% to 47% compared with reference model. In hypertensive patients, serum liver enzymes and bilirubin within 4 standard deviations of the mean show independent effects on mortality and BP control. Our findings would support further studies to elucidate the mechanisms by which liver enzymes and bilirubin may exert an effect on BP and cardiovascular risk, but there is little support for using them in risk stratification. PMID:25941342

  4. [A new direct solubilizer for bilirubinate calcium stones].

    PubMed

    Asakawa, S; Igimi, H; Shimura, H

    1983-10-01

    Hepatobiliary surgeons must have faced difficulty in treating patients with intrahepatic gallstones. In spite of considerable progress in operative methods or mechanical techniques, it is very difficult to remove intrahepatic gallstones completely. Under such circumstances, the development of a solubilizer that can dissolve intrahepatic bilirubinate calcium stones by means of injecting it through a postoperative catheter or PTCD catheter has been awaited. Up to now, a chelating agent, so-called hexametaphosphate (HMP) has been used for removing the calcium from calcium bilirubinate. But this chelating agent, in itself, cannot dissolve the bilirubin. The authors found a direct solubilizer for bilirubin, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) which is a well known bi-polar non protonic solvent and used as an accelerator for bilirubin determination. After the purification of DMSO to 99.98%, toxicity was examined by oral administration, intravenous administration and infusion into biliary tract. But no remarkable toxicity or side effects were detected on biochemical and pathological examinations. Clinical application of 90% DMSO together with 5% HMP was performed and a satisfactory effect was obtained as a direct solubilizer for bilirubinate calcium stones.

  5. Influence of hemoglobin on non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingying; Gong, Qiliang; Zou, Da; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    Since the abnormal metabolism of bilirubin could lead to diseases in the human body, especially the jaundice which is harmful to neonates. Traditional invasive measurements are difficult to be accepted by people because of pain and infection. Therefore, the real-time and non-invasive measurement of bilirubin is of great significance. However, the accuracy of currently transcutaneous bilirubinometry(TcB) is generally not high enough, and affected by many factors in the human skin, mostly by hemoglobin. In this talk, absorption spectra of hemoglobin and bilirubin have been collected and analyzed, then the Partial Least Squares (PLS) models have been built. By analyzing and comparing the Correlation and Root Mean Square Error of Prediction(RMSEP), the results show that the Correlation of bilirubin solution model is larger than that of the mixture solution added with hemoglobin, and its RMSEP value is smaller than that of mixture solution. Therefore, hemoglobin has influences on the non-invasive optical bilirubin sensing. In next step, it is necessary to investigate how to eliminate the influence.

  6. Fluorescent protein-based detection of unconjugated bilirubin in newborn serum

    PubMed Central

    Iwatani, Sota; Nakamura, Hajime; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yamana, Keiji; Nishida, Kosuke; Fukushima, Sachiyo; Koda, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin are associated with the development of brain damage in newborns. In current clinical settings, there are no methods for directly determining serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin. UnaG, a fluorescent protein from Japanese eel muscle that specifically binds to unconjugated bilirubin was used in this study. Linear regression analysis was carried out to compare unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by UnaG and conventional bilirubin oxidase methods. Unconjugated bilirubin levels in the serum of newborns who were untreated or treated with phototherapy were compared. Effects of interfering factors in the serum (conjugated bilirubin, hemoglobin, and lipid) on unconjugated bilirubin concentration measured by the UnaG method were also evaluated. Unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by the UnaG method were highly correlated with those determined by the bilirubin oxidase assay. Unconjugated bilirubin levels determined by bilirubin oxidase and UnaG assays were similar in serum samples containing conjugated bilirubin. The performance of the UnaG assay was unaffected by phototherapy and the presence of serum hemoglobin and lipid emulsion. These results demonstrate the clinical applicability of the UnaG method for direct measurement of unconjugated bilirubin levels in newborn serum. PMID:27324682

  7. Fluorescent protein-based detection of unconjugated bilirubin in newborn serum.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, Sota; Nakamura, Hajime; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yamana, Keiji; Nishida, Kosuke; Fukushima, Sachiyo; Koda, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin are associated with the development of brain damage in newborns. In current clinical settings, there are no methods for directly determining serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin. UnaG, a fluorescent protein from Japanese eel muscle that specifically binds to unconjugated bilirubin was used in this study. Linear regression analysis was carried out to compare unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by UnaG and conventional bilirubin oxidase methods. Unconjugated bilirubin levels in the serum of newborns who were untreated or treated with phototherapy were compared. Effects of interfering factors in the serum (conjugated bilirubin, hemoglobin, and lipid) on unconjugated bilirubin concentration measured by the UnaG method were also evaluated. Unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by the UnaG method were highly correlated with those determined by the bilirubin oxidase assay. Unconjugated bilirubin levels determined by bilirubin oxidase and UnaG assays were similar in serum samples containing conjugated bilirubin. The performance of the UnaG assay was unaffected by phototherapy and the presence of serum hemoglobin and lipid emulsion. These results demonstrate the clinical applicability of the UnaG method for direct measurement of unconjugated bilirubin levels in newborn serum. PMID:27324682

  8. Transendothelial albumin flux: evidence against active transport of albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Siflinger-Birnboim, A.; Del Vecchio, P.J.; Cooper, J.A.; Malik, A.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors studied whether albumin is actively transported across cultured pulmonary endothelium by comparing the transendothelial flux of /sup 125/I-albumin from the luminal-to-abluminal side to the flux from the abluminal-to-luminal side. Bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were grown to confluence on gelatinized polycarbonated filters separating abluminal from luminal compartments. Each compartment had an albumin concentration of 1 g/100 ml to equalize oncotic pressure gradients. The effect of hydrostatic pressure was eliminated by maintaining an equal level of fluid in both compartments. The transendothelial flux of albumin across the monolayer was measured by placing /sup 125/I-albumin tracer either on the luminal or the abluminal side. Equal fluxes of /sup 125/I-albumin from luminal-to-abluminal side and from abluminal-to-luminal side were observed. The results indicate that the pulmonary endothelium behaves symmetrically for albumin, indicating the absence of active transport of albumin.

  9. FT-IR Study On The Hydration Of Calcium Bilirubinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hai; Soloway, Roger D.; Yang, Zhanlan; Ding, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wu, Jin-Guang

    1989-12-01

    Comparison of the dessicated and hydrated forms of the neutral salt of calcium bilirubinate indicated that water alters both the C-E1 skeleton and the polar groups of the molecule, suggesting that water may considerably alters the conformation and, therefore, the properties of calcium bilirubinate. The small degree of swelling indicates that some cross-linking is present in this ionic polymer but that it is much less than in whole pigment gallstones, suggesting that other molecules, possibly glycoproteins, provide much of the cross-linking.

  10. Urinary albumin in space missions.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Massimo; De Santo, Natale G; Heer, Martina; Norsk, Peter; Elmann-Larsen, Benny; Bellini, Luigi; Stellato, Davide; Drummer, Christian

    2002-07-01

    Proteinuria was hypothesized for space mission but research data are missing. Urinary albumin, as index of proteinuria, was analyzed in frozen urine samples collected by astronauts during space missions onboard MIR station and on ground (control). Urinary albumin was measured by a double antibody radioimmunoassay. On average, 24h urinary albumin was 27.4% lower in space than on ground; the difference was statistically significant. Low urinary albumin excretion could be another effect of exposure to weightlessness (microgravity).

  11. BILIRUBIN CONCENTRATIONS IN CLINICALLY HEALTHY AND DISEASED CAPTIVE WATERBUCK (KOBUS ELLIPSIPRYMNUS) AT THE SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Lamberski, Nadine; Christopher, Mary M

    2016-06-01

    Captive waterbuck ( Kobus ellipsiprymnus ) that appear clinically healthy have been noted to have high serum bilirubin concentrations compared with other ruminants; however, questions remain about the physiologic factors affecting bilirubin concentration and its potential association with underlying disease and icteric serum or mucous membranes. Serum bilirubin concentrations of healthy and diseased waterbuck housed at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park from 1989 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed to determine any link between icteric serum, total bilirubin concentration (tBili), and disease entities in this species. Total bilirubin and direct (dBili) bilirubin concentrations and the prevalence of icteric serum were compared by subspecies, age group, and health status; associations with complete blood count and biochemical results and clinical diagnosis were assessed. No significant differences were found in tBili or dBili between Ellipsen (n = 32) and Defassa (n = 29) subspecies or in juveniles (n = 22) versus adults (n = 39). Clinically healthy waterbuck (n = 40) had significantly higher tBili (mean ± 2SD, 7.9 ± 1.2 mg/dl; P < 0.001) and dBili (3.7 ± 1.0 mg/dl; P < 0.001) than did diseased waterbuck (n = 21; tBili: 4.9 ± 2.56 mg/dl; dBili: 2.2 ± 0.8 mg/dl). No waterbuck had icteric tissues on physical examination. Twelve (19.7%) waterbuck (six healthy, six diseased) had icteric serum. Few minor correlations were seen between tBili or dBili and clinical, laboratory, or necropsy evidence of disease, though an inverse correlation between dBili and blood glucose was noted. Of the 40 healthy animals, reference intervals were calculated for tBili (5.5-10.3 mg/dl), dBili (1.7-5.7 mg/dl), and indirect bilirubin (2.2-6.2 mg/dl). These results suggest healthy waterbuck have relatively high tBili and dBili compared with related species. Icteric serum may be seen in up to 15% of healthy animals in the absence of icteric tissues. PMID:27468025

  12. BILIRUBIN CONCENTRATIONS IN CLINICALLY HEALTHY AND DISEASED CAPTIVE WATERBUCK (KOBUS ELLIPSIPRYMNUS) AT THE SAN DIEGO ZOO SAFARI PARK.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Ryan A; Lamberski, Nadine; Christopher, Mary M

    2016-06-01

    Captive waterbuck ( Kobus ellipsiprymnus ) that appear clinically healthy have been noted to have high serum bilirubin concentrations compared with other ruminants; however, questions remain about the physiologic factors affecting bilirubin concentration and its potential association with underlying disease and icteric serum or mucous membranes. Serum bilirubin concentrations of healthy and diseased waterbuck housed at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park from 1989 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed to determine any link between icteric serum, total bilirubin concentration (tBili), and disease entities in this species. Total bilirubin and direct (dBili) bilirubin concentrations and the prevalence of icteric serum were compared by subspecies, age group, and health status; associations with complete blood count and biochemical results and clinical diagnosis were assessed. No significant differences were found in tBili or dBili between Ellipsen (n = 32) and Defassa (n = 29) subspecies or in juveniles (n = 22) versus adults (n = 39). Clinically healthy waterbuck (n = 40) had significantly higher tBili (mean ± 2SD, 7.9 ± 1.2 mg/dl; P < 0.001) and dBili (3.7 ± 1.0 mg/dl; P < 0.001) than did diseased waterbuck (n = 21; tBili: 4.9 ± 2.56 mg/dl; dBili: 2.2 ± 0.8 mg/dl). No waterbuck had icteric tissues on physical examination. Twelve (19.7%) waterbuck (six healthy, six diseased) had icteric serum. Few minor correlations were seen between tBili or dBili and clinical, laboratory, or necropsy evidence of disease, though an inverse correlation between dBili and blood glucose was noted. Of the 40 healthy animals, reference intervals were calculated for tBili (5.5-10.3 mg/dl), dBili (1.7-5.7 mg/dl), and indirect bilirubin (2.2-6.2 mg/dl). These results suggest healthy waterbuck have relatively high tBili and dBili compared with related species. Icteric serum may be seen in up to 15% of healthy animals in the absence of icteric tissues.

  13. Nanofibrous polymeric beads from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-08-16

    Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the beads were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the beads displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the beads possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the beads still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the beads were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the beads showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the beads showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber beads, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields. PMID:27481656

  14. Solar Irradiation of Bilirubin: An Experiment in Photochemical Oxidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay A. E.; Salih, F. M.

    2006-01-01

    An experiment in photochemical oxidation, which deals with bilirubin, a well-known light-sensitive biological compound that is pedagogically ideal for photochemical experiments at tertiary institutes, is presented. The experiment would benefit students in chemistry who eventually branch out into the health sciences or biochemistry.

  15. Nanofibrous polymeric beads from aramid fibers for efficient bilirubin removal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zihang; Yang, Ye; Luo, Jiyue; Nie, Chuanxiong; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2016-08-16

    Polymer based hemoperfusion has been developed as an effective therapy to remove the extra bilirubin from patients. However, the currently applied materials suffer from either low removal efficiency or poor blood compatibility. In this study, we report the development of a new class of nanofibrous absorbent that exhibited high bilirubin removal efficiency and good blood compatibility. The Kevlar nanofiber was prepared by dissolving micron-sized Kevlar fiber in proper solvent, and the beads were prepared by dropping Kevlar nanofiber solutions into ethanol. Owing to the nanofiborous structure of the Kevlar nanofiber, the beads displayed porous structures and large specific areas, which would facilitate the adsorption of toxins. In the adsorption test, it was noticed that the beads possessed an adsorption capacity higher than 40 mg g(-1) towards bilirubin. In plasma mimetic solutions, the beads still showed high bilirubin removal efficiency. Furthermore, after incorporating with carbon nanotubes, the beads were found to have increased adsorption capacity for human degradation waste. Moreover, the beads showed excellent blood compatibility in terms of a low hemolysis ratio, prolonged clotting times, suppressed coagulant activation, limited platelet activation, and inhibited blood related inflammatory activation. Additionally, the beads showed good compatibility with endothelial cells. In general, the Kevlar nanofiber beads, which integrated with high adsorption capacity, good blood compatibility and low cytotoxicity, may have great potential for hemoperfusion and some other applications in biomedical fields.

  16. Bilirubin, copper-porphyrins, and the bronze-baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Antony F

    2011-01-01

    Controlled in vitro spectroscopic measurements reveal that bilirubin does not photosensitize the degradation of copper-porphyrins, as has been proposed for the mechanism of the bronze-baby syndrome, an uncommon side-effect of phototherapy. Calculations also show that copper-porphyrins are unlikely to cause the "bronzing." In conclusion, the copper-porphyrin hypothesis is photochemically implausible.

  17. Biphasic Effect of Rifampicin on Bilirubin- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Mandalam Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Drug induced hepatitis is a major problem which a physician encounters in his clinical practice. In view of increasing incidence of tuberculosis in our country a large number of infected individuals are started on Antituberculous (ATT) drugs and rifampicin is invariably part of the regimen. One of the major adverse effects of ATT drugs is drug- induced hepatitis which is characterized by elevation of liver enzymes and bilirubin. Hepatotoxicity is usually idiosyncratic or dose-dependent. Rifampicin causes transient elevation of transaminases in 10-20 percent of individuals and this does not warrant dose adjustments of the drug. Rarely rifampicin can lead to severe hepatitis with hyperbilirubinaemia and marked elevations of SGOT and SGPT and in some patients this can be fatal. The exact mechanism of Rifampicin induced hepatotoxicity is not known but it is postulated to be due to idiosyncratic reaction to rifampicin metabolites which may be directly toxic or induce an immunologically mediated liver injury. Rarely rifampicin may cause hyperbilirubinaemia without enzyme elevation. Here we report a patient with bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis who developed transient severe indirect hyperbilirubinaemia on rifampicin. On review of relevant literature we find that rifampicin can have a biphasic effect on bilirubin, an initial increase in indirect bilirubin and later normalization of bilirubin. We have reported this case because of its rarity in clinical practice. PMID:27190870

  18. Bilirubin binding with liver cystatin induced structural and functional changes.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mir Faisal; Bano, Bilqees

    2014-05-01

    Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors play a significant role in the proteolytic environment of the cells. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases regulate the activity of these enzymes helping in checking the degdration activity of cathepsins. The bilirubin secreated by liver cells can bind to cystatin present in the liver resulting in its functional inactivation, which may further lead to the increase in cathepsins level causing liver cirrhosis. In case of some pathophysiological conditions excess bilirubin gets accumulated e.g. in presence of Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke) in mammals and humans, leading to liver cirrhosis and possibly jaundice or normal blockade of bile duct causing increased level of bilirubin in blood. Protease-cystatin imbalance causes disease progression. In the present study, Bilirubin (BR) and liver cystatin interaction was studied to explore the cystatin inactivation and structural alteration. The binding interaction was studied by UV-absorption, FT-IR and fluorescence spectroscopy. The quenching of protein fluorescence confirmed the binding of BR with buffalo liver cystatin (BLC). Stern-Volmer analysis of BR-BLC system indicates the presence of static component in the quenching mechanism and the number of binding sites to be close to 1. The fluorescence data proved that the fluorescence quenching of liver cystatin by BR was the result of BR-cystatin complex formation. FTIR analysis of BR-Cystatin complex revealed change in the secondary structure due to perturbation in the microenvironment further confirmed by the decreased caseinolytic activity of BLC against papain. Fluorescence measurements also revealed quenching of fluorescence and shift in peak at different time intervals and at varying pH values. Photo-illumination of BR-cystatin complex causes change in the surrounding environment of liver cystatin as indicated by red-shift. The binding constant for BR-BLC complex was found to be 9.279 × 10(4) M(-1). The cystatin binding with

  19. FT-IR Spectra And Normal Vibrational Analysis Of Bilirubin IX α

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Soloway, Roger D.; Wu, Jin-Guang; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Guang-Xian

    1989-12-01

    Bilirubin (C33H36N406) is a water insoluble breakdown product of hemoglobin. It is of biological importance. For example, it can bind with calcium ions to form calcium bilirubinates which are major components in human pigment gallstones. The identification of IR bands of bilirubin are incomplete and the band assignments by different authors have not coincided.

  20. Twenty-five years of progress in bilirubin metabolism (1952-77).

    PubMed Central

    Billing, B H

    1978-01-01

    This review deals with the development of our understanding of the chemistry of bilirubin and its glucuronide derivatives during the years 1952-1977. It examines the relation between haem metabolism and bilirubin formation and our present knowledge of hepatic transport of bilirubin. The heterogeneity of familial hyperbilirubinaemia is discussed. PMID:98394

  1. Determination of bilirubin by thermal lens spectrometry and studies of its transport into hepatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margon, A.; Terdoslavich, M.; Cocolo, A.; Decorti, G.; Passamonti, S.; Franko, M.

    2005-06-01

    The liver is responsible for clearance of bilirubin, the end product of heme catabolism, from the bloodstream. The main aim of our investigation was to determine the role of the carrier protein bilitranslocase in bilirubin uptake into the liver. Our experiments consisted of exposing cell cultures to bilirubin solutions under different conditions and measuring the uptake of bilirubin into the cells. However, since bilirubin is only slightly soluble in aqueous solution (< 70 nM at pH 7.4), we had to use bilirubin concentrations that are far below the limit of detection of the commonly used techniques (e.g. LOD for HPLC with UV-Vis detection \\cong 10 μM). TLS showed up to be a suitable technique for investigation of bilirubin uptake with an LOD of 2 nM. Under basal conditions, bilirubin uptake did not occur. However, increase of cytosolic NADH due to catabolism of specific substrates (e.g. lactate or ethanol) seemed to trigger bilirubin uptake. Furthermore, bilirubin uptake was completely inhibited by addition of specific anti-bilitranslocase antibodies. We can thus infer that, under these conditions, bilitranslocase is the main bilirubin transporter.

  2. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aaliya; Bano, Bilqees

    2011-02-01

    Studies on the role of endogenous metabolites such as bilirubin and their interactions with biomolecules have attracted considerable attention over the past several years. In this work, the interaction of bilirubin (BR) with purified goat liver cystatin (LC) was studied using fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy. The fluorescence data proved that the fluorescence quenching of liver cystatin by BR was the result of BR-cystatin complex formation. Stern-Volmer analysis of fluorescence quenching data showed the binding constant to be 9.27 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ and the number of binding sites to be close to unity. The conformation of the BR-cystatin complex was found to change upon varying the pH of the complex. The BR-cystatin complex was found to have reduced papain inhibitory activity. Photo-illumination of BR-cystatin complex causes perturbation in the micro-environment of goat liver cystatin as indicated by red-shift. This report summarizes our research efforts to reveal the mechanism of interaction of bilirubin with liver cystatin.

  3. Multistimuli-Responsive Bilirubin Nanoparticles for Anticancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yonghyun; Lee, Soyoung; Lee, Dong Yun; Yu, Byeongjun; Miao, Wenjun; Jon, Sangyong

    2016-08-26

    Although stimuli-responsive materials hold potential for use as drug-delivery carriers for treating cancers, their clinical translation has been limited. Ideally, materials used for the purpose should be biocompatible and nontoxic, provide "on-demand" drug release in response to internal or external stimuli, allow large-scale manufacturing, and exhibit intrinsic anticancer efficacy. We present multistimuli-responsive nanoparticles formed from bilirubin, a potent endogenous antioxidant that possesses intrinsic anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity. Exposure of the bilirubin nanoparticles (BRNPs) to either reactive oxygen species (ROS) or external laser light causes rapid disruption of the BRNP nanostructure as a result of a switch in bilirubin solubility, thereby releasing encapsulated drugs. In a xenograft tumor model, BRNPs loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX@BRNPs), when combined with laser irradiation of 650 nm, significantly inhibited tumor growth. This study suggests that BRNPs may be used as a drug-delivery carrier as well as a companion medicine for effectively treating cancers. PMID:27485478

  4. The Kjeldahl method as a primary reference procedure for total protein in certified reference materials used in clinical chemistry. I. A review of Kjeldahl methods adopted by laboratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Chromý, Vratislav; Vinklárková, Bára; Šprongl, Luděk; Bittová, Miroslava

    2015-01-01

    We found previously that albumin-calibrated total protein in certified reference materials causes unacceptable positive bias in analysis of human sera. The simplest way to cure this defect is the use of human-based serum/plasma standards calibrated by the Kjeldahl method. Such standards, commutative with serum samples, will compensate for bias caused by lipids and bilirubin in most human sera. To find a suitable primary reference procedure for total protein in reference materials, we reviewed Kjeldahl methods adopted by laboratory medicine. We found two methods recommended for total protein in human samples: an indirect analysis based on total Kjeldahl nitrogen corrected for its nonprotein nitrogen and a direct analysis made on isolated protein precipitates. The methods found will be assessed in a subsequent article.

  5. The mildly elevated serum bilirubin level is negatively associated with the incidence of end stage renal disease in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Chin, Ho Jun; Cho, Hyun Jin; Lee, Tae Woo; Na, Ki Young; Oh, Kook Hwan; Joo, Kwon Wook; Yoon, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yon-Su; Ahn, Curie; Han, Jin Suk; Kim, Suhnggwon; Jeon, En Sil; Jin, Dong Chan; Kim, Yong-Lim; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Song, Young Rim; Kim, Seong Gyun; Kim, Yoon Goo; Lee, Jung Eun; Oh, Yoon Kyu; Lim, Chun Soo; Lee, Sang Koo; Chae, Dong-Wan; Cho, Won Yong; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays various roles in the development and progression of IgA nephropathy, while bilirubin is known as a potent antioxidant. We therefore hypothesized that serum bilirubin would be associated with renal prognosis in IgA nephropathy. The study subjects comprised 1,458 adult patients with primary IgA nephropathy in Korea. We grouped patients according to the following quartile levels of bilirubin: <0.4 mg/dL (Q1), 0.4-0.5 mg/dL (Q2), 0.6-0.7 mg/dL (Q3), and >0.8 mg/dL (Q4). The outcome data were obtained from the Korean Registry of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Eighty patients (5.5%) contracted ESRD during a mean follow-up period of 44.9 months. The ESRD incidences were 10.7% in Q1, 8.2% in Q2, 2.8% in Q3, and 2.8% in Q4 (p<0.001). The relative risk of ESRD compared to that in Q1 was 0.307 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.126-0.751) in Q3 and 0.315 (95% CI, 0.130-0.765) in Q4. The differences of ESRD incidence were greater in subgroups of males and of patients aged 35 yr or more, with serum albumin 4.0 g/dL or more, with normotension, with eGFR 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or more, and with proteinuria less then 3+ by dipstick test. In conclusion, higher bilirubin level was negatively associated with ESRD incidence in IgA nephropathy.

  6. On the interaction of luminol with human serum albumin: Nature and thermodynamics of ligand binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism and thermodynamic parameters for the binding of luminol (LH 2) with human serum albumin was explored by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that out of two possible LH 2 conformers present is solution, only one is accessible for binding with HSA. The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) change corresponding to the ligand binding process were also estimated by performing the experiment at different temperatures. The ligand replacement experiment with bilirubin confirms that LH 2 binds into the sub-domain IIA of the protein.

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Palm Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Supplementation on Bilirubin-Metabolizing Enzymes in Hyperbilirubinemic Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kamisah, Yusof; Lim, Jing Jye; Lim, Chew-Lian; Asmadi, Ahmad Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phenylhydrazine, a hemolytic agent, is widely used as a model of experimental hyperbilirubinemia. Palm tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) was shown to exert beneficial effects in hyperbilirubinemic rat neonates. Aim To investigate the effects of palm TRF supplementation on hepatic bilirubin-metabolizing enzymes and ocidative stress status in rats administered phenylhydrazine. Methods Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided into two groups; one group was intraperitoneally injected with palm TRF at the dose of 30 mg/kg/day, while another group was only given vehicle (control) (vitamin E-free palm oil) for 14 days. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, each group was further subdivided into another two groups. One group was administered phenylhydrazine (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and another group was administered normal saline. Twenty-four hours later, blood and liver were collected for biochemical parameter measurements. Results Phenylhydrazine increased plasma total bilirubin level and oxidative stress in the erythrocytes as well as in the liver, which were reduced by the pretreatment of palm TRF. Palm TRF also prevented the increases in hepatic heme oxygenase, biliverdin reductase and UDP-glucuronyltransferase activities induced by phenylhydrazine. Conclusion Palm tocotrienol-rich fraction was able to afford protection against phenylhydrazine-induced hyperbilirubinemia, possibly by reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting bilirubin-metabolizing enzymes in the liver. PMID:24586630

  8. Reduction of biliverdin and placental transfer of bilirubin and biliverdin in the pregnant guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, A F; Palma, L A; Schmid, R

    1981-01-01

    Biliverdin was reduced to bilirubin in pregnant and foetal guinea pigs, and the 100000 g supernatant from homogenates of foetal liver, placenta and maternal liver showed high biliverdin reductase activity. The placental transport of unconjugated bilirubin and biliverdin was compared by injecting unlabelled and radiolabelled pigments into the foetal or maternal circulation and analysing blood collected from the opposite side of the placenta. Injected bilirubin crossed the placenta from foetus to mother and vice versa, but injected biliverdin did not appear to cross without prior reduction to bilirubin. The guinea-pig placenta is apparently more permeable to bilirubin than biliverdin. Reduction of biliverdin to bilirubin in the foetus may, therefore, be essential for efficient elimination of haem catabolites from the foetus in placental mammals. PMID:7305981

  9. Induction of human UGT1A1 by bilirubin through AhR dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Shigeko; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2008-12-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A1 (UGT1A1) plays a key role to conjugate bilirubin and preventing jaundice, but there is no report showing the induction of human UGT1A1 (UGT1A1) by bilirubin. In this report, we show findings of the induction of the reporter gene (-3475/+14) of UGT1A1 in HepG2 cells by bilirubin at 50 microM, 100 microM, with human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (hAhR). We confirmed that induction of the reporter gene by bilirubin is dependent on the position of the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE) (-3328/-3319) of UGT1A1, because the XRE deletion UGT1A1 gene did not respond to stimulation by a complex of bilirubin and hAhR. alpha-Naphthoflavone (alpha-NF) of a typical AhR antagonist at 50 microM inhibited induction by bilirubin, suggesting that bilirubin stimulates through binding with hAhR. Meanwhile, bilirubin itself did not stimulate the induction of AhR, because we detected no-elevation of the mRNA level of AhR by RT-PCR. These results indicate that the induction of UGT1A1 by bilirubin-AhR did not depend on the elevation of AhR but on ligand binding. From this result, we considered that high bilirubin in neonates must induce the elevation of UGT1A1 after birth to prevent jaundice, and bilirubin in adults also regulates the level of UGT1A1. This is the first report showing direct induction of UGT1A1 by a bilirubin through AhR pathway. PMID:19356098

  10. Predictive effects of bilirubin on response of colorectal cancer to irinotecan-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qian-Qian; Qiu, Hong; Zhang, Ming-Sheng; Hu, Guang-Yuan; Liu, Bo; Huang, Liu; Liao, Xin; Li, Qian-Xia; Li, Zhi-Huan; Yuan, Xiang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the predictive effects of baseline serum bilirubin levels and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1*28 polymorphism on response of colorectal cancer to irinotecan-based chemotherapy. METHODS: The present study was based on a prospective multicenter longitudinal trial of Chinese metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with irinotecan-based chemotherapy (NCT01282658). Baseline serum bilirubin levels, including total bilirubin (TBil) and unconjugated bilirubin (UBil), were measured, and genotyping of UGT1A1*28 polymorphism was performed. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to determine cutoff values of TBil and UBil. The TBil values were categorized into > 13.0 or ≤ 13.0 groups; the UBil values were categorized into > 4.1 or ≤ 4.1 groups. Combining the cutoff values of TBil and UBil, which was recorded as CoBil, patients were classified into three groups. The classifier’s performance of UGT1A1*28 and CoBil for predicting treatment response was evaluated by ROC analysis. Associations between response and CoBil or UGT1A1*28 polymorphism were estimated using simple and multiple logistic regression models. RESULTS: Among the 120 mCRC patients, the serum bilirubin level was significantly different between the UGT1A1*28 wild-type and mutant genotypes. Patients with the mutant genotype had an increased likelihood of a higher TBil (P = 0.018) and a higher UBil (P = 0.014) level compared with the wild-type genotype. Patients were stratified into three groups based on CoBil. Group 1 was patients with TBil > 13.0 and UBil > 4.1; Group 2 was patients with TBil ≤ 13.0 and UBil > 4.1; and Group 3 was patients with TBil ≤ 13.0 and UBil ≤ 4.1. Patients in Group 3 had more than a 10-fold higher likelihood of having a response in the simple (OR = 11.250; 95%CI: 2.286-55.367; P = 0.003) and multiple (OR = 16.001; 95%CI: 2.802 -91.371; P = 0.002) analyses compared with the Group 1 individuals. Patients carrying the UGT1

  11. Automated continuous flow determination of urine albumin by competition with dye-detergent binding.

    PubMed

    Lever, M; Walmsley, T A

    1978-02-15

    A continuous flow automated method for urine albumin was developed based on the ability of albumin to displace bromophenol blue from a bromophenol blue detergent complex. The method is almost specific for albumin, giving a slight response with an alpha-globulin fraction from serum. Results agreed closely with rocket electrophoresis albumin estimates on urine samples, but significantly less closely with "total urine protein" estimates by an acid protein precipitation, followed by biuret colour reaction, procedure. This method is being used to replace the indefinite "total protein" test for most routine purposes.

  12. Nicotinic acid test in the diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome: correlation with bilirubin clearance.

    PubMed Central

    Röllinghoff, W; Paumgartner, G; Preisig, R

    1981-01-01

    A provocation test with nicotinic acid (50 mg intravenously) was performed in 13 patients with Gilbert's syndrome and seven healthy volunteers to investigate the diagnostic value of several test parameters and to correlate them with the bilirubin clearance. The maximal increment of unconjugated serum bilirubin, the retention at four hours, and the area under the bilirubin concentration time curve. (AUC) were measured. Significant differences between patients and controls were found with regard to the AUC (7.95 +/- SD, 3.29 mmol/min/l vs. 3.08 +/- 0.57; P less than 0.001), the increment of unconjugated bilirubin (24.1 +/- 7.1 mumol/l vs. 10.2 +/- 3.2; P less than 0.001) and the retention (77.7 +/- 8.9% vs. 45.8 +/- 27.4%; P less than 0.02). Of those, the AUC discriminated best between patients and controls. Five patients with Gilbert's syndrome had normal serum bilirubin concentrations (less than 17.1 mumol/l = 1 mg%) at the time of the study, but abnormal AUC and bilirubin increment. A significant correlation was found between the bilirubin clearance and the retention (r = -0.96; P less than 0.001) as well as the AUC (r = -0.82; P less than 0.05) but not with the bilirubin increment. This simple test may be used to assess the disturbance of bilirubin clearance in Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:7286783

  13. The mechanism of haem catabolism. Bilirubin formation in living rats by [18O]oxygen labelling.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S B; King, R F

    1978-01-01

    1. The pathway of haem breakdown in living rats was studied by using 18O in the oxygen that the animals consumed. By cannulation of the common bile duct and collection of bile, labelled bilirubin was isolated and its mass spectrum determined. One set of results was obtained for a rat to which haemoglobin had been intravenously administered and another set obtained for a rat that was not given exogenous haem. Isomerization of bilirubin IXalpha to the XIIIalpha and IIIalpha isomers did not occur to any significant extent. The 18O-labelling pattern obtained in the bilirubin was consistent with a Two-Molecule Mechanism, whereby the terminal lactam oxygen atoms of bilirubin are derived from different oxygen molecules. The consequences of this mechanism are discussed in terms of the possible intermediates of the catabolic pathway. 2. 18O-labelled bilirubin appeared in the bile in less than 10 min after exposure of the animals to labelled oxygen. This result suggests that all of the chemical transformations involving production of biliverdin, reduction to bilirubin and conjugation of the bilirubin are fast processes. 3. The quantitative recovery of label obtained in the experiments suggests that there is little or no exchange of newly synthesized bilirubin with existing bilirubin pools in the animal. PMID:637844

  14. Bilirubin acts as an endogenous regulator of inflammation by disrupting adhesion molecule-mediated leukocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Megan E.; Zucker, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that bilirubin, which is generated during the physiological breakdown of heme, exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects. Previous work by our group suggests that bilirubin is able to suppress inflammatory responses by preventing the migration of leukocytes into target tissues through disruption of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent cell signaling. As VCAM-1 is an important mediator of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. As anticipated, bilirubin-treated animals manifested significantly less colonic injury and reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into colon tissues. We further observed that bilirubin administration was associated with a reduced number of eosinophils and monocytes in the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia, regardless of whether mice received DSS. These findings suggest that bilirubin impairs the normal migration of eosinophils into intestinal tissues, as supported by in vitro experiments showing that bilirubin blocks the VCAM-1-dependent movement of Jurkat cells across human endothelial cell monolayers. Taken together, our findings support that bilirubin ameliorates DSS-induced colitis and disrupts the physiological trafficking of leukocytes to the intestine by preventing transmigration across the vascular endothelium, potentially through the inhibition VCAM-1-mediated signaling. Our findings raise the possibility that bilirubin functions as an endogenous regulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:26925435

  15. Unusual presentation of Gilbert disease with high levels of unconjugated bilirubin. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villalba, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Montalvo, Carlos; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Arredondo-Saldaña, Gabriela; Zertuche-Maldonado, Tania; Torre-Flores, Landy

    2016-04-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is a benign condition characterized by asymptomatic sporadic episodes of jaundice, due to a mild unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by a deficiency in bilirubin glucoronidation. Under certain physiologic or pathologic events bilirubin level rises but according to literature it does not reach out more than 3 mg/dl. We report 2 cases of Gilbert's syndrome, genetically tested, which presented with bilirubin levels above 6 mg/dl without any trigger or coexisting condition. In conclusion, bilirubin levels higher than 6 mg/dL in Gilbert syndrome are rare, hemolytic and other metabolism diseases must be ruled out, and genetic testing may be necessary in some cases. PMID:26181050

  16. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1115 - Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1115 Urinary bilirubin and its conjugates (nonquantitative)...

  1. Biochemical measurement of bilirubin with an evanescent wave optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poscio, Patrick; Depeursinge, Christian D.; Emery, Y.; Parriaux, Olivier M.; Voirin, Guy

    1991-09-01

    Optical sensing techniques can be considered as powerful information sources on the biochemistry of tissue, blood, and physiological fluids. Various sensing modalities can be considered: spectroscopic determination of the fluorescence or optical absorption of the biological medium itself, or more generally, of a reagent in contact with the biological medium. The principle and realization of the optical sensor developed are based on the use of polished fibers: the cladding of a monomode fiber is removed on a longitudinal section. The device can then be inserted into an hypodermic needle for in-vivo measurements. Using this minute probe, local measurements of the tissue biochemistry or metabolic processes can be obtained. The sensing mechanism is based on the propagation of the evanescent wave in the tissues or reagent: the proximity of the fiber core allows the penetration of the model field tail into the sensed medium, with a uniquely defined field distribution. Single or multi-wavelength analysis of the light collected into the fiber yields the biochemical information. Here an example of this sensing technology is discussed. In-vitro measurement of bilirubin in gastric juice demonstrates that the evanescent wave optical sensor provides a sensitivity which matches the physiological concentrations. A device is proposed for in-vivo monitoring of bilirubin concentration in the gastro-oesophageal tract.

  2. Bilirubin scavenges chloramines and inhibits myeloperoxidase-induced protein/lipid oxidation in physiologically relevant hyperbilirubinemic serum.

    PubMed

    Boon, A C; Hawkins, C L; Coombes, J S; Wagner, K H; Bulmer, A C

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), an oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), induces protein and lipid oxidation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Individuals with mildly elevated bilirubin concentrations (i.e., Gilbert syndrome; GS) are protected from atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and related mortality. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous/endogenous unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), at physiological concentrations, can protect proteins/lipids from oxidation induced by reagent and enzymatically generated HOCl. Serum/plasma samples supplemented with exogenous UCB (≤250µM) were assessed for their susceptibility to HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) oxidation, by measuring chloramine, protein carbonyl, and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Serum/plasma samples from hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats and humans with GS were also exposed to MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) to: (1) validate in vitro data and (2) determine the relevance of endogenously elevated UCB in preventing protein and lipid oxidation. Exogenous UCB dose-dependently (P<0.05) inhibited HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-induced chloramine formation. Albumin-bound UCB efficiently and specifically (3.9-125µM; P<0.05) scavenged taurine, glycine, and N-α-acetyllysine chloramines. These results were translated into Gunn rat and GS serum/plasma, which showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced chloramine formation after MPO-induced oxidation. Protein carbonyl and MDA formation was also reduced after MPO oxidation in plasma supplemented with UCB (P<0.05; 25 and 50µM, respectively). Significant inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation was demonstrated within the physiological range of UCB, providing a hypothetical link to protection from atherosclerosis in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. These data demonstrate a novel and physiologically relevant mechanism whereby UCB could inhibit protein and lipid modification by quenching chloramines induced by MPO-induced HOCl. PMID:26057938

  3. Bilirubin inhibits iNOS expression and NO production in response to endotoxin in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizheng W; Smith, Darcey L H; Zucker, Stephen D

    2004-08-01

    The inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO), HO-1, has been shown to play an important role in attenuating tissue injury. Because HO-1 catalyzes the rate-limiting step in bilirubin synthesis, we examined the hypothesis that bilirubin is a key mediator of HO-1 cytoprotection, employing a rat model of endotoxemia. Bilirubin treatment resulted in improved survival and attenuated liver injury in response to lipopolysaccharide infusion. Serum levels of NO and tumor necrosis factor alpha, key mediators of endotoxemia, and hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were significantly lower in bilirubin-treated rodents versus control animals. Both intraperitoneal and local administration of bilirubin also was found to ameliorate hindpaw inflammation induced by the injection of lambda-carrageenan. Consistent with in vivo results, bilirubin significantly inhibited iNOS expression and suppressed NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In contrast, bilirubin treatment induced a threefold increase in LPS-mediated prostaglandin synthesis in the absence of significant changes in cyclooxygenase expression or activity, suggesting that bilirubin enhances substrate availability for eicosanoid synthesis. Bilirubin had no effect on LPS-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappaB or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, consistent with a nuclear factor kappaB-independent mechanism of action. Taken together, these data support a cytoprotective role for bilirubin that is mediated, at least in part, through the inhibition of iNOS expression and, potentially, through stimulation of local prostaglandin E2 production. In conclusion, our findings suggest a role for bilirubin in mollifying tissue injury in response to inflammatory stimuli and support the possibility that the phenomenon of "jaundice of sepsis" represents an adaptive physiological response to endotoxemia. Supplementary material for this article can be found on the

  4. Surface molecularly imprinted magnetic microspheres for the recognition of albumin.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Fatma; Denizli, Adil

    2014-08-01

    A new approach, combining metal coordination with the molecular imprinting technique, was developed to prepare affinity materials. Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres in monosize form were used for specific recognition toward the target protein. The magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were prepared by dispersion polymerization in the presence of magnetite nanopowder. Surface imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres based on metal coordination were prepared and used for the selective recognition of human serum albumin. Iminodiacetic acid was used as the metal coordinating agent and human serum albumin was anchored by Cu(2+) ions on the surface of magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres by metal coordination. The magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were coated with a polymer formed by condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane. The human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and particle size analysis. The maximum adsorption capacity of human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres was 37.7 mg/g polymer at pH 6.0. The selectivity experiments of human serum albumin imprinted magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres prepared with different concentrations in the presence of lysozyme, bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C were performed in order to determine the relative selectivity coefficients.

  5. Bilirubin as a Protective Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis: An NHANES Study of 2003 - 2006 Data

    PubMed Central

    Fischman, Daniel; Valluri, Ashok; Gorrepati, Venkata Subhash; Murphy, Megan E.; Peters, Ian; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2010-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis(RA) is a chronic inflammatory, autoimmune polyarthritis, with a prevalence estimated at one percent of the United States(US) population. Serum bilirubin, because of its antioxidant nature, has been conjectured to exert an anti-inflammatory biologic effect. The objective of this study is to discern whether higher serum Total Bilirubin(TBili) levels are protective against RA. Methods This is a secondary analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data collected between 2003-2006. Study participants completed a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their health history, underwent a physical examination, and had body fluids collected for laboratory studies. In NHANES, to assess for the presence of RA, the following questions were asked: "Doctor ever said you had arthritis?" If so, "Which type of arthritis". Statistical analysis was performed, using SAS version 9.1, proc survey methods. Participant data were adjusted for demographic characteristics as well as risk factors for RA. Results NHANES 2003-2006 included 20,470 individuals, chosen as a representative sampling of the entire US population. Exclusion criteria included age less than twenty years or liver dysfunction, defined as history of abnormal liver function tests or liver disease. 8,147 subjects did not have any exclusion criteria and were included in the data analysis. RA is inversely related to the serum level of TBili with an odds ratio of 0.679 (95% CI 0.533-0.865) and remained significant even after adjusting for age, gender, race, education, and tobacco history, with an odds ratio 0.749 (95% CI 0.575 - 0.976). Conclusions Our study supports the hypothesis that higher TBili levels are protective against RA. A plausible mechanism for this association would be that the anti-oxidant effects of TBili exert a physiologic anti-inflammatory effect, which provides protection against RA. This explanation is supported by prior studies which show that higher

  6. Clinical system model for monitoring the physiological status of jaundice by extracting bilirubin components from skin diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alla S.; Clark, Joseph; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2009-02-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition which occurs in newborns as a result of an imbalance between the production and elimination of bilirubin. The excess bilirubin in the blood stream diffuses into the surrounding tissue leading to a yellowing of the skin. As the bilirubin levels rise in the blood stream, there is a continuous exchange between the extra vascular bilirubin and bilirubin in the blood stream. Exposure to phototherapy alters the concentration of bilirubin in the vascular and extra vascular regions by causing bilirubin in the skin layers to be broken down. Thus, the relative concentration of extra vascular bilirubin is reduced leading to a diffusion of bilirubin out of the vascular region. Diffuse reflectance spectra from human skin contains physiological and structural information of the skin and nearby tissue. A diffuse reflectance spectrum must be captured before and after blanching in order to isolate the intravascular and extra vascular bilirubin. A new mathematical model is proposed with extra vascular bilirubin concentration taken into consideration along with other optical parameters in defining the diffuse reflectance spectrum from human skin. A nonlinear optimization algorithm has been adopted to extract the optical properties (including bilirubin concentration) from the skin reflectance spectrum. The new system model and nonlinear algorithm have been combined to enable extraction of Bilirubin concentrations within an average error of 10%.

