Science.gov

Sample records for albumin-derived peptides efficiently

  1. An albumin-derived peptide scaffold capable of binding and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Luisi, Immacolata; Pavan, Silvia; Fontanive, Giampaolo; Tossi, Alessandro; Benedetti, Fabio; Savoini, Adriano; Maurizio, Elisa; Sgarra, Riccardo; Sblattero, Daniele; Berti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We have identified a 101-amino-acid polypeptide derived from the sequence of the IIA binding site of human albumin. The polypeptide contains residues that make contact with IIA ligands in the parent protein, and eight cysteine residues to form disulfide bridges, that stabilize the polypeptide structure. Seventy-four amino acids are located in six α-helical regions, while the remaining thirty-seven amino acids form six connecting coil/loop regions. A soluble GST fusion protein was expressed in E. coli in yields as high as 4 mg/l. This protein retains the IIA fragment's capacity to bind typical ligands such as warfarin and efavirenz and other albumin's functional properties such as aldolase activity and the ability to direct the stereochemical outcome of a diketone reduction. This newly cloned polypeptide thus represents a valuable starting point for the construction of libraries of binders and catalysts with improved proficiency.

  2. Hyperosmotic treatment synergistically boost efficiency of cell-permeable peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zeng, Fanhui; Liu, Changbai

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutics delivery into cells has been hurdled due to the barrier of cytoplasmic membrane. Although cell penetrating peptide (CPP) can potentially serve as an intracellular drug delivery vehicle, the application of CPP-based delivery is limited because the unsatisfactory delivery efficiency of CPP conjugated potent cargos is challenging their applications in present. Thus, the development of strategies for enhancing the penetrating efficiency of CPP would therefore urgent need to be explored to increase the scope of potential applications. We report here the effects of glucose, sucrose and manntiol (abbreviated as GSM) combination facilitating the penetration efficiency of CPP peptide alone or CPP-GFP (green fluorescence protein) conjugation in cultured cell lines or primary cells. Moreover, osmoprotectants glycerol and glycine supplementation help cells cope with the stress from GSM combination. Thus, our present study suggests that GSM combination in the presence of osmoprotectant can work as a new strategy for CPP penetration enhancement. PMID:27213591

  3. A method to determine the ionization efficiency change of peptides caused by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-11-01

    Quantitative assessment of post-translational modifications in proteins by mass spectrometry often requires the consideration of the alteration in ionization efficiency of peptides induced by the modification. Herein, we introduced a method to measure the relative ionization efficiencies of peptides using specifically designed unlabeled peptides. In our design, the peptide under study, in either the unmodified or modified form, is linked with an internal standard peptide via an enzyme cleavage site; thus, after enzymatic digestion, we could obtain readily a 1:1 ratio between the peptide under investigation and the internal standard peptide. The relative ionization efficiencies of the modified and unmodified peptides can then be calculated from the modification-induced change in the ratio of relative abundances of the ion of the peptide of interest over that of the internal standard peptide. We demonstrated the usefulness of the method by assessing the change in ionization efficiencies of four peptides introduced by phosphorylation.

  4. Functionality of albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based artificial oxygen carriers in the Langendorff-heart (†).

    PubMed

    Wrobeln, Anna; Schlüter, Klaus D; Linders, Jürgen; Zähres, Manfred; Mayer, Christian; Kirsch, Michael; Ferenz, Katja B

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prove whether albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based nanoparticles (capsules) can operate as a novel artificial oxygen carrier in a rat Langendorff-heart perfusion model. Hearts perfused with capsules showed increased left ventricular pressure and rate pressure product compared to hearts perfused with pure Krebs-Henseleit (KH)-buffer. The capsules prevented the myocardium from functional fail when in their absence a noxious ischemia was observed. Capsules did not change rheological properties of KH-buffer and could repeatedly reload with oxygen. This albumin-derived perfluorocarbon-based artificial oxygen carrier preserved the function of rat hearts due to the transport of oxygen in a satisfactory manner. Because of these positive results, the functionality of the applied capsules should be verified in living animals.

  5. Interactions Between Peptide and Preservatives: Effects on Peptide Self-Interactions and Antimicrobial Efficiency In Aqueous Multi-Dose Formulations.

    PubMed

    Heljo, P; Ross, A; Zarraga, I E; Pappenberger, A; Mahler, H-C

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobial preservatives are known to interact with proteins and potentially affect their stability in aqueous solutions. In this systematic study, the interactions of a model peptide with three commonly used preservatives, benzyl alcohol, phenol and m-cresol, were evaluated. The impact on peptide oligomerization was studied using GC-MALS, SEC-MALS and DLS, antimicrobial efficiency of different formulations were studied using the Ph. Eur. antimicrobial efficacy test, and the molecular adsorption of preservative molecules on reversible peptide oligomers was monitored using NMR. The hydrodynamic radius and molar mass of the peptide oligomers was shown to clearly increase in the presence of m-cresol but less significantly with phenol and benzyl alcohol. The increase in size was most likely caused by peptide self-interactions becoming more attractive, leading to reversible oligomerization. On the other hand, increasing the concentration of peptide in multi-dose formulations led to reduced molecular mobility and decreased antimicrobial efficacy of all preservatives. Peptide-preservative interactions not only affect peptide self-interactions, but also antimicrobial efficiency of the preservatives and are thus of significant relevance. Adsorption of preservatives on oligomeric states of peptides is proposed as a mechanism to explain this reduced antimicrobial efficacy.

  6. Dendritic Guanidines as Efficient Analogues of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bonduelle, Colin V.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread application of cell penetrating agents to clinical therapeutics and imaging agents relies on the ability to prepare them on a large scale and to readily conjugate them to their cargos. Dendritic analogues of cell penetrating peptides, with multiple guanidine groups on their peripheries offer advantages as their high symmetry allows them to be efficiently synthesized, while orthogonal functionalities at their focal points allow them to be conjugated to cargo using simple synthetic methods. Their chemical structures and properties are also highly tunable as their flexibility and the number of guanidine groups can be tuned by altering the dendritic backbone or the linkages to the guanidine groups. This review describes the development of cell-penetrating dendrimers based on several different backbones, their structure-property relationships, and comparisons of their efficacies with those of known cell penetrating peptides. The toxicities of these dendritic guanidines are also reported as well as their application towards the intracellular delivery of biologically significant cargos including proteins and nanoparticles. PMID:27713272

  7. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules.

    PubMed

    Berkers, Celia R; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rodenko, Boris; Ovaa, Huib

    2015-11-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I-restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags.

  8. Contrasting effects of cysteine modification on the transfection efficiency of amphipathic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajpal; Nisakar, Daniel; Shivpuri, Shivangi; Ganguli, Munia

    2014-08-01

    Delivery of DNA to cells remains a key challenge towards development of gene therapy. A better understanding of the properties involved in stability and transfection efficiency of the vector could critically contribute to the improvement of delivery vehicles. In the present work we have chosen two peptides differing only in amphipathicity and explored how presence of cysteine affects DNA uptake and transfection efficiency. We report an unusual observation that addition of cysteine selectively increases transfection efficiency of secondary amphipathic peptide (Mgpe-9) and causes a drop in the primary amphipathic peptide (Mgpe-10). Our results point the effect of cysteine is dictated by the importance of physicochemical properties of the carrier peptide. We also report a DNA delivery agent Mgpe-9 exhibiting high transfection efficiency in multiple cell lines (including hard-to-transfect cell lines) with minimal cytotoxicity which can be further explored for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategies of Drug Transporter Quantitation by LC-MS: Importance of Peptide Selection and Digestion Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Buyun; Liu, Liling; Ho, Hoangdung; Chen, Yuan; Yang, Ze; Liang, Xiaorong; Payandeh, Jian; Dean, Brian; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Deng, Yuzhong

    2017-06-06

    Huge variation of drug transporter abundance was seen in the literature, making PBPK prediction difficult when transporters play a major role. Among multiple factors such as membrane fraction, digestion, and peptide selection that contributed to such variation, peptide selection is the least discussed. Herein, a strategy was established by using a small amount of purified protein standard to select a peptide with near 100% digestion efficiency for quantitation of a transporter protein MDR1. The impact of native membrane protein's tertiary structure on the digestion efficiency of surrogate peptides of MDR1 was investigated. Peptides in more solvent accessible regions are found to be digested much more efficiently than those in large stretches of helical structures. The concentration of peptide EALDESIPPVSFWR(EAL) in the most solvent accessible linker region of MDR1 was found closest to the true protein concentration. When using EAL for MDR1 quantitation, the abundance is over 10 times higher than previously reported, indicating the importance of peptide selection for transporter quantitation. In addition, this study also proposes a screening strategy to select peptides appropriate for relative quantitation for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation in the absence of any protein standard.

  10. Efficient conformational sampling of peptides adsorbed onto inorganic surfaces: insights from a quartz binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Wright, Louise B; Walsh, Tiffany R

    2013-04-07

    Harnessing the properties of biomolecules, such as peptides, adsorbed on inorganic surfaces is of interest to many cross-disciplinary areas of science, ranging from biomineralisation to nanomedicine. Key to advancing research in this area is determination of the peptide conformation(s) in its adsorbed state, at the aqueous interface. Molecular simulation is one such approach for accomplishing this goal. In this respect, use of temperature-based replica-exchange molecular dynamics (T-REMD) can yield enhanced sampling of the interfacial conformations, but does so at great computational expense, chiefly because of the need to include an explicit representation of water at the interface. Here, we investigate a number of more economical variations on REMD, chiefly those based on Replica Exchange with Solvent Tempering (REST), using the aqueous quartz-binding peptide S1-(100) α-quartz interfacial system as a benchmark. We also incorporate additional implementation details specifically targeted at improving sampling of biomolecules at interfaces. We find the REST-based variants yield configurational sampling of the peptide-surface system comparable with T-REMD, at a fraction of the computational time and resource. Our findings also deliver novel insights into the binding behaviour of the S1 peptide at the quartz (100) surface that are consistent with available experimental data.

