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Sample records for albumin-derived peptides efficiently

  1. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  2. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  3. Enhancing the efficiency of sortase-mediated ligations through nickel-peptide complex formation.

    PubMed

    David Row, R; Roark, Travis J; Philip, Marina C; Perkins, Lorena L; Antos, John M

    2015-08-14

    A modified sortase A recognition motif containing a masked Ni(2+)-binding peptide was employed to boost the efficiency of sortase-catalyzed ligation reactions. Deactivation of the Ni(2+)-binding peptide using a Ni(2+) additive improved reaction performance at low to equimolar ratios of the glycine amine nucleophile and sortase substrate. The success of this approach was demonstrated with both peptide and protein substrates. PMID:26152789

  4. Effect of poly-glutamate on uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Shirani, Ali; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Shahbazi Mojarrad, Javid; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-04-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were developed as vehicles for efficient delivery of various molecules. An ideal CPP-peptide should not display any toxicity against cancer cells as well as healthy cells and efficiently enter into the cell. Because of the cationic nature and the intrinsic vector capabilities, these peptides can cause cytotoxicity. One of the possible reasons for toxicity of CPPs is direct translocation and consequently, pore formation on the plasma membrane. In this study it was demonstrated that interaction of poly-glutamate with CPP considerably reduced their cytotoxicity in A549 cell. This strategy could be useful for efficient drug delivery mediated by CPP. PMID:27074859

  5. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Derived from Human Lactoferrin with Conformation-dependent Uptake Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Duchardt, Falk; Ruttekolk, Ivo R.; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Bürck, Jochen; Hufnagel, Hansjörg; Fischer, Rainer; van den Heuvel, Maaike; Löwik, Dennis W. P. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Ulrich, Anne; de Waard, Michel; Brock, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The molecular events that contribute to the cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are still a matter of intense research. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of a 22-amino acid CPP derived from the human milk protein, lactoferrin. The peptide exhibits a conformation-dependent uptake efficiency that is correlated with efficient binding to heparan sulfate and lipid-induced conformational changes. The peptide contains a disulfide bridge formed by terminal cysteine residues. At concentrations exceeding 10 μm, this peptide undergoes the same rapid entry into the cytoplasm that was described previously for the arginine-rich CPPs nona-arginine and Tat. Cytoplasmic entry strictly depends on the presence of the disulfide bridge. To better understand this conformation dependence, NMR spectroscopy was performed for the free peptide, and CD measurements were performed for free and lipid-bound peptide. In solution, the peptides showed only slight differences in secondary structure, with a predominantly disordered structure both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bridge. In contrast, in complex with large unilamellar vesicles, the conformation of the oxidized and reduced forms of the peptide clearly differed. Moreover, surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the oxidized form binds to heparan sulfate with a considerably higher affinity than the reduced form. Consistently, membrane binding and cellular uptake of the peptide were reduced when heparan sulfate chains were removed. PMID:19858187

  6. Acquisition of an insertion peptide for efficient aminoacylation by a halophile tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Evilia, Caryn; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2006-06-01

    Enzymes of halophilic organisms contain unusual peptide motifs that are absent from their mesophilic counterparts. The functions of these halophile-specific peptides are largely unknown. Here we have identified an unusual peptide that is unique to several halophile archaeal cysteinyl-tRNA synthetases (CysRS), which catalyze attachment of cysteine to tRNA(Cys) to generate the essential cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys) required for protein synthesis. This peptide is located near the active site in the catalytic domain and is highly enriched with acidic residues. In the CysRS of the extreme halophile Halobacterium species NRC-1, deletion of the peptide reduces the catalytic efficiency of aminoacylation by a factor of 100 that largely results from a defect in kcat, rather than the Km for tRNA(Cys). In contrast, maintaining the peptide length but substituting acidic residues in the peptide with neutral or basic residues has no major deleterious effect, suggesting that the acidity of the peptide is not important for the kcat of tRNA aminoacylation. Analysis of general protein structure under physiological high salt concentrations, by circular dichroism and by fluorescence titration of tRNA binding, indicates little change due to deletion of the peptide. However, the presence of the peptide confers tolerance to lower salt levels, and fluorescence analysis in 30% sucrose reveals instability of the enzyme without the peptide. We suggest that the stability associated with the peptide can be used to promote proper enzyme conformation transitions in various stages of tRNA aminoacylation that are associated with catalysis. The acquisition of the peptide by the halophilic CysRS suggests an enzyme adaptation to high salinity.

  7. Efficient conformational sampling of peptides adsorbed onto inorganic surfaces: insights from a quartz binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise B; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2013-04-01

    Harnessing the properties of biomolecules, such as peptides, adsorbed on inorganic surfaces is of interest to many cross-disciplinary areas of science, ranging from biomineralisation to nanomedicine. Key to advancing research in this area is determination of the peptide conformation(s) in its adsorbed state, at the aqueous interface. Molecular simulation is one such approach for accomplishing this goal. In this respect, use of temperature-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) can yield enhanced sampling of the interfacial conformations, but does so at great computational expense, chiefly because of the need to include an explicit representation of water at the interface. Here, we investigate a number of more economical variations on REMD, chiefly those based on Replica Exchange with Solvent Tempering (REST), using the aqueous quartz-binding peptide S1-(100) α-quartz interfacial system as a benchmark. We also incorporate additional implementation details specifically targeted at improving sampling of biomolecules at interfaces. We find the REST-based variants yield configurational sampling of the peptide-surface system comparable with T-REMD, at a fraction of the computational time and resource. Our findings also deliver novel insights into the binding behaviour of the S1 peptide at the quartz (100) surface that are consistent with available experimental data.

  8. Estimation of peptide N-Cα bond cleavage efficiency during MALDI-ISD using a cyclic peptide.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) induces N-Cα bond cleavage via hydrogen transfer from the matrix to the peptide backbone, which produces a c'/z• fragment pair. Subsequently, the z• generates z' and [z + matrix] fragments via further radical reactions because of the low stability of the z•. In the present study, we investigated MALDI-ISD of a cyclic peptide. The N-Cα bond cleavage in the cyclic peptide by MALDI-ISD produced the hydrogen-abundant peptide radical [M + 2H](+) • with a radical site on the α-carbon atom, which then reacted with the matrix to give [M + 3H](+) and [M + H + matrix](+) . For 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) adducts with z fragments, post-source decay of [M + H + 1,5-DAN](+) generated from the cyclic peptide showed predominant loss of an amino acid with 1,5-DAN. Additionally, MALDI-ISD with Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry allowed for the detection of both [M + 3H](+) and [M + H](+) with two (13) C atoms. These results strongly suggested that [M + 3H](+) and [M + H + 1,5-DAN](+) were formed by N-Cα bond cleavage with further radical reactions. As a consequence, the cleavage efficiency of the N-Cα bond during MALDI-ISD could be estimated by the ratio of the intensity of [M + H](+) and [M + 3H](+) in the Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance spectrum. Because the reduction efficiency of a matrix for the cyclic peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Val) was correlated to its tendency to cleave the N-Cα bond in linear peptides, the present method could allow the evaluation of the efficiency of N-Cα bond cleavage for MALDI matrix development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194516

  9. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  10. Chemical derivatization of peptide carboxyl groups for highly efficient electron transfer dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-01-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99%. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex due to partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ∼90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared to less than 40% for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g. 70% for modified versus only 43% for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50% increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications. PMID:23918461

  11. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection. PMID:27427753

  12. Enhanced Intracellular Hyperthermia Efficiency by Magnetic Nanoparticles Modified with Nucleus and Mitochondria Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Zhou, Jumei; Chen, Benke; Tang, Zhenghai; Zhang, Jieying; Li, Liya; Tang, Jintian

    2016-06-01

    In order to investigate whether cell organelle targeting peptide can transport magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into specific cell organelle, peptides bearing nuclear localization signal (NLS) or mitochondria targeting sequences were coagulated to MNPs. In vitro cytotoxicity study on the human liver cancer cells (HepG2) was tested by using MTT assay. Sub-cellular location of each peptide modified MNP (PEP-MNPs) was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The uptake of HepG2 cells growing in PEP-MNPs was measured by using ICP-OES. Magnetic induction heating efficacies of PEP-MNPs were analyzed by exposing the PEP-MNPs containing cells in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). It was demonstrated that PEP-MNPs were efficient agents for cancer nanothermotherapy with satisfactory biocompatibility. TEM showed that the fate of MNPs inside the cells depended on the peptide sequence attached to the particle surface. The uptake improvement was observed both in PEP-MNPs bearing NLS peptides and in PEP-MNPs bearing mitochondria targeting sequences. Virus original endocytosis sequence can enhance the uptake. MNP bearing mitochondria targeting sequence exerted a better magnetic induction hyperthermia performance comparing to that of NLS. Our investigation provides a strategy for fabrication cell organelle targeting magnetic nanoparticles. For instance, mitochondria targeting peptide conjugated MNPs for highly-efficiency magnetic nanothermotherapy and nuclear targeting peptides conjugated MNPs for gene magnetofection.

  13. Efficient Gene Delivery of Primary Human Cells Using Peptide Linked Polyethylenimine Polymer Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Devaveena; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Lee, Andrew S; Limiuex, Melbes; Zhang, Xuexiang; Wu, Yi; Nag, Divya; De Almeida, Patricia Eliza; Han, Leng; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Wu, Joseph C

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) based polymers are efficient agents for cell transfection. However, their use has been hampered due to high cell death associated with transfection thereby resulting in low efficiency of gene delivery within the cells. To circumvent the problem of cellular toxicity, metal binding peptides were linked to PEI. Eight peptide-PEI derivatives were synthesized to improve cell survival and transfection efficiency. TAT linked PEI was used as a control polymer. Peptides linked with PEI amines formed nano gels as shown by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic measurements. Polymers were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their ability to form complexes with plasmids was tested using electrophoretic studies. These modifications improved polymer biocompatibility as well as cell survival markedly when compared to PEI alone. A subset of the modified peptide-polymers also showed significantly higher transfection efficiency in primary human cells with respect to the widely used transfection agent, lipofectamine. Study of the underlying mechanism of the observed phenomena revealed lower levels of ‘reactive oxygen species’ (ROS) in presence of the peptide-polymers when compared to PEI alone. This was further corroborated with global gene expression analysis which showed upregulation of multiple genes and pathways involved in regulating intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:21477858

  14. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  15. Improved transduction efficiencies of adeno-associated virus vectors by synthetic cell-permeable peptides.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Murakami, Fumika; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Taku; Tomita, Hiroshi

    2016-09-30

    Various serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been used for gene therapy and as research tools. Among these serotypes, the AAV type 2 vector has been used successfully in human gene therapies. However, the transduction efficiency of AAV2 depends on the cell type, and this poses a problem in the efficacy of gene therapy. To improve the transduction efficiency of AAV2, we designed a small peptide consisting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide and the HIV-Tat sequence Tat-Y1068. Pre- or co-treatment of CYNOM-K1 cells from cynomolgus monkey embryo skin with Tat-Y1068 increased the transduction efficiencies in a dose-dependent manner and caused p38 phosphorylation. The transduction efficiency of AAV2 into the rat fibroblast cell line RAT-1 highly expressing EGFR was less than the transduction efficiency of AAV2 into CYNOM-K1 cells. Tat-Y1068 increased the transduction efficiency in RAT-1 cells in the same manner as in CYNOM-K1 cells. In conclusion, cell-permeable peptides possessing the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor function might serve as a useful ingredient of AAV2 vector solution for increasing the transduction efficiency of gene therapies.

  16. Improved transduction efficiencies of adeno-associated virus vectors by synthetic cell-permeable peptides.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Kitako; Sugano, Eriko; Murakami, Fumika; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Taku; Tomita, Hiroshi

    2016-09-30

    Various serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been used for gene therapy and as research tools. Among these serotypes, the AAV type 2 vector has been used successfully in human gene therapies. However, the transduction efficiency of AAV2 depends on the cell type, and this poses a problem in the efficacy of gene therapy. To improve the transduction efficiency of AAV2, we designed a small peptide consisting of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor peptide and the HIV-Tat sequence Tat-Y1068. Pre- or co-treatment of CYNOM-K1 cells from cynomolgus monkey embryo skin with Tat-Y1068 increased the transduction efficiencies in a dose-dependent manner and caused p38 phosphorylation. The transduction efficiency of AAV2 into the rat fibroblast cell line RAT-1 highly expressing EGFR was less than the transduction efficiency of AAV2 into CYNOM-K1 cells. Tat-Y1068 increased the transduction efficiency in RAT-1 cells in the same manner as in CYNOM-K1 cells. In conclusion, cell-permeable peptides possessing the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor function might serve as a useful ingredient of AAV2 vector solution for increasing the transduction efficiency of gene therapies. PMID:27614311

  17. Supplemental activation method for high-efficiency electron-transfer dissociation of doubly protonated peptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Swaney, Danielle L; McAlister, Graeme C; Wirtala, Matthew; Schwartz, Jae C; Syka, John E P; Coon, Joshua J

    2007-01-15

    Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) delivers the unique attributes of electron capture dissociation to mass spectrometers that utilize radio frequency trapping-type devices (e.g., quadrupole ion traps). The method has generated significant interest because of its compatibility with chromatography and its ability to: (1) preserve traditionally labile post-translational modifications (PTMs) and (2) randomly cleave the backbone bonds of highly charged peptide and protein precursor ions. ETD, however, has shown limited applicability to doubly protonated peptide precursors, [M + 2H]2+, the charge and type of peptide most frequently encountered in "bottom-up" proteomics. Here we describe a supplemental collisional activation (CAD) method that targets the nondissociated (intact) electron-transfer (ET) product species ([M + 2H]+*) to improve ETD efficiency for doubly protonated peptides (ETcaD). A systematic study of supplementary activation conditions revealed that low-energy CAD of the ET product population leads to the near-exclusive generation of c- and z-type fragment ions with relatively high efficiency (77 +/- 8%). Compared to those formed directly via ETD, the fragment ions were found to comprise increased relative amounts of the odd-electron c-type ions (c+*) and the even-electron z-type ions (z+). A large-scale analysis of 755 doubly charged tryptic peptides was conducted to compare the method (ETcaD) to ion trap CAD and ETD. ETcaD produced a median sequence coverage of 89%-a significant improvement over ETD (63%) and ion trap CAD (77%).

  18. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, Justin A.; Frederick, Daniel R.; Taylor, Justin J.; Heffernan, James R.; Kotov, Dmitri I.; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C.; Ruggiero, Jenna L.; Rust, Blake J.; Landry, Samuel J.; Jenkins, Marc K.; McLachlan, James B.; Fife, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide–MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  19. Leader Peptide Establishes Dehydration Order, Promotes Efficiency, and Ensures Fidelity During Lacticin 481 Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Wagoner, Joshua; Yu, Yi; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-05-25

    The mechanisms by which lanthipeptide synthetases control the order in which they catalyze multiple chemical processes are poorly understood. The lacticin 481 synthetase (LctM) cleaves eight chemical bonds and forms six new chemical bonds in a controlled and ordered process. Two general mechanisms have been suggested for the temporal and spatial control of these transformations. In the spatial positioning model, leader peptide binding promotes certain reactions by establishing the spatial orientation of the substrate peptide relative to the synthetase active sites. In the intermediate structure model, the LctM-catalyzed dehydration and cyclization reactions that occur in two distinct active sites orchestrate the overall process by imparting a specific structure into the maturing peptide that facilitates the ensuing reaction. Using isotopically labeled LctA analogues with engineered lacticin 481 biosynthetic machinery and mass spectrometry analysis, we show here that the LctA leader peptide plays critical roles in establishing the modification order and enhancing the catalytic efficiency and fidelity of the synthetase. The data are most consistent with a mechanistic model for LctM where both spatial positioning and intermediate structure contribute to efficient biosynthesis.

  20. Avidin-biotin interaction mediated peptide assemblies as efficient gene delivery vectors for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wei; Chen, Wei-Hai; Kuang, Ying; Zeng, Xuan; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhou, Xiang; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a bright future for the treatment of cancers. One of the research highlights focuses on smart gene delivery vectors with good biocompatibility and tumor-targeting ability. Here, a novel gene vector self-assembled through avidin-biotin interaction with optimized targeting functionality, biotinylated tumor-targeting peptide/avidin/biotinylated cell-penetrating peptide (TAC), was designed and prepared to mediate the in vitro and in vivo delivery of p53 gene. TAC exhibited efficient DNA-binding ability and low cytotoxicity. In in vitro transfection assay, TAC/p53 complexes showed higher transfection efficiency and expression amount of p53 protein in MCF-7 cells as compared with 293T and HeLa cells, primarily due to the specific recognition between tumor-targeting peptides and receptors on MCF-7 cells. Additionally, by in situ administration of TAC/p53 complexes into tumor-bearing mice, the expression of p53 gene was obviously upregulated in tumor cells, and the tumor growth was significantly suppressed. This study provides an alternative and unique strategy to assemble functionalized peptides, and the novel self-assembled vector TAC developed is a promising gene vector for cancer therapy.

  1. Bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD) for the efficient production of an interfacially active peptide.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Giacomo; Lee, Eun Gyo; Jones, Daniel B; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2004-09-30

    The efficient expression and purification of an interfacially active peptide (mLac21) was achieved by using bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD), wherein key bioprocess considerations are addressed during the initial molecular biology work. The 21 amino acid mLac21 peptide sequence is derived from the lac repressor protein and is shown to have high affinity for the oil-water interface, causing a substantial reduction in interfacial tension following adsorption. The DNA coding for the peptide sequence was cloned into a modified pET-31(b) vector to permit the expression of mLac21 as a fusion to ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Rational iterative molecular design, taking into account the need for a scaleable bioprocess flowsheet, led to a simple and efficient bioprocess yielding mLac21 at 86% purity following ion exchange chromatography (and >98% following chromatographic polishing). This case study demonstrates that it is possible to produce acceptably pure peptide for potential commodity applications using common scaleable bioprocess unit operations. Moreover, it is shown that BMD is a powerful strategy that can be deployed to reduce bioseparation complexity.

  2. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Brian M. G.; van Ommeren, Sven P. F. I.; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py–Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py–Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py–Im polyamides. The effect of Py–Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established. PMID:26053396

  3. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Brian M G; van Ommeren, Sven P F I; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-06-04

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py-Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py-Im polyamides. The effect of Py-Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established.

  4. Leader Peptide Establishes Dehydration Order, Promotes Efficiency, and Ensures Fidelity During Lacticin 481 Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Wagoner, Joshua; Yu, Yi; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2016-05-25

    The mechanisms by which lanthipeptide synthetases control the order in which they catalyze multiple chemical processes are poorly understood. The lacticin 481 synthetase (LctM) cleaves eight chemical bonds and forms six new chemical bonds in a controlled and ordered process. Two general mechanisms have been suggested for the temporal and spatial control of these transformations. In the spatial positioning model, leader peptide binding promotes certain reactions by establishing the spatial orientation of the substrate peptide relative to the synthetase active sites. In the intermediate structure model, the LctM-catalyzed dehydration and cyclization reactions that occur in two distinct active sites orchestrate the overall process by imparting a specific structure into the maturing peptide that facilitates the ensuing reaction. Using isotopically labeled LctA analogues with engineered lacticin 481 biosynthetic machinery and mass spectrometry analysis, we show here that the LctA leader peptide plays critical roles in establishing the modification order and enhancing the catalytic efficiency and fidelity of the synthetase. The data are most consistent with a mechanistic model for LctM where both spatial positioning and intermediate structure contribute to efficient biosynthesis. PMID:27123925

  5. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW).

  6. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism.

  7. A general and efficient approach for NMR studies of peptide dynamics in class I MHC peptide binding grooves.

    PubMed

    Insaidoo, Francis K; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Baker, Brian M

    2009-10-20

    T-Cell receptor recognition of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins initiates a cellular immune response. Dynamics of peptides within MHC binding grooves can influence TCR recognition, yet NMR studies which could address this rigorously have been hindered by the expense of isotopically labeled peptides and the large size of peptide-MHC complexes. Here we describe a methodology for characterizing peptide dynamics within MHC binding grooves via NMR, using a biosynthetic approach for producing labeled peptide. With the Tax(11-19) peptide bound to the human class I MHC HLA-A*0201, we demonstrate that peptide generated in this manner can be well characterized in MHC binding grooves by NMR, providing opportunities to more precisely study the role of peptide dynamics in TCR recognition. Demonstrating the utility of such studies, the data with the Tax(11-19) peptide indicate the presence of slow conformational exchange in the peptide, supporting an "induced-fit" style TCR binding mechanism. PMID:19772349

  8. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  9. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  10. Incorporation of Naked Peptide Nucleic Acids into Liposomes Leads to Fast and Efficient Delivery.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; Accardo, Antonella; Ringhieri, Paola; Morelli, Giancarlo; Saviano, Michele; Montagner, Giulia; Fabbri, Enrica; Gallerani, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2015-08-19

    The delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to cells is a very challenging task. We report here that a liposomal formulation composed of egg PC/cholesterol/DSPE-PEG2000 can be loaded, according to different encapsulation techniques, with PNA or fluorescent PNA oligomers. PNA loaded liposomes efficiently and quickly promote the uptake of a PNA targeting the microRNA miR-210 in human erythroleukemic K562 cells. By using this innovative delivery system for PNA, down-regulation of miR-210 is achieved at a low PNA concentration.

  11. Incorporation of Naked Peptide Nucleic Acids into Liposomes Leads to Fast and Efficient Delivery.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; Accardo, Antonella; Ringhieri, Paola; Morelli, Giancarlo; Saviano, Michele; Montagner, Giulia; Fabbri, Enrica; Gallerani, Eleonora; Gambari, Roberto; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2015-08-19

    The delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) to cells is a very challenging task. We report here that a liposomal formulation composed of egg PC/cholesterol/DSPE-PEG2000 can be loaded, according to different encapsulation techniques, with PNA or fluorescent PNA oligomers. PNA loaded liposomes efficiently and quickly promote the uptake of a PNA targeting the microRNA miR-210 in human erythroleukemic K562 cells. By using this innovative delivery system for PNA, down-regulation of miR-210 is achieved at a low PNA concentration. PMID:26176882

  12. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  13. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  14. Efficient Methods to Generate Reproducible Mass Spectra in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-06-01

    In our previous matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) studies of peptides, we found that their mass spectra were virtually determined by the effective temperature in the early matrix plume, Tearly, when samples were rather homogeneous. This empirical rule allowed acquisition of quantitatively reproducible spectra. A difficulty in utilizing this rule was the complicated spectral treatment needed to get Tearly. In this work, we found another empirical rule that the total number of particles hitting the detector, or TIC, was a good measure of the spectral temperature and, hence, selection of spectra with the same TIC resulted in reproducible spectra. We also succeeded in obtaining reproducible spectra throughout a measurement by controlling TIC near a preset value through feedback adjustment of laser pulse energy. Both TIC selection and TIC control substantially reduced the shot-to-shot spectral variation in a spot, spot-to-spot variation in a sample, and even sample-to-sample variation in MALDI using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix. Based on the utilization of acquired data, TIC control was more efficient than TIC selection by an order of magnitude. Both techniques produced calibration curves with excellent linearity, suggesting their utility in quantification of peptides.

  15. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW). PMID:26219270

  16. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  17. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye.

  18. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye. PMID:26905457

  19. Lipid-mediated DNA and siRNA Transfection Efficiency Depends on Peptide Headgroup.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; Lamanna, Caroline M; Kohman, Richie E; McIntosh, Thomas J; Han, Xue; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2013-05-01

    A series of amphiphiles with differing cationic tri- and di- peptide headgroups, designed and synthesized based on lysine (K), ornithine (O), arginine (R), and glycine (G), have been characterized and evaluated for DNA and siRNA delivery. DNA-lipoplexes formed from the tri- and di- lipopeptides possessed lipid:nucleic acid charge ratios of 7:1 to 10:1, diameters of ~200 nm to 375 nm, zeta potentials of 23 mV to 41 mV, melting temperatures of 12 °C to 46 °C, and lamellar repeat periods of 6 nm to 8 nm. These lipid-DNA complexes formed supramolecular structures in which DNA is entrapped at the surface between multilamellar liposomal vesicles. Compared to their DNA counterparts, siRNA-lipoplexes formed slightly larger complexes (348 nm to 424 nm) and required higher charge ratios to form stable structures. Additionally, it was observed that lipids with multivalent, tripeptide headgroups (i.e., KGG, OGG, and RGG) were successful at transfecting DNA in vitro, whereas DNA transfection with the dipeptide lipids proved ineffective. Cellular uptake of DNA was more effective with the KGG compared to the KG lipopeptide. In siRNA knockdown experiments, both tri- and di- peptide lipids (i.e., RGG, GGG, KG, OG, RG, GG) showed some efficacy, but total cellular uptake of siRNA complexes was not indicative of knockdown outcomes and suggested that the intracellular fate of lipoplexes may be a factor. Overall, this lipopeptide study expands the library of efficient DNA transfection vectors available for use, introduces new vectors for siRNA delivery, and begins to address the structure-activity relationships which influence delivery and transfection efficacy. PMID:24391676

  20. Lipid-mediated DNA and siRNA Transfection Efficiency Depends on Peptide Headgroup

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiang; LaManna, Caroline M.; Kohman, Richie E.; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Han, Xue; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A series of amphiphiles with differing cationic tri- and di- peptide headgroups, designed and synthesized based on lysine (K), ornithine (O), arginine (R), and glycine (G), have been characterized and evaluated for DNA and siRNA delivery. DNA-lipoplexes formed from the tri- and di- lipopeptides possessed lipid:nucleic acid charge ratios of 7:1 to 10:1, diameters of ~200 nm to 375 nm, zeta potentials of 23 mV to 41 mV, melting temperatures of 12 °C to 46 °C, and lamellar repeat periods of 6 nm to 8 nm. These lipid-DNA complexes formed supramolecular structures in which DNA is entrapped at the surface between multilamellar liposomal vesicles. Compared to their DNA counterparts, siRNA-lipoplexes formed slightly larger complexes (348 nm to 424 nm) and required higher charge ratios to form stable structures. Additionally, it was observed that lipids with multivalent, tripeptide headgroups (i.e., KGG, OGG, and RGG) were successful at transfecting DNA in vitro, whereas DNA transfection with the dipeptide lipids proved ineffective. Cellular uptake of DNA was more effective with the KGG compared to the KG lipopeptide. In siRNA knockdown experiments, both tri- and di- peptide lipids (i.e., RGG, GGG, KG, OG, RG, GG) showed some efficacy, but total cellular uptake of siRNA complexes was not indicative of knockdown outcomes and suggested that the intracellular fate of lipoplexes may be a factor. Overall, this lipopeptide study expands the library of efficient DNA transfection vectors available for use, introduces new vectors for siRNA delivery, and begins to address the structure-activity relationships which influence delivery and transfection efficacy. PMID:24391676

  1. Efficient Microscale Basic Reverse Phase Peptide Fractionation for Global and Targeted Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Liebler, Daniel C

    2016-07-01

    Analysis of small biological samples would benefit from an efficient microscale fractionation strategy that minimizes sample handling, transfer steps, and accompanying losses. Here we describe a microscale basic reverse phase liquid chromatographic (bRPLC) fractionation method that offers high reproducibility and efficiency for peptide mixtures from small (5-20 μg) samples. We applied our platform to detect differentially expressed proteins from lung tumor cell lines that are sensitive (11-18) and resistant (11-18R) to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. Label-free analyses of 5-20 μg samples yielded identifications of approximately 3,200 to 4,000 proteins with coefficients of variation of 1.9-8.9% in replicate analyses. iTRAQ analyses produced similar protein inventories. Label-free and iTRAQ analyses displayed high concordance in identifications of proteins differentially expressed in 11-18 and 11-18R cells. Micro-bRPLC fractionation of cell proteomes increased sensitivity by an average of 4.5-fold in targeted quantitation using parallel reaction monitoring for three representative receptor tyrosine kinases (EGFR, PDGFRA, and BMX), which are present at low abundance in 11-18 and 11-18R cells. These data illustrate the broad utility of micro-bRPLC fractionation for global and targeted proteomic analyses. Data are available through Proteome eXchange Accession PXD003604. PMID:27255222

  2. Comparative gene transfer efficiency of low molecular weight polylysine DNA-condensing peptides.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, D L; Collard, W T; Rice, K G

    1999-10-01

    In a previous report (M.S. Wadhwa et al. (1997) Bioconjugate Chem. 8, 81-88), we synthesized a panel of polylysine-containing peptides and determined that a minimal repeating lysine chain of 18 residues followed by a tryptophan and an alkylated cysteine residue (AlkCWK18) resulted in the formation of optimal size (78 nm diameter) plasmid DNA condensates that mediated efficient in vitro gene transfer. Shorter polylysine chains produced larger DNA condensates and mediated much lower gene expression while longer lysine chains were equivalent to AlkCWK18. Surprisingly, AlkCWK18 (molecular weight 2672) was a much better gene transfer agent than commercially available low molecular weight polylysine (molecular weight 1000-4000), despite its similar molecular weight. Possible explanations were that the cysteine or tryptophan residue in AlkCWK18 contributed to the DNA binding and the formation of small condensates or that the homogeneity of AlkCWK18 relative to low molecular weight polylysine facilitated optimal condensation. To test these hypotheses, the present study prepared AlkCYK18 and K20 and used these to form DNA condensates and conduct in vitro gene transfer. The results established that DNA condensates prepared with either AlkCYK18 or K20 possessed identical particle size and mediated in vitro gene transfer efficiencies that were indistinguishable from AlkCWK18 DNA condensates, eliminating the possibility of contributions from cysteine or tryptophan. However, a detailed chromatographic and electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of low molecular weight polylysine revealed it to possess a much lower than anticipated average chain length of dp 6. Thus, the short chain length of low molecular weight polylysine explains its inability to form small DNA condensates and mediate efficient gene transfer relative to AlkCWK18 DNA condensates. These experiments further emphasize the need to develop homogenous low molecular weight carrier molecules for nonviral gene delivery.

  3. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics.

  4. Peptide-linked molecular beacons for efficient delivery and rapid mRNA detection in living cells.

    PubMed

    Nitin, Nitin; Santangelo, Philip J; Kim, Gloria; Nie, Shuming; Bao, Gang

    2004-01-01

    Real-time visualization of specific endogenous mRNA expression in vivo has the potential to revolutionize medical diagnosis, drug discovery, developmental and molecular biology. However, conventional liposome- or dendrimer-based cellular delivery of molecular probes is inefficient, slow, and often detrimental to the probes. Here we demonstrate the rapid and sensitive detection of RNA in living cells using peptide-linked molecular beacons that possess self-delivery, targeting and reporting functions. We conjugated the TAT peptide to molecular beacons using three different linkages and demonstrated that, at relatively low concentrations, these molecular beacon constructs were internalized into living cells within 30 min with nearly 100% efficiency. Further, peptide-based delivery did not interfere with either specific targeting by or hybridization-induced fluorescence of the probes. We could therefore detect human GAPDH and survivin mRNAs in living cells fluorescently, revealing intriguing intracellular localization patterns of mRNA. We clearly demonstrated that cellular delivery of molecular beacons using the peptide-based approach has far better performance compared with conventional transfection methods. The peptide-linked molecular beacons approach promises to open new and exciting opportunities in sensitive gene detection and quantification in vivo.

  5. Presumed LRP1-targeting transport peptide delivers β-secretase inhibitor to neurons in vitro with limited efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ah; Casalini, Tommaso; Brambilla, Davide; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Interfering with the activity of β-secretase to reduce the production of Aβ peptides is a conceivable therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. However, the development of efficient yet safe inhibitors is hampered by secondary effects, usually linked to the indiscriminate inhibition of other substrates’ processing by the targeted enzyme. Based on the spatial compartmentalization of the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase, we hypothesized that by exploiting the endocytosis receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein it would be possible to direct an otherwise cell-impermeable inhibitor to the endosomes of neurons, boosting the drug’s efficacy and importantly, sparing the off-target effects. We used the transport peptide Angiopep to build an endocytosis-competent conjugate and found that although the peptide facilitated the inhibitor’s internalization into neurons and delivered it to the endosomes, the delivery was not efficient enough to potently reduce β-secretase activity at the cellular level. This is likely connected to the finding that in the cell lines we used, Angiopep’s internalization was not mediated by its presumed receptor to a significant extent. Additionally, Angiopep exploited different internalization mechanisms when applied alone or when conjugated to the inhibitor, highlighting the impact that drug conjugation can have on transport peptides. PMID:27682851

  6. Catalysis of peptide formation by inorganic oxides: high efficiency of alumina under mild conditions on the Earth-like planets.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, V A; Sainz-Rojas, J

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid condensation catalyzed by inorganic oxides is a widely recognized way for prebiotic peptide formation. Silica and alumina are widely distributed in the Earth-like planets' crust as minerals of different complexity, and thus are attractive model catalysts for the studies of abiotic peptide synthesis. Experiments performed in other laboratories have shown that this process can be efficient at > 80 degrees C, which is not easy to find on the planetary surface in combination with sufficient concentrations of amino acids and necessary catalysts. In the present work we tested catalytic activity of three forms of alumina (which proved to be an efficient catalyst for this process) in the intermolecular condensation of L-alanine. We expanded the temperature interval down to 55 degrees C and used the simplest permanent heating procedure, without employing fluctuating drying/wetting conditions. The most important finding is that even under the lowest temperature considered (i.e. 55 degrees C), short peptide formation can be detected already after 10-30 days of heating. This fact implies that the abiotic peptide formation might occur in a wide variety of planetary environments, without need for high temperatures, given the presence of amino acid building blocks and alumina-containing minerals.

  7. Recyclable hypervalent iodine(III) reagent iodosodilactone as an efficient coupling reagent for direct esterification, amidation, and peptide coupling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jun; Gao, Wen-Chao; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Chi

    2012-06-15

    A hypervalent iodine(III) reagent plays a novel role as an efficient coupling reagent to promote the direct condensation between carboxylic acids and alcohols or amines to provide esters, macrocyclic lactones, amides, as well as peptides without racemization. The regeneration of iodosodilactone (1) can also be readily achieved. The intermediate acyloxyphosphonium ion C from the activation of a carboxylic acid is thought to be involved in the present esterification reaction.

  8. Self-assembled cationic peptide nanoparticles as an efficient antimicrobial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Xu, Kaijin; Wang, Huaying; Jeremy Tan, P. K.; Fan, Weimin; Venkatraman, Subbu S.; Li, Lanjuan; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides are of interest because they can combat multi-drug-resistant microbes. Most peptides form α-helices or β-sheet-like structures that can insert into and subsequently disintegrate negatively charged bacterial cell surfaces. Here, we show that a novel class of core-shell nanoparticles formed by self-assembly of an amphiphilic peptide have strong antimicrobial properties against a range of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The nanoparticles show a high therapeutic index against Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and are more potent than their unassembled peptide counterparts. Using Staphylococcus aureus-infected meningitis rabbits, we show that the nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier and suppress bacterial growth in infected brains. Taken together, these nanoparticles are promising antimicrobial agents that can be used to treat brain infections and other infectious diseases.

  9. Use of lipolanthionine peptide, a toll-like receptor 2 inhibitor, enhances transdermal delivery efficiency

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, BIN; LIU, DA-LIE; PAN, WEN-YAN; YANG, XIAO-HUI; SHOU, JIA-BAO; WU, JU-HUA; MAO, QING-LONG; WANG, JIA

    2014-01-01

    The transdermal delivery system (TDS) is able to obtain a systemic therapeutic effect by administration through the skin, which has low side effects and is able to maintain a sustained blood concentration. However, due to the barrier presented by the stratum corneum, numerous drugs have poor percutaneous permeability. Therefore, the improvement of skin permeability is key to TDS. The main method of promoting transdermal absorption is through the usage of penetration enhancers. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a commonly used penetration enhancer, which has anti-inflammatory analgesic effects and is able to penetrate the skin. Retinoic acid (RA) and lipolanthionine peptide (LP) may also benefit the permeation efficiency of TDS. Therefore, the present study examined the function of DMSO, RA and LP as penetration enhancers in TDS. Firstly, the optimum concentration of DMSO was confirmed by detecting the expression of the LacZ gene in vitro. Secondly, different combinations of LP, RA and DMSO were applied to mouse skin to analyze the penetration enhancer combination with the greatest efficacy. All the animals were divided into five groups: The RA + LP + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the RA + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the LP + DMSO + pORF-LacZ group, the DMSO + pORF-LacZ group and the control group. Skin was soaked in combinations of LP, RA and DMSO for seven days and then the pORF-LacZ plasmids were daubed onto the skin once daily three days. On the 11th day, all the animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and the skin and blood samples were collected. The blood samples were used to detect the expression of the LacZ gene by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the skin samples were used to detect the expression of claudin-4 and zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) proteins by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that the combination of LP, RA and DMSO exhibited the greatest transdermal delivery efficiency, which verified that RA and LP were

  10. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  11. Comparison of the efficiency of complexes based on S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptides in plasmid DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Maia, Sílvia; Gomes, Paula; Jurado, Amália S; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-07-01

    The successful application of gene therapy approaches is highly dependent on the efficient delivery of nucleic acids into target cells. In the present study, new peptide-based nonviral systems were developed to enhance plasmid DNA and siRNA delivery, aiming at generating appropriate gene delivery and gene silencing tools for preclinical and clinical application. For this purpose, a new cell-penetrating peptide derived from the wild-type S4(13)-PV peptide was synthesized through the addition of a five-histidine tail to its N-terminus (H5-S4(13)-PV), and its ability to mediate gene expression and gene silencing was evaluated and compared to that of the wild-type peptide. The histidine-enriched peptide, H5-S4(13)-PV, proved to be generally more efficient and less toxic than the wild-type peptide in the delivery of plasmid DNA. In addition, complexes of H5-S4(13)-PV with siRNAs, but not of S4(13)-PV, were efficiently internalized by cells and presented high knockdown activity (63%). Interestingly, systems containing the S4(13)-PV or the H5-S4(13)-PV peptide exhibited superior biological activity when compared to those containing the reverse NLS or scrambled peptides, suggesting that both the cell-penetrating sequence and the NLS of the S4(13)-PV peptide influence the competence of binary and ternary complexes to accomplish nucleic acid delivery. In order to unravel the cancer therapeutic potential of formulations with the histidine-enriched peptide, their efficiency to mediate silencing of the oncogenic protein survivin was evaluated. As opposed to complexes with the wild-type peptide, H5-S4(13)-PV complexes showed the ability to promote a high survivin knockdown at the level of both protein (44%) and mRNA (73%), in HT1080 cells.

  12. Efficient 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins using tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Hassink, Matthew; Selvaraj, Ramajeyam; Yap, Li-Peng; Park, Ryan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Fox, Joseph M; Li, Zibo; Conti, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    18F positron emission tomography (PET) has a number of attributes that make it clinically attractive, including nearly 100% positron efficiency, very high specific radioactivity, and a short half-life of ≈ 110 minutes. However, the short half-life of 18F and the poor nucleophilicity of fluoride introduce challenges for the incorporation of 18F into complex molecules. Recently, the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation was introduced as a novel 18F labeling method that proceeds with fast reaction rates without catalysis. Herein we report an efficient method for 18F labeling of free cysteines of peptides and proteins based on sequential ligation with a bifunctional tetrazinyl-maleimide and an 18F-labeled trans-cyclooctene. The newly developed method was tested for site-specific labeling of both c(RGDyC) peptide and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-SH protein. Starting with 4 mCi of 18F-trans-cyclooctene and only 10 μg of tetrazine-RGD (80-100 μM) or 15 μg of tetrazine-VEGF (6.0 μM), 18F-labeled RGD peptide and VEGF protein could be obtained within 5 minutes in 95% yield and 75% yield, respectively. The obtained tracers were then evaluated in mice. In conclusion, a highly efficient method has been developed for site-specific 18F labeling of cysteine-containing peptides and proteins. The special characteristics of the tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation provide unprecedented opportunities to synthesize 18F-labeled probes with high specific activity for PET applications.