  7. Protein-Support Interactions for Rationally Designed Bilirubin Oxidase Based Cathode: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Matanovic, Ivana; Babanova, Sofia; Chavez, Madelaine Seow; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-21

    An example of biocathode based on bilirubin oxidase (BOx) was used to demonstrate how density functional theory can be combined with docking simulations in order to study the interface interactions between the enzyme and specifically designed electrode surface. The electrode surface was modified through the adsorption of bilirubin, the natural substrate for BOx, and the prepared electrode was electrochemically characterized using potentiostatic measurements. The experimentally determined current densities showed that the presence of bilirubin led to significant improvement of the cathode operation. On the basis of the computationally calculated binding energies of bilirubin to the graphene support and BOx and the analysis of the positioning of bilirubin relative to the support and T1 Cu atom of the enzyme, we hypothesize that the bilirubin serves as a geometric and electronic extension of the support. The computational results further confirm that the modification of the electrode surface with bilirubin provides an optimal orientation of BOx toward the support but also show that bilirubin facilitates the interfacial electron transfer by decreasing the distance between the electrode surface and the T1 Cu atom. PMID:27015361

  8. Relationship of Bilirubin Levels in Infancy to Later Intellectual Development. Interim Report No. 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Rosalyn A.; And Others

    The relationship of bilirubin (a red bile pigment that is sometimes found in the urine and occurs in the blood and tissues in jaundice) in infancy to later intellectual development was investigated in 241 infants with moderately elevated and high bilirubin levels. Ss were administered motor, psycholinguistic, and intelligence tests at age 8…

  9. Metabolism of bilirubin by human cytochrome P450 2A6

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Bakar, A'edah; Arthur, Dionne M.; Wikman, Anna S.; Rahnasto, Minna; Juvonen, Risto O.; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Raunio, Hannu; Ng, Jack C.; Lang, Matti A.

    2012-05-15

    The mouse cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2A5 has recently been shown to function as hepatic “Bilirubin Oxidase” (Abu-Bakar, A., et al., 2011. Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 257, 14–22). To date, no information is available on human CYP isoforms involvement in bilirubin metabolism. In this paper we provide novel evidence for human CYP2A6 metabolising the tetrapyrrole bilirubin. Incubation of bilirubin with recombinant yeast microsomes expressing the CYP2A6 showed that bilirubin inhibited CYP2A6-dependent coumarin 7-hydroxylase activity to almost 100% with an estimated K{sub i} of 2.23 μM. Metabolite screening by a high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry indicated that CYP2A6 oxidised bilirubin to biliverdin and to three other smaller products with m/z values of 301, 315 and 333. Molecular docking analyses indicated that bilirubin and its positively charged intermediate interacted with key amino acid residues at the enzyme's active site. They were stabilised at the site in a conformation favouring biliverdin formation. By contrast, the end product, biliverdin was less fitting to the active site with the critical central methylene bridge distanced from the CYP2A6 haem iron facilitating its release. Furthermore, bilirubin treatment of HepG2 cells increased the CYP2A6 protein and activity levels with no effect on the corresponding mRNA. Co-treatment with cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, resulted in increased half-life of the CYP2A6 compared to cells treated only with CHX. Collectively, the observations indicate that the CYP2A6 may function as human “Bilirubin Oxidase” where bilirubin is potentially a substrate and a regulator of the enzyme. -- Highlights: ► Human CYP2A6 interacts with bilirubin with a high affinity. ► Bilirubin docking to the CYP2A6 active site is more stable than biliverdin docking. ► Recombinant CYP2A6 microsomes metabolised bilirubin to biliverdin. ► Bilirubin increased the hepatic CYP2

  10. Revalidation and rationale for high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, J Donald; Mukerjee, Pasupati

    2007-01-01

    Background Our prior solvent partition analysis, published in 1992, yielded pKa values for unconjugated bilirubin of about 8.1 and 8.4, but these results have been challenged and studies by other methods have suggested pKa values below 5.0. Methods We repeated our published solvent partition studies, using 14C-unconjugated bilirubin highly purified by extraction of residual labeled impurities from CHCl3 into an aqueous buffer, pH 7.0. Partition ratios at six pH values from 5.0 to 9.0 were determined by radioassay and compared with our prior values obtained by diazo assay. Results At pH values ranging from 4.8 to 9.2, stable aqueous/chloroform 14C-partition ratios did not differ significantly from our published partition ratios based on diazo assay. Conclusion These results support the high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin, above 8.0, derived from our earlier solvent partition study. In both studies, our measurements were based on the rapid analysis of clearly under-saturated solutions of highly-purified bilirubin over a wide pH range, using properly purified and preserved solvents. No previous direct estimate of the aqueous pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin meets all these preconditions. Three theoretical factors acting in combination, each related to the unique, extensive internal H-bonding of the -COOH groups, are proposed to support high pKa values of unconjugated bilirubin in water: a) donation of an H-bond from the -OH moiety of the -COOH group, which is broken on ionization; b) hindered solvation of the -COO- group after ionization; and c) restricted rotation of the -COO- and -COOH groups. Our findings and rationale rebut methodological and theoretical criticisms leveled against our prior work. High pKa values for unconjugated bilirubin dictate that: a) bilirubin diacid, which readily diffuses across membranes and can cause neurotoxicity, is the dominant unbound bilirubin species of unconjugated bilirubin in plasma at physiological pH; b) at the near

  11. Multiple Genetic Modifiers of Bilirubin Metabolism Involvement in Significant Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Patients of Chinese Descent

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zheng, Lei; Lin, Min; Zheng, Xiang-bin; Lin, Fen

    2015-01-01

    The potential for genetic variation to modulate neonatal hyperbilirubinemia risk is increasingly being recognized. A case-control study was designed to assess comprehensive contributions of the multiple genetic modifiers of bilirubin metabolism on significant neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in Chinese descendents. Eleven common mutations and polymorphisms across five bilirubin metabolism genes, namely those encoding UGT1A1, HMOX1, BLVRA, SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3, were determined using the high resolution melt (HRM) assay or PCR-capillary electrophoresis analysis. A total of 129 hyperbilirubinemic infants and 108 control subjects were evaluated. Breastfeeding and the presence of the minor A allele of rs4148323 (UGTA*6) were correlated with an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia (OR=2.17, P=0.02 for breastfeeding; OR=9.776, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 homozygote; OR=3.151, P=0.000 for UGTA*6 heterozygote); whereas, increasing gestational age and the presence of –TA7 repeat variant of UGT1A1 decreased the risk (OR=0.721, P=0.003 for gestational age; OR=0.313, P=0.002 for heterozygote TA6/TA7). In addition, the SLCO1B1 and SLCO1B3 polymorphisms also contributed to an increased risk of hyperbilirubinemia. This detailed analysis revealed the impact of multiple genetic modifiers on neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. This may support the use of genetic tests for clinical risk assessment. Furthermore, the established HRM assay can serve as an effective method for large-scale investigation. PMID:26146841

  12. Influence of diets with different levels of protein and energy on liver albumin content in the rat.

    PubMed

    Maurice, M; Lardeux, B; De Saint-Steban, C; Bourdel, G; Feldmann, G

    1986-11-01

    The influence of protein ingestion on liver albumin synthesis and albumin content was investigated in rats fed protein as a meal (90% casein) given apart from the other dietary components provided ad libitum. In this condition, protein ingestion rapidly stimulates liver total protein synthesis. Separately fed rats were studied 6 and 20 h after the protein meal. Control rats fed mixed diets containing 13 or 80% casein were killed either during the absorptive (night) or postabsorptive (light) periods. The ratio of hepatic albumin synthesis to total protein synthesis remained fairly constant (12-15%) in all groups, indicating that albumin synthesis paralleled total protein synthesis. Liver albumin content measured in microsomes by immunonephelometry was significantly higher in separately fed rats killed 6 h postmeal than in those killed after 20 h. In rats fed 13% casein, the liver albumin content remained high regardless of the time of killing. In rats fed 80% casein, the albumin content was higher during the absorptive period than during the postabsorptive period. Immunoperoxidase staining of the hepatocyte organelles involved in albumin synthesis, especially the Golgi apparatus, was more intense for separately fed rats killed 6 h postmeal than for those killed after 20 h. Livers of rats fed 13% casein also exhibited a pattern indicative of high hepatocyte albumin content, whereas livers of rats fed 80% casein contained less. These results show that, in separate feeding, wide circadian variations of albumin synthesis run parallel to changes in liver albumin content.

  13. Impact of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) is the constellation of neurologic sequelae following milder degrees of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia than are associated with kernicterus. Clinically, BIND may manifest after the neonatal period as developmental delay, cognitive impairment, disordered executive function, and behavioral and psychiatric disorders. However, there is controversy regarding the relative contribution of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia versus other risk factors to the development of later neurodevelopmental disorders in children with BIND. In this review, we focus on the empiric data from the past 25 years regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes and BIND, including specific effects on developmental delay, cognition, speech and language development, executive function, and th neurobehavioral disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. PMID:25585889

  14. Serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin are early surrogate markers for ischemic cholangiopathy and graft failure in liver transplantation from donation after circulatory death.

    PubMed

    Halldorson, J B; Rayhill, S; Bakthavatsalam, R; Montenovo, M; Dick, A; Perkins, J; Reyes, J

    2015-03-01

    Liver transplantation with the use of donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with ischemic cholangiopathy (IC) often leading to graft loss. We hypothesized that serial postoperative analysis of alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin might identify patients who would later on develop ischemic cholangiopathy and/or graft loss, allowing early recognition and potentially retransplantation. The University of Washington DCD experience totals 89 DCD liver transplantations performed from 2003 to 2011 with Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year patient and graft survival rates of 81.6% and 75.6%, respectively; 84/89 patients transplanted with DCD livers lived ≥ 60 days after transplantation and were analyzed. Serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels at 1 week, 2 week, 1 month, and 2 months after transplantation were analyzed. Two-month serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase proved to have the strongest associations with development of IC and graft failure. Two-month alkaline phosphatase of <100 U/L had a negative predictive value of 97% for development of IC. Two-month alkaline phosphatase demonstrated an inflection starting at >300 U/L strongly associated with development of IC (P < .0001). Serum bilirubin at 2 months was most strongly associated with graft failure within the 1st year with a strong inflection point at 2.5 mg/dL (P = .0001). All jaundiced recipients at 60 days after transplantation (bilirubin >2.5 mg/dL) developed graft failure within the 1st year (P < .0001). Use of these early surrogate markers could facilitate prioritization and early retransplantation for DCD liver recipients with allografts destined for failure.

  15. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Neelofar, Km.; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  16. Addition of Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS®) Albumin Dialysis for the Preoperative Management of Jaundiced Patients with Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Fuks, David; Chapuis-Roux, Emilie; Yzet, Thierry; Cosse, Cyril; Bartoli, Eric; N'Guyen-Khac, Eric; Robert, Brice; Lobjoie, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The preoperative management of hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC) with jaundice focuses on decreasing the total serum bilirubin level (SBL) by performing preoperative biliary drainage (PBD). However, it takes about 6–8 weeks for the SBL to fall at a sufficient extent. The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the impact of Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS®) dialysis (in association with PBD) on SBL decrease. From January 2010 to January 2011, we prospectively selected all jaundiced patients admitted to our university hospital for resectable HC and requiring PBD prior to major hepatectomy. The PBD was followed by 3 sessions of MARS dialysis over a period of 72 h. A total of 10 patients with HC were screened and two of them were included (Bismuth-Corlette stage IIIa, gender ratio 1, median age 68 years). The initial SBL in the two patients was 328 and 242 μmol/l, respectively. After three MARS dialysis sessions, the SBL had fallen by 30 and 52%, respectively. After the end of each session, there was a SBL rebound of about 10 μmol/l. The MARS decreased the serum creatinine level, the platelet count and the prothrombin index, but did not modify the serum albumin level. Pruritus disappeared after one and two sessions, respectively. MARS-related morbidity included hypotension (n = 1), tachycardia (n = 1), thrombocytopenia (n = 2) and anaemia (n = 1). When combined with PBD, MARS dialysis appears to accelerate the decrease in SBL and thus may enable earlier surgery. This hypothesis must be validated in a larger study. PMID:24163652

  17. Enterohepatic circulation of nonconjugated bilirubin in rats fed with human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, E.M.; Whitington, P.F.; Whitington, S.H.; Rivard, W.A.; Given, G. )

    1991-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that enhanced intestinal absorption of bilirubin may contribute to prolonged nonconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in human milk-fed infants, we studied a cross-section of 36 healthy infants and mothers. Milk from mothers and serum from infants were collected at 16.3 +/- 2.4 days. Milk was studied for its effect on the absorption of bilirubin labeled with carbon 14 in rats and compared with buffer and iron-fortified infant formula (Similac With Iron). The percentage of a 1 mg bilirubin dose absorbed by the rat was 25.29 +/- 4.0% when it was administered into the duodenum with buffer, 4.67 +/- 2.4% with Similac formula, and 7.7 +/- 2.9% with human milk. Linear regression analysis, using the infant's serum nonconjugated bilirubin level as the dependent variable and the percentage of (14C)bilirubin absorbed by the rat with the corresponding mother's milk as the independent variable, revealed a significant correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.016). Inspection of the data suggested that absorptive permissiveness correlated closely with infant serum bilirubin values greater than 24 mumol/L (1.4 mg/dl) (r = 0.55; p = 0.007), whereas in those with bilirubin values less than or equal to 24 mumol/L, there was no apparent correlation. Milk was also analyzed for beta-glucuronidase, nonesterified fatty acids, and the ability to inhibit glucuronosyltransferase activity of rat liver microsomes in vitro, none of which correlated with the infant's serum bilirubin. These data support the theory that enhanced intestinal absorption of bilirubin contributes to the jaundice associated with breast-feeding.

  18. A retrospective analysis of 25% human serum albumin supplementation in hypoalbuminemic dogs with septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Farrah B.; Read, Robyn L.; Powell, Lisa L.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the influence of 25% human serum albumin (HSA) supplementation on serum albumin level, total protein (TP), colloid osmotic pressure (COP), hospital stay, and survival in dogs with septic peritonitis. Records of 39 dogs with septic peritonitis were evaluated. In the HSA group, initial and post-transfusion TP, albumin, COP, and HSA dose were recorded. In the non-supplemented group, repeated values of TP, albumin, and COP were recorded over their hospitalization. Eighteen dogs survived (53.8% mortality). Repeat albumin values were higher in survivors (mean 23.9 g/L) and elevated repeat albumin values were associated with HSA supplementation. Repeat albumin and TP were higher in the HSA supplemented group (mean 24 g/L and 51.9 g/L, respectively) and their COP increased by 5.8 mmHg. Length of hospitalization was not affected. Twenty-five percent HSA increases albumin, TP, and COP in canine patients with septic peritonitis. Higher postoperative albumin levels are associated with survival. PMID:26028681

  19. Unconjugated bilirubin effect on 3H-ouabain binding to human fetal red cells.

    PubMed

    Corchs, J L; Corchs, M J; Serrani, R E

    1994-03-01

    Human fetal red cells show heterogeneity of 3H-ouabain binding sites. These cells were chosen as a model to look into unconjugated bilirubin effects on the primary active Na(+)-K+ transport mechanism. Evidences are presented suggesting that unconjugated bilirubin affects 3H-ouabain binding but not through a direct effect. This is supported by the fact that the "low affinity" subgroup sites of the last mentioned ligand persists after unconjugated bilirubin treatment of cells, whereas the "high-affinity" subgroup disappears.

  20. Transport and Metabolism at Blood–Brain Interfaces and in Neural Cells: Relevance to Bilirubin-Induced Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gazzin, Silvia; Strazielle, Nathalie; Tiribelli, Claudio; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non-pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood–brain interfaces (BBIs) into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, BBIs act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of BBIs in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood–brain and blood–cerebrospinal fluid barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as the potential role of transporters such as ABCC1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed. PMID:22629246

  1. Physical measurements of Cu{sup 2+}-complexes of bilirubin

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Wu, J.G.; Li, W.H.; Xu, Y.Z.; Xu, D.F.; Shen, G.R.; Soloway, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    Copper is known to form complexes with bilirubin (H{sub 2}BR). Such complexes have received increased attention due to their clinical significance as free-radical scavengers. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of Cu{sup 2+}BR complexes to ascertain the nature of the binding between Cu{sup 2+} and BR. Several physical measurements of the salts were made, such as Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR), Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-R), and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The complexes were prepared by dissolving protonated BR in NaOH, and adding different ratios of aqueous CuCl{sub 2}. At ratios of Cu{sup 2+}:H{sub 2}BR of 1:1 and 2:1, soluble complexes were formed. In solution EPR spectra demonstrated 9 hyperfine peaks, which from the splitting, is indicative of Cu{sup 2+} coordinated to 4 nitrogen atoms coming from 2 molecules of BR.

  2. Human plasma lipocalins and serum albumin: Plasma alternative carriers?

    PubMed

    di Masi, Alessandra; Trezza, Viviana; Leboffe, Loris; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2016-04-28

    Lipocalins are an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins that bind and transport a variety of exogenous and endogenous ligands. Lipocalins share a conserved eight anti-parallel β-sheet structure. Among the different lipocalins identified in humans, α-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), apolipoprotein D (apoD), apolipoprotein M (apoM), α1-microglobulin (α1-m) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) are plasma proteins. In particular, AGP is the most important transporter for basic and neutral drugs, apoD, apoM, and RBP mainly bind endogenous molecules such as progesterone, pregnenolone, bilirubin, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and retinol, while α1-m binds the heme. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a monomeric all-α protein that binds endogenous and exogenous molecules like fatty acids, heme, and acidic drugs. Changes in the plasmatic levels of lipocalins and HSA are responsible for the onset of pathological conditions associated with an altered drug transport and delivery. This, however, does not necessary result in potential adverse effects in patients because many drugs can bind both HSA and lipocalins, and therefore mutual compensatory binding mechanisms can be hypothesized. Here, molecular and clinical aspects of ligand transport by plasma lipocalins and HSA are reviewed, with special attention to their role as alterative carriers in health and disease. PMID:26951925

  3. [Role of bilirubin in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and cancer].

    PubMed

    Vítek, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes importantly to pathogenesis of numerous civilization diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, as well as autoimmune and neurodegenerative conditions. Bilirubin is the major product of the heme catabolic pathway in the intravascular compartment. For long time, bilirubin was considered to be only a waste product, however, recent data from the last two decades have proved its important protective properties, which contributes to defense against development of civilization diseases. Numerous experimental as well as clinical studies have demonstrated association between low bilirubin concentrations and cardiovascular diseases, as well as certain cancers. On the other hand, subjects with mildly elevated blood bilirubin levels, typical for Gilbert syndrome, have decreased risk of these diseases. PMID:27088786

  4. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  5. Normal coordinate analysis of bilirubin vibrational spectra: Effects of intramolecular hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bijun; Taylor, Robert C.; Morris, Michael D.; Wang, Xiu-Zhen; Wu, Jin-guang; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Xu, Guang-xian; Soloway, Roger D.

    1993-11-01

    Normal coordinate analyses are presented for half-bilirubin molecules. Calculations for the AB pyrromethenone include intramolecular hydrogen bonds, while those for the CD chromophore exclude intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Valence force-field parameters have been optimized to correlate closely with the IR and Raman spectra of the target molecules. The results of the calculations are compared with the spectra of bilirubin IXa and various model compounds in the solid state and solution.

  6. Bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 gene polymorphisms: susceptibility to oxidative damage and cancer?

    PubMed

    Grant, D J; Bell, D A

    2000-12-01

    The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene product catalyzes the glucuronidation of serum bilirubin as part of normal heme catabolism. Recently, TA repeat polymorphisms containing five, six, seven, and eight TA dinucleotides in a putative TATA box in the promoter region of the UGT1A1 gene have been described. TA repeat number modulates UGT1A1 transcriptional activity and the quantity of enzyme available to conjugate serum bilirubin. Serum bilirubin is a known antioxidant, and low serum bilirubin has been associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease and inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced damage to erythrocytes in vitro. We hypothesize that the UGT1A1 TA repeats or other functional polymorphisms resulting in lower serum bilirubin levels may be predictive of genetic susceptibility to oxidative damage and cancer. Exposure-related or endogenous production of ROS may impact the integrity of cellular macromolecules and infrastructure, lead to DNA base changes or chromosomal aberrations, and induce toxicity or apoptosis. ROS damage to lipoproteins may be a factor in formation of atherogenic plaques in coronary heart disease. Thus, cellular oxidative stress could contribute to tumorigenesis through mutagenic or epigenetic pathways, and higher serum bilirubin levels should inhibit this process. No definitive studies have been performed, but in a small prospective study of colon cancer, serum bilirubin levels were observed to be lower in these cases. Another study has suggested a link between UGT1A1 alleles, estrogen metabolism, and risk in breast cancer. Epidemiologic studies examining variation in ROS metabolism, ROS damage, bilirubin, and cancer risk will demonstrate the value of this hypothesis. PMID:11170257

  7. Potential role of conjugated bilirubin and copper in the metabolism of lipid peroxides in bile.

    PubMed

    Stocker, R; Ames, B N

    1987-11-01

    Conjugated bilirubin and copper ions at their physiological concentrations in bile may play an important role in hydroperoxide and other detoxification. Conjugated bilirubin may also be an important chain-breaking antioxidant preventing lipid peroxidation. Bilirubin ditaurine (BR-DT), a water-soluble model compound of conjugated bilirubin, completely prevents the peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of phosphatidylcholine in either multilamellar liposomes or micelles. This antioxidant activity is associated with the bilirubin moiety of BR-DT, since taurine alone is inefficient in scavenging peroxyl radicals. The number of peroxyl radicals trapped per molecule of BR-DT is 1.9, compared to 4.7 trapped per molecule of biliverdin, the water-soluble physiological precursor of bilirubin. Peroxyl radical-induced oxidation of BR-DT results in a spectral shift in maximal absorbance toward shorter wavelengths; biliverdin is not formed as a major oxidation product. BR-DT, but neither taurine nor biliverdin, greatly accelerates the cupric ion-catalyzed decomposition of linoleic acid hydroperoxide. In the presence of ferric ion, BR-DT shows no lipid hydroperoxide-degrading activity. Addition of cupric ion to BR-DT results in formation of a complex with spectral features similar to that of a biliverdin-cupric ion complex, indicating that BR-DT and cupric ion undergo redox reactions.

  8. Extended mathematical model for "in vivo" quantification of the interaction betweeen atazanavir and bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Roberto; Domeque, Nieves; Apesteguia, Alberto-Fermín

    2014-02-01

    The objective of the present work was to conduct an "in vivo" analysis of the atazanavir-bilirubin interaction. We developed a new mathematical approach to PK/PDPK models for competitive interaction based on the Michaelis-Menten equation, which was applied to patients with polymorphisms in the gene for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). Atazanavir is known to induce concentration-dependent increases in bilirubin plasma levels. Thus, we employed our mathematical model to analyse rises in steady state atazanavir and bilirubin concentrations, ultimately plotting a nomogram for detection of suboptimal atazanavir exposure. Application of our model revealed that an absolute value or a steady state increase in bilirubin falling below 3.8Φ µmol/L (where Φ is a correction factor, =1 for UGT1A1 wild type and ≠1 for UGT1A1 variants) could be used to predict suboptimal atazanavir exposure and treatment failure. Thus, we have successfully established a new mathematical approach for pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic modelling of the interaction between atazanavir and bilirubin, as it relates to genetic variants of UGT1A1. Taken together, our findings indicate that bilirubin plasma levels represent a valuable marker of atazanavir exposure. PMID:24243081

  9. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts. PMID:26851257

  10. Effects of ethanol and hyperosmotic perfusates on albumin synthesis and release

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, M.A.; Oratz, M.; Schreiber, S.S.; Mongelli, J.

    1986-11-01

    Sucrose and ethanol inhibit albumin synthesis; sucrose via an osmotic mechanism and ethanol during its metabolism. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of both of these agents on albumin synthesis and secretion, and to see if ethanol inhibition could be related to an osmotic effect. Male, fed rabbits served as liver donors in all studies. There were a total of 35 studies: 13 control; 10 ethanol (39 to 52 mM); 4 cycloheximide (0.5 mM), and 8 sucrose (1%). Plasma volume was measured with /sup 125/I-albumin (human) and extracellular volume measured with either /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid or (/sup 14/C)sucrose. During perfusion, rabbit albumin content in the perfusate was measured immunologically every 15 to 30 min for 225 min. Interstitial albumin efflux was measured by the rate of appearance in the perfusate of /sup 125/I-albumin given to 10 other rabbits 3 days prior to hepatic removal and perfusion. During the initial 75 min of perfusion, 74% of the in vivo equilibrated exchangeable /sup 125/I-albumin appeared in the perfusate, and during this period the rabbit albumin that entered the perfusate was taken to represent efflux from the interstitial volume plus synthesis. Rabbit albumin appearing in the perfusate during the later period of 150 min was taken to represent mainly synthesis and was used to calculate the amount of albumin that would be synthesized in 75 min. The difference between these two values would be hepatic interstitial albumin appearing in the perfusate.

  11. Stimulation of albumin gene transcription by insulin in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C.E.; Kalinyak, J.E.; Hutson, S.M.; Jefferson, L.S.

    1987-02-01

    The first goal of the work reported here was to prepare single-stranded DNA sequences for use in studies on the regulation of albumin gene expression. A double-stranded rat albumin cDNA clone was subcloned into the bacteriophage vector M13mp7. Single-stranded recombinant clones were screened for albumin sequences containing either the mRNA strand or the complementary strand. Two clones were selected that contained the 1200 nucleotide long 3' end of the albumin sequence. DNA from the clone containing the mRNA strand was used as a template for DNA polymerase I to prepare a radiolabeled, single-stranded cDNA to albumin mRNA. This radiolabeled cDNA probe was used to quantitate the relative abundance of albumin mRNA in samples of total cellular RNA. DNA from the clone containing the complementary strand was used to measure relative rates of albumin gene transcription in isolated nuclei. The second goal was to use the single-stranded DNA probes to investigate the mechanism of the insulin-mediated stimulation of albumin synthesis in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. Addition of insulin to hepatocytes maintained in a chemically defined, serum-free medium for 40 h in the absence of any hormones resulted in a specific 1.5- to 2.5-fold stimulation of albumin gene transcription that was maximal at 3 h and was maintained above control values for at least 24 h. The rate of albumin gene transcription in nuclei isolated from livers of diabetic rats was reduced to 50% of the value recorded in control nuclei. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that insulin regulates synthesis of albumin at the level of gene transcription.

  12. Dynamics of Albumin Synthetic Response to Intra-Abdominal Abscess in Patients with Gastrointestinal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo; Han, Gang; Chen, Yu; A, Jiye; Gu, Guosheng; Chen, Jun; Wang, Gefei; Li, Jieshou

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low serum albumin concentration is a predictor of failure of source control for intra-abdominal infection. However, data on dynamics of albumin synthesis in these patients and to what extent these changes contribute to hypoalbuminemia are relatively scarce. We investigated in a group of patients with gastrointestinal fistula the dynamic response of liver albumin synthesis to intra-abdominal abscess and how these related to hypoalbuminemia and circulating endocrine hormone profiles. Methods: Eight gastrointestinal fistula patients scheduled to undergo percutaneous abscess sump drainage were enrolled prospectively to measure albumin synthesis rates at different stages of the inflammatory response (immediately after diagnosis and 7 d following sump drainage when clinical signs of intra-abdominal sepsis had been eradicated). Eight age-, sex-, and body mass index–matched intestinal fistula patients were studied as control patients. Consecutive arterial blood samples were drawn during a primed-constant infusion (priming dose: 4 micromol·kg−1, infusion rate: 6 micromol·kg−1·min−1) to determine the incorporation rate of L-[ring-2H5]-phenylalanine directly into plasma albumin using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Results: Patients suffering from intra-abdominal infection had reduced plasma albumin and total plasma protein concentrations, compared with control patients. Albumin fractional synthesis rates in patients with intra-abdominal abscess were decreased, compared with those in the control group. When the source of infection was removed, albumin synthesis rates returned to control values, whereas albumin concentrations did not differ significantly from the corresponding concentrations in control subjects and patients with intra-abdominal abscess. Conclusion: Despite nutritional intervention, albumin synthesis rate is decreased in intestinal fistula patients with intra-abdominal abscess; albumin synthesis returns to

  13. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pieringer, Herwig; Brummaier, Tobias; Piringer, Bettina; Auer-Hackenberg, Lorenz; Hartl, Andreas; Puchner, Rudolf; Pohanka, Erich; Schmid, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  14. Urinary Albumin Excretion and Vascular Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with significant cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. Increased urinary albumin excretion is a marker of CV risk. There are only few data on urinary albumin excretion in RA patients. Aim of the present study was to investigate urinary albumin excretion in RA patients and analyze, whether there is an association between urinary albumin excretion and vascular function as measured by the augmentation index (AIx). In a total of 341 participants (215 with RA, 126 without RA) urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) was determined and the AIx was measured. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov-test was used to cluster patient groups whose distributions of ACR can be considered to be equal. A crude analysis showed a median ACR of 6.6 mg/g in the RA group and 5.7 mg/g in patients without RA (P > 0.05). In order to account for diabetes (DM) we formed 4 distinct patient groups. Group 1: RA-/DM- (n = 74); group 2: RA+/DM- (n = 195); group 3: RA-/DM+ (n = 52); group 4: RA+/DM+ (n = 20). Clustering of these groups revealed two distinct patient groups: those without RA and DM, and those with either RA or DM or both. The latter group showed statistically significant higher ACR (median 8.1 mg/g) as the former (median 4.5 mg/g). We found no significant correlation between AIx and ACR. Urinary albumin excretion in patients with RA or DM or both is higher than in subjects without RA and DM. This can be seen as a sign of vascular alteration and increased CV risk in these patients. PMID:26955238

  15. Laser welding with an albumin stent: experimental ureteral end-to-end anastomosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hua; Shaffer, Brian S.; Prahl, Scott A.; Gregory, Kenton W.

    2000-05-01

    Porcine ureters were anastomosed using an albumin stent and diode laser in vitro. The albumin stent provided precise apposition for an end to end anastomosis and enhanced welding strength. The anastomosis seam was lasered with an 810 nm diode laser using continuous wave and pulse light through a hand-held 600 micrometer noncontact optical fiber. Tensile strength, burst pressures, operative times, total energy and thermal damaged were measured in this study. The results demonstrated that using an albumin stent to laser weld ureteral anastomoses produces strong weld strengths. The liquid albumin solder also provided satisfactory welding strength. There were no significant differences of tissue thermal damage between the albumin stent alone, liquid solder alone and both combination groups. Thermal damage to tissue depended on laser setting and energy. This study determined the appropriate laser setting parameters to perform in vivo ureteral end to end anastomosis.

  16. Inhibition of the metabolic degradation of filtered albumin is a major determinant of albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Vuchkova, Julijana; Comper, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of the degradation of filtered albumin has been proposed as a widespread, benign form of albuminuria. There have however been recent reports that radiolabeled albumin fragments in urine are not exclusively generated by the kidney and that in albuminuric states albumin fragment excretion is not inhibited. In order to resolve this controversy we have examined the fate of various radiolabeled low molecular weight protein degradation products (LMWDPs) introduced into the circulation in rats. The influence of puromycin aminonucleoside nephrosis on the processing and excretion of LMWDPs is also examined. The status and destinies of radiolabeled LMWDPs in the circulation are complex. A major finding is that LMWDPs are rapidly eliminated from the circulation (>97% in 2 h) but only small quantities (<4%) are excreted in urine. Small (<4%) but significant amounts of LMWDPs may have prolonged elimination (>24 h) due to binding to high molecular weight components in the circulation. If LMWDPs of albumin seen in the urine are produced by extra renal degradation it would require the degradation to far exceed the known catabolic rate of albumin. Alternatively, if an estimate of the role of extra renal degradation is made from the limit of detection of LMWDPs in plasma, then extra renal degradation would only contribute <1% of the total excretion of LMWDPs of albumin. We confirm that the degradation process for albumin is specifically associated with filtered albumin and this is inhibited in albuminuric states. This inhibition is also the primary determinant of the massive change in intact albuminuria in nephrotic states.

  17. Biophysical studies of interaction between hydrolysable tannins isolated from Oenothera gigas and Geranium sanguineum with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sekowski, Szymon; Ionov, Maksim; Kaszuba, Mateusz; Mavlyanov, Saidmukhtar; Bryszewska, Maria; Zamaraeva, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Tannins, secondary plant metabolites, possess diverse biological activities and can interact with biopolymers such as lipids or proteins. Interactions between tannins and proteins depend on the structures of both and can result in changes in protein structure and activity. Because human serum albumin is the most abundant protein in plasma and responsible for interactions with important biological compounds (e.g. bilirubin) and proper blood pressure, therefore, it is very important to investigate reactions between HSA and tannins. This paper describes the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and two tannins: bihexahydroxydiphenoyl-trigalloylglucose (BDTG) and 1-O-galloyl-4,6-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-d-glucose (OGβDG), isolated from Geranium sanguineum and Oenothera gigas leafs, respectively. Optical (spectrofluorimetric) and chiral optical (circular dichroism) methods were used in this study. Fluorescence analysis demonstrated that OGβDG quenched HSA fluorescence more strongly than BDTG. Both OGβDG and BDTG formed complexes with albumin and caused a red shift of the fluorescence spectra but did not significantly change the protein secondary structure. Our studies clearly demonstrate that the tested tannins interact very strongly with human serum albumin (quenching constant K=88,277.26±407.04 M(-1) and K=55,552.67±583.07 M(-1) respectively for OGβDG and BDTG) in a manner depending on their chemical structure.

  18. Shank2 Regulates Renal Albumin Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Lewis, Linda; Doctor, R Brian; Okamura, Kayo; Lee, Min Goo; Altmann, Christopher; Faubel, Sarah; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong and independent predictor of kidney disease progression but the mechanisms of albumin handling by the kidney remain to be fully defined. Previous studies have shown that podocytes endocytose albumin. Here we demonstrate that Shank2, a large scaffolding protein originally identified at the neuronal postsynaptic density, is expressed in podocytes in vivo and in vitro and plays an important role in albumin endocytosis in podocytes. Knockdown of Shank2 in cultured human podocytes decreased albumin uptake, but the decrease was not statistically significant likely due to residual Shank2 still present in the knockdown podocytes. Complete knockout of Shank2 in podocytes significantly diminished albumin uptake in vitro. Shank2 knockout mice develop proteinuria by 8 weeks of age. To examine albumin handling in vivo in wild-type and Shank2 knockout mice we used multiphoton intravital imaging. While FITC-labeled albumin was rapidly seen in the renal tubules of wild-type mice after injection, little albumin was seen in the tubules of Shank2 knockout mice indicating dysregulated renal albumin trafficking in the Shank2 knockouts. We have previously found that caveolin-1 is required for albumin endocytosis in cultured podocytes. Shank2 knockout mice had significantly decreased expression and altered localization of caveolin-1 in podocytes suggesting that disruption of albumin endocytosis in Shank2 knockouts is mediated via caveolin-1. In summary, we have identified Shank2 as another component of the albumin endocytic pathway in podocytes. PMID:26333830

  19. Familial hypercatabolic hypoproteinemia. A disorder of endogenous catabolism of albumin and immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Waldmann, T A; Terry, W D

    1990-01-01

    The metabolism of albumin and IgG was investigated in two siblings, products of a first-cousin marriage, a female aged 34 yr and a male aged 17, who had a marked reduction in their respective serum concentrations of IgG (1.3 and 3.1 mg/ml) and albumin (19 and 21 mg/ml). The metabolism of radioiodinated IgG and albumin was studied in the two patients. The total circulating and body pools of IgG were less than 28% of normal. The IgG synthetic rates were within the normal range. However, the IgG survival was short, with their respective fractional catabolic rates increased fivefold to 31% and 36% of the intravenous pool per day (normal, 6.7 +/- 2%/d). Furthermore, the patients had reduced total body pools, normal synthetic rates, and increased fractional catabolic rates for albumin. There was no proteinuria or abnormality of renal or liver function. In addition, the patients did not have circulating antibodies directed toward IgG, IgA, or albumin. Furthermore, both patients had normal fecal 51Cr-labeled albumin tests, thus excluding excessive gastrointestinal protein loss. We propose that these siblings have a previously unrecognized familial disorder characterized by reduced serum concentrations of IgG and albumin caused by a defect in endogenous catabolism, leading to a short survival of these proteins that is associated in this family with chemical diabetes and a skeletal deformity. Images PMID:2254461

  20. Bilirubin modulated cytokines, growth factors and angiogenesis to improve cutaneous wound healing process in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ram, Mahendra; Singh, Vishakha; Kumawat, Sanjay; Kant, Vinay; Tandan, Surendra Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin has shown cutaneous wound healing potential in some preliminary studies. Here we hypothesize that bilirubin facilitates wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating important healing factors/candidates and antioxidant parameters in a time-dependent manner. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by streptozotocin. In all diabetic rats wounds were created under pentobarbitone anesthesia. All the rats were divided into two groups, of which one (control) was treated with ointment base and other with bilirubin ointment (0.3%). Wound closer measurement and tissue collection were done on days 3, 7, 14 and 19 post-wounding. The relative expressions of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α), transforming growth factor- beta1 (TGF-β1()), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interlukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and proteins and the mRNA of interlukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and matrix metalloprteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined in the wound tissues. CD-31 staining and collagen content were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and picrosirius red staining, respectively. Histopathological changes were assessed by H&E staining. The per cent wound closer was significantly higher from day 7 onwards in bilirubin-treated rats. HIF-1α, VEGF, SDF-1α, TGF-β1, IL-10 mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher on days 3, 7 and 14 in bilirubin-treated rats. The mRNA expression and protein level of TNF-α and the mRNA of IL-1β and MMP-9 were progressively and markedly reduced in bilirubin-treated rats. The collagen deposition and formation of blood vessels were greater in bilirubin-treated rats. Bilirubin markedly facilitated cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats by modulating growth factors, cytokines, neovasculogenesis and collagen contents to the wound site. Topical application of bilirubin ointment might be of great use in cutaneous wound healing in diabetic patients.

  1. Recombinant albumin monolayers on latex particles.

    PubMed

    Sofińska, Kamila; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Kujda, Marta; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-14

    The adsorption of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) on negatively charged polystyrene latex micro-particles was studied at pH 3.5 and the NaCl concentration range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M. The electrophoretic mobility of latex monotonically increased with the albumin concentration in the suspension. The coverage of adsorbed albumin was quantitatively determined using the depletion method, where the residual protein concentration was determined by electrokinetic measurements and AFM imaging. It was shown that albumin adsorption was irreversible. Its maximum coverage on latex varied between 0.7 mg m(-2) for 10(-3) M NaCl to 1.3 mg m(-2) for 0.15 M NaCl. The latter value matches the maximum coverage previously determined for human serum albumin on mica using the streaming potential method. The increase in the maximum coverage was interpreted in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed molecules. These facts confirm that albumin adsorption at pH 3.5 is governed by electrostatic interactions and proceeds analogously to colloid particle deposition. The stability of albumin monolayers was measured in additional experiments where changes in the latex electrophoretic mobility and the concentration of free albumin in solutions were monitored over prolonged time periods. Based on these experimental data, a robust procedure of preparing albumin monolayers on latex particles of well-controlled coverage and molecule distribution was proposed. PMID:24354916

  2. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Demonstrates The Reactivity Of The Protonated Carboxyl Group Of The Acid Salt Of Calcium Bilirubinate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloway, R. D.; Wu, J.-G.; Xu, D.-F.; Zhang, Y.-F.; Martini, D. K.; Hong, N.-K.; Crowther, R. S.

    1989-12-01

    Calcium bilirubinate is a major salt in pigment gallstones. Bilirubin IX (H2BR) is a tetrapyrrole with 1 propionic acid side chain on both the B and C rings. A striking feature is the strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding of both carboxyl groups as determined by x-ray diffraction. This greatly reduces aqueous solubility. Much less is known about the structure of the salts of calcium bilirubinate since single crystals have not been formed. One or both carboxyl groups of bilirubin may coordinate with calcium in stone, forming the acid or neutral salt.