  11. Designing Signal Peptides for Efficient Periplasmic Expression of Human Growth Hormone in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Meisam Jeirani; Moshiri, Farzaneh; Falasafi, Soheil Keyhan; Zomorodipour, Alireza

    2017-08-31

    Secretion efficiency of a protein in a SEC-type secretion system is mainly determined by an N-terminal signal peptide and its combination with its cognate protein. Five signal peptides, including; two synthetic Sec-type and three Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase derived signal peptides were compared for periplasmic expression of the human growth hormone (hGH) in E. coli. Based on in silico predictions on the signal peptides' cleavage efficiencies and their corresponding mRNA secondary structures, a number of amino acid substitutions and silent mutations were considered in the modified signal sequences. The two synthetic signal peptides, specifically designed for the hGH secretion in E. coli, differ in their N-terminal positively charged residues and hydrophobic regions lengths. According to the mRNA secondary structure predictions, combinations of the protein and each of the five signal sequences could lead to different outcomes, especially when accessibility of the initiator ATG and ribosome binding sites were considered. In the experimental stage, the two synthetic signal peptides displayed complete processing and resulted in efficient secretion of the mature hGH in periplasmic regions, as it was demonstrated by protein analysis. The three alpha-amylase-derived signal peptides, however, were processed partially from their precursors. Therefore, to achieve efficient secretion of a protein in a heterologous system, designing of a specific signal peptide in which a combined approach of optimizations of the mRNA secondary structure and the signal peptide H-domain and cleavage site is recommended.

  12. Estimation of peptide N-Cα bond cleavage efficiency during MALDI-ISD using a cyclic peptide.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Daiki; Smargiasso, Nicolas; De Pauw, Edwin

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization in-source decay (MALDI-ISD) induces N-Cα bond cleavage via hydrogen transfer from the matrix to the peptide backbone, which produces a c'/z• fragment pair. Subsequently, the z• generates z' and [z + matrix] fragments via further radical reactions because of the low stability of the z•. In the present study, we investigated MALDI-ISD of a cyclic peptide. The N-Cα bond cleavage in the cyclic peptide by MALDI-ISD produced the hydrogen-abundant peptide radical [M + 2H](+) • with a radical site on the α-carbon atom, which then reacted with the matrix to give [M + 3H](+) and [M + H + matrix](+) . For 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (1,5-DAN) adducts with z fragments, post-source decay of [M + H + 1,5-DAN](+) generated from the cyclic peptide showed predominant loss of an amino acid with 1,5-DAN. Additionally, MALDI-ISD with Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry allowed for the detection of both [M + 3H](+) and [M + H](+) with two (13) C atoms. These results strongly suggested that [M + 3H](+) and [M + H + 1,5-DAN](+) were formed by N-Cα bond cleavage with further radical reactions. As a consequence, the cleavage efficiency of the N-Cα bond during MALDI-ISD could be estimated by the ratio of the intensity of [M + H](+) and [M + 3H](+) in the Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance spectrum. Because the reduction efficiency of a matrix for the cyclic peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Val) was correlated to its tendency to cleave the N-Cα bond in linear peptides, the present method could allow the evaluation of the efficiency of N-Cα bond cleavage for MALDI matrix development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Chemical Derivatization of Peptide Carboxyl Groups for Highly Efficient Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Brian L.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Sondalle, Samuel B.; Krusemark, Casey J.; Jue, April L.; Coon, Joshua J.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2013-11-01

    The carboxyl groups of tryptic peptides were derivatized with a tertiary or quaternary amine labeling reagent to generate more highly charged peptide ions that fragment efficiently by electron transfer dissociation (ETD). All peptide carboxyl groups—aspartic and glutamic acid side-chains as well as C-termini—were derivatized with an average reaction efficiency of 99 %. This nearly complete labeling avoids making complex peptide mixtures even more complex because of partially-labeled products, and it allows the use of static modifications during database searching. Alkyl tertiary amines were found to be the optimal labeling reagent among the four types tested. Charge states are substantially higher for derivatized peptides: a modified tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin (BSA) generates ~90% of its precursor ions with z > 2, compared with less than 40 % for the unmodified sample. The increased charge density of modified peptide ions yields highly efficient ETD fragmentation, leading to many additional peptide identifications and higher sequence coverage (e.g., 70 % for modified versus only 43 % for unmodified BSA). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated on a tryptic digest of ribosomal proteins isolated from yeast cells. Peptide derivatization of this sample produced an increase in the number of identified proteins, a >50 % increase in the sequence coverage of these proteins, and a doubling of the number of peptide spectral matches. This carboxyl derivatization strategy greatly improves proteome coverage obtained from ETD-MS/MS of tryptic digests, and we anticipate that it will also enhance identification and localization of post-translational modifications.

  14. CL22 - a novel cationic peptide for efficient transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Haines, A M; Irvine, A S; Mountain, A; Charlesworth, J; Farrow, N A; Husain, R D; Hyde, H; Ketteringham, H; McDermott, R H; Mulcahy, A F; Mustoe, T L; Reid, S C; Rouquette, M; Shaw, J C; Thatcher, D R; Welsh, J H; Williams, D E; Zauner, W; Phillips, R O

    2001-01-01

    Condensing peptide-DNA complexes have great potential as nonviral agents for gene delivery. To date, however, such complexes have given transfection activities greatly inferior to adenovirus and somewhat inferior to cationic lipid-DNA complexes, even for cell lines and primary cells in vitro. We report here the identification of a novel condensing peptide, CL22, which forms DNA complexes that efficiently transfect many cell lines, as well as primary dendritic and endothelial cells. We report studies with sequence and structure variants that define some properties of the peptide that contribute to efficient transfection. We demonstrate that the superior transfection activity of CL22 compared with other DNA condensing peptides is conferred at a step after uptake of the complexes into cells. We show that CL22-DNA complexes have transfection activity that is at least equivalent to the best available nonviral agents.

  15. Efficient gene delivery of primary human cells using peptide linked polyethylenimine polymer hybrid.

    PubMed

    Dey, Devaveena; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Lee, Andrew S; LeMieux, Melburne C; Zhang, Xuexiang; Wu, Yi; Nag, Divya; De Almeida, Patricia Eliza; Han, Leng; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Wu, Joseph C

    2011-07-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) based polymers are efficient agents for cell transfection. However, their use has been hampered due to high cell death associated with transfection thereby resulting in low efficiency of gene delivery within the cells. To circumvent the problem of cellular toxicity, metal binding peptides were linked to PEI. Eight peptide-PEI derivatives were synthesized to improve cell survival and transfection efficiency. TAT linked PEI was used as a control polymer. Peptides linked with PEI amines formed nanogels as shown by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic measurements. Polymers were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their ability to form complexes with plasmids was tested using electrophoretic studies. These modifications improved polymer biocompatibility as well as cell survival markedly, when compared to PEI alone. A subset of the modified peptide-polymers also showed significantly higher transfection efficiency in primary human cells with respect to the widely used transfection agent, lipofectamine. Study of the underlying mechanism of the observed phenomena revealed lower levels of 'reactive oxygen species' (ROS) in the presence of the peptide-polymers when compared to PEI alone. This was further corroborated with global gene expression analysis which showed upregulation of multiple genes and pathways involved in regulating intracellular oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Insulin chains as efficient fusion tags for prokaryotic expression of short peptides.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ligang; Xue, Xiaoying; Shen, Cangjie; Song, Xiaohan; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Nan

    2017-10-01

    Insulin chains are usually expressed in Escherichia coli as fusion proteins with different tags, including various low molecular weight peptide tags. The objective of this study was to determine if insulin chains could facilitate the recombinant expression of other target proteins, with an emphasis on low molecular weight peptides. A series of short peptides were fused to mini-proinsulin, chain B or chain A, and induced for expression in Escherichia coli. All the tested peptides including glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a C-terminal extended GLP-1, oxyntomodulin, enfuvirtide, linaclotide, and an unstructured artificial peptide were expressed with reasonable yields, identified by Tricine-SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. All recombinant products were expressed in inclusion bodies. The effective accumulation of products was largely attributed to the insoluble expression induced by fusion with insulin chains, and was confirmed by the fusion expression of transthyretin. Insulin chains thus show promise as efficient fusion tags for mass production of heterologous peptides in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficient removal of detergents from proteins and peptides in a spin column format.

    PubMed

    Antharavally, Babu S; Mallia, Krishna A; Rosenblatt, Michael M; Salunkhe, Ashok M; Rogers, John C; Haney, Paul; Haghdoost, Navid

    2011-09-01

    Detergents are commonly used in protein-chemistry protocols and may be necessary for protein extraction, solubilization, and denaturation; however, their presence interferes with many downstream analysis techniques, including mass spectrometry (MS). To enable downstream analysis, it is critical to remove unbound detergents from protein and peptide samples. In this study, we describe a high-performance resin that offers exceptional detergent removal for proteins and peptides. When used in a spin column format, this resin dramatically improves protein and peptide MS results by more than 95% removal of 1-5% detergents, including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), sodium deoxycholate, Chaps, Triton X-100, Triton X-114, NP-40, Brij-35, octyl glucoside, octyl thioglucoside, and lauryl maltoside, with high recovery of proteins and peptides. Postcolumn liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) analysis of trypsin digests of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and HeLa cell lysate revealed excellent sequence coverage, indicating successful removal of detergent from the peptides. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-MS analysis of unprocessed and processed samples further confirmed efficient removal of detergents. The advantages of this method include speed (<15min), efficient detergent removal, and high recovery of proteins and peptides.