  13. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G.; Gilding, Edward K.; Conlan, Brendon F.; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  14. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Harris, Karen S; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G; Gilding, Edward K; Conlan, Brendon F; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Craik, David J; Anderson, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  15. Green-lighting green fluorescent protein: Faster and more efficient folding by eliminating a cis–trans peptide isomerization event

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, David J; Huang, Yao-ming; Xia, Ke; Fraser, Keith; Jones, Victoria E; Lamberson, Colleen M; Van Roey, Patrick; Colón, Wilfredo; Bystroff, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) folds on a time scale of minutes. The slow step in folding is a cis–trans peptide bond isomerization. The only conserved cis-peptide bond in the native GFP structure, at P89, was remodeled by the insertion of two residues, followed by iterative energy minimization and side chain design. The engineered GFP was synthesized and found to fold faster and more efficiently than its template protein, recovering 50% more of its fluorescence upon refolding. The slow phase of folding is faster and smaller in amplitude, and hysteresis in refolding has been eliminated. The elimination of a previously reported kinetically trapped state in refolding suggests that X-P89 is trans in the trapped state. A 2.55 Å resolution crystal structure revealed that the new variant contains only trans-peptide bonds, as designed. This is the first instance of a computationally remodeled fluorescent protein that folds faster and more efficiently than wild type. PMID:24408076

  16. An Efficient Method for the In Vitro Production of Azol(in)e-Based Cyclic Peptides**

    PubMed Central

    Houssen, Wael E; Bent, Andrew F; McEwan, Andrew R; Pieiller, Nathalie; Tabudravu, Jioji; Koehnke, Jesko; Mann, Greg; Adaba, Rosemary I; Thomas, Louise; Hawas, Usama W; Liu, Huanting; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich; Smith, Margaret C M; Naismith, James H; Jaspars, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Heterocycle-containing cyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the pharmaceutical industry but their chemical synthesis is very challenging. A new universal method has been devised to prepare these compounds by using a set of engineered marine-derived enzymes and substrates obtained from a family of ribosomally produced and post-translationally modified peptides called the cyanobactins. The substrate precursor peptide is engineered to have a non-native protease cleavage site that can be rapidly cleaved. The other enzymes used are heterocyclases that convert Cys or Cys/Ser/Thr into their corresponding azolines. A macrocycle is formed using a macrocyclase enzyme, followed by oxidation of the azolines to azoles with a specific oxidase. The work is exemplified by the production of 17 macrocycles containing 6–9 residues representing 11 out of the 20 canonical amino acids. PMID:25331823

  17. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    Organelle-targeted drug delivery can enhance the efficiency of the intracellularly acting drugs and reduce their toxicity. We generated core-shell type CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) densely decorated with NLS peptidic targeting residues using a 3-stage decoration approach and investigated their endocytosis and nuclear targeting efficiencies. The diameter of the generated QDs increased following the individual decoration stages (16.3, 18.9, and 21.9 nm), the ζ-potential became less negative (-33.2, -17.5, and -11.9 mV), and characteristic changes appeared in the FTIR spectra following decoration with the linker and NLS peptides. Quantitative analysis of the last decoration stage revealed that 37.9% and 33.2% of the alkyne-modified NLS groups that were added to the reaction mix became covalently attached or adsorbed to the QDs surface, respectively. These numbers correspond to 63.6 and 55.7 peptides conjugated or adsorbed to a single QD (the surface density of 42 and 37 conjugated and adsorbed peptides per 1000 nm(2) of the QDs surface), which is higher than in the majority of previous studies that reported decoration efficiencies of formulations intended for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. QDs decorated with NLS peptides undergo more efficient endocytosis, as compared to other investigated QDs formulations, and accumulated to a higher extent in the cell nucleus or in close vicinity to it (11.9%, 14.6%, and 56.1% of the QDs endocytosed by an average cell for the QD-COOH, QD-azide, and QD-NLS formulations, respectively). We conclude that dense decoration of QDs with NLS residues increased their endocytosis and led to their nuclear targeting (preferential accumulation in the cells nuclei or in close vicinity to them). The experimental system and research tools that were used in this study allow quantitative investigation of the mechanisms that govern the QDs nuclear targeting and their dependence on the formulation properties. These findings will contribute to the

  18. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    Organelle-targeted drug delivery can enhance the efficiency of the intracellularly acting drugs and reduce their toxicity. We generated core-shell type CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) densely decorated with NLS peptidic targeting residues using a 3-stage decoration approach and investigated their endocytosis and nuclear targeting efficiencies. The diameter of the generated QDs increased following the individual decoration stages (16.3, 18.9, and 21.9 nm), the ζ-potential became less negative (-33.2, -17.5, and -11.9 mV), and characteristic changes appeared in the FTIR spectra following decoration with the linker and NLS peptides. Quantitative analysis of the last decoration stage revealed that 37.9% and 33.2% of the alkyne-modified NLS groups that were added to the reaction mix became covalently attached or adsorbed to the QDs surface, respectively. These numbers correspond to 63.6 and 55.7 peptides conjugated or adsorbed to a single QD (the surface density of 42 and 37 conjugated and adsorbed peptides per 1000 nm(2) of the QDs surface), which is higher than in the majority of previous studies that reported decoration efficiencies of formulations intended for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. QDs decorated with NLS peptides undergo more efficient endocytosis, as compared to other investigated QDs formulations, and accumulated to a higher extent in the cell nucleus or in close vicinity to it (11.9%, 14.6%, and 56.1% of the QDs endocytosed by an average cell for the QD-COOH, QD-azide, and QD-NLS formulations, respectively). We conclude that dense decoration of QDs with NLS residues increased their endocytosis and led to their nuclear targeting (preferential accumulation in the cells nuclei or in close vicinity to them). The experimental system and research tools that were used in this study allow quantitative investigation of the mechanisms that govern the QDs nuclear targeting and their dependence on the formulation properties. These findings will contribute to the

  19. Cyclic Amphipathic Peptide-DNA Complexes Mediate High-Efficiency Transfection of Adherent Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, Jean-Yves; Szoka, Francis C., Jr.

    1993-02-01

    A DNA transfection protocol has been developed that makes use of the cyclic cationic amphipathic peptide gramicidin S and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine. The DNA complex is formed by mixing gramicidin S with DNA at a 1:1 charge ratio and then adding phosphatidylethanolamine at a lipid/peptide molar ratio of 5:1. The complex mediates rapid association of DNA with cells and leads to transient expression levels of β-galactosidase ranging from 1 to 30% of the transfected cells, with long-term expression being about an order of magnitude lower. The respective roles of peptide and phospholipid are not yet resolved but optimal transfection requires both the cyclic peptide and the hexagonal phase-competent phospholipid PtdEtn. Transfection in CV-1 cells is not affected by lysomotrophic agents, which suggests that DNA entry into the cell is via the plasma membrane. This technique that is simple, economical, and reproducible mediates transfection levels up to 20-fold higher than cationic liposomes in adherent mammalian cells.

  20. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  1. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  2. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development. PMID:26069962

  3. A high-efficiency, low-toxicity, phospholipids-based phase separation gel for long-term delivery of peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Peng, Qiang; San, Feng-Ying; Luo, Jing-Wen; Wang, Meng-Xin; Wu, Wen-Qi; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhi-Rong

    2015-03-01

    Peptide and protein drugs are currently under rapid development attributed to their high potency and efficacy in therapy. Their successful delivery, however, is highly limited by their short half-life, fast degradation and rapid clearance. Here, we present a high content phospholipids-based phase separation gel (PPSG), which is readily injectable due to its low initial viscosity and can rapidly transform into an in situ implant after injection upon exposure to an aqueous environment. A selected model peptide, octreotide acetate, is loaded into PPSG and achieves sustained release profiles for one month in rats. In addition, the local irritation caused by ethanol contained in PPSG is ethanol content-dependent and the irritation of PPSG with 70% phospholipids content can be eliminated by partially replacing ethanol with medium chain triglyceride. The mechanisms underlying phase transition of PPSG are based on water-insolubility of phospholipids. Our findings demonstrate that PPSG is a readily injectable, highly safe and efficient in situ forming implant for sustained delivery of peptides.

  4. DNA Subtraction of In Vivo Selected Phage Repertoires for Efficient Peptide Pathology Biomarker Identification in Neuroinflammation Multiple Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Sanchez, Karina; Vekris, Antonios; Petry, Klaus G.

    2016-01-01

    To streamline in vivo biomarker discovery, we developed a suppression subtractive DNA hybridization technique adapted for phage-displayed combinatorial libraries of 12 amino acid peptides (PhiSSH). Physical DNA subtraction is performed in a one-tube-all-reactions format by sequential addition of reagents, producing the enrichment of specific clones of one repertoire. High-complexity phage repertoires produced by in vivo selections in the multiple sclerosis rat model (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) and matched healthy control rats were used to evaluate the technique. The healthy repertoire served as a physical DNA subtractor from the EAE repertoire to produce the subtraction repertoire. Full next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the three repertoires was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the subtraction technique. More than 96% of the clones common to the EAE and healthy repertoires were absent from the subtraction repertoire, increasing the probability of randomly selecting various specific peptides for EAE pathology to about 70%. Histopathology experiments were performed to confirm the quality of the subtraction repertoire clones, producing distinct labeling of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) affected by inflammation among healthy nervous tissue or the preferential binding to IL1-challenged vs. resting human BBB model. Combining PhiSSH with NGS will be useful for controlled in vivo screening of small peptide combinatorial libraries to discover biomarkers of specific molecular alterations interspersed within healthy tissues. PMID:26917946

  5. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  6. Examining ubiquitinated peptide enrichment efficiency through an epitope labeled protein.

    PubMed

    Parker, J; Oh, Y; Moazami, Y; Pierce, J G; Loziuk, P L; Dean, R A; Muddiman, D C

    2016-11-01

    Ubiquitination is a dynamic process that is responsible for regulation of cellular responses to stimuli in a number of biological systems. Previous efforts to study this post-translational modification have focused on protein enrichment; however, recent research utilizes the presence of the di-glycine (Gly-Gly) remnants following trypsin digestion to immuno-enrich ubiquitinated peptides. Monoclonal antibodies developed to the cleaved ubiquitin modification epitope, (tert-butoxycarbonyl) glycylglycine (Boc-Gly-Gly-NHS)(1), are used to identify the Gly-Gly signature. Here, we have successfully generated the Boc-Gly-Gly-NHS modification and showed that when conjugated to a lysine containing protein, such as lysozyme, it can be applied as a standard protein to examine ubiquitinated peptide enrichment within a complex background. PMID:27562526

  7. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  8. Synthetic peptides for efficient discrimination of anti-enterovirus antibodies at the serotype level.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Mavrouli, Maria D; Antonaki, Georgia; Spanakis, Nikolaos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-08-01

    Enteroviruses are important human pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases from minor common colds to fatal myocarditis. However, certain disease syndromes are caused by one or few serotypes. Serotype identification is difficult due to the laborious neutralization tests that lack of sensitivity, while in commercial ELISAs homotypic antibodies' activities are largely masked by the recognition of genera-specific epitopes by heterotypic antibodies. In the present study homotypic assays were developed with the ability to discriminate different enterovirus serotypes. Seventy-three children sera, positive for IgM antibodies against enterovirus genus and 49 healthy children were examined for the presence of antibodies against 14 synthetic peptides derived from a non-conserved region of the VP1 protein of coxsackieviruses B2, B3, B4, B5, A9, A16, A24, echoviruses 6, 7, 9, 11, 30, enterovirus 71 and parechovirus 1. 50% of the anti-enterovirus IgM positive sera (>150 BU) reacted with the peptides with the majority of them to preferentially recognize one of them, supporting the homotypic nature of our assay. Inhibition studies yielded homologous inhibition rates 67-95% suggesting that specific peptide recognition actually occurred. The diagnostic value of our assay was tested in blood samples drawn over a 1.5-year period from a 5-year old patient. The anti-enterovirus reactivity was clearly attributed to echovirus serotype 11. The IgM/IgG antibody ratio was reversed 4 months later and subsequently IgM antibodies dropped below the cutoff point. In this paper we demonstrate that our assay can be used to discriminate between antibodies targeting different enterovirus serotypes.

  9. Facile synthesis of yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres for efficient enrichment of low abundance peptides.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hao; Qin, Hongqiang; Xiong, Zhichao; Zhang, Weibing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-11-21

    Magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres with a yolk-shell structure (YSMMCS) have been prepared via a new in situ carbon source strategy. The material was fabricated by two shells coated onto the Fe3O4 particles; the inner dense and thick silica shell could protect the magnetic core from harsh acidic solvents as well as induce the void between the core and the outer shell for the yolk-shell structure, while the outer organosilica shell was used as the template and carbon source for in situ preparation of a carbon shell with mesoporous structure. A C18-alkyl chain was incorporated in situ as the carbon precursor efficiently, avoiding the conventional infiltration step, which was very difficult to manipulate and time-consuming with the possibility of losing the carbon precursor. The resulting yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres exhibited a high surface area (273.15 m(2) g(-1)), a large pore volume (0.31 cm(3) g(-1)), and a strong magnetic response (a saturation magnetization value of 34.57 emu g(-1)). As a result of the void between the core and the outer shell and the π-π stacking effect, adsorption capacity reached 191.64 mg g(-1) by using Rhodamine B as a standard analyte, indicating the great potential application of the material as drug carriers. Owing to the inherent hydrophobicity and high surface area, the composite material showed better performance in the enrichment of peptides than a magnetic mesoporous silica material (Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2). According to the LC-MS/MS results, about 51 and 29 nonredundant peptides were identified from tryptic digests of 5 nM BSA. Additionally, taking advantage of the mesoporous structure and strong magnetic response, the material was utilized to selectively extract low abundance endogenous peptides from human serum in the presence of high abundance proteins. Based on the LC-MS/MS results, 962 endogenous peptides were obtained by 2.5 mg YSMMCS relative to 539 endogenous peptides by 5 mg Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2

  10. Facile synthesis of yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres for efficient enrichment of low abundance peptides.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hao; Qin, Hongqiang; Xiong, Zhichao; Zhang, Weibing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-11-21

    Magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres with a yolk-shell structure (YSMMCS) have been prepared via a new in situ carbon source strategy. The material was fabricated by two shells coated onto the Fe3O4 particles; the inner dense and thick silica shell could protect the magnetic core from harsh acidic solvents as well as induce the void between the core and the outer shell for the yolk-shell structure, while the outer organosilica shell was used as the template and carbon source for in situ preparation of a carbon shell with mesoporous structure. A C18-alkyl chain was incorporated in situ as the carbon precursor efficiently, avoiding the conventional infiltration step, which was very difficult to manipulate and time-consuming with the possibility of losing the carbon precursor. The resulting yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres exhibited a high surface area (273.15 m(2) g(-1)), a large pore volume (0.31 cm(3) g(-1)), and a strong magnetic response (a saturation magnetization value of 34.57 emu g(-1)). As a result of the void between the core and the outer shell and the π-π stacking effect, adsorption capacity reached 191.64 mg g(-1) by using Rhodamine B as a standard analyte, indicating the great potential application of the material as drug carriers. Owing to the inherent hydrophobicity and high surface area, the composite material showed better performance in the enrichment of peptides than a magnetic mesoporous silica material (Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2). According to the LC-MS/MS results, about 51 and 29 nonredundant peptides were identified from tryptic digests of 5 nM BSA. Additionally, taking advantage of the mesoporous structure and strong magnetic response, the material was utilized to selectively extract low abundance endogenous peptides from human serum in the presence of high abundance proteins. Based on the LC-MS/MS results, 962 endogenous peptides were obtained by 2.5 mg YSMMCS relative to 539 endogenous peptides by 5 mg Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2

  11. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by a preS1-binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoli; Zhou, Ming; He, Yonggang; Wan, Yanmin; Bai, Weiya; Tao, Shuai; Ren, Yanqin; Zhang, Xinxin; Xu, Jianqing; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Junqi; Hu, Kanghong; Xie, Youhua

    2016-01-01

    Entry inhibitors are promising novel antivirals against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The existing potential entry inhibitors have targeted the cellular receptor(s). In this study, we aim to develop the first entry inhibitor that inhibits HBV infection via targeting viral particles. The preS1 segment of the large envelope glycoprotein of HBV is essential for virion attachment and infection. Previously, we obtained a preS1-binding short peptide B10 by screening a phage display peptide library using the N-terminal half of preS1 (residues 1 to 60, genotype C). We report here that by means of concatenation of B10, we identified a quadruple concatemer 4B10 that displayed a markedly increased preS1-binding activity. The main binding site of 4B10 in preS1 was mapped to the receptor binding enhancing region. 4B10 blocked HBV attachment to hepatic cells and inhibited HBV infection of primary human and tupaia hepatocytes at low nanomolar concentrations. The 4B10-mediated inhibition of HBV infection is specific as it did not inhibit the infection of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus or human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Moreover, 4B10 showed no binding activity to hepatic cells. In conclusion, we have identified 4B10 as a promising candidate for a novel class of HBV entry inhibitors. PMID:27384014

  12. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  13. Efficiency of enteral nitrogen support in surgical patients: small peptides v non-degraded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, F; Ollivier, J M; Cynober, L; Masini, J P; Coudray-Lucas, C; Levy, E; Giboudeau, J

    1990-01-01

    In a prospective study, 12 intensive care patients, after abdominal surgery, received three alternate six-day courses of two enteral diets with identical nitrogen (0.3 g N/kg per day) and energy (60 kcal/kg per day) supply. The protein hydrolysate (PH) diet contained enzyme-hydrolysed casein and lactoserum (60% small peptides), while the non-degraded protein (NDP) diet contained a nitrogen source of similar amino acid composition, but in the form of non-degraded proteins. The patients were randomised to receive either PH-NDP-PH or NDP-PH-NDP. Parameters reflecting protein metabolism were assessed in the plasma, urine, and stomal effluent on days 1, 6, 12, and 18, three hours after stopping the nutrition (t0), and one hour after restarting it (t1). Comparisons of t1 and t0 values showed that 13 amino acids (including the eight essential amino acids) increased significantly with the protein hydrolysate diet, but only two increased with the non-degraded protein diet. Similarly, with protein hydrolysate, insulin-aemia at t1 was significantly higher than at t0 and correlated with plasma leucine, phenylalanine, alanine, and lysine concentrations. In addition, significant improvements in plasma albumin, transferrin, and retinol binding protein concentrations were seen with protein hydrolysate, together with a significant decrease in the plasma phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio and urinary 3-methylhistidine excretion. We conclude that in patients in intensive care after abdominal surgery enteral support containing small peptides is more effective than an equivalent diet containing whole proteins in restoring plasma amino acid and protein levels. PMID:2123819

  14. Stoichiometry determination of the MP1-p14 complex using a novel and cost-efficient method to produce an equimolar mixture of standard peptides.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Johann; Pichler, Peter; Madalinski, Mathias; Kurzbauer, Robert; Mechtler, Karl

    2009-12-15

    Determination of protein complex stoichiometry can be achieved by absolute quantification of the interacting constituents based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Current available platforms for the generation of standard peptides are cost-intensive and deliver variable results concerning the equimolarity of the standard peptides. Here we describe a novel and cost-efficient method to generate an equimolar mixture of standard peptides, which we call the equimolarity through equalizer peptide (EtEP) strategy. The rationale of the strategy allows equalization of internal standard peptides and absolute quantification of any protein of interest via a single peptide, from which the exact amount was determined by amino acid analysis. This and the use of the mTRAQ reagent significantly decrease the costs of absolute quantification and stoichiometry determination. We used the EtEP strategy to determine the MP1-p14 complex stoichiometry of two different concentrations, one simulating a condition following tandem affinity purification. Absolute quantification of MP1-p14 was performed on two different mass spectrometers, and the 1:1 stoichiometry was confirmed with high accuracy and precision. On the basis of the quantification of MP1-p14, we demonstrate the importance to assess completeness of protein digestion and discuss the use of peptides containing labile amino acids and the choice of instrumentation.

  15. Low-density lipoprotein peptide-combined DNA nanocomplex as an efficient anticancer drug delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Tao, Jun; Hua, Haiying; Sun, Pengchao; Zhao, Yongxing

    2015-08-01

    DNA is a type of potential biomaterials for drug delivery due to its nanoscale geometry, loading capacity of therapeutics, biocompatibility, and biodegradability. Unfortunately, DNA is easily degraded by DNases in the body circulation and has low intracellular uptake. In the present study, we selected three cationic polymers polyethylenimine (PEI), hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor targeted peptide (RLT), to modify DNA and improve the issues. A potent anti-tumor anthracycline-doxorubicin (DOX) was intercalated into DNA non-covalently and the DOX/DNA was then combined with PEI, CTAB, and RLT, respectively. Compact nanocomplexes were formed by electrostatic interaction and could potentially protect DNA from DNases. More importantly, RLT had the potential to enhance intracellular uptake by LDL receptor mediated endocytosis. In a series of in vitro experiments, RLT complexed DNA enhanced intracellular delivery of DOX, increased tumor cell death and intracellular ROS production, and reduced intracellular elimination of DOX. All results suggested that the easily prepared and targeted RLT/DNA nanocomplexes had great potential to be developed into a formulation for doxorubicin with enhanced anti-tumor activity.

  16. Efficient four-drug cocktail therapy targeting amyloid-β peptide for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Asai, Masashi; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Tomita, Taisuke; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Ishiura, Shoichi; Saido, Takaomi C; Maruyama, Kei

    2010-12-01

    Cocktail treatment is an effective multidrug medication therapy for some diseases, such as cancer and AIDS, because of the additive or synergistic effect of each medicine and relief from adverse effects. Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is now recognized as central to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived from the sequential proteolysis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Secretase inhibitors are one of most attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in AD. However, because β- and γ-secretases cleave not only APP but also other substrate proteins, strong inhibition of these secretases leads to severe adverse effects. Some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cholesterol-lowering drugs (statins) can modify the production of Aβ. Here, we report that a cocktail treatment with four drugs (NSAID, statin, and β- and γ-secretase inhibitors) had additive effects on the reduction of Aβ levels in cultured cells without competing with each other. Moreover, the four-drug cocktail treatment caused no changes in processing of the γ-secretase substrate Notch. This is suggests that this cocktail treatment could be a new therapeutic approach for AD. PMID:20890992

  17. Higher efficiency soluble prokaryotic expression, purification, and structural analysis of antimicrobial peptide G13.

    PubMed

    Che, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yinghu; Zha, Xiangdong; Huang, Huoqing; Yang, Peilong; Ma, Lijuan; Xu, Xuejiao

    2016-03-01

    G13 is a 19-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from granulysin. In order to achieve high-level expression of G13 in Escherichia coli cells, and to reduce downstream processing costs, we introduced an Asp-Pro acid labile bond between the His-Patch thioredoxin and G13 and constructed the recombinant plasmid pThiohisA-DP-G13. The plasmid was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). After induction with isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside for 5 h, the fusion protein accumulated up to 200 mg/L in soluble form. The fusion protein was released by a high pressure homogenizer, cleaved using 13% acetic acid at 50 °C hydrolysis for 72 h. The recombinant G13 (r-G13) was then successively purified by fractional precipitation with ammonium sulfate and trichloroacetic acid, followed by one-step cation exchange chromatography. The purified r-G13 displayed a single band (about 2.2 kDa) as analyzed by Tris-Tricine buffered SDS-PAGE, and its precise molecular weight was confirmed using tandem mass spectrometry. Analysis of r-G13 by circular dichroism (CD) indicated that r-G13 contained predominantly β-sheet and random coil. Agar plate diffusion assay revealed that the r-G13 exhibited antibacterial activity against both Bacillus subtilis and E. coli.

  18. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Efficient expression of nattokinase in Bacillus licheniformis: host strain construction and signal peptide optimization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuetuan; Zhou, Yinhua; Chen, Jingbang; Cai, Dongbo; Wang, Dan; Qi, Gaofu; Chen, Shouwen

    2015-02-01

    Nattokinase (NK) possesses the potential for prevention and treatment of thrombus-related diseases. In this study, high-level expression of nattokinase was achieved in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02 via host strain construction and signal peptides optimization. First, ten genes (mpr, vpr, aprX, epr, bpr, wprA, aprE, bprA, hag, amyl) encoding for eight extracellular proteases, a flagellin and an amylase were deleted to obtain B. licheniformis BL10, which showed no extracellular proteases activity in gelatin zymography. Second, the gene fragments of P43 promoter, Svpr, nattokinase and TamyL were combined into pHY300PLK to form the expression vector pP43SNT. In BL10 (pP43SNT), the fermentation activity and product activity per unit of biomass of nattokinase reached 14.33 FU/mL and 2,187.71 FU/g respectively, which increased by 39 and 156 % compared to WX-02 (pP43SNT). Last, Svpr was replaced with SsacC and SbprA, and the maximum fermentation activity (33.83 FU/mL) was achieved using SsacC, which was 229 % higher than that of WX-02 (pP43SNT). The maximum NK fermentation activity in this study reaches the commercial production level of solid state fermentation, and this study provides a promising engineered strain for industrial production of nattokinase, as well as a potential platform host for expression of other target proteins.

  20. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27695323

  1. RGD peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles enable highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingdan; Alves, Carla S; Hou, Wenxiu; Qiu, Jieru; Möhwald, Helmuth; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    We report the use of arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) for highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells. In this study, generation 5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers modified with RGD via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer and with PEG monomethyl ether were used as templates to entrap gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The native and the RGD-modified PEGylated dendrimers and the respective well characterized Au DENPs were used as vectors to transfect human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with plasmid DNA (pDNA) carrying both the enhanced green fluorescent protein and the luciferase (pEGFPLuc) reporter genes, as well as pDNA encoding the human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) gene. We show that all vectors are capable of transfecting the hMSCs with both pDNAs. Gene transfection using pEGFPLuc was demonstrated by quantitative Luc activity assay and qualitative evaluation by fluorescence microscopy. For the transfection with hBMP-2, the gene delivery efficiency was evaluated by monitoring the hBMP-2 concentration and the level of osteogenic differentiation of the hMSCs via alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin secretion, calcium deposition, and von Kossa staining assays. Our results reveal that the stem cell gene delivery efficiency is largely dependent on the composition and the surface functionality of the dendrimer-based vectors. The coexistence of RGD and AuNPs rendered the designed dendrimeric vector with specific stem cell binding ability likely via binding of integrin receptor on the cell surface and improved three-dimensional conformation of dendrimers, which is beneficial for highly efficient and specific stem cell gene delivery applications. PMID:25658033

  2. On comparison of SimTandem with state-of-the-art peptide identification tools, efficiency of precursor mass filter and dealing with variable modifications.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jiří; Sachsenberg, Timo; Hoksza, David; Skopal, Tomáš; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2013-11-14

    The similarity search in theoretical mass spectra generated from protein sequence databases is a widely accepted approach for identification of peptides from query mass spectra produced by shotgun proteomics. Growing protein sequence databases and noisy query spectra demand database indexing techniques and better similarity measures for the comparison of theoretical spectra against query spectra. We employ a modification of previously proposed parameterized Hausdorff distance for comparisons of mass spectra. The new distance outperforms the original distance, the angle distance and state-of-the-art peptide identification tools OMSSA and X!Tandem in the number of identified peptides even though the q-value is only 0.001. When a precursor mass filter is used as a database indexing technique, our method outperforms OMSSA in the speed of search. When variable modifications are not searched, the search time is similar to X!Tandem. We show that the precursor mass filter is an efficient database indexing technique for high-accuracy data even though many variable modifications are being searched. We demonstrate that the number of identified peptides is bigger when variable modifications are searched separately by more search runs of a peptide identification engine. Otherwise, the false discovery rates are affected by mixing unmodified and modified spectra together resulting in a lower number of identified peptides. Our method is implemented in the freely available application SimTandem which can be used in the framework TOPP based on OpenMS.

  3. Exogenous chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan associate with arginine-rich peptide-DNA complexes to alter their intracellular processing and gene delivery efficiency.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rangeetha J; Sharma, Rajpal; Nisakar, Daniel; Purohit, Gunjan; Ganguli, Munia

    2015-04-01

    Arginine-rich peptides have been used extensively as efficient cellular transporters. However, gene delivery with such peptides requires development of strategies to improve their efficiency. We had earlier demonstrated that addition of small amounts of exogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) like heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate to different arginine-rich peptide-DNA complexes (polyplexes) led to an increase in their gene delivery efficiency. This was possibly due to the formation of a 'GAG coat' on the polyplex surface through electrostatic interactions which improved their extracellular stability and subsequent cellular entry. In this report, we have attempted to elucidate the differences in intracellular processing of the chondroitin sulfate (CS)-coated polyplexes in comparison to the native polyplexes by using a combination of endocytic inhibitors and co-localization with endosomal markers in various cell lines. We observed that both the native and CS-coated polyplexes are internalized by multiple endocytic pathways although in some cell lines, the coated polyplexes are taken up primarily by caveolae mediated endocytosis. In addition, the CS-coat improves the endosomal escape of the polyplexes as compared to the native polyplexes. Interestingly, during these intracellular events, exogenous CS is retained with the polyplexes until their accumulation near the nucleus. Thus we show for the first time that exogenous GAGs in small amounts improve intracellular routing and nuclear accumulation of arginine-based polyplexes. Therefore, addition of exogenous GAGs is a promising strategy to enhance the transfection efficiency of cationic arginine-rich peptides in multiple cell types.

  4. Peptide Self-Assembled Biofilm with Unique Electron Transfer Flexibility for Highly Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yun-Xiang; Cong, Huai-Ping; Men, Yu-Long; Xin, Sen; Sun, Zheng-Qing; Liu, Chang-Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-11-24

    Inspired by natural photosynthesis, biomaterial-based catalysts are being confirmed to be excellent for visible-light-driven photocatalysis, but are far less well explored. Herein, an ultrathin and uniform biofilm fabricated from cold-plasma-assisted peptide self-assembly was employed to support Eosin Y (EY) and Pt nanoparticles to form an EY/Pt/Film catalyst for photocatalytic water splitting to H2 and photocatalytic CO2 reduction with water to CO, under irradiation of visible light. The H2 evolution rate on EY/Pt/Film is 62.1 μmol h(-1), which is about 5 times higher than that on Pt/EY and 1.5 times higher than that on the EY/Pt/TiO2 catalyst. EY/Pt/Film exhibits an enhanced CO evolution rate (19.4 μmol h(-1)), as compared with Pt/EY (2.8 μmol h(-1)) and EY/Pt/TiO2 (6.1 μmol h(-1)). The outstanding activity of EY/Pt/Film results from the unique flexibility of the biofilm for an efficient transfer of the photoinduced electrons. The present work is helpful for designing efficient biomaterial-based catalysts for visible-light-driven photocatalysis and for imitating natural photosynthesis.

  5. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  6. An efficient transcriptome analysis pipeline to accelerate venom peptide discovery and characterisation.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, Jutty Rajan; Lewis, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Transcriptome sequencing is now widely adopted as an efficient means to study the chemical diversity of venoms. To improve the efficiency of analysis of these large datasets, we have optimised an analysis pipeline for cone snail venom gland transcriptomes. The pipeline combines ConoSorter with sequence architecture-based elimination and similarity searching using BLAST to improve the accuracy of sequence identification and classification, while reducing requirements for manual intervention. As a proof-of-concept, we used this approach reanalysed three previously published cone snail transcriptomes from diverse dietary groups. Our pipeline method generated similar results to the published studies with significantly less manual intervention. We additionally found undiscovered sequences in the piscovorous Conus geographus and vermivorous Conus miles and identified sequences in incorrect superfamilies in the molluscivorus Conus marmoreus and C. geographus transcriptomes. Our results indicate that this method can improve toxin detection without extending analysis time. While this method was evaluated on cone snail transcriptomes it can be easily optimised to retrieve toxins from other venomous animals.

  7. A highly efficient route to enantiomerically pure l-N-Bz-Pmp(t-Bu)2-OH and incorporation into a peptide-based protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Caitlin E; Barrios, Amy M

    2008-01-15

    Phosphonomethyl phenylalanine (Pmp), a nonhydrolyzable mimic of phosphotyrosine, is an important building block in the development of peptide-based PTP inhibitors. We have designed a novel, efficient synthesis of N-Bz-Pmp(t-Bu)2-OH. A Pmp-containing peptide based on a known biological substrate of the tyrosine phosphatase CD45 (Ac-TEGQ-Pmp-QPQP-NH2) inhibits CD45 with an IC50 value of approximately 100 microM with virtually no inhibition of TCPTP up to concentrations of 120 microM.

  8. Efficient production of active chicken avidin using a bacterial signal peptide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Chicken avidin is a highly popular tool with countless applications in the life sciences. In the present study, an efficient method for producing avidin protein in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli in the active form is described. Avidin was produced by replacing the native signal sequence of the protein with a bacterial OmpA secretion signal. The yield after a single 2-iminobiotin–agarose affinity purification step was approx. 10 mg/l of virtually pure avidin. Purified avidin had 3.7 free biotin-binding sites per tetramer and showed the same biotin-binding affinity and thermal stability as egg-white avidin. Avidin crystallized under various conditions, which will enable X-ray crystallographic studies. Avidin produced in E. coli lacks the carbohydrate chains of chicken avidin and the absence of glycosylation should decrease the non-specific binding that avidin exhibits towards many materials [Rosebrough and Hartley (1996) J. Nucl. Med. 37, 1380–1384]. The present method provides a feasible and inexpensive alternative for the production of recombinant avidin, avidin mutants and avidin fusion proteins for novel avidin–biotin technology applications. PMID:15324300

  9. Cationic micelle delivery of Trp2 peptide for efficient lymphatic draining and enhanced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qin; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao; Sun, Xun

    2015-02-28

    Neutral particles 20-45 nm in diameter showed potential as tumor antigen vectors because they targeted the draining lymph nodes after subcutaneous injection. However, they were weakly immune-stimulatory and could also spread throughout the body, raising the risk of systemic toxicity. Here we explored whether incorporating positively charged amphiphilic polymers into micelles improves their site specificity and immunogenicity. Cationic polyethylenimine (2k)-stearic acid (PSA) micelles were loaded with the melanoma antigen peptide Trp2; they showed an average size of 28.7±8.2 nm and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.21±5.38%. Empty PSA micelles acted as a robust adjuvant in vitro, promoting maturation, proliferation and migration of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in a dose-dependent manner. After subcutaneous injection into mice, Trp2-loaded PSA micelles accumulated preferentially in the medulla and paracortex of the draining lymph nodes and were present at negligible levels in the systemic circulation. Mice immunized with Trp2-loaded PSA micelles showed significantly higher Trp2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity than mice immunized with free Trp2 or a mixture of Trp2 and empty PSA micelles. In a B16-F10 murine melanoma model, Trp2-loaded PSA micelles inhibited tumor growth significantly more than did free Trp2 and PSA micelles caused less systemic toxicity. These findings suggest that cationic PSA micelles loaded with Trp2 may be a potential approach for melanoma immunotherapy.

  10. Design of embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acids that efficiently enter and accurately reactivate gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joy; Peterson, Kenneth R; Iancu-Rubin, Camelia; Bieker, James J

    2010-09-28

    Pharmacological treatments designed to reactivate fetal γ-globin can lead to an effective and successful clinical outcome in patients with hemoglobinopathies. However, new approaches remain highly desired because such treatments are not equally effective for all patients, and toxicity issues remain. We have taken a systematic approach to develop an embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that effectively enters the cell and the nucleus, binds to its target site at the human fetal γ-globin promoter, and reactivates this transcript in adult transgenic mouse bone marrow and human primary peripheral blood cells. In vitro and in vivo DNA-binding assays in conjunction with live-cell imaging have been used to establish and optimize chimeric PNA design parameters that lead to successful gene activation. Our final molecule contains a specific γ-promoter-binding PNA sequence embedded within two amino acid motifs: one leads to efficient cell/nuclear entry, and the other generates transcriptional reactivation of the target. These embedded PNAs overcome previous limitations and are generally applicable to the design of in vivo transcriptional activation reagents that can be directed to any promoter region of interest and are of direct relevance to clinical applications that would benefit from such a need.

  11. Improving chemotherapeutic efficiency in acute myeloid leukemia treatments by chemically synthesized peptide interfering with CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Duan, Hongyang; Yang, Yanlian; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma can protect acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells against chemotherapeutic agents and provide anti-apoptosis and chemoresistance signals through secreting chemokine CXCL12 to activate its receptor CXCR4 on AML cells, resulting in minimal residual leukemia and relapse. Therefore disrupting the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis with antagonists is of great significance for improving chemosensitivity and decreasing relapse rate. In a previous study, we reported a novel synthetic peptide E5 with its remarkable effect on inhibiting CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated adhesion and migration of AML cells. Here we presented E5’s capacity of enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of various chemotherapeutics on AML in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that E5 can diminish bone marrow stromal cell-provided protection to leukemia cells, significantly increasing the apoptosis induced by various chemotherapeutics in multiple AML cell lines. In an AML mouse xenograft model, E5 induced 1.84-fold increase of circulating AML cells out of protective stroma niche. Combined with vincristine or cyclophosphamide, E5 inhibited infiltration of AML cells into bone marrow, liver and spleen, as well as prolonged the lifespan of AML mice compared with mice treated with chemotherapy alone. In addition, E5 presented no toxicity in vivo according to the histological analysis and routine clinical parameters of serum analysis. PMID:26538086

  12. Development of Nanoparticles Incorporating a Novel Liposomal Membrane Destabilization Peptide for Efficient Release of Cargos into Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohgita, Takashi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    In anti-cancer therapy mediated by a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (DDS), overall efficacy depends on the release efficiency of cargos from the nanoparticles in the cancer cells as well as the specificity of delivery to tumor tissue. However, conventional liposome-based DDS have no mechanism for specifically releasing the encapsulated cargos inside the cancer cells. To overcome this barrier, we developed nanoparticles containing a novel liposomal membrane destabilization peptide (LMDP) that can destabilize membranes by cleavage with intramembranous proteases on/in cancer cells. Calcein encapsulated in liposomes modified with LMDP (LMDP-lipo) was effectively released in the presence of a membrane fraction containing an LMDP-cleavable protease. The release was inhibited by a protease inhibitor, suggesting that LMDP-lipo could effectively release its cargo into cells in response to a cancer-specific protease. Moreover, when LMDP-lipo contained fusogenic lipids, the release of cargo was accelerated, suggesting that the fusion of LMDP-lipo with cellular membranes was the initial step in the intracellular delivery. Time-lapse microscopic observations showed that the release of cargo from LMDP-lipo occurred immediately after association of LMDP-lipo with target cells. Consequently, LMDP-lipo could be a useful nanoparticle capable of effective release of cargos specifically into targeted cancer cells. PMID:25343714

  13. The ermC leader peptide: amino acid alterations leading to differential efficiency of induction by macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayford, M; Weisblum, B

    1990-01-01

    The inducibility of ermC by erythromycin, megalomicin, and celesticetin was tested with both wild-type ermC and several regulatory mutants altered in the 19-amino-acid-residue leader peptide, MGIFSIFVISTVHYQP NKK. In the model test system that was used, the ErmC methylase was translationally fused to beta-galactosidase. Mutational alterations that mapped in the interval encoding Phe-4 through Ile-9 of the leader peptide not only affected induction by individual antibiotics, but did so differentially. The subset of mutations that affected inducibility by the two macrolides erythromycin and megalomicin overlapped and were distinct from the subset of mutations that affected induction by celesticetin. These studies provide a model system for experimentally varying the relative efficiencies with which different antibiotics induce the expression of ermC. The possibility that antibiotics with inducing activity interact directly with the nascent leader peptide was tested by using a chemically synthesized decapeptide, MGIFSIFVIS--, attached at its C-terminus to a solid-phase support. This peptide, however, failed to bind erythromycin in vitro. PMID:2113911

  14. Preparation of sandwich-structured graphene/mesoporous silica composites with C8-modified pore wall for highly efficient selective enrichment of endogenous peptides for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Yan; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin; Yang, Pengyuan

    2012-09-01

    In this study, sandwich-structured graphene/mesoporous silica composites (C8-modified graphene@mSiO(2)) were synthesized by coating mesoporous silica onto hydrophilic graphene nanosheets through a surfactant-mediated cocondensation sol-gel process. The newly prepared C8-modified graphene@mSiO(2) nanocomposites possess unique properties of extended plate-like morphology, good water dispersibility, highly open pore structure, uniform pore size (2.8 nm), high surface area (632 m(2)/g), and C8-modified-interior pore walls. The unique structure of the C8-modified graphene@mSiO(2) composite nanosheets not only provide extended planes with hydrophilic surface that prevents aggregation in solution, but also offer a huge number of C8-modified mesopores with high surface area that can ensure an efficient adsorption of peptides through hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction between C8-moified pore walls and target molecules. The obtained C8-modified graphene@mSiO(2) materials were utilized for size selectively and specifically enriching peptides in standard peptide mixtures and endogenous peptides in real biological samples (mouse brain tissue). PMID:22837154

  15. A Cancer Specific Cell-Penetrating Peptide, BR2, for the Efficient Delivery of an scFv into Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki Jung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Shin, Ju Ri; Lee, Young Woong; Kim, Da Jung; Yang, Kyung Seok; Kim, Sun Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2) was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49–57). The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V). BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity. PMID:23776609

  16. TAT peptide on the surface of liposomes affords their efficient intracellular delivery even at low temperature and in the presence of metabolic inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Rammohan, Ram; Weissig, Volkmar; Levchenko, Tatyana S.

    2001-07-01

    To achieve an efficient intracellular drug and DNA delivery, attempts were made to target microparticulate drug carriers into cytoplasm bypassing the endocytotic pathway. TAT peptides derived from the HIV-1 TAT protein facilitate intracellular delivery of proteins and small colloidal particles. We demonstrated that relatively large drug carriers, such as 200-nm liposomes, can also be delivered into cells by TAT peptide attached to the liposome surface. Liposomes were fluorescently labeled with membranotropic rhodamine-phosphatidylethanolamine or by entrapping FITC-dextran. Incubation of fluorescent TAT liposomes with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells, human breast tumor BT20 cells, and rat cardiac myocyte H9C2 results in intracellular localization of certain liposomes. Steric hindrances for TAT peptide·cell interaction (attachment of TAT directly to the liposome surface without spacer or the presence of a high MW polyethylene glycol on the liposome surface) abolish liposome internalization, evidencing the importance of direct contact of TAT peptide with the cell surface. Low temperature or metabolic inhibitors, sodium azide or iodoacetamide, have little influence on the translocation of TAT liposomes into cells, confirming the energy-independent character of this process. The approach may have important implications for drug delivery directly into cell cytoplasm.

  17. Statically Adsorbed Coatings for High Separation Efficiency and Resolution in CE-MS Peptide Analysis: Strategies and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Pattky, Martin; Barkovits, Katalin; Marcus, Katrin; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Huhn, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Coatings are necessary to prevent protein and peptide adsorption to the capillary surface and obtain high intermediate precision. In this protocol, we first present our basic strategy to address peptide separation using three different coatings: one neutral and two cationic coatings, the latter largely differing in their induced electroosmotic mobility. In detail, we will describe how we apply the statically adsorbed coatings to obtain very high plate numbers and high repeatability.With some model examples, we clearly describe the scope of the method for the analysis of peptide samples: tryptic digests are addressed as well as small glycoproteins and glycopeptides largely differing in their effective electrophoretic mobility. We also show that the method is suitable for a fast screening of peptide samples despite a high matrix load comprising of up to 500 mmol/L sodium chloride. We demonstrate that this basic CE-MS method is rather independent of the polarity of the analytes with a very fast near-baseline separation of very hydrophobic Aβ peptides related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. These examples will give an impression, which coating is most suitable for a specific analytical application.Special attention is paid to difficult aspects of the coating procedure and the CE-MS method, e.g., the potential of cross-contamination when changing the coatings. PMID:27645731

  18. A hydrophilic immobilized trypsin reactor with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone modified polymer microparticles as matrix for highly efficient protein digestion with low peptide residue.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Yuan, Huiming; Liang, Yu; Xia, Simin; Zhao, Qun; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-13

    In this work, a novel kind of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NVP) modified poly acrylic ester microspheres was prepared, followed by trypsin immobilization to prepare a hydrophilic immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER), to achieve highly efficient protein digestion with low peptide residue. The nonspecific adsorption of peptides on such an IMER was evaluated by the in sequence digestion of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and myoglobin. Without NVP modification, both proteins could be identified after digestion by a 5 cm-length IMER, but 18 peptides of BSA were found in the digests of myoglobin caused by the nonspecific adsorption of the matrix. With NVP modification, the hydrophilicity of IMER was greatly improved, resulting in not only the sequence coverage of myoglobin increased from 63% to 73%, but also no residual peptides from BSA observed in myoglobin digests. Although the sequence coverages of proteins obtained by the IMER were comparable to those obtained by in-solution digestion, the digestion time was shortened from 24h to 1 min. By such an IMER, a protein mixture, containing BSA, myoglobin, and cytochrome c (100, 1 and 0.01 μg/mL, respectively), was digested, and all proteins were unambiguously identified with improved sequence coverages than that achieved by in-solution digestion. Furthermore, the hydrophilic IMER was also off-line coupled to nano-RPLC-ESI-MS/MS for the analysis of proteins extracted from yeast. After 1.5 min digestion, 271 protein groups with at least 2 distinct peptides were identified, much more than those obtained by 24h in-solution digestion (192 protein groups), indicating the great potential of such an IMER for proteome analysis.