  3. Continuous de novo biosynthesis of haem and its rapid turnover to bilirubin are necessary for cytoprotection against cell damage

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Taka-aki; Mu, Anfeng; Tai, Tran Tien; Kitajima, Sakihito; Taketani, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that haem serves as the prosthetic group of various haemoproteins that function in oxygen transport, respiratory chain, and drug metabolism. However, much less is known about the functions of the catabolites of haem in mammalian cells. Haem is enzymatically degraded to iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, which is then converted to bilirubin. Owing to difficulties in measuring bilirubin, however, the generation and transport of this end product remain unclear despite its clinical importance. Here, we used UnaG, the recently identified bilirubin-binding fluorescent protein, to analyse bilirubin production in a variety of human cell lines. We detected a significant amount of bilirubin with many non-blood cell types, which was sensitive to inhibitors of haem metabolism. These results suggest that there is a basal level of haem synthesis and its conversion into bilirubin. Remarkably, substantial changes were observed in the bilirubin generation when cells were exposed to stress insults. Since the stress-induced cell damage was exacerbated by the pharmacological blockade of haem metabolism but was ameliorated by the addition of biliverdin and bilirubin, it is likely that the de novo synthesis of haem and subsequent conversion to bilirubin play indispensable cytoprotective roles against cell damage. PMID:25990790

  4. Inaccuracies in measurement of conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin in bile with ethyl anthranilate diazo and solvent-partition methods.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, J D; Boonyapisit, S T

    1978-01-01

    A criticial evaluation was made of the ethyl anthranilate diazo and two solvent-partition methods for the determination of conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin in human and rat bile. The ethyl anthranilate diazo reagent, which reacts only with conjugated bilirubin in serum, also diazotized a variable proportion of unconjugated bilirubin in bile and thus overestimated the concentration of monoconjugates. With the Weber-Schalm and modified Folsch solvent-partition methods applied to human or rat bile, 4--9% of added 14C-labelled unconjugated bilirubin partitioned with the conjugated bilirubin in the upper phase, and 4--9% of added 14C-labelled conjugated bilirubin partitioned into the lower phase. With dog bile, the spill-over of 14C-labelled bilirubin into the lower phase was 9--11%. Analysis of azopigments from the Weber-Schalm partition confirmed that over two-thirds of the bilirubin in the lower phase represents monoconjugates, principally the less-polar monoxylosides and monoglucosides. These solvent-partition methods thus overestimate the concentration of unconjugated bilirubin in bile. PMID:687371

  5. Potential Cardiovascular Risk Protection of Bilirubin in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients under Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    do Sameiro-Faria, Maria; Kohlova, Michaela; Ribeiro, Sandra; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Laetitia; Nascimento, Henrique; Reis, Flávio; Miranda, Vasco; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential cardiovascular risk protection of bilirubin in hemodialysis (HD) patients. An enlarged set of studies were evaluated in 191 HD patients, including hematological study, lipid profile, iron metabolism, nutritional, inflammatory markers, and dialysis adequacy. The TA duplication screening in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 A1 (UGT1A1) promoter region was also performed. The UGT1A1 genotype frequencies in HD patients were 49.2%, 42.4%, and 8.4% for 6/6, 6/7, and 7/7 genotypes, respectively. Although no difference was found in UGT1A1 genotype distribution between the three tertiles of bilirubin, significant differences were found with increasing bilirubin levels, namely, a decrease in platelet, leukocyte, and lymphocyte counts, transferrin, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), ox-LDL/low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, apolipoprotein (Apo) A, Apo B, and interleukin-6 serum levels and a significant increased concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit, erythrocyte count, iron, transferrin saturation, Apo A/Apo B ratio, adiponectin, and paraoxonase 1 serum levels. After adjustment for age these results remained significant. Our data suggest that higher bilirubin levels are associated with beneficial effects in HD patients, by improving lipid profile and reducing the inflammatory grade, which might contribute to increase in iron availability. These results suggest a potential cardiovascular risk protection of bilirubin in HD patients. PMID:25276769

  6. N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediate Bilirubin-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Maria A; Vaz, Ana R; Silva, Sandra L; Falcão, Ana S; Fernandes, Adelaide; Silva, Rui FM; Brites, Dora

    2010-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia may lead to neurotoxicity and neuronal death. Although the mechanisms of nerve cell damage by unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) appear to involve a disruption of the redox status and excitotoxicity, the contribution of nitric oxide (NO·) and of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors is unclear. We investigated the role of NO· and NMDA glutamate receptors in the pathways of nerve cell demise by UCB. Neurons were incubated with 100 μmol/L UCB, in the presence of 100 μmol/L human serum albumin for 4 h at 37ºC, alone or in combination with N-ω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) (an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase [nNOS]), hemoglobin (an NO· scavenger) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801) (an NMDA-receptor antagonist). Exposure to UCB led to increased expression of nNOS and production of both NO· and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), along with protein oxidation and depletion of glutathione. These events concurred for cell dysfunction and death and were counteracted by l-NAME. Moreover, the UCB-induced loss of neuronal viability was abolished by hemoglobin, whereas the activation of nNOS and production of both NO· and cGMP were counteracted by MK-801, resulting in significant protection from cell dysfunction and death. These results reinforce the involvement of oxidative stress by showing that nerve cell damage by UCB is mediated by NO· and therefore is counteracted by NO· inhibitors or scavengers. Our findings strongly suggest that the activation of nNOS and neurotoxicity occur through the engagement of NMDA receptors. These data reveal a role for overstimulation of glutamate receptors in mediating oxidative damage by UCB. PMID:20593111

  7. Higher plasma bilirubin predicts veno-occlusive disease in early childhood undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with cyclosporine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwi Suk; Moon, Aree; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Choi, Young Hee; Kim, Hyang Sook; Kim, Sang Geon

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the association between plasma bilirubin levels and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) in non-adult patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) during cyclosporine therapy. METHODS: A total of 123 patients taking cyclosporine were evaluated using an electronic medical system at the Seoul National University Children’s Hospital from the years 2004 through 2011. Patients were grouped by age and analyzed for incidence and type of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including VOD. RESULTS: The HSCT patients were divided into three age groups: G#1 ≥ 18; 9 ≤ G#2 ≤ 17; and G#3 ≤ 8 years of age). The majority of transplant donor types were cord blood transplantations. Most prevalent ADRs represented acute graft-vs-host disease (aGVHD) and VOD. Although the incidences of aGVHD did not vary among the groups, the higher frequency ratios of VOD in G#3 suggested that an age of 8 or younger is a risk factor for developing VOD in HSCT patients. After cyclosporine therapy, the trough plasma concentrations of cyclosporine were lower in G#3 than in G#1, indicative of its increased clearance. Moreover, in G#3 only, a maximal total bilirubin level (BILmax) of ≥ 1.4 mg/dL correlated with VOD incidence after cyclosporine therapy. CONCLUSION: HSCT patients 8 years of age or younger are more at risk for developing VOD, diagnosed as hyperbilirubinemia, tender hepatomegaly, and ascites/weight gain after cyclosporine therapy, which may be represented by a criterion of plasma BILmax being ≥ 1.4 mg/dL, suggestive of more sensitive VOD indication in this age group. PMID:27358786

  8. Bilirubin Encephalopathy in a Domestic Shorthair Cat With Increased Osmotic Fragility and Cholangiohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Contreras, E T; Giger, U; Malmberg, J L; Quimby, J M; Schaffer, P A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-month-old female domestic shorthair cat was diagnosed with chronic regenerative hemolytic anemia characterized by increased osmotic fragility of unknown etiology. At 13 months of age, the cat was evaluated for acute collapse. The cat was icteric with severe hyperbilirubinemia but no hematocrit changes. Severe obtundation and lateral recumbency progressed to tetraparesis and loss of proprioception in all 4 limbs, and a cerebellar or brainstem lesion was suspected. Postmortem examination revealed suppurative cholangiohepatitis and acute neuronal necrosis in the nuclei of the brainstem and cerebellum, consistent with bilirubin encephalopathy. This is the first known occurrence of cholangiohepatitis and bilirubin encephalopathy in an adult cat with chronic hemolytic anemia. Although rare, bilirubin encephalopathy should be considered a possible sequela to hyperbilirubinemia in adult patients. It remains unknown whether increased osmotic fragility was related to the cholangiohepatopathy.

  9. Unconjugated bilirubin and the bile from light exposed Gunn rats inhibit intestinal water and electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Guandalini, S; Fasano, A; Albini, F; Marchesano, G; Nocerino, A; De Curtis, M; Rubaltelli, F F; Pettenazzo, A; Rubino, A

    1988-01-01

    Jaundiced babies undergoing phototherapy often develop diarrhoea. The cause of it is still uncertain. Increasing evidence supports a role of a secretory mechanism for the diarrhoea. We therefore studied the effects of bile from congenitally jaundiced rats undergoing phototherapy and of unconjugated bilirubin on rat small intestine in vivo and in vitro. Results suggest that: (1) the bile from homozygous Gunn rats under phototherapy has an anti-absorptive effect when tested in the perfused jejunum of normal Wistar rats; (2) unconjugated bilirubin has a dose dependent secretory effect on the intestinal transport of water and electrolytes, when tested in the same system. Alteration of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP, known intracellular mediators of secretion, was not observed. We conclude that free bilirubin is an intestinal secretagogue acting by an as yet unknown mechanism, that may mediate the secretory type of diarrhoea in jaundiced neonates undergoing phototherapy. PMID:3356369

  10. Separation by thin-layer chromatography and structure elucidation of bilirubin conjugates isolated from dog bile.

    PubMed Central

    Heirwegh, K P; Fevery, J; Michiels, R; van Hees, G P; Compernolle, F

    1975-01-01

    1. A system for separation of bile pigments by t.l.c. and for their structure elucidation is presented. Separated bile pigments are characterized by t.l.c. of derived dipyrrolic azopigments. 2. At the tetrapyrrolic stage hydrolysis in strongly alkaline medium followed by t.l.c. demonstrates the presence of bilirubin-IIIalpha, -IXalpha and -XIIIalpha and allows assessment of their relative amounts. 3. Most structural information is derived from analysis of dipyrrolic azopigments. Such derivatives, obtained by treatment of separated bile pigments with diazotized ethyl anthranilate, were separated and purified by t.l.c. Micro methods showed (a) the nature of the dipyrrolic aglycone, (b) the nature of the bonds connecting aglycone to a conjugating group, (c) the ratio of vinyl/isovinyl isomers present in the aglycone and, (d) the nature of the conjugating groups (by suitable derivative formation and t.l.c. with reference to known compounds). 4. In bile of normal dogs at least 20 tetrapyrrolic, diazo-positive bile pigments could be recognized. Except for two pigments the tetrapyrrolic nucleus corresponded predominantly to bilirubin-IXalpha. All conjugated pigments had their conjugating groups connected in ester linkage to the tetrapyrrolic aglycone, Apart from bilirubin-IXalpha, monoconjugates and homogeneous and mixed diconjugates of bilirubin were demonstrated; conjugating groups of major importance were xylose, glucose and glucuronic acid. 5. Bilirubin isomer determination on native bile and isolated bile pigments, and dipyrrole-exchange assays with [14C8]bilirubin indicated (a) that the conjugates pre-exist in bile, and (b) that no significant dipyrrole exchange occurs during isolation of the pigments. PMID:1156357

  11. Reduction of bilirubin by targeting human heme oxygenase-1 through siRNA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Li, Chun-E; Jin, You-Xin; Shi, Yi; Xu, Li-Qing; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang; Zhang, Zi-Li

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical condition caused mainly by the increased production and decreased excretion of bilirubin. Current treatment is aimed at reducing the serum levels of bilirubin. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme that generates bilirubin. In this study we intended to suppress HO-1 using the RNA interference technique. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-A, -B, and -C were designed based on human HO-1 (hHO-1) mRNA sequences. siRNA was transfected into a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702). hHO-1 transcription and protein levels were then determined. In addition, the inhibitory effect of siRNA on hHO-1 was assessed in cells treated with hemin or transfected with an hHO-1 plasmid. siRNA-C showed the most potent suppressive effect on hHO-1. This inhibition is dose and time dependent. Compared with control, both hemin and hHO-1 plasmids up-regulated hHO-1 expression in HL-7702 cells. However, the up-regulation was significantly attenuated by siRNA-C. Furthermore, the decrease in hHO-1 activity was coincident with the suppression of its transcription. Finally, siRNA-C was shown to reduce hHO-1 enzymatic activity and bilirubin levels. Thus, this study provides a novel therapeutic rationale by blocking bilirubin formation via siRNA for preventing and treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin encephalopathy at an early clinical stage.

  12. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  13. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  14. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  15. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  16. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  17. Calcium bilirubinate intercalated calcite single crystal: evidence for microstructure of pigment gallstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Z.; Xu, D. J.; Soloway, Roger D.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Xu, Duan-Fu; Wu, JinGuang

    1994-01-01

    During the preparation of calcium bilirubinate (CaBR) single crystals, brown crystals were grown in a gel solution of CaCl2/Sodium bilirubinate. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that the crystal was calcite. FTIR investigations support this result. However, the subtracted spectra revealed that the CaBR dispersed in the crystals and interacted with calcite on the molecular level, since the maximum band shift of the CaBR in calcite from the correspond bands of CaBR was ca. 20 cm-1. It was confirmed that microstructure also by x- ray diffraction and photoacoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  18. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Riordan, Sean M; Bittel, Douglas C; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F; Wennberg, Richard P; Shapiro, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60-80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a "load" is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity in

  19. Oxygen biosensor based on bilirubin oxidase immobilized on a nanostructured gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Pita, Marcos; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Cristina; Toscano, Miguel D; Shleev, Sergey; De Lacey, Antonio L

    2013-12-01

    Gold disk electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles have been used as a scaffold for the covalent immobilization of bilirubin oxidase. The nanostructured bioelectrodes were tested as mediator-less biosensors for oxygen in a buffer that mimics the content and the composition of human physiological fluids. Chronoamperometry measurements showed a detection limit towards oxygen of 6 ± 1 μM with a linear range of 6-300 μM, i.e. exceeding usual physiological ranges of oxygen in human tissues and fluids. The biosensor presented is the first ever-reported oxygen amperometric biosensor based on direct electron transfer of bilirubin oxidase. PMID:23973738

  20. A Novel Perspective on the Biology of Bilirubin in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Gazzin, Silvia; Vitek, Libor; Watchko, Jon; Shapiro, Steven M; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) is known to be one of the most potent endogenous antioxidant substances. While hyperbilirubinemia has long been recognized as an ominous sign of liver dysfunction, recent data strongly indicate that mildly elevated bilirubin (BLB) levels can be protective against an array of diseases associated with increased oxidative stress. These clinical observations are supported by new discoveries relating to the role of BLB in immunosuppression and inhibition of protein phosphorylation, resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling pathways in vascular biology and cancer, among others. Collectively, the evidence suggests that targeting BLB metabolism could be considered a potential therapeutic approach to ameliorate a variety of conditions. PMID:27515064

  1. A Hypothesis for Using Pathway Genetic Load Analysis for Understanding Complex Outcomes in Bilirubin Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Sean M.; Bittel, Douglas C.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Gazzin, Silvia; Tiribelli, Claudio; Watchko, Jon F.; Wennberg, Richard P.; Shapiro, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic-based susceptibility to bilirubin neurotoxicity and chronic bilirubin encephalopathy (kernicterus) is still poorly understood. Neonatal jaundice affects 60–80% of newborns, and considerable effort goes into preventing this relatively benign condition from escalating into the development of kernicterus making the incidence of this potentially devastating condition very rare in more developed countries. The current understanding of the genetic background of kernicterus is largely comprised of mutations related to alterations of bilirubin production, elimination, or both. Less is known about mutations that may predispose or protect against CNS bilirubin neurotoxicity. The lack of a monogenetic source for this risk of bilirubin neurotoxicity suggests that disease progression is dependent upon an overall decrease in the functionality of one or more essential genetically controlled metabolic pathways. In other words, a “load” is placed on key pathways in the form of multiple genetic variants that combine to create a vulnerable phenotype. The idea of epistatic interactions creating a pathway genetic load (PGL) that affects the response to a specific insult has been previously reported as a PGL score. We hypothesize that the PGL score can be used to investigate whether increased susceptibility to bilirubin-induced CNS damage in neonates is due to a mutational load being placed on key genetic pathways important to the central nervous system's response to bilirubin neurotoxicity. We propose a modification of the PGL score method that replaces the use of a canonical pathway with custom gene lists organized into three tiers with descending levels of evidence combined with the utilization of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) causality prediction methods. The PGL score has the potential to explain the genetic background of complex bilirubin induced neurological disorders (BIND) such as kernicterus and could be the key to understanding ranges of outcome severity

  2. Albumin administration prevents the onset of pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Serra, Raffaele; Grande, Raffaele; Buffone, Gianluca; Gallelli, Luca; Caroleo, Santo; Tropea, Francesco; Amantea, Bruno; de Franciscis, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common problem in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) and they account for more than 70% of patients with low serum albumin at admission. The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of intravenous administration of albumin in patients with low serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl. In a 1-year period, a total of 73 patients were admitted to the ICU (males 45, 61·64% and females 28, 38·36%); of these, 21 patients were admitted with hypoalbuminaemia (serum albumin < 3·3 g/dl) and randomised into two groups: 11 patients were treated with 25 g intravenous albumin for the first 3 days within the first week of ICU stay (group A) and 10 patients did not receive albumin (group B). Three patients (27·27%) showed the onset of PUs in group A, whereas seven patients (70%) showed the onset of PUs within the first 7 days of stay in group B. Moreover, ulcers of group B were more severe than those of group A. This study shows that intravenous administration of albumin reduces the onset of PUs in patients admitted to the ICU and in some cases it also reduces the risk of progression to advanced stages of PUs.

  3. Comparison of Calcium Phosphate and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles as Dermal Penetration Enhancers for Albumin.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Narges; Javar, H A

    2015-01-01

    quicker. Maximum cumulative (total) permeated albumin in presence of zinc oxide nanoparticles was obtained at time of 1.5 h, which was 40.2±3.6 mg, while in presence of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, it was obtained at 1 h, which was 33.8±5.5 mg. Skin distribution of the nanoparticles and albumin confirmed the above profiles.

  4. The Negative Relationship between Bilirubin Level and Diabetic Retinopathy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaomei; Ning, Kang; Jiang, Feng; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Findings on the relationship between total bilirubin level (TBL) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) are inconsistent. Thus, we carried out a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between TBL and the risk of DR. Methods Relevant studies were selected from six databases up to 31 May 2016 using a search strategy. The relevant data were extracted from the included studies according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and the mean value with standard errors or odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. We compared TBL in patients with DR with that in patients with diabetes but without retinopathy (NDR), and analyzed the dose-response relationship between TBL and the risk of DR. Results Twenty-four studies were selected in this meta-analysis. Twenty studies were included to calculate the pooled SMD, and the results showed that TBL in the DR group was lower than that in the NDR group (SMD: –0.52, 95% CI: –0.67, –0.38). Nine studies were included to calculate the pooled ORs, and the results showed that there was a significant negative relationship between TBL and the risk of DR (OR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.14, 0.25). Six studies were included to investigate the dose-response relationship between TBL and the risk of DR, and we found a nonlinear relationship between TBL and the risk of DR. The results of our meta-analysis were found to be reliable using subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Conclusions The results of our meta-analysis indicate that higher TBL may be protective against DR in subjects with diabetes, and TBL could be used as a biomarker to predict the risk of DR. PMID:27571522

  5. Reviewing the binding of a series of parabens to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Kaissi, Rana; Magdalou, Jacques; Jraij, Alia

    2013-04-01

    To better understand the factors that contribute to the accumulation of unmetabolized parabens (p-hydroxybenzoic acid esters) in breast cancer tissue, the binding of a series of parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, butyl-, benzyl-paraben) to human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and also their ability to modify the binding parameters of albumin site markers. Emission spectra of HSA upon fluorescence excitation of Trp 214 residue at 295 nm were recorded at different molar ratios of PB/HSA and data were corrected for the inner-filter effect. A significant inner-filter effect was obtained for molar ratios of 2.0 and above. For lower molar ratios, a slight increase in fluorescence of HSA was detected. p-Hydroxybenzoic acid, the main metabolite of parabens, did not modify the fluorescence of HSA whatever the molar ratio used. Binding parameters for compounds that are markers of site I, bilirubin and warfarin, were determined in the absence and presence of methyl, butyl and benzyl paraben at molar ratios of PB/HSA of 0, 1 and 2. No variation of the binding constants of these markers was observed. The results indicate that parabens weakly interact with HSA thus suggesting that they are in a free form in blood and therefore more available to reach tissues.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of free and total flucloxacillin in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Herngren, L; Ehrnebo, M; Broberger, U

    1987-01-01

    Flucloxacillin 50 mg/kg b.w. was administered intravenously (in combination with ampicillin/gentamicin) and orally (with amoxicillin) to 9 newborn infants (gestational age 33-41 weeks) to treat bacterial infections. The concentrations of flucloxacillin in plasma and urine after i.v. injection were analysed according to an open two-compartment model, and the plasma protein binding of flucloxacillin and its distribution to blood cells and plasma water in whole blood were determined. Considerable differences were found from values reported in adults. The terminal half-life averaged 4 h 38 min and was significantly correlated with gestational age. Plasma clearance was low (0.744 ml X min-1 X kg-1), due to the small renal clearance (0.182 ml X min-1 X kg-1), whilst non-renal clearance (0.563 ml X min-1 X kg-1) was approximately the same as in adults. The mean apparent volume of distribution of total drug (Vz) was 0.280 l/kg. The corresponding volume of distribution of unbound drug (Vu1 + Vu2) was 1.74 l/kg, which indicates considerable extravascular drug binding. The plasma protein binding of flucloxacillin (mean 86.3%) was significantly correlated with gestational age and the bilirubin/albumin concentration ratio. Bioavailability after oral administration, when corrected for changes in terminal half-life, was 47.7%, which is only slightly lower than that reported in adults. Since the plasma concentrations after both i.v. and oral administration were well above the MIC-values generally reported for Staphylococcus aureus, and since few side-effects were observed, intravenous injection or, in selected cases, orl administration of flucloxacillin appears to be a reliable therapy for the treatment of infections due to sensitive strains of S. aureus in premature newborn infants.

  7. [The photometric determination of total bile protein].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, V P; Savel'ev, V G

    1989-01-01

    Studies of bilirubin absorption spectra by protein measurements with the use of the biuret test and Lowry's method have shown that bilirubin influences much the protein absorption spectrum, provoking higher results in examinations of the bile. To eliminate bilirubin effects, the authors recommend bilirubin extraction with ethyl-acetone mixture in a 1:1 ratio after protein sedimentation with trichloroacetic acid. The biuret test with bilirubin-free protein yields results compatible with those obtained by nonphotometric techniques not involving bilirubin effects.

  8. Combined Effects of Smoking and Bilirubin Levels on the Risk of Lung Cancer in Korea: The Severance Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-eun; Kimm, Heejin; Jee, Sun Ha

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoking is a major risk factor for lung cancer. Bilirubin, an antioxidant, is inversely associated with the risk of diseases related to oxidative stress. This study was conducted to determine the influence of smoking and bilirubin levels on the risk of lung cancer in the Severance cohort study. Methods This study included 68,676 Korean who received a health examination at Severance Health Promotion Center from 1994 to 2004. Serum bilirubin measurements within normal range were divided into tertiles whereas smoking states were divided as never-smokers, former smokers and current smokers. A diagnosis of lung cancer was coded as occurring based on the report from the National Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards model. Results At the end of the study period, 240 patients (men: 181, women: 59) developed lung cancer. Compared to those with bilirubin levels ≥1.0 mg/dL, HRs (95% CI) for lung cancer were 2.8 (1.8–4.2) for subjects having bilirubin levels from 0.2 to 0.7 mg/dL in men. When we stratified our analysis by smoking status, bilirubin consistently showed a protective effect on the risk of lung cancer on both never- and current smokers. Current smokers having bilirubin levels from 0.2 to 0.7 mg/dL had a risk of lung cancer by 6.0-fold higher than never-smokers with bilirubin levels ≥1.0 mg/dL in men. Conclusion In this large prospective study, higher baseline bilirubin level in the normal range was associated with low risk of lung cancer. Smoking and low bilirubin levels were cumulatively associated with a higher risk of lung cancer. PMID:25100210

  9. Purification, identification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 2S albumin seed protein from Lens culinaris

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Pankaj; Gaur, Vineet; Salunke, Dinakar M.

    2008-08-01

    A 2S albumin from L. culinaris was purified and crystallized and preliminary crystallographic studies were carried out. Lens culinaris (lentil) is a widely consumed high-protein-content leguminous crop. A 2S albumin protein (26.5 kDa) has been identified using NH{sub 2}-terminal sequencing from a 90% ammonium sulfate saturation fraction of total L. culinaris seed protein extract. The NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence shows very high homology to PA2, an allergy-related protein from Pisum sativum. The 2S albumin protein was purified using a combination of size-exclusion and ion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the 2S seed albumin obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and were indexed in space group P4{sub 1} (or P4{sub 3}), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 78.6, c = 135.2 Å.

  10. Bilirubin, platelet activation and heart disease: a missing link to cardiovascular protection in Gilbert's syndrome?

    PubMed

    Kundur, Avinash R; Singh, Indu; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2015-03-01

    Gilbert's syndrome (GS) is a relatively common condition, inducing a benign, non-hemolytic, unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert's Syndrome is associated with mutation in the Uridine Glucuronosyl Transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene promoter, reducing UGT1A1 activity, which normally conjugates bilirubin allowing its elimination from the blood. Individuals with GS demonstrate mildly elevated plasma antioxidant capacity caused by elevated levels of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), reduced thiols and glutathione. Interestingly, the development of, and risk of mortality from, cardiovascular disease is remarkably reduced in GS individuals. An explanation for this protection may be explained by bilirubin's ability to inhibit multiple processes that induce platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis, thus far under-appreciated in the literature. Reactive oxygen species are produced continuously via metabolic processes and have the potential to oxidatively modify proteins and lipids within cell membranes, which may encourage the development of thrombosis and CVDs. Oxidative stress induced platelet hyper-reactivity significantly increases the risk of thrombosis, which can potentially lead to tissue infarction. Here, we discuss the possible mechanisms by which increased antioxidant status might influence platelet function and link this to cardiovascular protection in GS. In summary, this is the first article to discuss the possible role of bilirubin as an anti-thrombotic agent, which inhibits platelet activation and potentially, organ infarction, which could contribute to the reduced mortality rate in mildly hyperbilirbinemic individuals. PMID:25576848

  11. Serum albumin and risk of venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron. R.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Cushman, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Summary The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is increased in patients with albuminuria. However, whether a low serum albumin concentration is associated with increased risk of VTE has been a matter of controversy. We determined the association of serum albumin with VTE incidence in two large, prospective, population-based cohorts: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (n = 15,300) and the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) (n = 5,400). Validated VTE occurrence (n=462 in ARIC and n=174 in CHS) was ascertained during follow-up. In both studies, after adjustment for age, sex, race, use of hormone replacement therapy, estimated GFR, history of cancer, and diabetes, serum albumin tended to be associated inversely with VTE. The adjusted hazard ratio per standard deviation lower albumin was 1.18 (95% CI = 1.08, 1.31) in ARIC and 1.10 (95% CI = 0.94, 1.29) in CHS. The hazard ratio for albumin below (versus above) the fifth percentile was 1.28 (95% CI = 0.90, 1.84) in ARIC and 1.80 (95% CI = 1.11, 2.93) in CHS. In conclusion, low serum albumin was a modest marker of increased VTE risk. The observed association likely does not reflect cause and effect, but rather that low serum albumin reflects a hyperinflammatory or hypercoagulable state. Whether this association has clinical relevance warrants further study. PMID:20390234

  12. [At what concentration should albumin be prescribed?].

    PubMed

    Mantz, J

    1996-01-01

    Human albumin is available either as a 4 or a 20% solution. Only the latter is a plasma expander which increases volaemia by an amount corresponding to the four-fold of the infused volume. In addition, the sodium load by the latter per gramme of albumin is five times lower as both solutions have the same sodium content. Therefore, when the administration of albumin is indicated, the 20% solution should be preferred, as well as for volume expansion as for other uses, due to a decreased sodium load. However, this recommendation has not been substantiated by comparative studies.

  13. Initial plasma disappearance and tissue uptake of 131I-albumin in normal rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Bent-Hansen, L. )

    1991-05-01

    The simultaneous plasma disappearance curves of 131I-albumin and 125I-fibrinogen were recorded in normal rabbits for 1 hr. Using fibrinogen as a plasma reference, the disappearance curves of albumin were shown to contain two separate phases of efflux: one fast from zero to 10 min. comprising 8% of the total tracer; and one slow appearing in the interval of 10 to 60 min. containing another 9% of the tracer. Total albumin escape was analyzed to yield an initial slope of 0.024 {plus minus} 0.004 min-1, corresponding to a wholebody unidirectional albumin clearance (Cl(0)) of 0.090 {plus minus} 0.009 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1. The distribution of efflux was assessed by biopsy uptakes using the same tracers in spleen, kidney, heart, lung, liver, intestine, skin, muscle, and brain. The disappearance curve generally reflects a biphasic pattern of uptake in peripheral tissue, predominantly by muscle and lung. The rapid phase has contributions from the fast near equilibration of liver, and intestine and skin are significant codeterminants of the slow phase. Due to their low body masses highly perfused organs such as kidney, spleen, and heart have little influence on the plasma disappearance. In accordance, the Cl(0) determined for the wholebody was higher than initial clearances found in skin (0.053 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1) and muscle (0.054 ml(min{asterisk}100 g)-1), but much lower than those found in the highly perfused organs. The initial (unidirectional) rates of peripheral albumin transfer demonstrated, ranged from 10 to 30 times higher than estimates of lymphatic return, suggesting that transcapillary albumin exchange is mediated by high-rate bidirectional diffusion. The rapid decrease of net albumin exchange rates suggests a second, highly significant barrier located within the interstitial matrix, which restricts plasma escape and reduces plasma to lymph albumin transport.

  14. The Role of Bilirubin in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome, and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Vítek, Libor

    2012-01-01

    Bilirubin belongs to a phylogenetically old superfamily of tetrapyrrolic compounds, which have multiple biological functions. Although for decades bilirubin was believed to be only a waste product of the heme catabolic pathway at best, and a potentially toxic compound at worst; recent data has convincingly demonstrated that mildly elevated serum bilirubin levels are strongly associated with a lower prevalence of oxidative stress-mediated diseases. Indeed, serum bilirubin has been consistently shown to be negatively correlated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD), as well as to CVD-related diseases and risk factors such as arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. In addition, the clinical data are strongly supported by evidence arising from both in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. This data not only shows the protective effects of bilirubin per se; but additionally, of other products of the heme catabolic pathway such as biliverdin and carbon monoxide, as well as its key enzymes (heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase); thus, further underlining the biological impacts of this pathway. In this review, detailed information on the experimental and clinical evidence between the heme catabolic pathway and CVD, and those related diseases such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity is provided. All of these pathological conditions represent an important threat to human civilization, being the major killers in developed countries, with a steadily increasing prevalence. Thus, it is extremely important to search for novel markers of these diseases, as well as for novel therapeutic modalities to reverse this unfavorable situation. The heme catabolic pathway seems to fulfill the criteria for both diagnostic purposes as well as for potential therapeutical interventions. PMID:22493581

  15. Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  16. [Modified albumin in harp seal blood serum].

    PubMed

    Erokhina, I A

    1999-01-01

    The content of modified albumin (Am) in harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandica Erxleben, 1777) blood serum was studied. Am was determined by paper electrophoresis by means of re-precipitation in the trichloroacetic acid-ethanol system. Modified albumin content in normal seal pups' blood serum increased from 1990 to 1994. The Am level in undernourished pups was stable from year to year and higher than in normal pups. In oceanarium investigations it was revealed a low albumin resistance to denaturation and the dependence of Am content on the animals' physiological state. Thus there is a possibility to regard modified albumin content as one of the significant parameters in biomonitoring of harp seal population and, moreover, as a supplementary criterion for estimation of seals' health state in captivity.

  17. Drug binding in sera deficient in lipoproteins, albumin or orosomucoid.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, E; Kierulf, P; Skuterud, B; Bredesen, J E; Lunde, P K

    1983-01-01

    The relative role of lipoproteins, albumin and orosomucoid in the serum binding variation of various drugs was examined by separate removal of these proteins. Lipoproteins were removed from serum by ultracentrifugation, albumin by affinity chromatography and orosomucoid by immunoprecipitation. Removal of the lipoproteins did not affect the serum binding of the acidic (phenytoin) and neutral (digitoxin) drugs tested, nor the basic drugs disopyramide, quinidine or propranolol. A reduction in binding of amitryptyline, nortriptyline, doxepin and desmethyldoxepin was observed. Removal of albumin did, with some exception for nortriptyline, not affect the serum binding of the basic drugs tested. A pronounced reduction in the binding of phenytoin and digitoxin was observed. Removal of orosomucoid did not affect the binding of the acidic and neutral drugs tested. A reduction in the binding of all the basic drugs tested was observed, especially for disopyramide whose binding almost disappeared. Quinidine, propranolol, phenytoin and digitoxin all bound to isolated lipoproteins, but the removal of lipoproteins had no effect on the total serum binding for these drugs. Hence, the use of deficient sera provides valuable information as to the quantitative role of the various proteins in drug binding, whereas studies using purified proteins are often necessary to examine the mechanisms of the drug protein interactions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6626414

  18. The effect of bilirubin on the excitability of mitral cells in the olfactory bulb of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Juan; Zhou, Hui-Qun; Ye, Hai-bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common clinical phenomenon observed in various liver diseases. Previous studies have shown a correlation between smell disorders and bilirubin levels in patients with hepatic diseases. Bilirubin is a well-known neurotoxin; however, its effect on neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), the first relay in the olfactory system, has not been examined. We investigated the effect of bilirubin (>3 μM) on mitral cells (MCs), the principal output neurons of the MOB. Bilirubin increased the frequency of spontaneous firing and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). TTX completely blocked sEPSCs in almost all of the cells tested. Bilirubin activity was partially blocked by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepro pionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, we found that bilirubin increased the frequency of intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission in MCs. Our findings suggest that bilirubin enhances glutamatergic transmission and strengthens intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission, all of which cause hyperexcitability in MCs. Our findings provide the basis for further investigation into the mechanisms underlying olfactory dysfunction that are often observed in patients with severe liver disease. PMID:27611599

  19. The effect of bilirubin on the excitability of mitral cells in the olfactory bulb of the rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Juan; Zhou, Hui-Qun; Ye, Hai-Bo; Li, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common clinical phenomenon observed in various liver diseases. Previous studies have shown a correlation between smell disorders and bilirubin levels in patients with hepatic diseases. Bilirubin is a well-known neurotoxin; however, its effect on neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), the first relay in the olfactory system, has not been examined. We investigated the effect of bilirubin (>3 μM) on mitral cells (MCs), the principal output neurons of the MOB. Bilirubin increased the frequency of spontaneous firing and the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). TTX completely blocked sEPSCs in almost all of the cells tested. Bilirubin activity was partially blocked by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepro pionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonists. Furthermore, we found that bilirubin increased the frequency of intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission in MCs. Our findings suggest that bilirubin enhances glutamatergic transmission and strengthens intrinsic firing independent of synaptic transmission, all of which cause hyperexcitability in MCs. Our findings provide the basis for further investigation into the mechanisms underlying olfactory dysfunction that are often observed in patients with severe liver disease. PMID:27611599

  20. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  1. Large fragments of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Geisow, M J; Beaven, G H

    1977-03-01

    Large fragments of human serum albumin were produced by treatment of the native protein with pepsin at pH3.5. Published sequences of human albumin [Behrens, Spiekerman & Brown (1975) Fed. Proc. Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol. 34, 591; Meloun, Moravek & Kostka (1975) FEBSLett.58, 134-137]were used to locate the fragments in the primary structure. The fragments support both the sequence and proposed disulphide-linkage pattern (Behrens et al., 1975). As the pH of a solution of albumin is lowered from pH4 to pH3.5, the protein undergoes a reversible conformational change known as the N-F transition. The distribution of large fragments of human albumin digested with pepsin in the above pH region was critically dependent on pH. It appeared that this distribution was dependent on the conformation of the protein at low pH, rather than the activity of pepsin. The yields of the large fragments produced by peptic digestion at different values of pH suggested that the C-terminal region of albumin unfolds or separates from the rest of the molecule during the N-F transition. The similarity of peptic fragments of human and bovine albumin produced under identical conditions supports the proposed similar tertiary structure of these molecules.

  2. Bilirubin prevents acute DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting leukocyte infiltration and suppressing upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stephen D; Vogel, Megan E; Kindel, Tammy L; Smith, Darcey L H; Idelman, Gila; Avissar, Uri; Kakarlapudi, Ganesh; Masnovi, Michelle E

    2015-11-15

    Bilirubin is thought to exert anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-dependent leukocyte migration and by suppressing the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). As VCAM-1 and iNOS are important mediators of tissue injury in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) murine model of inflammatory colitis, we examined whether bilirubin prevents colonic injury in DSS-treated mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days, while simultaneously receiving intraperitoneal injections of bilirubin (30 mg/kg) or potassium phosphate vehicle. Disease activity was monitored, peripheral blood counts and serum nitrate levels were determined, and intestinal specimens were analyzed for histological injury, leukocyte infiltration, and iNOS expression. The effect of bilirubin on IL-5 production by HSB-2 cells and on Jurkat cell transendothelial migration also was determined. DSS-treated mice that simultaneously received bilirubin lost less body weight, had lower serum nitrate levels, and exhibited reduced disease severity than vehicle-treated animals. Concordantly, histopathological analyses revealed that bilirubin-treated mice manifested significantly less colonic injury, including reduced infiltration of eosinophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, and diminished iNOS expression. Bilirubin administration also was associated with decreased eosinophil and monocyte infiltration into the small intestine, with a corresponding increase in peripheral blood eosinophilia. Bilirubin prevented Jurkat migration but did not alter IL-5 production. In conclusion, bilirubin prevents DSS-induced colitis by inhibiting the migration of leukocytes across the vascular endothelium and by suppressing iNOS expression.

  3. Growth Status and Its Relationship with Serum Lipids and Albumin in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Gholam Hossein; Latifi, Sahar; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Kushki, Davood; Haghhi Ashtiani, Mohammad Taghi; Morteza, Afsaneh; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease, which affects many organs as it impairs chloride channel. This study was performed to evaluate growth status and its relationship with some laboratory indices such as Cholesterol (chol), Triglyceride (TG), albumin and total protein in children with CF referred to pediatrics center. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study in one year section. Demographic features were compared with standard percentiles curves. Chol, TG, albumin, total protein, prothrombin time, and hemoglobin were measured. Stool exams were also performed. A questionnaire was designed to obtain a history of the first presentation of disease, birth weight, type of labor and parent relativity. In 52% of patients, failure to thrive (FTT) was the first presentation. Steatorrhea and respiratory infections were the first presentations, which were seen in 13.7% and 33% of the cases, respectively. The weight of 88% of patients was below the 15th percentile while 82% had a height percentile below 15th. Head circumference in 53% of patients was below the 15th percentile. There was a significant association between weight percentile and serum albumin and total protein (P=0.03 and P=0.007, respectively). There was also a significant relationship between height percentile and serum albumin and total protein (P<0.001 and P<0.000, respectively). The relationships between head circumference and serum albumin and total protein were also significant (P=0.006 and P<0.000, respectively). There was also a significant association between height percentile and hemoglobin. The decrease in anthropometric percentiles leads to decreased serum albumin and total protein. PMID:27309270

  4. Effects of albumin 5% and artificial colloids on clot formation in small infants.

    PubMed

    Haas, T; Preinreich, A; Oswald, E; Pajk, W; Berger, J; Kuehbacher, G; Innerhofer, P

    2007-10-01

    Albumin is often cited in textbooks as the gold standard for fluid replacement in paediatrics, but in practice artificial colloids are more frequently used. Although one concern with the use of artificial colloids is their intrinsic action on haemostasis, the available data in children are inconclusive for 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) and no data exist for gelatine solution with respect to coagulation. A total of 42 children (3-15 kg) undergoing surgery and needing colloid replacement were randomly assigned to receive 15 mlxkg(-1) of either albumin 5%, 4% modified gelatine solution or 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 solution. Standard coagulation tests and modified thrombelastography (ROTEM) were performed. After colloid administration, routine coagulation test results changed significantly and comparably in all groups, although activated partial thromboplastin time values increased more with gelatine and HES. Coagulation time was unchanged in the children who received albumin or gelatine but other activated modified thrombelastography values were significantly impaired in all groups. After gelatine and after albumin the median clot firmness decreased significantly but remained within the normal range. Following HES, coagulation time increased significantly, and clot formation time, alpha angle, clot firmness, and fibrinogen/fibrin polymerisation were significantly more impaired than for albumin or gelatine, reaching median values below the normal range. From a haemostatic point of view it might be preferable to use gelatine solution as an alternative to albumin; HES showed the greatest effects on the overall coagulation process.

  5. Inducible bilirubin oxidase: A novel function for the mouse cytochrome P450 2A5

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Bakar, A'edah; Arthur, Dionne Maioha; Aganovic, Simona; Ng, Jack C.; Lang, Matti A.

    2011-11-15

    We have previously shown that bilirubin (BR), a breakdown product of haem, is a strong inhibitor and a high affinity substrate of the mouse cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5). The antioxidant BR, which is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is potentially useful in cellular protection against oxygen radicals if its intracellular levels can be strictly controlled. The mechanisms that regulate cellular BR levels are still obscure. In this paper we provide preliminary evidence for a novel function of CYP2A5 as hepatic 'BR oxidase'. A high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry screening showed that recombinant yeast microsomes expressing the CYP2A5 oxidise BR to biliverdin, as the main metabolite, and to three other smaller products with m/z values of 301, 315 and 333. The metabolic profile is significantly different from that of chemical oxidation of BR. In chemical oxidation the smaller products were the main metabolites. This suggests that the enzymatic reaction is selective, towards biliverdin production. Bilirubin treatment of primary hepatocytes increased the CYP2A5 protein and activity levels with no effect on the corresponding mRNA. Co-treatment with cycloheximide (CHX), a protein synthesis inhibitor, resulted in increased half-life of the CYP2A5 compared to cells treated only with CHX. Collectively, the observations suggest that the CYP2A5 is potentially an inducible 'BR oxidase' where BR may accelerate its own metabolism through stabilization of the CYP2A5 protein. It is possible that this metabolic pathway is potentially part of the machinery controlling intracellular BR levels in transient oxidative stress situations, in which high amounts of BR are produced. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2A5 metabolizes bilirubin to biliverdin and dipyrroles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bilirubin increased the hepatic CYP2A5 protein and activity levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bilirubin does not change the hepatic CYP2A5

  6. Albumin in Burn Shock Resuscitation: A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, David G.; Wilkes, Mahlon M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical appraisal of outcomes after burn shock resuscitation with albumin has previously been restricted to small relatively old randomized trials, some with high risk of bias. Extensive recent data from nonrandomized studies assessing the use of albumin can potentially reduce bias and add precision. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effect of burn shock resuscitation with albumin on mortality and morbidity in adult patients. Randomized and nonrandomized controlled clinical studies evaluating mortality and morbidity in adult patients receiving albumin for burn shock resuscitation were identified by multiple methods, including computer database searches and examination of journal contents and reference lists. Extracted data were quantitatively combined by random-effects meta-analysis. Four randomized and four nonrandomized studies with 688 total adult patients were included. Treatment effects did not differ significantly between the included randomized and nonrandomized studies. Albumin infusion during the first 24 hours showed no significant overall effect on mortality. However, significant statistical heterogeneity was present, which could be abolished by excluding two studies at high risk of bias. After those exclusions, albumin infusion was associated with reduced mortality. The pooled odds ratio was 0.34 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19 to 0.58 (P < .001). Albumin administration was also accompanied by decreased occurrence of compartment syndrome (pooled odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.07–0.50; P < .001). This meta-analysis suggests that albumin can improve outcomes of burn shock resuscitation. However, the scope and quality of current evidence are limited, and additional trials are needed. PMID:25426807

  7. Intravital Imaging Reveals Angiotensin II-Induced Transcytosis of Albumin by Podocytes.

    PubMed

    Schießl, Ina Maria; Hammer, Anna; Kattler, Veronika; Gess, Bernhard; Theilig, Franziska; Witzgall, Ralph; Castrop, Hayo

    2016-03-01

    Albuminuria is a hallmark of kidney disease of various etiologies and usually caused by deterioration of glomerular filtration barrier integrity. We recently showed that angiotensin II (Ang II) acutely increases albumin filtration in the healthy kidney. Here, we used intravital microscopy to assess the effects of Ang II on podocyte function in rats. Acute infusion of 30, 60, or 80 ng/kg per minute Ang II enhanced the endocytosis of albumin by activation of the type 1 Ang II receptor and resulted in an average (±SEM) of 3.7±2.2, 72.3±18.6 (P<0.001), and 239.4±34.6 µm(3) (P<0.001) albumin-containing vesicles per glomerulus, respectively, compared with none at baseline or 10 ng/kg per minute Ang II. Immunostaining of Ang II-infused kidneys confirmed the presence of albumin-containing vesicles, which colocalized with megalin, in podocin-positive cells. Furthermore, podocyte endocytosis of albumin was markedly reduced in the presence of gentamicin, a competitive inhibitor of megalin-dependent endocytosis. Ang II infusion increased the concentration of albumin in the subpodocyte space, a potential source for endocytic protein uptake, and gentamicin further increased this concentration. Some endocytic vesicles were acidified and colocalized with LysoTracker. Most vesicles migrated from the capillary to the apical aspect of the podocyte and were eventually released into the urinary space. This transcytosis accounted for approximately 10% of total albumin filtration. In summary, the transcellular transport of proteins across the podocyte constitutes a new pathway of glomerular protein filtration. Ang II enhances the endocytosis and transcytosis of plasma albumin by podocytes, which may eventually impair podocyte function.

  8. Ischemia-modified albumin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao-gang; WEI, Chun-ling; HONG, Bing; YU, Wei-nan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is an association between serum ischemia-modified albumin and the risk factor profile in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease and to identify the risk markers for peripheral arterial disease. METHODS: Participants included 290 patients (35.2% women) with type 2 diabetes. The ankle-brachial pressure index was measured using a standard protocol, and peripheral arterial disease was defined as an ankle-brachial index <0.90 or ≥1.3. The basal ischemia-modified albumin levels and clinical parameters were measured and analyzed. The risk factors for peripheral arterial disease were examined by multiple logistic analyses. RESULTS: Age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, urine albumin, homocysteine, and ischemia-modified albumin were significantly higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease than in disease-free patients (p<0.05), while ankle-brachial index was lower in the former group (p<0.05). Ischemia-modified albumin was positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels (r = 0.220, p = 0.030; r = 0.446, p = 0.044, respectively), while no correlation was found with ankle-brachial index. Multiple logistic analyses indicated that HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, homocysteine and ischemia-modified albumin were independent risk factors for peripheral arterial disease in the diabetic subjects. CONCLUSION: The baseline ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly higher and positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. Ischemia-modified albumin was a risk marker for peripheral arterial disease. Taken together, these results might be helpful for monitoring diabetic peripheral arterial disease. PMID:22012037

  9. Lungfish albumin is more similar to tetrapod than to teleost albumins: purification and characterisation of albumin from the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Victoria J; George, Peter M; Brennan, Stephen O

    2007-07-01

    Lobe-finned fish, particularly lungfish, are thought of as the closest extant relatives to tetrapods. Albumin, the major vertebrate plasma protein, has been well studied in tetrapods, but there exists no comparative study of the presence and characteristics of albumin in lobe-finned fish versus other vertebrates. There is a controversy over the presence of albumin in fish, although it is present in salmonids and lamprey. The presence of albumin in lungfish has also recently been documented. We identified albumin in plasma of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, using a combination of agarose gel electrophoresis, [(14)C]palmitic acid binding and SDS-PAGE. Lungfish albumin was purified using DEAE-ion exchange chromatography, and has a mass of 67 kDa, is present at approximately 8 g/L in plasma and like other fish albumins, does not bind nickel. However, like tetrapod albumins, it is not glycosylated. N-terminal and internal peptide sequencing generated 101 amino acids of sequence, which showed a high degree of identity with tetrapod albumins. Despite the similarity in sequence but congruent with the evolutionary distances separating them, lungfish albumin did not cross-react with anti-chicken or anti-tuatara A albumin antisera. Lungfish albumin has characteristics more akin with tetrapod albumin and less like those of other fish.