  18. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license.

  19. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models

    PubMed Central

    Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license. PMID:24688855

  20. Cleavage efficient 2A peptides for high level monoclonal antibody expression in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chng, Jake; Wang, Tianhua; Nian, Rui; Lau, Ally; Hoi, Kong Meng; Ho, Steven C L; Gagnon, Peter; Bi, Xuezhi; Yang, Yuansheng

    2015-01-01

    Linking the heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) genes required for monoclonal antibodies (mAb) production on a single cassette using 2A peptides allows control of LC and HC ratio and reduces non-expressing cells. Four 2A peptides derived from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (F2A), equine rhinitis A virus (E2A), porcine teschovirus-1 (P2A) and Thosea asigna virus (T2A), respectively, were compared for expression of 3 biosimilar IgG1 mAbs in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. HC and LC were linked by different 2A peptides both in the absence and presence of GSG linkers. Insertion of a furin recognition site upstream of 2A allowed removal of 2A residues that would otherwise be attached to the HC. Different 2A peptides exhibited different cleavage efficiencies that correlated to the mAb expression level. The relative cleavage efficiency of each 2A peptide remains similar for expression of different IgG1 mAbs in different CHO cells. While complete cleavage was not observed for any of the 2A peptides, GSG linkers did enhance the cleavage efficiency and thus the mAb expression level. T2A with the GSG linker (GT2A) exhibited the highest cleavage efficiency and mAb expression level. Stably amplified CHO DG44 pools generated using GT2A had titers 357, 416 and 600 mg/L for the 3 mAbs in shake flask batch cultures. Incomplete cleavage likely resulted in incorrectly processed mAb species and aggregates, which were removed with a chromatin-directed clarification method and protein A purification. The vector and methods presented provide an easy process beneficial for both mAb development and manufacturing.

  1. Efficient and directed peptide bond formation in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-01-28

    Amide linkages are among the most important chemical bonds in living systems, constituting the connections between amino acids in peptides and proteins. We demonstrate the controlled formation of amide bonds between amino acids or peptides in the gas phase using ion/ion reactions in a mass spectrometer. Individual amino acids or peptides can be prepared as reagents by (i) incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to silence otherwise reactive functional groups, such as the N terminus; (ii) converting the carboxyl groups to the active ester of N-hydroxysuccinimide; and (iii) incorporating a charge site. Protonation renders basic sites (nucleophiles) unreactive toward the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents, resulting in sites with the greatest gas phase basicities being, in large part, unreactive. The N-terminal amines of most naturally occurring amino acids have lower gas phase basicities than the side chains of the basic amino acids (i.e., those of histidine, lysine, or arginine). Therefore, reagents may be directed to the N terminus of an existing "anchor" peptide to form an amide bond by protonating the anchor peptide's basic residues, while leaving the N-terminal amine unprotonated and therefore reactive. Reaction efficiencies of greater than 30% have been observed. We propose this method as a step toward the controlled synthesis of peptides in the gas phase.

  2. Occurrence, distribution, dereplication and efficient discovery of thiazolyl peptides by sensitive-resistant pair screening.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Zhang, Chaowei; Zink, Deborah L; Herath, Kithsiri; Ondeyka, John; Masurekar, Prakash; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi; Goetz, Michael A; Tormo, Jose Rubén; Vicente, Francisca; Martín, Jesús; González, Ignacio; Genilloud, Olga

    2013-10-01

    Natural products have been major sources of antibacterial agents and remain very promising. Frequent rediscoveries of known compounds hampers progress of new discoveries and demands development and utilization of new methods for rapid biological and chemical dereplication. This paper describes an efficient approach for discovery of new thiazolyl peptides by sensitive-resistant pair screening and dereplication in a time and cost-effective manner at industrial scale. A highly effective library-based dereplication of thiazolyl peptides by high resolution fourier transform liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HRFTLCMS) has been developed, which can detect and dereplicate very low levels of thiazolyl peptides particularly when combined with miniaturized high-throughput 96-well solid-phase extraction separation, and as well can be automated. Combination of sensitive (susceptible)-resistant pair screening, diversified screening collection and miniaturized high-throughput SPE and HRFTLCMS techniques were applied for discovery of new thiazolyl peptides. The combined approach allowed for identification of over 24 thiazolyl peptides represented by three of the five structural subgroups, including three novel compounds. In addition, it is possible for the first time to mechanistically group three structural subgroups of over 24 thiazolyl peptides. Furthermore, these studies helped to understand natural frequency of distribution of these compounds and helped in discovery of new producing strains of many thiazolyl compounds.

  3. CXCR4-targeted modular peptide carriers for efficient anti-VEGF siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Egorova, Anna; Shubina, Anastasia; Sokolov, Dmitriy; Selkov, Sergey; Baranov, Vladislav; Kiselev, Anton

    2016-12-30

    The application of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for specific gene inhibition is a promising strategy in gene therapy treatments. The efficient cellular delivery of therapeutic siRNA is a critical step in RNA interference (RNAi) application. Highly efficient siRNA carriers should be developed for specific cellular uptake, stable RNA-complexes formation and intracellular RNA release. To study these features, we evaluated modular peptide carriers bearing CXCR4 targeting ligand for their ability to condense siRNA, facilitate endosomal escape and VEGFA gene silencing in CXCR4-expressing endothelial and glioblastoma cells. Peptide carriers were shown to condense and protect siRNA from RNAse degradation. Various N/P ratios were used for physicochemical characterization to optimize siRNA/peptide complexes for in vitro studies. On average, cytotoxicity of siRNA-polyplexes depended on cell type and was not higher than that of PEI/siRNA complexes. VEGFA gene knockdown was significantly improved with CXCR4-targeted carriers in contrast to nontargeted peptides. siRNA delivery by means of ligandconjugated carriers resulted in 2.5-3-fold decrease of VEGF expression in glioblastoma cells and in 1.5-2-fold decrease of VEGF expression in endothelial cells. Delivery of siRNA/peptide complexes resulted in 2-6- fold decrease in VEGF protein yield and in significant inhibition of endothelial cells migration. The study shows that implication of peptide carriers modified with CXCR4 ligand is a promising approach to develop targeted siRNA delivery system into CXCR4-expressing cancer and endothelial cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveals highly efficient cytosolic delivery of certain penta-arg proteins and stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    LaRochelle, Jonathan R; Cobb, Garrett B; Steinauer, Angela; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Schepartz, Alanna

    2015-02-25

    We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to accurately and precisely determine the relative efficiencies with which three families of "cell-penetrating peptides" traffic to the cytosol of mammalian cells. We find that certain molecules containing a "penta-arg" motif reach the cytosol, intact, with efficiencies greater than 50%. This value is at least 10-fold higher than that observed for the widely studied cationic sequence derived from HIV Tat or polyarginine Arg8, and equals that of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides that are active in cells and animals. Moreover, we show that the efficiency with which stapled peptides reach the cytosol, as determined by FCS, correlates directly with their efficacy in cell-based assays. We expect that these findings and the associated technology will aid the design of peptides, proteins, and peptide mimetics that predictably and efficiently reach the interior of mammalian cells.

  5. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Brian M G; van Ommeren, Sven P F I; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-06-04

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py-Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py-Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py-Im polyamides. The effect of Py-Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py-Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established.

  6. Bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD) for the efficient production of an interfacially active peptide.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Giacomo; Lee, Eun Gyo; Jones, Daniel B; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2004-09-30

    The efficient expression and purification of an interfacially active peptide (mLac21) was achieved by using bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD), wherein key bioprocess considerations are addressed during the initial molecular biology work. The 21 amino acid mLac21 peptide sequence is derived from the lac repressor protein and is shown to have high affinity for the oil-water interface, causing a substantial reduction in interfacial tension following adsorption. The DNA coding for the peptide sequence was cloned into a modified pET-31(b) vector to permit the expression of mLac21 as a fusion to ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Rational iterative molecular design, taking into account the need for a scaleable bioprocess flowsheet, led to a simple and efficient bioprocess yielding mLac21 at 86% purity following ion exchange chromatography (and >98% following chromatographic polishing). This case study demonstrates that it is possible to produce acceptably pure peptide for potential commodity applications using common scaleable bioprocess unit operations. Moreover, it is shown that BMD is a powerful strategy that can be deployed to reduce bioseparation complexity. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Efficient Synthesis of Peptide and Protein Functionalized Pyrrole-Imidazole Polyamides Using Native Chemical Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Brian M. G.; van Ommeren, Sven P. F. I.; Merkx, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of DNA-based bionanotechnology requires efficient strategies to functionalize DNA nanostructures in a specific manner with other biomolecules, most importantly peptides and proteins. Common DNA-functionalization methods rely on laborious and covalent conjugation between DNA and proteins or peptides. Pyrrole-imidazole (Py–Im) polyamides, based on natural minor groove DNA-binding small molecules, can bind to DNA in a sequence specific fashion. In this study, we explore the use of Py–Im polyamides for addressing proteins and peptides to DNA in a sequence specific and non-covalent manner. A generic synthetic approach based on native chemical ligation was established that allows efficient conjugation of both peptides and recombinant proteins to Py–Im polyamides. The effect of Py–Im polyamide conjugation on DNA binding was investigated by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). Although the synthesis of different protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates was successful, attenuation of DNA affinity was observed, in particular for the protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates. The practical use of protein-Py–Im-polyamide conjugates for addressing DNA structures in an orthogonal but non-covalent manner, therefore, remains to be established. PMID:26053396