  19. Enhanced transfection efficiency of a systemically delivered tumor-targeting immunolipoplex by inclusion of a pH-sensitive histidylated oligolysine peptide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Yu, Bin; Rait, Antonina; Xiang, Laiman; Huang, Weiqun; Zhou, Qi; Ertem, Gözen; Chang, Esther H

    2004-03-16

    Successful cancer gene therapy depends on the development of non-toxic, efficient, tumor cell- specific systemic gene delivery systems. Our laboratory has developed a systemically administered, ligand-liposome complex that can effectively and preferentially deliver its therapeutic payload to both primary and metastatic tumors. To further improve the transfection efficiency of this targeting complex, a synthetic pH-sensitive histidylated oligolysine K[K(H)KKK]5-K(H)KKC (HoKC), designed to aid in endosomal escape and condensation of DNA, was included in the complex. The presence of HoKC increased the in vitro transfection efficiency over that of the original complex. Moreover, no increase in cytotoxicity was observed due to the presence of the HoKC peptide. In a DU145 human prostate cancer xenograft tumor model in athymic nude mice, inclusion of the HoKC peptide did not interfere with the tumor targeting specificity of the i.v. administered ligand/liposome/DNA complex. Most importantly, the level of transgene expression was significantly elevated in the tumors, but not in the normal tissue in those animals receiving the complex incorporating HoKC. The in vivo enhancement of transfection efficiency by this modified gene delivery vehicle could lead to a reduction in the number of administrations required for antitumor efficacy.

  20. A Robust and Efficient Production and Purification Procedure of Recombinant Alzheimers Disease Methionine-Modified Amyloid-β Peptides.

    PubMed

    Hoarau, Marie; Malbert, Yannick; Irague, Romain; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter; Gras, Emmanuel; André, Isabelle; Remaud-Siméon, Magali

    2016-01-01

    An improved production and purification method for Alzheimer's disease related methionine-modified amyloid-β 1-40 and 1-42 peptides is proposed, taking advantage of the formation of inclusion body in Escherichia coli. A Thioflavin-S assay was set-up to evaluate inclusion body formation during growth and optimize culture conditions for amyloid-β peptides production. A simple and fast purification protocol including first the isolation of the inclusion bodies and second, two cycles of high pH denaturation/ neutralization combined with an ultrafiltration step on 30-kDa cut-off membrane was established. Special attention was paid to purity monitoring based on a rational combination of UV spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE analyses at the various stages of the process. It revealed that this chromatography-free protocol affords good yield of high quality peptides in term of purity. The resulting peptides were fully characterized and are appropriate models for highly reproducible in vitro aggregation studies. PMID:27532547

  1. A Robust and Efficient Production and Purification Procedure of Recombinant Alzheimers Disease Methionine-Modified Amyloid-β Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Marie; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter; Gras, Emmanuel; André, Isabelle; Remaud-Siméon, Magali

    2016-01-01

    An improved production and purification method for Alzheimer’s disease related methionine-modified amyloid-β 1–40 and 1–42 peptides is proposed, taking advantage of the formation of inclusion body in Escherichia coli. A Thioflavin-S assay was set-up to evaluate inclusion body formation during growth and optimize culture conditions for amyloid-β peptides production. A simple and fast purification protocol including first the isolation of the inclusion bodies and second, two cycles of high pH denaturation/ neutralization combined with an ultrafiltration step on 30-kDa cut-off membrane was established. Special attention was paid to purity monitoring based on a rational combination of UV spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE analyses at the various stages of the process. It revealed that this chromatography-free protocol affords good yield of high quality peptides in term of purity. The resulting peptides were fully characterized and are appropriate models for highly reproducible in vitro aggregation studies. PMID:27532547

  2. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic.

  3. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic. PMID:27305812

  4. Exosomes as potent cell-free peptide-based vaccine. II. Exosomes in CpG adjuvants efficiently prime naive Tc1 lymphocytes leading to tumor rejection.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Schartz, Nöel E C; André, Fabrice; Taïeb, Julien; Novault, Sophie; Bonnaventure, Pierre; Aubert, Nathalie; Bernard, Jacky; Lemonnier, François; Merad, Miriam; Adema, Gosse; Adams, Malcolm; Ferrantini, Maria; Carpentier, Antoine F; Escudier, Bernard; Tursz, Thomas; Angevin, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2004-02-15

    Ideal vaccines should be stable, safe, molecularly defined, and out-of-shelf reagents efficient at triggering effector and memory Ag-specific T cell-based immune responses. Dendritic cell-derived exosomes could be considered as novel peptide-based vaccines because exosomes harbor a discrete set of proteins, bear functional MHC class I and II molecules that can be loaded with synthetic peptides of choice, and are stable reagents that were safely used in pioneering phase I studies. However, we showed in part I that exosomes are efficient to promote primary MHC class I-restricted effector CD8(+) T cell responses only when transferred onto mature DC in vivo. In this work, we bring evidence that among the clinically available reagents, Toll-like receptor 3 and 9 ligands are elective adjuvants capable of triggering efficient MHC-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses when combined to exosomes. Exosome immunogenicity across species allowed to verify the efficacy of good manufactory procedures-manufactured human exosomes admixed with CpG oligonucleotides in prophylactic and therapeutic settings of melanoma in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. CpG adjuvants appear to be ideal adjuvants for exosome-based cancer vaccines.

  5. Design of a peptide-based vector, PepFect6, for efficient delivery of siRNA in cell culture and systemically in vivo

    PubMed Central

    EL Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; Mäger, Imre; Rosenthal-Aizman, Katri; Oprea, Iulian I.; Simonson, Oscar E.; Sork, Helena; Ezzat, Kariem; Copolovici, Dana M.; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Viola, Joana R.; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Sillard, Rannar; Johansson, Henrik J.; Said Hassane, Fatouma; Guterstam, Peter; Suhorutšenko, Julia; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Oskolkov, Nikita; Hälldin, Jonas; Tedebark, Ulf; Metspalu, Andres; Lebleu, Bernard; Lehtiö, Janne; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Langel, Ülo

    2011-01-01

    While small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been rapidly appreciated to silence genes, efficient and non-toxic vectors for primary cells and for systemic in vivo delivery are lacking. Several siRNA-delivery vehicles, including cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), have been developed but their utility is often restricted by entrapment following endocytosis. Hence, developing CPPs that promote endosomal escape is a prerequisite for successful siRNA implementation. We here present a novel CPP, PepFect 6 (PF6), comprising the previously reported stearyl-TP10 peptide, having pH titratable trifluoromethylquinoline moieties covalently incorporated to facilitate endosomal release. Stable PF6/siRNA nanoparticles enter entire cell populations and rapidly promote endosomal escape, resulting in robust RNAi responses in various cell types (including primary cells), with minimal associated transcriptomic or proteomic changes. Furthermore, PF6-mediated delivery is independent of cell confluence and, in most cases, not significantly hampered by serum proteins. Finally, these nanoparticles promote strong RNAi responses in different organs following systemic delivery in mice without any associated toxicity. Strikingly, similar knockdown in liver is achieved by PF6/siRNA nanoparticles and siRNA injected by hydrodynamic infusion, a golden standard technique for liver transfection. These results imply that the peptide, in addition to having utility for RNAi screens in vitro, displays therapeutic potential. PMID:21245043

  6. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle W; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration-dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  7. A novel chemosynthetic peptide with β-sheet motif efficiently kills Klebsiella pneumoniae in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shirui; Gan, Changpei; Li, Rongpeng; Ye, Yan; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Xu; Yang, Yi Yan; Fan, Weimin; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp) is one of the most common pathogens in nosocomial infections and is increasingly becoming multiple drug resistant. However, the molecular pathogenesis of Kp in causing tissue injury and dysregulated host defense remains elusive, further dampening the development of novel therapeutic measures. We have previously screened a series of synthetic antimicrobial beta-sheet forming peptides and identified a peptide (IRIKIRIK; ie, IK8L) with a broad range of bactericidal activity and low cytotoxicity in vitro. Here, employing an animal model, we investigated the antibacterial effects of IK8L in acute infection and demonstrated that peritoneal injection of IK8L to mice down-regulated inflammatory cytokines, alleviated lung injury, and importantly, decreased mortality compared to sham-injected controls. In addition, a math model was used to evaluate in vivo imaging data and predict infection progression in infected live animals. Mechanistically, IK8L can kill Kp by inhibiting biofilm formation and modulating production of inflammatory cytokines through the STAT3/JAK signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these findings reveal that IK8L may have potential for preventing or treating Kp infection. PMID:25709431

  8. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A.; Friedrich, David P.; Gabriel, Erin E.; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B.; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7–30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  9. Pooled-Peptide Epitope Mapping Strategies Are Efficient and Highly Sensitive: An Evaluation of Methods for Identifying Human T Cell Epitope Specificities in Large-Scale HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials.

    PubMed

    Fiore-Gartland, Andrew; Manso, Bryce A; Friedrich, David P; Gabriel, Erin E; Finak, Greg; Moodie, Zoe; Hertz, Tomer; De Rosa, Stephen C; Frahm, Nicole; Gilbert, Peter B; McElrath, M Juliana

    2016-01-01

    The interferon gamma, enzyme-linked immunospot (IFN-γ ELISpot) assay is widely used to identify viral antigen-specific T cells is frequently employed to quantify T cell responses in HIV vaccine studies. It can be used to define T cell epitope specificities using panels of peptide antigens, but with sample and cost constraints there is a critical need to improve the efficiency of epitope mapping for large and variable pathogens. We evaluated two epitope mapping strategies, based on group testing, for their ability to identify vaccine-induced T-cells from participants in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial, and compared the findings to an approach of assaying each peptide individually. The group testing strategies reduced the number of assays required by >7-fold without significantly altering the accuracy of T-cell breadth estimates. Assays of small pools containing 7-30 peptides were highly sensitive and effective at detecting single positive peptides as well as summating responses to multiple peptides. Also, assays with a single 15-mer peptide, containing an identified epitope, did not always elicit a response providing validation that 15-mer peptides are not optimal antigens for detecting CD8+ T cells. Our findings further validate pooling-based epitope mapping strategies, which are critical for characterizing vaccine-induced T-cell responses and more broadly for informing iterative vaccine design. We also show ways to improve their application with computational peptide:MHC binding predictors that can accurately identify the optimal epitope within a 15-mer peptide and within a pool of 15-mer peptides. PMID:26863315

  10. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  11. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  12. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  13. Antiplatelet Aggregation and Antithrombosis Efficiency of Peptides in the Snake Venom of Deinagkistrodon acutus: Isolation, Identification, and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Bin; Xu, Zhenghong; Qian, Chaodong; Jiang, Fusheng; Ding, Xinghong; Ruan, Yeping; Ding, Zhishan; Fan, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two peptides of Pt-A (Glu-Asn-Trp 429 Da) and Pt-B (Glu-Gln-Trp 443 Da) were isolated from venom liquor of Deinagkistrodon acutus. Their antiplatelet aggregation effects were evaluated with platelet-rich human plasma in vitro; the respective IC50 of Pt-A and Pt-B was 66 μM and 203 μM. Both peptides exhibited protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis in mice. After ADP administration, the paralysis time of different concentration of Pt-A and Pt-B lasted as the following: 80 mg/kg Pt-B (152.8 ± 57.8 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-A (163.5 ± 59.8 s) < 20 mg/kg Pt-A (253.5 ± 74.5 s) < 4 mg/kg clopidogrel (a positive control, 254.5 ± 41.97 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-B (400.8 ± 35.9 s) < 10 mg/kg Pt-A (422.8 ± 55.4 s), all of which were statistically shorter than the saline treatment (666 ± 28 s). Pulmonary tissue biopsy confirmed that Pt-A and Pt-B prevented the formation of thrombi in the lung. Unlike ADP injection alone, which caused significant reduction of peripheral platelet count, Pt-A treatment prevented the drop of peripheral platelet counts; interestingly, Pt-B could not, even though the same amount of Pt-B also showed protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis and thrombosis. More importantly, intravenous injection of Pt-A and Pt-B did not significantly increase the hemorrhage risks as clopidogrel. PMID:26483843

  14. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  15. Selective encapsulation of cesium ions using the cyclic peptide moiety of surfactin: Highly efficient removal based on an aqueous giant micellar system.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toshiaki; Yanagisawa, Satohiro; Nagano, Takuto; Zhu, Yanbei; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Koumura, Nagatoshi; Kitamoto, Dai; Imura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic peptide of surfactin (SF) is one of the promising environment-friendly biosurfactants abundantly produced by microorganisms such as Bacillus subtilis. SF is also known to act as an ionophore, wherein alkali metal ions can be trapped in the cyclic peptide. Especially, SF is expected to show high affinity for Cs(+) because of the distinctive cavity size and coordination number. In this study, we reported the specific interaction between SF and Cs(+) and succeeded in the highly efficient removal of Cs(+) from water using giant SF micelles as a natural sorbent. The specific interaction between SF and Cs(+) to form their inclusion complex was revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. We found that SF micelles selectively encapsulate Cs(+), which was suggested by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). A highly effective separation of Cs(+) immobilized on the surface of the SF micelles was also achieved through facile centrifugal ultrafiltration in 91% even in coexisting with other alkali metal ions such as Na(+) and K(+). Thus, the use of the giant micellar system of SF with its high Cs(+) affinity and distinctive assembling properties would be a new approach for the treatment of contaminated soil and water.

  16. Potential of prodendronic polyamines with modulated segmental charge density as novel coating for fast and efficient analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE and CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Acunha, Tanize; Ibáñez, Clara; Pascual Reguera, María Isabel; Sarò, Mariagiovanna; Navarro, Rodrigo; Alfonso Redondo, Juan; Reinecke, Helmut; Gallardo, Alberto; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the suitability of a new polymer family has been investigated as capillary coatings for the analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE. This polymer family has been designed to minimize or completely prevent protein-capillary wall interactions and to modify the EOF. These coating materials are linear polymeric chains bearing as side cationizable moiety a dentronic triamine derived from N,N,N',N'-tetraethyldiethylenetriamine (TEDETA), which is linked to the backbone through a spacer (unit labeled as TEDETAMA). Four different polymers have been prepared and evaluated: a homopolymer which comprised only of those cationizable repetitive units of TEDETAMA, and three copolymers that randomly incorporate TEDETAMA together with neutral hydrosoluble units of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) at different molar percentages (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25). It has been demonstrated that the composition of the copolymers influences the EOF and therefore the separation of the investigated biopolymers. Among the novel polymers studied, poly-(TEDETAMA-co-HPMA) 50:50 copolymer was successfully applied as coating material of the inner capillary surface in CE-UV and CE-MS, providing EOF reversing together with fast and efficient baseline separation of peptides and basic proteins. Finally, the feasibility of the polymer-coated capillary was shown through the analysis of lysozyme in a cheese sample. PMID:25820626

  17. Peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hamley, Ian W

    2014-07-01

    The self-assembly of different classes of peptide, including cyclic peptides, amyloid peptides and surfactant-like peptides into nanotube structures is reviewed. The modes of self-assembly are discussed. Additionally, applications in bionanotechnology and synthetic materials science are summarized.

  18. An E3-14.7K peptide that promotes microtubules-mediated transport of plasmid DNA increases polyplexes transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pigeon, Lucie; Gonçalves, Cristine; Gosset, David; Pichon, Chantal; Midoux, Patrick

    2013-11-25

    Chemical vectors as cationic polymers and cationic lipids are promising alternatives to viral vectors for gene therapy. Beside endosome escape and nuclear import, plasmid DNA (pDNA) migration in the cytosol toward the nuclear envelope is also regarded as a limiting step for efficient DNA transfection with non-viral vectors. Here, the interaction between E3-14.7K and FIP-1 to favor migration of pDNA along microtubules is exploited. E3-14.7K is an early protein of human adenoviruses that interacts via FIP-1 (Fourteen.7K Interacting Protein 1) protein with the light-chain components of the human microtubule motor protein dynein (TCTEL1). This peptide is conjugated with pDNA and mediates interaction of pDNA in vitro with isolated microtubules as well as with microtubules in cellulo. Videomicroscopy and tracking treatment of images clearly demonstrate that P79-98/pDNA conjugate exhibits a linear transport with large amplitude along microtubules upon 2 h transfection with polyplexes whereas control pDNA conjugate exhibits small non-directional movements in the cytoplasm. Remarkably, P79-98/peGFP polyplexes enhance by a factor 2.5 (up to 76%) the number of transfected cells. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the transfection efficiency of polyplexes can be drastically increased when the microtubules migration of pDNA is facilitated by a peptide allowing pDNA docking to TCTEL1. This is a real breakthrough in the non viral gene delivery field that opens hope to build artificial viruses.

  19. Efficient Production of a Bioactive Bevacizumab Monoclonal Antibody Using the 2A Self-cleavage Peptide in Transgenic Rice Callus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Da; Yu, Weichang

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has been widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of multiple cancers. Bevacizumab was mostly produced by the mammalian cell expression system. We here reported the first plant-derived Bevacizumab by using transgenic rice callus as an alternative gene expression system. Codon-optimized Bevacizumab light chain (BLC) and Bevacizumab heavy chain (BHC) genes were designed, synthesized as a polyprotein with a 2A self-cleavage linker peptide from the Foot-and-mouth disease virus, cloned into a plant binary vector under a constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter, and transformed into rice nuclear genome through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot and western blot analyses confirmed the integration and expression of BLC and BHC genes in transgenic rice callus. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that the rice-derived Bevacizumab mAb was biologically active and the recombinant mAb was expressed at high levels (160.7-242.8 mg/Kg) in transgenic rice callus. The mAb was purified by using protein A affinity chromatography and the purified antibody was tested for its binding affinity with its target human VEGF (hVEGF) antigen by ELISA. Rice callus produced Bevacizumab and a commercial Bevacizumab (Avastin) were shown to have similar binding affinity to hVEGF. These results indicated that rice callus produced Bevacizumab could have similar biological activity and might potentially be used as a cost-effective biosimilar molecule in future cancer treatment. PMID:27555853

  20. Efficient Production of a Bioactive Bevacizumab Monoclonal Antibody Using the 2A Self-cleavage Peptide in Transgenic Rice Callus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Da; Yu, Weichang

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has been widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of multiple cancers. Bevacizumab was mostly produced by the mammalian cell expression system. We here reported the first plant-derived Bevacizumab by using transgenic rice callus as an alternative gene expression system. Codon-optimized Bevacizumab light chain (BLC) and Bevacizumab heavy chain (BHC) genes were designed, synthesized as a polyprotein with a 2A self-cleavage linker peptide from the Foot-and-mouth disease virus, cloned into a plant binary vector under a constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter, and transformed into rice nuclear genome through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot and western blot analyses confirmed the integration and expression of BLC and BHC genes in transgenic rice callus. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that the rice-derived Bevacizumab mAb was biologically active and the recombinant mAb was expressed at high levels (160.7–242.8 mg/Kg) in transgenic rice callus. The mAb was purified by using protein A affinity chromatography and the purified antibody was tested for its binding affinity with its target human VEGF (hVEGF) antigen by ELISA. Rice callus produced Bevacizumab and a commercial Bevacizumab (Avastin) were shown to have similar binding affinity to hVEGF. These results indicated that rice callus produced Bevacizumab could have similar biological activity and might potentially be used as a cost-effective biosimilar molecule in future cancer treatment. PMID:27555853

  1. Antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With increasing antibiotics resistance, there is an urgent need for novel infection therapeutics. Since antimicrobial peptides provide opportunities for this, identification and optimization of such peptides have attracted much interest during recent years. Here, a brief overview of antimicrobial peptides is provided, with focus placed on how selected hydrophobic modifications of antimicrobial peptides can be employed to combat also more demanding pathogens, including multi-resistant strains, without conferring unacceptable toxicity. PMID:24758244

  2. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the 'holy grail' in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  3. Efficient presentation of naturally processed HLA class I peptides by artificial antigen-presenting cells for the generation of effective antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Naoto; Butler, Marcus O; Xia, Zhinan; Berezovskaya, Alla; Murray, Andrew P; Ansén, Sascha; Nadler, Lee M

    2006-05-15

    Appropriate presentation of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) by antigen-presenting cells (APC) is required for the development of clinically relevant antitumor T-cell responses. One common approach, which uses APC pulsed with synthetic peptides, can sometimes generate ineffective immune responses. This failure may, in part, be attributed to the formation of HLA/synthetic pulsed peptide complexes that possess different conformations compared with those of endogenously presented peptides. In addition, endogenous peptides may undergo post-translational modifications, which do not occur with synthetic peptides. Because our goal is to induce immunity that can recognize TAA that are endogenously presented by tumors, we designed an APC that would not only express the required immunoaccessory molecules but also naturally process and present target antigenic peptides. In this study, we generated an artificial APC (aAPC) that can endogenously present any chosen HLA-A*0201 (A2)-restricted peptide by processing a fusion protein that contains a unique "LTK" sequence linked to the antigenic peptide. Proteasome-dependent processing is so effective that the presented peptide can be directly eluted from the cell surface and identified by biochemical methods. Furthermore, we found that aAPC, engineered to endogenously present peptide derived from the melanoma antigen MART1, can be used to prime and expand antitumor CTL that target MART1-expressing tumor cells in a HLA-A2-restricted manner. Our engineered aAPC could serve as an "off-the-shelf" APC designed to constitutively express class I-restricted TAA peptides and could be used to generate effective T-cell responses to treat human disease. PMID:16707591

  4. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the ‘holy grail’ in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  5. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  6. Highly efficient in vivo gene transfection by plasmid/PEI complexes coated by anionic PEG derivatives bearing carboxyl groups and RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Sakae, Mitsuko; Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Yanagie, Hironobu; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2008-09-01

    A new class of an anionic poly (ethylene glycol) derivative, PEG-Suc, bearing 17.7 pairs of carboxylic acid-side chains was synthesized. PEG-Suc deposited onto the DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes without destroying them even at high dose ratio. Coating of the DNA complexes by PEG-Suc recharged their surface to negative, and effectively protected them from the albumin-induced aggregation. Paired carboxyl groups in the side chains showed higher proton sponge effect. Negatively charged surface would diminish the electrostatic binding of the complexes to the cells, and the transfection efficiency on the cultured cells was not high. RGD peptide side chain as a ligand to malignant cell surfaces was then introduced to compensate the reduced electrical adhesion. RGD-PEG-Suc-coated plasmid/PEI complex brought about more than 3 times higher reporter protein activity on the cultured B16 cells. Those bio-compatible DNA complexes with ligand attained very high gene expression in tumor, lung, and liver after injection into mouse tail vein.

  7. Efficient model chemistries for peptides. I. General framework and a study of the heterolevel approximation in RHF and MP2 with Pople split-valence basis sets.

    PubMed

    Echenique, Pablo; Alonso, José Luis

    2008-07-15

    We present an exhaustive study of more than 250 ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). The model chemistries (MCs) investigated are constructed as homo- and heterolevels involving possibly different RHF and MP2 calculations for the geometry and the energy. The basis sets used belong to a sample of 39 representants from Pople's split-valence families, ranging from the small 3-21G to the large 6-311++G(2df,2pd). The reference PES to which the rest are compared is the MP2/6-311++G(2df,2pd) homolevel, which, as far as we are aware, is the most accurate PES in the literature. All data sets have been analyzed according to a general framework, which can be extended to other complex problems and which captures the nearness concept in the space of MCs. The great number of MCs evaluated has allowed us to significantly explore this space and show that the correlation between accuracy and computational cost of the methods is imperfect, thus justifying a systematic search for the combination of features in a MC that is optimal to deal with peptides. Regarding the particular MCs studied, the most important conclusion is that the potentially very cost-saving heterolevel approximation is a very efficient one to describe the whole PES of HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). Finally, we show that, although RHF may be used to calculate the geometry if a MP2 single-point energy calculation follows, pure RHF//RHF homolevels are not recommendable for this problem.

  8. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  9. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. PMID:27451165

  10. Efficient in vitro Expansion of JC virus-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses by JCV peptide-stimulated Dendritic Cells from patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Marzocchetti, Angela; Lima, Marco; Tompkins, Troy; Kavanagh, Daniel.G.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; O'Neill, David W.; Bhardwaj, Nina; Koralnik, Igor J.

    2009-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the brain caused by JC virus (JCV) for which there is no cure. PML patients who have JCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in their blood have a better clinical outcome. We compared JCV-specific CTL responses in vitro elicited either by JCV peptide-loaded dendritic cells (DC) or by direct peptide stimulation of lymphocytes from 20 HLA A*0201+ healthy controls, HIV+ and PML patients. JCV peptide-loaded DC elicited a stronger CTL expansion in 13/15 responders. DC can induce potent JCV-specific CTL response in vitro, and may constitute a promising approach for PML immunotherapy. PMID:19062062

  11. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  12. Synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Francis, M J

    1996-01-01

    Efforts to produce more stable and defined vaccines have concentrated on studying, in detail, the immune response to many infectious diseases in order to identify the antigenic sites on the pathogens that are involved in stimulating protective immumty. Armed with this knowledge, it is possible to mimic such sites by producing short chains of amino acids (peptides) and to use these as the basis for novel vaccines. The earliest documented work on peptide immunization is actually for a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus. In 1963, Anderer (1) demonstrated that rabbit antibodies to an isolated hexapeptide fragment from the virus-coat protein coupled to bovine serum albumm would neutralize the infectious vn-us in culture. Two years later, he used a synthetically produced copy of the same peptide to confirm this observation. This was pioneering work, and it was over 10 years before the next example of a peptide that elicited antivirus antibody appeared following work by Sela and his colleagues (2) on a virus, MS2 bacteriophage, which infects bacteria. The emergence of more accessible techniques for sequencing proteins in 1977, coupled with the ability to synthesize readily peptides already developed in 1963, heralded a decade of intensive research into experimental peptide vaccines. The first demonstration that peptides could elicit protective immunity in vivo, in addition to neutralizing activity in vitro, was obtained using a peptide from the VP1 coat protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in 1982, with the guinea pig as a laboratory animal model (3, 4). PMID:21359696

  13. Sustainable efficient way for opioid peptide LVV-h7 preparation from enzymatic proteolysis in a microfluidic-based reaction-extraction process with solvent recycling.

    PubMed

    Elagli, Adil; Belhacene, Kalim; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Renato

    2016-05-01

    LVV-h7 (LVVYPWTQFR) is a bioactive peptide that can be obtained from blood as waste of food industry, more precisely from hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin. This opioid peptide belongs to the hemorphins family and have strong physiological effects that bring its use in pharmaceutics and various therapeutic treatments attractive, in particular for substituting its costly chemically synthetized analogous. Hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin generates a huge variety of peptides among whose LVV-h7 can be purified by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Herein, selective preparation of this peptide is proposed by a microfluidic-based continuous reaction-separation process. Hemoglobin hydrolysis in microreactor was firstly coupled to LVV-h7 LLE in octan-1-ol and then coupled to LVV-h7 back LLE in acidic water. This continuous process allowed to prepare pure LVV-h7, as confirmed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The microfluidic circuit also allowed octan-1-ol recycling in a closed loop, making this method more sustainable than similar biphasic batch process.

  14. Efficient Atomistic Simulation of Pathways and Calculation of Rate Constants for a Protein-Peptide Binding Process: Application to the MDM2 Protein and an Intrinsically Disordered p53 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zwier, Matthew C; Pratt, Adam J; Adelman, Joshua L; Kaus, Joseph W; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Chong, Lillian T

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of protein binding processes - with all of the key conformational changes - has been a grand challenge in the field of biophysics. Here, we have used the weighted ensemble path sampling strategy to orchestrate molecular dynamics simulations, yielding atomistic views of protein-peptide binding pathways involving the MDM2 oncoprotein and an intrinsically disordered p53 peptide. A total of 182 independent, continuous binding pathways were generated, yielding a kon that is in good agreement with experiment. These pathways were generated in 15 days using 3500 cores of a supercomputer, substantially faster than would be possible with "brute force" simulations. Many of these pathways involve the anchoring of p53 residue F19 into the MDM2 binding cleft when forming the metastable encounter complex, indicating that F19 may be a kinetically important residue. Our study demonstrates that it is now practical to generate pathways and calculate rate constants for protein binding processes using atomistic simulation on typical computing resources. PMID:27532687

  15. Peptide-cleaving agents for human islet amyloid polypeptide containing substrate recognition site based on quinoxaline: cleavage efficiency enhanced by lowering substrate concentration.

    PubMed

    Chei, Woosuk; Ju, Heeyeon; Suh, Junghun

    2012-02-15

    Oligomers of human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP) are believed to be the pathogenic species for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Peptide-cleaving agents selective for oligomers of h-IAPP were synthesized by using quinoxaline derivatives as recognition sites attached to the Co(III) complex of cyclen in this study. When the initial concentration of h-IAPP was lowered from 4.0 to 0.20 μM, cleavage yield of the new agents was enhanced by 3 times reaching 16-22 mol%. This shows that the agents would have significant activities at subnano molar concentrations if the concentration of h-IAPP is lowered to the in vivo values. This further indicates that the peptide-cleaving agents prepared previously in this laboratory possess sufficiently high activity for application as a new therapeutic option for Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and Parkinson's disease.

  16. Thermodynamic and Biophysical Analysis of the Membrane-Association of a Histidine-Rich Peptide with Efficient Antimicrobial and Transfection Activities.

    PubMed

    Voievoda, Nataliia; Schulthess, Therese; Bechinger, Burkhard; Seelig, Joachim

    2015-07-30

    LAH4-L1 is a synthetic amphipathic peptide with antimicrobial activity. The sequence of the 23 amino acid peptide was inspired by naturally occurring frog peptides such as PGLa and magainin. LAH4-L1 also facilitates the transport of nucleic acids through the cell membrane. We have investigated the membrane binding properties and energetics of LAH4-L1 at pH 5.5 with physical-chemical methods. CD spectroscopy was employed to quantitate the membrane-induced random coil-to-helix transition of LAH4-L1. Binding isotherms were obtained with CD spectroscopy as a function of the lipid-to-protein ratio for neutral and negatively charged membranes and were analyzed with both the Langmuir multisite adsorption model and the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model. According to the Langmuir adsorption model each molecule LAH4-L1 binds 4 POPS molecules, independent of the POPS concentration in the membrane. This is supported by the surface partition/Gouy-Chapman model which predicts an electric charge of LAH4-L1 of z = 4. Binding affinity is dominated by electrostatic attraction. The thermodynamics of the binding process was elucidated with isothermal titration calorimetry. The ITC data revealed that the binding process is composed of at least three different reactions, that is, a coil-to-helix transition with an exothermic enthalpy of about -11 kcal/mol and two endothermic processes with enthalpies of ∼4 and ∼8 kcal/mol, respectively, which partly compensate the exothermic enthalpy of the conformational change. The major endothermic reaction is interpreted as a deprotonation reaction following the insertion of a highly charged cationic peptide into a nonpolar environment. PMID:26134591

  17. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle W.; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. PMID:24743021

  18. Efficient amidation of C-peptide deleted NPY precursors by non-endocrine cells is affected by the presence of Lys-Arg at the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; Catipovic, B; Okamoto, H; Gether, U; Schwartz, T W; Johansen, T E

    1993-02-01

    Post-translational processing of peptide precursors producing amidated, biologically active peptides generally occurs in specially differentiated endocrine or neural cells. However, we have previously shown that a C-peptide-deleted precursor of neuropeptide Y (NPY1-39) in which the precursor terminates in the sequence Gly-Lys-Arg was partially amidated by the non-endocrine cell line, CHO. In the present study we show that two other non-endocrine cell lines, NIH 3T3 and BHK, also possess amidating activities and that the NPY1-39 precursor was completely converted to NPY1-36 amide by the NIH 3T3 cell line. The role of the two basic residues (Lys-Arg) in the C-terminus was studied by transfection of a construct encoding a NPY precursor terminating with glycine alone. Both the CHO and NIH 3T3 cell lines, transfected with this construct, secreted a significantly smaller fraction of NPY reactive material as amidated NPY compared to the fraction of amidated NPY secreted by the cells transfected with the NPY1-39 precursor. It is concluded that the capacity to perform C-terminal amidation appears to be a universal feature of eukaryotic cells and that the carboxypeptidase E-like enzyme influences the amidation process, beyond its known ability to remove the C-terminal basic residues.

  19. An efficient bioorthogonal strategy using CuAAC click chemistry for radiofluorinations of SNEW peptides and the role of copper depletion.

    PubMed

    Pretze, Marc; Kuchar, Manuela; Bergmann, Ralf; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2013-06-01

    The EphB2 receptor is known to be overexpressed in various types of cancer and is therefore a promising target for tumor cell imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). In this regard, imaging could facilitate the early detection of EphB2-overexpressing tumors, monitoring responses to therapy directed toward EphB2, and thus improvement in patient outcomes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of several fluorine-18-labeled peptides containing the SNEW amino acid motif, with high affinity for the EphB2 receptor, for their potential as radiotracers in the non-invasive imaging of cancer using PET. For the purposes of radiofluorination, EphB2-antagonistic SNEW peptides were varied at the C terminus by the introduction of L-cysteine, and further by alkyne- or azide-modified amino acids. In addition, two novel bifunctional and bioorthogonal labeling building blocks [(18)F]AFP and [(18)F]BFP were applied, and their capacity to introduce fluorine-18 was compared with that of the established building block [(18)F]FBAM. Copper-assisted Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, which belongs to the set of bioorthogonal click chemistry reactions, was used to introduce both novel building blocks into azide- or alkyne-modified SNEW peptides under mild conditions. Finally, the depletion of copper immediately after radiolabeling is a highly important step of this novel methodology.

  20. Facile removal of high mannose structures prior to extracting complex type N-glycans from de-N-glycosylated peptides retained by C18 solid phase to allow more efficient glycomic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Hung; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Jarvis, Donald L; Khoo, Kay-Hooi

    2014-01-01

    The relative amount of high mannose structures within an N-glycomic pool differs from one source to another but quite often it predominates over the larger size complex type structures carrying biologically important glyco-epitopes. An efficient method to separate these two classes of N-glycans would significantly aid in detecting the lower abundant components by mass spectrometry. Capitalizing on an initial observation that only high mannose type structures were recovered in the flow through fraction when PNGase F digested peptides were passed through a C18 cartridge in 0.1% formic acid, we demonstrated here that native complex type N-glycans can be retained by C18 cartridge and to be efficiently separated from both the smaller high mannose type structures, as well as de-N-glycosylated peptides by stepwise elution with increasing acetonitrile concentration. The weak retention of the largely hydrophilic N-glycans on C18 resin is dependent not only on size but also increased by the presence of α6-fucosylation. This was shown by comparing the resulting N-glycomic profiles of the washed and low acetonitrile eluted fractions derived from both a human cancer cell line and an insect cell line. PMID:24174266

  1. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  3. Antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-11-28

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill "superbugs" emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics).

  4. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  5. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... C-peptide is a useful marker of insulin production. The following are some purposes of C-peptide ... it nearly impossible to directly evaluate endogenous insulin production. In these cases, C-peptide measurement is a ...

  6. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  7. Cardioprotection Resulting from Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Administration Involves Shifting Metabolic Substrate Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Rat Heart

    PubMed Central

    Aravindhan, Karpagam; Bao, Weike; Harpel, Mark R.; Willette, Robert N.; Lepore, John J.; Jucker, Beat M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) provides cardiovascular benefits independent of its role on peripheral glycemic control. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which GLP-1 treatment renders cardioprotection during myocardial ischemia remain unresolved. Here we examined the role for GLP-1 treatment on glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and ischemic rat hearts following a 30 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion injury, and in isolated cardiomyocytes (CM). Relative carbohydrate and fat oxidation levels were measured in both normal and ischemic hearts using a 1-13C glucose clamp coupled with NMR-based isotopomer analysis, as well as in adult rat CMs by monitoring pH and O2 consumption in the presence of glucose or palmitate. In normal heart, GLP-1 increased glucose uptake (↑64%, p<0.05) without affecting glycogen levels. In ischemic hearts, GLP-1 induced metabolic substrate switching by increasing the ratio of carbohydrate versus fat oxidation (↑14%, p<0.01) in the LV area not at risk, without affecting cAMP levels. Interestingly, no substrate switching occurred in the LV area at risk, despite an increase in cAMP (↑106%, p<0.05) and lactate (↑121%, p<0.01) levels. Furthermore, in isolated CMs GLP-1 treatment increased glucose utilization (↑14%, p<0.05) and decreased fatty acid oxidation (↓15%, p<0.05) consistent with in vivo finding. Our results show that this benefit may derive from distinct and complementary roles of GLP-1 treatment on metabolism in myocardial sub-regions in response to this injury. In particular, a switch to anaerobic glycolysis in the ischemic area provides a compensatory substrate switch to overcome the energetic deficit in this region in the face of reduced tissue oxygenation, whereas a switch to more energetically favorable carbohydrate oxidation in more highly oxygenated remote regions supports maintaining cardiac contractility in a complementary manner. PMID:26098939

  8. Cardioprotection Resulting from Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Administration Involves Shifting Metabolic Substrate Utilization to Increase Energy Efficiency in the Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Aravindhan, Karpagam; Bao, Weike; Harpel, Mark R; Willette, Robert N; Lepore, John J; Jucker, Beat M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) provides cardiovascular benefits independent of its role on peripheral glycemic control. However, the precise mechanism(s) by which GLP-1 treatment renders cardioprotection during myocardial ischemia remain unresolved. Here we examined the role for GLP-1 treatment on glucose and fatty acid metabolism in normal and ischemic rat hearts following a 30 min ischemia and 24 h reperfusion injury, and in isolated cardiomyocytes (CM). Relative carbohydrate and fat oxidation levels were measured in both normal and ischemic hearts using a 1-13C glucose clamp coupled with NMR-based isotopomer analysis, as well as in adult rat CMs by monitoring pH and O2 consumption in the presence of glucose or palmitate. In normal heart, GLP-1 increased glucose uptake (↑64%, p<0.05) without affecting glycogen levels. In ischemic hearts, GLP-1 induced metabolic substrate switching by increasing the ratio of carbohydrate versus fat oxidation (↑14%, p<0.01) in the LV area not at risk, without affecting cAMP levels. Interestingly, no substrate switching occurred in the LV area at risk, despite an increase in cAMP (↑106%, p<0.05) and lactate (↑121%, p<0.01) levels. Furthermore, in isolated CMs GLP-1 treatment increased glucose utilization (↑14%, p<0.05) and decreased fatty acid oxidation (↓15%, p<0.05) consistent with in vivo finding. Our results show that this benefit may derive from distinct and complementary roles of GLP-1 treatment on metabolism in myocardial sub-regions in response to this injury. In particular, a switch to anaerobic glycolysis in the ischemic area provides a compensatory substrate switch to overcome the energetic deficit in this region in the face of reduced tissue oxygenation, whereas a switch to more energetically favorable carbohydrate oxidation in more highly oxygenated remote regions supports maintaining cardiac contractility in a complementary manner.

  9. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  10. Gene delivery using ternary lipopolyplexes incorporating branched cationic peptides: the role of Peptide sequence and branching.

    PubMed

    Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Kudsiova, Laila; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Hart, Stephen L; Barlow, David J; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2013-01-01

    Cationic peptide sequences, whether linear, branched, or dendritic, are widely used to condense and protect DNA in both polyplex and lipopolyplex gene delivery vectors. How these peptides behave within these particles and the consequences this has on transfection efficiency remain poorly understood. We have compared, in parallel, a complete series of cationic peptides, both branched and linear, coformulated with plasmid DNA to give polyplexes, or with plasmid DNA and the cationic lipid, DOTMA, mixed with 50% of the neutral helper lipid, DOPE, to give lipopolyplexes, and correlated the transfection efficiencies of these complexes to their biophysical properties. Lipopolyplexes formulated from branched Arg-rich peptides, or linear Lys-rich peptides, show the best transfection efficiencies in an alveolar epithelial cell line, with His-rich peptides being relatively ineffective. The majority of the biophysical studies (circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, small angle neutron scattering, and gel band shift assay) indicated that all of the formulations were similar in size, surface charge, and lipid bilayer structure, and longer cationic sequences, in general, gave better transfection efficiencies. Whereas lipopolyplexes formulated from branched Arg-containing peptides were more effective than those formulated from linear Arg-containing sequences, the reverse was true for Lys-containing sequences, which may be related to differences in DNA condensation between Arg-rich and Lys-rich peptides observed in the CD studies.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  12. Salt-resistant short antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for the development of antibiotics against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. However, in vivo applications of AMPs remain obscure due to salt and serum mediated inactivation. The high cost of chemical synthesis of AMPs also impedes potential clinical application. Consequently, short AMPs resistant toward salt and serum inactivation are desirable for the development of peptide antibiotics. In this work, we designed a 12-residue amphipathic helical peptide RR12 (R-R-L-I-R-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide) and two Trp containing analogs of RR12 namely RR12Wpolar (R-R-L-I-W-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide), and RR12Whydro (R-R-L-I-R-L-W-L-R-L-L-R-amide). Designed peptides demonstrated potent antibacterial activity; MIC ranging from 2 to 8 μM, in the presence of sodium chloride (150 mM and 300 mM). Antibacterial activity of these peptides was also detected in the presence of human serum. Designed peptides, in particular RR12 and RR12Whydro, were only poorly hemolytic. As a mode of action; these peptides demonstrated efficient permeabilization of bacterial cell membrane and lysis of cell structure. We further investigated interactions of the designed peptides with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane permeability barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Designed peptides adopted helical conformations in complex with LPS. Binding of peptides with LPS has yielded dissociation the aggregated structures of LPS. Collectively, these designed peptides hold ability to be developed for salt-resistant antimicrobial compounds. Most importantly, current work provides insights for designing salt-resistant antimicrobial peptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 345-356, 2016. PMID:26849911

  13. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier.