  10. Exploring the interaction between picoplatin and human serum albumin: The effects on protein structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Peirong; Zhou, Xinchun; Zhang, Hongmei; Qiu, Ligan; Cao, Jian

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, the effects of picoplatin on the structure and esterase-like catalytic activity of human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic approaches and molecular modeling. The circular dichroism (CD) spectral examinations indicated that the binding of picoplatin with HSA induced a slight decrease of a-helix content of protein and unfolded the constituent polypeptides of the protein. The synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectral methods were used to estimate the effect of picoplatin on the micro-environmental changes of the Trp and Tyr residues of HSA, indicating that the micro-environment around the Tyr and Trp residue is partly disturbed by picoplatin. UV-vis absorption spectral result indicated the formation of the ground state complex between picoplatin with HSA. The ANS binding assay indicated the existence of competitive combination of picoplatin and ANS with HSA. The studies on the effects of picoplatin on the binding of HSA with bilirubin and heme showed that picoplatin binding caused a change of angle between two chromophores of bound bilirubin and the binding site of picoplatin does not locate in subdomain IB in HSA that bound with heme. The molecular modeling results showed that picoplatin binds to the connection between domain I and domain II by hydrophobic, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals forces. In addition, HSA maintains most of its esterase activity in the presence of picoplatin. The investigations on how picoplatin interacts with HSA are important for the understanding of the anticancer mechanism and toxicity of platinum-based anticancer drug. PMID:27484966

  11. CAR and PXR agonists stimulate hepatic bile acid and bilirubin detoxification and elimination pathways in mice.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Martin; Halilbasic, Emina; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Zollner, Gernot; Fickert, Peter; Langner, Cord; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Trauner, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Induction of hepatic phase I/II detoxification enzymes and alternative excretory pumps may limit hepatocellular accumulation of toxic biliary compounds in cholestasis. Because the nuclear xenobiotic receptors constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate involved enzymes and transporters, we aimed to induce adaptive alternative pathways with different CAR and PXR agonists in vivo. Mice were treated with the CAR agonists phenobarbital and 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichlorpyridyloxy)]benzene, as well as the PXR agonists atorvastatin and pregnenolone-16alpha-carbonitrile. Hepatic bile acid and bilirubin-metabolizing/detoxifying enzymes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Sult2a1), their regulatory nuclear receptors (CAR, PXR, farnesoid X receptor), and bile acid/organic anion and lipid transporters (Ntcp, Oatp1,2,4, Bsep, Mrp2-4, Mdr2, Abcg5/8, Asbt) in the liver and kidney were analyzed via reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Potential functional relevance was tested in common bile duct ligation (CBDL). CAR agonists induced Mrp2-4 and Oatp2; PXR agonists induced only Mrp3 and Oatp2. Both PXR and CAR agonists profoundly stimulated bile acid-hydroxylating/detoxifying enzymes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10. In addition, CAR agonists upregulated bile acid-sulfating Sult2a1 and bilirubin-glucuronidating Ugt1a1. These changes were accompanied by reduced serum levels of bilirubin and bile acids in healthy and CBDL mice and by increased levels of polyhydroxylated bile acids in serum and urine of cholestatic mice. Atorvastatin significantly increased Oatp2, Mdr2, and Asbt, while other transporters and enzymes were moderately affected. In conclusion, administration of specific CAR or PXR ligands results in coordinated stimulation of major hepatic bile acid/bilirubin metabolizing and detoxifying enzymes and hepatic key alternative efflux systems, effects that are predicted to counteract cholestasis. PMID:15986414

  12. Bioactivity of albumins bound to silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mariam, Jessy; Sivakami, S; Kothari, D C; Dongre, P M

    2014-06-01

    The last decade has witnessed a tremendous rise in the proposed applications of nanomaterials in the field of medicine due to their very attractive physiochemical properties and novel actions such as the ability to reach previously inaccessible targets such as brain. However biological activity of functional molecules bound to nanoparticles and its physiological consequences is still unclear and hence this area requires immediate attention. The functional properties of Human Serum Albumin (HSA) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) bound to silver nanoparticles (~60 nm) have been studied under physiological environment. Esterase activity, binding of drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen), antioxidant activity and copper binding by albumins was evaluated. The catalytic efficiencies of HSA and BSA diminished upon binding to silver nanoparticles. Perturbation in binding of warfarin and ibuprofen, loss of free sulphydryls, antioxidant activity and enhancement of copper binding were observed in albumins bound to nanoparticles. These alterations in functional activity of nanoparticle bound albumins which will have important consequences should be taken into consideration while using nanoparticles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  13. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-04

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride-HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure.

  14. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride–HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure. PMID:26742031

  15. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride-HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure. PMID:26742031

  16. Significance and prognostic value of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis in Chinese rectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chun; Fang, Long; Li, Jing-Tao; Zhao, Hong-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the significance of increased serum direct bilirubin level for lymph node metastasis (LNM) in Chinese rectal cancer patients, after those with known hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases were excluded. METHODS: A cohort of 469 patients, who were treated at the China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Ministry of Health (Beijing, China), in the period from January 2003 to June 2011, and with a pathological diagnosis of rectal adenocarcinoma, were recruited. They included 231 patients with LNM (49.3%) and 238 patients without LNM. Follow-up for these patients was taken through to December 31, 2012. RESULTS: The baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration was (median/inter-quartile range) 2.30/1.60-3.42 μmol/L. Univariate analysis showed that compared with patients without LNM, the patients with LNM had an increased level of direct bilirubin (2.50/1.70-3.42 vs 2.10/1.40-3.42, P = 0.025). Multivariate analysis showed that direct bilirubin was independently associated with LNM (OR = 1.602; 95%CI: 1.098-2.338, P = 0.015). Moreover, we found that: (1) serum direct bilirubin differs between male and female patients; a higher concentration was associated with poor tumor classification; (2) as the baseline serum direct bilirubin concentration increased, the percentage of patients with LNM increased; and (3) serum direct bilirubin was associated with the prognosis of rectal cancer patients and higher values indicated poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Higher serum direct bilirubin concentration was associated with the increased risk of LNM and poor prognosis in our rectal cancers. PMID:26937145

  17. Proximal Tubules Have the Capacity to Regulate Uptake of Albumin.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mark C; Campos-Bilderback, Silvia B; Chowdhury, Mahboob; Flores, Brittany; Lai, Xianyin; Myslinski, Jered; Pandit, Sweekar; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Wei, Yuan; Satlin, Lisa M; Wiggins, Roger C; Witzmann, Frank A; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from multiple studies supports the concept that both glomerular filtration and proximal tubule (PT) reclamation affect urinary albumin excretion rate. To better understand these roles of glomerular filtration and PT uptake, we investigated these processes in two distinct animal models. In a rat model of acute exogenous albumin overload, we quantified glomerular sieving coefficients (GSC) and PT uptake of Texas Red-labeled rat serum albumin using two-photon intravital microscopy. No change in GSC was observed, but a significant decrease in PT albumin uptake was quantified. In a second model, loss of endogenous albumin was induced in rats by podocyte-specific transgenic expression of diphtheria toxin receptor. In these albumin-deficient rats, exposure to diphtheria toxin induced an increase in albumin GSC and albumin filtration, resulting in increased exposure of the PTs to endogenous albumin. In this case, PT albumin reabsorption was markedly increased. Analysis of known albumin receptors and assessment of cortical protein expression in the albumin overload model, conducted to identify potential proteins and pathways affected by acute protein overload, revealed changes in the expression levels of calreticulin, disabled homolog 2, NRF2, angiopoietin-2, and proteins involved in ATP synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that a regulated PT cell albumin uptake system can respond rapidly to different physiologic conditions to minimize alterations in serum albumin level.

  18. Evaluation of new oxidation methods for the measurement of bilirubin on the aeroset clinical chemistry analyzer and comparison with methods on the Hitachi 717.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Ernhard; Albrecht-Groos, Ragnhild; Seyfarth, Michael

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated analytical and performance quality of the new oxidation methods for direct and total bilirubin on the Abbott Aeroset clinical chemistry analyzer. Within-day imprecisions for Abbott Aeroset assays ranged from 0.7 to 2.9% and between-day imprecisions from 2.1 to 7.3%. Inaccuracies as compared with the control "target values" for the Jendrassik-Gróf method showed deviations of -18.2 to +4.2%. Limits of detection were determined and showed very low values of < or = 0.25 micromol/l and dilution linearities were confirmed up to > 300 micromol/l. A method comparison for 100 patient samples with established Jendrassik-Gróf and DPD methods on the Roche Hitachi 717 showed good linearities between the investigated methods (r > or = 0.995). Due to slopes that ranged from 0.829 to 0.950, reference ranges for the oxidation methods differ slightly from those of established Roche Jendrassik-Gróf methods, but results can be adapted by the introduction of converting factors. In conclusion, the oxidation bilirubin assays revealed convincing analytical and performance qualities for medical needs that were similar or even better than for established methods. Application of the oxidation methods on the Aeroset clinical chemistry analyzer also improves laboratory efficiency by increasing throughput, speed of obtaining results and lowered sample and reagent volumes compared to established methods.

  19. Albumin extinction without methylation of its gene.

    PubMed

    Ott, M O; Sperling, L; Weiss, M C

    1984-03-01

    In earlier work we identified at the 5' end of the rat albumin gene an Msp I site whose undermethylation appears to be necessary but not sufficient for stable expression of the gene in rat hepatoma cells. Here, we ask whether the block to expression of albumin production, which occurs when rat hepatoma cells are hybridized with cells that do not produce the protein, could be the result of de novo methylation of this site. In two types of somatic hybrids, rat hepatoma-mouse L cell fibroblasts, and rat hepatoma-dedifferentiated variant rat hepatoma cells, extinction occurs and is maintained during the first 5-15 generations after fusion. During this time the Msp I site of the now inactive rat albumin gene remained unmethylated.

  20. Polymerized soluble venom--human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.; Suszko, I.M.; Grammer, L.C.

    1985-03-01

    Extensive previous studies have demonstrated that attempts to produce polymers of Hymenoptera venoms for human immunotherapy resulted in insoluble precipitates that could be injected with safety but with very limited immunogenicity in allergic patients. We now report soluble polymers prepared by conjugating bee venom with human serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The bee venom-albumin polymer (BVAP) preparation was fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 to have a molecular weight range higher than catalase. /sup 125/I-labeled bee venom phospholipase A was almost completely incorporated into BVAP. Rabbit antibody responses to bee venom and bee venom phospholipase A were induced by BVAP. Human antisera against bee venom were absorbed by BVAP. No new antigenic determinants on BVAP were present as evidenced by absorption of antisera against BVAP by bee venom and albumin. BVAP has potential immunotherapeutic value in patients with anaphylactic sensitivity to bee venom.

  1. Preliminary crystallographic studies of four crystal forms of serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. C.; Chang, B.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Krishnasami, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Several crystal forms of serum albumin suitable for three-dimensional structure determination have been grown. These forms include crystals of recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, baboon serum albumin, and canine serum albumin. The intrinsic limits of X-ray diffraction for these crystals are in the range 0.28-0.22 nm. Two of the crystal forms produced from human and canine albumin include incorporated long-chain fatty acids. Molecular replacement experiments have been successfully conducted on each crystal form using the previously determined atomic coordinates of human serum albumin illustrating the conserved tertiary structure.

  2. Albumin-induced apoptosis of tubular cells is modulated by BASP1.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Niño, M D; Fernandez-Fernandez, B; Perez-Gomez, M V; Poveda, J; Sanz, A B; Cannata-Ortiz, P; Ruiz-Ortega, M; Egido, J; Selgas, R; Ortiz, A

    2015-02-12

    Albuminuria promotes tubular injury and cell death, and is associated with faster progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to end-stage renal disease. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating tubular cell death in response to albuminuria are not fully understood. Brain abundant signal protein 1 (BASP1) was recently shown to mediate glucose-induced apoptosis in tubular cells. We have studied the role of BASP1 in albumin-induced tubular cell death. BASP1 expression was studied in experimental puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome in rats and in human nephrotic syndrome. The role of BASP1 in albumin-induced apoptosis was studied in cultured human HK2 proximal tubular epithelial cells. Puromycin aminonucleoside induced proteinuria and increased total kidney BASP1 mRNA and protein expression. Immunohistochemistry localized the increased BASP1 to tubular cells. BASP1 expression colocalized with deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining for apoptotic cells. Increased tubular BASP1 expression was observed in human proteinuric nephropathy by immunohistochemistry, providing evidence for potential clinical relevance. In cultured tubular cells, albumin induced apoptosis and increased BASP1 mRNA and protein expression at 6-48 h. Confocal microscopy localized the increased BASP1 expression in albumin-treated cells mainly to the perinuclear area. A peripheral location near the cell membrane was more conspicuous in albumin-treated apoptotic cells, where it colocalized with actin. Inhibition of BASP1 expression by a BASP1 siRNA protected from albumin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, albumin-induced apoptosis in tubular cells is BASP1-dependent. This information may be used to design novel therapeutic approaches to slow CKD progression based on protection of tubular cells from the adverse consequences of albuminuria.

  3. Decreased total and corrected antioxidant capacity in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Koutroubakis, Ioannis E; Malliaraki, Niki; Dimoulios, Philippos D; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Castanas, Elias; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidants may play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related intestinal damage. A new automated assay for the determination of blood total antioxidant capacity (TAC), based on the crocin bleaching method, has been used for the measurement of TAC and corrected TAC (cTAC) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) in comparison to healthy controls (HC). Ninety-four patients with UC, 97 patients with CD, and 72 HC were included in this study. Serum TAC was measured in all patients and controls on an Olympus AU-600 chemistry analyzer using a TAC kit. cTAC was calculated from TAC after subtraction of the interactions due to endogenous uric acid, bilirubin and albumin. Mean serum TAC as well as cTAC levels were significantly lower in both UC and CD patients compared with HC (P < 0.0001). Patients with active UC had no different TAC and cTAC compared to those with inactive disease. Patients with active CD had significantly lower mean TAC compared to those with inactive disease but cTAC was not different between the two phases of disease activity. Patients with proctitis had significantly higher TAC and cTAC compared to patients with left-sided colitis and total colitis. In CD patients no association between disease localization and these markers was found. TAC and cTAC are significantly reduced in IBD patients compared with controls irrespective of disease activity. The decreased antioxidant defenses may be a primary phenomenon severely compromising the mucosa and therefore increase susceptibility to oxidative tissue damage.

  4. Trajectories of Serum Albumin Predict Survival of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Fang; Tsai, Chun-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Lin; Yang, Tse-Yen; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Chen, Hung-Lin; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although initial serum albumin level is highly associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, we consider that the dynamic change and trend of albumin after initiation of PD are also essential. We enrolled patients who received PD for more than 3 months from January 1999 to March 2014. We categorized these patients into 2 groups by the difference in serum albumin level (Δalbumin = difference between peak with initial albumin level = peak albumin level − initial albumin level) after PD. The patients with Δalbumin < 0.2 g/dL (median level) were considered as group A (n, number = 238) and those with Δalbumin ≥ 0.2 g/dL were considered as group B (n = 278). Further, we stratified these patients into quartiles: Q1 Δalbumin < −0.2 g/dL; Q2, −0.2 ≦∼ <0.2 g/dL; Q3, 0.2 ≦∼ <0.6 g/dL; and Q4, ≥0.6 g/dL. Regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation of initial albumin and Δalbumin. Group A patients presented with higher levels of serum albumin (3.71 ± 0.54 vs 3.04 ± 0.55 g/dL; P < 0.001) and hematocrit as well as better initial residual renal function. However, those in group A had lower serum albumin increment and downward-sloped trends after dialysis. In contrast, the albumin trend was upward sloped and the increment of albumin was remarkable in group B, despite the high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Overtime, group A patients had poorer survival and experienced more frequent and longer hospitalizations. Group Q1 patients with least albumin increment had worst survival. Group Q4 patients with lowest initial albumin also had poor survival. Age, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, BMI, initial albumin, and Δalbumin could affect patient outcomes independently. Regression analysis showed a better outcome can be obtained if the initial albumin level is at least above 3.15 g/dL. (Initial albumin level

  5. Albumin-binding of diclofenac and the effect of a site II inhibitor in the aqueous humor of cataract patients with the instillation of diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Mineo; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Tokunaga, Jin; Setoguchi, Nao; Arimori, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Diclofenac instillation has been used widely in cataract surgery to prevent postoperative inflammation. Since diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the circulation, it does not have a sufficient effect on patients in whom diclofenac binds strongly to albumin in the aqueous humor. A decrease in diclofenac binding and an increase in free diclofenac levels are necessary in these patients. The binding of diclofenac to albumin was investigated in the aqueous humor. In a diclofenac binding assay with albumin in the aqueous humor of individual patients, diclofenac was extracted from aliquots of the aqueous humor, and its total levels were measured using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). Free diclofenac levels were measured using ultrafiltration and UHPLC. The albumin-binding fraction of diclofenac was 0.8 or higher in the aqueous humor of some patients. Ibuprofen significantly inhibited diclofenac binding to site II of albumin in mimic aqueous humor, but not in pooled aqueous humor. This difference may have been due to the weak binding of diclofenac to site II in the pooled aqueous humor. Flurbiprofen was used instead of diclofenac. Flurbiprofen has been shown to bind more strongly than diclofenac to the same site of albumin. Thus, the inhibitory effect of ibuprofen on the binding of flurbiprofen to albumin was investigated in pooled aqueous humor. The results indicated that ibuprofen significantly inhibited the flurbiprofen binding. An effective diclofenac administration method may be established for clinical application by the instillation of an appropriate inhibitor of binding to the albumin site II.

  6. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Poór, Miklós; Lemli, Beáta; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2015-12-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3) and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow's Site I). In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions.

  7. [Current role of albumin in critical care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre Puig, P; Orallo Morán, M A; Pereira Matalobos, D; Prieto Requeijo, P

    2014-11-01

    The use of colloids in fluid therapy has been, and still continues to be a controversial topic, particularly when referring to the critical patient. The choice of the fluid that needs to be administered depends on several factors, many of which are theoretical, and continue being an object of debate. The interest in the clinical use of the albumin has emerged again, immediately after recent publications in the search of the most suitable colloid. It is the most abundant protein in the plasma, being responsible for 80% of the oncotic pressure. It regulates the balance between the intra- and extra-vascular volumes. Recent multicenter studies question the supposed lack of safety that was previously assigned to it. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrate other important actions besides oncotic, for example neutralization of free radicals, and exogenous (drugs) and endogenous substances (bile pigments, cholesterol). Being aware of these secondary properties of albumin, and evaluating the pathophysiology of the critical patient (in particular, sepsis), to maintain plasma albumin levels within the normal range, could be of great importance. Based on the most recent publications, the aim of this review is to briefly analyze the pathophysiology of albumin, as well as to discuss its possible indications in the critical patient. PMID:24952825

  8. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Poór, Miklós; Lemli, Beáta; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3) and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I). In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions. PMID:26633504

  9. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-12-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with /sup 125/I or /sup 131/I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return.

  10. ATR-FTIR measurements of albumin and fibrinogen adsorption: Inert versus calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boix, Marcel; Eslava, Salvador; Costa Machado, Gil; Gosselin, Emmanuel; Ni, Na; Saiz, Eduardo; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis, bone fracture, bone tumors and other musculoskeletal diseases affect millions of people across the world. Nowadays, inert and bioactive ceramics are used as bone substitutes or for bone regeneration. Their bioactivity is very much dictated by the way proteins adsorb on their surface. In this work, we compared the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on inert and calcium phosphates ceramics (CaPs) using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to follow in situ protein adsorption on these materials. To this effect, we developed a sol-gel technique to control the surface chemistry of an ATR-FTIR detector. Hydroxyapatite adsorbed more albumin and β-tricalcium phosphate adsorbed more fibrinogen. Biphasic calcium phosphate presented the lowest adsorption among CaP for both proteins, illustrating the effect of surface heterogeneities. Inert ceramics adsorbed a lower amount of both proteins compared with bioactive ceramics. A significant change was observed in the conformation of the adsorbed protein versus the surface chemistry. Hydroxyapatite produced a larger loss of α-helix structure on albumin and biphasic calcium phosphate reduced β-sheet percentage on fibrinogen. Inert ceramics produced large α-helix loss on albumin and presented weak interaction with fibrinogen. Zirconia did not adsorb albumin and titanium dioxide promoted huge denaturalization of fibrinogen.

  11. Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Albumin-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Stenzel, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Albumin has been a popular building block to create nanoparticles for drug delivery purposes. The performance of albumin as a drug carrier can be enhanced by combining protein with polymers, which allows the design of carriers to encompass a broader spectrum of drugs while features unique to synthetic polymers such as stimuli-responsiveness are introduced. Nanoparticles based on polymer-albumin hybrids can be divided into two classes: one that carries album as a bioactive surface coating and the other that uses albumin as biocompatible, although nonbioactive, building block. Nanoparticles with bioactive albumin surface coating can either be prepared by self-assembly of albumin-polymer conjugates or by postcoating of existing nanoparticles with albumin. Albumin has also been used as building block, either in its native or denatured form. Existing albumin nanoparticles are coated with polymers, which can influence the degradation of albumin or impact on the drug release. Finally, an alternative way of using albumin by denaturing the protein to generate a highly functional chain, which can be modified with polymer, has been presented. These albumin nanoparticles are designed to be extremely versatile so that they can deliver a wide variety of drugs, including traditional hydrophobic drugs, metal-based drugs and even therapeutic proteins and siRNA.

  12. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040 Albumin immunological test system. (a) Identification. An albumin immunological test system is a device that consists...

  13. Identification of heme oxygenase-1 stimulators by a convenient ELISA-based bilirubin quantification assay.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Hannelore; Amslinger, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    The upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has proven to be a useful tool for fighting inflammation. In order to identify new HO-1 inducers, an efficient screening method was developed which can provide new lead structures for drug research. We designed a simple ELISA-based HO-1 enzyme activity assay, which allows for the screening of 12 compounds in parallel in the setting of a 96-well plate. The well-established murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 is used and only about 26µg of protein from whole cell lysates is needed for the analysis of HO-1 activity. The quantification of HO-1 activity is based on an indirect ELISA using the specific anti-bilirubin antibody 24G7 to quantify directly bilirubin in the whole cell lysate, applying a horseradish peroxidase-tagged antibody together with ortho-phenylenediamine and H2O2 for detection. The bilirubin is produced on the action of HO enzymes by converting their substrate heme to biliverdin and additional recombinant biliverdin reductase together with NADPH at pH 7.4 in buffer. This sensitive assay allows for the detection of 0.57-82pmol bilirubin per sample in whole cell lysates. Twenty-three small molecules, mainly natural products with an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl unit such as polyphenols, including flavonoids and chalcones, terpenes, an isothiocyanate, and the drug oltipraz were tested at typically 6 or 24h incubation with RAW264.7 cells. The activity of known HO-1 inducers was confirmed, while the chalcones cardamonin, flavokawain A, calythropsin, 2',3,4'-trihydroxy-4-methoxychalcone (THMC), and 2',4'-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxychalcone (DHDMC) were identified as new potent HO-1 inducers. The highest inductive power after 6h incubation was found at 10µM for DHDMC (6.1-fold), carnosol (3.9-fold), butein (3.1-fold), THMC (2.9-fold), and zerumbone (2.5-fold). Moreover, the time dependence of HO-1 protein production for DHDMC was compared to its enzyme activity, which was further evaluated in the presence of

  14. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A.; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  15. Hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores and their performance as separable bilirubin adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Limin; Cui, Xiangzhi; Li, Yongsheng; He, Qianjun; Zhang, Lingxia; Bu, Wenbo; Shi, Jianlin

    2009-09-01

    Hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores are directly replicated from hollow mesoporous aluminosilicate spheres with hematite cores by a simple incipient-wetness impregnation technique. The amount of magnetic cores and the saturation magnetization value can be easily tuned by changing the concentration of iron nitrate solution used in the synthesis procedure. As-prepared hollow mesoporous carbon spheres with magnetic cores are used as separable bilirubin adsorbents and show very good adsorptive properties. The characteristics of as-prepared composites are examined by XRD, N(2) sorption, TEM, vibrating-sample magnetometry, and UV/Vis spectroscopy. PMID:19582733

  16. Comparison Between Measured and Calculated Free Calcium Values at Different Serum Albumin Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Altaf Ahmad; Goyal, Bela; Datta, Sudip Kumar; Ikkurthi, Saidaiah; Pal, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Free ionic calcium is the metabolically active component of total calcium (TCa) in blood. However, most laboratories report TCa levels that are dependent on serum albumin concentration. Hence, several formulae have evolved to calculate free calcium levels from TCa after adjustment for albumin. However, free calcium can directly be measured using direction selective electrodes rather than spectrophotometric methods used in autoanalyzers. Objectives: This study compares the levels of free calcium obtained by measurement by direct ion selective electrode (ISE) and the one calculated as a function of TCa by formulae. Materials and Methods: A total of 254 serum samples submitted to clinical biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary care hospital were analyzed for total protein, albumin, and TCa by standard spectrophotometric methods and for free calcium by direct ISE. Three commonly used formulae viz. Orrell, Berry et al. and Payne et al. were used to calculate adjusted TCa. Calculated free calcium was obtained by taking 50% of these values. Results: A significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between calculated free calcium by all the three formulae and measured free calcium estimated by direct ISE using paired t-test and Bland–Altman plots. Conclusion: Formulae for predicting free calcium by estimating TCa and albumin lacks consistency in prediction and free calcium should be evaluated by direct measurement. PMID:27365914

  17. Displacement of bilirubin from cord serum by sulphadimethoxine, amoxycillin, clavulanic acid in combination with either amoxycillin or ticarcillin, temocillin and cloxacillin.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, B E

    1985-01-01

    The displacement of bilirubin from its binding sites in cord serum by sulphadimethoxine and various penicillins was studied using Sephadex gel filtration. Sulphadimethoxine displaced bilirubin at concentrations well within the normal therapeutic range of sulphonamide concentrations. Amoxycillin, clavulanic acid in combination with either amoxycillin or ticarcillin, temocillin and cloxacillin displaced bilirubin at concentrations much higher than those found clinically. It was concluded that the primary binding site/s of sulphadimethoxine and the secondary binding site/s of the penicillins were at or near the primary bilirubin binding site. PMID:4074603

  18. Co-amoxiclav Effects on the Structural and Binding Properties of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Hesami Takallu, Saeed; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Kalantari, Shiva; Amir Bakhtiarvand, Mahrooz; Mahdavi, Sayed Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in the human body. HSA plays an important role in drug transport and metabolism. This protein has a high affinity to a very wide range of materials, including metals such as Cu2+ and Zn2+, fatty acids, amino acids and metabolites such as bilirubin and many drug compounds. In this study, we investigated the effects of co-amoxiclav, as a drug which could be carried by this protein, on HSA structure and binding properties via spectroscopy and electrochemistry techniques. Based on this study, it was found that a therapeutic dose of co-amoxiclav as well as doses 4 to 8 folds higher than the therapeutic dose has no considerable effect on the HSA tertiary structure at 37oC. However, a dose 2 folds that of the therapeutic dose has a slight effect, but higher doses of the drug has a mild effect in pathological temperature (42oC). In addition, charge density of HSA surface is decreased at 42oC, compared to 37oC. Hence, this finding suggests a reduced role of HSA in regulation of osmotic pressure in the fever conditions, compared to the physiological conditions. Co-amoxiclav reduces the charge surface density of HSA at physiological and pathological temperatures and therefore alters its binding properties, which could be important in drug interference and complications. PMID:24363734

  19. Uptake of oleate from albumin solutions by rat liver. Failure to detect catalysis of the dissociation of oleate from albumin by an albumin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Weisiger, R A; Ma, W L

    1987-01-01

    The hepatic removal of albumin-bound substances from plasma requires that they dissociate from albumin. Using indirect methods, we and others have proposed that dissociation may be catalyzed by interaction of albumin with the liver cell surface. This study looked for direct evidence of catalysis by comparing the rate of dissociation of oleate from albumin in vitro with the rate observed within the sinusoids of perfused rat liver. No evidence for catalysis was found. The rate of hepatic oleate removal from dilute albumin solutions did not exceed but instead closely paralleled the rate predicted from the in vitro dissociation rate constant (0.14s-1). These results suggest that under some conditions the liver can remove unbound material from the sinusoids faster than it can be replenished by dissociation from albumin, resulting in dissociation-limited removal. However, dissociation of oleate does not appear to be catalyzed by the liver. PMID:3031131

  20. [When should we give albumin in patients with cirrhosis?].

    PubMed

    Bochatay, L; Elkrief, L; Spahr, L

    2015-09-01

    The beneficial effects of the use of albumin, either alone or combines with other treat- ments, have been demonstrated in patients with various complications of cirrhosis. Therefore, albumin should be administred in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in association with antibiotics, and in association with terlipressin in patients with type 1 hepatorenal syndrome. Albumin use reduces the occurrence of paracentesis-related circulatory dysfunction, in patients with large ascites undergoing paracentesis. So far, the beneficial effect of albumin has not been demonstrated, neither for infections other than spontaneous bacterial peritonitis nor for hepatic encephalopathy. This article provides an overview of the data evaluating the effects of albumin in patients with cirrhosis.

  1. The use of competitive displacement agents to resolve albumin binding problems observed during the development of a radioimmunoassay for ICI 215001.

    PubMed

    Ballard, P; Malone, M D; Law, B

    1994-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the analysis of ICI 215001, a carboxylic acid metabolite of ICI D7114. The level of binding and sensitivity of the assay were good in the absence of plasma. However, the addition of plasma to the incubation medium reduced the antibody binding of radiolabelled tracer (I) from 41 to 9%. This was attributed to the high (> 99%) plasma albumin binding of ICI 215001. A series of compounds (DL-tryptophan, octanoic acid, bilirubin, ponalrestat, warfarin, phenylbutazone and salicylic acid) which all bind to plasma albumin, were examined for their effect on the tracer-antibody interaction. Warfarin and phenylbutazone were the only compounds to specifically displace the iodinated tracer from albumin; warfarin was the only compound to restore antibody binding to control levels. The warfarin concentration and the pH of the incubation medium also had a substantial effect on the magnitude of the displacement. The optimized method for the analysis of ICI 215001 in human plasma (20 microliters) used phosphate buffer (pH 6.0, 0.1 M) containing warfarin (50 micrograms ml-1), which gave an assay with the desired specificity, precision and sensitivity. PMID:7909237

  2. Unconjugated Bilirubin exerts Pro-Apoptotic Effect on Platelets via p38-MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    NaveenKumar, Somanathapura K.; Thushara, Ram M.; Sundaram, Mahalingam S.; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Paul, Manoj; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Basappa; Nagaraju, Ganesh; Raghavan, Sathees C.; Girish, Kesturu S.; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the most frequently observed secondary complications in many pathological conditions including liver diseases, where hyperbilirubinemia is very common. The present study sought to find the cause of thrombocytopenia in unconjugated hyperbilirubinemic conditions. Unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), an end-product of heme catabolism, is known to have pro-oxidative and cytotoxic effects at high serum concentration. We investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-apoptotic effect of UCB on human platelets in vitro, and followed it up with studies in phenylhydrazine-induced hyperbilirubinemic rat model and hyperbilirubinemic human subjects. UCB is indeed found to significantly induce platelet apoptotic events including elevated endogenous reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, increased intracellular calcium levels, cardiolipin peroxidation and phosphatidylserine externalization (p < 0.001) as evident by FACS analysis. The immunoblots show the elevated levels of cytosolic cytochrome c and caspase activation in UCB-treated platelets. Further, UCB is found to induce mitochondrial ROS generation leading to p38 activation, followed by downstream activation of p53, ultimately resulting in altered expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins as evident from immunoblotting. All these parameters conclude that elevated unconjugated bilirubin causes thrombocytopenia by stimulating platelet apoptosis via mitochondrial ROS-induced p38 and p53 activation. PMID:26459859

  3. Method for Estimating Bilirubin Isomerization Efficiency in Phototherapy to Treat Neonatal Jaundice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisenko, S. A.; Kugeiko, M. M.

    2014-11-01

    We propose a method for quantitative assessment of the efficacy of phototherapy to treat neonatal jaundice using the diffuse reflectance spectrum for the newborn's skin, based on the analytical dependence of the measured spectrum on the structural and morphological parameters of the skin, affecting the optical conditions in the medium, and an algorithm for rapid calculation of the bilirubin photoisomerization rate in the skin tissues as a function of the structural and morphological parameters of the skin and the wavelength of the exciting radiation. From the results of a numerical simulation of the process of radiation transport in the skin, we assess the stability of our method to variations in the scattering properties of the skin and the concentrations of its optically active chromophores (melanin, oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin). We show that in order to achieve the maximum efficacy of phototherapy, we should use light from the range 484-496 nm. In this case, the intensity of the exciting radiation should be selected individually for each newborn according to the bilirubin photoisomerization rate characteristic for it.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin protects endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damage.

    PubMed

    He, Meihua; Nitti, Mariapaola; Piras, Sabrina; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Traverso, Nicola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Mann, Giovanni E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia and diabetes are associated with endothelial cell dysfunction arising from enhanced oxidative injury, leading to the progression of diabetic vascular pathologies. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of antioxidant genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress. We have investigated the pathways involved in high glucose-induced activation of HO-1 in endothelial cells and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying cytoprotection. Elevated d-glucose increased intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells, with no changes in cell viability. Superoxide scavenging and inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) abrogated upregulation of HO-1 expression by elevated glucose. Inhibition of HO-1 increased the sensitivity of endothelial cells to high glucose-mediated damage, while addition of bilirubin restored cell viability. Our findings establish that exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose leads to activation of endogenous antioxidant defense genes via the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Upregulation of HO-1 provides cytoprotection against high glucose-induced oxidative stress through the antioxidant properties of bilirubin. Modulation of the Nrf2 pathway in the early stages of diabetes may thus protect against sustained damage by hyperglycemia during progression of the disease.

  5. Role of bilirubin oxidation products in the pathophysiology of DIND following SAH.

    PubMed

    Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Nair, Sunil G; Stamper, Danielle N Caudell; Clark, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts, by our own team and many others, the molecules responsible for acute neurological damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and contributing to delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) have not yet been elucidated. While there are a number of candidate mechanisms, including nitric oxide (NO) scavenging, endothelin-1, protein kinase C (PKC) activation, and rho kinase activation, to name but a few, that have been investigated using animal models and human trials, we are, it seems, no closer to discovering the true nature of this complex and enigmatic pathology. Efforts in our laboratory have focused on the chemical milieu present in hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following SAH and the interaction of the environment with the molecules generated by SAH and subsequent events, including NO scavenging, immune response, and clot breakdown. We have identified and characterized a group of molecules formed by the oxidative degradation of bilirubin (a clot breakdown product) and known as BOXes (bilirubin oxidation products). We present a synopsis of the characterization of BOXes as found in human SAH patients' CSF and the multiple signaling pathways by which BOXes act. In summary, BOXes are likely to play an essential role in the etiology of acute brain injury following SAH, as well as DIND. PMID:22890679

  6. Molecular basis of bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase induction in spontaneously diabetic rats, acetone-treated rats and starved rats.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L; Coffey, M J; Puskás, F; Kardon, T; Nagy, G; Conley, A A; Burchell, B; Mandl, J

    1998-01-01

    The co-ordinated induction of several hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes is a common feature in the regulation of drug biotransformation under normal and pathological conditions. In the present study the activity and expression of bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT1A1) were investigated in livers of BioBreeding/Worcester diabetic, fasted and acetone-treated rats. Bilirubin glucuronidation was stimulated by all three treatments; this was correlated with an increase in the UGT1A1 protein concentration in hepatic microsomes. Transcriptional induction of UGT1A1 was also observed in diabetes and starvation but not with acetone treatment, which apparently caused translational stabilization of the enzyme protein. The hormonal/metabolic alterations in diabetes and starvation might be a model for postnatal development. The sudden interruption of maternal glucose supply signals the enhanced expression of UGT1A1, giving a novel explanation for the physiological induction of bilirubin glucuronidation in newborn infants. PMID:9841869

  7. Fluorescent holograms with albumin-acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    We describe fluorescent holograms were made with photosensitive films of albumin (protein) quail, used as modified matrices. Albumin is mixed with acrylamide and eosin Y. Therefore, prepare a photosensitive emulsion and solid hydrated with the ability to phase transmission holograms and volume (VPH). Eosin Y is a fluorescent agent that acts as a photo-sensitizing dye which stimulates the polymerization of acrylamide. To record the interference pattern produced by two waves superimposed on the modified matrix, we use a He-Cd laser. To reconstruct the diffraction pattern is observed with He- Ne laser, λ = 632.8nm, the material is self-developing properties. Measure the diffraction efficiency of the diffracted orders (η[-1, +1]) as a function of exposure energy. We work with various thicknesses and measure the variation of the refractive index using the coupled wave theory of Kogelnik, the holographic gratings meet Bragg condition.

  8. Albumin use is beneficial in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Faisal M; Marotta, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    There are several indications for the use of albumin in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and its role has existed in clinical practice for many decades. While the drug enjoys immense popularity, it yet attracts intensive debate amongst clinicians and pharmacologists alike. Regardless of its pharmacological properties, its clinical use in cirrhotic patients has its fair share of proponents and opponents. At present, in the setting of cirrhosis this debate centers around the treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, in patients with ascites treated with large volume paracentesis, and in those with hepato-renal syndrome. With the evolving evidence it has become imperative to shed old dogmas and address this issue in the light of evidence-based medicine. This article gives a representative view of albumin use in the above conditions across both sides of the clinical divide.

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  10. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  11. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid/glycinergic synaptic transmission in mediating bilirubin-induced hyperexcitation in developing auditory neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xin-Lu; Liang, Min; Shi, Hai-Bo; Wang, Lu-Yang; Li, Chun-Yan; Yin, Shan-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical phenomenon observed in human newborns. A high level of bilirubin can result in severe jaundice and bilirubin encephalopathy. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying bilirubin excitotoxicity are unclear. Our previous studies showed the action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycine switches from excitatory to inhibitory during development in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN), one of the most sensitive auditory nuclei to bilirubin toxicity. In the present study, we investigated the roles of GABAA/glycine receptors in the induction of bilirubin hyperexcitation in early developing neurons. Using the patch clamp technique, GABAA/glycine receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents (sIPSCs) were recorded from bushy and stellate cells in acute brainstem slices from young mice (postnatal day 2-6). Bilirubin significantly increased the frequency of sIPSCs, and this effect was prevented by pretreatments of slices with either fast or slow Ca(2+) chelators BAPTA-AM and EGTA-AM suggesting that bilirubin can increase the release of GABA/glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Using cell-attached recording configuration, we found that antagonists of GABAA and glycine receptors strongly attenuated spontaneous spiking firings in P2-6 neurons but produced opposite effect in P15-19 neurons. Furthermore, these antagonists reversed bilirubin-evoked hyperexcitability in P2-6 neurons, indicating that excitatory action of GABA/glycinergic transmission specifically contribute to bilirubin-induced hyperexcitability in the early stage of development. Our results suggest that bilirubin-induced enhancement of presynaptic release GABA/Glycine via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms may play a critical role in mediating neuronal hyperexcitation associated with jaundice, implicating potential new strategies for predicting, preventing, and treating bilirubin neurotoxicity.

  12. Albumin infusion in humans does not model exercise induced hypervolaemia after 24 hours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskell, A.; Gillen, C. M.; Mack, G. W.; Nadel, E. R.

    1998-01-01

    We rapidly infused 234 +/- 3 mL of 5% human serum albumin in eight men while measuring haematocrit, haemoglobin concentration, plasma volume (PV), albumin concentration, total protein concentration, osmolality, sodium concentration, renin activity, aldosterone concentration, and atrial natriuretic peptide concentration to test the hypotheses that plasma volume expansion and plasma albumin content expansion will not persist for 24 h. Plasma volume and albumin content were expanded for the first 6 h after infusion (44.3 +/- 1.9-47.2 +/- 2.0 mL kg-1 and 1.9 +/- 0.1-2.1 +/- 0.1 g kg-1 at pre-infusion and 1 h, respectively, P < 0.05), but by 24 h plasma volume and albumin content decreased significantly from 1 h post-infusion and were not different from pre-infusion (44.8 +/- 1.9 mL kg-1 and 1.9 +/- 0.1 g kg-1, respectively). Plasma aldosterone concentration showed a significant effect of time over the 24 h after infusion (P < 0.05), and showed a trend to decrease at 2 h after infusion (167.6 +/- 32.5(-1) 06.2 +/- 13.4 pg mL-1, P = 0.07). These data demonstrate that a 6.8% expansion of plasma volume and 10.5% expansion of plasma albumin content by infusion does not remain in the vascular space for 24 h and suggest a redistribution occurs between the intravascular space and interstitial fluid space.

  13. The role of albumin in nutritional support.

    PubMed

    Mobarhan, S

    1988-12-01

    Hypoalbuminemia is considered one of the hallmarks of protein-calorie malnutrition and chronic liver disease. Recently, serum albumin has also been proposed as a critical predictor of the response to nutritional support and tolerance to enteral feeding in critically ill patients. Albumin is essential for maintenance of plasma colloidal osmotic pressure, prevention of edema, and transport of certain drugs and nutrients. Experimental studies have shown that rapid plasma expansion and reduced plasma protein concentration and osmotic pressure induce a net secretion of sodium and water into the small intestinal lumen. However, the effects of chronic hypoalbuminemia per se on intestinal absorption, independent of malnutrition, have not been fully studied. It is documented that both chronic illness and malnutrition may profoundly affect intestinal anatomical structure and function, inducing some degree of malabsorption. In the last few years, some have advocated albumin infusion to improve clinical response to patients with hypoalbuminemia receiving parenteral nutritional support or to reduce intestinal intolerance and diarrhea in patients receiving enteral tube feeding. A review of the literature shows that both clinical and experimental data to support these suggestions are scarce and further investigations are needed. Hypoalbuminemia is one of many parameters of malnutrition, and it is unlikely that correction of a single parameter for a short time would lead to major clinical benefits. PMID:3147998

  14. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction.

  15. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  16. [Albumin and artificial colloids for massive bleeding].

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and massive bleeding has to be counteracted by efficient volume restoration against rapid loss of intravascular volume. There are two phases of volume management for massive bleeding, uncontrolled phase and controlled phase. During initial uncontrolled phase, rapid infusion of crystalloid with RCC (red cell concentrate) is the first choice of volume management to prevent shock and profound decline of hemoglobin level. After shifting to the next controlled phase, artificial colloids and RCC become the next choice for efficient volume restoration. Although albumin has not been proven to improve prognosis in clinical studies, anti-inflammatory effect could be expected. Albumin infusion may be followed in this phase, and also albumin concentrate may be beneficial to reduce subsequent tissue edema due to massive infusion of crystalloid and artificial colloid. A new generation of hydroxyethyl starch is a promising blood substitute, designed with minimum side effect. Although renal damage especially in septic patient and coagulation disorder are theoretically suspected, beneficial effect as volume expansion overwhelms these stochastic side effects. Since the side effect depends on the dose and how much it remains in the body, a purposeful use during volume expansion phase should be recommended.