  8. Construction of a high efficiency copper adsorption bacterial system via peptide display and its application on copper dye polluted wastewater.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Murali Kannan; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Ganesh, Irisappan; Ravikumar, Sambandam; Yun, Hyungdon; Yoo, Ik-Keun; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-11-01

    For the construction of an efficient copper waste treatment system, a cell surface display strategy was employed. The copper adsorption ability of recombinant bacterial strains displaying three different copper binding peptides were evaluated in LB Luria-Bertani medium (LB), artificial wastewater, and copper phthalocyanine containing textile dye industry wastewater samples. Structural characteristics of the three peptides were also analyzed by similarity-based structure modeling. The best binding peptide was chosen for the construction of a dimeric peptide display and the adsorption ability of the monomeric and dimeric peptide displayed strains were compared. The dimeric peptide displayed strain showed superior copper adsorption in all three tested conditions (LB, artificial wastewater, and textile dye industry wastewater). When the strains were exposed to copper phthalocyanine dye polluted wastewater, the dimeric peptide display [543.27 µmol/g DCW dry cell weight (DCW)] showed higher adsorption of copper when compared with the monomeric strains (243.53 µmol/g DCW).

  9. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes.

  10. Efficient Gene Knockdown in Mouse Oocytes through Peptide Nanoparticle-Mediated SiRNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhen; Li, Ruichao; Zhou, Chunxiang; Shi, Liya; Zhang, Xiaolan; Yang, Zhixia; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The use of mouse oocytes as a model for studying female meiosis is very important in reproductive medicine. Gene knockdown by specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) is usually the first step in the study of the function of a target gene in mouse oocytes during in vitro maturation. Traditionally, the only way to introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes is through microinjection, which is certainly less efficient and strenuous than siRNA transfection in somatic cells. Recently, in research using somatic cells, peptide nanoparticle-mediated siRNA transfection has been gaining popularity over liposome nanoparticle-mediated methods because of its high efficiency, low toxicity, good stability, and strong serum compatibility. However, no researchers have yet tried transfecting siRNA into mouse oocytes because of the existence of the protective zona pellucida surrounding the oocyte membrane (vitelline membrane). We therefore tested whether peptide nanoparticles can introduce siRNA into mouse oocytes. In the present study, we showed for the first time that our optimized program can efficiently knock down a target gene with high specificity. Furthermore, we achieved the expected meiotic phenotypes after we knocked down a test unknown target gene TRIM75. We propose that peptide nanoparticles may be superior for preliminary functional studies of unknown genes in mouse oocytes. PMID:26974323

  11. Enhancing tumor-specific intracellular delivering efficiency of cell-penetrating peptide by fusion with a peptide targeting to EGFR.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long The; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Du, Xuan; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun; Dong, Yang; Li, Peng-Fei

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are well known as intracellular delivery vectors. However, unsatisfactory delivery efficiency and poor specificity are challenging barriers to CPP applications at the clinical trial stage. Here, we showed that S3, an EGFR-binding domain derived from vaccinia virus growth factor, when fused to a CPP such as HBD or TAT can substantially enhance its internalization efficiency and tumor selectivity. The uptake of S3-HBD (S3H) recombinant molecule by tumor cells was nearly 80 folds increased compared to HBD alone. By contrast, the uptake of S3H by non-neoplastic cells still remained at a low level. The specific recognition between S3 and its receptor, EGFR, as well as between HBD and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface was essential for these improvements, suggesting a syngeneic effect between the two functional domains in conjugation. This syngeneic effect is likely similar to that of the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, which is highly abundant particularly in metastatic tumors. The process that S3H entered cells was dependent on time, dosage, and energy, via macropinocytosis pathway. With excellent cell-penetrating efficacy and a novel tumor-targeting ability, S3H appears as a promising candidate vector for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery.

  12. Insight into the role of physicochemical parameters in a novel series of amphipathic peptides for efficient DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajpal; Shivpuri, Shivangi; Anand, Amitesh; Kulshreshtha, Ankur; Ganguli, Munia

    2013-07-01

    Amphipathic peptides constitute a class of molecules with the potential to develop as efficient and safer alternatives to viral and other nonviral vectors for intracellular delivery of therapeutics. These peptides can be useful for nucleic acid delivery and hence promise to have pharmaceutical application, particularly in gene therapy. In order to design novel amphipathic peptides and improve their efficiency of therapeutic cargo delivery, one needs to understand the role of the physicochemical properties of the peptide. There are very few reports in the literature where the physicochemical properties of the peptide have been correlated with efficiency of plasmid DNA delivery. In the present work we hunted out a naturally occurring amphipathic peptide termed Mgpe-1 (derived from HUMAN Protein phosphatase 1E) as a possible novel DNA delivery agent. We systematically altered the physicochemical parameters of this peptide to further enhance its DNA delivery efficiency. We changed its amphipathicity (from secondary to primary), the total charge (from +6 to +9), hydrophobicity, and the amino acid composition (lysine and serines to arginine; substitution of tryptophan) and studied which of these alterations affect DNA delivery efficiency. Our results showed that although Mgpe-1 exhibited very strong cellular uptake, its plasmid DNA delivery efficiency was poor. The presence of nine arginines improved the DNA delivery efficiency, and the effect was observed in both the primary and the secondary amphipathic variants. We further observed that the presence of tryptophan was important but not essential and the effect of its removal was stronger in the case of the secondary amphipathic peptide. However, increase in total hydrophobicity of the peptide led to a fall in transfection efficiency in the primary amphipathic peptide whereas the secondary amphipathic peptide having the same chemical composition was almost unaffected by this change. The primary amphipathic peptides with

  13. Downsizing the BAD BH3 peptide to small constrained α-helices with improved ligand efficiency.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Nicholas E; Harrison, Rosemary S; Ruiz-Gomez, Gloria; Abbenante, Giovanni; Mason, Jody M; Fairlie, David P

    2016-11-22

    Bcl2 Homology (BH) proteins can either trigger or prevent programmed cell death or apoptosis. Deregulation of the BH protein family network leads to evasion of apoptosis, uncontrolled proliferation and is a hallmark of cancer. Inhibition of pro-survival BH proteins is a promising chemotherapeutic strategy for certain cancers. We have examined whether helix-constrained peptides based on the BAD BH3 domain (residues 103-127) can be downsized to much smaller more drug-like peptides. We report the preparation, structural characterisation, in vitro Bcl-xL inhibition and leukemic T-cell killing ability of 45 linear, mono-, bi- and tricyclic helical peptidomimetics between 8- and 19-residues in length. We show that the BAD BH3 can be downsized to 8-14 residues and still maintain appreciable affinity for Bcl-xL. In addition, the binding efficiency indices (BEI) of the downsized mimetics are significantly higher than the BAD BH3 and similar stapled BH3 mimetics, approaching drug-like molecules. This suggests that bicyclic and monocyclic mimetics based on BH3 domains are much more efficient binding ligands than the longer peptides which they mimic.

  14. High efficiency enrichment of low-abundance peptides by novel dual-platform graphene@SiO2@PMMA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Peng; Zhao, Man; Deng, Chunhui

    2012-11-21

    For the first time, dual-platform graphene@SiO(2)@poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) material was synthesized, and successfully applied to efficiently enrich low-abundance peptides for mass spectrometry analysis.

  15. An IDB-containing low molecular weight short peptide as an efficient DNA cleavage reagent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunying; Chen, Huan; Li, Chao; Zhang, Jin; Qiao, Renzhong

    2015-04-21

    Artificial nucleases have attracted significant interest due to their abilities in accelerating DNA cleavage, which results in the possibility of genome manipulation. However, compared with natural nucleases, the currently available artificial nucleases have low cleavage efficiency, especially metal-free artificial nucleases. Thus, it is still a challenge to develop highly efficient metal-free artificial nucleases via a non-oxidative pathway. We here designed and prepared a group of rigid bis-amine-grafted PASP conjugates (PASP-IDB), and investigated their abilities to induce DNA double-strand cleavage. The detailed assays showed that in the absence of metal ions, these short peptide conjugates can effectively break the phosphodiester linkage at a relatively low concentration and under physiological conditions through a hydrolytic process, giving the 10(7)-fold rate acceleration over uncatalyzed double-strand DNA. The probable mechanism verified by control experiments revealed that IDBs and free carboxyl groups in PASP synergically catalyzed DNA cleavage. In addition, the effects of degrees of substitution on the cleavage activity were studied, and the results indicated the existence of minimum building blocks of PASP-IDB for efficient DNA cleavage. The results of our study have implications on the design of short peptide-based molecules as new artificial nucleases and may provide a strategy for developing safe and efficient metal-free DNA cleavage reagents.