  14. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    PubMed

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies.

  15. Understanding Lipid Recognition by Protein-Mimicking Cyclic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Azade S; Zheng, Hong; Gao, Jianmin

    2014-10-21

    This paper describes our investigation of the structural determinants of a designed cyclic peptide (cLac, cyclic peptide mimicking lactadherin)(1) for phosphatidylserine (PS) recognition. A highly efficient strategy that takes advantage of the native chemical ligation (NCL) chemistry has been developed for the synthesis and labeling of cyclic peptides in general. Ala scanning of the cLac peptide revealed a sophisticated model for PS binding, in which the peptide scaffold assembles multiple polar residues to balance the desolvation and electrostatic interactions (salt bridge and hydrogen bonding) to achieve lipid selectivity. The results suggest that cLac effectively mimics the membrane binding mechanism of the parent protein lactadherin.

  16. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions.

  17. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  19. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested. PMID:27145593

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. A statistical approach to determining responses to individual peptides from pooled-peptide ELISpot data.

    PubMed

    Ström, Peter; Støer, Nathalie; Borthwick, Nicola; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Tomáš; Reilly, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To investigate in detail the effect of infection or vaccination on the human immune system, ELISpot assays are used to simultaneously test the immune response to a large number of peptides of interest. Scientists commonly use "peptide pools", where, instead of an individual peptide, a test well contains a group of peptides. Since the response from a well may be due to any or many of the peptides in the pool, pooled assays usually need to be followed by confirmatory assays of a number of individual peptides. We present a statistical method that enables estimation of individual peptide responses from pool responses using the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for "incomplete data". We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of these estimates in simulation studies of ELISpot plates with 90 pools of 6 or 7 peptides arranged in three dimensions and three Mock wells for the estimation of background. In analysis of real pooled data from 6 subjects in a HIV-1 vaccine trial, where 199 peptides were arranged in 80 pools if size 9 or 10, our estimates were in very good agreement with the results from individual-peptide confirmatory assays. Compared to the classical approach, we could identify almost all the same peptides with high or moderate response, with less than half the number of confirmatory tests. Our method facilitates efficient use of the information available in pooled ELISpot data to avoid or reduce the need for confirmatory testing. We provide an easy-to-use free online application for implementing the method, where on uploading two spreadsheets with the pool design and pool responses, the user obtains the estimates of the individual peptide responses. PMID:27196788

  3. Computational peptide vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Immunoinformatics focuses on modeling immune responses for better understanding of the immune system and in many cases for proposing agents able to modify the immune system. The most classical of these agents are vaccines derived from living organisms such as smallpox or polio. More modern vaccines comprise recombinant proteins, protein domains, and in some cases peptides. Generating a vaccine from peptides however requires technologies and concepts very different from classical vaccinology. Immunoinformatics therefore provides the computational tools to propose peptides suitable for formulation into vaccines. This chapter introduces the essential biological concepts affecting design and efficacy of peptide vaccines and discusses current methods and workflows applied to design successful peptide vaccines using computers.

  4. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  5. Recent advances in peptide-based subunit nanovaccines.

    PubMed

    Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination is the most efficient way to protect humans against pathogens. Peptide-based vaccines offer several advantages over classical vaccines, which utilized whole organisms or proteins. However, peptides alone are not immunogenic and need a delivery system that can boost their recognition by the immune system. In recent years, nanotechnology-based approaches have become one of the most promising strategies in peptide vaccine delivery. This review summarizes knowledge on peptide vaccines and nanotechnology-based approaches for their delivery. The recently reported nano-sized delivery platforms for peptide antigens are reviewed, including nanoparticles composed of polymers, peptides, lipids, inorganic materials and nanotubes. The future prospects for peptide-based nanovaccines are discussed.

  6. Preparation of Peptide p-Nitroanilides using an Aryl Hydrazine Solid Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y; Welsh, K; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2004-08-05

    Peptide p-nitroanilides are useful compounds for studying protease activity, however the poor nucleophilicity of p-nitroaniline makes their preparation difficult. We describe a new efficient approach for the Fmoc-based synthesis of peptide p-nitroanilides using an aryl hydrazine resin. Mild oxidation of the peptide hydrazide resin yields a highly reactive acyl diazene, which efficiently reacts with weak nucleophiles. We have prepared several peptide p-nitroanilides, including substrates for the Lethal Factor protease from B. anthracis.

  7. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification efficiency after on-blot or in-gel digestion with and without desalting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lamer, S; Jungblut, P R

    2001-03-10

    In theory, peptide mass fingerprinting by matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has the potential to identify all of the proteins detected by silver staining on gels. In practice, if the genome of the organism investigated is completely sequenced, using current techniques, all proteins stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue can be identified. This loss of identification sensitivity of ten to hundred-fold is caused by loss of peptides by surface contacts. Therefore, we performed digestion and transfer of peptides in the lower microl range and reduced the number of steps. The peptide mix obtained from in-gel or on-blot digestion was analyzed directly after digestion or after concentration on POROS R2 beads. Eight protein spots of a 2-DE gel from Mycobacterium bovis BCG were identified using these four preparation procedures for MALDI-MS. Overall, on-blot digestion was as effective as in-gel digestion. Whereas higher signal intensities resulted after concentration, hydrophilic peptides are better detected by direct measurement of the peptide mix without POROS R2 concentration.

  8. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  9. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  10. Synthesis of biologically important neutral amylo-β peptide by using improved Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthetic strategy.

    PubMed

    Selvam, R; Sudha, E; Rajkumar, P R; Subashchandran, K P

    2015-04-01

    The 10 amino acid sequence of the biologically important neutral amylo-β peptide has equally hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, which reduces the coupling efficiency during its synthesis and reduces the final yield of the peptide, and is therefore classified as a "difficult peptide sequence." The method presented here minimizes the synthetic problems by the introduction of improved Fmoc chemistry and effective hydroxybenzotriazole (HoBt), diisopropylcarbodiimide (DIC)-coupling and activation strategies. In addition, we developed a PS-TPGD resin as a solid support for the synthesis of specific neutral peptides, which is still a challenge to peptide chemistry. The most essential biologically active neutral amylo-β peptide (KVKRIILARS) was successfully synthesized, and some synthetic modification was performed using the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) method for purity and yield improvement. Graphical abstractᅟ.

  11. Peptide separation in hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongjing; Jin, Wenhai; Xiao, Hua; Huang, Haiwei; Zou, Hanfa

    2003-06-01

    Separation of small peptides by hydrophilic interaction capillary electrochromatography (HI-CEC) has been investigated. The negative surface charge of a hydrophilic, strong-cation-exchange stationary phase (PolySULFOETHYL A) provided a substantial cathodic electroosmotic flow (EOF). The influence of acetonitrile content, ionic strength, mobile phase pH as well as applied voltage on the migration of the peptides was studied. Possible retention mechanisms of the peptides in HI-CEC were discussed. It was found that hydrophilic interaction between the solutes and the stationary phase played a major role in this system, especially when mobile phases with high acetonitrile content were used. However, an ion-exchange mechanism and electrophoretic mobility also affect the migration of the peptides in HI-CEC. Elution order and selectivity was proved to be different in HI-CEC and capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), thus revealing the potential of HI-CEC as a complementary technique to CZE for the separation of peptides. Efficiency and selectivity of HI-CEC for the separation of peptides were demonstrated by baseline separating nine peptides in 6 min. PMID:12858379

  12. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  13. Deciphering enzyme function using peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Alexandra; Stangl, Gabriele I; Schutkowski, Mike

    2011-11-01

    Enzymes are key molecules in signal-transduction pathways. However, only a small fraction of more than 500 human kinases, 300 human proteases and 200 human phosphatases is characterised so far. Peptide microarray based technologies for extremely efficient profiling of enzyme substrate specificity emerged in the last years. This technology reduces set-up time for HTS assays and allows the identification of downstream targets. Moreover, peptide microarrays enable optimisation of enzyme substrates. Focus of this review is on assay principles for measuring activities of kinases, phosphatases or proteases and on substrate identification/optimisation for kinases. Additionally, several examples for reliable identification of substrates for lysine methyl-transferases, histone deacetylases and SUMO-transferases are given. Finally, use of high-density peptide microarrays for the simultaneous profiling of kinase activities in complex biological samples like cell lysates or lysates of complete organisms is described. All published examples of peptide arrays used for enzyme profiling are summarised comprehensively.

  14. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  15. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  16. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  17. Electron Capture Dissociation of Trivalent Metal Ion-Peptide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Donald, William A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    With electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions, trivalent metal ions readily adduct to small peptides resulting in formation of predominantly (peptide + MT – H)2+, where MT = La, Tm, Lu, Sm, Ho, Yb, Pm, Tb, or Eu, for peptides with molecular weights below ~1000 Da, and predominantly (peptide + MT)3+ for larger peptides. ECD of (peptide + MT – H)2+ results in extensive fragmentation from which nearly complete sequence information can be obtained, even for peptides for which only singly protonated ions are formed in the absence of the metal ions. ECD of these doubly charged complexes containing MT results in significantly higher electron capture efficiency and sequence coverage than peptide-divalent metal ion complexes that have the same net charge. Formation of salt-bridge structures in which the metal ion coordinates to a carboxylate group are favored even for (peptide + MT)3+. ECD of these latter complexes for large peptides results in electron capture by the protonation site located remotely from the metal ion and predominantly c/z fragments for all metals, except Eu3+, which undergoes a one electron reduction and only loss of small neutral molecules and b/y fragments are formed. These results indicate that solvation of the metal ion in these complexes is extensive, resulting in similar electrochemical properties of these metal ions both in the peptide environment and in water. PMID:23283726

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  19. Functions of Cationic Host Defense Peptides in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Anaparti, Vidyanand; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2016-01-01

    Cationic host defense peptides are a widely distributed family of immunomodulatory molecules with antimicrobial properties. The biological functions of these peptides include the ability to influence innate and adaptive immunity for efficient resolution of infections and simultaneous modulation of inflammatory responses. This unique dual bioactivity of controlling infections and inflammation has gained substantial attention in the last three decades and consequent interest in the development of these peptide mimics as immunomodulatory therapeutic candidates. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the wide range of functions of cationic host defense peptides in the context of the mammalian immune system. PMID:27384571

  20. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  1. Insulin C-peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  2. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring the microbiological safety of biological therapeutics remains an important concern. Our group has recently reported small trimeric peptides that have the ability to bind and remove a model non-enveloped virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. In an effort to improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, we created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contain two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY. This library was screened and several hexamer peptides were discovered that also removed PPV from solution, but there was no marked improvement in removal efficiency when compared to the trimeric peptides. Based on simulated docking experiments, it appeared that hexamer peptide binding is dictated more by secondary structure, whereas the binding of trimeric peptides is dominated by charge and hydrophobicity. This study demonstrates that trimeric and hexameric peptides may have different, matrix-specific roles to play in virus removal applications. In general, the hexamer ligand may perform better for binding of specific viruses, whereas the trimer ligand may have more broadly reactive virus-binding properties. PMID:21751387

  3. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described.

  4. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described. PMID:25411902

  5. Biomathematical description of synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Timo; Hare, Eric; Hofmann, Heike; Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  6. Biomathematical description of synthetic peptide libraries.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Timo; Hare, Eric; Hofmann, Heike; Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries.

  7. Spectral Library Searching To Identify Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, Devin K; Chavez, Juan D; Navare, Arti T; Wu, Xia; Ruiz, Bianca; Eng, Jimmy K; Lam, Henry; Bruce, James E

    2016-05-01

    Methods harnessing protein cross-linking and mass spectrometry (XL-MS) offer high-throughput means to identify protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and structural interfaces of protein complexes. Yet, specialized data dependent methods and search algorithms are often required to confidently assign peptide identifications to spectra. To improve the efficiency of matching high confidence spectra, we developed a spectral library based approach to search cross-linked peptide data derived from Protein Interaction Reporter (PIR) methods using the spectral library search algorithm, SpectraST. Spectral library matching of cross-linked peptide data from query spectra increased the absolute number of confident peptide relationships matched to spectra and thereby the number of PPIs identified. By matching library spectra from bona fide, previously established PIR-cross-linked peptide relationships, spectral library searching reduces the need for continued, complex mass spectrometric methods to identify peptide relationships, increases coverage of relationship identifications, and improves the accessibility of XL-MS technologies.

  8. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  9. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  10. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B

    2012-08-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  12. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  13. [Tuftsin-like peptides from a C-reactive protein molecule as regulators of lymphocyte proliferation].

    PubMed

    Polevshchikov, A V; Nazarov, P G

    1994-01-01

    Influence of synthetic peptides from human C-reactive protein (CRP) on proliferation of intact and mitogen stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was studied. Effect of the tetra-peptides from CRP was similar to that of tuftsin Thr-Lys-Pro-Arg. All the peptides studied did not increase the 3H-thymidine incorporation into the resting lymphocytes but accelerated it after mitogen stimulation. The peptides efficiency depended on T- or B-specificity of mitogens. PMID:8122411

  14. A novel system enhancing the endosomal escapes of peptides promotes Bak BH3 peptide inducing apoptosis in lung cancer A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nanjing; Zheng, Wenyun; Li, Linfeng; Liu, Hui; Wang, Tianwen; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2014-06-01

    Therapeutic peptides have been proven useful for treating various diseases. However, it is difficult for therapeutic peptides to reach their target sites with an effective concentration due to inefficient intracellular delivery. Although Tat transduction peptide is a promising tool to deliver therapeutic peptides into cells, the entrapment within endosomes and the nuclear localization of Tat transduction peptide severely limited the biological effects of Tat-linked cargos. In this study, we designed a novel peptide delivering system, Tat-INF7-ubiquitin (TIU), which consisted of Tat transduction peptide, endosomal escape enhancer peptide INF7, and ubiquitin protein. We found that the TIU system was able to efficiently deliver the mCherry fluorescent proteins and the apoptosis-inducing Bak BH3 peptide into the cytosol. The Bak BH3 peptide transported into the cells by the TIU system increased the apoptotic rate to 46.15 ± 4.86% (p < 0.001) in A549 cells, while Tat-BH3 could result in only 20.45 ± 2.89%. These results demonstrated that the TIU system could enhance the effects of therapeutic peptides by facilitating the transmembrane delivery of peptides into the cells and the escape of target proteins from the endosome efficiently.

  15. Engineering cyclic peptide toxins.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard J; Craik, David J

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based toxins have attracted much attention in recent years for their exciting potential applications in drug design and development. This interest has arisen because toxins are highly potent and selectively target a range of physiologically important receptors. However, peptides suffer from a number of disadvantages, including poor in vivo stability and poor bioavailability. A number of naturally occurring cyclic peptides have been discovered in plants, animals, and bacteria that have exceptional stability and potentially ameliorate these disadvantages. The lessons learned from studies of the structures, stabilities, and biological activities of these cyclic peptides can be applied to the reengineering of toxins that are not naturally cyclic but are amenable to cyclization. In this chapter, we describe solid-phase chemical synthetic methods for the reengineering of peptide toxins to improve their suitability as therapeutic, diagnostic, or imaging agents. The focus is on small disulfide-rich peptides from the venoms of cone snails and scorpions, but the technology is potentially widely applicable to a number of other peptide-based toxins. PMID:22230565

  16. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Thundimadathil, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field. PMID:23316341

  17. Cellular uptake and in vivo distribution of polyhistidine peptides.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takashi; Tokuda, Yoshihisa; Kotake, Ayaka; Okada, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shuji; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Yuji

    2015-07-28

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are arginine/lysine-rich sequences, and they are effectively internalized into cells. In this process, positive charge is crucial. In the present study, we found polyhistidine peptides (PHPs), as the novel CPP, which are efficiently internalized into cells in a positive charge-independent manner. Interestingly, cellular uptake of the PHPs increased as the chain length increased, reaching a maximum uptake at H16 (HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH-NH2). This H16 peptide showed up to 14.6-fold higher cell-penetrating capacity against HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells relative to a major CPP, the octa-arginine (RRRRRRRR-NH2) peptide. Cellular uptake of the H16 peptide is mainly due to macropinocytosis and most of the H16 peptide localizes in the lysosome and Golgi apparatus. However, a cytoplasmic pro-apoptotic domain (KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2) conjugated to the H16 peptide showed cytotoxic effects. This indicates that a proportion of the H16 peptide escapes from the macropinosome to the cytoplasm. In a protein transduction study, green fluorescence protein fused to the H16 peptide (GFP-H16) was purified by Ni-NTA chromatography, detected using an anti-His-tag antibody and internalized into cells. This serial process reveals that H16 functions as a His-tag and protein transduction domain. Furthermore, in vivo distribution analysis showed that the H16 peptide accumulates immediately in tumor tissue and is retained up to 132h following injection into the tumor (HT1080 human fibrosarcoma)-bearing mice. This is the first observation of a His-polymer being internalize into cells efficiently. The findings suggest that PHPs are novel CPPs. In particular, the H16 peptide represents a promising drug delivery carrier candidate in medical and biotechnological fields.

  18. Analytical model of peptide mass cluster centres with applications

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Witold E; Farrow, Malcolm; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Lehrach, Hans; Lalowski, Maciej; Reinert, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Background The elemental composition of peptides results in formation of distinct, equidistantly spaced clusters across the mass range. The property of peptide mass clustering is used to calibrate peptide mass lists, to identify and remove non-peptide peaks and for data reduction. Results We developed an analytical model of the peptide mass cluster centres. Inputs to the model included, the amino acid frequencies in the sequence database, the average length of the proteins in the database, the cleavage specificity of the proteolytic enzyme used and the cleavage probability. We examined the accuracy of our model by comparing it with the model based on an in silico sequence database digest. To identify the crucial parameters we analysed how the cluster centre location depends on the inputs. The distance to the nearest cluster was used to calibrate mass spectrometric peptide peak-lists and to identify non-peptide peaks. Conclusion The model introduced here enables us to predict the location of the peptide mass cluster centres. It explains how the location of the cluster centres depends on the input parameters. Fast and efficient calibration and filtering of non-peptide peaks is achieved by a distance measure suggested by Wool and Smilansky. PMID:16995952

  19. LPS interactions with immobilized and soluble antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna; Olin, Anders I; Ljunggren, Lennart

    2010-04-19

    A promising approach in sepsis therapy is the use of peptides truncated from serum- and membrane-proteins with binding domains for LPS: antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). AMPs can be useful in combination with conventional antibiotics to increase killing and neutralize LPS. Although many AMPs show a high specificity towards bacterial membranes, they can also exhibit toxicity, i.e. non-specific membrane lysis, of mammalian cells such as erythrocytes and therefore, unsuitable as systemic drugs. A way to overcome this problem may be an extracorporeal therapy with immobilized peptides. This study will compare neutralization of LPS using different AMPs in solution and when immobilized on to solid phases. The peptides ability to neutralize LPS-induced cytokine release in whole blood will also be tested. The peptides are truncated derivates from the known AMPs LL-37, SC4, BPI, S3 Delta and CEME. Two different methods were used to immobilize peptides, biomolecular interaction analysis, and Pierce SulfoLink Coupling Gel. To investigate LPS binding in solution the LAL test was used. After whole blood incubation with LPS and AMPs ELISA was used to measure TNFalpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 production. The results suggest that immobilization of antimicrobial peptides does not inhibit their capacity to neutralize LPS, although there are differences between the peptides tested. Thus, peptides derived from LL-37 and CEME were more efficient both in LPS binding and neutralizing LPS-induced cytokine production. PMID:20233038

  20. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  1. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-05-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  2. Introduction to peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fields, Gregg B

    2002-02-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins, including their purification. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  3. A viral peptide for intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Cantisani, Marco; Della Pepa, Maria Elena; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2012-10-01

    Biological membranes represent a critical hindrance for administering active molecules which are often unable to reach their designated intracellular target sites. In order to overcome this barrier-like behavior not easily circumvented by many pharmacologically-active molecules, synthetic transporters have been exploited to promote cellular uptake. Linking or complexing therapeutic molecules to peptides that can translocate through the cellular membranes could enhance their internal delivery, and consequently, a higher amount of active compound would reach the site of action. Use of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is one of the most promising strategy to efficiently translocate macromolecules through the plasma membrane, and have attracted a lot of attention. New translocating peptides are continuously described and in the present review, we will focus on viral derived peptides, and in particular a peptide (gH625) derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein H (gH) that has proved to be a useful delivery vehicle due to its intrinsic properties of inducing membrane perturbation.

  4. One-step surface modification of polyurethane using affinity binding peptides for enhanced fouling resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Liting; Qin, Peng; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Affinity binding peptides were examined for surface fabrication of synthetic polymeric materials. Peptides possessing strong binding affinities toward polyurethane (PU) were discovered via biopanning of M13 phage peptide library. The apparent binding constant (K(app)) was as high as 2.68 × 10(9) M(-1) with surface peptide density exceeded 1.8 μg/cm(2). Structural analysis showed that the ideal peptide had a high content (75%) of H-donor amino acid residues, and that intensified hydrogen bond interaction was the key driving force for the highly stable binding of peptides on PU. PU treated with such affinity peptides promises applications as low-fouling materials, as peptides increased its wettability and substantially reduced protein adsorption and cell adhesion. These results demonstrated a facile but highly efficient one-step strategy for surface property modification of polymeric materials for biotechnological applications. PMID:25732121

  5. Macrocyclic peptides self-assemble into robust vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-jin; Lim, Yong-beom

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we developed macrocyclic peptide building blocks that formed self-assembled peptide vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities. Macrocyclic peptides were significantly different from conventional amphiphiles, in that they could self-assemble into vesicles at very high hydrophilic-to-total mass ratios. The flexibility of the hydrophobic self-assembly segment was critical for vesicle formation. The unique features of this peptide vesicle system include a homogeneous size distribution, unusually small size, and robust structural and thermal stability. The peptide vesicles successfully entrapped a hydrophilic model drug, released the payload very slowly, and were internalized by cells in a highly efficient manner. Moreover, the peptide vesicles exhibited molecular recognition capabilities, in that they selectively bound to target RNA through surface-displayed peptides. This study demonstrates that self-assembled peptide vesicles can be used as strong intracellular delivery vehicles that recognize specific biomacromolecular targets.

  6. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations. PMID:25038786

  7. The Use of Aryl Hydrazide Linkers for the Solid Phase Synthesis of Chemically Modified Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Y; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2006-11-03

    Since Merrifield introduced the concept of solid phase synthesis in 1963 for the rapid preparation of peptides, a large variety of different supports and resin-linkers have been developed that improve the efficiency of peptide assembly and expand the myriad of synthetically feasible peptides. The aryl hydrazide is one of the most useful resin-linkers for the synthesis of chemically modified peptides. This linker is completely stable during Boc- and Fmoc-based solid phase synthesis and yet it can be cleaved under very mild oxidative conditions. The present article reviews the use of this valuable linker for the rapid and efficient synthesis of C-terminal modified peptides, head-to-tail cyclic peptides and lipidated peptides.

  8. Membranotropic Cell Penetrating Peptides: The Outstanding Journey

    PubMed Central

    Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The membrane bilayer delimits the interior of individual cells and provides them with the ability to survive and function properly. However, the crossing of cellular membranes constitutes the principal impediment to gaining entry into cells, and the potential therapeutic application of many drugs is predominantly dependent on the development of delivery tools that should take the drug to target cells selectively and efficiently with only minimal toxicity. Cell-penetrating peptides are short and basic peptides are widely used due to their ability to deliver a cargo across the membrane both in vitro and in vivo. It is widely accepted that their uptake mechanism involves mainly the endocytic pathway, the drug is catched inside endosomes and lysosomes, and only a small quantity is able to reach the intracellular target. In this wide-ranging scenario, a fascinating novel hypothesis is that membranotropic peptides that efficiently cross biological membranes, promote lipid-membrane reorganizing processes and cause a local and temporary destabilization and reorganization of the membrane bilayer, may also be able to enter cells circumventing the endosomal entrapment; in particular, by either favoring the escape from the endosome or by direct translocation. This review summarizes current data on membranotropic peptides for drug delivery. PMID:26512649

  9. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface. PMID:26490468

  10. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions.

  11. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  12. Conformational Restriction of Peptides Using Dithiol Bis-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Peraro, L; Siegert, T R; Kritzer, J A

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic peptides are highly promising as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. While many bond-forming reactions can be used to make cyclic peptides, most have limitations that make this chemical space challenging to access. Recently, a variety of cysteine alkylation reactions have been used in rational design and library approaches for cyclic peptide discovery and development. We and others have found that this chemistry is versatile and robust enough to produce a large variety of conformationally constrained cyclic peptides. In this chapter, we describe applications, methods, mechanistic insights, and troubleshooting for dithiol bis-alkylation reactions for the production of cyclic peptides. This method for efficient solution-phase macrocyclization is highly useful for the rapid production and screening of loop-based inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27586339

  13. Gramicidin A-based peptide vector for intracellular protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Stoilova, Tatiana B; Kovalchuk, Sergey I; Egorova, Natalya S; Surovoy, Andrey Y; Ivanov, Vadim T

    2008-10-01

    The development of the peptide-based vectors for the intracellular delivery of biologically active macromolecules has opened new prospects of their application in research and therapy. Earlier the amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) Pep-1 was reported to mediate cellular uptake of proteins without covalent binding to them. In this work we studied the ability of a series of membrane-active amphipathic peptides, based on the gramicidin A sequence, to transport a model protein across the eukaryotic cell membrane. Among them the positively charged Cys-containing peptide P10C demonstrated the most effective beta-galactosidase intracellular delivery. Besides, this peptide was shown to form noncovalent associates with beta-galactosidase as judged from electrophoresis and enzymatic activity assays. In addition, a series of new gramicidin analogues were prepared and the effect of N-terminus modification of gramicidin on the protein transduction efficiency was studied.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tam, James P; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  15. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  17. Differences in the production of spliced antigenic peptides by the standard proteasome and the immunoproteasome.

    PubMed

    Dalet, Alexandre; Stroobant, Vincent; Vigneron, Nathalie; Van den Eynde, Benoît J

    2011-01-01

    Peptide splicing allows the production of antigenic peptides composed of two fragments initially non-contiguous in the parental protein. The proposed mechanism of splicing is a transpeptidation occurring within the proteasome. Three spliced peptides, derived from FGF-5, melanoma protein gp100 and nuclear protein SP110, have been described. Here, we compared the production of these spliced peptides by the standard proteasome and the immunoproteasome. Differential isotope labelling was used to quantify (by mass spectrometry) the fragments contained in digests obtained with precursor peptides and purified proteasomes. The results show that both the standard and the immunoproteasomes can produce spliced peptides although they differ in their efficiency of production of each peptide. The FGF-5 and gp100 peptides are more efficiently produced by the standard proteasome, whereas the SP110 peptide is more efficiently produced by the immunoproteasome. This seems to result from differences in the production of the two splicing partners, which depends on a balance between cleavages liberating or destroying those fragments. By showing that splicing depends on the efficiency of production of the splicing partners, these results also support the transpeptidation model of peptide splicing. Furthermore, given the presence of immunoproteasomes in dendritic cells and cells exposed to IFN-γ, the findings may be relevant for vaccine design.

  18. [Peptide synthesis aiming at elucidation and creation of protein functions].

    PubMed

    Futaki, S

    1998-11-01

    The recent development of molecular biology has been elucidating outlines of the cross-talk of biomolecules. The understanding of the function of these biomolecules from the viewpoint of chemistry is now demanded not only for the understanding of biological systems but also for the creation of novel functional molecules. Here two topics are described about peptide synthesis aiming at the elucidation and the creation of protein functions. The first topic is the development of approaches for the synthesis of Tyr (SO3H)-containing peptides. Tyrosine sulfation is one of the most popular protein post-translational modifications. Synthetic peptides are of great help for the elucidation of the biological significance of tyrosine sulfation. We have developed two approaches for the efficient synthesis of tyrosine sulfate [Tyr (SO3H)]-containing peptides. The first approach employs a dimethylformamide-sulfur trioxide (DMF-SO3) complex as a sulfating agent and safety-catch protecting groups for the selective sulfation of tyrosine in the presence of serine. The second approach employs the direct introduction of Tyr(SO3H) into the peptide chain in the form of Fmoc-Tyr(SO3Na) followed by deprotection at 4 degrees C in trifluoroacetic acid. These approaches were successfully applied for the synthesis of cholecystokinin (CCK)-related peptides. The second topic deals with new approaches for the creation of artificial proteins through assembling alpha-helical peptides via selective disulfide or thioether formation. Approaches to assemble individual peptide segments on a peptide template were also developed. Four peptides corresponding to the transmembrane segments of the sodium channel (S4 in repeat I-IV) were assembled on a peptide template to give a protein having ion channel activity with rectification.

  19. Signal peptide of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shaomin; Wu, Guang

    2014-06-01

    Cellulase is an enzyme playing a crucial role in biotechnology industries ranging from textile to biofuel because of tremendous amount of cellulose produced in plant. In order to improve cellulase productivity, huge resource has been spent in search for good cellulases from microorganism in remote areas and in creation of ideal cellulase by engineering. However, not much attention is given to the secretion of cellulases from cell into extracellular space, where a cellulase plays its enzymatic role. In this minireview, the signal peptides, which lead secreted proteins to specific secretion systems and scatter in literature, are reviewed. The patterns of signal peptides are checked against 4,101 cellulases documented in UniProtKB, the largest protein database in the world, to determine how these cellulases are secreted. Simultaneous review on both literature and cellulases from the database not only provides updated knowledge on signal peptides but also indicates the gap in our research.

  20. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  1. Antimicrobial peptides in the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Joon Ha; Shin, Younhee; Shim, Jae-Young; Jung, Myunghee; Kang, Byeong-Chul; Oh, Jaedon; Seong, Jiyeon; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kong, Hong Sik; Song, Ki-Duk; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Woo; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Ui-Wook; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2014-06-01

    The centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans is an environmentally beneficial and medically important arthropod species. Although this species is increasingly applied as a reliable source of new antimicrobial peptides, the transcriptome of this species is a prerequisite for more rational selection of antimicrobial peptides. In this report, we isolated total RNA from the whole body of adult centipedes, S. subspinipes mutilans, that were nonimmunized and immunized against Escherichia coli, and we generated a total of 77,063 pooled contigs and singletons using high-throughput sequencing. To screen putative antimicrobial peptides, in silico analyses of the S. subspinipes mutilans transcriptome were performed based on the physicochemical evidence of length, charge, isoelectric point, and in vitro and in vivo aggregation scores together with the existence of continuous antimicrobial peptide stretches. Moreover, we excluded some transcripts that showed similarity with both previously known antimicrobial peptides and the human proteome, had a proteolytic cleavage site, and had downregulated expression compared with the nonimmunized sample. As a result, we selected 17 transcripts and tested their antimicrobial activity with a radial diffusion assay. Among them, ten synthetic peptides experimentally showed antimicrobial activity against microbes and no toxicity to mouse erythrocytes. Our results provide not only a useful set of antimicrobial peptide candidates and an efficient strategy for novel antimicrobial peptide development but also the transcriptome data of a big centipede as a valuable resource.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Joon Ha; Shin, Younhee; Shim, Jae-Young; Jung, Myunghee; Kang, Byeong-Chul; Oh, Jaedon; Seong, Jiyeon; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kong, Hong Sik; Song, Ki-Duk; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Woo; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Ui-Wook; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2014-06-01

    The centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans is an environmentally beneficial and medically important arthropod species. Although this species is increasingly applied as a reliable source of new antimicrobial peptides, the transcriptome of this species is a prerequisite for more rational selection of antimicrobial peptides. In this report, we isolated total RNA from the whole body of adult centipedes, S. subspinipes mutilans, that were nonimmunized and immunized against Escherichia coli, and we generated a total of 77,063 pooled contigs and singletons using high-throughput sequencing. To screen putative antimicrobial peptides, in silico analyses of the S. subspinipes mutilans transcriptome were performed based on the physicochemical evidence of length, charge, isoelectric point, and in vitro and in vivo aggregation scores together with the existence of continuous antimicrobial peptide stretches. Moreover, we excluded some transcripts that showed similarity with both previously known antimicrobial peptides and the human proteome, had a proteolytic cleavage site, and had downregulated expression compared with the nonimmunized sample. As a result, we selected 17 transcripts and tested their antimicrobial activity with a radial diffusion assay. Among them, ten synthetic peptides experimentally showed antimicrobial activity against microbes and no toxicity to mouse erythrocytes. Our results provide not only a useful set of antimicrobial peptide candidates and an efficient strategy for novel antimicrobial peptide development but also the transcriptome data of a big centipede as a valuable resource. PMID:24652097

  3. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens. PMID:25757622

  4. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  5. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  6. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  7. Antimicrobial peptides in the brain.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanhua; Zhang, Kai; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune system of many species. The brain is an immunologically privileged organ but can produce a robust immune response against pathogens and cell debris, promoting rapid and efficient clearance. AMPs may be critically involved in the innate immune system of the brain. Though the mechanisms of AMPs' action in the brain still need further elucidation, many studies have shown that AMPs are multifunctional molecules in the brain. In addition to antimicrobial action, they take part in congenital and adaptive immune reactions (immunoregulation), function as signaling molecules in tissue repair, inflammation and other important processes through different mechanisms, and they might, in addition, become diagnostic markers of brain disease.

  8. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  9. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    PubMed

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  10. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  11. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant loop region of hepatitis B core antigen: Insertion of multiple copies of M2e increases immunogenicity and protective efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Blokhina, Elena A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Shaldjan, Aram A; Kovaleva, Anna A; Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2015-06-26

    The extracellular domain of the transmembrane protein M2 (M2e) of influenza A virus is a promising target for the development of "universal" vaccines against influenza. M2e is a poor immunogen by itself; however, when M2e is linked to an appropriate carrier, such as hepatitis B virus core (HBc) particles, it becomes highly immunogenic. Insertions of target peptides into the surface-exposed major immunodominant loop region (MIR) of the HBc antigen are especially immunogenic, but such insertions often affect the protein folding and formation of recombinant virus-like particles. To facilitate an appropriate conformation of the M2e insert, we introduced flexible linkers at the junction points between the insert and flanking HBc sequences. This approach allowed the construction of recombinant HBc particles carrying 1, 2 and 4 copies of M2e in the MIR region. These particles were produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The immune response and protective activity of hybrid HBc particles in mice correlated with the number of inserted M2e peptides: the highest immunogenicity and complete protection of mice against the lethal challenge by influenza virus was observed with particles carrying four copies of M2e. The possibility of the simultaneous presentation of M2e peptides from several important influenza strains on a single HBc particle could also facilitate the development of a broad-specificity vaccine efficient not only against influenza A strains of human origin but also for newly emerging strains of animal origin, such as the avian influenza. PMID:25937448

  12. Peptide based DNA nanocarriers incorporating a cell-penetrating peptide derived from neurturin protein and poly-L-lysine dendrons.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Nurlina; Christie, Michelle P; Moyle, Peter M; Toth, Istvan

    2015-05-15

    Multicomponent gene delivery systems incorporating cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) from the human neurturin protein (NRTN-30, NRTN(132-161); NRTN-17, NRTN(145-161)) and a poly-l-lysine (PLL) dendron, were synthesized and characterized for plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. Acetylated NRTN peptides (Ac-CPP) and peptides conjugated to a PLL dendron (DEN-CPP) efficiently condensed and stabilized pDNA. Complexes between pDNA and DEN-CPP formed smaller and more stable nanoparticles. Flow cytometry experiments showed that pDNA-DEN-CPPs were taken up more efficiently into HeLa cells. There was also no significant difference between NRTN-30 and NRTN-17 for pDNA uptake, indicating that the truncated peptide alone is sufficient as a CPP for pDNA delivery.

  13. Antihypertensive peptides from food proteins.

    PubMed

    Aluko, Rotimi E

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are encrypted within the primary structure of food proteins where they remain inactive until released by enzymatic hydrolysis. Once released from the parent protein, certain peptides have the ability to modulate the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) because they decrease activities of renin or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the two main enzymes that regulate mammalian blood pressure. These antihypertensive peptides can also enhance the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway to increase nitric oxide (NO) levels within vascular walls and promote vasodilation. The peptides can block the interactions between angiotensin II (vasoconstrictor) and angiotensin receptors, which can contribute to reduced blood pressure. This review focuses on the methods that are involved in antihypertensive peptide production from food sources, including fractionation protocols that are used to enrich bioactive peptide content and enhance peptide activity. It also discusses mechanisms that are believed to be involved in the antihypertensive activity of these peptides.

  14. Self-assembly of fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexeisen, Emilie Lynn

    Many therapeutic strategies incorporate peptides into their designs to mimic the natural protein ligands found in vivo. A few examples are the short peptide sequences RGD and PHSRN that mimic the primary and synergy-binding domains of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, which is recognized by the cell surface receptor, alpha5beta 1 integrin. Even though scaffold modification with biomimetic peptides remains one of the most promising approaches for tissue engineering, the use of these peptides in therapeutic tissue-engineered products and drug delivery systems available on the commercial market is limited because the peptides are not easily able to mimic the natural protein. The design of a peptide that can effectively target the alpha5beta1 integrin would greatly increase biomimetic scaffold therapeutic potential. A novel peptide containing both the RGD primary binding domain and PHSRN synergy-binding domain for fibronectin joined with the appropriate linker should bind alpha 5beta1 integrin more efficiently and lead to greater cell adhesion over RGD alone. Several fibronectin mimetic peptides were designed and coupled to dialkyl hydrocarbon tails to make peptide-amphiphiles. The peptides contained different linkers connecting the two binding domains and different spacers separating the hydrophobic tails from the hydrophilic headgroups. The peptide-amphiphiles were deposited on mica substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Langmuir isotherms indicated that the peptide-amphiphiles that contained higher numbers of serine residues formed a more tightly packed monolayer, but the increased number of serines also made transferring the amphiphiles to the mica substrate more difficult. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the bilayers showed that the headgroups might be bent, forming small divots in the surface. These divots may help expose the PHSRN synergy-binding domain. Parallel studies undertaken by fellow group members showed that human

  15. A multicomponent conjugation strategy to unique N-steroidal peptides: first evidence of the steroidal nucleus as a β-turn inducer in acyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Daniel G; Vasco, Aldrin V; Echemendía, Radell; Concepción, Odette; Pérez, Carlos S; Gavín, José A; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2014-10-01

    Constraining small peptides into specific secondary structures has been a major challenge in peptide ligand design. So far, the major solution for decreasing the conformational flexibility in small peptides has been cyclization. An alternative is the use of topological templates, which are able to induce and/or stabilize peptide secondary structures by means of covalent attachment to the peptide. Herein a multicomponent strategy and structural analysis of a new type of peptidosteroid architecture having the steroid as N-substituent of an internal amide bond is reported. The approach comprises the one-pot conjugation of two peptide chains (or amino acid derivatives) to aminosteroids by means of the Ugi reaction to give a unique family of N-steroidal peptides. The conjugation efficiency of a variety of peptide sequences and steroidal amines, as well as their consecutive head-to-tail cyclization to produce chimeric cyclopeptide-steroid conjugates, that is, macrocyclic lipopeptides, was assessed. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of an acyclic N-steroidal peptide in solution proved that the bulky, rigid steroidal template is capable of both increasing significantly the conformational rigidity, even in a peptide sequence as short as five amino acid residues, and inducing a β-turn secondary structure even in the all-s-trans isomer. This report provides the first evidence of the steroid skeleton as β-turn inducer in linear peptide sequences.

  16. Peptide o-aminoanilides as crypto-thioesters for protein chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Xing; Fang, Ge-Min; He, Yao; Qu, Da-Liang; Yu, Min; Hong, Zhang-Yong; Liu, Lei

    2015-02-01

    Fully unprotected peptide o-aminoanilides can be efficiently activated by NaNO2 in aqueous solution to furnish peptide thioesters for use in native chemical ligation. This finding enables the convergent synthesis of proteins from readily synthesizable peptide o-aminoanilides as a new type of crypto-thioesters. The practicality of this approach is shown by the synthesis of histone H2B from five peptide segments. Purification or solubilization tags, which are sometimes needed to improve the efficiency of protein chemical synthesis, can be incorporated into the o-aminoanilide moiety, as demonstrated in the preparation of the cyclic protein lactocyclicin Q.

  17. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  18. Effects of cargo molecules on membrane perturbation caused by transportan10 based cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Luís; Madani, Fatemeh; Arukuusk, Piret; Pärnaste, Ly; Gräslund, Astrid; Langel, Ulo

    2014-12-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides with the ability to escape endosomes and reach the target are of great value as delivery vectors for different bioactive cargoes and future treatment of human diseases. We have studied two such peptides, NickFect1 and NickFect51, both originated from stearylated transportan10 (PF3). To obtain more insight into the mechanism(s) of peptide delivery and the biophysical properties of an efficient vector system, we investigated the effect of different bioactive oligonucleotide cargoes on peptide-membrane perturbation and peptide structural induction. We studied the membrane interactions of the peptides with large unilamellar vesicles and compared their effects with parent peptides transportan10 and PF3. In addition, cellular uptake and peptide-mediated oligonucleotide delivery were analyzed. Calcein leakage experiments showed that similar to transportan10, NickFect51 caused a significant degree of membrane leakage, whereas NickFect1, similar to PF3, was less membrane perturbing. The results are in agreement with previously published results indicating that NickFect51 is a more efficient endosomal escaper. However, the presence of a large cargo like plasmid DNA inhibited NickFect's membrane perturbation and cellular uptake efficiency of the peptide was reduced. We conclude that the pathway for cellular uptake of peptide complexes is cargo dependent, whereas the endosomal escape efficacy depends on peptide hydrophobicity and chemical structure. For small interfering RNA delivery, NickFect51 appears to be optimal. The biophysical signature shows that the peptide alone causes membrane perturbation, but the cargo complex does not. These two biophysical characteristics of the peptide and its cargo complex may be the signature of an efficient delivery vector system.