  17. Ultrafast deactivation of bilirubin: dark intermediates and two-photon isomerization.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Blanco, Carlos; Singer, Patrick; Diller, Rolf; Luis Pérez Lustres, J

    2016-03-14

    Bilirubin is a neurotoxic product responsible for neonatal jaundice, which is generally treated by phototherapy. The photoreaction involves ultrafast internal conversion via an elusive intermediate and Z-E isomerization with minor yield (less than 3% in solution). The structure of the intermediate remains unclear. Here, the combination of UV-vis and mid-IR ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reports a comprehensive picture of the mechanism and provides essential structural information about the intermediate species. Thus, spectral dynamics during the earliest ps unveils a wavepacket travelling from the Franck-Condon region to the crossing point with a dark state. The latter shows a tighter molecular skeleton than the ground state and decays with 15 ps time constant. Remarkably, the relative contribution of a non-decaying component increases linearly with pump energy, suggesting that Z-E isomerization could also be triggered by two-photon excitation. Implications for the photochemistry of protein-bound open tetrapyrroles are discussed. PMID:26887629

  18. Mechanisms of albumin uptake by proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N

    2001-01-01

    The likely role of albumin in the induction tubulo-interstitial injury in proteinuria has stimulated considerable interest in the entry of albumin into the proximal tubule and its subsequent uptake by proximal tubular cells. Currently, there is considerable controversy over the degree of glomerular permeability to albumin. After filtration, however, albumin binds to megalin and cubulin, two giant receptors in the apical membrane of proximal tubular cells. Albumin is subsequently re-absorbed by proximal tubular cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process subject to complex regulation. The interaction of albumin with proximal tubule cells also leads to the generation of intracellular signals. The understanding of these pathways may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of renal scarring in proteinuria. PMID:11158855

  19. Albumin Metabolism in Rabbits and Rats with Transplanted Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Wraight, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Albumin distributions and turnover rates have been studied using 131I labelled tracer material in rabbits with Vx2 carcinoma and rats bearing SP7 fibrosarcoma in comparison with control animals. Albumin concentrations were reduced in the tumour bearing animals but plasma volumes increased as the tumours developed. Relative increases were seen in the extravascular distribution of albumin, due partly to albumin pooling in and around the tumours and possibly also to general increases in capillary permeability. In the rats there was a considerable increase in the catabolic rate of albumin which was not related to urinary protein loss. The tumour bearing rabbits showed evidence both of increased catabolism and of decreased synthesis and the combination of the two effects resulted in a greater lowering of albumin concentration than was seen in the rats. Possible mechanisms for these findings and their significance in human malignant disease are discussed. PMID:5115834

  20. Serum bilirubin concentration in healthy adult North-Europeans is strictly controlled by the UGT1A1 TA-repeat variants.

    PubMed

    Kringen, Marianne K; Piehler, Armin P; Grimholt, Runa M; Opdal, Mimi S; Haug, Kari Bente F; Urdal, Petter

    2014-01-01

    The major enzyme responsible for the glucuronidation of bilirubin is the uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose glucuronosyltransferase A1 (UGT1A1) enzyme, and genetic variation in the UGT1A1 gene is reported to influence the bilirubin concentration in the blood. In this study, we have investigated which gene-/haplotype variants may be useful for genetic testing of Gilbert's syndrome. Two groups of samples based on serum bilirubin concentrations were obtained from the Nordic Reference Interval Project Bio-bank and Database (NOBIDA): the 150 individuals with the highest bilirubin (>17.5 µmol/L) and the 150 individuals with normal bilirubin concentrations (<17.5 µmol/L). The individuals were examined for the TA6>TA7 variant in the UGT1A1 promoter and 7 tag-SNPs in an extended promoter region of UGT1A1 (haplotype analysis) and in selected SNPs in candidate genes (SLCO1B3, ABCC2 and NUP153). We found significant odds ratios for high bilirubin level for all the selected UGT1A1 variants. However, in stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis of all genetic variants together with age, sex, country of origin and fasting time, the repeat variants of UGT1A1 TA6>TA7 and SLCO1B3 rs2117032 T>C were the only variants significantly associated with higher bilirubin concentrations. Most individuals with high bilirubin levels were homozygous for the TA7-repeat (74%) while only 3% were homozygous for the TA7-repeat in individuals with normal bilirubin levels. Among individuals heterozygous for the TA7-repeat, a low frequent UGT1A1-diplotype harboring the rs7564935 G-variant was associated with higher bilirubin levels. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that in testing for Gilbert's syndrome, analyzing for the homozygous TA7/TA7-genotype would be appropriate.

  1. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200mgpyrazole/kg/day for 3days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. PMID:25478736

  2. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200mgpyrazole/kg/day for 3days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection.

  3. Comparison of the biliary excretion of the four isomers of bilirubin-IX in Wistar and homozygous Gunn rats.

    PubMed Central

    Blanckaert, N; Heirwegh, K P; Zaman, Z

    1977-01-01

    The biliary excretion of the four isomers of bilirubin-IX was studied in Wistar rats (JJ) and homozygous Gunn rats (jj). Synthetic preparations of 14C-labelled pigments were used. 1. After intravenous administration, the alpha-isomer was rapidly excreted in conjugated form in bile of Wistar rats. In Gunn rats excretion was insignificant. In contrast, both rat species promptly excreted the non-alpha-isomers at rates that were comparable with that found for bilirubin-IXalpha in Wistar rats. 2. In normal rats about 16% of the beta- and delta-isomers and at least 50% of the gamma-isomer were excreted as ester conjugates of the injected parent bile pigments. Conjugation of the beta- and delta-isomers had occurred exclusively at the carboxyl groups of pyrrole ring D and C respectively. For bilirubin-IXgamma no preference for any carboxyl group could be established. 3. In homozygous Gunn rats the non-alpha-isomers were apparently excreted chemically unaltered. This suggests that, as for bilirubin-IXalpha, conjugation of the non-alpha-isomers is also deficient in Gunn rats. PMID:880229

  4. [Postpartal serum bilirubin levels in the newborn after induction of labour with "prostaglandin cap" or oxytocin (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Coradello, H; Huber, J; Husslein, P

    1981-04-01

    In the course of a prospective study the development of Serum bilirubine levels was controlled in 90 neonates. In 30 cases labour had been induced by means of intravenous oxytocin infusion, in a further 30 cases by means of local peri-cervical prostaglandine E2 (PGE2)-application. The control group consisted of 30 children, with spontaneous onset of labour. Anamnesis, duration of gravidity, course of labour and method of delivery were the same in all groups; the neonates were all treated the same. The serum bilirubine was determined fotometrically with the Greiner Selective Analyzer GSA II on the 1st, 3rd and 5th post partum day and the results assessed by the multivariant analysis according to Newman-Keuls. No differences were found between the PGE2- and the control group, the bilirubine values of the oxytocin groups were significantly higher (p less than 0.001). Icteric neonates with serum bilirubine values of greater than 12 mg% were found more than double as often in the oxytocin group than in the PGE2- group (7:3). The results indicate, that for labour induction by pharmaceuticals, local application of PGE2 by means of a portio cap should be favored over intravenous oxytocin administration.

  5. Associated factors in modulating aflatoxin B1-albumin adduct level in three Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Zhi-Ming, Liu; Tang-Wei, Liu; Le-Qun, Li; Min-Hao, Peng; Xue, Qin; Lu-Nam, Yan; Ren-Xiang, Liang; Zong-Liang, Wei; Lian-Wen, Wang; Qiao, Wang; Han-Ming, Shen; Choon-Nam, Ong; Santella, Regina M

    2005-03-01

    To elucidate the potential factors modulating exposure to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in three Chinese populations, an epidemiologic study was conducted in Fusui County and Nanning City of Guangxi Province and Chengdu City of Sichuan Province. The incidence rates of hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) for males in these three regions were 92-97 per 100,000, 32-47 per 100,000, and 21 per 100,000, respectively. Eighty-nine residents from Fusui, 196 residents from Nanning, and 118 residents from Chengdu were screened for AFB1-albumin adduct (AAA) levels and hepatitis virus (HBV, HCV, HDV, HEV, and HGV) infections, as well as liver biochemistry (alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], alkaline phosphatase [ALP], y-glutamyl transpeptidase [GGT], 5'-nucleotidase, globulin [GLO], direct bilirubin, indirect bilirubin, and bile acid levels). At least one marker of hepatitis virus (HV) infection was present in 47.2% (42/89) of subjects from Fusui, while in Nanning and Chengdu the values were 15.8% (31/196) and 22.0% (26/118), respectively. In contrast to females, a higher level of AAA was observed in males; the difference was statistically significant in both the Nanning (P = 0.023) and the Chengdu (P = 0.026) subjects. In the Chengdu group, there was a significantly higher level of AAA in cases with HV infection (P = 0.041). There was a close association between AAA level and BMI in the adults without HV infection (r = 0.148, P = 0.044). Also, AAA was closely associated with DBIL and GGT in non-HV-infected minors (P < 0.05), closely associated with ALB, GLO, and GGT in HV-infected minors (P < 0.05), and closely associated with IBIL, GLO, TBA, and AST in non-HV-infected adults (P < 0.01). The co-effect of HV infection and AFB1 exposure may be responsible for the high risk of HCC in the Fusui region, whereas age, gender, BMI, and HV infection may modify individual aflatoxin levels. The relationship between AAA level and liver biochemistry indicates injury induced

  6. Experimental investigation of the serum albumin fascia microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shcherbak, Yu. P.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of biological liquids are reported. Structural effects observed in fascias are considered with account of the molecular features of albumin and the concept of supramolecular organization of polymers. It is revealed that the morphology of human serum albumin fascias depends on the concentration and quality of the solvent. It is shown that the water-salt fascias of albumin are more structured than water solutions with the same concentration.

  7. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J A; Cistola, D P

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted [1-13C]oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles (vesicles or albumin with oleic acid) and acceptor particles (fatty acid-free albumin or vesicles), the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to 80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to 90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin; at pH 5.4, less than or equal to 10% of the oleic acid was bound to albumin and greater than 90% was associated with vesicles. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The 13C NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data. PMID:3455761

  8. Transfer of Oleic Acid between Albumin and Phospholipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, James A.; Cistola, David P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by 13C NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted [1-13C]oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles (vesicles or albumin with oleic acid) and acceptor particles (fatty acid-free albumin or vesicles), the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with >= 80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was >= 90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin; at pH 5.4, <= 10% of the oleic acid was bound to albumin and >90% was associated with vesicles. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The 13C NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  9. Preoperative Body Mass Index, Blood Albumin and Triglycerides Predict Survival for Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin Zheng; Tao, Lin; Chen, Yun Zhao; Li, Xu Zhe; Dong, Yu Ling; Ma, Ya Jing; Li, Shu Gang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer (GC) is common and its prognosis is often poor due to difficulties in early diagnosis and optimal treatment strategies. TNM staging system is useful in predicting prognosis but only possible after surgery. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate prognostic factors/markers that may predict prognosis before surgery by which helps appropriate management decisions preoperatively. Methods A total of 320 GC patients were consecutively recruited from 2004 to 2013 and followed up for 127 months (10.6 years) after surgery. These patients’ were examined for body mass index (BMI) and blood levels of albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test were used to analyze long-term survival using the above potential risk markers. We first employed medians of these variables to reveal maximal potentials of the above prognostic predictors. Results Three major findings were obtained: (1) Preoperative BMI was positively correlated with albumin (r = 0.144, P<0.05) and triglyceride (r = 0.365, P<0.01), but negatively correlated with TNM staging (r = -0.265, P<0.05). Preoperative albumin levels were positively correlated with triglyceride (r = 0.173, P<0.05) but again, negatively correlated with TNM staging (r = -0.137, P<0.05); (2) Poor survival was observed in GC patients with lower levels of BMI (P = 0.028), albumin (P = 0.004), and triglyceride (P = 0.043), respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses suggested BMI, albumin and triglyceride to have survival-predictor powers similar to TNM system; and (3) Cox multi-factorial analyses demonstrated that age (P = 0.049), BMI (P = 0.016), cell differentiation (P = 0.001), and TNM staging (P = 0.011) were independent overall survival-predictors for GC patients. Conclusions Preoperative BMI, albumin, and triglyceride levels are capable of predicting survival for

  10. Development of an HPLC assay to study the effect of endogenous and exogenous substances on heat-induced aggregation of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Saso, L; Casini, M L; Valentini, G; Mattei, E; Panzironi, C; Silvestrini, B

    1998-03-01

    The mechanism of action of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs which are used in high doses in chronic inflammatory conditions is not clearly understood. Their known protein-stabilizing properties could play a significant role. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase may not be essential for their anti-rheumatic activity, since compounds with strong anti-denaturant properties and devoid of anti-inflammatory activity were shown to be effective in an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis. Hence, to develop new anti-rheumatic drugs it is essential that a simple in vitro method to evaluate the anti-denaturant activity of endogenous and exogenous compounds is available. We developed a new assay, using gel permeation high performance liquid chromatography, to study the effect of endogenous and exogenous compounds on heat-induced aggregation of human serum albumin in conditions in which protein precipitation does not occur. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like diclofenac, ibuprofen and naproxen inhibited the aggregation of albumin at low concentrations (EC50 10(-4)-10(-5) mol/l) comparable to those active in a classical turbidimetric method, whereas the effect of weak stabilizers, like sodium cloride and formic, fumaric, maleic, malonic, and succinic acid (EC50 10(-1)-10(-2) mol/l in the Mizushima test) was not detectable. Furthermore, the HPLC assay allowed the examination of a number of coloured substances, including bilirubin, which appeared to be a strong stabilizer of its physiological carrier, albumin. These data could be clinically relevant, since the drugs examined are used at very high doses in rheumatoid arthritis and related conditions, with plasma levels that could cause significant stabilization of serum albumin and perhaps other proteins.

  11. Smartphone based point-of-care detector of urine albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Svoboda, Ondrej; Koscova, Pavlina; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Albumin plays an important role in human body. Its changed level in urine may indicate serious kidney disorders. We present a new point-of-care solution for sensitive detection of urine albumin - the miniature optical adapter for iPhone with in-built optical filters and a sample slot. The adapter exploits smart-phone flash to generate excitation light and camera to measure the level of emitted light. Albumin Blue 580 is used as albumin reagent. The proposed light-weight adapter can be produced at low cost using a 3D printer. Thus, the miniaturized detector is easy to use out of lab.

  12. Reabsorption kinetics of albumin from pleural space of dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, M.; Parker, J.C.; Pistolesi, M.; Cartledge, J.T.; Martin, D.J.; Giuntini, C.; Taylor, A.E.

    1988-08-01

    The reabsorption of albumin from the pleural space was measured in eight dogs receiving 0.5 ml intrapleural injection of /sup 131/I-labeled albumin and a simultaneous intravenous injection of /sup 125/I-labeled albumin. Plasma curves for both tracers were obtained over 24 h. The /sup 125/I-albumin curve served as input function of albumin for interstitial spaces, including pleura, whereas the /sup 131/I-albumin curve represented the output function from pleural space. The frequency function of albumin transit times from pleural space to plasma was obtained by deconvolution of input-output plasma curves. Plasma recovery of /sup 131/I-albumin was complete by 24 h, and the mean transit time from pleura to plasma averaged 7.95 +/- 1.57 (SD) h. Albumin reabsorption occurred mainly via lymphatics as indicated by experiments in 16 additional dogs in which their right lymph ducts or thoracic ducts were ligated before intrapleural injection. A pleural lymph flow of 0.020 +/- 0.003 (SD) ml.kg-1.h-1 was estimated, which is balanced by a comparable filtration of fluid into the pleural space. This suggests that, under physiological conditions, the subpleural lymphatics represent an important control mechanism of pleural liquid pressure.

  13. Binding and hydrolysis of soman by human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nachon, Florian; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Verdier, Laurent; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Brasme, Bernardo; Gillon, Emilie; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana; Masson, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Human plasma and fatty acid free human albumin were incubated with soman at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C. Four methods were used to monitor the reaction of albumin with soman: progressive inhibition of the aryl acylamidase activity of albumin, the release of fluoride ion from soman, 31P NMR, and mass spectrometry. Inhibition (phosphonylation) was slow with a bimolecular rate constant of 15 +/- 3 M(-1) min (-1). MALDI-TOF and tandem mass spectrometry of the soman-albumin adduct showed that albumin was phosphonylated on tyrosine 411. No secondary dealkylation of the adduct (aging) occurred. Covalent docking simulations and 31P NMR experiments showed that albumin has no enantiomeric preference for the four stereoisomers of soman. Spontaneous reactivation at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C, measured as regaining of aryl acylamidase activity and decrease of covalent adduct (pinacolyl methylphosphonylated albumin) by NMR, occurred at a rate of 0.0044 h (-1), indicating that the adduct is quite stable ( t1/2 = 6.5 days). At pH 7.4 and 22 degrees C, the covalent soman-albumin adduct, measured by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, was more stable ( t1/2 = 20 days). Though the concentration of albumin in plasma is very high (about 0.6 mM), its reactivity with soman (phosphonylation and phosphotriesterase activity) is too slow to play a major role in detoxification of the highly toxic organophosphorus compound soman. Increasing the bimolecular rate constant of albumin for organophosphates is a protein engineering challenge that could lead to a new class of bioscavengers to be used against poisoning by nerve agents. Soman-albumin adducts detected by mass spectrometry could be useful for the diagnosis of soman exposure. PMID:18163544

  14. Intrarenal distribution of inorganic mercury and albumin after coadministration

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K. ); Barfuss, D.W. )

    1993-01-01

    The renal disposition and the intrarenal distribution of albumin and mercury were studied simultaneously in rats co-injected with a 0.5-[mu]mol/kg dose of albumin and a 0.25-[mu]mol/kg dose of inorganic mercury at 2, 5, 30, and 180 min after injection. These studies were carried out to test the hypothesis that one of the mechanisms involved in the renal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury is cotransport with albumin. By the end of the first 2 min after injection, the ratio of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer strip of the outer medulla was approximately 2.6 and 1.6, respectively. Both the cortex and outer stripe contain segments of the proximal tubule, and it is these segments that have been shown to be principally involved in the renal tubular uptake of both albumin and inorganic mercury. The ration increased slightly in these two zones after 5 and 20 min after injection. These data demonstrate that there is a relatively close relationship in the renal content of inorganic mercury and albumin. However, the ratios are significantly greater than the ratio of inorganic mercury of albumin in the injection solution, which was 0.5. After 180 min following co-injection, the ratio increased to about 38 in the cortex and 15 in the outer stripe. This increase in the ratio is probably related to the metabolism of albumin. Based on the ratios of inorganic mercury to albumin in the renal cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla, it appears that some proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury occurs by mechanisms other than endocytotic cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin. However, since the ratios were small during the early times after injection, cotransport of inorganic mercury with albumin cannot be excluded as one of the mechanisms involved in the proximal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury. 32 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Total protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  16. [Influence of the albumin fraction in the plasma oncotic pressure (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Portillo, M; Trujillo Rodríguez, F; Aznar Reig, A

    1979-12-15

    This work analyzes the influence which albumin fraction exerts upon plasma oncotic pressure. With this objective three different groups were studied, each one of which was composed of subjects with identical total proteinemia and variable albuminemia. The first group: nine subjects with 6.2 g/100 ml proteinemia and albumin values between 3.2 and 3.8 g/100 ml; the second group: seven healthy subjects with 6.4 g/100 ml proteinemia and the level of albumina between 3 and 4 g/100 ml; the third group: subjects with proteinemia at 6.6 g/100 ml and extreme values of albumin between 3.1 and 4.3 g/100 ml. Plasma oncotic pressure was determined by means of an electronic osmometer, according to the described technique. With a proteinemia constant at 6.2 g/100 ml, a 0.6 percent fluctuation of the albumin concentration induced a variation in the plasma oncotic pressure of up to 20.4 per cent. In cases of proteinemia remaining constant at 6.4 g/100 ml, the oscillation of albumin levels between 3 and 4 g/100 ml represented a change in the plasmatic oncotic pressure of 32.58 per cent. In the third group, the influence of the albuminemia was lesser (23.1 per cent variability in the plasma oncotic pressure, with an oscillation of 1.2 g/100 ml in albuminemia). The existence of variable values of plasma oncotic pressure corresponding to cases with identical proteinemia and albuminemia, lead us to consider the powerful influence exerted upon the plasma oncotic pressure by other factors which affect the mass-structure and the electrical charges of proteins. PMID:529866

  17. Changes in erythrocytic deformability and plasma viscosity in neonatal ictericia.

    PubMed

    Bonillo-Perales, A; Muñoz-Hoyos, A; Martínez-Morales, A; Molina-Carballo, A; Uberos-Fernández, J; Puertas-Prieto, A

    1999-01-01

    We studied 45 full-term newborns divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 17 newborns with bilirubin <10 mg/dL; Group 2: 18 newborns with hemolytic ictericia (bilirubin 11-20 mg/dL) and Group 3: 10 newborns with moderate hemolytic ictericia needing exchange transfusion. The following were studied: erythrocytic deformability, plasma viscosity, plasmatic osmolarity, seric bilirubin, bilirubin/albumin ratio, free fatty acids and corpuscular volume of the erythrocytes. In full-term newborns, the following are risk factors for increased erythrocytic rigidity: neonatal hemolytic illness (p = 0.004, odds ratio: 7.02), increases in total bilirubin (p = 0.02, odds ratio: 4.3) and increases in the bilirubin/albumin ratio (p = 0.025, odds ratio: 4.25). Furthermore, the most important risk factor for high plasma viscosity is also neonatal hemolytic illness (p = 0.01, odds ratio: 2.30). The role of total bilirubin is also important (p = 0.09, odds ratio: 2.10), while that of the bilirubin/albumin ratio (p = 0.012, NS) is less so. The greater the hemolysis, the greater the erythrocytic rigidity and plasma viscosity (p < 0.01). In full-term newborns with moderate ictericia, hemolytic illness and increases in the bilirubin/albumin ratio are accompanied by rheological alterations that could affect cerebral microcirculation and cause a neurological deficit not exclusively related to the levels of bilirubin in plasma.

  18. Synthesis and separation by thin-layer chromatography of bilirubin-IX isomers. Their identification as tetrapyrroles and dipyrrolic ethyl anthranilate azo derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Blanckaert, N; Heirwegh, K P; Compernolle, F

    1976-01-01

    Procedures for the synthesis, separation and determination of structure of the bilirubin-IX isomers are described. 1. The four biliverdin-IX isomers were prepared by oxidative cleavage of haemin and were separated as their dimethyl esters. The individual esters were reduced with NaBH4, and the bilirubin esters obtained were subjected to alkaline hydrolysis yielding the corresponding bilirubin-IX isomers. 2. The bilirubin-IX isomers were structurally characterized (a) at the tetrapyrrolic stage by mass spectrometry of their trimethylsilyl derivatives and (b) by formation and structural analysis of their dipyrrolic ethyl anthranilate azo derivatives. 3. The absorption spectrum of bilirubin-IX alpha differed strikingly from the spectra of the other isomers. The presence of a pronounced shoulder around 453 nm in the spectrum of bilirubin-IXbeta allows easy differentiation from bilirubin-IXdelta. Methylation of the carboxyl groups largely eliminates the spectral differences between the IXalpha- and non-alpha isomers. 4. The bilirubin-IX isomers are conveniently separated by t.l.c. Detection and unequivocal identification is possible on a micro-scale by (a) t.l.c. with respect to reference compounds and (b) subsequent formation and t.l.c. of the more stable ethyl anthranilate azopigments. 5. Pronounced differences in polarity, i.e. solvent distribution, between the bilirubin-IX isomers indicate that a re-evaluation of conclusions reached previously with regard to the presence in, or absence from, biological fluids of some isomers and their relative amounts is needed. PMID:938489

  19. Investigation of bovine serum albumin glycation by THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, Olga P.; Nazarov, Maxim M.; Shkurinov, Alexander P.

    2016-04-01

    Protein glycation is accelerated under hyperglycemic conditions resulting to loss in the structure and biological functions of proteins. The transmission THz spectroscopy has been used for measuring of bovine serum albumin glycation dynamics. It was found that amplitude of albumin THz absorption depends on type of sugars and incubation time.

  20. Albumin Is Recycled from the Primary Urine by Tubular Transcytosis

    PubMed Central

    Tenten, Verena; Menzel, Sylvia; Kunter, Uta; Sicking, Eva-Maria; van Roeyen, Claudia R. C.; Sanden, Silja K.; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Boor, Peter; Fuss, Astrid; Uhlig, Sandra; Lanzmich, Regina; Willemsen, Brigith; Dijkman, Henry; Grepl, Martin; Wild, Klemens; Kriz, Wilhelm; Smeets, Bart; Floege, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Under physiologic conditions, significant amounts of plasma protein pass the renal filter and are reabsorbed by proximal tubular cells, but it is not clear whether the endocytosed protein, particularly albumin, is degraded in lysosomes or returned to the circulatory system intact. To resolve this question, a transgenic mouse with podocyte-specific expression of doxycycline-inducible tagged murine albumin was developed. To assess potential glomerular backfiltration, two types of albumin with different charges were expressed. On administration of doxycycline, podocytes expressed either of the two types of transgenic albumin, which were secreted into the primary filtrate and reabsorbed by proximal tubular cells, resulting in serum accumulation. Renal transplantation experiments confirmed that extrarenal transcription of transgenic albumin was unlikely to account for these results. Genetic deletion of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), which rescues albumin and IgG from lysosomal degradation, abolished transcytosis of both types of transgenic albumin and IgG in proximal tubular cells. In summary, we provide evidence of a transcytosis within the kidney tubular system that protects albumin and IgG from lysosomal degradation, allowing these proteins to be recycled intact. PMID:23970123

  1. Facile cell patterning on an albumin-coated surface.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Uemura, Toshimasa; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2008-08-19

    Fabrication of micropatterned surfaces to organize and control cell adhesion and proliferation is an indispensable technique for cell-based technologies. Although several successful strategies for creating cellular micropatterns on substrates have been demonstrated, a complex multistep process and requirements for special and expensive equipment or materials limit their prevalence as a general experimental tool. To circumvent these problems, we describe here a novel facile fabrication method for a micropatterned surface for cell patterning by utilizing the UV-induced conversion of the cell adhesive property of albumin, which is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. An albumin-coated surface was prepared by cross-linking albumin with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether and subsequent casting of the cross-linked albumin solution on the cell culture dish. While cells did not attach to the albumin surface prepared in this way, UV exposure renders the surface cell-adhesive. Thus, surface micropatterning was achieved simply by exposing the albumin-coated surface to UV light through a mask with the desired pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were inoculated on the patterned albumin substrates, and cells attached and spread in a highly selective manner according to the UV-irradiated pattern. Although detailed investigation of the molecular-level mechanism concerning the change in cell adhesiveness of the albumin-coated surface is required, the present results would give a novel facile method for the fabrication of cell micropatterned surfaces. PMID:18627191

  2. Self-assembly of aqueous bilirubin ditaurate, a natural conjugated bile pigment, to contraposing enantiomeric dimers and M(-) and P(+) tetramers and their selective hydrophilic disaggregation by monomers and micelles of bile salts.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-02-24

    The solution behavior of bilirubin ditaurate (BDT), the first naturally occurring conjugated bile pigment to be physically and chemically characterized, was assessed in aqueous solution and in monomeric and micellar solutions of common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that BDT self-associates in monomer-dimer equilibria between 1 and 500 μM, forming limiting tetramers at low millimolar concentrations. Self-association was enthalpically driven with ΔG values of ≈5 kcal/mol, suggesting strong hydrophobic interactions. Added NaCl and decreases in temperature shifted the oligomerization to lower BDT concentrations. On the basis of circular dichroism spectra and the limiting size of the self-aggregates, we infer that the tetramers are composed of 2P(+) and 2M(-) enantiomeric BDT pairs in "ridge-tile" conformations interacting in a "double-bookend" structure. With added monomeric BS, blue shifts in the UV-vis spectra and tight isosbestic points revealed that BDT/BS heterodimers form, followed by BDT "decorating" BS micelles mostly via hydrophilic interactions. Conformational enantiomerism, fluorescence intensities, and anisotropy, as well as resistance of the hybrid particles to disaggregation in 6 M urea, suggested that two or three hydrogen-bonding sites bound BDT monomers to the hydroxyl groups of BS, possibly via pyrrole-π-orbital-OH interactions. BDT stabilized these interactions by enveloping the BS in its "ridge-tile" pincers with variable strain that maximized van der Waals interactions. Possibly because the BDT molecule becomes highly strained with BS subtending a 7β-hydroxyl group, BDT became totally resistant to oxidation in air. This work predicts that, because of BS dissolution of the BDT self-aggregates, BS/bilirubin hybrid particles, which are stabilized hydrophilically, are likely to be the dominant mode of transport for all conjugated bilirubins in bile.

  3. Self-assembly of aqueous bilirubin ditaurate, a natural conjugated bile pigment, to contraposing enantiomeric dimers and M(-) and P(+) tetramers and their selective hydrophilic disaggregation by monomers and micelles of bile salts.

    PubMed

    Neubrand, Michael W; Carey, Martin C; Laue, Thomas M

    2015-02-24

    The solution behavior of bilirubin ditaurate (BDT), the first naturally occurring conjugated bile pigment to be physically and chemically characterized, was assessed in aqueous solution and in monomeric and micellar solutions of common taurine-conjugated bile salts (BS). Analytical ultracentrifugation revealed that BDT self-associates in monomer-dimer equilibria between 1 and 500 μM, forming limiting tetramers at low millimolar concentrations. Self-association was enthalpically driven with ΔG values of ≈5 kcal/mol, suggesting strong hydrophobic interactions. Added NaCl and decreases in temperature shifted the oligomerization to lower BDT concentrations. On the basis of circular dichroism spectra and the limiting size of the self-aggregates, we infer that the tetramers are composed of 2P(+) and 2M(-) enantiomeric BDT pairs in "ridge-tile" conformations interacting in a "double-bookend" structure. With added monomeric BS, blue shifts in the UV-vis spectra and tight isosbestic points revealed that BDT/BS heterodimers form, followed by BDT "decorating" BS micelles mostly via hydrophilic interactions. Conformational enantiomerism, fluorescence intensities, and anisotropy, as well as resistance of the hybrid particles to disaggregation in 6 M urea, suggested that two or three hydrogen-bonding sites bound BDT monomers to the hydroxyl groups of BS, possibly via pyrrole-π-orbital-OH interactions. BDT stabilized these interactions by enveloping the BS in its "ridge-tile" pincers with variable strain that maximized van der Waals interactions. Possibly because the BDT molecule becomes highly strained with BS subtending a 7β-hydroxyl group, BDT became totally resistant to oxidation in air. This work predicts that, because of BS dissolution of the BDT self-aggregates, BS/bilirubin hybrid particles, which are stabilized hydrophilically, are likely to be the dominant mode of transport for all conjugated bilirubins in bile. PMID:25671490

  4. Bilirubin and amyloid-beta peptide induce cytochrome c release through mitochondrial membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, C. M.; Solá, S.; Silva, R.; Brites, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of bilirubin encephalopathy and Alzheimer's disease appears to result from accumulation of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) and amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, respectively, which may cause apoptosis. Permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane, with release of intermembrane proteins, has been strongly implicated in cell death. Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability is one pathway by which ursodeoxycholate (UDC) and tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) protect against apoptosis in hepatic and nonhepatic cells. In this study, we further characterize UCB- and Abeta-induced cytotoxicty in isolated neural cells, and investigate membrane perturbation during incubation of isolated mitochondria with both agents. In addition, we evaluate whether the anti-apoptotic drugs UDC and TUDC prevent any changes from occurring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Primary rat neuron and astrocyte cultures were incubated with UCB or Abeta peptide, either alone or in the presence of UDC. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation and nuclear morphological changes. Isolated mitochondria were treated with each toxic, either alone or in combination with UDC, TUDC, or cyclosporine A. Mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically and cytochrome c protein levels determined by Western blot. RESULTS: Incubation of neural cells with both UCB and Abeta induced apoptosis (p < 0.01). Coincubation with UDC reduced apoptosis by > 50% (p < 0.05). Both toxins caused membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria (p < 0.001); whereas, pretreatment with UDC was protective (p < 0.05). TUDC was even more effective at preventing matrix swelling mediated by Abeta (p < 0.01). UDC and TUDC markedly reduced cytochrome c release associated with mitochondrial permeabilization induced by UCB and Abeta, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly inhibited mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c efflux mediated by UCB (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: UCB and Abeta peptide

  5. Interaction of coffee compounds with serum albumins. Part II: Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Guercia, Elena; Forzato, Cristina; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Cafestol and 16-O-methylcafestol are diterpenes present in coffee, but whilst cafestol is found in both Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC) was reported to be specific of only C. canephora. The interactions of such compounds, with serum albumins, have been studied. Three albumins have been considered, namely human serum albumin (HSA), fatty acid free HSA (ffHSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The proteins interact with the diterpenes at the interface between Sudlow site I and the fatty acid binding site 6 in a very peculiar way, leading to a significant change in the secondary structure. The diterpenes do not displace reference binding drugs of site 2, but rather they enhance the affinity of the site for the drugs. They, therefore, may alter the pharmacokinetic profile of albumin - bound drugs.

  6. Albumin Naskapi variant in North American Indians and Eti Turks.

    PubMed

    Franklin, S G; Wolf, S I; Ozdemir, Y; Yüregir, G T; Isbir, T; Blumberg, B S

    1980-09-01

    Both conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and a new type of electrophoretic screening procedure indicate that the polymorphic albumin variants Naskapi, found chiefly in the Naskapi Indians of Quebec, and Mersin, found in the Eti Turks of southeastern Turkey, are molecularly identical or very similar and that the amino acid substitution site in these variants is located between residues 330 and 446. This discovery is consistent with a genetic relationship between the Eti Turks and American Indians. We also report a new variant found in the Eti Turks, albumin Adana, which migrates similarly to albumin B on conventional gels but which our new system shows to differ from the common albumin A and albumin B by a substitution between residues 549 and 585.

  7. Ghrelin binding to serum albumin and its biological impact.

    PubMed

    Lufrano, Daniela; Trejo, Sebastián A; Llovera, Ramiro E; Salgueiro, Mariano; Fernandez, Gimena; Martínez Damonte, Valentina; González Flecha, F Luis; Raingo, Jesica; Ermácora, Mario R; Perelló, Mario

    2016-11-15

    Ghrelin is an octanoylated peptide hormone that plays a key role in the regulation of the body weight and glucose homeostasis. In plasma, ghrelin circulates bound to larger proteins whose identities are partially established. Here, we used size exclusion chromatography, mass spectrometry and isothermal titration microcalorimetry to show that ghrelin interacts with serum albumin. Furthermore, we found that such interaction displays an estimated dissociation constant (KD) in the micromolar range and involves albumin fatty-acid binding sites as well as the octanoyl moiety of ghrelin. Notably, albumin-ghrelin interaction reduces the spontaneous deacylation of the hormone. Both in vitro experiments-assessing ghrelin ability to inhibit calcium channels-and in vivo studies-evaluating ghrelin orexigenic effects-indicate that the binding to albumin affects the bioactivity of the hormone. In conclusion, our results suggest that ghrelin binds to serum albumin and that this interaction impacts on the biological activity of the hormone. PMID:27431015

  8. Liver function tests and urinary albumin in house painters with previous heavy exposure to organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, I; Nise, G; Hedenborg, G; Högberg, M; Vesterberg, O

    1994-05-01

    The serum activities or concentrations of aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), alanine aminotransferase (ALAT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), bilirubin (BIL), cholic acid (CHOL), chenodeoxycholic acid (CHENO), and transferrin with isoelectric point 5.7, and the urinary excretion of albumin were determined among male current or former house painters (n = 135) and house carpenters (n = 71) who had worked in their trades for at least 10 years before 1970. Workers who showed a value above the 90th percentile among the carpenters in at least one of the tests ASAT, ALAT, GGT, BIL, CHOL, or CHENO were regarded as showing "possible signs of liver dysfunction". Each participant's lifetime solvent exposure was evaluated by interview. The painters were divided into categories with low, intermediate, and heavy cumulative exposure during life (LTSE) or during the most exposed year (MEYSE). All participants stated none or slight recent exposure. The prevalence of possible signs of liver dysfunction increased with solvent exposure category according to LTSE as well as MEYSE with a numerically higher risk estimate in the heavy exposure category for MEYSE than for LTSE. ALP activity increased with exposure category according to both exposure estimates. This increase seemed to be due to an interaction between exposure to solvents and current or previous long term intake of medicines potentially toxic to the liver. None of these results was affected by whether or not the subjects had been exposed to solvents during the year before the investigation. The exposure to solvents was not significantly related to any other outcome variable. It is concluded that long term heavy exposure to solvents may elicit changes in conventional liver function tests indicative of a mild chronic effect on the liver. The findings also suggest that heavy solvent exposure during short time periods is a more likely cause of the findings than lifetime cumulative

  9. Study of the cross-reaction between rabbit anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies and equine serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, H.

    1965-01-01

    Cross-reactions between bovine serum albumin and equine serum albumin were studied using heterologous soluble complexes and specifically purified cross-reacting antibody. Experiments with soluble complexes showed that homologous antigen can displace heterologous antigen specifically bound to antibody but heterologous antigen cannot displace homologous antigen. On gel precipitation tests a specific precipitation resulted when heterologous soluble complex reacted with homologous antigen. By using equine serum albumin conjugated to polyaminopolystyrene the cross-reacting antibodies from anti-bovine serum albumin imune sera could be isolated. These are divalent 7S, γ-globulin antibodies. A figure of cross-reaction was obtained when these purified antibodies were tested by double diffusion in agar with bovine and equine serum albumins. The results obtained both with soluble complexes and with purified antibody support the view that cross-reacting antibody is more avid for the homologous than for the heterologous antigen. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:14245318

  10. Radioactive excretion in human milk following administration of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Pittard, W.B.; Merkatz, R.; Fletcher, B.D.

    1982-08-01

    Albumin-tagged sodium pertechnetate (technetium) is routinely used in nuclear medicine for scanning procedures of the lung. The rate of excretion of this radionuclide into breast milk and the resultant potential radiation hazard to the nursing infant have received little attention. Therefore the milk from a nursing mother who required a lung scan because of suspected pulmonary emboli using an intravenous injection of 4 mCi of /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated human serum albumin was monitored. Albumin tagging severely limited the entrance of technetium into her milk and the radioactivity of the milk returned to base line by 24 hours. A total of 2.02 muCi of technetium was measured in the 24-hour milk collection after technetium injection and 94% of this amount was excreted by 15.5 hours. This amount of technetium administered orally to a newborn would deliver a total body radiation dose of .3 mrad. Therefore, an infant would receive trivial doses of radiation if breast-feeding were resumed 15.5 hours after administration of the radionuclide to the mother and nursing can clearly be resumed safely 24 hours after injection.

  11. Lysozyme and bilirubin bind to ACE and regulate its conformation and shedding

    PubMed Central

    Danilov, Sergei M.; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Akinbi, Henry T.; Nesterovitch, Andrew B.; Epshtein, Yuliya; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Kryukova, Olga V.; Piegeler, Tobias; Golukhova, Elena Z.; Schwartz, David E.; Dull, Randal O.; Minshall, Richard D.; Kost, Olga A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) hydrolyzes numerous peptides and is a critical participant in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling. Elevated tissue ACE levels are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Blood ACE concentrations are determined by proteolytic cleavage of ACE from the endothelial cell surface, a process that remains incompletely understood. In this study, we identified a novel ACE gene mutation (Arg532Trp substitution in the N domain of somatic ACE) that increases blood ACE activity 7-fold and interrogated the mechanism by which this mutation significantly increases blood ACE levels. We hypothesized that this ACE mutation disrupts the binding site for blood components which may stabilize ACE conformation and diminish ACE shedding. We identified the ACE-binding protein in the blood as lysozyme and also a Low Molecular Weight (LMW) ACE effector, bilirubin, which act in concert to regulate ACE conformation and thereby influence ACE shedding. These results provide mechanistic insight into the elevated blood level of ACE observed in patients on ACE inhibitor therapy and elevated blood lysozyme and ACE levels in sarcoidosis patients. PMID:27734897

  12. Bilirubin oxidase based enzymatic air-breathing cathode: Operation under pristine and contaminated conditions.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Erable, Benjamin; Schuler, Andrew; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-01

    The performance of bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based air breathing cathode was constantly monitored over 45 days. The effect of electrolyte composition on the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) output was investigated. Particularly, deactivation of the electrocatalytic activity of the enzyme in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and in activated sludge (AS) was evaluated. The greatest drop in current density was observed during the first 3 days of constant operation with a decrease of ~60 μA cm(-2) day(-1). The rate of decrease slowed to ~10 μA cm(-2) day(-1) (day 3 to 9) and then to ~1.5 μA cm(-2)day(-1) thereafter (day 9 to 45). Despite the constant decrease in output, the BOx cathode generated residual current after 45 days operations with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 475 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Enzyme deactivation was also studied in AS to simulate an environment close to the real waste operation with pollutants, solid particles and bacteria. The presence of low-molecular weight soluble contaminants was identified as the main reason for an immediate enzymatic deactivation within few hours of cathode operation. The presence of solid particles and bacteria does not affect the natural degradation of the enzyme.

  13. Development of a diagnostic system for bilirubin detection in cerebral spinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadri, Prashant R.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Majumdar, Anindya; Morgan, Chad J.; Zuccarello, Mario; Pyne, Gail J.; Dulaney, Elizabeth; Caffery, James, Jr.; Shukla, Rakesh; Beyette, Fred R., Jr.

    2004-11-01

    A weakened portion of an artery in the brain leads to a medical condition known as a cerebral aneurysm. A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) occurs when an aneurysm ruptures. For those individuals suspected of having a SAH, a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the brain usually demonstrates evidence of the bleeding. However, in a considerable portion of people, the CT scan is unable to detect the blood that has escaped from the blood vessel. Recent studies have indicated nearly 30% of patients with a SAH are initially misdiagnosed. For circumstances when a SAH is suspected despite a normal CT scan, physicians make the diagnosis of SAH by performing a spinal tap. A spinal tap uses a needle to sample the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from the patient"s lumbar spine. However, it is also possible for blood to be introduced into the CSF as a result of the spinal tap procedure. Therefore, an effective solution is required to help medical personnel differentiate between the blood that results from a tap and that from a ruptured aneurysm. In this paper, the development of a prototype is described which is sensitive and specific for measuring bilirubin in CSF, hemorrhagic-CSF and CSF-like solutions. To develop this instrument a combination of spectrophotometric analysis, custom data analysis software and other hardware interfaces are assembled that lay the foundation for the development of portable and user-friendly equipment suitable for assisting trained medical personnel with the diagnosis of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm.