  16. Versatile signal peptide of Flavobacterium-originated organophosphorus hydrolase for efficient periplasmic translocation of heterologous proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong Gyun; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Jo, Byung Hoon; Kim, Chang Sup; Choi, Suk Soon; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-07-08

    Organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) from Flavobacterium species is a membrane-associated homodimeric metalloenzyme and has its own signal peptide in its N-terminus. We found that OPH was translocated into the periplasmic space when the original signal peptide-containing OPH was expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli even though its translocation efficiency was relatively low. To investigate the usability of this OPH signal peptide for periplasmic expression of heterologous proteins in an E. coli system, we employed green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a cytoplasmic folding reporter and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a periplasmic folding reporter. We found that the OPH signal peptide was able to use both twin-arginine translocation (Tat) and general secretory (Sec) machineries by switching translocation pathways according to the nature of target proteins in E. coli. These results might be due to the lack of Sec-avoidance sequence in the c-region and a moderate hydrophobicity of the OPH signal peptide. Interestingly, the OPH signal peptide considerably enhanced the translocation efficiencies for both GFP and ALP compared with commonly used TorA and PelB signal peptides that have Tat and Sec pathway dependences, respectively. Therefore, this OPH signal peptide could be successfully used in recombinant E. coli system for efficient periplasmic production of target protein regardless of the subcellular localization where functional folding of the protein occurs. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:848-854, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  17. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  18. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  19. Comprehensive conformational studies of five tripeptides and a deduced method for efficient determinations of peptide structures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbo; Wu, Zhiqing; Chen, Huibin; Liu, Xu; MacKerell, Alexander D; Lin, Zijing

    2012-02-23

    Thorough searches on the potential energy surfaces of five tripeptides, GGG, GYG, GWG, TGG, and MGG, were performed by considering all possible combinations of the bond rotational degrees of freedom with a semiempirical and ab initio combined computational approach. Structural characteristics of the obtained stable tripeptide conformers were carefully analyzed. Conformers of the five tripeptides were found to be closely connected with conformers of their constituting dipeptides and amino acids. A method for finding all important tripeptide conformers by optimizing a small number of trial structures generated by suitable superposition of the parent amino acid and dipeptide conformers is thus proposed. Applying the method to another five tripeptides, YGG, FGG, WGG, GFA, and GGF, studied before shows that the new approach is both efficient and reliable by providing the most complete ensembles of tripeptide conformers. The method is further generalized for application to larger peptides by introducing the breeding and mutation concepts in a genetic algorithm way. The generalized method is verified to be capable of finding tetrapeptide conformers with secondary structures of strands, helices, and turns, which are highly populated in larger peptides. This show some promise for the proposed method to be applied for the structural determination of larger peptides. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  20. Comprehensive Conformational Studies of Five Tripeptides and a Deduced Method for Efficient Determinations of Peptide Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenbo; Wu, Zhiqing; Chen, Huibin; Liu, Xu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2012-01-01

    Thorough searches on the potential energy surfaces of five tripeptides, GGG, GYG, GWG, TGG and MGG, were performed by considering all possible combinations of the bond rotational degrees of freedom with a semi-empirical and ab initio combined computational approach. Structural characteristics of the obtained stable tripeptide conformers were carefully analyzed. Conformers of the five tripeptides were found to be closely connected with conformers of their constituting dipeptides and amino acids. A method for finding all important tripeptide conformers by optimizing a small number of trial structures generated by suitable superposition of the parent amino acid and dipeptide conformers is thus proposed. Applying the method to another five tripeptides, YGG, FGG, WGG, GFA and GGF, studied before shows that the new approach is both efficient and reliable by providing the most complete ensembles of tripeptide conformers. The method is further generalized for application to larger peptides by introducing the breeding and mutation concepts in a genetic algorithm way. The generalized method is verified to be capable of finding tetrapeptide conformers with secondary structures of strands, helices and turns which are highly populated in larger peptides. This show some promise for the proposed method to be applied for the structural determination of larger peptides. PMID:22260814

  1. Convergence and sampling efficiency in replica exchange simulations of peptide folding in explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E

    2007-01-07

    Replica exchange methods (REMs) are increasingly used to improve sampling in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of biomolecular systems. However, despite having been shown to be very effective on model systems, the application of REM in complex systems such as for the simulation of protein and peptide folding in explicit solvent has not been objectively tested in detail. Here we present a comparison of conventional MD and temperature replica exchange MD (T-REMD) simulations of a beta-heptapeptide in explicit solvent. This system has previously been shown to undergo reversible folding on the time scales accessible to MD simulation and thus allows a direct one-to-one comparison of efficiency. The primary properties compared are the free energy of folding and the relative populations of different conformers as a function of temperature. It is found that to achieve a similar degree of precision T-REMD simulations starting from a random set of initial configurations were approximately an order of magnitude more computationally efficient than a single 800 ns conventional MD simulation for this system at the lowest temperature investigated (275 K). However, whereas it was found that T-REMD simulations are more than four times more efficient than multiple independent MD simulations at one temperature (300 K) the actual increase in conformation sampling was only twofold. The overall gain in efficiency using REMD resulted primarily from the ordering of different conformational states over temperature, as opposed to a large increase of conformational sampling. It is also shown that in this system exchanges are accepted primarily based on (random) fluctuations within the solvent and are not strongly correlated with the instantaneous peptide conformation raising questions in regard to the efficiency of T-REMD in larger systems.

  2. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Christopher J; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific (13)C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)(+) ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H](+) ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Efficient Covalent Bond Formation in Gas-Phase Peptide-Peptide Ion Complexes with the Photoleucine Stapler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, Christopher J.; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Řezáč, Jan; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Tureček, František

    2016-04-01

    Noncovalent complexes of hydrophobic peptides GLLLG and GLLLK with photoleucine (L*) tagged peptides G(L* n L m )K (n = 1,3, m = 2,0) were generated as singly charged ions in the gas phase and probed by photodissociation at 355 nm. Carbene intermediates produced by photodissociative loss of N2 from the L* diazirine rings underwent insertion into X-H bonds of the target peptide moiety, forming covalent adducts with yields reaching 30%. Gas-phase sequencing of the covalent adducts revealed preferred bond formation at the C-terminal residue of the target peptide. Site-selective carbene insertion was achieved by placing the L* residue in different positions along the photopeptide chain, and the residues in the target peptide undergoing carbene insertion were identified by gas-phase ion sequencing that was aided by specific 13C labeling. Density functional theory calculations indicated that noncovalent binding to GL*L*L*K resulted in substantial changes of the (GLLLK + H)+ ground state conformation. The peptide moieties in [GL*L*LK + GLLLK + H]+ ion complexes were held together by hydrogen bonds, whereas dispersion interactions of the nonpolar groups were only secondary in ground-state 0 K structures. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics for 100 ps trajectories of several different conformers at the 310 K laboratory temperature showed that noncovalent complexes developed multiple, residue-specific contacts between the diazirine carbons and GLLLK residues. The calculations pointed to the substantial fluidity of the nonpolar side chains in the complexes. Diazirine photochemistry in combination with Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics is a promising tool for investigations of peptide-peptide ion interactions in the gas phase.

  4. N-triazinylammonium tetrafluoroborates. A new generation of efficient coupling reagents useful for peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Zbigniew J; Kolesińska, Beata; Kolesińska, Justyna; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Chelli, Mario; Rovero, Paolo; Błaszczyk, Michał; Główka, Marek L; Papini, Anna Maria

    2005-12-07

    A new generation of triazine-based coupling reagents (TBCRs), designed according to the concept of "superactive esters", was obtained by treatment of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium (DMTMM) chloride with lithium or silver tetrafluoroborate. The structure of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium tetrafluoroborate was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Activation of carboxylic acids by using this reagent proceeds via triazine "superactive ester". The coupling reagent was successfully used for the synthesis of Z-, Boc-, and Fmoc-protected dipeptides derived from natural and unnatural sterically hindered amino acids and for fragment condensation, in 80-100% yield and with high enantiomeric purity. The manual SPPS of the ACP(65-74) peptide fragment (H-Val-Gln-Ala-Ala-Ile-Asp-Tyr-Ile-Asn-Gly-OH) proceeded significantly faster than with TBTU or HATU, as well as the automated SPPS of the same fragment gave a purer product than by using TBTU or PyBOP. The reagent was also demonstrated to be efficient in on-resin head-to-tail cyclization of constrained cyclopeptides, in SPPS synthesis of Aib peptides, and in the synthesis of esters from appropriate acids, alcohols, and phenols. The high efficiency and versatility of this new generation of TBCRs confirm, for the first time, the usefulness of the concept of "superactive esters" in rational design of the structure of coupling reagents.

  5. Efficient inhibition of miR-155 function in vivo by peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Fabani, Martin M.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; Williams, Donna; Lyons, Paul A.; Torres, Adrian G.; Smith, Kenneth G. C.; Enright, Anton J.; Gait, Michael J.; Vigorito, Elena

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in diverse physiological processes and are potential therapeutic agents. Synthetic oligonucleotides (ONs) of different chemistries have proven successful for blocking miRNA expression. However, their specificity and efficiency have not been fully evaluated. Here, we show that peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) efficiently block a key inducible miRNA expressed in the haematopoietic system, miR-155, in cultured B cells as well as in mice. Remarkably, miR-155 inhibition by PNA in primary B cells was achieved in the absence of any transfection agent. In mice, the high efficiency of the treatment was demonstrated by a strong overlap in global gene expression between B cells isolated from anti-miR-155 PNA-treated and miR-155-deficient mice. Interestingly, PNA also induced additional changes in gene expression. Our analysis provides a useful platform to aid the design of efficient and specific anti-miRNA ONs for in vivo use. PMID:20223773

  6. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  7. Efficient Methods to Generate Reproducible Mass Spectra in Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sung Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-06-01

    In our previous matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) studies of peptides, we found that their mass spectra were virtually determined by the effective temperature in the early matrix plume, Tearly, when samples were rather homogeneous. This empirical rule allowed acquisition of quantitatively reproducible spectra. A difficulty in utilizing this rule was the complicated spectral treatment needed to get Tearly. In this work, we found another empirical rule that the total number of particles hitting the detector, or TIC, was a good measure of the spectral temperature and, hence, selection of spectra with the same TIC resulted in reproducible spectra. We also succeeded in obtaining reproducible spectra throughout a measurement by controlling TIC near a preset value through feedback adjustment of laser pulse energy. Both TIC selection and TIC control substantially reduced the shot-to-shot spectral variation in a spot, spot-to-spot variation in a sample, and even sample-to-sample variation in MALDI using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix. Based on the utilization of acquired data, TIC control was more efficient than TIC selection by an order of magnitude. Both techniques produced calibration curves with excellent linearity, suggesting their utility in quantification of peptides.