  19. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  20. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  1. Characterization of a transport activity for long-chain peptides in barley mesophyll vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Magali Schnell; Abele, Rupert; Nagy, Réka; Grotemeyer, Marianne Suter; Tampé, Robert; Rentsch, Doris; Martinoia, Enrico

    2011-04-01

    The plant vacuole is the largest compartment in a fully expanded plant cell. While only very limited metabolic activity can be observed within the vacuole, the majority of the hydrolytic activities, including proteolytic activities reside in this organelle. Since it is assumed that protein degradation by the proteasome results in the production of peptides with a size of 3-30 amino acids, we were interested to show whether the tonoplast exhibits a transport activity, which could deliver these peptides into the vacuole for final degradation. It is shown here that isolated barley mesophyll vacuoles take up peptides of 9-27 amino acids in a strictly ATP-dependent manner. Uptake is inhibited by vanadate, but not by NH(+)(4), while GTP could partially substitute for ATP. The apparent affinity for the 9 amino acid peptide was 15 μM, suggesting that peptides are efficiently transferred to the vacuole in vivo. Inhibition experiments showed that peptides with a chain length below 10 amino acids did not compete as efficiently as longer peptides for the uptake of the 9 amino acid peptide. Our results suggest that vacuoles contain at least one peptide transporter that belongs to the ABC-type transporters, which efficiently exports long-chain peptides from the cytosol into the vacuole for final degradation.

  2. Peptide and peptide library cyclization via bromomethylbenzene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David E; Almohaini, Mohammed; Anbazhagan, Aruna; Ma, Zhong; Hartman, Matthew C T

    2015-01-01

    Cyclization confers several advantages to peptides, cumulatively serving to make them more drug-like. In this protocol, cyclic peptides are generated via bis-alkylation of cysteine-containing peptides using α,α'-dibromo-m-xylene. The reactions are robust and high yielding. Multiple reaction platforms for the application of this versatile strategy are described herein: the cyclization of solid-phase-synthesized peptides, both in solution and on resin, as well as the cyclization of in vitro translated mRNA-peptide fusion libraries on oligo(dT) resin.

  3. Stable-isotope-labeled Histone Peptide Library for Histone Post-translational Modification and Variant Quantification by Mass Spectrometry *

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Wein, Samuel; Gonzales-Cope, Michelle; Otte, Gabriel L.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Maile, Tobias; Berger, Shelley L.; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Arnott, David; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate accurate histone variant and post-translational modification (PTM) quantification via mass spectrometry, we present a library of 93 synthetic peptides using Protein-Aqua™ technology. The library contains 55 peptides representing different modified forms from histone H3 peptides, 23 peptides representing H4 peptides, 5 peptides representing canonical H2A peptides, 8 peptides representing H2A.Z peptides, and peptides for both macroH2A and H2A.X. The PTMs on these peptides include lysine mono- (me1), di- (me2), and tri-methylation (me3); lysine acetylation; arginine me1; serine/threonine phosphorylation; and N-terminal acetylation. The library was subjected to chemical derivatization with propionic anhydride, a widely employed protocol for histone peptide quantification. Subsequently, the detection efficiencies were quantified using mass spectrometry extracted ion chromatograms. The library yields a wide spectrum of detection efficiencies, with more than 1700-fold difference between the peptides with the lowest and highest efficiencies. In this paper, we describe the impact of different modifications on peptide detection efficiencies and provide a resource to correct for detection biases among the 93 histone peptides. In brief, there is no correlation between detection efficiency and molecular weight, hydrophobicity, basicity, or modification type. The same types of modifications may have very different effects on detection efficiencies depending on their positions within a peptide. We also observed antagonistic effects between modifications. In a study of mouse trophoblast stem cells, we utilized the detection efficiencies of the peptide library to correct for histone PTM/variant quantification. For most histone peptides examined, the corrected data did not change the biological conclusions but did alter the relative abundance of these peptides. For a low-abundant histone H2A variant, macroH2A, the corrected data led to a different conclusion than the

  4. Peptides and Ageing.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, Vladimir Kh

    2002-01-01

    A technology has been developed for manufacturing of biologically active complex peptide preparations from extracts of different tissues. In particular, the pineal preparation (Epithalamin) augments the in vitro outgrowth of explants from the pineal gland but not from other tissues, the latter being stimulated by peptide preparations from respective tissues. Epithalamin increases melatonin production by the pineal gland of rats, improves immunological parameters in rats and mice, produces anticarcinogenic effects in different experimental models, stimulates antioxidant defenses, and restores the reproductive function in old rats. These effects are combined in the ability of Epithalamin to increase the lifespan in rats, mice, and fruit flies. Many of these effects are reproduced in clinical trials, which have demonstrated the geroprotector activity of Epithalamin in humans. Among the effects of the thymic preparation Thymalin, those related to its ability to stimulate immunity are the most prominent. This ability is associated with anticarcinogenic and geroprotector activities. Clinical trials of the peptide preparations obtained from other organs including the prostate, the cerebral cortex, and the eye retina, have demonstrated beneficial effects reflected by the improvement of the conditions of respective organs. Based on the data about the amino acid compositions of the peptide preparations, novel principles of the design of biologically active short peptides possessing tissue-specific activities has been developed. Dipeptides specific for the thymus and tetrapeptides specific for the heart, liver, brain cortex, and pineal glands stimulate the in vitro outgrowth of explants of respective organs. Interestingly, for eye retina and the pineal gland, a common tetrapeptide Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly (Epitalon) has been designed, probably reflecting the common embryonal origin of these two organs. Epitalon reproduces the effects of Epithalamin including those related to its

  5. Pronase E-Based Generation of Fluorescent Peptide Fragments: Tracking Intracellular Peptide Fate in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Emilie R; Dobes, Nicholas C; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2015-08-01

    The ability to track intracellular peptide proteolysis at the single cell level is of growing interest, particularly as short peptide sequences continue to play important roles as biosensors, therapeutics, and endogenous participants in antigen processing and intracellular signaling. We describe a rapid and inexpensive methodology to generate fluorescent peptide fragments from a parent sequence with diverse chemical properties, including aliphatic, nonpolar, basic, acidic, and non-native amino acids. Four peptide sequences with existing biochemical applications were fragmented using incubation with Pronase E and/or formic acid, and in each case a complete set of fluorescent fragments was generated for use as proteolysis standards in chemical cytometry. Fragment formation and identity was monitored with capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to confirm the presence of all sequences and yield fragmentation profiles across Pronase E concentrations which can readily be used by others. As a pilot study, Pronase E-generated standards from an Abl kinase sensor and an ovalbumin antigenic peptide were then employed to identify proteolysis products arising from the metabolism of these sequences in single cells. The Abl kinase sensor fragmented at 4.2 ± 4.8 zmol μM(-1) s(-1) and the majority of cells possessed similar fragment identities. In contrast, an ovalbumin epitope peptide was degraded at 8.9 ± 0.1 zmol μM(-1) s(-1), but with differential fragment formation between individual cells. Overall, Pronase E-generated peptide standards were a rapid and efficient method to identify proteolysis products from cells. PMID:26171808

  6. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  7. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants.

  8. Ribosomal Synthesis of Peptides with Multiple β-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Tomoshige; Goto, Yuki; Suga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Hiroshi

    2016-02-17

    The compatibility of β-amino acids with ribosomal translation was studied for decades, but it has been still unclear whether the ribosome can accept various β-amino acids, and whether the ribosome can introduce multiple β-amino acids in a peptide. In the present study, by using the Escherichia coli reconstituted cell-free translation system with a reprogramed genetic code, we screened β-amino acids that give high single incorporation efficiency and used them to synthesize peptides containing multiple β-amino acids. The experiments of single β-amino acid incorporation into a peptide revealed that 13 β-amino acids are compatible with ribosomal translation. Six of the tested β-amino acids (βhGly, l-βhAla, l-βhGln, l-βhPhg, l-βhMet, and d-βhPhg) showed high incorporation efficiencies, and seven (l-βhLeu, l-βhIle, l-βhAsn, l-βhPhe, l-βhLys, d-βhAla, and d-βhLeu) showed moderate incorporation efficiencies; whereas no full-length peptide was produced using other β-amino acids (l-βhPro, l-βhTrp, and l-βhGlu). Subsequent double-incorporation experiments using β-amino acids with high single incorporation efficiency revealed that elongation of peptides with successive β-amino acids is prohibited. Efficiency of the double-incorporation of the β-amino acids was restored by the insertion of Tyr or Ile between the two β-amino acids. On the basis of these experiments, we also designed mRNA sequences of peptides, and demonstrated the ribosomal synthesis of peptides containing different types of β-amino acids at multiple positions.

  9. Peptide conjugation: before or after nanoparticle formation?

    PubMed

    Valetti, Sabrina; Mura, Simona; Noiray, Magali; Arpicco, Silvia; Dosio, Franco; Vergnaud, Juliette; Desmaële, Didier; Stella, Barbara; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-11-19

    We report herein a detailed study concerning the impact of different bioconjugation and nanoformulation strategies on the in vitro targeting ability of peptide-decorated squalenoyl gemcitabine (SQdFdC) nanoparticles (NPs). NPs have been functionalized with the CKAAKN peptide, previously identified as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Two approaches have been followed: (i) either the CKAAKN peptide was directly conjugated at the surface of preformed SQdFdC nanoparticles (conjugation after NP formation) or (ii) it was first reacted with a maleimide squalenoyl derivative before the resulting bioconjugate was co-nanoprecipitated with SQdFdC to form the peptide-decorated NPs (conjugation before NP formation). NPs were characterized with respect to mean diameter, zeta potential, and stability over time. Then, their specific interaction with the sFRP-4 protein was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance. Although both synthetic strategies allowed us to formulate NPs able to interact with the corresponding receptor, enhanced target binding and better specific avidity were observed with CKAAKN-NPs functionalized before NP formation. These NPs displayed the highest cell uptake and cytotoxicity in an in vitro model of human MIA Paca-2 pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. A caged substrate peptide for matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Decaneto, Elena; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Heise, Inge; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Knipp, Markus

    2015-02-01

    Based on the widely applied fluorogenic peptide FS-6 (Mca-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2; Mca = methoxycoumarin-4-acetyl; Dpa = N-3-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)l-α,β-diaminopropionyl) a caged substrate peptide Ac-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Lys*-Lys-Ala-Arg-NH2 (*, position of the cage group) for matrix metalloproteinases was synthesized and characterized. The synthesis implies the modification of a carbamidated lysine side-chain amine with a photocleavable 2-nitrobenzyl group. Mass spectrometry upon UV irradiation demonstrated the complete photolytic cleavage of the protecting group. Time-resolved laser-flash photolysis at 355 nm in combination with transient absorption spectroscopy determined the biphasic decomposition with τa = 171 ± 3 ms (79%) and τb = 2.9 ± 0.2 ms (21%) at pH 6.0 of the photo induced release of the 2-nitrobenzyl group. The recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of human membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) was used to determine the hydrolysis efficiency of the caged peptide before and after photolysis. It turned out that the cage group sufficiently shields the peptide from peptidase activity, which can be thus controlled by UV light.

  11. PASSEL: the PeptideAtlas SRMexperiment library.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Terry; Deutsch, Eric W; Kreisberg, Richard; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S; Mendoza, Luis; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Schiess, Ralph; Selevsek, Nathalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Public repositories for proteomics data have accelerated proteomics research by enabling more efficient cross-analyses of datasets, supporting the creation of protein and peptide compendia of experimental results, supporting the development and testing of new software tools, and facilitating the manuscript review process. The repositories available to date have been designed to accommodate either shotgun experiments or generic proteomic data files. Here, we describe a new kind of proteomic data repository for the collection and representation of data from selected reaction monitoring (SRM) measurements. The PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL) allows researchers to easily submit proteomic data sets generated by SRM. The raw data are automatically processed in a uniform manner and the results are stored in a database, where they may be downloaded or browsed via a web interface that includes a chromatogram viewer. PASSELenables cross-analysis of SRMdata, supports optimization of SRMdata collection, and facilitates the review process of SRMdata. Further, PASSELwill help in the assessment of proteotypic peptide performance in a wide array of samples containing the same peptide, as well as across multiple experimental protocols.

  12. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  13. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  14. Antimicrobial peptides: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K V R; Yedery, R D; Aranha, C

    2004-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important component of the natural defences of most living organisms against invading pathogens. These are relatively small (< 10kDa), cationic and amphipathic peptides of variable length, sequence and structure. During the past two decades several AMPs have been isolated from a wide variety of animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, and plants as well as from bacteria and fungi. Most of these peptides are obtained from different sources like macrophages, neutrophils, epithelial cells, haemocytes, fat body, reproductive tract, etc. These peptides exhibit broad-spectrum activity against a wide range of microorganisms including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, protozoa, yeast, fungi and viruses. A few peptides have also been found to be cytotoxic to sperm and tumour cells. AMPs are classified based on the three dimensional structural studies carried out with the help of NMR. The peptides are broadly classified into five major groups namely (a) peptides that form alpha-helical structures, (b) peptides rich in cysteine residues, (c) peptides that form beta-sheet, (d) peptides rich in regular amino acids namely histatin, arginine and proline and (e) peptides composed of rare and modified amino acids. Most of these peptides are believed to act by disrupting the plasma membrane leading to the lysis of the cell. AMPs have been found to be excellent candidates for developing novel antimicrobial agents and a few of these peptides show antimicrobial activity against pathogens causing sexually transmitted infection (STI), including HIV/HSV. Peptides, namely magainin and nisin have been shown to demonstrate contraceptive properties in vitro and in vivo. A few peptides have already entered clinical trials for the treatment of impetigo, diabetic foot ulcers and gastric helicobacter infections. In this review, we discuss the source, structures and mode of action with special reference to therapeutic considerations of various AMPs

  15. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction.

  16. The helical propensity of KLA amphipathic peptides enhances their binding to gel-state lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arouri, Ahmad; Dathe, Margitta; Blume, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    The role and importance of the conformation of antimicrobial peptides for their binding and incorporation into lipid membranes as well as for their bioactivity are still not well understood. In this paper, we studied the interaction between four cationic alpha-helical KLA peptides, which differ primarily in their helical propensity, and the anionic gel-state lipid DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol). Of particular interest was the influence of the peptide conformation and membrane surface properties on the electrostatic binding process. Dynamic light scattering (DSL) showed that generally the KLA peptides possess high aggregation power but modest solubilization power. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) spectra revealed that the KLA peptides with the low helical propensity tend to form beta-structures at low lipid/peptide ratios. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms showed that the helical KLA peptides stabilize the DPPG bilayer, whereas the beta-structured peptides induce pronounced membrane perturbations. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) isotherms showed that the helical KLA peptides bind more efficiently to DPPG vesicles than the beta-structured KLA peptides, and that the binding affinity of the peptides is proportional to the peptide helical propensity and membrane negative surface charge. The stoichiometry values (N) deduced from the ITC isotherms suggest that the helical KLA peptides have a higher capacity to translocate the DPPG lipid bilayer. The new data presented in this study demonstrate the flexibility of KLA peptides in adopting various conformations in response to the surrounding and also how the peptide structuring controls the mode of peptide-membrane interaction. PMID:23792704

  17. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  18. Optimization for Peptide Sample Preparation for Urine Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-02-25

    Analysis of native or endogenous peptides in biofluids can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms. Furthermore, the detected peptides may also have utility as potential biomarkers for non-invasive monitoring of human diseases. The non-invasive nature of urine collection and the abundance of peptides in the urine makes analysis by high-throughput ‘peptidomics’ methods , an attractive approach for investigating the pathogenesis of renal disease. However, urine peptidomics methodologies can be problematic with regards to difficulties associated with sample preparation. The urine matrix can provide significant background interference in making the analytical measurements that it hampers both the identification of peptides and the depth of the peptidomics read when utilizing LC-MS based peptidome analysis. We report on a novel adaptation of the standard solid phase extraction (SPE) method to a modified SPE (mSPE) approach for improved peptide yield and analysis sensitivity with LC-MS based peptidomics in terms of time, cost, clogging of the LC-MS column, peptide yield, peptide quality, and number of peptides identified by each method. Expense and time requirements were comparable for both SPE and mSPE, but more interfering contaminants from the urine matrix were evident in the SPE preparations (e.g., clogging of the LC-MS columns, yellowish background coloration of prepared samples due to retained urobilin, lower peptide yields) when compared to the mSPE method. When we compared data from technical replicates of 4 runs, the mSPE method provided significantly improved efficiencies for the preparation of samples from urine (e.g., mSPE peptide identification 82% versus 18% with SPE; p = 8.92E-05). Additionally, peptide identifications, when applying the mSPE method, highlighted the biology of differential activation of urine peptidases during acute renal transplant rejection with distinct laddering of specific peptides, which was obscured for most proteins

  19. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  20. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  1. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  2. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents. PMID:25515753

  3. Peptides@mica: from affinity to adhesion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, A; John, T; Gladytz, T; Hassert, R; Pagel, M; Risselada, H J; Naumov, S; Beck-Sickinger, A G; Abel, B

    2016-09-14

    Investigating the adsorption of peptides on inorganic surfaces, on the molecular level, is fundamental for medicinal and analytical applications. Peptides can be potent as linkers between surfaces and living cells in biochips or in implantation medicine. Here, we studied the adsorption process of the positively charged pentapeptide RTHRK, a recently identified binding sequence for surface oxidized silicon, and novel analogues thereof to negatively charged mica surfaces. Homogeneous formation of monolayers in the nano- and low micromolar peptide concentration range was observed. We propose an alternative and efficient method to both quantify binding affinity and follow adhesion behavior. This method makes use of the thermodynamic relationship between surface coverage, measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the concomitant free energy of adhesion. A knowledge-based fit to the autocorrelation of the AFM images was used to correct for a biased surface coverage introduced by the finite lateral resolution of the AFM. Binding affinities and mechanisms were further explored by large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The combination of well validated MD simulations with topological data from AFM revealed a better understanding of peptide adsorption processes on the atomistic scale. We demonstrate that binding affinity is strongly determined by a peptide's ability to form salt bridges and hydrogen bonds with the surface lattice. Consequently, differences in hydrogen bond formation lead to substantial differences in binding affinity despite conservation of the peptide's overall charge. Further, MD simulations give access to relative changes in binding energy of peptide variations in comparison to a lead compound. PMID:27491508

  4. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  5. Chemical macrocyclization of peptides fused to antibody Fc fragments.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Alessandro; Diderich, Philippe; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Thurnheer, Sarah; Hacker, David; Menin, Laure; Heinis, Christian

    2012-09-19

    To extend the plasma half-life of a bicyclic peptide antagonist, we chose to link it to the Fc fragment of the long-lived serum protein IgG1. Instead of chemically conjugating the entire bicyclic peptide, we recombinantly expressed its peptide moiety as a fusion protein to an Fc fragment and subsequently cyclized the peptide by chemically reacting its three cysteine residues with tris-(bromomethyl)benzene. This reaction was efficient and selective, yielding completely modified peptide fusion protein and no side products. After optimization of the linker and the Fc fragment format, the bicyclic peptide was fully functional as an inhibitor (K(i) = 76 nM) and showed an extended terminal half-life of 1.5 days in mice. The unexpectedly clean reaction makes chemical macrocyclization of peptide-Fc fusion proteins an attractive synthetic approach. Its good compatibility with the Fc fragment may lend the bromomethylbenzene-based chemistry also for the generation of antibody-drug conjugates.

  6. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  7. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. PMID:26918308

  8. The Specificity of Peptide Chain Extension by N-Carboxyanhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ke; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-01-01

    We have used amino acids activated by carbonyldiimidazole to study the enantiospecificity of peptide elongation in aqueous solution. Peptide primers Glu(sub 10) and Ala3Glulo were elongated with the enantiomers of arginine, glutamic acid, asparagine, phenylalanine, serine and valine. The homochiral addition was always the more efficient reaction; the enantiospecificity was large in some cases but very small in others. In every case Ala(sub 3)Glu(sub l0) was elongated more efficiently than Glu(sub 10).

  9. Peptide-based Antifungal Therapies against Emerging Infections

    PubMed Central

    Matejuk, A.; Leng, Q.; Begum, M.D.; Woodle, M.C.; Scaria, P.; Chou, S-T; Mixson, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Acquired drug resistance to mycotic infections is rapidly emerging as a major medical problem. Opportunistic fungal infections create therapeutic challenges, particularly in high risk immunocompromised patients with AIDS, cancer, and those undergoing transplantation. Higher mortality and/or morbidity rates due to invasive mycosis have been increasing over the last 20 years, and in light of growing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, novel antifungal drugs and approaches are required. Currently there is considerable interest in antifungal peptides that are ubiquitous in plant and animal kingdoms. These small cationic peptides may have specific targets or may be multifunctional in their mechanism of action. On the basis of recent advances in protein engineering and solid phase syntheses, the utility and potential of selected peptides as efficient antifungal drugs with acceptable toxicity profiles are being realized. This review will discuss recent advances in peptide therapy for opportunistic fungal infections. PMID:20495663

  10. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  11. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities. PMID:26948900

  12. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  13. Peptide Aptamers: Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Peptide aptamers are small combinatorial proteins that are selected to bind to specific sites on their target molecules. Peptide aptamers consist of short, 5-20 amino acid residues long sequences, typically embedded as a loop within a stable protein scaffold. Various peptide aptamer scaffolds and in vitro and in vivo selection techniques are reviewed with emphasis on specific biomedical, bioimaging, and bioanalytical applications. PMID:25866267

  14. Selection of ceramic fluorapatite-binding peptides from a phage display combinatorial peptide library: optimum affinity tags for fluorapatite chromatography.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tuhidul; Bibi, Noor Shad; Vennapusa, Rami Reddy; Fernandez-Lahore, Marcelo

    2013-08-01

    Peptide affinity tags have become efficient tools for the purification of recombinant proteins from biological mixtures. The most commonly used ligands in this type of affinity chromatography are immobilized metal ions, proteins, antibodies, and complementary peptides. However, the major bottlenecks of this technique are still related to the ligands, including their low stability, difficulties in immobilization, and leakage into the final products. A model approach is presented here to overcome these bottlenecks by utilizing macroporous ceramic fluorapatite (CFA) as the stationary phase in chromatography and the CFA-specific short peptides as tags. The CFA chromatographic materials act as both the support matrix and the ligand. Peptides that bind with affinity to CFA were identified from a randomized phage display heptapeptide library. A total of five rounds of phage selection were performed. A common N-terminal sequence was found in two selected peptides: F4-2 (KPRSMLH) and F5-4 (KPRSVSG). The peptide F5-4, displayed by more than 40% of the phages analyzed in the fifth round of selection, was subjected to further studies. Selectivity of the peptide for the chemical composition and morphology of CFA was assured by the adsorption studies. The dissociation constant, obtained from the F5-4/CFA adsorption isotherm, was in the micromolar range, and the maximum capacity was 39.4 nmol/mg. The chromatographic behavior of the peptides was characterized on a CFA stationary phase with different buffers. Preferential affinity and specific retention properties suggest the possible application of the phage-derived peptides as a tag in CFA affinity chromatography for enhancing the selective recovery of proteins.

  15. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  16. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  17. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  18. Fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides.

    PubMed

    Paizs, Béla; Suhai, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    The fragmentation pathways of protonated peptides are reviewed in the present paper paying special attention to classification of the known fragmentation channels into a simple hierarchy defined according to the chemistry involved. It is shown that the 'mobile proton' model of peptide fragmentation can be used to understand the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides only in a qualitative manner rationalizing differences observed for low-energy collision induced dissociation of peptide ions having or lacking a mobile proton. To overcome this limitation, a deeper understanding of the dissociation chemistry of protonated peptides is needed. To this end use of the 'pathways in competition' (PIC) model that involves a detailed energetic and kinetic characterization of the major peptide fragmentation pathways (PFPs) is proposed. The known PFPs are described in detail including all the pre-dissociation, dissociation, and post-dissociation events. It is our hope that studies to further extend PIC will lead to semi-quantative understanding of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides which could be used to develop refined bioinformatics algorithms for MS/MS based proteomics. Experimental and computational data on the fragmentation of protonated peptides are reevaluated from the point of view of the PIC model considering the mechanism, energetics, and kinetics of the major PFPs. Evidence proving semi-quantitative predictability of some of the ion intensity relationships (IIRs) of the MS/MS spectra of protonated peptides is presented. PMID:15389847

  19. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  20. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  1. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  2. De Novo Peptide Design and Experimental Validation of Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, James; Peterson, Meghan B.; Zee, Barry M.; Garapaty, Shivani; Mago, Aashna; Lee, Christina; Giannis, Athanassios; Trojer, Patrick; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-01-01

    Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2. These inhibitors should

  3. Constructing thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via on-resin intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingchuan; Zhang, Qingzhou; Li, Zigang

    2016-08-01

    Thiol-ene reactions have been used in a variety of applications that mostly involve an inter-molecular pathway. Herein, we report a facile method to construct thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via an intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction. This reaction is efficient, selective, and has good residue compatibility. Short peptides with thioether tethers were constructed and were used to construct longer cyclic peptides. This synthetic method may be useful for constructing bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27378284

  4. Phytosulfokine peptide signalling.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2015-08-01

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) belongs to the group of plant peptide growth factors. It is a disulfated pentapeptide encoded by precursor genes that are ubiquitously present in higher plants, suggestive of universal functions. Processing of the preproprotein involves sulfonylation by a tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase in the trans-golgi and proteolytic cleavage in the apoplast. The secreted peptide is perceived at the cell surface by a membrane-bound receptor kinase of the leucine-rich repeat family. The PSK receptor PSKR1 from Arabidopsis thaliana is an active kinase and has guanylate cyclase activity resulting in dual-signal outputs. Receptor activity is regulated by calmodulin. While PSK may be an autocrine growth factor, it also acts non-cell autonomously by promoting growth of cells that are receptor-deficient. In planta, PSK has multiple functions. It promotes cell growth, acts in the quiescent centre cells of the root apical meristem, contributes to funicular pollen tube guidance, and differentially alters immune responses depending on the pathogen. It has been suggested that PSK integrates growth and defence signals to balance the competing metabolic costs of these responses. This review summarizes our current understanding of PSK synthesis, signalling, and activity.

  5. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  6. Development of a lytic peptide derived from BH3-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Zhao, H; Jiang, Y; Wu, M; Tian, Y; Wang, D; Lao, Y; Xu, N; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Despite great advances in cancer therapy, drug resistance is a difficult hurdle to overcome that requires development of anticancer agents with novel and effective modes of action. In a number of studies, lytic peptides have shown remarkable ability to eliminate cancer cells through a different way from traditional treatments. Lytic peptides are positively charged, amphiphilic, and are efficient at binding and disrupting the negatively charged cell membrane of cancer cells. In this study, we described the anticancer properties of a lytic peptide that was developed on the basis of the alignment of amphiphilic BH3 peptides. Our results demonstrated that the positive charge and conformation constraint were favourable for efficient cancer cell elimination. Artificial BCL-2 homology 3 peptides (ABH3) exhibited effective anticancer effects against a series of cancer cell lines in vitro and in HeLa human cervical tumour xenografts in vivo. ABH3 induced cell death in an apoptosis-independent manner through the lytic properties of the peptide that caused disruption of cell membrane. Our results showed that charge tuning and conformation constraining in a lytic peptide could be applied to optimise the anticancer activity of lytic peptides. These results also suggest that ABH3 may be a promising beginning for the development of additional lytic peptides as anticancer reagents. PMID:27551502

  7. Development of a lytic peptide derived from BH3-only proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Zhao, H; Jiang, Y; Wu, M; Tian, Y; Wang, D; Lao, Y; Xu, N; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Despite great advances in cancer therapy, drug resistance is a difficult hurdle to overcome that requires development of anticancer agents with novel and effective modes of action. In a number of studies, lytic peptides have shown remarkable ability to eliminate cancer cells through a different way from traditional treatments. Lytic peptides are positively charged, amphiphilic, and are efficient at binding and disrupting the negatively charged cell membrane of cancer cells. In this study, we described the anticancer properties of a lytic peptide that was developed on the basis of the alignment of amphiphilic BH3 peptides. Our results demonstrated that the positive charge and conformation constraint were favourable for efficient cancer cell elimination. Artificial BCL-2 homology 3 peptides (ABH3) exhibited effective anticancer effects against a series of cancer cell lines in vitro and in HeLa human cervical tumour xenografts in vivo. ABH3 induced cell death in an apoptosis-independent manner through the lytic properties of the peptide that caused disruption of cell membrane. Our results showed that charge tuning and conformation constraining in a lytic peptide could be applied to optimise the anticancer activity of lytic peptides. These results also suggest that ABH3 may be a promising beginning for the development of additional lytic peptides as anticancer reagents. PMID:27551502

  8. Novel osteoblast-adhesive peptides for dental/orthopedic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Dettin, Monica; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Gambaretto, Roberta; Pasquato, Antonella; Folin, Marcella; Di Bello, Carlo; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo

    2002-06-01

    Next generation dental/orthopedic biomaterials must be designed to enhance and support osteoblast adhesion. The osteoblasts use different ways to adhere, that is, integrin- and proteoglycan-mediated mechanisms. The present study reports on the synthesis and osteoblast-adhesive properties of peptides carrying RGD motifs and of sequences mapped on human vitronectin. Our data suggest that osteoblast adhesion on polystyrene plates modified with a linear peptide, in which the GRGDSP sequence is repeated four times, was significantly higher when compared to the adhesion obtained using branched peptides, interestingly containing the same motif. Osteoblast adhesion assays on acellular bone matrix using this active peptide gave very promising results. We also demonstrated that a novel peptide, carrying the X-B-B-B-X-B-B-X motif (where B is a basic amino acid and X is a nonbasic residue), promotes proteoglycan-mediated osteoblast adhesion more efficiently with respect to the KRSR sequence that was recently proposed as heparan-sulfate binding peptide. PMID:11920671

  9. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  10. Anti-HIV screening for cell-penetrating peptides using chloroquine and identification of anti-HIV peptides derived from matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Ohashi, Nami; Nomura, Wataru; Komoriya, Mao; Hashimoto, Chie; Yamamoto, Naoki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2015-08-01

    Previously, compounds which inhibit the HIV-1 replication cycle were found in overlapping peptide libraries covering the whole sequence of an HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein constructed with the addition of an octa-arginyl group. The two top lead compounds are sequential fragments MA-8L and MA-9L. In the present study, the addition of chloroquine in cell-based anti-HIV assays was proven to be an efficient method with which to find anti-HIV compounds among several peptides conjugated by cell-penetrating signals such as an octa-arginyl group: the conjugation of an octa-arginyl group to individual peptides contained in whole proteins in combination with the addition of chloroquine in cells is a useful assay method to search active peptides. To find more potent fragment peptides, individual peptides between MA-8L and MA-9L, having the same peptide chain length but with sequences shifted by one amino acid residue, were synthesized in this paper and their anti-HIV activity was evaluated with an anti-HIV assay using chloroquine. As a result, the peptides in the C-terminal side of the series, which are relatively close to MA-9L, showed more potent inhibitory activity against both X4-HIV-1 and R5-HIV-1 than the peptides in the N-terminal side.

  11. Bacterial Display and Screening of Posttranslationally Thioether-Stabilized Peptides ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bosma, Tjibbe; Kuipers, Anneke; Bulten, Erna; de Vries, Louwe; Rink, Rick; Moll, Gert N.

    2011-01-01

    A major hurdle in the application of therapeutic peptides is their rapid degradation by peptidases. Thioether bridges effectively protect therapeutic peptides against breakdown, thereby strongly increasing bioavailability, enabling oral and pulmonary delivery and potentially significantly optimizing the receptor interaction of selected variants. To efficiently select optimal variants, a library of DNA-coupled thioether-bridged peptides is highly desirable. Here, we present a unique cell surface display system of thioether-bridged peptides and successfully demonstrate highly selective screening. Peptides are posttranslationally modified by thioether bridge-installing enzymes in Lactococcus lactis, followed by export and sortase-mediated covalent coupling to the lactococcal cell wall. This allows the combinatorial optimization and selection of medically and economically highly important therapeutic peptides with strongly enhanced therapeutic potential. PMID:21821759

  12. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  13. Thermolysin: a peptide forming enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A V

    1991-02-01

    Thermolysin, a thermostable endopeptidase, is recognised as a potential peptide bond forming enzyme. The importance of structural properties and its stereospecific nature towards peptide bond formation is described. Thermolysin's use in the keystep of the preparation of an artificial sweetener 'aspartame' is highlighted.

  14. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  15. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide

  16. Macrocyclization and labeling of helix-loop-helix peptide with intramolecular bis-thioether linkage.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Toshio; Kitada, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-11-01

    Conformationally constrained peptides have been developed as an inhibitor for protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and we have de novo designed cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide with a disulfide bond consisting of 40 amino acids to generate molecular-targeting peptides. However, synthesis of long peptides has sometimes resulted in low yield according to the respective amino acid sequences. Here we developed a method for efficient synthesis and labeling for cHLH peptides. First, we synthesized two peptide fragments and connected them by the copper-mediated alkyne and azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Cyclization was performed by bis-thioether linkage using 1,3-dibromomethyl-5-propargyloxybenzene, and subsequently, the cHLH peptide was labeled with an azide-labeled probe. Finally, we designed and synthesized a peptide inhibitor for the p53-HDM2 interaction using a structure-guided design and successfully labeled it with a fluorescent probe or a functional peptide, respectively, by click chemistry. This macrocyclization and labeling method for cHLH peptide would facilitate the discovery of de novo bioactive ligands and therapeutic leads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 415-421, 2016. PMID:26917088

  17. Immunogenicity of polysaccharides conjugated to peptides containing T- and B-cell epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Lett, E; Gangloff, S; Zimmermann, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1994-01-01

    To develop a general model of polysaccharide-peptide vaccine, we have investigated the efficiency of linear peptides derived from protein SR, and adhesin of the I/II protein antigen family of oral streptococci, to act as carriers for two T cell-independent polysaccharides: serogroup f polysaccharide from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (poly f) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan. Peptide 3 (YEKEPTPPTRTPDQ) and peptide 6 (TPEDPTDPTDPQDPSS), accessible on the native SR protein as demonstrated by their reactivity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays with rat antisera raised against protein SR, correspond to immunodominant regions of SR. Peptide 3 contains at least one B- and one T-cell epitope, as demonstrated by its ability to induce peptide- and SR-specific antibody responses without any carrier and to stimulate the proliferation of rat lymph node cells primed either with free peptide or native SR, whereas peptide 6 contains only B-cell epitope(s). Peptide 3 was then covalently coupled though reductive amination to either poly f or mannan, and peptide 6 was coupled to poly f. Subcutaneous immunizations of rats with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates produced a systemic immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody response, and the elicited antibodies reacted with free poly f or mannan, peptide 3, protein SR, and S. mutans or S. cerevisiae whole cells. Rats immunized with poly f-peptide 6 did not develop any antipeptide or anti-SR response. Furthermore, a booster immunization of animals with poly f-peptide 3 or mannan-peptide 3 conjugates induced high titers of anti-peptide 3, anti-poly f, and antimannan antibodies, which occurred quickly. The response is anamnestic for the peptide and the polysaccharides and is characterized by an Ig switch from IgM to IgG. The data presented here confirm that the presence of B- and T-cell epitopes is necessary to induce an anamnestic antipeptide response and that a peptide containing relevant B- and T-cell epitopes can act

  18. Peptide and non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shibo; Zhao, Qian; Debnath, Asim K

    2002-01-01

    Fusion of the HIV envelope with the target cell membrane is a critical step of HIV entry into the target cell. The HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays an important role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV fusion inhibitors. The extracellular domain of gp41 contains three important functional regions, i.e. fusion peptide (FP), N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). The FP region is composed of hydrophobic, glycine-rich residues that are essential for the initial penetration of the target cell membrane. NHR and CHR regions consist of hydrophobic residues, which have the tendency to form alpha-helical coiled coils. During the process of fusion of HIV or HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells, FP inserts into the target cell membrane and subsequently the NHR and CHR regions change conformations and associate with each other to form a fusion-active gp41 core. Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions, designated N- and C-peptides, respectively, have potent inhibitory activity against HIV fusion by binding to the CHR and NHR regions, respectively, to prevent the formation of the fusion-active gp41 core. C-peptide may also bind to FP, thereby blocking its insertion into the target cell membrane. One of the C-peptides, T-20, which is in the phase III clinical trials, has potent in vivo activity against HIV infection and is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion. Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non-peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having a mechanism of action similar to the C-peptides. One of the approaches in identifying the inhibitors is to use an immunological assay to screen chemical libraries for the compounds that potentially block the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form a fusion

  19. Site-selective recognition of peptide phosphorylation by a terbium(III) complex in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Tao; Luo, Jian; Yang, Liu; Yao, Cheng

    2015-05-11

    A terbium(III) complex exhibits efficient selectivity for proximal diphosphorylation of peptides, accompanied with remarkable luminescence enhancement in the presence of Zn(II) ions in both buffer and protein extraction solutions from brain homogenates of mice.

  20. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  1. Engineered peptide-based nanobiomaterials for electrochemical cell chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafi, Md. Abdul; Cho, Hyeon-Yeol; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials having cell adhesion ability are considered to be integral part of a cell chip. A number of researches have been carried out to search for a suitable material for effective immobilization of cell on substrate. Engineered ECM materials or their components like collagen, Poly- l-Lysine (PLL), Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide have been extensively used for mammalian cell adhesion and proliferation with the aim of tissue regeneration or cell based sensing application. This review focuses on the various approaches for two- and three-dimensionally patterned nanostructures of a short peptide i.e. RGD peptide on chip surfaces together with their effects on cell behaviors and electrochemical measurements. Most of the study concluded with positive remarks on the well-oriented engineered RGD peptide over their homogenous thin film. The engineered RGD peptide not only influences cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation but also their periodic nano-arrays directly influence electrochemical measurements of the chips. The electrochemical signals found to be enhanced when RGD peptides were used in well-defined two-dimensional nano-arrays. The topographic alteration of three-dimensional structure of engineered RGD peptide was reported to be suitably contacted with the integrin receptors of cellular membrane which results indicated the enhanced cell-electrode adhesion and efficient electron exchange phenomenon. This enhanced electrochemical signal increases the sensitivity of the chip against the target analytes. Therefore, development of engineered cellular recognizable peptides and its 3D topological design for fabrication of cell chip will provide the synergetic effect on bio-affinity, sensitivity and accuracy for the in situ real-time monitoring of analytes.

  2. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  3. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  4. Plant biofarming: novel insights for peptide expression in heterologous systems.

    PubMed

    Viana, Antônio Américo Barbosa; Pelegrini, Patrícia Barbosa; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Peptide expression methods have been widely studied and developed from many different biological sources. The cultivation ofprokaryotic and eukaryotic cells has proven to be efficient for the expression of foreign peptides in several heterologous systems, including bacteria, insects, yeasts, and mammals. Earlier reports brought up new insights for the improvement of expressed products to not only increase the production rate of desired peptides but also reproduce desirable post-translational modifications and even to reduce the risk of allergenicity when those products are aimed for human use. The development of bioreactor systems provided the optimization of cell growth conditions to scale up the amounts of expressed peptides. On the other hand, different cell systems and mutants provided a plethora of possible peptide modifications. Hence, in this report, we describe the many organisms and systems used for the large scale production of several macromolecules with relevance in health and agriculture. We also bring into discussion plant biofarming in the moss Physcomitrella patens and its recent adaptations, as a cost-effective and efficient approach in the production of more complex heterologous proteins, given the fact that its glycosylation pattern can be engineered to avoid allergenicity to humans (common to plant-derived glycoproteins). PMID:23193604

  5. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community. PMID:27610387

  6. Polar profile of antiviral peptides from AVPpred Database.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of viral origin in humans are among the most serious threats to health and the global economy. As recent history has shown the virus has a high pandemic potential, among other reasons, due to its ability to spread by air, hence the identification, investigation, containment, and treatment of viral diseases should be considered of paramount importance. In this sense, the bioinformatics research has focused on finding fast and efficient algorithms that can identify highly toxic antiviral peptides and to serve as a first filter, so that trials in the laboratory are substantially reduced. The work presented here contributes to this effort through the use of an algorithm already published by this team, called polarity index method, which identifies with high efficiency antiviral peptides from the exhaustive analysis of the polar profile, using the linear sequence of the peptide. The test carried out included all peptides in APD2 Database and 60 antiviral peptides identified by Kumar and co-workers (Nucleic Acids Res 40:W199-204, 2012), to build its AVPpred algorithm. The validity of the method was focused on its discriminating capacity so we included the 15 sub-classifications of both Databases. PMID:24993579

  7. SABinder: A Web Service for Predicting Streptavidin-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Juanjuan; Ru, Beibei; Zhou, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Streptavidin is sometimes used as the intended target to screen phage-displayed combinatorial peptide libraries for streptavidin-binding peptides (SBPs). More often in the biopanning system, however, streptavidin is just a commonly used anchoring molecule that can efficiently capture the biotinylated target. In this case, SBPs creeping into the biopanning results are not desired binders but target-unrelated peptides (TUP). Taking them as intended binders may mislead subsequent studies. Therefore, it is important to find if a peptide is likely to be an SBP when streptavidin is either the intended target or just the anchoring molecule. In this paper, we describe an SVM-based ensemble predictor called SABinder. It is the first predictor for SBP. The model was built with the feature of optimized dipeptide composition. It was observed that 89.20% (MCC = 0.78; AUC = 0.93; permutation test, p < 0.001) of peptides were correctly classified. As a web server, SABinder is freely accessible. The tool provides a highly efficient way to exclude potential SBP when they are TUP or to facilitate identification of possibly new SBP when they are the desired binders. In either case, it will be helpful and can benefit related scientific community.

  8. Identification of FAK substrate peptides via colorimetric screening of a one-bead one-peptide combinatorial library.

    PubMed

    Witucki, Laurie A; Borowicz, Lauren Sanford; Pedley, Anthony M; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Kuszpit, Elizabeth Girnys

    2015-04-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is associated with regulating cellular functions such as cell adhesion and migration and has emerged as an important target for cancer research. Short peptide substrates that are selectively and efficiently phosphorylated by FAK have not been previously identified and tested. Here we report the synthesis and screening of a one-bead one-peptide combinatorial library to identify novel substrates for FAK. Using a solid-phase colorimetric antibody tagging detection platform, the peptide beads phosphorylated by FAK were sequenced via Edman degradation and then validated through radioisotope kinetic studies with [γ-(32)P] ATP to derive Michaelis-Menton constants. The combination of results gathered from both colorimetric and radioisotope kinase assays led to the rational design of a second generation of FAK peptide substrates. Out of all the potential peptide substrates evaluated, the most active was GDYVEFKKK with a K(M)  = 92 μM and a Vmax  = 1920 nmol/min/mg. Peptide substrates discovered within this study may be useful diagnostic tools for future kinase investigations and may lead to novel therapeutic agents.