  14. Rethinking the immune properties of bilirubin in viral hepatitis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Corral-Jara, Karla F; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge L; Realpe, Mauricio; Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia; Fierro, Nora A

    2015-01-01

    Communication between the immune system and metabolic components can be exemplified by the process of heme catabolism. The immunomodulatory functions of the enzymes, substrates and active products related to catabolism of the heme group have been extensively studied. Bilirubin (BR), the final breakdown product of heme, is primarily considered to be a toxic waste product but has recently been considered to be an immunomodulatory metabolite. Through mechanisms that include intracellular signaling and transcriptional control, BR affects those immune cell functions that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. During the pathogenesis of viral hepatitis, the heme degradation pathway is disrupted, resulting in changes to normal BR concentrations. These alterations have been previously studied mainly as a consequence of the infection. However, little is known about the potential immunomodulatory role played by BR in the development of infectious hepatocellular diseases. Differences in BR levels in the context of viral hepatitis are likely to provide important insights into the metabolite-mediated mechanisms controlling the immune responses underlying both the long-term persistence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the resolution of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection during the acute phase. In this review, the cross-talk between heme catabolism and immune function is described in detail. Special emphasis is given to discoveries that hold promise for identifying immunologic features of metabolic products in the resolution of viral diseases. PMID:26719800

  15. [Refractometric measurement of total serum protein, comparison of refractometry and biuret test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liappis, N; Jäkel, A

    1978-07-01

    Study on the Refractometric Determination of Total Protein in Serum, Comparison of the Refractometric and Biuret Method. Total protein concentration in serum was determined by the aid of the Abbé-refractometer and the biuret method. Both methods showed a good precision and accuracy. The investigation was carried out in 241 sera with normal bilirubin (up to 1 mg/100 ml), cholesterol (up to 200 mg/100 ml) and urea (up to 23,0 mg/100 ml) concentration, in 43 sera with increased (10,6-26,6 mg/100 ml) bilirubin concentration, in 129 sera with increased (200-520 mg/100 ml) cholesterol concentration and in 43 sera with increased (23,0-155,3 mg/100 ml) urea concentration. The comparison of the refractometric values with the values obtained by the biuret method in the 241 sera with normal bilirubin, cholesterol and urea concentration (correlation coefficient = 0,971) showed a close correlation and in the 43 sera with increased bilirubin concentration (correlation coefficient = 0,958) an acceptable correlation. However no close correlations were observed in the 129 sera with increased cholesterol concentration and in the 43 sera with increased urea concentration. The correlation lines diverged proportional with the increase of cholesterol and urea concentration from the expected correlation lines.

  16. Studies on preparing and adsorption property of grafting terpolymer microbeads of PEI-GMA/AM/MBA for bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Baojiao; Lei, Haibo; Jiang, Liding; Zhu, Yong

    2007-06-15

    Crosslinking copolymer microbeads with a diameter range of 100-150 microm were synthesized by suspension copolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), acrylamide (AM) and N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA). Subsequently, polyethyleneimine (PEI) was grafted on the surfaces of the terpolymer microbeads GMA/AM/MBA via the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups, and the grafting microbeads PEI-GMA/AM/MBA were prepared. In this paper, the adsorption property of the grafting microbeads for bilirubin was mainly investigated, and the effects of various factors, such as pH value, ionic strength and grafting degree of PEI on the surface of grafting microbeads and the adsorption capacity of the grafting microbeads for bilirubin were examined. The batch adsorption experiment results show that by right of the action of grafted polyamine macromolecules PEI, the grafting microbeads PEI-GMA/AM/MBA have quite strong adsorption ability for bilirubin; the isotherm adsorption conforms to Freundlich equation. The pH value of the medium affects the adsorption capacity greatly, As in the nearly neutral solutions with pH 6, the grafting microbeads have the strongest adsorption ability for bilirubin, whereas in acidic and basic solutions their adsorption ability is weak. The ionic strength hardly affects the adsorption ability of the grafting microbeads. The grafting degree of PEI on the surfaces of the grafting microbeads also has a great effect on the adsorption capacity, and higher the grafting degree of PEI on the surface of the microbead PEI-GMA/AM/MBA, the stronger is the adsorption ability of the microbeads.

  17. Comparison of Albumin, Hydroxyethyl Starch and Ringer Lactate Solution as Priming Fluid for Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Paediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Mrugesh; Solanki, Atul; Pandya, Himani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In paediatric cardiac surgery, there is still not any information with regard to the best choice of priming fluids for Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB). Albumin, Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES) & ringer lactate are equally used, but each has its advantages & disadvantages. Albumin & HES had better fluid balance which affect outcome in paediatric cardiac surgery significantly. Aim To compare priming solution containing albumin, hydroxyethyl starch and ringer lactate during elective open-heart surgery in paediatrics aged up to 3 years. Materials and Methods All patients were managed by standardized institution protocol and were randomly distributed into three groups based on the priming solution which is used in the CPB Circuit and having 35 patients in each group. Group A: Receive albumin 10 ml/kg in priming solution, Group B: Receive Hydroxyethyl starch (HES130/0.4) 6% 20ml/kg in priming solution, Group C: Receive ringer lactate priming solution. Primary outcome variable included perioperative haemoglobin, total protein, colloid osmotic pressure, platelets, fluid balance, urine output, post-operative blood loss, blood products usage, renal & liver function, extubation time, ICU stay & outcome. Results Patients receiving albumin had higher perioperative platelet count, total protein level & colloid osmotic pressure, lesser post-operative blood loss & blood products requirement. Patients receiving HES had lower level of platelets postoperatively than ringer lactate group but not associated with increase blood loss. HES did not affect renal function & haemostasis in this dose. Patients receiving ringer lactate had positive fluid balance intraoperatively. All three groups have similar effect on renal & liver function, urine output, time to extubation, ICU stay & outcome. Conclusion We conclude that albumin is expensive but better prime as maintain haemostasis, colloid oncotic pressure & reduced blood product requirement. HES will not hamper haemostasis & renal

  18. Nephroprotective Potential of Human Albumin Infusion: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, Christian J; Joannidis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Albumin infusion improves renal function in cirrhosis; however, mechanisms are incompletely understood. In clinical practice, human albumin is used in various intensive care unit indications to deal with a wide range of problems, from volume replacement in hypovolemic shock, or sepsis, to treatment of ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Against the background of the results of recent studies on the use of human albumin in septic patients, the importance of the natural colloid in these critically ill patients is being redefined. In addition to the hemodynamic effects of administration of human albumin impacting on sympathetic tone, attention is being paid to other effects in which its pharmacodynamics is associated with the physiological importance of endogenous albumin. The morbidity and mortality data discussed in this paper support the importance of both the hemodynamic and the pharmacological effects of the administration of human albumin in various indications. The contribution that human albumin could make towards the maintenance of renal function in the course and treatment of severe sepsis and cirrhosis of the liver is the subject of this narrative review. PMID:26136776

  19. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  20. Transport of nitrated albumin across continuous vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Dan; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B.

    2002-01-01

    Because modification of plasma albumin on tyrosine residues generates nitrated albumin (NOA) that may function as a mechanism of nitrogen monoxide clearance from microcirculation, we investigated biochemicaly and morphologically the cell surface binding and the transendothelial transport of NOA. An electron microscopic study was carried out with mouse lungs and hearts perfused in situ with NOA and NOA-Au complexes. The results indicate that NOA-Au can bind to the endothelial cell surface, and its binding can be blocked by albumin plus nitrotyrosine (NO-tyrosine) or abolished by excess NOA. We detected NOA-Au into perivascular spaces as early as 30 sec after the beginning of its perfusion. NOA, unlike native albumin, leaves the vascular lumina via both endothelial caveolae and open junctions. By cross-linking and ligand blotting analysis, we showed that NOA interacted with the same albumin binding proteins of 16–18, 30–32, 60, and 74 kDa as native albumin. ELISA performed on tissue homogenates obtained from the same specimens showed that NOA transport was 2- to 4-fold greater than native albumin. The augmented transendothelial transport of NOA reflects its transcytosis as well as its exit from the microcirculation via open junctions. The increased transport of NOA may serve as an important mechanism that protects a vascular bed against the damaging effects of nitrogen monoxide and peroxynitrite. PMID:12370442

  1. Application of high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ultra-sensitive thermal lens spectrometric detection for simultaneous biliverdin and bilirubin assessment at trace levels in human serum.

    PubMed

    Martelanc, Mitja; Žiberna, Lovro; Passamonti, Sabina; Franko, Mladen

    2016-07-01

    We present the applicability of a new ultra-sensitive analytical method for the simultaneous determination of biliverdin and bilirubin in human serum. The method comprises isocratic reversed-phase (RP) C18 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermal lens spectrometric detection (TLS) based on excitation by a krypton laser emission line at 407nm. This method enables the separation of IX-α biliverdin and IX-α bilirubin in 11min with limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) for biliverdin of 1.2nM and 3nM, and 1nM and 2.8nM for bilirubin, respectively. In addition, a step-gradient elution was set up, by changing the mobile phase composition, in order to further enhance the sensitivity for bilirubin determination with LOD and LOQ of 0.5nM and 1.5nM, respectively. In parallel, an isocratic HPLC-DAD method was developed for benchmarking against HPLC-TLS methods. The LOD and LOQ for biliverdin were 6nM and 18nM, and 2.5nM and 8nM for bilirubin, respectively. Additionally, both isocratic methods were applied for measuring biliverdin and free bilirubin in human serum samples (from 2 male and 2 female healthy donors). Combining isocratic HPLC method with TLS detector was crucial for first ever biliverdin determination in serum together with simultaneous free bilirubin determination. We showed for the first time the concentration ratio of free bilirubin versus unbound biliverdin in human serum samples.

  2. Impairment of enzymatic antioxidant defenses is associated with bilirubin-induced neuronal cell death in the cerebellum of Ugt1 KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Bortolussi, G; Codarin, E; Antoniali, G; Vascotto, C; Vodret, S; Arena, S; Cesaratto, L; Scaloni, A; Tell, G; Muro, A F

    2015-01-01

    Severe hyperbilirubinemia is toxic during central nervous system development. Prolonged and uncontrolled high levels of unconjugated bilirubin lead to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy and eventually death by kernicterus. Despite extensive studies, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of bilirubin toxicity are still poorly defined. To fill this gap, we investigated the molecular processes underlying neuronal injury in a mouse model of severe neonatal jaundice, which develops hyperbilirubinemia as a consequence of a null mutation in the Ugt1 gene. These mutant mice show cerebellar abnormalities and hypoplasia, neuronal cell death and die shortly after birth because of bilirubin neurotoxicity. To identify protein changes associated with bilirubin-induced cell death, we performed proteomic analysis of cerebella from Ugt1 mutant and wild-type mice. Proteomic data pointed-out to oxidoreductase activities or antioxidant processes as important intracellular mechanisms altered during bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity. In particular, they revealed that down-representation of DJ-1, superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins 2 and 6 was associated with hyperbilirubinemia in the cerebellum of mutant mice. Interestingly, the reduction in protein levels seems to result from post-translational mechanisms because we did not detect significant quantitative differences in the corresponding mRNAs. We also observed an increase in neuro-specific enolase 2 both in the cerebellum and in the serum of mutant mice, supporting its potential use as a biomarker of bilirubin-induced neurological damage. In conclusion, our data show that different protective mechanisms fail to contrast oxidative burst in bilirubin-affected brain regions, ultimately leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:25950469

  3. Application of high-performance liquid chromatography combined with ultra-sensitive thermal lens spectrometric detection for simultaneous biliverdin and bilirubin assessment at trace levels in human serum.

    PubMed

    Martelanc, Mitja; Žiberna, Lovro; Passamonti, Sabina; Franko, Mladen

    2016-07-01

    We present the applicability of a new ultra-sensitive analytical method for the simultaneous determination of biliverdin and bilirubin in human serum. The method comprises isocratic reversed-phase (RP) C18 high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermal lens spectrometric detection (TLS) based on excitation by a krypton laser emission line at 407nm. This method enables the separation of IX-α biliverdin and IX-α bilirubin in 11min with limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) for biliverdin of 1.2nM and 3nM, and 1nM and 2.8nM for bilirubin, respectively. In addition, a step-gradient elution was set up, by changing the mobile phase composition, in order to further enhance the sensitivity for bilirubin determination with LOD and LOQ of 0.5nM and 1.5nM, respectively. In parallel, an isocratic HPLC-DAD method was developed for benchmarking against HPLC-TLS methods. The LOD and LOQ for biliverdin were 6nM and 18nM, and 2.5nM and 8nM for bilirubin, respectively. Additionally, both isocratic methods were applied for measuring biliverdin and free bilirubin in human serum samples (from 2 male and 2 female healthy donors). Combining isocratic HPLC method with TLS detector was crucial for first ever biliverdin determination in serum together with simultaneous free bilirubin determination. We showed for the first time the concentration ratio of free bilirubin versus unbound biliverdin in human serum samples. PMID:27154653

  4. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A.; Cistola, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by TC NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted (1- TC)oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles, the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The TC NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  5. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin; Zhu, Daling

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  6. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  7. Ameliorative Effect of Vanillic Acid on Serum Bilirubin, Chronotropic and Dromotropic Properties in the Cholestasis-Induced Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Atefipour, Narges; Dianat, Mahin; Badavi, Mohammad; Sarkaki, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The liver modulates several important roles, such as metabolism and liver cirrhosis, which have several cardiovascular problems. Due to preservative role of antioxidant agents in cardiovascular disease, consequently, many of them are applied as medicinal plants in traditional medicine. Vanillic acid (VA), as an antioxidant agent, has a principal preservative role on some diseases. In this study, the effect of vanillic acid was examined on heart rate (as chronotropic property), P-R interval (as dromotropic property), and serum bilirubin in cholestasis-induced model rats. Methods In this study, 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 200–250 g were allocated into four groups, and each group contained eight rats as follows: Control (normal saline, 1 ml/kg, gavage, daily for 4 weeks), cirrhotic (normal saline, 1 ml/kg, gavage, daily for 4 weeks), vanillic acid (10 mg/kg, gavage, daily for 4 weeks), cirrhotic treated with vanillic acid (10 mg/kg, gavage, daily for 4 weeks). Chronic biliary cirrhosis was induced in cirrhotic groups by four weeks Bile Duct Ligation (BDL). At the first day and four weeks after surgery, the animals were anesthetized, electrocardiograms were recorded (lead II), and chronotropic and dromotropic properties (HR and PR interval) were investigated. At the end of experimental duration, the animals were anesthetized, and blood samples were taken to measure serum bilirubin. The results were analyzed using t-test and one-way ANOVA by SPSS software, version 22. Results After induced of BDL, the results presented that laboratory parameter (bilirubin) in the cirrhotic group significantly increased compared to the control group. The P-R interval was reduced in the cirrhotic group compared to the control group, and there was no significant difference between heart rate in all groups. Bilirubin were reduced in cirrhotic groups treated with vanillic acid (VA) compared to cirrhotic group and also administration of VA in the cirrhotic treated with

  8. Serum albumin-alginate coated beads: mechanical properties and stability.

    PubMed

    Edwards-Lévy, F; Lévy, M C

    1999-11-01

    According to a previously described method, alginate beads were prepared from a Na-alginate solution containing propylene glycol alginate (PGA) and human serum albumin (HSA). The solution was added dropwise to a CaCl2 solution. The beads were treated with NaOH, which started the formation of amide bonds between HSA and PGA at the periphery, giving a membrane. Batches of beads with increasingly thick membranes were prepared using growing concentrations of NaOH, and studied with a texture analyser. When raising NaOH concentration, the rupture strength progressively increased, and the resistance strength to a deformation of 50% of total height also increased before slightly decreasing for the highest NaOH concentration. Variations of bead elasticity were also observed. When the beads were prepared with saline reducing gelation time from 10 to 5 min, and reaction time from 15 to 5 min, mechanical properties varied more progressively with the NaOH concentration, while the results became more reproducible. A series of assays conducted with 0.01 M NaOH confirmed the importance of using a short gelation time, and saline rather than water. Stability assays were also performed. The results were compared to those of alginate-polylysine coated beads and showed the interest of the transacylation method. PMID:10535819

  9. Copper binding to bilirubin as determined by FT-IR and EPR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferraro, J.R.; Wu, J.; Soloway, R.D.; Li, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, D.; Shen, G.

    1996-07-01

    Copper is known to form complexes with bilirubin (H2BR). Such complexes have received increased attention due to their clinical significance as free-radical scavengers. The purpose of this study was to examine a series of Cu(2+) BR complexes to ascertain the nature of the binding between Cu(2+) and BR. Several physical measurements of the salts were made, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The complexes were prepared by dissolving protonated BR in NaOH, and adding different ratios of aqueous CuCl2. At ratios of Cu(2+):H2BR of 1:1 and 2:1, soluble complexes were formed. In solution EPR spectra demonstrated nine hyperfine peaks, which from the splitting, is indicative of Cu(2+) coordinated to four nitrogen atoms coming from two molecules of BR. The solid obtained from the solutions demonstrated predominant infrared absorptions at 1574cm({minus}1) and 1403cm({minus}1) (assigned previously as COO- vibrations, asymmetric and symmetric), whereas the 1710cm({minus}1) vibration appears only as a shoulder (assigned previously as the free COOH vibration) indicative that most of the COO groups have reacted with sodium, thus accounting for the aqueous solubility. The NH stretching vibration in the pyrrole group of H2BR has disappeared and is replaced with the OH stretching vibration in H2O. At higher ratios of 3:1 and 5:1 (Cu2+H2BR), black precipitates are formed, which produce no EPR signals. Furthermore, the NH vibration disappears as in the soluble solution complexes. It can be concluded that the insoluble salts (higher Cu2+:H2BR ratios) are mixed complexes containing the Cu nitrogen chelate and Cu salts involving the COOH groups. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  10. Modification of biliary tree permeability in rats treated with a manganese-bilirubin combination

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, P.; Plaa, G.L.

    1986-06-30

    Previous studies in this laboratory demonstrated incorporation of manganese (Mn) and bilirubin (BR) in rat liver bile canalicular membrane (BCM) following a cholestatic regimen composed sequentially of Mn plus BR. The present study investigates biliary tree permeability using segmented retrograde intrabiliary injection (SRII) with (/sup 3/H)mannitol and (3H)inulin as marker substances. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given the following iv: (a) Mn (high and low dose), (b) BR, (c) sulfobromophthalein (BSP), (d) Mn-BSP-BR, (e) MnBR. Results obtained with mannitol showed a approximately 63% decrease (p less than 0.05) in marker recovery following administration of MnBR combination. While BSP alone had no effect on mannitol recovery, BSP abolished the MnBR response when administered in the Mn-BSP-BR sequence. With inulin, Mn (high dose), MnBR, and Mn-BSP-BR all produced a approximately 45% decrease (p less than 0.05) in recovery, while BSP or BR alone caused a approximately 25% decrease (p less than 0.05). Mn (low dose) was without effect. These results and others obtained when the time pattern of the MnBR treatment was modified suggest: (1) MnBR treatment increases biliary tree permeability by altering both BCM and the junctional complex; (2) BCM alteration is probably the more critical event, since BSP, which protects against MnBR cholestasis, protected against the MnBR-induced change in mannitol recovery, but exerted no effect on inulin recovery.

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction induced by unconjugated bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yukun; Qin, Huanlong; Zhang, Ming; Shen, Tongyi; Chen, Hongqi; Ma, Yanlei; Chu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Zhihua

    2010-08-01

    Although a large number of in vitro and in vivo tests have confirmed that taking probiotics can improve the intestinal barrier, few studies have focused on the relationship between probiotics and the intestinal epithelial barrier in hyperbilirubinaemia. To investigate the effects of and mechanisms associated with probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus plantarum; LP) and unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) on the intestinal epithelial barrier, we measured the viability, apoptotic ratio and protein kinase C (PKC) activity of Caco-2 cells. We also determined the distribution and expression of tight junction proteins such as occludin, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-1, claudin-4, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-1 and F-actin using confocal laser scanning microscopy, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and real-time quantitative PCR. The present study demonstrated that high concentrations of UCB caused obvious cytotoxicity and decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of the Caco-2 cell monolayer. Low concentrations of UCB inhibited the expression of tight junction proteins and PKC but could induce UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1 family-polypeptide A1 (UGT1A1) expression. UCB alone caused decreased PKC activity, serine phosphorylated occludin and ZO-1 levels. After treatment with LP, the effects of UCB on TER and apoptosis were mitigated; LP also prevented aberrant expression and rearrangement of tight junction proteins. Moreover, PKC activity and serine phosphorylated tight junction protein levels were partially restored after treatment with LP, LP exerted a protective effect against UCB damage to Caco-2 monolayer cells, and it restored the structure and distribution of tight junction proteins by activating the PKC pathway. In addition, UGT1A1 expression induced by UCB in Caco-2 cells could ameliorate the cytotoxicity of UCB. PMID:20412608

  12. In vivo albumin labeling and lymphatic imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Lang, Lixin; Huang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Ali, Iqbal U; Teng, Gaojun; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately and easily locate sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) with noninvasive imaging methods would assist in tumor staging and patient management. For this purpose, we developed a lymphatic imaging agent by mixing fluorine-18 aluminum fluoride-labeled NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid)-conjugated truncated Evans blue ((18)F-AlF-NEB) and Evans blue (EB) dye. After local injection, both (18)F-AlF-NEB and EB form complexes with endogenous albumin in the interstitial fluid and allow for visualizing the lymphatic system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and/or optical imaging of LNs was performed in three different animal models including a hind limb inflammation model, an orthotropic breast cancer model, and a metastatic breast cancer model. In all three models, the LNs can be distinguished clearly by the apparent blue color and strong fluorescence signal from EB as well as a high-intensity PET signal from (18)F-AlF-NEB. The lymphatic vessels between the LNs can also be optically visualized. The easy preparation, excellent PET and optical imaging quality, and biosafety suggest that this combination of (18)F-AlF-NEB and EB has great potential for clinical application to map sentinel LNs and provide intraoperative guidance. PMID:25535368

  13. In vivo albumin labeling and lymphatic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Lang, Lixin; Huang, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Jacobson, Orit; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Ali, Iqbal U.; Teng, Gaojun; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accurately and easily locate sentinel lymph nodes (LNs) with noninvasive imaging methods would assist in tumor staging and patient management. For this purpose, we developed a lymphatic imaging agent by mixing fluorine-18 aluminum fluoride-labeled NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid)-conjugated truncated Evans blue (18F-AlF-NEB) and Evans blue (EB) dye. After local injection, both 18F-AlF-NEB and EB form complexes with endogenous albumin in the interstitial fluid and allow for visualizing the lymphatic system. Positron emission tomography (PET) and/or optical imaging of LNs was performed in three different animal models including a hind limb inflammation model, an orthotropic breast cancer model, and a metastatic breast cancer model. In all three models, the LNs can be distinguished clearly by the apparent blue color and strong fluorescence signal from EB as well as a high-intensity PET signal from 18F-AlF-NEB. The lymphatic vessels between the LNs can also be optically visualized. The easy preparation, excellent PET and optical imaging quality, and biosafety suggest that this combination of 18F-AlF-NEB and EB has great potential for clinical application to map sentinel LNs and provide intraoperative guidance. PMID:25535368

  14. Molecular interactions between albumin and proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    1998-01-01

    In glomerular diseases the filtration of excess proteins into the proximal tubule, together with their subsequent reabsorption may represent an important pathological mechanism underlying progressive renal scarring. The most prominent protein in glomerular filtrate, albumin, is reabsorbed by receptor-mediated endocytosis by proximal tubular cells. It binds both to scavenger-type receptors and to megalin in the proximal tubule. Some of these receptors appear to be shared with other cell types, particularly endothelial cells. The endocytic uptake of albumin is subjected to complex hormonal and enzymatic regulation. In addition to being reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, albumin may act as a signalling molecule in these cells, and may induce the expression of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. Modulation of the interaction of albumin with proximal tubular cells may eventually prove to be of therapeutic importance in the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:9807019

  15. 99M-technetium labeled macroaggregated human serum albumin pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Winchell, Harry S.; Barak, Morton; Van Fleet, III, Parmer

    1977-05-17

    A reagent comprising macroaggregated human serum albumin having dispersed therein particles of stannous tin and a method for instantly making a labeled pharmaceutical therefrom, are disclosed. The labeled pharmaceutical is utilized in organ imaging.

  16. Study on Serum Albumin in Third Trimester of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sufrin, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M T; Das, R K; Rahman, M H

    2015-07-01

    Various hormones can cause marked changes in pregnant woman's appearance. Decreased level of serum albumin occurs in third trimester of pregnancy, which may be associated with increased maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. So, this study was carried out to evaluate and assess the level of serum albumin in third trimester of pregnancy. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Physiology Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh. This study enrolled 100 pregnant women of third trimester of pregnancy and 100 aged matched non-pregnant women from Mymensingh district. In this study serum albumin level in study group were 33.41 ± 4.62gm/l and in control group were 37.09 ± 4.21 gm/l, which was statistically decreased. The lower level of serum albumin in third trimester of pregnancy is the major concern of development of physiological edema during pregnancy and may be associated with pre-eclampsia.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures...

  18. Development of FET-type albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Yong; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Young-Seuk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2008-07-15

    An albumin biosensor based on a potentiometric measurement using Biofield-effect-transistor (BioFET) has been designed and fabricated, and its characteristics were investigated. The BioFET was fabricated using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology. The gate surface of the BioFET was chemically modified by newly developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) synthesized by a thiazole benzo crown ether ethylamine (TBCEA)-thioctic acid to immobilize anti-albumin. SAM formation, antibody immobilization, and antigen-antibody interaction were verified using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The output voltage changes of the BioFET with respect to various albumin concentrations were obtained. Quasi-reference electrode (QRE) and reference FET (ReFET) has been integrated with the BioFET, and its output characteristic was investigated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the BioFET as the albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

  19. Palmitate uptake by hepatocyte monolayers. Effect of albumin binding.

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, A B; Shurmantine, W O; Luxon, B A; Forker, E L

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of 14C-palmitate by rat liver cell monolayers is depressed by binding of the fatty acid to albumin. When the uptake flux is divided by the concentration of free palmitate in the bathing medium, however, the resulting clearance is approximately 14 times greater in the presence of albumin than in its absence. These findings are not accounted for by the different diffusion rates of free and bound palmitate across an unstirred fluid layer, nor attributable to nonequilibrium binding. Instead we argue that the most plausible explanation is accelerated dissociation of albumin-palmitate complexes mediated by the cell surface--an interpretation that also explains the uptake kinetics of other albumin-bound organic anions by perfused rat liver. Images PMID:3949983

  20. Why 24-h Urine Albumin Excretion Rate Method Still is Used for Screening of Diabetic Nephropathy in Isfahan Laboratories?

    PubMed Central

    Teimoury, Azam; Iraj, Bijan; Heidari-Beni, Motahar; Amini, Massoud; Hosseiny, Seyed-Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The first step in diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is measurement of albumin in a spot urine sample. The aim of this study was assessment of the accuracy of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) in random urine specimens (RUS) for microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria screening in Iranian diabetic patients. Methods: A total of 200 diabetic patients participated to our study. 24 h timed urine specimens followed by RUS were collected. 24-h urine albumin excretion (24-h urinary albumin excretion (UAE)) and UACR in RUS were measured. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and McNemar test. Results: A total of 165 patients finalized the study. Pearson's correlation of coefficient for 24-h UAE versus UACR was 0.64. The area under ROC curve for UACR was 0.83 in microalbuminuria and 0.91 in macroalbuminuria. The cutoff point of 30 mg/g in UACR method had 86% sensitivity and 60% specificity for microalbuminuria screening and cut-off point of 300 mg/g had 75% sensitivity and 99% specificity for macroalbuminuria screening respectively. Conclusions: UACR in RUS showed acceptable performance as a screening test for diagnosis of both micro and macroalbuminuria in Iranian diabetic patients. PMID:24829719

  1. Albumin leakage in online hemodiafiltration, more convective transport, more losses?

    PubMed

    Vega, Almudena; Quiroga, Borja; Abad, Soraya; Aragoncillo, Inés; Arroyo, David; Panizo, Nayara; López-Gómez, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Online hemodiafiltration (OL-HDF) has now demonstrated some benefits in reducing mortality. It seems that rising convective volumes improve the outcomes, but the risks of it, such as albumin leakage, are not well defined yet. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the albumin leakage using two different filters with 20 and 30 L of post-dilution OL-HDF. In this cross-sectional study, 20 prevalent patients receiving post-dilution OL-HDL were included. We analyzed two dialyzers: FX1000, FMC and Polyflux 210H, Gambro. During four consecutive dialysis sessions, monitors were programmed using control-volume to obtain 20 or 30 L with both dialyzers. We collected albumin samples of the effluent at 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min and performed area under the curve (AUC) determinations for evaluating the losses. Mean patient age was 60 ± 9 years, and 70% were men. Albumin leakage was significant higher with Polyflux 210H when compared to FX 1000 FMC. A convective volume of 30 L produced greater albumin leakage than 20 L with both filters, though only with the FX 1000 FMC was it significant (minimum albumin leakage during first hour with FX 1000 FMC 20 L: 79.2 [0.0-175.7] mg; 30 liters: 403.3 [63.5-960.7] mg; with PF 210 Gambro 20 L: 869.1 [420.0-3214.7] mg; 30 L: 1841.7 [443.8-3417.5] mg). During OL-HDF, convective transport causes albumin leakage at least during the first hour. The albumin concentration in the effluent differs according to the type of filter used and the convective volume.

  2. An inhibitor to erythrocyte agglutination in bovine albumin preparations.

    PubMed

    Gunson, H H; Phillips, P K

    1975-01-01

    Three out of 28 commercial preparations of bovine serum albumin have been encountered which have an inhibitory effect on the assay of anti-Rh-o(D) using the Technicon AutoAnalyser. The inhibitory property, which can also be demonstrated by standard manual serological techniques, appears to be directed towards the second stage of the agglutination reaction. An automated screening procedure for bovine serum albumin preparations and some properties of the inhibitor are described.

  3. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  4. Effect of angiotensin on glomerular filtration of albumin.

    PubMed

    Eisenbach, G M; Van Liew, J B

    1975-01-01

    Angiotensin-induced proteinuria was examined at the glomerular-tubular level in rats. Ultra-micro-disc electrophoresis was employed to determine albumin concentration of rat proximal tubular fluid samples under control conditions and during the infusion of 0.15 mug/min X 100 g body weight angiotensin II using micropuncture techniques. Under control conditions proximal tubular albumin concentration was 1.32 +/- 0.79 (SD) mg/100 ml (n = 71). There was no correlation between albumin concentration and (TF/P)-inulin ratio indicating an albumin reabsorption in the proximal tubule parallel to fluid reabsorption under control conditions. During angiotensin infusion using re-collection techniques, there is an average increase of 26 times in tubular albumin concentration, indicating an increase in albumin filtered. There was no change in GFR, SNGFR, transit time, (TF/P)-inulin ratio, an increase in urine flow rate, sodium excretion, protein excretion, mean arterial blood pressure during angiotensin infusion. Since effective glomerular filtration pressure was not increased during angiotensin it is concluded that angiotensin-induced proteinuria is due to an increase in filtered protien mediated by a change in glomerular permeability to proteins.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis of seed 2S albumins from Lupinus species.

    PubMed

    Salmanowicz, B P

    2000-10-13

    Two modes of capillary electrophoresis (CE)--free-solution capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate capillary electrophoresis (SDS-CE) using a non-gel sieving matrix--have been developed for comparative analysis of low-molecular-mass 2S albumin isoforms from lupins. The albumin fraction and 2S albumins were separated in uncoated fused-silica capillary by CZE with 0.02 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.3, containing the sodium salt of phytic acid. The use of phytic acid (0.025 M) as buffer modifier and ion-pairing agent improved migration reproducibility, peak shape and separation efficiency. The reduced 2S albumins were separated by SDS-CE using a high concentration (0.3-0.5 M) mixture of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and borate buffers in uncoated fused-silica capillary. Of the various polymers used as non-gel sieving matrix, SDS-CE with a 10% dextran solution was found to be suitable for separation of 2S albumin polypeptides with molecular masses of 4,000-7,000 and 8,000-11,000. The addition of glycerol or ethylene glycol to the SDS separating buffer improved the resolution of polypeptides. The examined Lupinus species showed species-specific CZE and SDS-CE migration profiles of the 2S albumins.

  6. The Relationship between Albumin-Binding Capacity of Recombinant Polypeptide and Changes in the Structure of Albumin-Binding Domain.

    PubMed

    Bormotova, E A; Gupalova, T V

    2015-07-01

    Many bacteria express surface proteins interacting with human serum albumin (HSA). One of these proteins, PAB from anaerobic bacteria, contains an albumin-binding domain consisting of 45 amino acid residues known as GA domain. GA domains are also found in G proteins isolated from human streptococcal strains (groups C and G) and of albumin-binding protein isolated from group G streptococcal strains of animal origin. The GA domain is a left-handed three-helix bundle structure in which amino acid residues of the second and third helixes are involved in albumin binding. We studied the relationship between HSA-binding activity of the recombinant polypeptide isolated from group G streptococcus of animal origin and structure of the GA domain is studied. Structural changes in GA domain significantly attenuated HAS-binding capacity of the recombinant polypeptide. Hence, affinity HSA-binding polypeptide depends on stability of GA domain structure.

  7. Suggested mechanism for the selective excretion of glucosylated albumin. The effects of diabetes mellitus and aging on this process and the origins of diabetic microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Kowluru, A; Kowluru, R; Bitensky, M W; Corwin, E J; Solomon, S S; Johnson, J D

    1987-11-01

    In previous studies in the Sprague-Dawley rat, Williams and coworkers reported the phenomenon of selective urinary excretion of glucosylated albumin (editing, i.e., the percent glucosylation of urinary albumin is more than that of plasma albumin) by the mammalian kidney. Ghiggeri and coworkers subsequently found that the extent of editing is reduced in human diabetics. Moreover, the reduction in editing in diabetes correlates inversely with levels of microalbuminuria. We also find reduction in the extent of editing in diabetic humans. We find a striking inverse correlation not only with the magnitude of microalbuminuria but also with the extent of plasma albumin glucosylation. In contrast, we found little correlation between the reduction in editing and the duration of diabetes in human subjects. Stz induced diabetes in the Sprague-Dawley rat is associated with a striking and rapid reduction in editing which develops virtually with the same kinetics exhibited by the appearance of hyperglycemia. This loss of editing is rapidly reversed by daily administration of insulin but not by aldose reductase inhibitors. Mannitol infusion in anesthetized Wistar rats resulted in an increase in urine volume, GFR, and microalbuminuria, and was also accompanied by a marked reduction in editing. This reduction was rapidly reversed by a cessation of mannitol infusion. We propose here that glucosylated albumin (in contrast to unmodified albumin) is not reabsorbed by the proximal tubule, and thus, is preferentially excreted in the urine. We postulate that the increase in GFR which emerges as a consequence of increased plasma osmolality in diabetes mellitus delivers more albumin to the proximal tubule than can be reabsorbed. This results in a dilution of excreted glucosylated albumin molecules by excreted unmodified albumin, which appears as the early microscopic albuminuria of diabetes. Paradoxically, the fall in apparent editing is accompanied by an absolute increase in the total

  8. Bilirubin overload modulates bile canalicular membrane fluidity in rats: association with disproportionate reduction of biliary lipid secretion.

    PubMed

    Kajihara, T; Tazuma, S; Yamashita, G; Kajiyama, G

    2000-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that several organic anions cause dissociation of biliary lipid secretion from that of bile acids; namely, the "uncoupling phenomenon," in association with changes in the phospholipid molecular species in the canalicular membrane lipid bilayer. Because of the uncoupling phenomenon, transcytotic vesicles are retained inside cells, resulting in the accumulation of substances normally excreted in the bile. In the present study, bilirubin ditaurate (BDT; synthetic bilirubin) was used to investigate the effect of bilirubin overload on biliary lipid secretion and the lipid composition of hepatic subcellular fractions, as well as canalicular membrane packing density and fluidity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent cannulation of the bile duct and femoral vein. Sodium taurocholate was infused intravenously at 100 nmol/min per 100 g body weight. Then BDT (50 nmol/min per 100 g body weight) was infused concomitantly, followed by periodic bile collection for analysis of lipids. Bile acid secretion was not significantly affected by the infusion of BDT. In contrast, the secretion of cholesterol and phospholipids was decreased by 56.7% and 49.2%, respectively, compared with control. The phosphatidylcholine hydrophobicity of canalicular membrane vesicles, estimated by the molar ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acids (S/U ratio) was decreased, but not significantly by BDT infusion. With BDT infusions, the biliary cholesterol/phospholipid (C/P) ratio was increased by 19%; canalicular membrane vesicle fluidity was decreased by 5.8%, whereas P-glycoprotein expression was unchanged. As P-glycoprotein expression was not altered, our findings suggested that the reduced canalicular membrane vesicle fluidity was a crucial regulator of canalicular membrane transporter function.

  9. Cytochrome P450 2A5 and bilirubin: Mechanisms of gene regulation and cytoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sangsoo Daniel; Antenos, Monica; Squires, E. James; Kirby, Gordon M.

    2013-07-15

    Bilirubin (BR) has recently been identified as the first endogenous substrate for cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5) and it has been suggested that CYP2A5 plays a major role in BR clearance as an alternative mechanism to BR conjugation by uridine-diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A1. This study investigated the mechanisms of Cyp2a5 gene regulation by BR and the cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 in BR hepatotoxicity. BR induced CYP2A5 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in primary mouse hepatocytes. BR treatment also caused nuclear translocation of Nuclear factor-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in hepatocytes. In reporter assays, BR treatment of primary hepatocytes transfected with a Cyp2a5 promoter-luciferase reporter construct resulted in a 2-fold induction of Cyp2a5 reporter activity. Furthermore, cotransfection of the hepatocytes with a Nrf2 expression vector without BR treatment resulted in an increase in Cyp2a5 reporter activity of approximately 2-fold and BR treatment of Nrf2 cotransfectants further increased reporter activity by 4-fold. In addition, site-directed mutation of the ARE in the reporter construct completely abolished both the BR- and Nrf2-mediated increases in reporter activity. The cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 against BR-mediated apoptosis was also examined in Hepa 1–6 cells that lack endogenous CYP2A5. Transient overexpression of CYP2A5 partially blocked BR-induced caspase-3 cleavage in Hepa 1–6 cells. Furthermore, in vitro degradation of BR was increased by microsomes from Hepa 1–6 cells overexpressing CYP2A5 compared to control cells transfected with an empty vector. Collectively, these results suggest that Nrf2-mediated CYP2A5 transactivation in response to BR may provide an additional mechanism for adaptive cytoprotection against BR hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • The mechanism of Cyp2a5 gene regulation by BR was investigated. • The cytoprotective role of CYP2A5 in BR hepatotoxicity was determined. • BR

  10. Required buried alpha-helical structure in the bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, UGT1A1, contains a nonreplaceable phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Ciotti, M; Cho, J W; George, J; Owens, I S

    1998-08-01

    A conserved hydrophobic region in the bilirubin-type UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isozyme was first uncovered as a consequence of a deleterious mutation in the UGT1A1 (HUG-Br1) isozyme of a Crigler-Najjar (CN) Type I patient. According to analysis by the RAOARGOS computer program, this hydrophobic region in UGT1A1 is located between residues 159-177 and defines a buried helix centered over position 169-172 with a positive factor of 1.22. Further analysis showed that the planar phenol-type UGT1A6 (HLUG P1) isoform, unlike the steroid-type UGT2B7 (UDPGTh2) isozyme, has a similar conserved hydrophobic region and that the positive factor for its buried helix is 1.14 compared to the threshold of 1.13 for such a structure. The analysis detected the typical membrane-insertion-signal sequence and a membrane-anchoring domain in each isoform. The different amino acid sequence patterns between positions 168-172 for the three types of isoforms and the deleterious mutations in this microregion (MRA) of UGT1A1 in CN-I patients are evidence of a critical and descriminating role for MRA. With the recombinant UGT1A1 enzyme and its mutants, P167G, F170del, F170L, F170I, F170V, F170A, F170Y, F170E, F171L, F171I, F171V, F171A, F171Y, or L175Q, expressed in COS-1 cells, bilirubin glucuronidating activity at both pH 6.4 and 7.6 demonstrated that Phe-170 is not replaceable, whereas Phe-171 can be replaced by Leu without any loss of activity. The less hydrophobic buried helix in the phenolic-type UGT1A6 has a Tyr/Leu at position 170/171; this isoform glucuronidated bilirubin at 1/10 the level of that by UGT1A1 with a Km (bilirubin) of 25 microM compared to that for UGT1A1 of 5. 0 microM.

  11. Serum Albumin Levels and Economic Status in Japanese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Asami; Kondo, Naoki; Murayama, Nobuko; Tanabe, Naohito; Shobugawa, Yugo; Kondo, Katsunori

    2016-01-01

    Background Low serum albumin levels are associated with aging and medical conditions such as cancer, liver dysfunction, inflammation, and malnutrition and might be an independent predictor of long-term mortality in healthy older populations. We tested the hypothesis that economic status is associated with serum albumin levels and explained by nutritional and health status in Japanese older adults. Design We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation study (JAGES). The study participants were 6528 functionally independent residents (3189 men and 3339 women) aged ≥65 years living in four municipalities in Aichi prefecture. We used household income as an indicator of economic status. Multiple linear regression was used to compare serum albumin levels in relation to household income, which was classified as low, middle, and high. Additionally, mediation by nutritional and health-related factors was analyzed in multivariable models. Results With the middle-income group as reference, participants with low incomes had a significantly lower serum albumin level, even after adjustment for sex, age, residential area, education, marital status, and household structure. The estimated mean difference was −0.17 g/L (95% confidence interval, −0.33 to −0.01 g/L). The relation between serum albumin level and low income became statistically insignificant when “body mass index”, “consumption of meat or fish”, “self-rated health”, “presence of medical conditions”, “hyperlipidemia”, or “respiratory disease “was included in the model. Conclusion Serum albumin levels were lower in Japanese older adults with low economic status. The decrease in albumin levels appears to be mediated by nutrition and health-related factors with low household incomes. Future studies are needed to reveal the existence of other pathways. PMID:27276092

  12. Long-term oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation does not improve serum albumin levels in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bossola, Maurizio; Giungi, Stefania; Tazza, Luigi; Luciani, Giovanna

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a frequent event in hemodialysis patients, has been implicated as a potential cause of protein-energy malnutrition. Unfortunately, correction of metabolic acidosis by means of high bicarbonate concentration in the dialysate does not seem to lead to significant changes in nutritional parameters. The project was a single-arm, open-label, 12-month pilot study at a university-based tertiary care center aimed at evaluating whether correction of metabolic acidosis through long-term oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation improves serum albumin levels and other nutritional parameters in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Twenty highly acidotic hemodialysis patients patients were invited to consume an oral supplementation of sodium bicarbonate (1 g, thrice daily), for 12 months. Patients were followed at baseline and every month, until month 12. At each follow-up visit, dry body weight, BMI, blood pressure, presence of edema, venous bicarbonate, and serum albumin were measured. Total lymphocyte count, fasting total cholesterol and C-reactive protein were assessed every 2 months. At baseline and at 12 months, the subjective global assessment of nutritional status and the protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance normalized to actual body weight were determined. Plasma bicarbonate level rose from 18.1 +/- 2.7 to 22.1 +/- 4.5 mmol/l after 10 months (p = 0.001). Mean serum albumin levels were 3.8 +/- 0.2 mg/dl at baseline and 3.9 +/- 0.2 at the end of the study. Repeated measure ANOVA showed that there was no significant effect of bicarbonate treatment on serum albumin levels (p = 0.29), dry weight (p = 0.1), serum total cholesterol (p = 0.97), total lymphocyte count (p = 0.69), or C-reactive protein (p = 0.85). Mean subjective global assessment score was 4.53 +/- 0.37 at baseline and 4.58 +/- 0.54 at 12 months (p = 0.1). Mean nPNA (g/kg/day) was 0.86 +/- 0.05 at baseline and 0.85 +/- 0.08 at month 12. The present study demonstrates that long

  13. How does airway exposure of aflatoxin B1 affect serum albumin adduct concentrations? Evidence based on epidemiological study and animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xianwei; Lai, Hao; Yang, Yang; Xiao, Jun; He, Ke; Liu, Chao; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) airway inhalation represents an additional route of exposure to this toxin. However, the association between AFB1 inhalation and serum AFB1 albumin adducts remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the association between airway exposure to AFB1 and serum AFB1 albumin adduct concentrations via an epidemiological study, as well as in an AFB1 airway exposure animal model. Our epidemiological study was conducted in a sugar factory in the Guangxi Autonomous Region of China. In order to examine fungal contamination, air samples were obtained in the workshop and areas outside the workshop, such as the office and nearby store. Dust samples were also collected from the bagasse warehouse and presser workshop, and were analyzed using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Additionally, blood samples were collected from a total of 121 workshop workers, and a control group (n = 80) was comprised of workers who undertook administrative tasks or other work outside the workshop. The animal experiment was conducted in the laboratory animal center of Guangxi Medical University, where a total of 60 adult male rabbits were involved in this study. By intubation, AFB1 was administered in three groups of rabbits daily, at dose rates of 0.075, 0.05 and 0.025 mg/kg/day for a period of 7 days. Blood samples were collected on day 1, day 3, day 7 and day 21, and the measurements of the AFB1 albumin adducts in the serum were performed by a double antibody sandwich ELISA. The epidemiological study showed that serum albumin adducts were detected in 67 workshop workers (55.37%), and the values ranged 6.4 pg/mg albumin to 212 pg/mg albumin (mean value: 51 ± 4.62 pg/mg albumin). In contrast, serum albumin adducts were detected in only 7 control group participants, with the values ranging from 9 pg AFB1/mg albumin to 59 pg/mg albumin (mean value: 20 ± 13.72 pg/mg albumin). The animal experiment revealed that the rabbits had detectable

  14. RBC-/Cr-51/ half-life and albumin turnover in growing Beagle dogs during chronic radial acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckman, D. A.; Evans, J. W.; Oyama, J.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of chronic centrifugation on growing Beagle dogs exposed to -2 or -2.6 Gx on albumin and RBC turnover rates, albumin concentration and space, and total blood volume were determined and compared with caged and run control of animals. Albumin-(I-125) and autologous RBC-(Cr-51) preparations were injected into all dogs at day 82 of the centrifugation periods, and the disappearance curves were determined by successive bleedings of the animals over the next 35 d, during which the centrifugation was continued. There were no differences in albumin turnover rates or space. Two populations of RBCs were found in both centrifugated groups, one with a normal half-life of 27 + or - 1 S.E.M. d, and one with a significantly (p less than 0.01) shorter half-life of 15 + or - 2 S.E.M. d. An absolute polycythemia was also observed in both centrifuged groups. The results suggest that chronic centrifugation acts through some as-yet unknown mechanism to affect RBC population kinetics.