  8. Efficient methods to generate reproducible mass spectra in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization of peptides.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sung Hee; Park, Kyung Man; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2013-06-01

    In our previous matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) studies of peptides, we found that their mass spectra were virtually determined by the effective temperature in the early matrix plume, Tearly, when samples were rather homogeneous. This empirical rule allowed acquisition of quantitatively reproducible spectra. A difficulty in utilizing this rule was the complicated spectral treatment needed to get Tearly. In this work, we found another empirical rule that the total number of particles hitting the detector, or TIC, was a good measure of the spectral temperature and, hence, selection of spectra with the same TIC resulted in reproducible spectra. We also succeeded in obtaining reproducible spectra throughout a measurement by controlling TIC near a preset value through feedback adjustment of laser pulse energy. Both TIC selection and TIC control substantially reduced the shot-to-shot spectral variation in a spot, spot-to-spot variation in a sample, and even sample-to-sample variation in MALDI using α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix. Based on the utilization of acquired data, TIC control was more efficient than TIC selection by an order of magnitude. Both techniques produced calibration curves with excellent linearity, suggesting their utility in quantification of peptides.

  9. Rice seed ER-derived protein body as an efficient delivery vehicle for oral tolerogenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hidenori; Hiroi, Takachika; Hirose, Sakiko; Yang, Lijun; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2010-08-01

    Mucosal delivery of peptide/protein therapeutics via the oral route is a desirable strategy in human immunotherapy. A key step for enhancing the bioavailability of orally administered therapeutics is to protect them from enzymatic digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Here, we generated transgenic rice seeds accumulating allergen-derived T cell epitopes, a model tolerogen for the control of pollen allergy, in either ER-derived protein body-I (PB-I) or protein storage vacuole protein body-II (PB-II). Compared with PB-II-localized or chemically synthesized forms, PB-I-localized T cell epitopes showed higher resistance to enzymatic digestion in simulated gastric fluid. Moreover, the dose of T cell epitope required for suppression of allergen-specific IgE in mice was about 20-fold lower when fed in PB-I localized form than when unprotected. These findings demonstrate the potential of bioencapsulation in PB-I for broad applications as a viable strategy to achieve efficient mucosal delivery of oral peptide/protein therapeutics.

  10. Placental leucine aminopeptidase efficiently generates mature antigenic peptides in vitro but in patterns distinct from endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Georgiadou, Dimitra; Hearn, Arron; Evnouchidou, Irini; Chroni, Angeliki; Leondiadis, Leondios; York, Ian A; Rock, Kenneth L; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2010-08-01

    All three members of the oxytocinase subfamily of M1 aminopeptidases, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), ERAP2, and placental leucine aminopeptidase (PLAP), also known as insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, have been implicated in the generation of MHC class I-presented peptides. ERAP1 and 2 trim peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum for direct presentation, whereas PLAP has been recently implicated in cross-presentation. The best characterized member of the family, ERAP1, has unique enzymatic properties that fit well with its role in Ag processing. ERAP1 can trim a large variety of long peptide sequences and efficiently accumulate mature antigenic epitopes of 8-9 aa long. In this study, we evaluate the ability of PLAP to process antigenic peptide precursors in vitro and compare it with ERAP1. We find that, similar to ERAP1, PLAP can trim a variety of long peptide sequences efficiently and, in most cases, accumulates appreciable amounts of correct length mature antigenic epitope. Again, similar to ERAP1, PLAP continued trimming some of the epitopes tested and accumulated smaller products effectively destroying the epitope. However, the intermediate accumulation properties of ERAP1 and PLAP are distinct and epitope dependent, suggesting that these two enzymes may impose different selective pressures on epitope generation. Overall, although PLAP has the necessary enzymatic properties to participate in generating or destroying MHC class I-presented peptides, its trimming behavior is distinct from that of ERAP1, something that supports a separate role for these two enzymes in Ag processing.

  11. Membrane penetrating peptides greatly enhance baculovirus transduction efficiency into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong-Zhang; Wu, Carol P.; Chao, Yu-Chan; Liu, Catherine Yen-Yen

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Ligation of CTP with GP64 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} Fusion of PTD with VP39 enhances baculovirus transduction into mammalian cells. {yields} CTP and PTD-carrying viruses improve the transduction of co-transduced baculoviruses. {yields} Virus entry and gene expression can be separate events in different cell types. -- Abstract: The baculovirus group of insect viruses is widely used for foreign gene introduction into mammalian cells for gene expression and protein production; however, the efficiency of baculovirus entry into mammalian cells is in general still low. In this study, two recombinant baculoviruses were engineered and their ability to improve viral entry was examined: (1) cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was fused with baculovirus envelope protein, GP64, to produce a cytoplasmic membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-CTP); and (2) the protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV TAT protein was fused with the baculovirus capsid protein VP39 to form a nuclear membrane penetrating baculovirus (vE-PTD). Transduction experiments showed that both viruses had better transduction efficiency than vE, a control virus that only expresses EGFP in mammalian cells. Interestingly, vE-CTP and vE-PTD were also able to improve the transduction efficiency of a co-transduced baculovirus, resulting in higher levels of gene expression. Our results have described new routes to further enhance the development of baculovirus as a tool for gene delivery into mammalian cells.

  12. A strategy for efficient cross-presentation of CTL-epitope peptides leading to enhanced induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akira; Wakita, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Mayumi, Tadanori; Mukai, Yohei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2007-01-22

    The activation of antitumor cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) depends on how efficiently the relevant tumor antigen peptides are delivered into the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation pathway in antigen presenting cells (APCs). An elegant approach to promote the peptide-MHC class I association has been described for enhanced peptide transportation into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by adding an ER insertion signal sequence (Eriss). Nevertheless, this approach does not appear potent enough to induce in vivo tumor protective immunity. Herein, we present a novel peptide-vaccine strategy based on the combined utilization of Eriss and fusogenic liposomes (FLs) capable of directly introducing encapsulated CTL-epitope peptides into the MHC class I pathway of APCs. APCs pulsed with free peptides, FL-encapsulated peptides, or FL-encapsulated Eriss-conjugated peptides exhibited comparable levels of antigen-presenting activity at early phases after pulsing. Interestingly, whereas in the first two methods the APC ability began to decline 40 to 60 h after pulsing, FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides allowed APCs to retain peptide-presentation activity for at least 140 h. This advantage of FL-encapsulated Eriss(+) peptides correlated with the induction of more potent antitumor immunity compared with soluble Eriss(+) or Eriss(-) peptides or FL-encapsulated Eriss(-) peptides when they were administered in vivo. Thus, Eriss-conjugated CTL-epitope peptides encapsulated in FLs provide a highly efficient tumor-vaccine to enhance the induction of in vivo tumor immunity.

  13. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yin, HaiFang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew JA

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies. PMID:24064708

  14. Context Dependent Effects of Chimeric Peptide Morpholino Conjugates Contribute to Dystrophin Exon-skipping Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Yin, Haifang; Boisguerin, Prisca; Moulton, Hong M; Betts, Corinne; Seow, Yiqi; Boutilier, Jordan; Wang, Qingsong; Walsh, Anthony; Lebleu, Bernard; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2013-09-24

    We have recently reported that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and novel chimeric peptides containing CPP (referred as B peptide) and muscle-targeting peptide (referred as MSP) motifs significantly improve the systemic exon-skipping activity of morpholino phosphorodiamidate oligomers (PMOs) in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In the present study, the general mechanistic significance of the chimeric peptide configuration on the activity and tissue uptake of peptide conjugated PMOs in vivo was investigated. Four additional chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates including newly identified peptide 9 (B-9-PMO and 9-B-PMO) and control peptide 3 (B-3-PMO and 3-B-PMO) were tested in mdx mice. Immunohistochemical staining, RT-PCR and western blot results indicated that B-9-PMO induced significantly higher level of exon skipping and dystrophin restoration than its counterpart (9-B-PMO), further corroborating the notion that the activity of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates is dependent on relative position of the tissue-targeting peptide motif within the chimeric peptide with respect to PMOs. Subsequent mechanistic studies showed that enhanced cellular uptake of B-MSP-PMO into muscle cells leads to increased exon-skipping activity in comparison with MSP-B-PMO. Surprisingly, further evidence showed that the uptake of chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates of both orientations (B-MSP-PMO and MSP-B-PMO) was ATP- and temperature-dependent and also partially mediated by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), indicating that endocytosis is likely the main uptake pathway for both chimeric peptide-PMO conjugates. Collectively, our data demonstrate that peptide orientation in chimeric peptides is an important parameter that determines cellular uptake and activity when conjugated directly to oligonucleotides. These observations provide insight into the design of improved cell targeting compounds for future therapeutics studies.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e124; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013

  15. Efficient siRNA-peptide conjugation for specific targeted delivery into tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gandioso, Albert; Massaguer, Anna; Villegas, Núria; Salvans, Cándida; Sánchez, Dani; Brun-Heath, Isabelle; Marchán, Vicente; Orozco, Modesto; Terrazas, Montserrat

    2017-03-02

    Despite the broad applicability of the Huisgen cycloaddition reaction, the click functionalization of RNAs with peptides still remains a challenge. Here we describe a straightforward method for the click functionalization of siRNAs with peptides of different sizes and complexities. Among them, a promising peptide carrier for the selective siRNA delivery into HER2+ breast cancer cell lines has been reported.