  9. Antibacterial peptides isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L

    2000-10-01

    Insects are amazingly resistant to bacterial infections. To combat pathogens, insects rely on cellular and humoral mechanisms, innate immunity being dominant in the latter category. Upon detection of bacteria, a complex genetic cascade is activated, which ultimately results in the synthesis of a battery of antibacterial peptides and their release into the haemolymph. The peptides are usually basic in character and are composed of 20-40 amino acid residues, although some smaller proteins are also included in the antimicrobial repertoire. While the proline-rich peptides and the glycine-rich peptides are predominantly active against Gram-negative strains, the defensins selectively kill Gram-positive bacteria and the cecropins are active against both types. The insect antibacterial peptides are very potent: their IC50 (50% of the bacterial growth inhibition) hovers in the submicromolar or low micromolar range. The majority of the peptides act through disintegrating the bacterial membrane or interfering with membrane assembly, with the exception of drosocin, apidaecin and pyrrhocoricin which appear to deactivate a bacterial protein in a stereospecific manner. In accordance with their biological function, the membrane-active peptides form ordered structures, e.g. alpha-helices or beta-pleated sheets and often cast permeable ion-pores. Their cytotoxic properties were exploited in in vivo studies targeting tumour progression. Although the native peptides degrade quickly in biological fluids other than insect haemolymph, structural modifications render the peptides resistant against proteases without sacrificing biological activity. Indeed, a pyrrhocoricin analogue shows lack of toxicity in vitro and in vivo and protects mice against experimental Escherichia coli infection. Careful selection of lead molecules based on the insect antibacterial peptides may extend their utility and produce viable alternatives to the conventional antimicrobial compounds for mammalian therapy.

  10. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  11. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  12. Applications of Convertible Isonitriles in the Ligation and Macrocyclization of Multicomponent Reaction-Derived Peptides and Depsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Wessjohann, Ludger A; Morejón, Micjel C; Ojeda, Gerardo M; Rhoden, Cristiano R B; Rivera, Daniel G

    2016-08-01

    Peptide ligation and macrocyclization are among the most relevant approaches in the field of peptide chemistry. Whereas a variety of strategies relying on coupling reagents and native chemical ligation are available, there is a continuous need for efficient peptide ligation and cyclization methods. Herein we report on the utilization of convertible isonitriles as effective synthetic tools for the ligation and macrocyclization of peptides arising from isocyanide-based multicomponent reactions. The strategy relies on the use of convertible isonitriles-derived from Fukuyama amines-and peptide carboxylic acids in Ugi and Passerini reactions to afford N-alkylated peptides and depsipeptides, respectively, followed by conversion of the C-terminal amide onto either N-peptidoacyl indoles or pyrroles. Such activated peptides proved efficient in the ligation to peptidic, lipidic and fluorescently labeled amines and in macrocyclization protocols. As a result, a wide set of N-substituted peptides (with methyl, glycosyl and amino acids as N-substituents), cyclic N-methylated peptides and a depsipeptide were produced in good yields using conditions that involve either classical heating or microwave irradiation. This report improves the repertoire of peptide covalent modification methods by exploiting the synthetic potential of multicomponent reactions and convertible isonitriles. PMID:27390908

  13. Peripheral and integral membrane binding of peptides characterized by time-dependent fluorescence shifts: focus on antimicrobial peptide LAH₄.

    PubMed

    Macháň, Radek; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Olżyńska, Agnieszka; Olšinová, Marie; Cebecauer, Marek; Marquette, Arnaud; Bechinger, Burkhard; Hof, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Positioning of peptides with respect to membranes is an important parameter for biological and biophysical studies using model systems. Our experiments using five different membrane peptides suggest that the time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan can help when distinguishing between peripheral and integral membrane binding and can be a useful, novel tool for studying the impact of transmembrane peptides (TMP) on membrane organization under near-physiological conditions. This article focuses on LAH4, a model α-helical peptide with high antimicrobial and nucleic acid transfection efficiencies. The predominantly helical peptide has been shown to orient in supported model membranes parallel to the membrane surface at acidic and, in a transmembrane manner, at basic pH. Here we investigate its interaction with fully hydrated large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) by TDFS and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). TDFS shows that at acidic pH LAH4 does not influence the glycerol region while at basic pH it makes acyl groups at the glycerol level of the membrane less mobile. TDFS experiments with antimicrobial peptides alamethicin and magainin 2, which are known to assume transmembrane and peripheral orientations, respectively, prove that changes in acyl group mobility at the glycerol level correlate with the orientation of membrane-associated peptide molecules. Analogous experiments with the TMPs LW21 and LAT show similar effects on the mobility of those acyl groups as alamethicin and LAH4 at basic pH. FCS, on the same neutral lipid bilayer vesicles, shows that the peripheral binding mode of LAH4 is more efficient in bilayer permeation than the transmembrane mode. In both cases, the addition of LAH4 does not lead to vesicle disintegration. The influence of negatively charged lipids on the bilayer permeation is also addressed.

  14. Highly Angiogenic Peptide Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek A.; Taylor, Nichole L.; Shi, Siyu; Wang, Benjamin K.; Jalan, Abhishek A.; Kang, Marci K.; Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Major limitations of current tissue regeneration approaches using artificial scaffolds are fibrous encapsulation, lack of host cellular infiltration, unwanted immune responses, surface degradation preceding biointegration, and artificial degradation byproducts. Specifically, for scaffolds larger than 200 500 μm, implants must be accompanied by host angiogenesis in order to provide adequate nutrient/waste exchange in the newly forming tissue. In the current work, we design a peptide-based self-assembling nanofibrous hydrogel containing cell-mediated degradation and proangiogenic moieties that specifically address these challenges. This hydrogel can be easily delivered by syringe, is rapidly infiltrated by cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin, and rapidly forms an extremely robust mature vascular network. scaffolds show no signs of fibrous encapsulation and after 3 weeks are resorbed into the native tissue. These supramolecular assemblies may prove a vital paradigm for tissue regeneration and specifically for ischemic tissue disease. PMID:25584521

  15. Amyloid peptide channels.

    PubMed

    Kagan, B L; Azimov, R; Azimova, R

    2004-11-01

    At least 16 distinct clinical syndromes including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), rheumatoid arthritis, type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and spongiform encephelopathies (prion diseases), are characterized by the deposition of amorphous, Congo red-staining deposits known as amyloid. These "misfolded" proteins adopt beta-sheet structures and aggregate spontaneously into similar extended fibrils despite their widely divergent primary sequences. Many, if not all, of these peptides are capable of forming ion-permeable channels in vitro and possibly in vivo. Common channel properties include irreversible, spontaneous insertion into membranes, relatively large, heterogeneous single-channel conductances, inhibition of channel formation by Congo red, and blockade of inserted channels by Zn2+. Physiologic effects of amyloid, including Ca2+ dysregulation, membrane depolarization, mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP), and cytotoxicity, suggest that channel formation in plasma and intracellular membranes may play a key role in the pathophysiology of the amyloidoses. PMID:15702375

  16. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  17. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472. PMID:27454336

  18. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    PubMed Central

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  19. Cell division responsive peptides for optimized plasmid DNA delivery: the mitotic window of opportunity?

    PubMed

    Remaut, K; Symens, N; Lucas, B; Demeester, J; De Smedt, S C

    2014-04-10

    The delivery of plasmid DNA remains hard to achieve, especially due to the presence of the nuclear membrane barrier. During cell division, however, the nuclear membrane is temporarily disassembled. We evaluated two different strategies to optimize plasmid DNA delivery in dividing cells: 1) phosphorylation responsive peptides that release plasmid DNA preferentially during mitosis and 2) chromatin targeting peptides to anchor plasmid DNA in newly formed nuclei upon cell division. Peptide/DNA particles alone were not efficient in penetrating cells. Upon co-delivery with lipid-based carriers, however, transfection efficiency drastically improved when compared to controls. For the phosphorylation responsive peptides, the presence of the phosphorylation sequence slightly increased transfection efficiency. For the chromatin targeting peptides, however, the chromatin targeting sequence did not seem to be the main reason for the improvement of transfection efficiency when applied in living cells. In conclusion, the pre-condensation of plasmid DNA with peptides improves lipid based delivery, but the nature of the peptides (cell responsive or not) does not seem to be the main reason for the improvement. It seems that the nuclear entry of foreign plasmid DNA is still under tight control, even during the mitotic window of opportunity.

  20. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  1. The good taste of peptides.

    PubMed

    Temussi, Piero A

    2012-02-01

    The taste of peptides is seldom one of the most relevant issues when one considers the many important biological functions of this class of molecules. However, peptides generally do have a taste, covering essentially the entire range of established taste modalities: sweet, bitter, umami, sour and salty. The last two modalities cannot be attributed to peptides as such because they are due to the presence of charged terminals and/or charged side chains, thus reflecting only the zwitterionic nature of these compounds and/or the nature of some side chains but not the electronic and/or conformational features of a specific peptide. The other three tastes, that is, sweet, umami and bitter, are represented by different families of peptides. This review describes the main peptides with a sweet, umami or bitter taste and their relationship with food acceptance or rejection. Particular emphasis will be given to the sweet taste modality, owing to the practical and scientific relevance of aspartame, the well-known sweetener, and to the theoretical importance of sweet proteins, the most potent peptide sweet molecules.

  2. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for advanced neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Bodei, Lisa; Cremonesi, Marta; Kidd, Mark; Grana, Chiara M; Severi, Stefano; Modlin, Irvin M; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) consists of the systemic administration of a synthetic peptide, labeled with a suitable β-emitting radionuclide, able to irradiate tumors and their metastases via internalization through a specific receptor (usually somatostatin S2), over-expressed on the cell membrane. After almost 2 decades of experience, PRRT, with either (90)Y-octreotide or (177)Lu-octreotate, has established itself to be an efficient and effective therapeutic modality. As a treatment, it is relatively safe up to the known thresholds of absorbed and bio-effective isotope dosages and the renal and hematological toxicity profiles are acceptable if adequate protective measures are undertaken.

  3. Tumor cell-targeting by phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Ulla B; Schreiber, Valerie; Schultz, Huguette; Mischler, Fabienne; Schughart, Klaus

    2002-07-01

    We isolated cancer cell-specific phages by subtracting and selecting complex peptide display phage libraries on cultured human cancer cells. The best candidate was selected by performing three rounds of subtraction before each of five selections on the human colorectal WiDr cell line. The phage showed more than 1000-fold higher binding efficiency for WiDr cells when compared to five other human cancer cell lines, including two of colorectal origin, and when compared to wild-type M13 phage. Fifty-fold higher binding efficiency was also seen for a human breast cancer cell line. We show that the WiDr cell binding of the selected phage was efficiently competed by the synthetic peptide HEWSYLAPYPWF, predicted from the phage sequence. This confirms that the specificity of the peptide is independent of the display by the phage coat proteins. The identified peptide may target biomarkers linked to colorectal cancer, and thus be useful for designing gene transfer vectors as well as diagnostic and prognostic tools for this disease. PMID:12082461

  4. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  6. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  7. Separation of Peptides on HALO 2-Micron Particles.

    PubMed

    Mant, Colin T; Hodges, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) is of fundamental importance to the isolation and separation of peptides, proteins, and other biomolecules. Hence, there is a continuing high demand for the development of RP-HPLC stationary-phase materials with enhanced separation efficiency. HALO packing materials began the revolution in "core-shell" technology with the advantages of faster separations, higher resolution and peak capacity, high temperature stability, and rugged reliable performance compared to traditional HPLC and UHPLC. These materials are characterized by a solid core surrounded by a thin layer of porous material, and represent a technology for the future with continuing refinements. Such refinements are aided via the use of designed synthetic peptide standards during stationary-phase development. Concomitantly, such standards also enable the researcher to monitor RP-HPLC column performance and develop optimized separation protocols for peptides from a wide array of sources. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479502

  8. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  9. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  10. Apidaecins: antibacterial peptides from honeybees.

    PubMed Central

    Casteels, P; Ampe, C; Jacobs, F; Vaeck, M; Tempst, P

    1989-01-01

    Although insects lack the basic entities of the vertebrate immune system, such as lymphocytes and immunoglobulins, they have developed alternative defence mechanisms against infections. Different types of peptide factors, exhibiting bactericidal activity, have been detected in some insect species. These humoral factors are induced upon infection. The present report describes the discovery of the apidaecins, isolated from lymph fluid of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). The apidaecins represent a new family of inducible peptide antibiotics with the following basic structure: GNNRP(V/I)YIPQPRPPHPR(L/I). These heat-stable, non-helical peptides are active against a wide range of plant-associated bacteria and some human pathogens, through a bacteriostatic rather than a lytic process. Chemically synthesized apidaecins display the same bactericidal activity as their natural counterparts. While only active antibacterial peptides are detectable in adult honeybee lymph, bee larvae contain considerable amounts of inactive precursor molecules. PMID:2676519

  11. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  12. Food-derived immunomodulatory peptides.

    PubMed

    Santiago-López, Lourdes; Hernández-Mendoza, Adrián; Vallejo-Cordoba, Belinda; Mata-Haro, Verónica; González-Córdova, Aarón F

    2016-08-01

    Food proteins contain specific amino acid sequences within their structures that may positively impact bodily functions and have multiple immunomodulatory effects. The functional properties of these specific sequences, also referred to as bioactive peptides, are revealed only after the degradation of native proteins during digestion processes. Currently, milk proteins have been the most explored source of bioactive peptides, which presents an interesting opportunity for the dairy industry. However, plant- and animal-derived proteins have also been shown to be important sources of bioactive peptides. This review summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence of the role of various food proteins as sources of immunomodulatory peptides and discusses the possible pathways involving these properties. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Peptide models for membrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D

    1996-01-01

    Peptides may be synthesized with sequences corresponding to putative transmembrane domains and/or pore-lining regions that are deduced from the primary structures of ion channel proteins. These can then be incorporated into lipid bilayer membranes for structural and functional studies. In addition to the ability to invoke ion channel activity, critical issues are the secondary structures adopted and the mode of assembly of these short transmembrane peptides in the reconstituted systems. The present review concentrates on results obtained with peptides from ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels, as well as proton-conducting channels. These are considered within the context of current molecular models and the limited data available on the structure of native ion channels and natural channel-forming peptides. PMID:8615800

  14. Facile Analysis and Sequencing of Linear and Branched Peptide Boronic Acids by MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Crumpton, Jason; Zhang, Wenyu; Santos, Webster

    2011-01-01

    Interest in peptides incorporating boronic acid moieties is increasing due to their potential as therapeutics/diagnostics for a variety of diseases such as cancer. The utility of peptide boronic acids may be expanded with access to vast libraries that can be deconvoluted rapidly and economically. Unfortunately, current detection protocols using mass spectrometry are laborious and confounded by boronic acid trimerization, which requires time consuming analysis of dehydration products. These issues are exacerbated when the peptide sequence is unknown, as with de novo sequencing, and especially when multiple boronic acid moieties are present. Thus, a rapid, reliable and simple method for peptide identification is of utmost importance. Herein, we report the identification and sequencing of linear and branched peptide boronic acids containing up to five boronic acid groups by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Protocols for preparation of pinacol boronic esters were adapted for efficient MALDI analysis of peptides. Additionally, a novel peptide boronic acid detection strategy was developed in which 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) served as both matrix and derivatizing agent in a convenient, in situ, on-plate esterification. Finally, we demonstrate that DHB-modified peptide boronic acids from a single bead can be analyzed by MALDI-MSMS analysis, validating our approach for the identification and sequencing of branched peptide boronic acid libraries. PMID:21449540

  15. Peptide-dependent Conformational Fluctuation Determines the Stability of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yanaka, Saeko; Ueno, Takamasa; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F.; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugase, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In immune-mediated control of pathogens, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I presents various antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells. Long-lived peptide presentation is important for efficient antigen-specific T-cell activation. Presentation time depends on the peptide sequence and the stability of the peptide-HLA complex (pHLA). However, the determinant of peptide-dependent pHLA stability remains elusive. Here, to reveal the pHLA stabilization mechanism, we examined the crystal structures of an HLA class I allomorph in complex with HIV-derived peptides and evaluated site-specific conformational fluctuations using NMR. Although the crystal structures of various pHLAs were almost identical independent of the peptides, fluctuation analyses identified a peptide-dependent minor state that would be more tightly packed toward the peptide. The minor population correlated well with the thermostability and cell surface presentation of pHLA, indicating that this newly identified minor state is important for stabilizing the pHLA and facilitating T-cell recognition. PMID:25028510

  16. Antiviral drug discovery strategy using combinatorial libraries of structurally constrained peptides.

    PubMed

    Real, Eléonore; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Battaglia, Véronique; Jallet, Corinne; Perrin, Pierre; Tordo, Noël; Chrisment, Peggy; D'Alayer, Jacques; Legrain, Pierre; Jacob, Yves

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a new strategy for antiviral peptide discovery by using lyssaviruses (rabies virus and rabies-related viruses) as models. Based on the mimicry of natural bioactive peptides, two genetically encoded combinatorial peptide libraries composed of intrinsically constrained peptides (coactamers) were designed. Proteomic knowledge concerning the functional network of interactions in the lyssavirus transcription-replication complex highlights the phosphoprotein (P) as a prime target for inhibitors of viral replication. We present an integrated, sequential drug discovery process for selection of peptides with antiviral activity directed against the P. Our approach combines (i). an exhaustive two-hybrid selection of peptides binding two phylogenetically divergent lyssavirus P's, (ii). a functional analysis of protein interaction inhibition in a viral reverse genetic assay, coupled with a physical analysis of viral nucleoprotein-P complex by protein chip mass spectrometry, and (iii). an assay for inhibition of lyssavirus infection in mammalian cells. The validity of this strategy was demonstrated by the identification of four peptides exhibiting an efficient antiviral activity. Our work highlights the importance of P as a target in anti-rabies virus drug discovery. Furthermore, the screening strategy and the coactamer libraries presented in this report could be considered, respectively, a general target validation strategy and a potential source of biologically active peptides which could also help to design pharmacologically active peptide-mimicking molecules. The strategy described here is easily applicable to other pathogens.

  17. Peptide and glycopeptide dendrimer apple trees as enzyme models and for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Darbre, Tamis

    2012-02-28

    Solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) provides peptides with a dendritic topology when diamino acids are introduced in the sequences. Peptide dendrimers with one to three amino acids between branches can be prepared with up to 38 amino acids (MW ~ 5,000 Da). Larger peptide dendrimers (MW ~ 30,000) were obtained by a multivalent chloroacetyl cysteine (ClAc) ligation. Structural studies of peptide dendrimers by CD, FT-IR, NMR and molecular dynamics reveal molten globule states containing up to 50% of α-helix. Esterase and aldolase peptide dendrimers displaying dendritic effects and enzyme kinetics (k(cat)/k(uncat) ~ 10(5)) were designed or discovered by screening large combinatorial libraries. Strong ligands for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecA and LecB able to inhibit biofilm formation were obtained with glycopeptide dendrimers. Efficient ligands for cobalamin, cytotoxic colchicine conjugates and antimicrobial peptide dendrimers were also developed showing the versatility of dendritic peptides. Complementing the multivalency, the amino acid composition of the dendrimers strongly influenced the catalytic or biological activity obtained demonstrating the importance of the "apple tree" configuration for protein-like function in peptide dendrimers.

  18. Inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptide on tumor proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Lian; Shen, Jian-Fen; Min, Li-Shan; Ping, Jin-Liang; Lu, Yong-Liang; Dai, Li-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the inhibitory effect of midkine-binding peptides on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) proliferation and angiogenesis of xenograft tumor. Methods: The midkine-binding peptides were panned by Ph.D.-7™ Phage Display Peptide Library Kit, and the specific binding activities of positive clones to target protein were examined by phage ELISA. The effect of midkine-binding peptides on proliferation of HUVECs was confirmed by MTT test. The xenograft tumor model was formed in BALB/c mice with the murine hepatocarcinoma cells H22 (H22). Microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry of factor VIII staining. Results: Midkine-binding peptides have the inhibitory effects on tumor angiogenesis, a proliferation assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) indicated that particular midkine-binding peptides significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HUVECs. Midkine-binding peptides were also observed to efficiently suppress angiogenesis induced by murine hepatocarcinoma H22 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Conclusion: The midkine-binding peptides can inhibit solid tumor growth by retarding the formation of new blood vessels. The results indicate that midkine-binding peptides may represent potent anti-angiogenesis agents in vivo. PMID:26191241

  19. Biomedical Applications of Organometal-Peptide Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    Peptides are well suited as targeting vectors for the directed delivery of metal-based drugs or probes for biomedical investigations. This chapter describes synthetic strategies for the preparation of conjugates of medically interesting peptides with covalently bound metal complexes. Peptides that were used include neuropeptides (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin), uptake peptides (TAT and poly-Arg), and intracellular localization sequences. To these peptides, a whole variety of transition metal complexes has been attached in recent years by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) techniques. The metal complex can be attached to the peptide on the resin as part of the SPPS scheme. Alternatively, the metal complex may be attached to the peptide as a postsynthetic modification. Advantages as well as disadvantages for either strategy are discussed. Biomedical applications include radiopharmaceutical applications, anticancer and antibacterial activity, metal-peptide conjugates as targeted CO-releasing molecules, and metal-peptide conjugates in biosensor applications.

  20. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  1. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated. PMID:26880470

  2. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  3. A physicochemical approach for predicting the effectiveness of peptide-based gene delivery systems for use in plasmid-based gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, J G; Li, C; Shi, M; Logan, M J; Alila, H; Rolland, A; Tomlinson, E; Sparrow, J T; Smith, L C

    1998-01-01

    Novel synthetic peptides, based on carrier peptide analogs (YKAKnWK) and an amphipathic peptide (GLFEALLELLESLWELLLEA), have been formulated with DNA plasmids to create peptide-based gene delivery systems. The carrier peptides are used to condense plasmids into nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter (DH) ranging from 40 to 200 nm, which are sterically stable for over 100 h. Size and morphology of the carrier peptide/plasmid complex have been determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The amphipathic peptide is used as a pH-sensitive lytic agent to facilitate release of the plasmid from endosomes after endocytosis of the peptide/plasmid complex. Hemolysis assays have shown that the amphipathic peptide destabilizes lipid bilayers at low pH, mimicking the properties of viral fusogenic peptides. However, circular dichroism studies show that unlike the viral fusion peptides, this amphipathic peptide loses some of its alpha-helical structure at low pH in the presence of liposomes. The peptide-based gene delivery systems were tested for transfection efficiency in a variety of cell lines, including 14-day C2C12 mouse myotubes, using gene expression systems containing the beta-galactosidase reporter gene. Transfection data demonstrate a correlation between in vitro transfection efficiency and the combination of several physical properties of the peptide/plasmid complexes, including 1) DNA dose, 2) the zeta potential of the particle, 3) the requirement of both lytic and carrier peptides, and 4) the number of lysine residues associated with the carrier peptide. Transfection data on 14-day C2C12 myotubes utilizing the therapeutic human growth hormone gene formulated in an optimal peptide gene delivery system show an increase in gene expression over time, with a maximum in protein levels at 96 h (approximately 18 ng/ml). PMID:9635734

  4. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  5. Latarcins: versatile spider venom peptides.

    PubMed

    Dubovskii, Peter V; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Feofanov, Alexey V; Grishin, Eugene V; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-12-01

    Arthropod venoms feature the presence of cytolytic peptides believed to act synergetically with neurotoxins to paralyze prey or deter aggressors. Many of them are linear, i.e., lack disulfide bonds. When isolated from the venom, or obtained by other means, these peptides exhibit common properties. They are cationic; being mostly disordered in aqueous solution, assume amphiphilic α-helical structure in contact with lipid membranes; and exhibit general cytotoxicity, including antifungal, antimicrobial, hemolytic, and anticancer activities. To suit the pharmacological needs, the activity spectrum of these peptides should be modified by rational engineering. As an example, we provide a detailed review on latarcins (Ltc), linear cytolytic peptides from Lachesana tarabaevi spider venom. Diverse experimental and computational techniques were used to investigate the spatial structure of Ltc in membrane-mimicking environments and their effects on model lipid bilayers. The antibacterial activity of Ltc was studied against a panel of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In addition, the action of Ltc on erythrocytes and cancer cells was investigated in detail with confocal laser scanning microscopy. In the present review, we give a critical account of the progress in the research of Ltc. We explore the relationship between Ltc structure and their biological activity and derive molecular characteristics, which can be used for optimization of other linear peptides. Current applications of Ltc and prospective use of similar membrane-active peptides are outlined.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides from Phyllomedusa frogs: from biomolecular diversity to potential nanotechnologic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Azevedo Calderon, Leonardo de; Silva, Alexandre de Almeida E; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Stábeli, Rodrigo Guerino

    2011-01-01

    Screening for new bioactive peptides in South American anurans has been pioneered in frogs of the genus Phyllomedusa. All frogs of this genus have venomous skin secretions, i.e., a complex mixture of bioactive peptides against potential predators and pathogens that presumably evolved in a scenario of predator-prey interaction and defense against microbial invasion. For every new anuran species studied new peptides are found, with homologies to hormones, neurotransmitters, antimicrobials, and several other peptides with unknown biological activity. From Vittorio Erspamer findings, this genus has been reported as a "treasure store" of bioactive peptides, and several groups focus their research on these species. From 1966 to 2009, more than 200 peptide sequences from different Phyllomedusa species were deposited in UniProt and other databases. During the last decade, the emergence of high-throughput molecular technologies involving de novo peptide sequencing via tandem mass spectrometry, cDNA cloning, pharmacological screening, and surface plasmon resonance applied to peptide discovery, led to fast structural data acquisition and the generation of peptide molecular libraries. Research groups on bioactive peptides in Brazil using these new technologies, accounted for the exponential increase of new molecules described in the last decade, much higher than in any previous decades. Recently, these secretions were also reported as a rich source of multiple antimicrobial peptides effective against multidrug resistant strains of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and virus, providing instructive lessons for the development of new and more efficient nanotechnological-based therapies for infectious diseases treatment. Therefore, novel drugs arising from the identification and analysis of bioactive peptides from South American anuran biodiversity have a promising future role on nanobiotechnology.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides as Infection Imaging Agents: Better Than Radiolabeled Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muammad Saeed; Imran, Muhammad Babar; Nadeem, Muhammad Afzal; Shahid, Abubaker

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging techniques offer whole body imaging for localization of number and site of infective foci inspite of limitation of spatial resolution. The innate human immune system contains a large member of important elements including antimicrobial peptides to combat any form of infection. However, development of antibiotics against bacteria progressed rapidly and gained popularity over antimicrobial peptides but even powerful antimicrobials failed to reduce morbidity and mortality due to emergence of mutant strains of bacteria resulting in antimicrobial resistance. Differentiation between infection and inflammation using radiolabeled compounds with nuclear medicine techniques has always been a dilemma which is still to be resolved. Starting from nonspecific tracers to specific radiolabeled tracers, the question is still unanswered. Specific radiolabeled tracers included antibiotics and antimicrobial peptides which bind directly to the bacteria for efficient localization with advanced nuclear medicine equipments. However, there are merits and demerits attributed to each. In the current paper, radiolabeled antibiotics and radiolabeled peptides for infection localization have been discussed starting with the background of primitive nonspecific tracers. Radiolabeled antimicrobial peptides have certain merits compared with labeled antibiotics which make them superior agents for localization of infective focus. PMID:22675369

  8. Alkaline Phosphatase-Mimicking Peptide Nanofibers for Osteogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gulseren, Gulcihan; Yasa, I Ceren; Ustahuseyin, Oya; Tekin, E Deniz; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2015-07-13

    Recognition of molecules and regulation of extracellular matrix synthesis are some of the functions of enzymes in addition to their catalytic activity. While a diverse array of enzyme-like materials have been developed, these efforts have largely been confined to the imitation of the chemical structure and catalytic activity of the enzymes, and it is unclear whether enzyme-mimetic molecules can also be used to replicate the matrix-regulatory roles ordinarily performed by natural enzymes. Self-assembled peptide nanofibers can provide multifunctional enzyme-mimetic properties, as the active sequences of the target enzymes can be directly incorporated into the peptides. Here, we report enhanced bone regeneration efficiency through peptide nanofibers carrying both catalytic and matrix-regulatory functions of alkaline phosphatase, a versatile enzyme that plays a critical role in bone formation by regulating phosphate homeostasis and calcifiable bone matrix formation. Histidine presenting peptide nanostructures were developed to function as phosphatases. These molecules are able to catalyze phosphate hydrolysis and serve as bone-like nodule inducing scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase-like peptide nanofibers enabled osteogenesis for both osteoblast-like and mesenchymal cell lines.

  9. Modulation of muscle contraction by a cell-permeable peptide

    PubMed Central

    Tünnemann, Gisela; Karczewski, Peter; Haase, Hannelore

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to immortal cell lines, primary cells are hardly susceptible to intracellular delivery methods such as transfection. In this study, we evaluated the direct delivery of several cell-permeable peptides under noninvasive conditions into living primary adult rat cardiomyocytes. We specifically monitored the functional effects of a cell-permeable peptide containing the 15 amino acid N-terminal peptide from human ventricular light chain-1 (VLC-1) on contraction and intracellular Ca2+ signals after electrical stimulation in primary adult cardiomyocytes. The transducible VLC-1 variant was taken up by cardiomyocytes within 5 min with more than 95% efficiency and localized to sarcomeric structures. Analysis of the functional effects of the cell-permeable VLC-1 revealed an enhancement of the intrinsic contractility of cardiomyocytes without affecting the intracellular Ca2+. Therefore, peptide transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides represents not only a unique strategy to enhance heart muscle function with no secondary effect on intracellular Ca2+ but also an invaluable tool for the modulation and manipulation of protein interactions in general and in primary cells. PMID:17717642

  10. An FPGA Implementation to Detect Selective Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Polanco González, Carlos; Nuño Maganda, Marco Aurelio; Arias-Estrada, Miguel; del Rio, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Exhaustive prediction of physicochemical properties of peptide sequences is used in different areas of biological research. One example is the identification of selective cationic antibacterial peptides (SCAPs), which may be used in the treatment of different diseases. Due to the discrete nature of peptide sequences, the physicochemical properties calculation is considered a high-performance computing problem. A competitive solution for this class of problems is to embed algorithms into dedicated hardware. In the present work we present the adaptation, design and implementation of an algorithm for SCAPs prediction into a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform. Four physicochemical properties codes useful in the identification of peptide sequences with potential selective antibacterial activity were implemented into an FPGA board. The speed-up gained in a single-copy implementation was up to 108 times compared with a single Intel processor cycle for cycle. The inherent scalability of our design allows for replication of this code into multiple FPGA cards and consequently improvements in speed are possible. Our results show the first embedded SCAPs prediction solution described and constitutes the grounds to efficiently perform the exhaustive analysis of the sequence-physicochemical properties relationship of peptides. PMID:21738652

  11. Anti-tumoral activity of human salivary peptides.

    PubMed

    da Costa, João Pinto; Carvalhais, Virginia; Amado, Francisco; Silva, Artur; Nogueira-Ferreira, Rita; Ferreira, Rita; Helguero, Luísa; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy continues to be the standard treatment for advanced or metastasized cancer. However, commonly used chemotherapeutic agents may induce damage in healthy cells and tissues. Thus, in recent years, there has been an increased focus on the development of new, efficient anticancer drugs exhibiting low toxicity and that are not affected by mechanisms of chemoresistance. In the present work, we tested synthetic and naturally obtained human salivary peptides against breast, prostate, colon, osteosarcoma and bladder cancer cell lines (T47-D, PC-3, HT-29, MG63, T-24, respectively). Results have showed that there is a reduced cell population increase that is peptide-, cell- and possibly pathway-specific, with the most potent effect observed in observed in T-47D breast cancer cells. Protein expression and microscopy results further indicate that, in this cell line, the peptide with the sequence GPPPQGGRPQG (GG peptide) interferes with the ability of cell adhesion proteins to stabilize adherens junctions, such as E-cadherin, leading to apoptosis. These promising results encourage future works aimed at disclosing the vast potential of salivary peptides as new therapeutic agents.

  12. Screening and characterization of anti-SEB peptides using a bacterial display library and microfluidic magnetic sorting

    PubMed Central

    Kogot, Joshua M; Pennington, Joseph M; Sarkes, Deborah A; Kingery, David A; Pellegrino, Paul M; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial peptide display libraries enable the rapid and efficient selection of peptides that have high affinity and selectivity toward their targets. Using a 15-mer random library on the outer surface of Escherichia coli (E.coli), high-affinity peptides were selected against a staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) protein after four rounds of biopanning. On-cell screening analysis of affinity and specificity were measured by flow cytometry and directly compared to the synthetic peptide, off-cell, using peptide-ELISA. DNA sequencing of the positive clones after four rounds of microfluidic magnetic sorting (MMS) revealed a common consensus sequence of (S/T)CH(Y/F)W for the SEB-binding peptides R338, R418, and R445. The consensus sequence in these bacterial display peptides has similar amino acid characteristics with SEB peptide sequences isolated from phage display. The Kd measured by peptide-ELISA off-cell was 2.4 nM for R418 and 3.0 nM for R445. The bacterial peptide display methodology using the semiautomated MMS resulted in the discovery of selective peptides with affinity for a food safety and defense threat. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Journal of Molecular Recognition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25319622

  13. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  14. Biosynthesized (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled pro-opiomelanocortin peptides as novel recovery markers in radioimmunoassay of peptide hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendale, B.E.; Jarrett, D.B.

    1985-12-01

    Hormones are extracted from plasma with varying efficiency. Thus, markers or internal standards are often needed, to monitor and correct for extraction losses. To do so is difficult in the case of peptide hormones because radioactive recovery markers either have a low specific activity or, if labeled with iodine, may not be fully representative because of alterations in their size and charge. More importantly, markers labeled with /sup 125/I can interact in, and thus compromise, the subsequent radioimmunoassay. AtT-20 mouse pituitary tumor cells, which can be stimulated to synthesize and secrete pro-opiomelanocortin peptides, can biosynthetically label beta-lipotropin (beta-LPH) with (/sup 35/S)methionine. The labeled peptide, which is co-eluted with unlabeled beta-LPH in high-performance liquid chromatography, is fully immunoprecipitable and has a specific activity of 34 Ci/g. We use this labeled peptide to monitor the recovery of beta-LPH in silicic acid extraction from plasma. This peptide is an ideal marker of analytical recovery because it does not interfere in subsequent radioimmunoassays.

  15. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mäde, Veronika; Els-Heindl, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Summary The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies. PMID:24991269

  16. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins via Fusion Peptides in Intact Plants

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kiaw Kiaw; Motoda, Yoko; Watanabe, Satoru; Sofiman Othman, Ahmad; Kigawa, Takanori; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    In current plant biotechnology, the introduction of exogenous DNA encoding desired traits is the most common approach used to modify plants. However, general plant transformation methods can cause random integration of exogenous DNA into the plant genome. To avoid these events, alternative methods, such as a direct protein delivery system, are needed to modify the plant. Although there have been reports of the delivery of proteins into cultured plant cells, there are currently no methods for the direct delivery of proteins into intact plants, owing to their hierarchical structures. Here, we demonstrate the efficient fusion-peptide-based delivery of proteins into intact Arabidopsis thaliana. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa) was selected as a model protein to optimize conditions for delivery into the cytosol. The general applicability of our method to large protein cargo was also demonstrated by the delivery of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, 150 kDa) into the cytosol. The compatibility of the fusion peptide system with the delivery of proteins to specific cellular organelles was also demonstrated using the fluorescent protein Citrine (27 kDa) conjugated to either a nuclear localization signal (NLS) or a peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS). In conclusion, our designed fusion peptide system can deliver proteins with a wide range of molecular weights (27 to 150 kDa) into the cells of intact A. thaliana without interfering with the organelle-targeting peptide conjugated to the protein. We expect that this efficient protein delivery system will be a powerful tool in plant biotechnology. PMID:27100681

  17. Autocrine-Based Selection of Drugs That Target Ion Channels from Combinatorial Venom Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongkai; Du, Mingjuan; Xie, Jia; Liu, Xiao; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Wei; Xin, Xiu; Possani, Lourival D; Yea, Kyungmoo; Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Animal venoms represent a rich source of pharmacologically active peptides that interact with ion channels. However, a challenge to discovering drugs remains because of the slow pace at which venom peptides are discovered and refined. An efficient autocrine-based high-throughput selection system was developed to discover and refine venom peptides that target ion channels. The utility of this system was demonstrated by the discovery of novel Kv1.3 channel blockers from a natural venom peptide library that was formatted for autocrine-based selection. We also engineered a Kv1.3 blocker peptide (ShK) derived from sea anemone to generate a subtype-selective Kv1.3 blocker with a long half-life in vivo. PMID:27197631

  18. Preparation and characterization of coacervate microcapsules for the delivery of antimicrobial oyster peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Yezhou; Wu, Zhongchen; Chen, Haixu

    2009-03-01

    Oyster peptides-loaded alginate/chitosan/starch microcapsules were prepared using external gelation method and internal emulsion gelation method. The solution of oyster peptides complexes was encapsulated into the microcapsules, which endowed the microcapsules with intestine passive targeting properties. The swelling behavior, encapsulation efficiency, and release behavior of oyster peptides from the microcapsules at different pH values were investigated. The microcapsules exhibited sustained release of the peptides in intestinal medium, and the release rate could be regulated by the pH value: in simulated gastric fluid, the release rate was greatly decreased, and in simulated body fluid and intestinal fluid, the microcapsules exhibited a sustained release in 24 h with different release rates. The microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared. The results suggested that the alginate/chitosan/starch microcapsules could be a suitable copolymeric carrier system for intestinal protein or peptides delivery in the intestine.

  19. Capillary electrophoretic studies on quantum dots and histidine appended peptides self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Chen, Yao; Teng, Yiwan; Wang, Cheli; Li, Jinchen; Liu, Li; Dong, Bingyu; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    Herein, we designed four peptides appended with different numbers of histidine (Hisn -peptide). We launched a systematic investigation on quantum dots (QDs) and Hisn -peptide self-assembly in solution using fluorescence coupled CE (CE-FL). The results indicated that CE-FL was a powerful method to probe how ligands interaction on the surface of nanoparticles. The self-assembly of QDs and peptide was determined by the numbers of histidine. We also observed that longer polyhistidine tags (n ≤ 6) could improve the self-assembly efficiency. Furthermore, the formation and separation of QD-peptide assembly were also studied by CE-FL inside a capillary. The total time for the mixing, self-assembly, separation, and detection was less than 10 min. Our method greatly expands the application of CE-FL in QDs-based biolabeling and bioanalysis.

  20. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    PubMed

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  1. Assessing the Efficacy of Mdm2/Mdm4-Inhibiting Stapled Peptides Using Cellular Thermal Shift Assays

    PubMed Central

    Xiong Tan, Ban; Brown, Christopher J.; Ferrer, Fernando J.; Yuen, Tsz Ying; Quah, Soo Tng; Chan, Boon Hong; Jansson, Anna E.; Teo, Hsiang Ling; Nordlund, Pär; Lane, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous publications on stapled peptide inhibitors against Mdm2/Mdm4-p53 interactions have established that this new class of drugs have the potential to be easily optimised to attain high binding affinity and specificity, but the mechanisms controlling their cellular uptake and target engagement remain elusive and controversial. To aid in understanding the rules of peptide and staple design, and to enable rapid optimisation, we employed the newly-developed cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA). CETSA was able to validate stapled peptide binding to Mdm2 and Mdm4, and the method was also used to determine the extent of cellular uptake, cellular availability, and intracellular binding of the endogenous target proteins in its native environment. Our data suggest that while the stapled peptides engage their targets intracellularly, more work is needed to improve their cellular entry and target engagement efficiency in vivo. CETSA now provides a valuable tool to optimize such in vivo properties of stapled peptides. PMID:26159518

  2. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  3. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation of Peptide Cations in a Dual Pressure Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Myles W.; Smith, Suncerae I.; Ledvina, Aaron R.; Madsen, James A.; Coon, Joshua J.; Schwartz, Jae C.; Stafford, George C.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    A dual pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer was modified to permit infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) in each of the two cells - the first a high pressure cell operated at nominally 5 × 10-3 Torr and the second a low pressure cell operated at nominally 3 × 10-4 Torr. When IRMPD was performed in the high pressure cell, most peptide ions did not undergo significant photodissociation; however, in the low pressure cell peptide cations were efficiently dissociated with less than 25 ms of IR irradiation regardless of charge state. IRMPD of peptide cations allowed the detection of low m/z product ions including the y1 fragments and immonium ions which are not typically observed by ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). Photodissociation efficiencies of ~100% and MS/MS (tandem mass spectrometry) efficiencies of greater than 60% were observed for both multiply and singly protonated peptides. In general, higher sequence coverage of peptides was obtained using IRMPD over CID. Further, greater than 90% of the product ion current in the IRMPD mass spectra of doubly charged peptide ions was composed of singly charged product ions compared to the CID mass spectra in which the abundances of the multiply and singly charged product ions were equally divided. Highly charged primary product ions also underwent efficient photodissociation to yield singly charged secondary product ions, thus simplifying the IRMPD product ion mass spectra. PMID:19739654

  5. Exogenous loading of a tapasin-dependent peptide onto HLA-B*44:02 can be restored by acid treatment or fixation of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Stroobant, Vincent; Demotte, Nathalie; Luiten, Rosalie M.; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Cresswell, Peter; Bonehill, Aude; Michaux, Alexandre; Ma, Wenbin; Mulder, Arend; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Vigneron, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Anti-tumor CTLs recognize peptides derived from cellular proteins and presented on MHC class I. One category of peptides recognized by these CTLs is derived from proteins encoded by “cancer-germline” genes, which are specifically expressed in tumors, and therefore represent optimal targets for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we identify an antigenic peptide, which is derived from the MAGE-A1-encoded protein (160-169) and presented to CTLs by HLA-B*44:02. Although this peptide is encoded by MAGE-A1, processed endogenously and presented by tumor cells, the corresponding synthetic peptide is hardly able to sensitize target cells to CTL recognition when pulsed exogenously. Endogenous processing and presentation of this peptide is strictly dependent on the presence of tapasin, which is believed to help peptide loading by stabilizing a peptide-receptive form of HLA-B*44:02. Exogenous loading of the peptide can be dramatically improved by paraformaldehyde fixation of surface molecules or by peptide loading at acidic pH. Either strategy allows efficient exogenous loading of the peptide, presumably by generating or stabilizing a peptide-receptive, empty conformation of the HLA. Altogether, our results indicate a potential drawback of short peptide-based vaccination strategies and offer possible solutions regarding the use of problematic epitopes such as the one described here. PMID:22678898

  6. Computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

    PubMed

    Rhinehardt, Kristen L; Mohan, Ram V; Srinivas, Goundla

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is the progressive process that holds each living creature in its grasp. From strands of DNA evolution shapes life with response to our ever-changing environment and time. It is the continued study of this most primitive process that has led to the advancement of modern biology. The success and failure in the reading, processing, replication, and expression of genetic code and its resulting biomolecules keep the delicate balance of life. Investigations into these fundamental processes continue to make headlines as science continues to explore smaller scale interactions with increasing complexity. New applications and advanced understanding of DNA, RNA, peptides, and proteins are pushing technology and science forward and together. Today the addition of computers and advances in science has led to the fields of computational biology and chemistry. Through these computational advances it is now possible not only to quantify the end results but also visualize, analyze, and fully understand mechanisms by gaining deeper insights. The biomolecular motion that exists governing the physical and chemical phenomena can now be analyzed with the advent of computational modeling. Ever-increasing computational power combined with efficient algorithms and components are further expanding the fidelity and scope of such modeling and simulations. This chapter discusses computational methods that apply biological processes, in particular computational modeling of peptide-aptamer binding.