  15. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEONLA-BSA, which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEONLA-BSA particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEONLA-BSA changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  16. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-08-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment.

  17. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  18. Prognostic significance of pretreatment albumin/globulin ratio in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yan; Pang, Qing; Miao, Run-Chen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Bi, Jian-Bin; Liu, Su-Shun; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Qu, Kai; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pretreatment nutritional and immunological statuses play an indispensable role in predicting the outcome of patients with various types of malignancies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive value of albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) in overall survival (OS) and recurrence in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following radical hepatic carcinectomy. Patients and methods This retrospective study included a total of 172 patients with HCC with complete medical and follow-up information between 2002 and 2012. AGR was calculated according to the following formula: AGR = albumin/globulin. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff value. The associations of AGR with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were assessed. Further multivariate analysis using Cox regression model and subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive value. Results Receiver operating characteristic curve determined 37.65, 31.99, and 1.48 as the optimal cutoff values of albumin, globulin, and AGR in terms of 5-year OS or death, respectively. On the basis of the cutoff value of AGR, all the patients were divided, respectively, into low-AGR (n=105) and high-AGR (n=67) groups. AGR was found to be significantly correlated with age, cancer embolus, international normalized ratio, and postoperative outcome (P<0.05). Hepatitis B virus infection (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.125; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.285–3.153), tumor node metastasis stage (HR: 1.656; 95% CI: 1.234–2.223), serum albumin (HR: 0.546; 95% CI: 0.347–0.857), and AGR (HR: 0.402; 95% CI: 0.233–0.691) were independent predictors of OS via univariate and multivariate survival analyses. However, alpha-fetoprotein (HR: 1.708; 95% CI: 1.027–2.838), tumor node metastasis stage (HR: 1.464; 95% CI: 1.078–1.989), and AGR (HR: 0.493; 95% CI: 0.293–0.828) functioned as independent risk variables for predicting recurrence. Moreover

  19. Prognostic significance of pretreatment albumin/globulin ratio in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yan; Pang, Qing; Miao, Run-Chen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Bi, Jian-Bin; Liu, Su-Shun; Zhang, Jing-Yao; Qu, Kai; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Pretreatment nutritional and immunological statuses play an indispensable role in predicting the outcome of patients with various types of malignancies. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive value of albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) in overall survival (OS) and recurrence in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following radical hepatic carcinectomy. Patients and methods This retrospective study included a total of 172 patients with HCC with complete medical and follow-up information between 2002 and 2012. AGR was calculated according to the following formula: AGR = albumin/globulin. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal cutoff value. The associations of AGR with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis were assessed. Further multivariate analysis using Cox regression model and subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate the predictive value. Results Receiver operating characteristic curve determined 37.65, 31.99, and 1.48 as the optimal cutoff values of albumin, globulin, and AGR in terms of 5-year OS or death, respectively. On the basis of the cutoff value of AGR, all the patients were divided, respectively, into low-AGR (n=105) and high-AGR (n=67) groups. AGR was found to be significantly correlated with age, cancer embolus, international normalized ratio, and postoperative outcome (P<0.05). Hepatitis B virus infection (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.125; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.285–3.153), tumor node metastasis stage (HR: 1.656; 95% CI: 1.234–2.223), serum albumin (HR: 0.546; 95% CI: 0.347–0.857), and AGR (HR: 0.402; 95% CI: 0.233–0.691) were independent predictors of OS via univariate and multivariate survival analyses. However, alpha-fetoprotein (HR: 1.708; 95% CI: 1.027–2.838), tumor node metastasis stage (HR: 1.464; 95% CI: 1.078–1.989), and AGR (HR: 0.493; 95% CI: 0.293–0.828) functioned as independent risk variables for predicting recurrence. Moreover

  20. Quantification of osmotic water transport in vivo using fluorescent albumin.

    PubMed

    Morelle, Johann; Sow, Amadou; Vertommen, Didier; Jamar, François; Rippe, Bengt; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-10-15

    Osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane is applied during peritoneal dialysis to remove the excess water accumulated in patients with end-stage renal disease. The discovery of aquaporin water channels and the generation of transgenic animals have stressed the need for novel and accurate methods to unravel molecular mechanisms of water permeability in vivo. Here, we describe the use of fluorescently labeled albumin as a reliable indicator of osmotic water transport across the peritoneal membrane in a well-established mouse model of peritoneal dialysis. After detailed evaluation of intraperitoneal tracer mass kinetics, the technique was validated against direct volumetry, considered as the gold standard. The pH-insensitive dye Alexa Fluor 555-albumin was applied to quantify osmotic water transport across the mouse peritoneal membrane resulting from modulating dialysate osmolality and genetic silencing of the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1). Quantification of osmotic water transport using Alexa Fluor 555-albumin closely correlated with direct volumetry and with estimations based on radioiodinated ((125)I) serum albumin (RISA). The low intraperitoneal pressure probably accounts for the negligible disappearance of the tracer from the peritoneal cavity in this model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the appropriateness of pH-insensitive Alexa Fluor 555-albumin as a practical and reliable intraperitoneal volume tracer to quantify osmotic water transport in vivo.

  1. Albumin-based nanocomposite spheres for advanced drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Misak, Heath E; Asmatulu, Ramazan; Gopu, Janani S; Man, Ka-Poh; Zacharias, Nora M; Wooley, Paul H; Yang, Shang-You

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system incorporating human serum albumin, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, magnetite nanoparticles, and therapeutic agent(s) was developed for potential application in the treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and skin cancer. An oil-in-oil emulsion/solvent evaporation (O/OSE) method was modified to produce a drug delivery system with a diameter of 0.5–2 μm. The diameter was mainly controlled by adjusting the viscosity of albumin in the discontinuous phase of the O/OSE method. The drug-release study showed that the release of drug and albumin was mostly dependent on the albumin content of the drug delivery system, which is very similar to the drug occlusion-mesopore model. Cytotoxicity tests indicated that increasing the albumin content in the drug delivery system increased cell viability, possibly due to the improved biocompatibility of the system. Overall, these studies show that the proposed system could be a viable option as a drug delivery system in the treatment of many illnesses, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and skin and breast cancers. PMID:24106002

  2. Regional differences in pleural lymphatic albumin concentration in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Schultz, E.L.; Wiener-Kronish, J.P.; Staub, N.C.

    1987-01-01

    We used quantitative reflectance autoradiography to compare the concentration of albumin in visceral pleural lymphatics at the cranial and caudal ends of the sheep's lung in the vertical (60 degrees head-up) and horizontal (supine) positions. Twelve to fourteen hours after injecting 125I-albumin intravenously we placed four anesthetized sheep in the vertical position to establish a microvascular hydrostatic pressure gradient along the vertical height of the lung. We placed two anesthetized sheep in the horizontal position. Four hours later, we fixed the left lung and removed visceral pleural tissue blocks from the cranial and caudal ends, separated by a 15-cm distance, along the costovertebral margin. We measured the silver grain density in the pleural lymphatic autoradiograms by dark-field reflectance microspectrophotometry. In the vertical position, the lymph albumin concentration at the cranial end (top) of the lung averaged 2.5 +/- 0.4 g/dl compared with the caudal end (bottom), which averaged 1.8 +/- 0.3 g/dl. The difference (42% greater at the top than the bottom) is significant (P less than 0.05). The computed gradient in perimicrovascular interstitial albumin osmotic pressure was 0.26 +/- 0.13 cmH2O/cm lung height. There were no differences between the cranial and caudal lymphatic groups in the two horizontal sheep. We conclude that in the sheep lung there is a gradient in perimicrovascular albumin concentration due to the vertical gradient in microvascular hydrostatic pressure.

  3. Albumin microvascular leakage in brains with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Ryuji; Chiba, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Toshitaka; Nishi, Nozomu; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Ueno, Masaki

    2016-09-01

    Their aim was to examine whether microvascular leakage of endogenous albumin, a representative marker for blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage, was induced in the periventricular area of diabetic db/db mice because periventricular white matter hyperintensity formation in magnetic resonance images was accelerating in elderly patients with diabetes mellitus. Using light and electron microscopes, and semi-quantitative analysis techniques, immunoreactivity of endogenous albumin, indicating vascular permeability, was examined in the periventricular area and spinal cord of db/db mice and db/+m control mice. Greater immunoreactivity of albumin was observed in the vessel wall of the periventricular area of db/db mice than in controls. Additionally, weak immunoreactivity was observed in the spinal cord of both db/db mice and controls. The number of gold particles, indicating immunoreactivity of albumin, in the perivascular area of db/db mice was significantly higher than that of control mice, but there was no significant difference in the number of particles in the spinal cord between db/db mice and controls. These findings suggest that albumin microvascular leakage, or BBB breakdown, is induced in the periventricular area of diabetic mice. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:833-837, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27333535

  4. Scaffold materials from glycosylated and PEGylated bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; David, Allan E; Choi, Young-Suk; Wu, Yonnie; Buschle-Diller, Gisela

    2015-09-01

    Bovine serum albumin has been PEGylated and glycosylated to create mimetic materials for the extracellular matrix (ECM) with potential tissue engineering applications. Different surfaces for cell adhesion were achieved by crosslinking the initial albumin product and forming either a coating or a sponge-like three-dimensional morphology to mimic the mesh structure of natural ECM. The biocompatibility of the albumin matrix with mammalian cells was evaluated using cell culture assays with NIH 3T3 cells. The results indicated that glycoprotein composition and specific morphology of the assembly can improve the cell growth environment. These ECM mimetic structures might eventually be considered to serve as alternatives for the more expensive collagen and elastin based ECM substances currently in use in tissue engineering. PMID:25691091

  5. PRODUCTION OF UNIFORMLY SIZED SERUM ALBUMIN AND DEXTROSE MICROBUBBLES

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Michael J.; O’Brien, William D.; Bernock, Laura J.; Williams, Heather R.; Hamilton, Eric; Wu, Jonah; Oelze, Michael L.; Culp, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Uniformly-sized preparations with average microbubble (MB) diameters from 1 µm to 7 µm were produced reliably by sonicating decafluorobutane-saturated solutions of serum albumin and dextrose. Detailed protocols for producing and size-separating the MBs are presented, along with the effects that changing each production parameter (serum albumin concentration, sonication power, sonication time, etc.) had on MB size distribution and acoustic stability. These protocols can be used to produce MBs for experimental applications or serve as templates for developing new protocols that yield MBs with physical and acoustic properties better suited to specific applications. Size stability and ultrasonic performance quality control tests were developed to assure that successive MB preparations perform identically and to distinguish the physical and acoustic properties of identically sized MBs produced with different serum albumin-dextrose formulations and sonication parameters. MBs can be stored at 5°C for protracted periods (2 weeks to one year depending on formulation). PMID:21689961

  6. Unraveling the Interaction between FcRn and Albumin: Opportunities for Design of Albumin-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Kine Marita Knudsen; Bern, Malin; Nilsen, Jeannette; Noordzij, Hanna Theodora; Sandlie, Inger; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) was first found to be responsible for transporting antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) class from the mother to the fetus or neonate as well as for protecting IgG from intracellular catabolism. However, it has now become apparent that the same receptor also binds albumin and plays a fundamental role in homeostatic regulation of both IgG and albumin, as FcRn is expressed in many different cell types and organs at diverse body sites. Thus, to gain a complete understanding of the biological function of each ligand, and also their distribution in the body, an in-depth characterization of how FcRn binds and regulates the transport of both ligands is necessary. Importantly, such knowledge is also relevant when developing new drugs, as IgG and albumin are increasingly utilized in therapy. This review discusses our current structural and biological understanding of the relationship between FcRn and its ligands, with a particular focus on albumin and design of albumin-based therapeutics. PMID:25674083

  7. Statin-sensitive endocytosis of albumin by glomerular podocytes.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Jeanette; Ioannou, Kyriakos; Grubb, Blair D; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Brunskill, Nigel J; Christensen, Erik I; Topham, Peter S

    2007-02-01

    Glomerular podocytes are critical regulators of glomerular permeability via the slit diaphragm and may play a role in cleaning the glomerular filter. Whether podocytes are able to endocytose proteins is uncertain. We studied protein endocytosis in conditionally immortalized mouse and human podocytes using FITC-albumin by direct quantitative assay and by fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy in mouse podocytes. Furthermore, in vivo uptake was studied in human, rat, and mouse podocytes. Both mouse and human podocytes displayed specific one-site binding for FITC-albumin with K(d) of 0.91 or 0.44 mg/ml and B(max) of 3.15 or 0.81 microg/mg cell protein, respectively. In addition, they showed avid endocytosis of FITC-albumin with K(m) of 9.48 or 4.5 mg/ml and V(max) of 474.3 or 97.4 microg.mg cell protein(-1).h(-1), respectively. Immunoglobulin and transferrin were inefficient competitors of this process, indicating some specificity for albumin. Accumulation of endocytosed albumin could be demonstrated in intracellular vesicles by fluorescence confocal microscopy and electron microscopy. Endocytosis was sensitive to pretreatment with simvastatin. In vivo accumulation of albumin was found in all three species but was most pronounced in the rat. We conclude that podocytes are able to endocytose protein in a statin-sensitive manner. This function is likely to be highly significant in health and disease. In addition, protein endocytosis by podocytes may represent a useful, measurable phenotypic characteristic against which potentially injurious or beneficial interventions can be assessed. PMID:17032937

  8. Engineering Bispecificity into a Single Albumin-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Alm, Tove; Hober, Sophia; Löfblom, John

    2011-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies as well as non-immunoglobulin based bispecific affinity proteins are considered to have a very high potential in future biotherapeutic applications. In this study, we report on a novel approach for generation of extremely small bispecific proteins comprised of only a single structural domain. Binding to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was engineered into an albumin-binding domain while still retaining the original affinity for albumin, resulting in a bispecific protein composed of merely 46 amino acids. By diversification of the non albumin-binding side of the three-helix bundle domain, followed by display of the resulting library on phage particles, bispecific single-domain proteins were isolated using selections with TNF-α as target. Moreover, based on the obtained sequences from the phage selection, a second-generation library was designed in order to further increase the affinity of the bispecific candidates. Staphylococcal surface display was employed for the affinity maturation, enabling efficient isolation of improved binders as well as multiparameter-based sortings with both TNF-α and albumin as targets in the same selection cycle. Isolated variants were sequenced and the binding to albumin and TNF-α was analyzed. This analysis revealed an affinity for TNF-α below 5 nM for the strongest binders. From the multiparameter sorting that simultaneously targeted TNF-α and albumin, several bispecific candidates were isolated with high affinity to both antigens, suggesting that cell display in combination with fluorescence activated cell sorting is a suitable technology for engineering of bispecificity. To our knowledge, the new binders represent the smallest engineered bispecific proteins reported so far. Possibilities and challenges as well as potential future applications of this novel strategy are discussed. PMID:21991353

  9. Thymoquinone, an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, binds with bilirubin and protects mice from hyperbilirubinemia and cyclophosphamide-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Amaj A; Khan, Masood A; Rahmani, Arshad H; Fatima, Sana; Younus, Hina

    2016-08-01

    Some reports indicate that thymoquinone (TQ), the main constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is hepatoprotective. The aim of this study was to determine whether TQ is able to bind directly to bilirubin, and whether TQ or liposomal formulation of TQ (Lip-TQ) can reduce cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced liver toxicity, serum bilirubin level in mice. The binding of TQ with bilirubin was studied by UV-VIS, fluorescence and Near-UV CD spectroscopy. Inhibition of binding of bilirubin to erythrocytes by TQ was also examined. To increase the in vivo efficacy, Lip-TQ was prepared and used against CYP-induced toxicity. The protective role of TQ or Lip-TQ against CYP-induced toxicity was assessed by determining the liver function parameters, the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and histological studies. It was found that TQ binds to bilirubin and significantly inhibits the binding of bilirubin to erythrocytes. Lip-TQ (10 mg/kg) significantly reduced the levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) from 254 ± 48 to 66 ± 18 IU/L (P < 0.001), alanine transaminase (ALT) from 142 ± 28 to 47.8 ± 16 IU/L (P < 0.05) and serum bilirubin from 2.8 ± 0.50 to 1.24 ± 0.30 mg/dl (P < 0.05). Treatment with Lip-TQ reduced the CYP-induced inflammation and hemorrhage in liver tissues. Moreover, treatment with free or Lip-TQ protected the activity of SOD and CAT in CYP-injected mice. Therefore, TQ can reduce the level of bilirubin in systemic circulation in disease conditions that lead to hyperbilirubinemia and liver toxicity and hence may be used as a supplement in the treatment of liver ailments. PMID:27265787

  10. Bilirubin Oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria Physically Absorbed on Graphite Electrodes. Insights into the Alternative Resting Form and the Sources of Activity Loss.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Federico; Farias, Diego; Castro, Carmen; Acuna-Rougier, Cristina; Antiochia, Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction is one of the most important chemical processes in energy converting systems and living organisms. Mediator-less, direct electro-catalytic reduction of oxygen to water was achieved on spectrographite electrodes modified by physical adsorption of bilirubin oxidases from Myrothecium verrucaria. The existence of an alternative resting form of the enzyme is validated. The effect on the catalytic cycle of temperature, pH and the presence of halogens in the buffer was investigated. Previous results on the electrochemistry of bilirubin oxidase and on the impact of the presence of halogens are reviewed and reinterpreted.

  11. Bilirubin Oxidase from Myrothecium verrucaria Physically Absorbed on Graphite Electrodes. Insights into the Alternative Resting Form and the Sources of Activity Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Federico; Farias, Diego; Castro, Carmen; Acuna-Rougier, Cristina; Antiochia, Riccarda

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction is one of the most important chemical processes in energy converting systems and living organisms. Mediator-less, direct electro-catalytic reduction of oxygen to water was achieved on spectrographite electrodes modified by physical adsorption of bilirubin oxidases from Myrothecium verrucaria. The existence of an alternative resting form of the enzyme is validated. The effect on the catalytic cycle of temperature, pH and the presence of halogens in the buffer was investigated. Previous results on the electrochemistry of bilirubin oxidase and on the impact of the presence of halogens are reviewed and reinterpreted. PMID:26196288

  12. Preparation and Characterization of 125I Labeled Bovine Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ashwitha Rai, K. S.; Jyothi; Rasmi, R. R.; Sarnaik, Jayula; Kadwad, V. B.; Shenoy, K. B.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin is a model protein, which has been conventionally used as protein standard and in many areas of biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. Radioiodination procedure for bovine serum albumin employing chloramine-T as an oxidant with slight modification was evaluated critically to establish the optimal conditions for the preparation of radiolabeled tracer (125I-BSA) with required specific activity without impairing the immune reactivity and biological activity. Optimized radioiodination procedure involving 10 µg of chloramine-T along with 20 µg of sodium metabisulphite with 60 seconds incubation at 2° yielded 125I-BSA with high integrity. PMID:25767326

  13. Effect of glycation of albumin on its renal clearance in normal and diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, G.J.; Jerums, G.

    1988-03-01

    Two independent techniques have been used to study the renal clearances of nonenzymatically glycated albumin and nonglycated albumin in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, 16 to 24 weeks after the onset of diabetes. In the first technique, serum and urinary endogenous glycated and nonglycated albumin were separated using m-aminophenylboronate affinity chromatography and subsequently quantified by radioimmunoassay. Endogenous glycated albumin was cleared approximately twofold faster than nonglycated albumin in normal and diabetic rats. However, no difference was observed in the glycated albumin/nonglycated albumin clearance ratios (Cga/Calb) in normal and diabetic rats, respectively (2.18 +/- 0.39 vs 1.83 +/- 0.22, P greater than 0.05). The second technique measured the renal clearance of injected 125I-labelled glycated albumin and 125I-labelled albumin. The endogenous results were supported by the finding that 125I-labelled glycated albumin was cleared more rapidly than 125I-labelled albumin in normal (P less than 0.01) and diabetic (P less than 0.05) rats. The Cga/Calb ratio calculated for the radiolabelled albumins was 1.4 and 2.0 in normal and diabetic rats, respectively. This evidence suggests that nonenzymatic glycation of albumin increases its renal clearance to a similar degree in normal and diabetic rats.

  14. Neuronal uptake of serum albumin is associated with neuron damage during the development of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zanhua; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Suping; Liu, Sibo; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that brain blood barrier dysfunction following the onset of seizures may lead to serum albumin extravasation into the brain. However, the effect of albumin extravasation on the development of epilepsy is yet to be fully elucidated. Previous studies have predominantly focused on the effect of albumin absorption by astrocytes; however, the present study investigated the effects of neuronal uptake of albumin in vitro and in kainic acid-induced Sprague-Dawley rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, electroencephalogram recordings were conducted to record seizure onset, Nissl and Evans blue staining were used to detect neuronal damage and albumin extravasation, respectively, and double immunofluorescence was used to explore neuronal absorption of albumin. Cell counting was also conducted in vitro to determine whether albumin contributes to neuronal death. The results of the present study indicated that extravasated serum albumin was absorbed by neurons, and the neurons that had absorbed albumin died and were dissolved 28 days after seizure onset in vivo. Furthermore, significant neuronal death was detected after albumin absorption in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggested that albumin may be absorbed by neurons following the onset of seizures. Furthermore, the results indicated that neuronal albumin uptake may be associated with neuronal damage and death in epileptic seizures. Therefore, attenuating albumin extravasation following epileptic seizures may reduce brain damage and slow the development of epilepsy. PMID:27446263

  15. Acute hypoproteinemic fluid overload: its determinants, distribution, and treatment with concentrated albumin and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Pappova, E; Bachmeier, W; Crevoisier, J L; Kollar, J; Kollar, M; Tobler, P; Zahler, H W; Zaugg, D; Lundsgaard-Hansen, P

    1977-01-01

    We simulated the use of massive volumes of crystalloid fluids as a treatment of acute plasma loss in a standardized experimental model and studied the factors determining the retention or excretion of the resulting acute hypoproteinemic fluid overload, its distribution within the body, and its treatment with concentrated albumin and diuretics. In accordance with the classic Starling concept, the serum protein level, i.e. the serum colloid osmotic pressure, determined the excretion/retention ratio of a given water and sodium load. Of the total fluid retention, fat and muscle each accommodated 25%, whereas the skin, which contributes only 7% to the total body weight, accounted for 37% and increased its volume by roughly one third. Concentrated albumin promoted fluid excretion in direct proportion to the achieved increment of the serum protein level and abolished the edema of fat, muscle and skin. Furosemide was virtually ineffective. The implications of these results for the 'adult respiratory distress syndrome' and disturbed wound healing are discussed and related to the concept of a critical threshold of the serum protein level. PMID:919420

  16. Metastable and equilibrium phase diagrams of unconjugated bilirubin IXα as functions of pH in model bile systems: Implications for pigment gallstone formation.

    PubMed

    Berman, Marvin D; Carey, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    Metastable and equilibrium phase diagrams for unconjugated bilirubin IXα (UCB) in bile are yet to be determined for understanding the physical chemistry of pigment gallstone formation. Also, UCB is a molecule of considerable biomedical importance because it is a potent antioxidant and an inhibitor of atherogenesis. We employed principally a titrimetric approach to obtain metastable and equilibrium UCB solubilities in model bile systems composed of taurine-conjugated bile salts, egg yolk lecithin (mixed long-chain phosphatidylcholines), and cholesterol as functions of total lipid concentration, biliary pH values, and CaCl2 plus NaCl concentrations. Metastable and equilibrium precipitation pH values were obtained, and average pKa values of the two carboxyl groups of UCB were calculated. Added lecithin and increased temperature decreased UCB solubility markedly, whereas increases in bile salt concentrations and molar levels of urea augmented solubility. A wide range of NaCl and cholesterol concentrations resulted in no specific effects, whereas added CaCl2 produced large decreases in UCB solubilities at alkaline pH values only. UV-visible absorption spectra were consistent with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions between UCB and bile salts that were strongly influenced by pH. Reliable literature values for UCB compositions of native gallbladder biles revealed that biles from hemolytic mice and humans with black pigment gallstones are markedly supersaturated with UCB and exhibit more acidic pH values, whereas biles from nonstone control animals and patients with cholesterol gallstone are unsaturated with UCB.

  17. Simultaneous determination of the bilirubin oxidation end products Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B in human serum using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Raphael A; Kahnes, Marcel; Bauer, Michael; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Bilirubin oxidation end products (BOXes) appear upon endogenous heme degradation and can be found in the cerebrospinal fluid after hemorrhagic stroke. BOXes are assumed to contribute to delayed cerebral vasospasm and secondary loss of brain tissue. Here, we present a validated LC-ESI-MS/MS method for the sensitive determination of the regio-isomers Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B in human serum. We found that Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B appear in serum of healthy volunteers. The sample preparation includes the addition of 5-bromonicotinamide as internal standard and protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Baseline-separation was achieved on a C-18 column with a binary solvent gradient of formic acid in water/acetonitrile at 1 mL/min within a total analysis time of 17 min. Using single reaction monitoring in the positive ion mode, the linear working ranges were 2.74-163 pg/μL (Z-BOX A) and 2.12-162.4 pg/μL (Z-BOX B) with R(2)>0.995. Intra- and inter-day precisions were <10%. The inherent analyte concentrations of Z-BOX A (14.4 ± 5.1 nM) and Z-BOX B (10.9 ± 3.1 nM) in pooled human serum were determined by standard addition. The photolability of both analytes was demonstrated. This method enables to monitor Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B as a prerequisite to systematically study the biological significance of higher order metabolites of heme degradation.

  18. Multiple-probe analysis of folding and unfolding pathways of human serum albumin. Evidence for a framework mechanism of folding.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Banerjee, Abhijit; Krishnakumar, Shyam Sundar; Rahaman, Obaidur; Panda, Dulal

    2004-05-01

    The changes in the far-UV CD signal, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and bilirubin absorbance showed that the guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl)-induced unfolding of a multidomain protein, human serum albumin (HSA), followed a two-state process. However, using environment sensitive Nile red fluorescence, the unfolding and folding pathways of HSA were found to follow a three-state process and an intermediate was detected in the range 0.25-1.5 m GdnHCl. The intermediate state displayed 45% higher fluorescence intensity than that of the native state. The increase in the Nile red fluorescence was found to be due to an increase in the quantum yield of the HSA-bound Nile red. Low concentrations of GdnHCl neither altered the binding affinity of Nile red to HSA nor induced the aggregation of HSA. In addition, the secondary structure of HSA was not perturbed during the first unfolding transition (<1.5 m GdnHCl); however, the secondary structure was completely lost during the second transition. The data together showed that the half maximal loss of the tertiary structure occurred at a lower GdnHCl concentration than the loss of the secondary structure. Further kinetic studies of the refolding process of HSA using multiple spectroscopic techniques showed that the folding occurred in two phases, a burst phase followed by a slow phase. An intermediate with native-like secondary structure but only a partial tertiary structure was found to form in the burst phase of refolding. Then, the intermediate slowly folded into the native state. An analysis of the refolding data suggested that the folding of HSA could be best explained by the framework model.

  19. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements.

    PubMed

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  20. Human serum albumin homeostasis: a new look at the roles of synthesis, catabolism, renal and gastrointestinal excretion, and the clinical value of serum albumin measurements

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, David G; Levitt, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin concentration (CP) is a remarkably strong prognostic indicator of morbidity and mortality in both sick and seemingly healthy subjects. Surprisingly, the specifics of the pathophysiology underlying the relationship between CP and ill-health are poorly understood. This review provides a summary that is not previously available in the literature, concerning how synthesis, catabolism, and renal and gastrointestinal clearance of albumin interact to bring about albumin homeostasis, with a focus on the clinical factors that influence this homeostasis. In normal humans, the albumin turnover time of about 25 days reflects a liver albumin synthesis rate of about 10.5 g/day balanced by renal (≈6%), gastrointestinal (≈10%), and catabolic (≈84%) clearances. The acute development of hypoalbuminemia with sepsis or trauma results from increased albumin capillary permeability leading to redistribution of albumin from the vascular to interstitial space. The best understood mechanism of chronic hypoalbuminemia is the decreased albumin synthesis observed in liver disease. Decreased albumin production also accounts for hypoalbuminemia observed with a low-protein and normal caloric diet. However, a calorie- and protein-deficient diet does not reduce albumin synthesis and is not associated with hypoalbuminemia, and CP is not a useful marker of malnutrition. In most disease states other than liver disease, albumin synthesis is normal or increased, and hypoalbuminemia reflects an enhanced rate of albumin turnover resulting either from an increased rate of catabolism (a poorly understood phenomenon) or enhanced loss of albumin into the urine (nephrosis) or intestine (protein-losing enteropathy). The latter may occur with subtle intestinal pathology and hence may be more prevalent than commonly appreciated. Clinically, reduced CP appears to be a result rather than a cause of ill-health, and therapy designed to increase CP has limited benefit. The ubiquitous occurrence of

  1. 2S Albumin Storage Proteins: What Makes them Food Allergens?

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, F. Javier; Clemente, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    2S albumin storage proteins are becoming of increasing interest in nutritional and clinical studies as they have been reported as major food allergens in seeds of many mono- and di-cotyledonous plants. This review describes the main biochemical, structural and functional properties of these proteins thought to play a role in determining their potential allergenicity. 2S albumins are considered to sensitize directly via the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The high stability of their intrinsic protein structure, dominated by a well-conserved skeleton of cysteine residues, to the harsh conditions present in the GIT suggests that these proteins are able to cross the gut mucosal barrier to sensitize the mucosal immune system and/or elicit an allergic response. The flexible and solvent-exposed hypervariable region of these proteins is immunodominant and has the ability to bind IgE from allergic patients´ sera. Several linear IgE-binding epitopes of 2S albumins spanning this region have been described to play a major role in allergenicity; the role of conformational epitopes of these proteins in food allergy is far from being understood and need to be investigated. Finally, the interaction of these proteins with other components of the food matrix might influence the absorption rates of immunologically reactive 2S albumins but also in their immune response. PMID:18949071

  2. Spontaneous formation of small sized albumin/acacia coacervate particles.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D J; Singh, O N

    1993-07-01

    Microgel coacervate particles form spontaneously on mixing aqueous solutions of oppositely charged albumin and acacia, under specific conditions of pH, ionic strength, and polyion concentration, close to but not at the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield. The mean particle diameter of these coacervate particles is approximately 6 microns when suspended in aqueous media, as determined by HIAC/Royco particle analysis. The geometric standard deviation of the particles falls in the range 1.2-1.9 microns. The particle size was not dependent on the method of emulsification of the coacervate in the equilibrium phase, or on the stirring speed applied during the manufacturing process. The microgel particles were stable on storage, for periods up to forty-six days, without the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent, or the application of heat. Stability was measured with respect to the change in particle size of samples stored at different temperatures. The non-cross-linked microcapsules were also shown to be stable on pH change, to pH values outside the coacervation pH range. At the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield the albumin/acacia system formed a very viscous coacervate phase, which was unsuitable for microcapsule preparation. The rheological properties of albumin/acacia and gelatin/acacia complex coacervates optimized for maximum coacervate yield were compared. The albumin/acacia coacervate was shown to be three orders of magnitude more viscous than the gelatin/acacia system.

  3. Separation of Albumin, Ceruloplasmin, and Transferrin from Human Plasma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Grady; Frieden, Earl

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are provided for separating the principal metalloproteins (albumin, ceruloplasmin, and transferrin) from plasma using column chromatographic techniques. The experiment can be completed in two separate three-hour laboratory periods during which column chromatography is illustrated and the effect of pH on charge and affinity of a protein…

  4. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1035 - Albumin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin test system. 862.1035 Section 862.1035 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  10. Evidence of transcellular albumin transport after hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Childs, Ed W; Udobi, Kahdi F; Hunter, Felicia A; Dhevan, Vijian

    2005-06-01

    Hemorrhagic shock-induced ischemia-reperfusion injury is characterized by an increase in microvascular permeability. This increase in permeability is thought to occur mainly via passive transport through interendothelial cell junctions. However, recent data have suggested that a transcellular (caveolae) transport mechanism(s) may also play a role after shock. The purpose of our study was to investigate the role of caveolae transport after hemorrhagic shock. After a control period, blood was withdrawn to reduce the mean arterial pressure to 40 mmHg for 1 h in urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Mesenteric postcapillary venules in a transilluminated segment of small intestine were examined to determine changes in permeability. Rats received an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine albumin during the control period. The fluorescent light intensity emitted from the fluorescein isothiocyanate-bovine albumin was recorded with digital microscopy within the lumen of the microvasculature and was compared with the intensity of light in the extravascular space. The images were downloaded to a computerized image analysis program that quantitates changes in light intensity. This change in light intensity represents albumin extravasation. Our results demonstrated a marked increase in albumin leak after hemorrhagic shock that was significantly attenuated with two different inhibitors of transcellular transport, N-ethylmaleimide and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. These data suggest that caveolae transport plays a significant role in microvascular permeability after hemorrhagic shock. PMID:15897811

  11. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040...

  14. Quarter variation and correlations of colostrum albumin, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Samarütel, Jaak; Baumrucker, Craig R; Gross, Josef J; Dechow, Chad D; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2016-05-01

    A high variation in immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) concentration in first milked quarter colostrum has been reported, but BSA quarter colostrum variation is not known. The occurrence of serum albumin in milk has been attributed to increased blood-milk barrier penetration. Reports of serum albumin binding to the Fc Receptor of the neonate, the receptor thought to be responsible for IgG1 transcytosis, suggested that a correlation with the appearance of IgG1 in colostrum of dairy cows was likely. The objective of the study was to establish the quarter colostrum concentration and mass of immunoglobulins and serum albumin. First colostrum was quarter collected within 4 h of parturition from healthy udders of 31 multiparous dairy cows. Individual quarter colostrum weight was determined and a sample of each was frozen for subsequent analysis. Concentrations of immunoglobulin G1, G2, and BSA were measured by ELISA and total mass of components was calculated. In addition, colostrum was also analysed for L-lactate dehydrogenase activity. Analysis of concentration and mass of BSA, immunoglobulin G1, G2 established that the quarter variations were different by cow, quarter and quarter within cow. Partial correlations corrected for colostrum weight indicated that BSA and IgG2 concentration and mass are closely correlated while that of BSA and IgG1 concentration and mass exhibited no correlation suggesting that BSA and IgG1 may have different transport mechanisms. Interestingly, immunoglobulin G1 and G2 concentration and mass exhibited strong correlations suggesting that also some unknown mechanism of immunoglobulin G2 appearance in colostrum is occurring. Finally, no measured protein exhibited any correlation with the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in colostrum.

  15. Comparison of albumin and cabergoline in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: A clinical trial study

    PubMed Central

    Torabizadeh, Aalie; Vahidroodsari, Fatemeh; Ghorbanpour, Zakieh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is the most serious and potentially life-threatening iatrogenic complication associated with ovarian stimulation during Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) protocols. OHSS typically is a result of ovarian expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which increases vascular permeability. Objective: Comparison of albumin and cabergoline in the prevention of OHSS. Materials and Methods: 95 high risk infertile women for OHSS (more than 20 follicles in both ovaries at day of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) injection) were randomly divided into two groups. First group including 48 women received 10 unit intravenous albumin at starting oocyte retrieval, and second group including 47 women received 0.5 mg/day dopamine agonist (Cabergolin) at day of HCG injection till 8 days. The dosage of human Menopausal Gonadotropin (HMG) used, total number of follicles developed, number of oocytes retrieved, serum E2 concentrations during the luteal phase, development of ascites, number of embryos generated, clinical pregnancy rate, results of the in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles and incidence and severity of any OHSS were evaluated. Results: There was evidence of a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of OHSS in the cabergolin group (53.7%) versus albumin group (46.3%) (p=0.04). But there was no significant difference of a reduction in severe OHSS (p=0.62). There was no difference in clinical pregnancy rate too. Conclusion: Administration of cabergolin can prevent incidence of OHSS and does not appear to effect on its severity. Registration ID in IRCT: IRCT138706281217N4 PMID:24639705

  16. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Urinary Albumin Excretion in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Canales, Muna T.; Paudel, Misti L.; Taylor, Brent C.; Ishani, Areef; Mehra, Reena; Steffes, Michael; Stone, Katie L.; Redline, Susan; Ensrud, Kristine E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sleep-disordered breathing(SDB) may be deleterious to the cardiovascular system and other organs, including the kidney. Although older men are at increased risk for both kidney disease and SDB, it is unknown whether SDB is associated with higher urinary albumin excretion in this population. Methods We examined 507 community-dwelling men age ≥67 years(mean 76.0±5.3) enrolled in the MrOS Sleep study who underwent overnight polysomnography and gave a spot urine sample. SDB severity was categorized using the respiratory disturbance index and percent total sleep time <90% oxygen saturation(%time O2<90). Urinary albumin excretion was expressed using the albumin-to-creatinine ratio(ACR). Results There was a graded association between respiratory disturbance index and ACR (age and race-adjusted mean ACR=9.35 mg/gCr for respiratory disturbance index≥30 versus 6.72 mg/gCr for respiratory disturbance index<5, p=0.007). This association was attenuated after further adjustment for body mass index(BMI), hypertension and diabetes and no longer reached significance(p=0.129). However, even after adjustment for age, race, BMI, hypertension and diabetes, greater %time O2<90 was associated with higher ACR(10.35 mg/gCr for ≥10%time O2<90 versus 7.45 mg/gCr for <1%time O2<90, p=0.046). Conclusion SDB, measured by elevated respiratory disturbance index or nocturnal hypoxemia, was associated with higher ACR. The relationship between respiratory disturbance index and ACR was partially explained by higher BMI and greater prevalence of hypertension and diabetes among men with SDB. However, greater nocturnal hypoxemia was independently associated with higher ACR, suggesting that the hypoxia component of SDB may mediate any detrimental effect of SDB on the kidney. PMID:20186573

  17. Impact of albumin on drug delivery--new applications on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Elsadek, Bakheet; Kratz, Felix

    2012-01-10

    Over the past decades, albumin has emerged as a versatile carrier for therapeutic and diagnostic agents, primarily for diagnosing and treating diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and infectious diseases. Market approved products include fatty acid derivatives of human insulin or the glucagon-like-1 peptide (Levemir(®) and Victoza(®)) for treating diabetes, the taxol albumin nanoparticle Abraxane(®) for treating metastatic breast cancer which is also under clinical investigation in further tumor indications, and (99m)Tc-aggregated albumin (Nanocoll(®) and Albures(®)) for diagnosing cancer and rheumatoid arthritis as well as for lymphoscintigraphy. In addition, an increasing number of albumin-based or albumin-binding drugs are in clinical trials such as antibody fusion proteins (MM-111) for treating HER2/neu positive breast cancer (phase I), a camelid albumin-binding nanobody anti-HSA-anti-TNF-α (ATN-103) in phase II studies for treating rheumatoid arthritis, an antidiabetic Exendin-4 analog bound to recombinant human albumin (phase I/II), a fluorescein-labeled albumin conjugate (AFL)-human serum albumin for visualizing the malignant borders of brain tumors for improved surgical resection, and finally an albumin-binding prodrug of doxorubicin (INNO-206) entering phase II studies against sarcoma and gastric cancer. In the preclinical setting, novel approaches include attaching peptides with high-affinity for albumin to antibody fragments, the exploitation of albumin-binding gadolinium contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and physical or covalent attachment of antiviral, antibacterial, and anticancer drugs to albumin that are permanently or transiently attached to human serum albumin (HSA) or act as albumin-binding prodrugs. This review gives an overview of the expanding field of preclinical and clinical drug applications and developments that use albumin as a protein carrier to improve the pharmacokinetic profile of the drug or to target the drug

  18. Liver Support With Albumin Dialysis Reduces Hepatitis C Virus Viremia and Facilitates Antiviral Treatment of Severe Hepatitis C Virus Recurrence After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Samaniego, Luis; Catalina, María-Vega; Rincón, Diego; Lo Iacono, Oreste; Fernández, Ainhoa; Clemente, Gerardo; Bañares, Rafael; Vaquero, Javier; Salcedo, Magdalena

    2016-04-01

    Patients with severe hepatitis C virus (HCV) recurrence after liver transplantation (LT) present an ominous prognosis, rarely achieving sustained virological response (SVR). Dialysis procedures may transiently decrease the HCV viral load, but the effect of albumin dialysis is currently unknown. Here, we evaluated the impact of albumin dialysis using the Molecular Adsorbent Recirculating System (MARS) used as a co-adjuvant antiviral treatment for severe HCV recurrence after LT. Thirteen patients (11 males, median age 48 years) with fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis or METAVIR fibrosis score ≥ F3 with severe portal hypertension underwent three consecutive MARS sessions. Antiviral therapy was initiated in 11 patients within 24 h after the MARS sessions. A contemporary cohort of seven patients who did not follow the MARS protocol is shown for comparison. MARS treatment resulted in consistent decreases of viral load from 7.59 log10 IU/mL [6.15-8.90] to 6.79 log10 IU/mL [5.18-7.84] (P = 0.003) as well as in decreases of serum bilirubin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (all P < 0.05). The overall rate of SVR was 0% in the Control group and 54.6% in patients initiating antiviral therapy within 24 h after MARS. Survival at 1 and 3 years was, respectively, 93% and 70% in patients undergoing MARS, compared with 29% and 14% in the Control group (P = 0.001). No major adverse events related to MARS treatment were observed. In conclusion, the use of MARS may facilitate the achievement of SVR and improve the prognosis of patients with severe HCV-recurrence after LT by reducing viral load and improving liver function prior to antiviral therapy. PMID:26929255

  19. Increasing the catalytic activity of Bilirubin oxidase from Bacillus pumilus: Importance of host strain and chaperones proteins.