  16. Presynaptic localization of neprilysin contributes to efficient clearance of amyloid-beta peptide in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Nobuhisa; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Shirotani, Keiro; Takaki, Yoshie; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Lu, Bao; Gerard, Norma P; Gerard, Craig; Ozawa, Keiya; Saido, Takaomi C

    2004-01-28

    A local increase in amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is closely associated with synaptic dysfunction in the brain in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report on the catabolic mechanism of Abeta at the presynaptic sites. Neprilysin, an Abeta-degrading enzyme, expressed by recombinant adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer, was axonally transported to presynaptic sites through afferent projections of neuronal circuits. This gene transfer abolished the increase in Abeta levels in the hippocampal formations of neprilysin-deficient mice and also reduced the increase in young mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. In the latter case, Abeta levels in the hippocampal formation contralateral to the vector-injected side were also significantly reduced as a result of transport of neprilysin from the ipsilateral side, and in both sides soluble Abeta was degraded more efficiently than insoluble Abeta. Furthermore, amyloid deposition in aged mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice was remarkably decelerated. Thus, presynaptic neprilysin has been demonstrated to degrade Abeta efficiently and to retard development of amyloid pathology.

  17. Force field-based conformational searches: efficiency and performance for peptide receptor complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebner, Christoph; Niebling, Stephan; Schmuck, Carsten; Schlücker, Sebastian; Engels, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Conformational search using force field methods on complex biomolecular systems is a key factor in understanding molecular and structural properties. The reliability of such investigations strongly depends on the efficiency of the conformational search algorithm as well as the accuracy of the employed force field. In the present work we compared the performance of two different approaches: the Monte-Carlo multiple minimum/low mode sampling (MCMM/LM), in combination with the OPLS2005 (MCMM/LM//OPLS2005), and Tabu-Search combined with Basin Hopping (TS/BH), employing the original OPLS-AA implementation proposed by Jorgensen (TS/BH//OPLS-AA). We investigated their performance in locating energetically low-lying structures and the efficiency in scanning the conformational phase space of non-covalently bonded complexes. As test systems we employed complexes of the artificial peptide receptor CBS-KKF with four different tetrapeptide ligands. The reliability and the accuracy of both approaches were examined by re-optimising all low-energy structures employing density functional theory with empirical dispersion correction in combination with triple zeta basis sets. Solvent effects were mimicked by a continuum solvent model. In all the four-test systems, the TS/BH//OPLS-AA approach yielded structures that are much lower in energy after the DFT optimisation. Additionally, it provided many low-lying structures that were not identified by the MCMM/LM//OPLS2005 approach.

  18. Peptide functionalized gold nanoparticles: the influence of pH on binding efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Emma; Hamilton, Jeremy W. J.; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Dixon, Dorian

    2017-07-01

    We report herein on the synthesis of mixed monolayer gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG) and one of three peptides. Either a receptor-mediated endocytosis peptide, an endosomal escape pathway (H5WYG) peptide or the Nrp-1 targeting RGD peptide (CRGDK) labeled with FITC. All three peptides have a thiol containing cysteine residue which can be used to bind the peptides to the AuNPs. In order to investigate the influence of pH on peptide attachment, PEGylated AuNPs were centrifuged, the supernatant removed, and the nanoparticles were then re-suspended in a range of pH buffer solutions above, below and at the respective isoelectric points of the peptides before co-functionalization. Peptide attachment was investigated using dynamic light scattering, Ultra-violet visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis), FTIR and photo luminescence spectroscopy. UV/Vis analysis coupled with protein assay results and photoluminescence of the FITC tagged RGD peptide concluded that a pH of ∼8 optimized the cysteine binding and stability, irrespective of the peptide used.

  19. Conjugation of photosensitisers to antimicrobial peptides increases the efficiency of photodynamic therapy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moret, Francesca; Gobbo, Marina; Reddi, Elena

    2015-07-01

    Some antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have the ability to penetrate and kill not only pathogenic microorganisms but also cancer cells, while they are less active toward normal eukaryotic cells. Here we have investigated the potential of three AMPs, namely apidaecin 1b (Api), magainin 2 (Mag) and buforin II (Buf), as carriers of drugs for cancer cells by using the hydrophobic photosensitiser 5-(4-carboxyphenyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin (cTPP) as the drug model, conjugated to the N-terminus of the peptides. Flow cytometry measurements demonstrated that conjugation of cTPP increased its rate and efficiency of uptake in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells in the order Mag > Buf > Api. In vitro photodynamic therapy (PDT) experiments showed that the increased uptake of the conjugated cTPP determined 100% cell killing at concentrations in the nanomolar range while micromolar concentrations were required for the same killing effect with unconjugated cTPP. Serum proteins interacted with cTPP conjugated to Buf and Api and slightly interfered with the cellular uptake of these conjugates but not with that of Mag. The data suggest electrostatic interactions of the conjugates with sialic acid and ganglioside rich domains, as lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, followed by cell internalization via non-caveolar dynamin-dependent endocytosis as indicated by the effects of inhibitors of specific endocytic pathways. Our study demonstrated that the three AMPs investigated, Mag in particular, have the ability to carry a hydrophobic cargo inside cancer cells and may therefore represent useful carriers of anticancer drugs, especially those with a poor capacity to penetrate inside the target cells.

  20. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye.

  1. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye. PMID:26905457

  2. Multifunctional peptide-lipid nanocomplexes for efficient targeted delivery of DNA and siRNA into breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yu; Dai, Wei; Nevagi, Reshma J; Toth, Istvan; Moyle, Peter M

    2017-09-01

    The development of carriers for the delivery of oligonucleotide therapeutics is essential for the successful translation of gene therapies to the clinic. In the present study, a delivery system, which combines the fusogenic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) with a well-defined synthetic multifunctional peptide, was produced and optimized for gene delivery, with the aim to develop an efficient gene delivery platform for breast cancer cells. For this purpose, a breast cancer-specific cell targeting peptide (CTP) was incorporated into our leading peptide-based gene delivery system (to generate DEN-K(GALA)-TAT-K(STR)-CTP) to improve its cell-specific internalization, and investigated in combination with a formulation approach (DOPE/1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)). DEN-K(GALA)-TAT-K(STR)-CTP alone efficiently complexed with DNA or siRNA, and promoted efficient cellular uptake, but low levels of gene expression. By adding the formulation approach, synergistic improvements in gene expression and silencing were observed compared to the peptide or formulation approaches alone. Of significance, this current system demonstrated more efficient gene knockdown when compared to the leading commercial siRNA delivery agent Lipofectamine® RNAiMAX. The utility of this system was demonstrated through the delivery of BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) siRNA to MCF-7 cells, which led to near complete knockdown of the Bcl-2 protein, and inhibition of MCF-7 cell migration in a wound healing assay. The present peptide/lipid hybrid system is an excellent candidate for the delivery of DNA or siRNA into breast cancer cells. The identification of safe and effective delivery systems for DNA and siRNA is of great importance. Herein, we developed a well-defined, multifunctional and cell-specific lipidic peptide DEN-K(GALA)-TAT-K(STR)-CTP as a breast cancer cell targeted gene delivery vector. When combined with a lipid component (DOTAP/DOPE), the peptide

  3. Introducing a cleavable signal peptide enhances the packaging efficiency of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Japanese encephalitis virus envelope proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanyang; Wu, Rui; Yuan, Lei; Tian, Geng; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Huang, Yong; Yan, Qigui; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie; Wen, Xintian

    2017-02-02

    Research into the properties of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) has been facilitated by use of pseudotyped viruses. The signal peptide is a key determinant for membrane targeting and membrane insertion, which could affect packaging of pseudotyped viruses. In this study, we generated three lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with JEV envelope proteins that co-express either a strong signal peptide from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G (VSVMEpv) or a weak signal peptide of JEV (SPMEpv), or a virus without a signal peptide in front of the JEV prM/E (MEpv). Western blot demonstrated that JEV E protein and HIV p24 were present in the same particles of the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. Electron microscopy revealed that the three pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors were 120-180nm in diameter. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that the titer of VSVMEpv was 17-fold higher than that of MEpv, while the titer of SPMEpv was six-fold higher than that of MEpv. Inclusion of a signal peptide enhanced packaging efficiency of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. With a strong signal peptide helping they generate a higher number of viral particles. Green fluorescent protein and luciferase expression showed that the transduction titer or relative fluorescence units of VSVMEpv, SPMEpv and MEpv were not significantly different. We suggest that the signal peptide does not influence the infectivity of pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors. In addition, our findings indicated that pseudotyped JEVs show preferential tropism for BHK-21 cells, supporting the mimic function displayed by parental JEV. Therefore, our study provided a cost-effective method to generate pseudotyped JEV-E based lentiviral vectors, which may represent a valid model to investigate some of the infectious properties of JEV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Presumed LRP1-targeting transport peptide delivers β-secretase inhibitor to neurons in vitro with limited efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Ah; Casalini, Tommaso; Brambilla, Davide; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Interfering with the activity of β-secretase to reduce the production of Aβ peptides is a conceivable therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease. However, the development of efficient yet safe inhibitors is hampered by secondary effects, usually linked to the indiscriminate inhibition of other substrates’ processing by the targeted enzyme. Based on the spatial compartmentalization of the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein by β-secretase, we hypothesized that by exploiting the endocytosis receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein it would be possible to direct an otherwise cell-impermeable inhibitor to the endosomes of neurons, boosting the drug’s efficacy and importantly, sparing the off-target effects. We used the transport peptide Angiopep to build an endocytosis-competent conjugate and found that although the peptide facilitated the inhibitor’s internalization into neurons and delivered it to the endosomes, the delivery was not efficient enough to potently reduce β-secretase activity at the cellular level. This is likely connected to the finding that in the cell lines we used, Angiopep’s internalization was not mediated by its presumed receptor to a significant extent. Additionally, Angiopep exploited different internalization mechanisms when applied alone or when conjugated to the inhibitor, highlighting the impact that drug conjugation can have on transport peptides. PMID:27682851

  5. Catalysis of peptide formation by inorganic oxides: high efficiency of alumina under mild conditions on the Earth-like planets.