  7. Atomic Coordination Reflects Peptide Immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Antipas, Georgios S. E.; Germenis, Anastasios E.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated that the immunological identity of variant peptides may be accurately predicted on the basis of atomic coordination of both unprotonated and protonated tertiary structures, provided that the structure of the native peptide (index) is known. The metric which was discovered to account for this discrimination is the coordination difference between the variant and the index; we also showed that increasing coordination difference in respect to the index was correlated to a correspondingly weakening immunological outcome of the variant. Additionally, we established that this metric quickly seizes to operate beyond the peptide scale, e.g., within a coordination shell inclusive of atoms up to a distance of 7 Å away from the peptide or over the entire pMHC-TCR complex. Analysis of molecular orbital interactions for a range of formal charges further revealed that the N-terminus of the agonists was always able to sustain a stable ammonium (NH3+) group which was consistently absent in antagonists. We deem that the presence of NH3+ constitutes a secondary observable with a biological consequence, signifying a change in T cell activation. While our analysis of protonated structures relied on the quantum chemical relaxation of the H species, the results were consistent across a wide range of peptide charge and spin polarization conditions. PMID:26793714

  8. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  9. Peptide targeted copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Michelle T; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-01-01

    Peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled diagnostic agents for positron emission tomography are viable candidates for molecular imaging of cancer. In a clinical setting, optimal image quality relies on selective tumor uptake of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer. The three components of the radiotracer construct--the chelate group, linker and targeting peptide--all influence the biodistribution of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Low or moderate Cu complex stability in vivo results in transmetallation of ⁶⁴Cu to endogenous proteins, giving rise to high background activity. The length and the nature of the linker group affect the affinity of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer for the target receptor. Variations in the peptide sequence can impact on the metabolic stability and therefore the bioavailability and tumor retention of the ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiotracer in vivo. Lastly, the hydrophilicity of the construct can influence radiotracer metabolism and clearance pathways. Recent advances in the field of peptide targeted ⁶⁴Cu-labelled radiopharmaceuticals involve GRPR-targeted and αvβ3 integrin receptor-targeted constructs. These constructs are based on the bombesin peptide sequence and the RGD recognition motif respectively. These examples are reviewed as case studies in the optimisation of ⁶⁴Cu radiotracer design.

  10. LL-37-derived peptides eradicate multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from thermally wounded human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  11. A rationally engineered anti-HIV peptide fusion inhibitor with greatly reduced immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Frances; Schmidt, Kerstin; Zahn, Roland C; Richter, Cornelia; Radeke, Heinfried H; Schmitz, Jörn E; von Laer, Dorothee; Egerer, Lisa

    2013-02-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 (HR2) region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very efficient HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. We previously developed innovative gene therapeutic approaches aiming at the direct in vivo production of C peptides from genetically modified host cells and found that T cells expressing membrane-anchored or secreted C peptides are protected from HIV-1 infection. However, an unwanted immune response against such antiviral peptides may significantly impair clinical efficacy and pose safety risks to patients. To overcome this problem, we engineered a novel C peptide, V2o, with greatly reduced immunogenicity and excellent antiviral activity. V2o is based on the chimeric C peptide C46-EHO, which is derived from the HR2 regions of HIV-2(EHO) and HIV-1(HxB2) and has broad anti-HIV and anti-simian immunodeficiency virus activity. Antibody and major histocompatibility complex class I epitopes within the C46-EHO peptide sequence were identified by in silico and in vitro analyses. Using rational design, we removed these epitopes by amino acid substitutions and thus minimized antigenicity and immunogenicity considerably. At the same time, the antiviral activity of the deimmunized peptide V2o was preserved or even enhanced compared to that of the parental C46-EHO peptide. Thus, V2o is an ideal candidate, especially for those novel therapeutic approaches for HIV infection that involve direct in vivo production of antiviral C peptides. PMID:23147734

  12. Antimicrobial activity of polycationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Del Prete, M S; Scalise, G

    1999-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six polycationic peptides, buforin II, cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin, were evaluated against several clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic bacteria, yeasts, Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptosporidium parvum, by using microbroth dilution methods. The peptides exhibited different antibacterial activities and rapid time-dependent killing. The gram-negative organisms were more susceptible to buforin II and cecropin P1, whereas buforin II and ranalexin were the most active compounds against the gram-positive strains. Similarly, ranalexin showed the highest activity against Candida spp., whereas magainin II exerted the highest anticryptococcal activity. Finally, the peptides showed high anti-Pneumocystis activity, whereas no compound had strong inhibitory effect on C. parvum. PMID:10612440

  13. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  14. Systematic Comparisons of Formulations of Linear Oligolysine Peptides with siRNA and Plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Albert; McCarthy, David; Hart, Stephen L; Tagalakis, Aristides D

    2016-05-01

    The effects of lysine peptide lengths on DNA and siRNA packaging and delivery were studied using four linear oligolysine peptides with 8 (K8), 16 (K16), 24 (K24) and 32 (K32) lysines. Oligolysine peptides with 16 lysines or longer were effective for stable monodisperse particle formation and optimal transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (pDNA), but K8 formulations were less stable under anionic heparin challenge and consequently displayed poor transfection efficiency. However, here we show that the oligolysines were not able to package siRNA to form stable complexes, and consequently, siRNA transfection was unsuccessful. These results indicate that the physical structure and length of cationic peptides and their charge ratios are critical parameters for stable particle formation with pDNA and siRNA and that without packaging, delivery and transfection cannot be achieved. PMID:26684657

  15. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  16. De novo design of self-assembled hexapeptides as β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuming; Liang, Guizhao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Zhao, Jun; Patel, Kunal; Yu, Xiang; Zhao, Chao; Ding, Binrong; Zhang, Ge; Zhou, Feimeng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-10-15

    The ability of peptides to construct specific secondary structures provides a useful function for biomaterial design that cannot be achieved with traditional organic molecules and polymers. Inhibition of amyloid formation is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Existing peptide-based inhibitors are mainly derived from original amyloid sequences, which have very limited sequence diversity and activity. It is highly desirable to explore other peptide-based inhibitors that are not directly derived from amyloid sequences. Here, we develop a hybrid high-throughput computational method to efficiently screen and design hexapeptide inhibitors against amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and toxicity from the first principle. Computationally screened/designed inhibitors are then validated for their inhibition activity using biophysical experiments. We propose and demonstrate a proof-of-concept of the "like-interacts-like" design principle that the self-assembling peptides are able to interact strongly with conformationally similar motifs of Aβ peptides and to competitively reduce Aβ-Aβ interactions, thus preventing Aβ aggregation and Aβ-induced toxicity. Such a de novo design can also be generally applicable to design new peptide inhibitors against other amyloid diseases, beyond traditional peptide inhibitors with homologous sequences to parent amyloid peptides.

  17. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  18. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N.; Paavola, Chad D.; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I.; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Martinez, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The “helper cell” packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  19. Homogenous Phase Enrichment of Cysteine-Containing Peptides for Improved Proteome Coverage.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Pruś, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    We describe a proteomic reactor-based homogeneous phase enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides in a filter aided sample preparation (FASP) format. In this approach thiol-reduced proteins are derivatized with thiol-activated polyethylene glycol (TAPEG) before protein cleavage. Consecutive digestion with endoproteinase LysC and trypsin allows isolation of two fractions of nonderivatized peptides. After reduction of disulfide bonds between cysteine-containing peptides and the polyethylene glycol moieties, a third fraction of peptides is collected. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed that on average this fraction consists of 95% cysteine-containing peptides. Since 85-93% of all peptides are unique to a single subfraction, the combination of TAPEG and FASP offers an efficient peptide separation strategy. Analysis of whole cell lysates of mouse brain, liver, red muscle fibers, and CaCo-2 cells using the TAPEG FASP approach allowed identification of 6,900, 5,800, 4,200 and 7,900 proteins, 10-30% more than were identified using two-step digestion without isolation of Cys-containing peptides. The fractionation also increased the protein sequence coverage by 10-30%. PMID:26028250

  20. Stability and efficacy of synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptides nebulized using high frequency acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Rezk, Amgad R; Khara, Jasmeet Singh; Yeo, Leslie Y; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel

    2016-05-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW), a nanometer amplitude electroelastic wave generated and propagated on low-loss piezoelectric substrates (such as LiNbO3), is an extremely efficient solid-fluid energy transfer mechanism. The present study explores the use of SAW nebulization as a solution for effective pulmonary peptide delivery. In vitro deposition characteristics of the nebulized peptides were determined using a Next Generation Cascade Impactor. 70% of the peptide-laden aerosols generated were within a size distribution favorable for deep lung distribution. The integrity of the nebulized peptides was found to be retained, as shown via mass spectrometry. The anti-mycobacterial activity of the nebulized peptides was found to be uncompromised compared with their non-nebulized counterparts, as demonstrated by the minimum inhibition concentration and the colony forming inhibition activity. The peptide concentration and volume recoveries for the SAW nebulizer were significantly higher than 90% and found to be insensitive to variation in the peptide sequences. These results demonstrate the potential of the SAW nebulization platform as an effective delivery system of therapeutic peptides through the respiratory tract to the deep lung. PMID:27375820

  1. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    PubMed

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.

  2. Mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis and structural characterization of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase isoenzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Gauss, C; Klein, J; Post, K; Suckau, D; Schneider, K; Thomas, H; Oesch, F; Przybylski, M

    1990-01-01

    The direct molecular weight determination and structural analysis of polypeptides and peptide mixtures have become amenable by the recent development of fast atom bombardment (FABMS) and 252Cf-plasma desorption (PDMS) mass spectrometry. FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping, i.e., the direct analysis of peptide mixtures resulting from proteolytic digestion, have been developed as powerful methods for the structural characterization of epoxide-metabolizing isoenzymes. The major advantage of this approach is provided by the selectivity of the endoproteolytic cleavage, combined with the specific and accurate molecular weight determination of complex digest mixtures containing peptides up to several thousands daltons in size. Furthermore, the mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis can be combined with a range of protein-chemical modification reactions and with sequential degradation such as by carboxypeptidases. Both FABMS and PDMS peptide mapping have already been successfully applied to the structural differentiation of glutathione transferase and epoxide hydrolase isoenzymes in cases where references sequence data for at least one isoenzyme form was available. In the application described here, for a series of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DDH) isoenzymes with hitherto undetermined primary structures, a direct correlation between the structural differentiation from peptide mapping data and differences in their substrate specificities could be demonstrated. The mass spectrometric peptide mapping analysis of isoenzymes proved to be an efficient basis for the elucidation of the structure of one major DDH isoenzyme form; partial sequence data for this protein are reported. PMID:2272334

  3. Promoting differentiation of cultured myoblasts using biomimetic surfaces that present alpha-laminin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Parker, Francine; White, Kathryn; Phillips, Siȏn; Peckham, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Traditionally, muscle cell lines are cultured on glass coverslips and differentiated to investigate myoblast fusion and differentiation. Efficient differentiation of myoblasts produces a dense network of myotubes with the correct organisation for contraction. Here we have tested the ability of artificially generated, precisely controlled peptide surfaces to enhance the efficiency of myoblast differentiation. We focused on specific short peptides from α-laminin-2 (IKVSV, VQLRNGFPYFSY and GLLFYMARINHA) as well as residues 15-155 from FGF1. We tested if these peptides in isolation, and/or in combination promoted muscle differentiation in culture, by promoting fusion and/or by improving sarcomere organisation. The majority of these peptides promoted fusion and differentiation in two different mouse myogenic cell lines and in primary human myoblasts. The additive effects of all four peptides gave the best results for both mouse cell lines tested, while primary human cell cultures differentiated equally well on most peptide surfaces tested. These data show that a mixture of short biomimetic peptides can reliably promote differentiation in mouse and human myoblasts. PMID:27507643

  4. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  5. High-sensitivity HLA class I peptidome analysis enables a precise definition of peptide motifs and the identification of peptides from cell lines and patients' sera.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Danilo; Gloger, Andreas; Weide, Benjamin; Garbe, Claus; Neri, Dario; Fugmann, Tim

    2016-05-01

    The characterization of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I is of fundamental importance for understanding CD8+ T cell-driven immunological processes and for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. However, until now, the mass spectrometric analysis of HLA-bound peptides has typically required billions of cells, still resulting in relatively few high-confidence peptide identifications. Capitalizing on the recent developments in mass spectrometry and bioinformatics, we have implemented a methodology for the efficient recovery of acid-eluted HLA peptides after purification with the pan-reactive antibody W6/32 and have identified a total of 27 862 unique peptides with high confidence (1% false discovery rate) from five human cancer cell lines. More than 93% of the identified peptides were eight to 11 amino acids in length and contained signatures that were in excellent agreement with published HLA binding motifs. Furthermore, by purifying soluble HLA class I complexes (sHLA) from sera of melanoma patients, up to 972 high-confidence peptides could be identified, including melanoma-associated antigens already described in the literature. Knowledge of the HLA class I peptidome should facilitate multiplex tetramer technology-based characterization of T cells, and allow the development of patient selection, stratification and immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies. PMID:26992070

  6. Accelerated chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Les P.; Alewood, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins is a powerful complementary strategy to recombinant protein overexpression and is widely used in structural biology, immunology, protein engineering, and biomedical research. Despite considerable improvements in the fidelity of peptide chain assembly, side-chain protection, and postsynthesis analysis, a limiting factor in accessing polypeptides containing greater than 50 residues remains the time taken for chain assembly. The ultimate goal of this work is to establish highly efficient chemical procedures that achieve chain-assembly rates of approximately 10–15 residues per hour, thus underpinning the rapid chemical synthesis of long polypeptides and proteins, including cytokines, growth factors, protein domains, and small enzymes. Here we report Boc chemistry that employs O-(7-azabenzotriazol-1-yl)-N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyluronium hexafluorophosphate (HATU)/dimethyl sulfoxide in situ neutralization as the coupling agent and incorporates a protected amino acid residue every 5 min to produce peptides of good quality. This rapid coupling chemistry was successfully demonstrated by synthesizing several small to medium peptides, including the “difficult” C-terminal sequence of HIV-1 proteinase (residues 81–99); fragment 65–74 of the acyl carrier protein; conotoxin PnIA(A10L), a potent neuronal nicotinic receptor antagonist; and the pro-inflammatory chemotactic protein CP10, an 88-residue protein, by means of native chemical ligation. The benefits of this approach include enhanced ability to identify and characterize “difficult couplings,” rapid access to peptides for biological and structure–activity studies, and accelerated synthesis of tailored large peptide segments (<50 residues) for use in chemoselective ligation methods. PMID:9989998

  7. Membrane peptides and their role in protobiological evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Chipot, Christophe

    2003-01-01

    How simple membrane peptides performed such essential protocellular functions as transport of ions and organic matter across membranes separating the interior of the cell from the environment, capture and utilization of energy, and transduction of environmental signals, is a key question in protobiological evolution. On the basis of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we explain how these peptides fold at water-membrane interfaces, insert into membranes, self-assemble into higher-order structures and acquire functions. We have investigated the interfacial behavior and folding of several peptides built of leucine and glutamine residues and have demonstrated that many of them tend to adopt ordered structures. Further, we have studied the insertion of an alpha-helical peptide containing leucine (L) and serine (S) of the form (LSLLLSL)3 into a model membrane. The transmembrane state is metastable, and approximately 15 kcal mol(-1) is required to insert the peptide into the membrane. Investigations of dimers formed by (LSLLLSL)3 and glycophorin A demonstrate how the favorable free energy of helix association can offset the unfavorable free energy of insertion, leading to self-assembly of peptide helices in the membrane. An example of a self-assembled structure is the tetrameric transmembrane pore of the influenza virus M2 protein, which is an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism and provide guidelines how to re-engineer the channel to act as a simple proton pump. In general, emergence of integral membrane proteins appears to be quite feasible and may be easier to envision than the emergence of water-soluble proteins.

  8. Membrane Peptides and their Role in Protobiological Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.; Chipot, Christophe

    2003-04-01

    How simple membrane peptides performed such essential protocellular functions as transport of ions and organic matter across membranes separating the interior of the cell from the environment, capture and utilization of energy, and transduction of environmental signals, is a key question in protobiological evolution. On the basis of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we explain how these peptides fold at water-membrane interfaces, insert into membranes, self-assemble into higher-order structures and acquire functions. We have investigated the interfacial behavior and folding of several peptides built of leucine and glutamine residues and have demonstrated that many of them tend to adopt ordered structures. Further, we have studied the insertion of an α-helical peptide containing leucine (L) and serine (S) of the form (LSLLLSL)3 into a model membrane. The transmembrane state is metastable, and approximately 15 kcal mol-1 is required to insert the peptide into the membrane. Investigations of dimers formed by (LSLLLSL)3 and glycophorin A demonstrate how the favorable free energy of helix association can offset the unfavorable free energy of insertion, leading to self-assembly of peptide helices in the membrane. An example of a self-assembled structure is the tetrameric transmembrane pore of the influenza virus M2 protein, which is an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism and provide guidelines how to re-engineer the channel to act as a simple proton pump. In general, emergence of integral membrane proteins appears to be quite feasible and may be easier to envision than the emergence of water-soluble proteins.

  9. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  10. Phytochelatins: peptides involved in heavy metal detoxification.

    PubMed

    Pal, Rama; Rai, J P N

    2010-03-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are enzymatically synthesized peptides known to involve in heavy metal detoxification and accumulation, which have been measured in plants grown at high heavy metal concentrations, but few studies have examined the response of plants even at lower environmentally relevant metal concentrations. Recently, genes encoding the enzyme PC synthase have been identified in plants and other species enabling molecular biological studies to untangle the mechanisms underlying PC synthesis and its regulation. The present paper embodies review on recent advances in structure of PCs, their biosynthetic regulation, roles in heavy metal detoxification and/or accumulation, and PC synthase gene expression for better understanding of mechanism involved and to improve phytoremediation efficiency of plants for wider application.

  11. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  12. Use of the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin for microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ieronymaki, Matthaia; Androutsou, Maria Eleni; Pantelia, Anna; Friligou, Irene; Crisp, Molly; High, Kirsty; Penkman, Kirsty; Gatos, Dimitrios; Tselios, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    A fast and efficient microwave (MW)-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis protocol using the 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin and the Fmoc/tBu methodology, has been developed. The established protocol combines the advantages of MW irradiation and the acid labile 2-chlorotrityl chloride resin. The effect of temperature during the MW irradiation, the degree of resin substitution during the coupling of the first amino acids and the rate of racemization for each amino acid were evaluated. The suggested solid phase methodology is applicable for orthogonal peptide synthesis and for the synthesis of cyclic peptides. PMID:26270247

  13. Boc-SPPS: Compatible Linker for the Synthesis of Peptide o-Aminoanilides.

    PubMed

    Weidmann, Joachim; Dimitrijević, Elena; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Dawson, Philip E

    2016-01-15

    A protection strategy is described for the efficient synthesis of peptide o-aminoanilides using in situ neutralization protocols for Boc-SPPS. On-resin protection of Boc-protected aminoacyl o-aminoanilides is achieved with 2-chlorobenzyl chloroformate. Activation through a peptidyl-benzotriazole intermediate allows for facile conversion to peptide-thioesters for use in native chemical ligation. In addition to providing a robust alternative to established thioester resins, as a latent thioester, the peptide o-aminoanilide has broad utility in convergent ligation strategies. PMID:26702477

  14. An Investigation on a Novel Anti-tumor Fusion Peptide of FSH33-53-IIKK.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runlin; Liu, Ping; Pan, Donghui; Zhang, Pengjun; Bai, Zhicheng; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Yan, Yongjun; Liu, Xingdang; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel fusion peptide FSH33-53-IIKK was designed and expected to combine the follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) targeting and tumor toxicity. In vitro and in vivo study showed the anti-tumor activity of FSH33-53-IIKK was enhanced compared to that of IIKK only. FSH33-53-IIKK could inhibit the growth of tumor via apoptosis and autophagy pathways. In summary, combining the tumor marker-target peptide and anti-tumor peptide together may be an efficient way to search for better anti-tumor candidates. PMID:27313792

  15. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  16. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  17. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  18. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

  19. Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seng Koon; Sandén, Camilla; Selegård, Robert; Liedberg, Bo; Aili, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo. PMID:26892926

  20. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-04-14

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets.

  1. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cromm, Philipp M.; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N.; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets. PMID:27075966

  2. Orthogonal ring-closing alkyne and olefin metathesis for the synthesis of small GTPase-targeting bicyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Cromm, Philipp M; Schaubach, Sebastian; Spiegel, Jochen; Fürstner, Alois; Grossmann, Tom N; Waldmann, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Bicyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the development of inhibitors of biological targets that proved intractable by typical small molecules. So far, access to bioactive bicyclic peptide architectures is limited due to a lack of appropriate orthogonal ring-closing reactions. Here, we report chemically orthogonal ring-closing olefin (RCM) and alkyne metathesis (RCAM), which enable an efficient chemo- and regioselective synthesis of complex bicyclic peptide scaffolds with variable macrocycle geometries. We also demonstrate that the formed alkyne macrocycle can be functionalized subsequently. The orthogonal RCM/RCAM system was successfully used to evolve a monocyclic peptide inhibitor of the small GTPase Rab8 into a bicyclic ligand. This modified peptide shows the highest affinity for an activated Rab GTPase that has been reported so far. The RCM/RCAM-based formation of bicyclic peptides provides novel opportunities for the design of bioactive scaffolds suitable for the modulation of challenging protein targets. PMID:27075966

  3. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  4. S-peptide as a potent peptidyl linker for protein cross-linking by microbial transglutaminase from Streptomyces mobaraensis.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Noriho; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takazawa, Takeshi; Takeda, Shuji; Watanabe, Kimitsuna; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-01-01

    We have found that ribonuclease S-peptide can work as a novel peptidyl substrate in protein cross-linking reactions catalyzed by microbial transglutaminase (MTG) from Streptomyces mobaraensis. Enhanced green fluorescent protein tethered to S-peptide at its N-terminus (S-tag-EGFP) appeared to be efficiently cross-linked by MTG. As wild-type EGFP was not susceptible to cross-linking, the S-peptide moiety is likely to be responsible for the cross-linking. A site-directed mutation study assigned Gln15 in the S-peptide sequence as the sole acyl donor. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that two Lys residues (Lys5 and Lys11) in the S-peptide sequence functioned as acyl acceptors. We also succeeded in direct monitoring of the cross-linking process by virtue of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between S-tag-EGFP and its blue fluorescent color variant (S-tag-EBFP). The protein cross-linking was tunable by either engineering S-peptide sequence or capping the S-peptide moiety with S-protein, the partner protein of S-peptide for the formation of ribonuclease A. The latter indicates that S-protein can be used as a specific inhibitor of S-peptide-directed protein cross-linking by MTG. The controllable protein cross-linking of S-peptide as a potent substrate of MTG will shed new light on biomolecule conjugation. PMID:12643745

  5. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  6. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  7. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  8. Synthesis of cyclic disulfide-rich peptides.

    PubMed

    Akcan, Muharrem; Craik, David J

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two SPPS approaches for producing cyclic disulfide-rich peptides in our laboratory, including cyclotides from plants, cyclic conotoxins from cone snail venoms, chlorotoxin from scorpion venom, and the sunflower trypsin inhibitor peptide, SFTI-1.

  9. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  10. Development of a pulmonary peptide delivery system using porous nanoparticle-aggregate particles for systemic application.

    PubMed

    Yang, Likai; Luo, Jing; Shi, Sanjun; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gong, Tao

    2013-07-15

    As a non-invasive administration route, pulmonary peptide delivery for systemic application has shown great promise. However, many barriers exist that prevent effective peptide delivery. The use of porous nanoparticle-aggregate particles (PNAPs) is an excellent option because of their proper aerodynamic size and maximal deposition. However, in most cases, the spray drying heating process for PNAPs has been challenging in regard to maintaining peptide stability and activity. To overcome these issues, we developed a spray freeze-drying method for PNAP preparation. To solve the low entrapment efficiency problem of nanostructured lipid carriers, we used hydrophobic ion pair complexes to increase the lipophilicity of the peptide, thus increasing entrapment efficiency and drug loading. Here, we used a model peptide, octreotide acetate, for PNAP preparation, which has a high entrapment efficiency (>95%) and proper aerodynamic size (~3 μm). In addition, after intrapulmonary administration, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in a rat preventive hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury model. Our in vivo data showed significantly increased area under the curve and improved plasma aspartate aminotransferase levels for our PNAP intrapulmonary delivery system vs. the clinically used octreotide acetate delivery via subcutaneous injection. Together, PNAPs may have great potential for carrying peptide drugs for pulmonary delivery.

  11. Dual-purpose linker for alpha helix stabilization and imaging agent conjugation to glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Navaratna, Tejas; Liao, Jianshan; Thurber, Greg M

    2015-02-18

    Peptides display many characteristics of efficient imaging agents such as rapid targeting, fast background clearance, and low non-specific cellular uptake. However, poor stability, low affinity, and loss of binding after labeling often preclude their use in vivo. Using glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) ligands exendin and GLP-1 as a model system, we designed a novel α-helix-stabilizing linker to simultaneously address these limitations. The stabilized and labeled peptides showed an increase in helicity, improved protease resistance, negligible loss or an improvement in binding affinity, and excellent in vivo targeting. The ease of incorporating azidohomoalanine in peptides and efficient reaction with the dialkyne linker enable this technique to potentially be used as a general method for labeling α helices. This strategy should be useful for imaging beta cells in diabetes research and in developing and testing other peptide targeting agents. PMID:25594741

  12. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  13. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  14. Targeting RNA with cysteine-constrained peptides

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Virginia A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Basso, Anne; Cavanagh, John; Melander, Christian

    2008-01-01

    A combined approach for targeting RNA with novel, biologically active ligands has been developed using a cyclic peptide library and in silico modeling. This approach has successfully identified novel cyclic peptide constructs that can target bTAR RNA. Subsequently, RNA/peptide interactions were effectively modeled using the HADDOCK docking program. PMID:18065222

  15. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  16. Single-molecule studies on individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2013-10-13

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress in single-molecule studies of individual peptides and peptide assemblies on surfaces. The structures and the mechanism of peptide assembly are discussed in detail. The contents include the following topics: structural analysis of single peptide molecules, adsorption and assembly of peptides on surfaces, folding structures of the amyloid peptides, interaction between amyloid peptides and dye or drug molecules, and modulation of peptide assemblies by small molecules. The explorations of peptide adsorption and assembly will benefit the understanding of the mechanisms for protein-protein interactions, protein-drug interactions and the pathogenesis of amyloidoses. The investigations on peptide assembly and its modulations could also provide a potential approach towards the treatment of the amyloidoses.

  17. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. PMID:8568273

  18. Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Simmons, W A; Leong, L Y; Satumtira, N; Butcher, G W; Howard, J C; Richardson, J A; Slaughter, C A; Hammer, R E; Taurog, J D

    1996-02-15

    Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cima and cimb, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cima B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cimb/b targets significantly less well than cima/a or cima/b targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cimb/b targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cima/a targets. Male B27 cimb/b cells were less efficient than cima/a cells in competitively inhibiting CTL lysis of female B27 cima/a targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. 3H-Labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cimb and three cima RT1 haplotypes showed that the cimb peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cima/b or cimb/b. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism.

  19. Peptide microarray with ligands at high density based on symmetrical carrier landscape phage for detection of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Qi, Huan; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2014-06-17

    Peptide microarrays evolved recently as a routine analytical implementation in various research areas due to their unique characteristics. However, the immobilization of peptides with high density in each spot during the fabricating process remains a problem, which will affect the performance of the resultant microarray greatly. To respond to this challenge, a novel peptide immobilization method using symmetrical phage carrier was developed in this work. The cellulytic enzyme endoglucanase I (EG I) was used as a model for selection of its specific peptide ligands from the f8/8 landscape library. Three phage monoclones were selected and identified by the specificity array, of which one phage monoclone displaying the fusion peptide EGSDPRMV (phage EGSDPRMV) could bind EG I specifically with highest affinity. Subsequently, the phage EGSDPRMV was used directly to construct peptide microarray. For comparison, major coat protein pVIII fused EG I specific peptide EGSDPRMV (pVIII-fused EGSDPRMV) which was isolated from phage EGSDPRMV was also immobilized by traditional method to fabricate peptide microarray. The fluorescent signal of the phage EGSDPRMV-mediated peptide microarray was more reproducible and about four times higher than the value for pVIII-fused EGSDPRMV-based microarray, suggesting the high efficiency of the proposed phage EGSDPRMV-mediated peptide immobilization method. Further, the phage EGSDPRMV based microarray not only simplified the procedure of microarray construction but also exhibited significantly enhanced sensitivity due to the symmetrical carrier landscape phage, which dramatically increased the density and sterical regularity of immobilized peptides in each spot. Thus, the proposed strategy has the advantages that the immobilizing peptide ligands were not disturbed by their composition and the immobilized peptides were highly regular with free amino-terminal.

  20. Novor: Real-Time Peptide de Novo Sequencing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data.

  1. Peptide-modified optical filters for detecting protease activity.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Kristopher A; Böcking, Till; Gaus, Katharina; Gal, Michael; Gooding, J Justin

    2007-11-01

    The organic derivatization of silicon-based nanoporous photonic crystals is presented as a method to immobilize peptides for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A narrow-line-width rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index at the pore walls. To immobilize peptide in the pore of the photonic crystal, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with the alkene 10-succinimidyl undecenoate via hydrosilylation. The monolayer with the succinimide ester moiety at the distal end served the dual function of protecting the underlying silicon from oxidation as well as providing a surface suitable for subsequent derivatization with amines. The surface was further modified with 1-aminohexa(ethylene glycol) (EG(6)) to resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins common in complex biological samples. The distal hydroxyl of the EG(6) is activated using the solid-phase coupling reagent disuccinimidyl carbonate for selective immobilization of peptides as protease recognition elements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals high activation and coupling efficiency at each stage of the functionalization. Exposure of the peptide-modified crystals to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The lowest detected concentration of enzyme was 37 nM (7.4 pmol in 200 microL).

  2. Solid-phase synthesis of oxaliplatin-TAT peptide bioconjugates.

    PubMed

    Abramkin, Sergey; Valiahdi, Seied M; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2012-03-14

    Platinum-based drugs play a crucial role in the fight against cancer. Oxaliplatin, which is used in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma, was the last platinum-based agent to be approved worldwide. However, the efficiency of the therapy is limited for example by a low accumulation of the drug in cancer cells. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known to ease the cellular membrane transport and are used as vectors for low-molecular-weight drugs and drug carriers; of them, TAT peptides are the best-studied group. In this work, a TAT-peptide fragment (YGRKKRRQRRR) was for the first time conjugated to a platinum(IV) analog of oxaliplatin as a vehicle for membrane penetration. Solid-phase peptide synthesis and subsequent coupling with the platinum complex afforded mono- and difunctionalized conjugates, which were separated by preparative HPLC and characterized by analytical HPLC, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Both conjugates are active in the low micromolar range in CH1 and SW480 human cancer cells, requiring much lower concentrations than the untargeted analogs for equal effects.

  3. Novor: real-time peptide de novo sequencing software.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin

    2015-11-01

    De novo sequencing software has been widely used in proteomics to sequence new peptides from tandem mass spectrometry data. This study presents a new software tool, Novor, to greatly improve both the speed and accuracy of today's peptide de novo sequencing analyses. To improve the accuracy, Novor's scoring functions are based on two large decision trees built from a peptide spectral library with more than 300,000 spectra with machine learning. Important knowledge about peptide fragmentation is extracted automatically from the library and incorporated into the scoring functions. The decision tree model also enables efficient score calculation and contributes to the speed improvement. To further improve the speed, a two-stage algorithmic approach, namely dynamic programming and refinement, is used. The software program was also carefully optimized. On the testing datasets, Novor sequenced 7%-37% more correct residues than the state-of-the-art de novo sequencing tool, PEAKS, while being an order of magnitude faster. Novor can de novo sequence more than 300 MS/MS spectra per second on a laptop computer. The speed surpasses the acquisition speed of today's mass spectrometer and, therefore, opens a new possibility to de novo sequence in real time while the spectrometer is acquiring the spectral data. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Combinatorial approach for large-scale identification of linked peptides from tandem mass spectrometry spectra.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R; Bourne, Philip E; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-04-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  5. A rapid in vitro screening for delivery of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors as potential drug candidates via epithelial peptide transporters.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Martin; Meyer, Antje; Theis, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Daniel, Hannelore

    2004-08-01

    Targeting drugs or prodrugs to a specific enzyme by simultaneously targeting cell membrane carriers for efficient transport should provide the highest bioavailability along with specificity at the site of action. The peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, including the brush-border membranes of epithelial cells of the small intestine and kidney. The transporters accept a wide range of substrates and are therefore good targets for a transporter-mediated drug delivery. Here, we report a screening procedure for peptidomimetic drug candidates combining two independent expression systems: 1) a competition assay in transgenic Pichia pastoris yeast cells expressing either mammalian PEPT1 or PEPT2 for identifying substrate interaction with the transporter binding site; and 2) a Xenopus laevis-based oocyte expression of the peptide transporter for assessing electrogenic transport of drug candidates. Based on the known oral availability and in vivo efficacy of the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPIV) inhibitor isoleucine-thiazolidide and its peptide-like structure, we first tested whether this compound is a substrate of epithelial peptide transporters. Additionally, a series of structurally related inhibitors were analyzed for transport. We identified various compounds that serve as substrates of the intestinal peptide transporter PEPT1. In contrast, none of these DPIV inhibitors showed electrogenic transport by PEPT2, although a variety of the compounds displayed good affinities for competition in peptide uptake in PEPT2-expressing cells, suggesting that they may serve as efficient inhibitors. In conclusion, we have applied an in vitro screening system that predicts efficient intestinal absorption of peptide-derived peptidase inhibitors via PEPT1 in vivo. PMID:15051798

  6. Sustained delivery of VEGF from designer self-assembling peptides improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hai-dong; Cui, Guo-hong; Yang, Jia-jun; Wang, Cun; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Li-sheng; Jiang, Jun; Shao, Shui-jin

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The designer peptide LRKKLGKA could self-assemble into nanofibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of LRKKLGKA peptides could promote the sustained delivery of VEGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides lead to sufficient angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides improves heart function. -- Abstract: Poor vascularization and insufficient oxygen supply are detrimental to the survival of residual cardiomyocytes or transplanted stem cells after myocardial infarction. To prolong and slow the release of angiogenic factors, which stimulate both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, we constructed a novel self-assembling peptide by attaching the heparin-binding domain sequence LRKKLGKA to the self-assembling peptide RADA16. This designer self-assembling peptide self-assembled into nanofiber scaffolds under physiological conditions, as observed by atomic force microscopy. The injection of designer self-assembling peptides can efficiently provide the sustained delivery of VEGF for at least 1 month. At 4 weeks after transplantation, cardiac function was improved, and scar size and collagen deposition were markedly reduced in the group receiving VEGF with the LRKKLGKA scaffolds compared with groups receiving VEGF alone, LRKKLGKA scaffolds alone or VEGF with RADA16 scaffolds. The microvessel density in the VEGF with LRKKLGKA group was higher than that in the VEGF with RADA16 group. TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 expression assays showed that the transplantation of VEGF with LRKKLGKA enhanced cell survival in the infarcted heart. These results present the tailor-made peptide scaffolds as a new generation of sustained-release biomimetic biomaterials and suggest that the use of angiogenic factors along with designer self-assembling peptides can lead to myocardial protection, sufficient angiogenesis, and improvement in cardiac function.

  7. How antimicrobial peptides disrupt lipid bilayers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Durba

    2011-03-01

    The molecular basis for the activity of cyclic and linear antimicrobial peptides is analysed. We performed multi-scale molecular dynamics simulations and biophysical measurements to probe the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with model membranes. Two linear antimicrobial peptides, magainin and melittin and a cyclic one, BPC194 have been studied. We test different models to determine the generic and specific forces that lead to bilayer disruption. We probe whether interfacial stress or local membrane perturbation is more likely to lead to the porated state. We further analyse the reasons that determine specificity and increase of activity in antimicrobial peptides. The results provide detailed insight in the mode of action of antimicrobial peptides.

  8. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  9. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  10. Comparative conformational analysis of peptide T analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akverdieva, Gulnare; Godjayev, Niftali; Akyuz, Sevim

    2009-01-01

    A series of peptide T analogs were investigated within the molecular mechanics framework. In order to determine the role of the aminoacid residues in spatial formation of peptide T the conformational peculiarities of the glycine-substituted analogs were investigated. The conformational profiles of some biologically tested analogs of this peptide were determined independently. The received data permit to assess the active form of this peptide. It is characterized by β-turn at the C-terminal physiologically active pentapeptide fragment of peptide molecule. The received results are important for the investigation of the structure-activity relationship and may be used at design of a rigid-molecule drug against HIV.

  11. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  12. A Method for Selective Enrichment and Analysis of Nitrotyrosine-Containing Peptides in Complex Proteome Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Sacksteder, Colette A.; Chin, Mark H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Camp, David G.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-06-01

    Elevated levels of protein tyrosine nitration have been found in various neurodegenerative diseases and aging related pathologies; however, the lack of an efficient enrichment method has prevented the analysis of this important low level protein modification. We have developed an efficient method for specific enrichment of nitrotyrosine containing peptides that permits nitrotyrosine peptides and specific nitration sites to be unambiguously identified with LC-MS/MS. The method is based on the derivatization of nitrotyrosine into free sulfhydryl groups followed by high efficiency enrichment of sulfhydryl-containing peptides with thiopropyl sepharose beads. The derivatization process starts with acetylation with acetic anhydride to block all primary amines, followed by reduction of nitrotyrosine to aminotyrosine, then derivatization of aminotyrosine with N-Succinimidyl S-Acetylthioacetate (SATA), and finally deprotecting of S-acetyl on SATA to form free sulfhydryl groups. This method was evaluated using nitrotyrosine containing peptides, in-vitro nitrated human histone 1.2, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). 91% and 62% of the identified peptides from enriched histone and BSA samples were nitrotyrosine derivatized peptides, respectively, suggesting relative high specificity of the enrichment method. The application of this method to in-vitro nitrated mouse brain homogenate resulted in 35% of identified peptides containing nitrotyrosine (compared to only 5.9% observed from the global analysis of unenriched sample), and a total of 150 unique nitrated peptides covering 102 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate estimated at 3.3% from duplicate LC-MS/MS analyses of a single enriched sample.

  13. Peptides in headlock – a novel high-affinity and versatile peptide-binding nanobody for proteomics and microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Michael B.; Traenkle, Bjoern; Koch, Philipp A.; Emele, Felix; Weiss, Frederik; Poetz, Oliver; Stehle, Thilo; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Nanobodies are highly valuable tools for numerous bioanalytical and biotechnical applications. Here, we report the characterization of a nanobody that binds a short peptide epitope with extraordinary affinity. Structural analysis reveals an unusual binding mode where the extended peptide becomes part of a β-sheet structure in the nanobody. This interaction relies on sequence-independent backbone interactions augmented by a small number of specificity-determining side chain contacts. Once bound, the peptide is fastened by two nanobody side chains that clamp it in a headlock fashion. Exploiting this unusual binding mode, we generated a novel nanobody-derived capture and detection system. Matrix-coupled nanobody enables the fast and efficient isolation of epitope-tagged proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Additionally, the fluorescently labeled nanobody visualizes subcellular structures in different cellular compartments. The high-affinity-binding and modifiable peptide tag of this system renders it a versatile and robust tool to combine biochemical analysis with microscopic studies. PMID:26791954

  14. Delivery of siRNA using ternary complexes containing branched cationic peptides: the role of peptide sequence, branching and targeting.