    PubMed

    Gounel, Sébastien; Rouhana, Jad; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Cadet, Marine; Mano, Nicolas

    2016-07-20

    Aggregation of recombinant proteins into inclusion bodies (IBs) is the main problem of the expression of multicopper oxidase in Escherichia coli. It is usually attributed to inefficient folding of proteins due to the lack of copper and/or unavailability of chaperone proteins. The general strategies reported to overcome this issue have been focused on increasing the intracellular copper concentration. Here we report a complementary method to optimize the expression in E. coli of a promising Bilirubin oxidase (BOD) isolated from Bacillus pumilus. First, as this BOD has a disulfide bridge, we switched E.coli strain from BL21 (DE3) to Origami B (DE3), known to promote the formation of disulfide bridges in the bacterial cytoplasm. In a second step, we investigate the effect of co-expression of chaperone proteins on the protein production and specific activity. Our strategy allowed increasing the final amount of enzyme by 858% and its catalytic rate constant by 83%. PMID:27165502

  20. Lipid-rich bovine serum albumin improves the viability and hatching ability of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Chie; SAKAGUCHI, Yosuke; HOSHI, Hiroyoshi; YOSHIOKA, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lipid-rich bovine serum albumin (LR-BSA) on the development of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro were examined. Addition of 0.5 to 5 mg/ml LR-BSA to porcine blastocyst medium (PBM) from Day 5 (Day 0 = in vitro fertilization) significantly increased the hatching rates of blastocysts on Day 7 and the total cell numbers in Day-7 blastocysts. When Day-5 blastocysts were cultured with PBM alone, PBM containing LR-BSA, recombinant human serum albumin or fatty acid-free BSA, addition of LR-BSA significantly enhanced hatching rates and the cell number in blastocysts that survived compared with other treatments. The diameter, ATP content and numbers of both inner cell mass and total cells in Day-6 and Day-7 blastocysts cultured with PBM containing LR-BSA were significantly higher than in blastocysts cultured with PBM alone, whereas LR-BSA had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential. The mRNA levels of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and β-oxidation (ACSL1, ACSL3, CPT1, CPT2 and KAT) in Day-7 blastocysts were significantly upregulated by the addition of LR-BSA. The results indicated that LR-BSA enhanced hatching ability and quality of porcine blastocysts produced in vitro, as determined by ATP content, blastocyst diameter and expression levels of the specific genes, suggesting that the stimulatory effects of LR-BSA arise from lipids bound to albumin. PMID:26582048

  1. Albumin testing in urine using a smart-phone

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Ahmet F.; Nagi, Richie; Sadeghi, Kayvon; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a digital sensing platform, termed Albumin Tester, running on a smart-phone that images and automatically analyses fluorescent assays confined within disposable test tubes for sensitive and specific detection of albumin in urine. This light-weight and compact Albumin Tester attachment, weighing approximately 148 grams, is mechanically installed on the existing camera unit of a smart-phone, where test and control tubes are inserted from the side and are excited by a battery powered laser diode. This excitation beam, after probing the sample of interest located within the test tube, interacts with the control tube, and the resulting fluorescent emission is collected perpendicular to the direction of the excitation, where the cellphone camera captures the images of the fluorescent tubes through the use of an external plastic lens that is inserted between the sample and the camera lens. The acquired fluorescent images of the sample and control tubes are digitally processed within one second through an Android application running on the same cellphone for quantification of albumin concentration in urine specimen of interest. Using a simple sample preparation approach which takes ~ 5 minutes per test (including the incubation time), we experimentally confirmed the detection limit of our sensing platform as 5–10 μg/mL (which is more than 3 times lower than clinically accepted normal range) in buffer as well as urine samples. This automated albumin testing tool running on a smart-phone could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney disease or for monitoring of chronic patients, especially those suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and/or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23995895

  2. Albumin testing in urine using a smart-phone.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Ahmet F; Nagi, Richie; Sadeghi, Kayvon; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate a digital sensing platform, termed Albumin Tester, running on a smart-phone that images and automatically analyses fluorescent assays confined within disposable test tubes for sensitive and specific detection of albumin in urine. This light-weight and compact Albumin Tester attachment, weighing approximately 148 grams, is mechanically installed on the existing camera unit of a smart-phone, where test and control tubes are inserted from the side and are excited by a battery powered laser diode. This excitation beam, after probing the sample of interest located within the test tube, interacts with the control tube, and the resulting fluorescent emission is collected perpendicular to the direction of the excitation, where the cellphone camera captures the images of the fluorescent tubes through the use of an external plastic lens that is inserted between the sample and the camera lens. The acquired fluorescent images of the sample and control tubes are digitally processed within one second through an Android application running on the same cellphone for quantification of albumin concentration in the urine specimen of interest. Using a simple sample preparation approach which takes ~5 min per test (including the incubation time), we experimentally confirmed the detection limit of our sensing platform as 5-10 μg mL(-1) (which is more than 3 times lower than the clinically accepted normal range) in buffer as well as urine samples. This automated albumin testing tool running on a smart-phone could be useful for early diagnosis of kidney disease or for monitoring of chronic patients, especially those suffering from diabetes, hypertension, and/or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23995895

  3. Chromatographic and traditional albumin isotherms on cellulose: a model for wound protein adsorption on modified cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin is the most abundant protein found in healing wounds. Traditional and chromatogrpahic protein isotherms of albumin binding on modified cotton fibers are useful in understanding albumin binding to cellulose wound dressings. An important consideration in the design of cellulosic wound dressin...

  4. Role of bovine serum albumin in the nutrition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, M; Wilson, A R; Solotorovsky, M

    1979-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin promotes the growth of small inocula of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in media containing unesterified fatty acids. Albumin binds fatty acids present in concentrations toxic for the organisms. In the present study, additional roles of albumin were investigated. When present in a basal medium, fatty acid-free albumin could be utilized by M. tuberculosis as a sole source of carbon. Since albumin could not substitute for the amino acids in basal medium as a nitrogen source, it was concluded that the protein component in albumin was not utilized as a nutrient by the organisms. An ether extract of fatty acid-free albumin supported a small but significant amount of growth. Analysis of the lipids in fatty acid-free albumin by gas chromatography revealed the presence of 686 microgram of fatty acid per g of albumin. Although a small amount of growth occurred when a lipid extract of albumin was present in the medium, growth stimulation was dependent in major part on the presence of undenatured albumin in the medium. Lipids, when bound to albumin, can serve as a nontoxic source of carbon and energy. PMID:120697

  5. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1645 - Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test... Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1645 Urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system. (a) Identification. A urinary protein or albumin (nonquantitative) test system is a device intended to...

  9. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K.; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F.; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S.; Fassett, Robert G.; Bulmer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin’s antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations. PMID:26498893

  10. Conjugated bilirubin affects cytokine profiles in hepatitis A virus infection by modulating function of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Castro-García, Flor P; Corral-Jara, Karla F; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Sandoval-Hernandez, Monserrat A; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is the major cause of acute liver failure in paediatric patients. The clinical spectrum of infection is variable, and liver injury is determined by altered hepatic enzyme function and bilirubin concentration. We recently reported differences in cytokine profiles between distinct HAV-induced clinical courses, and bilirubin has been recognized as a potential immune-modulator. However, how bilirubin may affect cytokine profiles underlying the variability in the course of infection has not been determined. Herein, we used a transcription factor (TF) binding site identification approach to retrospectively analyse cytokine expression in HAV-infected children and to predict the entire set of TFs associated with the expression of specific cytokine profiles. The results suggested that modulation of the activity of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins (STATs) may play a central role during HAV infection. This led us to compare the degree of STAT phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBLCs) from paediatric patients with distinct levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB). Low CB levels in sera were associated with increased STAT-1 and STAT-5 phosphorylation. A positive correlation was observed between the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) content and CB values, whereas higher levels of CB correlated with reduced serum IL-8 values and with a reduction in the proportion of PBLCs positive for STAT-5 phosphorylation. When CB was used to stimulate patients' PBLCs in vitro, the levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α were increased. The data showed that bilirubin plays a role in STAT function and affects cytokine profile expression during HAV infection.

  11. Developmental Onset of Bilirubin-induced Neurotoxicity Involves Toll-like Receptor 2-dependent Signaling in Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1 Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Yueh, Mei-Fei; Chen, Shujuan; Nguyen, Nghia; Tukey, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Biological and signaling events that connect developmentally induced hyperbilirubinemia to bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunction (BIND) and CNS toxicity in humans are poorly understood. In mammals, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) is the sole enzyme responsible for bilirubin glucuronidation, a rate-limiting step necessary for bilirubin metabolism and clearance. Humanized mice that express the entire UGT1 locus (hUGT1) and the UGT1A1 gene, develop neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, with 8–10% of hUGT1 mice succumbing to CNS damage, a phenotype that is presented by uncontrollable seizures. We demonstrate that neuroinflammation and reactive gliosis are prominent features of bilirubin brain toxicity, and a disturbed redox status resulting from activation of NADPH oxidase is an important contributing mechanism found in BIND. Using knock-out mice and primary brain cells, we connect a key pattern recognition receptor, Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), to hyperbilirubinemia-induced signaling. We illustrate a requirement for TLR2 signaling in regulating gliosis, proinflammatory mediators, and oxidative stress when neonatal mice encounter severe hyperbilirubinemia. TLR2-mediated gliosis strongly correlates with pronounced neuroinflammation in the CNS with up-regulation of TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6, creating a pro-inflammatory CNS environment. Gene expression and immunohistochemistry staining show that hUGT1/Tlr2−/− mice fail to activate glial cells, proinflammatory cytokines, and stress response genes. In addition, bilirubin-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced by blocking TLR2 signaling indicating its anti-apoptotic property. Consequently, a higher neonatal death rate (57.1%) in hUGT1/Tlr2−/− mice was observed when compared with hUGT1 mice (8.7%). These results suggest that TLR2 signaling and microglia neuroinflammation are linked to a repair and/or protection mode against BIND. PMID:24403077

  12. Influence of curcumin on cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion and on biliary excretion of cyclosporin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Deters, M; Siegers, C; Hänsel, W; Schneider, K P; Hennighausen, G

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the ability of curcumin, which can be extracted from different Curcuma species, to prevent cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion, and its influence on biliary excretion of cyclosporin (CS) and its metabolites in the bile fistula model in rats. I.v. injection of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) after 30 min increased dose-dependently basal bile flow (30 microliters/kg/min) up to 200%, biliary bilirubin excretion (3000 pmol/kg/min) up to 150%, and biliary cholesterol excretion (22 nmol/kg/min) up to 113%. CS (30 mg/kg) reduced bile flow to 66% and biliary excretion of bilirubin and of cholesterol to 33% of the basal value 30 min after i.v. injection. I.v. administration of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) 30 min after CS increased bile flow dose dependently again to 130% for 1 hour and biliary excretion of cholesterol and of bilirubin to 100% of the basal value for 30 and 150 min, respectively. Injection of curcumin 15 min before CS prevented the CS-induced drop of bile flow at 50 mg/kg and reduction of biliary bilirubin excretion already at 25 mg/kg until the end of the experiment (180 min). The CS-induced reduction of biliary cholesterol excretion, however, was not prevented by curcumin. Finally, the biliary excretions of CS (1200 ng/kg/min) and its metabolites (1200 ng/kg/min) were slightly reduced by curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg (to 83% of the initial values). The clinical importance of these controversial effects remains to be shown.

  13. Renal type a intercalated cells contain albumin in organelles with aldosterone-regulated abundance.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells.

  14. Renal Type A Intercalated Cells Contain Albumin in Organelles with Aldosterone-Regulated Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas Buus; Cheema, Muhammad Umar; Szymiczek, Agata; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1), late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D) or recycling endosomes (Rab11). Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells. PMID:25874770

  15. Laser nanostructuring 3-D bioconstruction based on carbon nanotubes in a water matrix of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimenko, Alexander Y.; Ichkitidze, Levan P.; Podgaetsky, Vitaly M.; Savelyev, Mikhail S.; Selishchev, Sergey V.

    2016-04-01

    3-D bioconstructions were created using the evaporation method of the water-albumin solution with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by the continuous and pulsed femtosecond laser radiation. It is determined that the volume structure of the samples created by the femtosecond radiation has more cavities than the one created by the continuous radiation. The average diameter for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) samples was almost two times higher (35-40 nm) than for single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) samples (20-30 nm). The most homogenous 3-D bioconstruction was formed from MWCNTs by the continuous laser radiation. The hardness of such samples totaled up to 370 MPa at the nanoscale. High strength properties and the resistance of the 3-D bioconstructions produced by the laser irradiation depend on the volume nanotubes scaffold forming inside them. The scaffold was formed by the electric field of the directed laser irradiation. The covalent bond energy between the nanotube carbon molecule and the oxygen of the bovine serum albumin aminoacid residue amounts 580 kJ/mol. The 3-D bioconstructions based on MWCNTs and SWCNTs becomes overgrown with the cells (fibroblasts) over the course of 72 hours. The samples based on the both types of CNTs are not toxic for the cells and don't change its normal composition and structure. Thus the 3-D bioconstructions that are nanostructured by the pulsed and continuous laser radiation can be applied as implant materials for the recovery of the connecting tissues of the living body.

  16. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine. PMID:24742664

  17. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine.

  18. Vanillin restrains non-enzymatic glycation and aggregation of albumin by chemical chaperone like function.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-01

    Vanillin a major component of vanilla bean extract is commonly used a natural flavoring agent. Glycation is known to induce aggregation and fibrillation of globular proteins such as albumin, hemoglobin. Here we report the inhibitory potential of vanillin toward early and advanced glycation modification and amyloid like aggregation of albumin based on the determination of both early and advanced glycation and conformational changes in albumin using circular dichroism. Inhibition of aggregation and fibrillation of albumin was determined based on amyloid specific dyes i.e., Congo red and Thioflavin T and microscopic imaging. It was evident that vanillin restrains glycation of albumin and exhibits protective effect toward its native conformation. PMID:26893056

  19. Vanillin restrains non-enzymatic glycation and aggregation of albumin by chemical chaperone like function.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-01

    Vanillin a major component of vanilla bean extract is commonly used a natural flavoring agent. Glycation is known to induce aggregation and fibrillation of globular proteins such as albumin, hemoglobin. Here we report the inhibitory potential of vanillin toward early and advanced glycation modification and amyloid like aggregation of albumin based on the determination of both early and advanced glycation and conformational changes in albumin using circular dichroism. Inhibition of aggregation and fibrillation of albumin was determined based on amyloid specific dyes i.e., Congo red and Thioflavin T and microscopic imaging. It was evident that vanillin restrains glycation of albumin and exhibits protective effect toward its native conformation.

  20. Buoyancy-Activated Cell Sorting Using Targeted Biotinylated Albumin Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including florescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4°C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44+) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44–), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44+ is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our targeted

  1. Uptake and metabolism of polymerized albumin by rat liver. Role of the scavenger receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.L.; Roll, F.J.; Jones, A.L.; Weisiger, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus binds avidly to albumin polymers, which in turn may mediate viral attachment to liver cells. This hypothesis is critically dependent on prior results obtained using glutaraldehyde-polymerized human serum albumin as a model for naturally occurring albumin species. We used the perfused rat liver to characterize the uptake, cellular distribution, and metabolism of glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin. /sup 125/I-glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was efficiently removed from the perfusate by the liver (29% extraction). However, few autoradiographic grains were located over hepatic parenchymal cells (6%). Instead, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin appeared to be removed by endothelial (59%) or Kupffer (31%) cells. Hepatic uptake was strongly inhibited by formaldehyde-treated monomeric albumin, a known ligand of the endothelial scavenger receptor for chemically modified proteins. After uptake, most glutaraldehyde-polymerized human albumin was rapidly degraded and released into the perfusate (74% within 60 min). This process was blocked by chloroquine and leupeptin, suggesting that it involves lysosomal acid hydrolases. We conclude that glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin is efficiently cleared and degraded by the endothelial scavenger pathway. Glutaraldehyde-polymerized albumin therefore appears to be a poor model for predicting the hepatic handling of naturally occurring albumin species bound to hepatitis B virions. Even if viral particles were to follow this pathway, few would enter parenchymal hepatocytes.

  2. Comparison of albumin receptors expressed on bovine and human group G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, R; Otten, R A; Boyle, M D

    1991-01-01

    The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G streptococci was extracted and affinity purified. The protein was characterized for species reactivity, and monospecific antibodies were prepared to the purified receptor. The bovine group G albumin receptor was compared functionally, antigenically, and for DNA homology with the albumin-binding protein expressed by human group G streptococci. In agreement with previous reports, the albumin-binding activity of human strains was mediated by a unique domain of the type III immunoglobulin G-Fc-binding molecule, protein G. The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G strains was found to lack any immunoglobulin G-binding potential but displayed a wider profile of species albumin reactivity than protein G. Both albumin receptors could inhibit the binding of the other to immobilized human serum albumin, and each displayed similar binding properties. Antigenic comparison of the two albumin receptors demonstrated a low level of cross-reactivity; however comparison at the DNA level, using an oligonucleotide probe specific for the albumin-binding region of protein G, demonstrated that the two albumin receptors expressed by human and bovine group G streptococcal strains do not display significant homology. Images PMID:1846128

  3. Serum albumin analysis for type II diabetes detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinyong; Cao, Gang; Lin, Juqiang; Liu, Nenrong; Liao, Fadian; Ruan, Qiuyong; Wu, Shanshan; Huang, Zufang; Li, Ling; Chen, Rong

    2014-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy combined with membrane electrophoresis (ME) was firstly employed to detect albumin variation in type II diabetic development. Albumin was first purified from human serum by ME and then mixed with silver nanoparticles to perform SERS spectral analysis. SERS spectra were obtained from blood albumin samples of 20 diabetic patients and 19 healthy volunteers. Subtle but discernible changes in the acquired mean spectra of the two groups were observed. Tentative assignment of albumin SERS bands indicated specific structural changes of albumin molecule with diabetic development. Meanwhile, PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms were employed to classify the two kinds of albumin SERS spectra, yielding the diagnostic sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 94.7%. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that the EM-SERS method in combination with multivariate statistical analysis has great potential for the label-free detection of albumin variation for improving type II diabetes screening.

  4. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression.

  5. Insulin Is Required to Maintain Albumin Expression by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O1 Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Lu, Mingjian; Monks, Bobby R; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2016-01-29

    Diabetes is accompanied by dysregulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. In recent years, much effort has been spent on understanding how insulin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, whereas the effect of insulin on protein metabolism has received less attention. In diabetes, hepatic production of serum albumin decreases, and it has been long established that insulin positively controls albumin gene expression. In this study, we used a genetic approach in mice to identify the mechanism by which insulin regulates albumin gene transcription. Albumin expression was decreased significantly in livers with insulin signaling disrupted by ablation of the insulin receptor or Akt. Concomitant deletion of Forkhead Box O1 (Foxo1) in these livers rescued the decreased albumin secretion. Furthermore, activation of Foxo1 in the liver is sufficient to suppress albumin expression. These results suggest that Foxo1 acts as a repressor of albumin expression. PMID:26668316

  6. Curcumin-incorporated albumin nanoparticles and its tumor image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Guangming; Pan, Qinqin; Wang, Kaikai; Wu, Rongchun; Sun, Yong; Lu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is an ideal carrier for hydrophobic drugs. This paper reports a facile route to develop human serum albumin (HSA)-curcumin (CCM) nanoparticles, in which β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) acted as an inducer and CCM acted as a bridge. Fluorescence quenching and conformational changes in HSA-CCM nanoparticles occurred during assembly. Disulfide bonds and hydrophobic interactions may play a key role in assembly. HSA-CCM nanoparticles were about 130 nm in size, and the solubility of CCM increased by more than 500 times. The HSA-CCM nanoparticles could accumulate at the cytoplasm of tumor cells and target the tumor tissues. Therefore, HSA nanoparticles fabricated by β-ME denaturation are promising nanocarriers for hydrophobic substances from chemotherapy drugs to imaging probes.

  7. Tamoxifen and curcumin binding to serum albumin. Spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Maliszewska, M.; Pożycka, J.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Góra, A.; Sułkowska, A.

    2013-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TMX) is widely used for the breast cancer treatment and is known as chemopreventive agent. Curcumin (CUR) is natural phenolic compound with broad spectrum of biological activity e.g. anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal and chemopreventive. Combination of tamoxifen and curcumin could be more effective with lower toxicity than each agent alone in use for the treatment or chemoprevention of breast cancer. Binding of drugs to serum albumin is an important factor, which determines toxicity and therapeutic dosage of the drugs. When two drugs are administered together the competition between them for the binding site on albumin can result in a decrease in bound fraction and an increase in the concentration of free biologically active fraction of drug.

  8. Novel lipid hybrid albumin nanoparticle greatly lowered toxicity of pirarubicin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Xuanmiao; Li, Mei; Wu, Wenqi; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Ling; Gong, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Pirarubicin (THP) is an effective anthracycline for the treatment of solid tumor. However, its potential side effects are prominent and clinical use is restricted. We aimed to develop a novel pirarubicin-oleic acid complex albumin nanoparticle (THP-OA-AN) in order to reduce the toxicity of THP. Oleic acid, human serum albumin (HSA), and egg yolk lecithin E80 was used to prepare THP-OA-AN. Prepared THP-OA-AN was characterized and animal experiments were conducted to assess its tumor suppression effect, distribution, and toxicity. Comparison between THP and THP-OA-AN showed that, with retained antitumor efficiency, the toxicity of THP-OA-AN is significantly reduced regarding bone marrow suppression, cardiotoxicity, renal toxicity, and gastrointestinal toxicity. This study developed a safe and effective formulation of THP, which has greater potential for clinic use in the tumor therapy.

  9. Raman microspectroscopy of nanodiamond-induced structural changes in albumin.

    PubMed

    Svetlakova, Anastasiya S; Brandt, Nikolay N; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Chikishev, Andrey Yu

    2015-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising agents for theranostic applications due to reported low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which is still being extensively tested on cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is presumed that for experimental and future clinical applications, NDs will be administered into the organism via the blood circulation system. In this regard, the interaction of NDs with blood components needs to be thoroughly studied. We studied the interaction of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) with albumin, one of the major proteins of blood plasma. After 2-h long in vitro incubation in an aqueous solution of the protein, 100-nm cNDs were dried and the dry samples were studied with the aid of Raman microspectroscopy. The spectroscopic data indicate significant conformational changes that can be due to cND–protein interaction. A possible decrease in the functional activity of albumin related to the conformational changes must be taken into account in the in vivo applications. PMID:25901656

  10. Iodide and albumin kinetics in normal canine wrists and knees

    SciTech Connect

    Simkin, P.A.; Benedict, R.S. )

    1990-01-01

    The clearance rates of free iodide and of radioiodinated serum albumin were measured in the knee and wrist joints of 9 normal adult dogs. Iodide clearance from the knee was 3 times greater than that from the wrist. In contrast, radioiodinated serum albumin clearance from the knee was only slightly greater than that from the wrist. Interpreted as respective indices of effective synovial plasma flow and lymphatic drainage, these values indicate that the filtration fraction is normally greater in microvessels of the wrist than in those of the knee. These findings complement the results of companion studies of Starling forces that indicate a higher pressure microvascular bed in the wrist than in the knee.

  11. Recent Topics in Chemical and Clinical Research on Glycated Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Yuki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The measuring method for glycated albumin (GA) has been developed as a new glycemic control marker since the beginning of the 21st century. Since GA has an advantage in reflecting glycemic status over a shorter period than hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), much research and many reviews have been reported. However, so far there have been few reports on glycation sites based on the tertiary structure of human serum albumin (HSA) and the comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c in detail. The present review discusses how the glycation sites of lysine residues in HSA are modified with glucose, whereas the glycation sites of lysine residues are located inside of HSA as well as the direct comparison of glycation rates between GA and HbA1c using human blood. Moreover, the most recent clinical researches on GA are described. PMID:25614014

  12. Recent advancements in erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin as delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Ruju; Wang, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been applied to enhance the efficacy of therapeutics and to alleviate negative effects through the controlled delivery of targeting and releasing agents. However, few drug carriers can achieve high targeting efficacy, even when targeting modalities and surface markers are introduced. Immunological problems have also limited their wide applications. Biological drug delivery systems, such as erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin, have been extensively investigated because of their unique properties. In this review, erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin are described as efficient drug delivery systems. Their properties, applications, advantages, and limitations in disease treatment are explained. This review confirms that these systems can be used to facilitate a specific, biocompatible, and smart drug delivery. PMID:27274282

  13. Raman microspectroscopy of nanodiamond-induced structural changes in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlakova, Anastasiya S.; Brandt, Nikolay N.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Chikishev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising agents for theranostic applications due to reported low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which is still being extensively tested on cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is presumed that for experimental and future clinical applications, NDs will be administered into the organism via the blood circulation system. In this regard, the interaction of NDs with blood components needs to be thoroughly studied. We studied the interaction of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) with albumin, one of the major proteins of blood plasma. After 2-h long in vitro incubation in an aqueous solution of the protein, 100-nm cNDs were dried and the dry samples were studied with the aid of Raman microspectroscopy. The spectroscopic data indicate significant conformational changes that can be due to cND-protein interaction. A possible decrease in the functional activity of albumin related to the conformational changes must be taken into account in the in vivo applications.

  14. Recent advancements in erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin as delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Ruju; Wang, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been applied to enhance the efficacy of therapeutics and to alleviate negative effects through the controlled delivery of targeting and releasing agents. However, few drug carriers can achieve high targeting efficacy, even when targeting modalities and surface markers are introduced. Immunological problems have also limited their wide applications. Biological drug delivery systems, such as erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin, have been extensively investigated because of their unique properties. In this review, erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin are described as efficient drug delivery systems. Their properties, applications, advantages, and limitations in disease treatment are explained. This review confirms that these systems can be used to facilitate a specific, biocompatible, and smart drug delivery.

  15. Expression of albumin in nonhepatic tissues and its synthesis by the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Shamay, A; Homans, R; Fuerman, Y; Levin, I; Barash, H; Silanikove, N; Mabjeesh, S J

    2005-02-01

    Albumin is a well-characterized product of the liver. In the present study, objectives were to determine if the albumin gene is also expressed in various nonhepatic tissues in the bovine; whether mammary gland epithelial cells synthesize albumin; and how its synthesis is affected by bovine mastitis. Albumin expression was monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Tissues examined were: liver, mammary gland, tongue, intestine, lymph gland, testicle, ovary, and uterus. All tissues except the ovary expressed the albumin gene, albeit less so than the liver. The highest level of expression (other than liver) was found in the lymph nodes but expression was also found in the mammary gland. Incubation of mammary gland explants with the labeled amino acid L-[(35)S] methionine resulted in formation of labeled immunoprecipitable albumin, newly synthesized in the explant. Immunoprecipitable albumin in the medium verified that newly synthesized albumin was also secreted into the medium. This shows that the gland itself is a source of milk albumin. Albumin mRNA expression was approximately 4 times higher in mammary gland tissue from 6 mastitic cows compared with expression in mammary tissue from 6 healthy glands. Further, secretion of albumin was increased 3.5-fold from explants of mastitic mammary glands compared with secretion from explants of healthy mammary glands. Addition of lipopolysaccharide increased the synthesis and secretion of albumin in mammary gland cells in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide accelerated albumin synthesis in a time-dependent manner up to 48 h. These results lead us to suggest that the secretion of albumin by the mammary gland is part of the innate nonspecific defense system. PMID:15653522

  16. Absorptive-mediated endocytosis of cationized albumin and a beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide by isolated brain capillaries. Model system of blood-brain barrier transport

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, A.K.; Eisenberg, J.B.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1987-11-05

    Cationized albumin (pI greater than 8), unlike native albumin (pI approximately 4), enters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rapidly from blood. This suggests that a specific uptake mechanism for cationized albumin may exist at the brain capillary wall, i.e. the blood-brain barrier. Isolated bovine brain capillaries rapidly bound cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin and approximately 70% of the bound radioactivity was resistant to mild acid wash, which is assumed to represent internalized peptide. Binding was saturable and a Scatchard plot gave a maximal binding capacity (Ro) = 5.5 +/- 0.7 micrograms/mgp (79 +/- 10 pmol/mgp), and a half-saturation constant (KD) = 55 +/- 8 micrograms/ml (0.8 +/- 0.1 microM). The binding of cationized (/sup 3/H)albumin (pI = 8.5-9) was inhibited by protamine, protamine sulfate, and polylysine (molecular weight = 70,000) with a Ki of approximately 3 micrograms/ml for all three proteins. The use of cationized albumin in directed delivery of peptides through the blood-brain barrier was examined by coupling (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin to unlabeled cationized albumin (pI = 8.5-9) using the bifunctional reagent, N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)proprionate. The (/sup 3/H)beta-endorphin-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was rapidly bound and endocytosed by isolated bovine brain capillaries, and this was inhibited by unlabeled cationized albumin but not by unconjugated beta-endorphin or native bovine albumin. Cationized albumin provides a new tool for studying absorptive-mediated endocytosis at the brain capillary and may also provide a vehicle for directed drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

  17. Asymmetric ( UC)albumin transport across bullfrog alveolar epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; LeBon, T.R.; Shinbane, J.S.; Crandall, E.D.

    1985-10-01

    Bullfrog lungs were prepared as planar sheets and bathed with Ringer solution in Ussing chambers. In the presence of a constant electrical gradient (20, 0, or -20 mV) across the tissue, UC-labeled bovine serum albumin or inulin was instilled into the upstream reservoir and the rate of appearance of the tracer in the downstream reservoir was monitored. Two lungs from the same animal were used to determine any directional difference in tracer fluxes. An apparent permeability coefficient was estimated from a relationship between normalized downstream radioactivities and time. Results showed that the apparent permeability of albumin in the alveolar to pleural direction across the alveolar epithelial barrier is 2.3 X 10(-7) cm/s, significantly greater (P less than 0.0005) than that in the pleural to alveolar direction (5.3 X 10(-8) cm/s) when the tissue was short circuited. Permeability of inulin, on the other hand, did not show any directional dependence and averaged 3.1 X 10(-8) cm/s in both directions. There was no effect on radiotracer fluxes permeabilities of different electrical gradients across the tissue. Gel electrophoretograms and corresponding radiochromatograms suggest that the large and asymmetric isotope fluxes are not primarily due to digestion or degradation of labeled molecules. Inulin appears to traverse the alveolar epithelial barrier by simple diffusion through hydrated paracellular pathways. On the other hand, ( UC)albumin crosses the alveolar epithelium more rapidly than would be expected by simple diffusion. These asymmetric and large tracer fluxes suggest that a specialized mechanism is present in alveolar epithelium that may be capable of helping to remove albumin from the alveolar space.

  18. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  19. Albumin fiber scaffolds for engineering functional cardiac tissues.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Sharon; Shapira, Assaf; Regev, Omri; Nseir, Nora; Zussman, Eyal; Dvir, Tal

    2014-06-01

    In recent years attempts to engineer contracting cardiac patches were focused on recapitulation of the myocardium extracellular microenvironment. We report here on our work, where for the first time, a three-dimensional cardiac patch was fabricated from albumin fibers. We hypothesized that since albumin fibers' mechanical properties resemble those of cardiac tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) and their biochemical character enables their use as protein carriers, they can support the assembly of cardiac tissues capable of generating strong contraction forces. Here, we have fabricated aligned and randomly oriented electrospun albumin fibers and investigated their structure, mechanical properties, and chemical nature. Our measurements showed that the scaffolds have improved elasticity as compared to synthetic electrospun PCL fibers, and that they are capable of adsorbing serum proteins, such as laminin leading to strong cell-matrix interactions. Moreover, due to the functional groups on their backbone, the fibers can be chemically modified with essential biomolecules. When seeded with rat neonatal cardiac cells the engineered scaffolds induced the assembly of aligned cardiac tissues with high aspect ratio cardiomyocytes and massive actinin striation. Compared to synthetic fibrous scaffolds, cardiac cells cultured within aligned or randomly oriented scaffolds formed functional tissues, exhibiting significantly improved function already on Day 3, including higher beating rate (P = 0.0002 and P < 0.0001, respectively), and higher contraction amplitude (P = 0.009 and P = 0.003, respectively). Collectively, our results suggest that albumin electrospun scaffolds can play a key role in contributing to the ex vivo formation of a contracting cardiac muscle tissue.

  20. Factors Associated With Serum Albumin in Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 With Microalbuminuria Using Non-Normal Mixed Models: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Khoundabi, Batoul; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Mansourian, Marjan; Faghihimani, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background: The globally increasing epidemic of diabetes will lead to serious problems including diabetic nephropathy and kidney diseases in near future. The first clinical diagnosable stage in a diabetic kidney disease is microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion of 30 - 300 g/24 hours). Objectives: This prospective cohort study investigated the risk factors of microalbuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes who had been registered in endocrine and metabolism research center in Isfahan city, Iran. Patients and Methods: This prospective cohort study was performed on 90 diabetic type 2 patients with microalbuminuria, who were selected according to the consecutive sample selection method during 6 years. Data were collected through regular and systematic measurements of serum albumin as the response variable and body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol, triglyceride (TG), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) as the related factors. Non-normal mixed models were used to investigate the impact of effective factors on the amount of excreted serum albumin. Results: According to the deviance information criterion (DIC = 56.2), the non-normal mixed effects model with the skewed t distribution had a best fit and indicated that HbA1c, HDL and total cholesterol had a significant effect on the amount of albumin in urine (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Using nonnormal mixed models may lead to the best results as compared to common normality assumption. PMID:26889385

  1. The pretreatment albumin to globulin ratio predicts survival in patients with natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xi-wen; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Wen-wen; Yan, Shu-mei; Sun, Peng; Xia, Yi; Li, Zhi-ming

    2016-01-01

    Background. The pretreatment albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) has been reported to be a predictor of survival in several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of AGR in patients with natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the available serum biochemistry results for 331 NKTCL patients before treatment. AGR was calculated as albumin/(total protein—albumin), and a cut-off value of 1.3 was used to define AGR as low or high. Survival analysis was used to assess the prognostic value of AGR. Results. A low AGR (<1.3) was associated with significantly more adverse clinical features, including old age, poor performance status, advanced stage, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, B symptoms, and high International Prognostic Index (IPI) and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma prognostic index (NKPI) scores. Patients with a low AGR had a significantly lower 5-year overall survival (44.5 vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001) and progression-free survival (33.1 vs. 57.4%, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, a low AGR remained an independent predictor of poorer survival. Additionally, AGR distinguished patients with different outcomes in the IPI low-risk group and in the NKPI high-risk group. Discussion. Pretreatment AGR may serve as a simple and effective predictor of prognosis in patients with NKTCL. PMID:26966671

  2. The pretreatment albumin to globulin ratio predicts survival in patients with natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xi-Wen; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Yan, Shu-Mei; Sun, Peng; Xia, Yi; Li, Zhi-Ming; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background. The pretreatment albumin to globulin ratio (AGR) has been reported to be a predictor of survival in several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of AGR in patients with natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the available serum biochemistry results for 331 NKTCL patients before treatment. AGR was calculated as albumin/(total protein-albumin), and a cut-off value of 1.3 was used to define AGR as low or high. Survival analysis was used to assess the prognostic value of AGR. Results. A low AGR (<1.3) was associated with significantly more adverse clinical features, including old age, poor performance status, advanced stage, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, B symptoms, and high International Prognostic Index (IPI) and natural killer/T-cell lymphoma prognostic index (NKPI) scores. Patients with a low AGR had a significantly lower 5-year overall survival (44.5 vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001) and progression-free survival (33.1 vs. 57.4%, P < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, a low AGR remained an independent predictor of poorer survival. Additionally, AGR distinguished patients with different outcomes in the IPI low-risk group and in the NKPI high-risk group. Discussion. Pretreatment AGR may serve as a simple and effective predictor of prognosis in patients with NKTCL.

  3. Superior serum half life of albumin tagged TNF ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Nicole; Schneider, Britta; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Wajant, Harald

    2010-06-11

    Due to their immune stimulating and apoptosis inducing properties, ligands of the TNF family attract increasing interest as therapeutic proteins. A general limitation of in vivo applications of recombinant soluble TNF ligands is their notoriously rapid clearance from circulation. To improve the serum half life of the TNF family members TNF, TWEAK and TRAIL, we genetically fused soluble variants of these molecules to human serum albumin (HSA). The serum albumin-TNF ligand fusion proteins were found to be of similar bioactivity as the corresponding HSA-less counterparts. Upon intravenous injection (i.v.), serum half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins, as determined by ELISA, was around 15 h as compared to approximately 1 h for all of the recombinant control TNF ligands without HSA domain. Moreover, serum samples collected 6 or 24 h after i.v. injection still contained high TNF ligand bioactivity, demonstrating that there is only limited degradation/inactivation of circulating HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins in vivo. In a xenotransplantation model, significantly less of the HSA-TRAIL fusion protein compared to the respective control TRAIL protein was required to achieve inhibition of tumor growth indicating that the increased half life of HSA-TNF ligand fusion proteins translates into better therapeutic action in vivo. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic fusion to serum albumin is a powerful and generally applicable mean to improve bioavailability and in vivo activity of TNF ligands.

  4. Pru du 2S albumin or Pru du vicilin?

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; De Paolis, Angelo; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2015-06-01

    A short partial sequence of 28 amino acids is all the information we have so far about the putative allergen 2S albumin from almond. The aim of this work was to analyze this information using mainly bioinformatics tools, in order to verify its rightness. Based on the results reported in the paper describing this allergen from almond, we analyzed the original data of amino acids sequencing through available software. The degree of homology of the almond 12kDa protein with any other known 2S albumin appears to be much lower than the one reported in the paper that firstly described it. In a publicly available cDNA library we discovered an expressed sequence tag which translation generates a protein that perfectly matches both of the sequencing outputs described in the same paper. A further analysis indicated that the latter protein seems to belong to the vicilin superfamily rather than to the prolamin one. The fact that also vicilins are seed storage proteins known to be highly allergenic would explain the IgE reactivity originally observed. Based on our observations we suggest that the IgE reactive 12kDa protein from almond currently known as Pru du 2S albumin is in reality the cleaved N-terminal region of a 7S vicilin like protein.

  5. Effect of tribology processes on adsorption of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Wang, Linghe; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2016-03-01

    As soon as artificial joint replacements are implanted into patients, the adsorption of proteins can occur. Joint implants operate in a protein-rich and relatively corrosive environment under tribological contact. The contacted area acted as an anodic part and the rest of the surface was more cathodic. Therefore, the adsorption of proteins is different in and outside the wear track. Adsorbed proteins would denature during rubbing and a tribofilm could form. The tribofilm can lubricate the surface and act as a barrier to corrosion damage. However, to observe the adsorption of proteins in situ has always been a challenge. Scanning Kelvin probe force microscope (SKPFM) was used to study the adsorption of albumin on the surface of CoCrMo alloy under simulated tribology movement. Fluorescence microscopy (FM) was employed to reveal the protein molecules in the wear scar. It was found that albumin molecules can decrease the surface potential and accelerate the corrosion process. In the wear track, albumin denatured and changed the surface potential as time progressed.

  6. [Detection of autoantibodies to polymerized human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Manns, M; Müller, M; Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1984-11-01

    Binding activity of antibodies against polymerized human serum albumin (pHSA) was measured in the serum of 348 patients with various hepatic and non-hepatic diseases and in the serum of 108 control persons. The methods used were passive hemagglutination (PH) with antigen loaded human erythrocytes and radial immunodiffusion (ID). In the PH-method only HBsAg-positive sera reacted. Blocking experiments with pHSA, polymerized bovine serum albumin (pBSA) and monomeric human serum albumin (mHSA) showed, that the PH-method measures HBsAG associated receptors for pHSA. In HBeAG-positive cases titers were significantly higher than in anti-HBe-positive sera. Using the ID-method it could be shown, that 40% of sera of patients with liver diseases (n = 272), 37% of patients with LED (n = 27), 72% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 32), 6% of patients with glomerulonephritis (n = 17) and 2% of normal persons (n = 108) reacted. These sera reacted in the immunodiffusion assay with pHSA and pBSA but not with mHSA. Autoantibodies against non species specific determinants of pHSA which are not specific for liver diseases and possibly due to disturbed immunoregulation can be demonstrated by immunodiffusion. They may possibly be modulators of the pHSA mediated binding of hepatitis B-virus to hepatocytes.

  7. Albumin extravasation rates in tissues of anesthetized and unanesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Renkin, E.M.; Joyner, W.L.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Plopper, G.; Sibley, L.

    1989-05-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I was injected intravenously in chronically prepared, unanesthetized rats and into pentobarbital-anesthetized rats that had received 2 ml 5% BSA to help sustain plasma volume. Initial uptake rates (clearances) in skin, skeletal muscles, diaphragm, and heart (left ventricle) were measured over 1 h. BSA labeled with /sup 125/I was injected terminally to correct for intravascular /sup 131/I-BSA. Observed clearances were in the following order in both groups of animals: heart much greater than diaphragm approximately equal to skin greater than resting skeletal muscles. Differences between unanesthetized and anesthetized animals were small and inconsistently directed. Our results suggest that the lower albumin clearances reported in the literature for anesthetized rats are not the result of their immobility or any direct effect of anesthesia on albumin transport in these tissues. The lower transport rates appear to result indirectly from changes produced by anesthesia and/or surgery in controllable parameters such as plasma volume and intravascular protein mass.

  8. Site specificity of glycation and carboxymethylation of bovine serum albumin by fructose.

    PubMed

    Hinton, D J S; Ames, J M

    2006-06-01

    We report an investigation of the site specificity, extent and nature of modification of bovine serum albumin (BSA) incubated with fructose or glucose at physiological temperature and pH. Sites of early glycation (Heyns rearrangement products (HRP) from fructose; fructoselysine (FL) from glucose) as well as advanced glycation (N(epsilon)-(carboxymethyl)lysine; CML) were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major site of modification by fructose, like glucose, is Lysine-524 and this results in, respectively, 31 and 76% loss of the corresponding unmodified tryptic peptide, Gln525-Lys533. In addition, total lysine, HRP, FL, CML and N(epsilon)-(carboxyethyl)lysine in the incubations, was quantified. Almost all of the loss of lysine in the fructose-modified BSA was attributed to the formation of CML, with the yield of CML being up to 17-fold higher than glucose-modified BSA. A mechanism for the formation of CML from the HRP is proposed. PMID:16583308

  9. Cellular Specificity of the Blood–CSF Barrier for Albumin Transfer across the Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Liddelow, Shane A.; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Whish, Sophie C.; Noor, Natassya M.; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Traweger, Andreas; Bauer, Hannelore; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Saunders, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood–CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood–CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of

  10. The relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahbap, Elbis; Sakaci, Tamer; Kara, Ekrem; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Sevinc, Mustafa; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu O.; Ucar, Zuhal A.; Bayraktar, Feyza; Unsal, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24-h ABPM) recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients. METHODS: A total of 354 patients (mean [SD] age: 55.5 [14.3] years, 50% females) with essential hypertension and 24-h ABPM recordings were included. Patient 24-h nighttime and daytime ABPM values, systolic and diastolic dipping status and average nocturnal dipping were recorded. The correlations between serum albumin levels and nocturnal systolic and diastolic dipping were evaluated, and correlates of average nocturnal systolic dipping were determined via a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 73.2% of patients were determined to be non-dippers. The mean (SD) levels of serum albumin (4.2 [0.3] g/dL vs. 4.4 [0.4] g/dL, p<0.001) and the average nocturnal systolic (15.2 [4.8] mmHg vs. 0.3 [6.6] mmHg, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (4.2 [8.6] mmHgvs. 18.9 [7.0] mmHg, p<0.001) were significantly lower in non-dippers than in dippers. A significant positive correlation was noted between serum albumin levels and both systolic (r=0.297, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (r=0.265, p<0.001). The linear regression analysis revealed that for each one-unit increase in serum albumin, the average nocturnal dip in systolic BP increased by 0.17 mmHg (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between serum albumin levels and the deterioration of circadian BP rhythm among essential hypertensive patients along with the identification of a non-dipper pattern in more than two-thirds of patients. Our findings emphasize the importance of serum albumin levels, rather than urinary albumin excretion, as an independent predictor of nocturnal systolic dipping, at least in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients with moderate proteinuria. PMID:27276394

  11. Role of Serum Interleukin 6, Albumin and C-Reactive Protein in COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Emami Ardestani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a non-specific inflammation, which involves the airways, lung parenchyma and pulmonary vessels. The inflammation causes the activation of inflammatory cells and the release of various inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-8 (IL-8), IL-6 and tumor necoris factor alpha (TNF-a). The purpose of the present study was to measure serum IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) (as a positive phase reactant) and albumin level (as a negative phase reactant) in COPD patients (only due to cigarette smok