    PubMed

    Kudsiova, Laila; Welser, Katharina; Campbell, Frederick; Mohammadi, Atefeh; Dawson, Natalie; Cui, Lili; Hailes, Helen C; Lawrence, M Jayne; Tabor, Alethea B

    2016-03-01

    Ternary nanocomplexes, composed of bifunctional cationic peptides, lipids and siRNA, as delivery vehicles for siRNA have been investigated. The study is the first to determine the optimal sequence and architecture of the bifunctional cationic peptide used for siRNA packaging and delivery using lipopolyplexes. Specifically three series of cationic peptides of differing sequence, degrees of branching and cell-targeting sequences were co-formulated with siRNA and vesicles prepared from a 1 : 1 molar ratio of the cationic lipid DOTMA and the helper lipid, DOPE. The level of siRNA knockdown achieved in the human alveolar cell line, A549-luc cells, in both reduced serum and in serum supplemented media was evaluated, and the results correlated to the nanocomplex structure (established using a range of physico-chemical tools, namely small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurement); the conformational properties of each component (circular dichroism); the degree of protection of the siRNA in the lipopolyplex (using gel shift assays) and to the cellular uptake, localisation and toxicity of the nanocomplexes (confocal microscopy). Although the size, charge, structure and stability of the various lipopolyplexes were broadly similar, it was clear that lipopolyplexes formulated from branched peptides containing His-Lys sequences perform best as siRNA delivery agents in serum, with protection of the siRNA in serum balanced against efficient release of the siRNA into the cytoplasm of the cell.

  15. Cu nanocrystal growth on peptide nanotubes by biomineralization: Size control of Cu nanocrystals by tuning peptide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ipsita A.; Yu, Lingtao; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    With recent interest in seeking new biologically inspired device-fabrication methods in nanotechnology, a new biological approach was examined to fabricate Cu nanotubes by using sequenced histidine-rich peptide nanotubes as templates. The sequenced histidine-rich peptide molecules were assembled as nanotubes, and the biological recognition of the specific sequence toward Cu lead to efficient Cu coating on the nanotubes. Cu nanocrystals were uniformly coated on the histidine-incorporated nanotubes with high packing density. In addition, the diameter of Cu nanocrystal was controlled between 10 and 30 nm on the nanotube by controlling the conformation of histidine-rich peptide by means of pH changes. Those nanotubes showed significant change in electronic structure by varying the nanocrystal diameter; therefore, this system may be developed to a conductivity-tunable building block for microelectronics and biological sensors. This simple biomineralization method can be applied to fabricate various metallic and semiconductor nanotubes with peptides whose sequences are known to mineralize specific ions.

  16. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    PubMed

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  17. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  18. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  19. Degradation and antioxidant activities of peptides and zinc-peptide complexes during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chan; Li, Bo; Wang, Bo; Xie, Ningning

    2015-04-15

    The degradation characteristics of three peptides (Ser-Met, Asn-Cys-Ser, and glutathione) and their zinc-peptide complexes were studied using a two-stage in vitro digestion model. Enzyme-resistant peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, antioxidant activities, and free amino acids released by digestive enzymes, were measured in this study. The results revealed that the three peptides and their zinc-peptide complexes were resistant to pepsin but not to pancreatin. Pancreatin can partly hydrolyse both peptides and zinc-peptide complexes, but more than half of them remaining in their original form after gastrointestinal digestion. The coordination of zinc improved the enzymatic resistance of the peptide due to lower solubility of complexes and affected the hydrolytic site of pepsin and pancreatin. Zinc-Asn-Cys-Ser, which is highly resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis and maintains Zn in a soluble form, may have potential to improve Zn bioavailability.

  20. Cation-exchange chromatography of peptides on poly(2-sulfoethyl aspartamide)-silica.

    PubMed

    Alpert, A J; Andrews, P C

    1988-06-29

    A strong cation-exchange material, poly(2-sulfoethyl aspartamide)-silica (PolySULFOETHYL Aspartamide) was developed for purification and analysis of peptides by high-performance liquid chromatography. All peptides examined were retained at pH 3, even when the amino terminus was the only basic group. Peptides were eluted in order of increasing number of basic residues with a salt gradient. Capacity was high, as was selectivity and column efficiency. This new column material displays modest mixed-mode effects, allowing the resolution of peptides having identical charges at a given pH. The selectivity can be manipulated by the addition of organic solvent to the mobile phases; this increases the retention of some peptides and decreases the retention of others. The retention in any given case may reflect a combination of steric factors and non-electrostatic interactions. Selectivity was complementary to that of reversed-phase chromatography (RPC) materials. Excellent purifications were obtained by sequential use of PolySULFOETHYL Aspartamide and RPC columns for purification of peptides from crude tissue extracts. The new cation exchanger is quite promising as a supplement to RPC for general peptide chromatography. PMID:2844843

  1. Immunomodulatory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Chicken Cathelicidin-2 Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Albert; van Eldik, Mandy; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Hanne L. M.; de Zoete, Marcel R.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2016-01-01

    Host Defence Peptides and derived peptides are promising classes of antimicrobial and immunomodulatory lead compounds. For this purpose we examined whether chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2)-derived peptides modulate the function and inflammatory response of avian immune cells. Using a chicken macrophage cell line (HD11) we found that full-length CATH-2 dose-dependently induced transcription of chemokines CXCLi2/IL-8, MCP-3 and CCLi4/RANTES, but not of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. In addition, CATH-2 efficiently inhibited IL-1β and nitric oxide production by HD11 cells induced by different sources of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). N-terminal truncated CATH-2 derived peptides maintained the capacity to selectively induce chemokine transcription, but despite their high LPS affinity several analogs lacked LPS-neutralizing capacity. Substitution of phenylalanine residues by tryptophan introduced endotoxin neutralization capacity in inactive truncated CATH-2 derived peptides. In contrast, amino acid substitution of phenylalanine by tyrosine abrogated endotoxin neutralization activity of CATH-2 analogs. These findings support a pivotal role for aromatic residues in peptide-mediated endotoxin neutralization by CATH-2 analogs and were shown to be independent of LPS affinity. The capacity to modulate chemokine production and dampen endotoxin-induced pro-inflammatory responses in chicken immune cells implicates that small CATH-2 based peptides could serve as leads for the design of CATH-2 based immunomodulatory anti-infectives. PMID:26848845

  2. Peptides in Receptor-Mediated Radiotherapy: From Design to the Clinical Application in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lozza, Catherine; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Pouget, Jean-Pierre; Vivès, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Short peptides can show high affinity for specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. Some of these are already used in cancerology as diagnostic tools and others are in clinical trials for therapeutic applications. Therefore, peptides exhibit great potential as a diagnostic tool but also as an alternative or an additional antitumoral approach upon the covalent attachment of a therapeutic moiety such as a radionuclide or a cytotoxic drug. The chemistry offers flexibility to graft onto the targeting-peptide either fluorine or iodine directly, or metallic radionuclides through appropriate chelating agent. Since short peptides are straightforward to synthesize, there is an opportunity to further improve existing peptides or to design new ones for clinical applications. However, several considerations have to be taken into account to optimize the recognition properties of the targeting-peptide to its receptor, to improve its stability in the biological fluids and its residence in the body, or to increase its overall therapeutic effect. In this review, we highlight the different aspects which need to be considered for the development of an efficient peptide receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy in different neoplasms. PMID:24093086

  3. Computer-aided design of peptide near infrared fluorescent probe for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Congying; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Integrin αvβ3 receptors are expressed on activated endothelial cells during neovascularization to maintain tumor growth, so they become hot research tagets in cancer diagnosis. Peptides possess several attractive features when compared to protein and small molecule, such as small size and high structural compatibility with target proteins. Efficient design of high-affinity peptide ligands to Integrin αvβ3 receptors has been an important problem. Designed peptides in silico provide a valuable and high-selectivity peptide, meanwhile decrease the time of drug screening. In this study, we design peptide which can bind with integrin αvβ3 via computer, and then synthesis near infrared fluorescent probe. The characterization of this near infrared fluorescent probe was detected by UV. To investigate the tumor cell targeting of this probe, it was labeled with visible fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (RhB) for microscopy. To evaluate the targeting capability of this near infrared fluorescent probe, mice bearing integrin αvβ3 positive tumor xenografts were used. In vitro cellular experiments indicated that this probe have a clear binding affinity to αvβ3-positive tumor cells. In vivo experiments confirmed the receptor binding specificity of this probe. The peptide of computational design can bind with integrin αvβ3. Combined peptide near-infrared fluorescent probe with imaging technology use for clinical and tumor diagnosis have a greater development in future.

  4. Coexistence of a Two-States Organization for a Cell-Penetrating Peptide in Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Plénat, Thomas; Boichot, Sylvie; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides transport cargoes across cell membranes with high efficiency and low lytic activity. These primary amphipathic peptides were previously shown to form aggregates or supramolecular structures in mixed lipid-peptide monolayers, but their behavior in lipid bilayers remains to be characterized. Using atomic force microscopy, we have examined the interactions of P(α), a primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide which remains α-helical whatever the environment, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Addition of P(α) at concentrations up to 5 mol % markedly modified the supported bilayers topography. Long and thin filaments lying flat at the membrane surface coexisted with deeply embedded peptides which induced a local thinning of the bilayer. On the other hand, addition of P(α) only exerted very limited effects on the corresponding liposome's bilayer physical state, as estimated from differential scanning calorimetry and diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The use of a gel-fluid phase separated supported bilayers made of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixture confirmed both the existence of long filaments, which at low peptide concentration were preferentially localized in the fluid phase domains and the membrane disorganizing effects of 5 mol % P(α). The simultaneous two-states organization of P(α), at the membrane surface and deeply embedded in the bilayer, may be involved in the transmembrane carrier function of this primary amphipathic peptide. PMID:16199494

  5. Inhibition of VEGF mediated corneal neovascularization by anti-angiogenic peptide nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Senturk, Berna; Cubuk, M Ozgur; Ozmen, M Cuneyt; Aydin, Bahri; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2016-11-01

    Atypical angiogenesis is one of the major symptoms of severe eye diseases, including corneal neovascularization, and the complex nature of abnormal vascularization requires targeted methods with high biocompatibility. The targeting of VEGF is the most common approach for preventing angiogenesis, and the LPPR peptide sequence is known to strongly inhibit VEGF activity by binding to the VEGF receptor neuropilin-1. Here, the LPPR epitope is presented on a peptide amphiphile nanofiber system to benefit from multivalency and increase the anti-angiogenic function of the epitope. Peptide amphiphile nanofibers are especially useful for ocular delivery applications due to their ability to remain on the site of interest for extended periods of time, facilitating the long-term presentation of bioactive sequences. Consequently, the LPPR sequence was integrated into a self-assembled peptide amphiphile network to increase its efficiency in the prevention of neovascularization. Anti-angiogenic effects of the peptide nanofibers were investigated by using both in vitro and in vivo models. LPPR-PA nanofibers inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, tube formation, and migration to a greater extent than the soluble LPPR peptide in vitro. In addition, the LPPR-PA nanofiber system led to the prevention of vascular maturation and the regression of angiogenesis in a suture-induced corneal angiogenesis model. These results show that the anti-angiogenic activity exhibited by LPPR peptide nanofibers may be utilized as a promising approach for the treatment of corneal angiogenesis. PMID:27616429

  6. High-resolution Mapping of Linear Antibody Epitopes Using Ultrahigh-density Peptide Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn; Nilsson, Peter; Uhlen, Mathias; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level. PMID:22984286

  7. Charge Effect on the Quantum Dots-Peptide Self-Assembly Using Fluorescence Coupled Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhao; Li, Jingyan; Teng, Yiwan; Bi, Yanhua; Hu, Wei; Li, Jinchen; Wang, Cheli; Qiu, Lin; Jiang, Pengju

    2016-04-01

    We present a molecular characterization of metal-affinity driven self-assembly between CdSe-ZnS quantum dots and a series of hexahistidine peptides with different charges. In particular, we uti- lized fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis to test the self-assembly process of quantum dots with peptides in solution. Four peptides with different charges can be efficiently separated by fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The migration time appeared to be influenced by the charges of the peptide. In addition, the kinetics of self-assembly process of quantum dots with one of the peptides manifested a bi-phasic kinetics followed by a saturating stage. This work revealed that there exist two types of binding sites on the surface of quantum dots for peptide 1: one type termed "high priority" binding site and a "low priority" site which is occupied after the first binding sites are fully occupied. The total self-assembly process finishes in solution within 80 s. Our work represents the systematic investigation of the details of self-assembly kinetics utilizing high-resolution fluorescence coupled capillary electrophoresis. The charge effect of peptide coating quantum dots provides a new way of preparing bioprobes.

  8. The interplay of peptide sequence and local structure in TiO2 biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Noori; Tan, Lihan; Jang, Ji-ryang; Um, Yu Mi; Yoo, Pil J; Choe, Woo-Seok

    2012-10-01

    Using cyclic constrained TiO(2) binding peptides STB1 (CHKKPSKSC), RSTB1 (CHRRPSRSC) and linear peptide LSTB1 (AHKKPSKSA), it was shown that while affinity of the peptide to TiO(2) is essential to enable TiO(2) biomineralization, other factors such as biomineralization kinetics and peptide local structure need to be considered to predict biomineralization efficacy. Cyclic and linear TiO(2) binding peptides show significantly different biomineralization activities. Cyclic STB1 and RSTB1 could induce TiO(2) precipitation in the presence of titanium(IV)-bis-ammonium-lactato-dihydroxide (TiBALDH) precursor in water or tris buffer at pH 8. In contrast, linear LSTB1 was unable to mineralize TiO(2) under the same experimental conditions despite its high affinity to TiO(2) comparable with STB1 and/or RSTB1. LSTB1 being a flexible molecule could not render the stable condensation of TiBALDH precursor to form TiO(2) particles. However, in the presence of phosphate buffer ions, the structure of LSTB1 is stabilized, leading to efficient condensation of TiBALDH and TiO(2) particle formation. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated TiO(2) mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of mineralizing aider such as phosphate ions.

  9. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  10. Requirements of the engineered leader peptide of nisin for inducing modification, export, and cleavage.

    PubMed

    Plat, Annechien; Kluskens, Leon D; Kuipers, Anneke; Rink, Rick; Moll, Gert N

    2011-01-01

    Nisin A is a pentacyclic peptide antibiotic produced by Lactococcus lactis. The leader peptide of prenisin keeps nisin inactive and has a role in inducing NisB- and NisC-catalyzed modifications of the propeptide and NisT-mediated export. The highly specific NisP cleaves off the leader peptide from fully modified and exported prenisin. We present here a detailed mutagenesis analysis of the nisin leader peptide. For alternative cleavage, we successfully introduced a putative NisP autocleavage site and sites for thrombin, enterokinase, Glu-C, and factor Xa in the C-terminal part of the leader peptide. Replacing residue F-18 with Trp or Thr strongly reduced production. On the other hand, D-19A, F-18H, F-18M, L-16D, L-16K, and L-16A enhanced production. Substitutions within and outside the FNLD box enhanced or reduced the transport efficiency. None of the above substitutions nor even an internal 6His tag from positions -13 to -8 had any effect on the capacity of the leader peptide to induce NisB and NisC modifications. Therefore, these data demonstrate a large mutational freedom. However, simultaneous replacement of the FNLD amino acids by four alanines strongly reduced export and even led to a complete loss of the capacity to induce modifications. Reducing the leader peptide to MSTKDFNLDLR led to 3- or 4-fold dehydration. Taken together, the FNLD box is crucial for inducing posttranslational modifications. PMID:21097596

  11. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  12. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  13. Chiral Heteroditopic Baskets Designed from Triazolated Calixarenes and Short Peptides.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Alexander; Sokolova, Nadezhda; Kudryashova, Elena; Nenajdenko, Valentine; Kovalev, Vladimir; Vatsouro, Ivan

    2016-08-22

    Cone calix[4]arenes and calix[6]arenes bearing two, three, and four short peptide units each having two chiral carbon atoms were prepared. The syntheses were performed by using an efficient modular approach that includes the Ugi preparation of the azido-peptide followed by its reactions with the propargylated calixarenes under CuAAC (Cu(I) -catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition) conditions. The three novel multitopic hosts were probed for their ability to bind metal ions by UV titration, and showed the highest complexation efficiency towards copper(II) and lead(II). These two cations possessed quite different complexation modes with copper(II) bound predominantly by multiple-triazole sites, in contrast to lead(II), which is stabilized mainly by multiple interactions with amide groups of the peptide units. Circular dichroism data for the free chiral hosts, their equimolar mixtures with copper(II) perchlorate and lead(II) perchlorate, and for tertiary mixtures of all three compounds showed the formation of mono- and binuclear complexes, or a switching behavior, depending on the structure of the host and the addition order of the cations. PMID:27444143

  14. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  15. A simple three-step method for design and affinity testing of new antisense peptides: an example of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Štambuk, Nikola; Manojlović, Zoran; Turčić, Petra; Martinić, Roko; Konjevoda, Paško; Weitner, Tin; Wardega, Piotr; Gabričević, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Antisense peptide technology is a valuable tool for deriving new biologically active molecules and performing peptide-receptor modulation. It is based on the fact that peptides specified by the complementary (antisense) nucleotide sequences often bind to each other with a higher specificity and efficacy. We tested the validity of this concept on the example of human erythropoietin, a well-characterized and pharmacologically relevant hematopoietic growth factor. The purpose of the work was to present and test simple and efficient three-step procedure for the design of an antisense peptide targeting receptor-binding site of human erythropoietin. Firstly, we selected the carboxyl-terminal receptor binding region of the molecule (epitope) as a template for the antisense peptide modeling; Secondly, we designed an antisense peptide using mRNA transcription of the epitope sequence in the 3'→5' direction and computational screening of potential paratope structures with BLAST; Thirdly, we evaluated sense-antisense (epitope-paratope) peptide binding and affinity by means of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscale thermophoresis. Both methods showed similar Kd values of 850 and 816 µM, respectively. The advantages of the methods were: fast screening with a small quantity of the sample needed, and measurements done within the range of physicochemical parameters resembling physiological conditions. Antisense peptides targeting specific erythropoietin region(s) could be used for the development of new immunochemical methods. Selected antisense peptides with optimal affinity are potential lead compounds for the development of novel diagnostic substances, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines. PMID:24865486

  16. Facile preparation of mesoporous carbon-silica-coated graphene for the selective enrichment of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanqing; Zhang, Qinghe; Xiong, Zhichao; Wan, Hao; Chen, Xiaoting; Li, Hongmei; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-01-01

    A sandwich-like composite composed of ordered mesoporous carbon-silica shell-coated graphene (denoted as graphene@mSiO2-C) was prepared by an in-situ carbonation strategy. A mesoporous silica shell was synthesized by a sol-gel method, and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide inside the mesopores were in-situ carbonized as a carbon source to obtain a carbon-silica shell. The resulting mesoporous carbon-silica material with a sandwich structure possesses a high surface area (600 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volume (0.587 cm(3) g(-1)), highly ordered mesoporous pore (3 nm), and high carbon content (30%). This material shows not only high hydrophobicity of graphene and mesoporous carbon but also a hydrophilic silica framework that ensures excellent dispersibility in aqueous solution. The material can capture many more peptides from bovine serum albumin tryptic digests than mesoporous silica shell-coated graphene, demonstrating great enrichment efficiency for peptides. Furthermore, the prepared composite was applied to the enrichment of low-abundance endogenous peptides in human serum. Based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry identification, the graphene@mSiO2-C could efficiently size-exclude proteins and enriches the low-abundant peptides on the graphene and mesoporous carbon. And based on the LC-MS/MS results, 892 endogenous peptides were obtained by graphene@mSiO2-C, hinting at its great potential in peptides analysis. PMID:26695263

  17. Phosphorylated Peptide Functionalization of Lanthanide Upconversion Nanoparticles for Tuning Nanomaterial-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Chi; Wei, Caiyi; Huang, Zhi; Lu, Yiqing; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Ju, Dianwen; Zhang, Xiangmin; Wang, Wenning; Zhang, Fan

    2016-03-23

    Peptide modification of nanoparticles with high efficiency is critical in determining the properties and bioapplications of nanoparticles, but the methodology remains a challenging task. Here, by using the phosphorylated linear and cyclic peptide with the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) targeting motifs as typical examples, the peptides binding efficiency for the inorganic metal compound nanoparticles was increased significantly after the phosphorylation treatment, and the modification allowed for improving the selectivity and signal-to-noise ratio for cancer targeting and reduced the toxicity derived from nonspecific interactions of nanoparticles with cells owing to the higher amount of phosphopeptide binding. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various peptides on inorganic metal compound surfaces revealed that the peptide adsorption on the surface is mainly driven by electrostatic interactions between phosphate oxygen and the polarized interfacial water layer, consistent with the experimental observation of the strong binding propensity of phosphorylated peptides. Significantly, with the RGD phosphopeptide surface modification, these nanoparticles provide a versatile tool for tuning material-cell interactions to achieve the desired level of autophagy and may prove useful for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  18. Biologically-Inspired Peptide Reagents for Enhancing IMS-MS Analysis of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Brian C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2011-09-01

    The binding properties of a peptidoglycan recognition protein are translated via combinatorial chemistry into short peptides. Non-adjacent histidine, tyrosine, and arginine residues in the protein's binding cleft that associate specifically with the glycan moiety of a peptidoglycan substrate are incorporated into linear sequences creating a library of 27 candidate tripeptide reagents (three possible residues permutated across three positions). Upon electrospraying the peptide library and carbohydrate mixtures, some noncovalent complexes are observed. The binding efficiencies of the peptides vary according to their amino acid composition as well as the disaccharide linkage and carbohydrate ring-type. In addition to providing a charge-carrier for the carbohydrate, peptide reagents can also be used to differentiate carbohydrate isomers by ion mobility spectrometry. The utility of these peptide reagents as a means of enhancing ion mobility analysis of carbohydrates is illustrated by examining four glucose-containing disaccharide isomers, including a pair that is not resolved by ion mobility alone. The specificity and stoichiometry of the peptide-carbohydrate complexes are also investigated. Trihistidine demonstrates both suitable binding efficiency and successful resolution of disaccharides isomers, suggesting it may be a useful reagent in IMS analyses of carbohydrates.

  19. Facile preparation of mesoporous carbon-silica-coated graphene for the selective enrichment of endogenous peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanqing; Zhang, Qinghe; Xiong, Zhichao; Wan, Hao; Chen, Xiaoting; Li, Hongmei; Zou, Hanfa

    2016-01-01

    A sandwich-like composite composed of ordered mesoporous carbon-silica shell-coated graphene (denoted as graphene@mSiO2-C) was prepared by an in-situ carbonation strategy. A mesoporous silica shell was synthesized by a sol-gel method, and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide inside the mesopores were in-situ carbonized as a carbon source to obtain a carbon-silica shell. The resulting mesoporous carbon-silica material with a sandwich structure possesses a high surface area (600 m(2) g(-1)), large pore volume (0.587 cm(3) g(-1)), highly ordered mesoporous pore (3 nm), and high carbon content (30%). This material shows not only high hydrophobicity of graphene and mesoporous carbon but also a hydrophilic silica framework that ensures excellent dispersibility in aqueous solution. The material can capture many more peptides from bovine serum albumin tryptic digests than mesoporous silica shell-coated graphene, demonstrating great enrichment efficiency for peptides. Furthermore, the prepared composite was applied to the enrichment of low-abundance endogenous peptides in human serum. Based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/ Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry identification, the graphene@mSiO2-C could efficiently size-exclude proteins and enriches the low-abundant peptides on the graphene and mesoporous carbon. And based on the LC-MS/MS results, 892 endogenous peptides were obtained by graphene@mSiO2-C, hinting at its great potential in peptides analysis.

  20. Pyroacm Resin: An Acetamidomethyl Derived Resin for Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptides through Side Chain Anchoring of C-Terminal Cysteine Residues.

    PubMed

    Juvekar, Vinayak; Gong, Young Dae

    2016-02-19

    The design, synthesis and utilization of an efficient acetamidomethyl derived resin for the peptide synthesis is presented using established Fmoc and Boc protocols via side chain anchoring. Cleavage of the target peptide from the resin is performed using carboxymethylsulfenyl chloride under mild conditions which gave in situ thiol-sulfenyl protection of the cysteine residues. The utility of the resin is successfully demonstrated through applications to the syntheses of model peptides and natural products Riparin 1.1 and Riparin 1.2.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  2. Peptide stabilized amphotericin B nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Tufteland, Megan; Pesavento, Joseph B; Bermingham, Rachelle L; Hoeprich, Paul D; Ryan, Robert O

    2007-04-01

    Nanometer scale apolipoprotein A-I stabilized phospholipid disk complexes (nanodisks; ND) have been formulated with the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AMB). The present studies were designed to evaluate if a peptide can substitute for the function of the apolipoprotein component of ND with respect to particle formation and stability. An 18-residue synthetic amphipathic alpha-helical peptide, termed 4F (Ac-D-W-F-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-F-K-E-A-F-NH(2)), solubilized vesicles comprised of egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipentadecanoyl PC or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at rates greater than or equal to solubilization rates observed with human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I; 243 amino acids). Characterization studies revealed that interaction with DMPC induced a near doubling of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission quantum yield (excitation 280 nm) and a approximately 7 nm blue shift in emission wavelength maximum. Inclusion of AMB in the vesicle substrate resulted in formation of 4F AMB-ND. Spectra of AMB containing particles revealed the antibiotic is a highly effective quencher of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission, giving rise to a Ksv=7.7 x 10(4). Negative stain electron microscopy revealed that AMB-ND prepared with 4F possessed a disk shaped morphology similar to ND prepared without AMB or prepared with apoA-I. In yeast and pathogenic fungi growth inhibition assays, 4F AMB-ND was as effective as apoA-I AMB-ND. The data indicate that AMB-ND generated using an amphipathic peptide in lieu of apoA-I form a discrete population of particles that possess potent biological activity. Given their intrinsic versatility, peptides may be preferred for scale up and clinical application of AMB-ND.

  3. PLGA nanoparticle-mediated delivery of tumor antigenic peptides elicits effective immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxue; Chen, Mingshui; Kaushal, Sharmeela; McElroy, Michele; Zhang, Yu; Ozkan, Cengiz; Bouvet, Michael; Kruse, Carol; Grotjahn, Douglas; Ichim, Thomas; Minev, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The peptide vaccine clinical trials encountered limited success because of difficulties associated with stability and delivery, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides in order to elicit enhanced immune responses using poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA-NPs) encapsulating tumor antigenic peptides. PLGA-NPs were made using the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Artificial antigen-presenting cells were generated by human dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with PLGA-NPs encapsulating tumor antigenic peptide(s). The efficiency of the antigen presentation was measured by interferon-γ ELISpot assay (Vector Laboratories, Burlingame, CA). Antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were generated and evaluated by CytoTox 96® Non-Radioactive Cytotoxicity Assay (Promega, Fitchburg, WI). The efficiency of the peptide delivery was compared between the methods of emulsification in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant and encapsulation in PLGA-NPs. Our results showed that most of the PLGA-NPs were from 150 nm to 500 nm in diameter, and were negatively charged at pH 7.4 with a mean zeta potential of −15.53 ± 0.71 mV; the PLGA-NPs could be colocalized in human DCs in 30 minutes of incubation. Human DCs loaded with PLGA-NPs encapsulating peptide induced significantly stronger CTL cytotoxicity than those pulsed with free peptide, while human DCs loaded with PLGA-NPs encapsulating a three-peptide cocktail induced a significantly greater CTL response than those encapsulating a two-peptide cocktail. Most importantly, the peptide dose encapsulated in PLGA-NPs was 63 times less than that emulsified in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant, but it induced a more powerful CTL response in vivo. These results demonstrate that the delivery of peptides encapsulated in PLGA-NPs is a promising approach to induce effective antitumor

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23935642

  5. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  6. Platyhelminth FMRFamide-related peptides.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C; Maule, A G; Halton, D W

    1996-04-01

    Platyhelminths are the most primitive metazoan phylum to possess a true central nervous system, comprising a brain and longitudinal nerve cords connected by commissures. Additional to the presence of classical neurotransmitters, the nervous systems of all major groups of flatworms examined have widespread and abundant peptidergic components. Decades of research on the major invertebrate phyla, Mollusca and Arthropoda, have revealed the primary structures and putative functions of several families of structurally related peptides, the best studied being the FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). Recently, the first platyhelminth FaRP was isolated from the tapeworm, Moniezia expansa, and was found to be a hexapeptide amide, GNFFRFamide. Two additional FaRPs were isolated from species of turbellarians; these were pentapeptides, RYIRFamide (Artioposthia triangulata) and GYIRFamide (Dugesia tigrina). The primary structure of a monogenean or digenean FaRP has yet to be deduced. Preliminary physiological studies have shown that both of the turbellarian FaRPs elicit dose-dependent contractions of isolated digenean and turbellarian somatic muscle fibres. Unlike the high structural diversity of FaRPs found in molluscs, arthropods and nematodes, the complement of FaRPs in individual species of platyhelminths appears to be restricted to 1 or 2 related molecules. Much remains to be learnt about platyhelminth FaRPs, particularly from peptide isolation, molecular cloning of precursor proteins, receptor localization, and physiological studies.

  7. Selective separation of peptides contained in a rapeseed (Brassica campestris L.) protein hydrolysate using UF/NF membranes.

    PubMed

    Tessier, B; Harscoat-Schiavo, C; Marc, I

    2006-05-17

    The ability of a charged UF membrane to fractionate the small peptides found in a rapeseed protein enzymatic hydrolysate, according to their charge characteristics, was investigated. The complexity of such a hydrolysate has required the setting up of technological alternatives to isolate the small peptides, to obtain a more efficient separation among the numerous peptide species. A preliminary step consisted of precipitation followed by filtration with a 3000 g/mol molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) membrane to obtain a solution concentrated in small peptides. The possibility of fractionating these small peptides by a charged 1000 g/mol MWCO membrane was investigated. The study enabled us to assess the contribution of electrostatic interactions during fractionation. The effect of pH and ionic strength on the peptide transmission was studied. The ionic strength contribution was considered by studying the effect on the selectivity of a desalting step by nanofiltration on a 500 g/mol MWCO membrane. Peptide transmission was lower at pH 9 than pH 4, and it was the lowest at pH 9 and low ionic strength. Ionic strength had a significant influence at pH 9 but showed no influence at pH 4. The amino acid analysis and capillary electrophoresis revealed that negatively charged (acid) peptides were found in lower proportions in the permeate. The opposite trend was observed for basic peptides, whereas neutral peptides were found in the same proportion in the retentate and the permeate. These results can be explained, according to the Donnan theory, by the existence of attractive and repulsive forces at the membrane-solution interface. Selectivity between basic and acid peptides was as high as 1.90 at pH 9 and low ionic strength. A rough sketch of a membrane-based process is proposed to fractionate rapeseed peptide mixtures. Results obtained were reproducible within 10%.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptide-Driven Colloidal Transformations in Liquid-Crystalline Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Gontsarik, Mark; Buhmann, Matthias T; Yaghmur, Anan; Ren, Qun; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Salentinig, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Designing efficient colloidal systems for the delivery of membrane active antimicrobial peptides requires in-depth understanding of their structural and morphological characteristics. Using dispersions of inverted type bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes), we examine the effect of integrating the amphiphilic peptide LL-37 at different concentrations on the self-assembled structure and evaluate its bactericidal ability against Escherichia coli. Small-angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy show that LL-37 integrates into the bicontinuous cubic structure, inducing colloidal transformations to sponge and lamellar phases and micelles in a concentration-dependent manner. These investigations, together with in vitro evaluation studies using a clinically relevant bacterial strain, established the composition-nanostructure-activity relationship that can guide the design of new nanocarriers for antimicrobial peptides and may provide essential knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the bacterial membrane disruption with peptide-loaded nanostructures. PMID:27541048

  9. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  10. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development.

  11. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies. PMID:25583214

  12. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-13

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  13. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  14. Anticancer Activity of the Antimicrobial Peptide Scolopendrasin VII Derived from the Centipede, Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Ha; Kim, In-Woo; Kim, Sang-Hee; Kim, Mi-Ae; Yun, Eun-Young; Nam, Sung-Hee; Ahn, Mi-Young; Kang, Dongchul; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2015-08-01

    Previously, we performed de novo RNA sequencing of Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans using high-throughput sequencing technology and identified several antimicrobial peptide candidates. Among them, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, scolopendrasin VII, was selected based on its physicochemical properties, such as length, charge, and isoelectric point. Here, we assessed the anticancer activities of scolopendrasin VII against U937 and Jurkat leukemia cell lines. The results showed that scolopendrasin VII decreased the viability of the leukemia cells in MTS assays. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining revealed that scolopendrasin VII induced necrosis in the leukemia cells. Scolopendrasin VII-induced necrosis was mediated by specific interaction with phosphatidylserine, which is enriched in the membrane of cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicated that scolopendrasin VII induced necrotic cell death in leukemia cells, probably through interaction with phosphatidylserine. The results provide a useful anticancer peptide candidate and an efficient strategy for new anticancer peptide development. PMID:25907065

  15. Solid-Phase Synthesis, Characterization, and Cellular Activities of Collagen-Model Nanodiamond-Peptide Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Knapinska, Anna M.; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Amar, Sabrina; Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Mochalin, Vadym N.; Gogotsi, Yury; Cosme, Patrick; Terentis, Andrew C.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2015-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have received considerable attention as potential drug delivery vehicles. NDs are small (~5 nm diameter), can be surface modified in a controllable fashion with a variety of functional groups, and have little observed toxicity in vitro and in vivo. However, most biomedical applications of NDs utilize surface adsorption of biomolecules, as opposed to covalent attachment. Covalent modification provides reliable and reproducible ND–biomolecule ratios, and alleviates concerns over biomolecule desorption prior to delivery. The present study has outlined methods for the efficient solid-phase conjugation of ND to peptides and characterization of ND–peptide conjugates. Utilizing collagen-derived peptides, the ND was found to support or even enhance the cell adhesion and viability activities of the conjugated sequence. Thus, NDs can be incorporated into peptides and proteins in a selective manner, where the presence of the ND could potentially enhance the in vivo activities of the biomolecule it is attached to. PMID:25753561

  16. Butelase-Mediated Macrocyclization of d-Amino-Acid-Containing Peptides.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Hemu, Xinya; Quek, Jun-Ping; Tam, James P

    2016-10-01

    Macrocyclic compounds have received increasing attention in recent years. With their large surface area, they hold promise for inhibiting protein-protein interactions, a chemical space that was thought to be undruggable. Although many chemical methods have been developed for peptide macrocyclization, enzymatic methods have emerged as a promising new economical approach. Thus far, most enzymes have been shown to act on l-peptides; their ability to cyclize d-amino-acid-containing peptides has rarely been documented. Herein we show that macrocycles consisting of d-amino acids, except for the Asn residue at the ligating site, were efficiently synthesized by butelase 1, an Asn/Asp-specific ligase. Furthermore, by using a peptide-library approach, we show that butelase 1 tolerates most of the d-amino acid residues at the P1'' and P2'' positions. PMID:27624217

  17. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8+ T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8+ T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8+ T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides. PMID:26099460

  18. Preorganized Peptide Scaffolds as Mimics of Phosphorylated Proteins Binding Sites with a High Affinity for Uranyl.

    PubMed

    Starck, Matthieu; Sisommay, Nathalie; Laporte, Fanny A; Oros, Stéphane; Lebrun, Colette; Delangle, Pascale

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic peptides with two phosphoserines and two glutamic acids were developed to mimic high-affinity binding sites for uranyl found in proteins such as osteopontin, which is believed to be a privileged target of this ion in vivo. These peptides adopt a β-sheet structure that allows the coordination of the latter amino acid side chains in the equatorial plane of the dioxo uranyl cation. Complementary spectroscopic and analytical methods revealed that these cyclic peptides are efficient uranyl chelating peptides with a large contribution from the phosphorylated residues. The conditional affinity constants were measured by following fluorescence tryptophan quenching and are larger than 10(10) at physiological pH. These compounds are therefore promising models for understanding uranyl chelation by proteins, which is relevant to this actinide ion toxicity. PMID:26583259

  19. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8(+) T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8(+) T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8(+) T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides.

  20. Modulating Charge Transfer Through Cyclic D,L α-Peptide Self-Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Horne, W. Seth; Ashkenasy, Nurit; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    2007-01-01

    We describe a concise solid support-based synthetic method for the preparation of cyclic D,L α-peptides bearing 1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide (NDI) side chains. Studies of the structural and photoluminescence properties of these molecules in solution show that the hydrogen bond directed self-assembly of the cyclic D,L α-peptide backbone promotes intermolecular NDI excimer formation. The efficiency of NDI charge transfer in the resulting supramolecular assemblies is shown to depend on the length of the linker between the NDI and the peptide backbone, the distal NDI substituent, and the number of NDIs incorporated in a given structure. The design rationale and synthetic strategies described here should provide a basic blueprint for a series of self-assembling cyclic D,L α-peptide nanotubes with interesting optical and electronic properties. PMID:15624124

  1. Structure and Mechanism of the Sphingopyxin I Lasso Peptide Isopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Fage, Christopher D; Hegemann, Julian D; Nebel, Annika J; Steinbach, Roman M; Zhu, Shaozhou; Linne, Uwe; Harms, Klaus; Bange, Gert; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2016-10-01

    Lasso peptides are natural products that assume a unique lariat knot topology. Lasso peptide isopeptidases (IsoPs) eliminate this topology through isopeptide bond cleavage. To probe how these enzymes distinguish between substrates and hydrolyze only isopeptide bonds, we examined the structure and mechanism of a previously uncharacterized IsoP from the proteobacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis RB2256 (SpI-IsoP). We demonstrate that SpI-IsoP efficiently and specifically linearizes the lasso peptide sphingopyxin I (SpI) and variants thereof. We also present crystal structures of SpI and SpI-IsoP, revealing a threaded topology for the former and a prolyl oligopeptidase (POP)-like fold for the latter. Subsequent structure-guided mutational analysis allowed us to propose roles for active-site residues. Our study sheds light on lasso peptide catabolism and expands the engineering potential of these fascinating molecules. PMID:27611791

  2. Peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for selective targeting of pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Valetti, Sabrina; Maione, Federica; Mura, Simona; Stella, Barbara; Desmaële, Didier; Noiray, Magali; Vergnaud, Juliette; Vauthier, Christine; Cattel, Luigi; Giraudo, Enrico; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-10-28

    Chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is hampered by the tumor's physio-pathological complexity. Here we show a targeted nanomedicine using a new ligand, the CKAAKN peptide, which had been identified by phage display, as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Taking advantage of the squalenoylation platform, the CKAAKN peptide was conjugated to squalene (SQCKAAKN) and then co-nanoprecipitated with the squalenoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (SQdFdC) giving near monodisperse nanoparticles (NPs) for safe intravenous injection. By interacting with a novel target pathway, the Wnt-2, the CKAAKN functionalization enabled nanoparticles: (i) to specifically interact with both tumor cells and angiogenic vessels and (ii) to simultaneously promote pericyte coverage, thus leading to the normalization of the vasculature likely improving the tumor accessibility for therapy. All together, this approach represents a unique targeted nanoparticle design with remarkable selectivity towards pancreatic cancer and multiple mechanisms of action.

  3. Determinant selection of major histocompatibility complex class I- restricted antigenic peptides is explained by class I-peptide affinity and is strongly influenced by nondominant anchor residues

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The contribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I- peptide affinity to immunodominance of particular peptide antigens (Ags) in the class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is not clearly established. Therefore, we have compared the H-2Kb- restricted binding and presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin (OVA)257-264 (SIINFEKL) determinant to that of a subdominant OVA determinant OVA55-62 (KVVRFDKL). Immunodominance of OVA257-264 was not attributable to the specific T cell repertoire but correlated instead with more efficient Ag presentation. This enhanced Ag presentation could be accounted for by the higher affinity of Kb/OVA257-264 compared with Kb/OVA55-62 despite the presence of a conserved Kb-binding motif in both peptides. Kinetic binding studies using purified soluble H-2Kb molecules (Kbs) and biosensor techniques indicated that the Kon for association of OVA257-264-C6 and Kbs at 25 degrees C was integral of 10- fold faster (5.9 x 10(3) M-1 s-1 versus 6.5 x 10(2) M-1 s-1), and the Koff approximately twofold slower (9.1 x 10(-6) s-1 versus 1.6 x 10(-5) s-1), than the rate constants for interaction of OVA55-62-C6 and Kbs. The association of these peptides with Kb was significantly influenced by multiple residues at presumed nonanchor sites within the peptide sequence. The contribution of each peptide residue to Kb-binding was dependent upon the sequence context and the summed contributions were not additive. Thus the affinity of MHC class I-peptide binding is a critical factor controlling presentation of peptide Ag and immunodominance in the class I-restricted CTL response. PMID:7523572

  4. Lysine-tagged peptide coupling onto polylactide nanoparticles coated with activated ester-based amphiphilic copolymer: a route to highly peptide-functionalized biodegradable carriers.

    PubMed

    Handké, Nadège; Ficheux, Damien; Rollet, Marion; Delair, Thierry; Mabrouk, Kamel; Bertin, Denis; Gigmes, Didier; Verrier, Bernard; Trimaille, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Efficient biomolecule conjugation to the surface of biodegradable colloidal carriers is crucial for their targeting efficiency in drug/vaccine delivery applications. We here propose a potent strategy to drastically improve peptide immobilization on biodegradable polylactide (PLA) nanoparticles (NPs). Our approach particularly relies on the use of an amphiphilic block copolymer PLA-b-poly(N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP)) as NP surface modifier, whose the N-succinimidyl (NS) ester functions of the NAS units along the polymer chain ensure N-terminal amine peptide coupling. The well-known immunostimulatory peptide sequence derived from the human interleukin 1β (IL-1β), VQGEESNDK, was coupled on the NPs of 169 nm mean diameter in phosphate buffer (pH 8, 10 mM). A maximum amount of 2 mg immobilized per gram of NPs (i.e. 0.042 peptidenm(-2)) was obtained. Introduction of a three lysine tag at the peptide N-terminus (KKKVQGEESNDK) resulted in a dramatic improvement of the immobilized peptide amounts (27.5 mg/g NP, i.e. 0.417 peptidenm(-2)). As a comparison, the density of tagged peptide achievable on surfactant free PLA NPs of similar size (140 nm), through classical EDC or EDC/NHS activation of the surface PLA carboxylic end-groups, was found to be 6 mg/g NP (i.e. 0.075 peptidenm(-2)), showing the decisive impact of the P(NAS-co-NVP)-based hairy corona for high peptide coupling. These results demonstrate that combined use of lysine tag and PLA-b-P(NAS-co-NVP) surfactant represents a valuable platform to tune and optimize surface bio-functionalization of PLA-based biodegradable carriers.

  5. A novel single-domain peptide, anti-LPS factor from prawn: synthesis of peptide, antimicrobial properties and complete molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Arockia