    PubMed

    Basiuk, V A; Sainz-Rojas, J

    2001-01-01

    Amino acid condensation catalyzed by inorganic oxides is a widely recognized way for prebiotic peptide formation. Silica and alumina are widely distributed in the Earth-like planets' crust as minerals of different complexity, and thus are attractive model catalysts for the studies of abiotic peptide synthesis. Experiments performed in other laboratories have shown that this process can be efficient at > 80 degrees C, which is not easy to find on the planetary surface in combination with sufficient concentrations of amino acids and necessary catalysts. In the present work we tested catalytic activity of three forms of alumina (which proved to be an efficient catalyst for this process) in the intermolecular condensation of L-alanine. We expanded the temperature interval down to 55 degrees C and used the simplest permanent heating procedure, without employing fluctuating drying/wetting conditions. The most important finding is that even under the lowest temperature considered (i.e. 55 degrees C), short peptide formation can be detected already after 10-30 days of heating. This fact implies that the abiotic peptide formation might occur in a wide variety of planetary environments, without need for high temperatures, given the presence of amino acid building blocks and alumina-containing minerals. c2001 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. DeMix Workflow for Efficient Identification of Cofragmented Peptides in High Resolution Data-dependent Tandem Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Pirmoradian, Mohammad; Chernobrovkin, Alexey; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Based on conventional data-dependent acquisition strategy of shotgun proteomics, we present a new workflow DeMix, which significantly increases the efficiency of peptide identification for in-depth shotgun analysis of complex proteomes. Capitalizing on the high resolution and mass accuracy of Orbitrap-based tandem mass spectrometry, we developed a simple deconvolution method of “cloning” chimeric tandem spectra for cofragmented peptides. Additional to a database search, a simple rescoring scheme utilizes mass accuracy and converts the unwanted cofragmenting events into a surprising advantage of multiplexing. With the combination of cloning and rescoring, we obtained on average nine peptide-spectrum matches per second on a Q-Exactive workbench, whereas the actual MS/MS acquisition rate was close to seven spectra per second. This efficiency boost to 1.24 identified peptides per MS/MS spectrum enabled analysis of over 5000 human proteins in single-dimensional LC-MS/MS shotgun experiments with an only two-hour gradient. These findings suggest a change in the dominant “one MS/MS spectrum - one peptide” paradigm for data acquisition and analysis in shotgun data-dependent proteomics. DeMix also demonstrated higher robustness than conventional approaches in terms of lower variation among the results of consecutive LC-MS/MS runs. PMID:25100859

  7. In Silico Template Selection of Short Antimicrobial Peptide Viscotoxin for Improving Its Antimicrobial Efficiency in Development of Potential Therapeutic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, B; Rajasekaran, R

    2017-03-01

    Rapid increase in antibiotic resistance has posed a worldwide threat, due to increased mortality, morbidity, and expenditure caused by antibiotic-resistant microbes. Recent development of the antimicrobial peptides like viscotoxin (Vt) has been successfully comprehended as a substitute for classical antibiotics. A structurally stable peptide, Vt can enhance antimicrobial property and can be used for various developmental purposes. Thus, structural stability among the antimicrobial peptides, Vt A1 (3C8P), A2 (1JMN), A3 (1ED0), B (1JMP), and C (1ORL) of Viscus album was computationally analyzed. In specific, the static confirmation of VtA3 showed high number of intramolecular interactions, along with an increase in hydrophobicity than others comparatively. Further, conformational sampling was used to analyze various geometrical parameters such as root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, and ovality which also revealed the structural stability of VtA3. Moreover, the statistically validated contours of surface area, lipophilicity, and distance constraints of disulfide bonds also supported the priority of VtA3 with respect to stability. Finally, the functional activity of peptides was accessed by computing their free energy of membrane association and membrane interactions, which defined VtA3 as functionally stable. Currently, peptide-based antibiotics and nanoparticles have attracted the pharmaceutical industries for their potential therapeutic applications. Thereby, it is proposed that viscotoxin A3 (1ED0) could be used as a preeminent template for scaffolding potentially efficient antimicrobial peptide-based drugs and nanomaterials in future.

  8. Self-assembled cationic peptide nanoparticles as an efficient antimicrobial agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Xu, Kaijin; Wang, Huaying; Jeremy Tan, P. K.; Fan, Weimin; Venkatraman, Subbu S.; Li, Lanjuan; Yang, Yi-Yan

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial cationic peptides are of interest because they can combat multi-drug-resistant microbes. Most peptides form α-helices or β-sheet-like structures that can insert into and subsequently disintegrate negatively charged bacterial cell surfaces. Here, we show that a novel class of core-shell nanoparticles formed by self-assembly of an amphiphilic peptide have strong antimicrobial properties against a range of bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The nanoparticles show a high therapeutic index against Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and are more potent than their unassembled peptide counterparts. Using Staphylococcus aureus-infected meningitis rabbits, we show that the nanoparticles can cross the blood-brain barrier and suppress bacterial growth in infected brains. Taken together, these nanoparticles are promising antimicrobial agents that can be used to treat brain infections and other infectious diseases.

  9. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. Oxime ligation in acetic acid: efficient synthesis of aminooxy-peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chelushkin, Pavel S; Leko, Maria V; Dorosh, Marina Yu; Burov, Sergey V

    2017-01-01

    Oxime ligation is a powerful tool in various bioconjugation strategies. Nevertheless, high reaction rates and quantitative yields are typically reported for aldehyde-derived compounds. In contrary, keto groups react much slower, with quantitative yields achieved at 5 h for low-molecular weight compounds and more than 15 h for polymers or dendrimers. In this communication, we report that oxime ligation proceeds rapidly with quantitative (>95%) conversion within 1.5-2 h in pure acetic acid. The practical utility of suggested technique is illustrated by the synthesis of peptide-steroid and peptide-polymer conjugates of model aminooxy-peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Efficient Esterification of Oxidized l-Glutathione and Other Small Peptides.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Emily R; Jackson, William; Masterson, Douglas S

    2015-06-08

    Oxidized l-glutathione was esterified to the tetra methyl ester using thionyl chloride in methanol solvent. Other alcohols were tested and the reaction progress was monitored via ESI-MS. This procedure proved to be compatible with other small peptides not containing serine and cysteine residues. In contrast to previously reported methods this procedure provided convenient access to esterified peptides requiring no purification, extended reaction times, or complicated reaction setups.

  12. Efficient Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Infection by Acylated Peptides Derived from the Large Viral Surface Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Gripon, Philippe; Cannie, Isabelle; Urban, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The lack of an appropriate in vitro infection system for the major human pathogen hepatitis B virus (HBV) has prevented a molecular understanding of the early infection events of HBV. We used the novel HBV-infectible cell line HepaRG and primary human hepatocytes to investigate the interference of infection by HBV envelope protein-derived peptides. We found that a peptide consisting of the authentically myristoylated N-terminal 47 amino acids of the pre-S1 domain of the large viral envelope protein (L protein) specifically prevented HBV infection, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8 nM. The replacement of myristic acid with other hydrophobic moieties resulted in changes in the inhibitory activity, most notably by a decrease in the IC50 to picomolar concentrations for longer unbranched fatty acids. The obstruction of HepaRG cell susceptibility to HBV infection after short preincubation times with the peptides suggested that the peptides efficiently target and inactivate a receptor at the hepatocyte surface. Our data both shed light on the molecular mechanism of HBV entry into hepatocytes and provide a basis for the development of potent hepadnaviral entry inhibitors as a novel therapeutic concept for the treatment of hepatitis Β. PMID:15650187

  13. Rapid and efficient assembly of functional silicone surfaces protected by PEG: cell adhesion to peptide-modified PDMS.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Ranger, Jill J; Liu, Lihua; Longenecker, Ryan; Thompson, David B; Sheardown, Heather D; Brook, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    While silicone elastomers generally have excellent biomaterials properties, their hydrophobicity can elicit undesired local biological responses through adsorption and denaturation of proteins. Surface-bound poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) can ameliorate the situation by preventing contact between the external biology and the silicone elastomer. It is further possible to manipulate the biocompatibility of the surface by linking peptides, proteins or other biological entities to the PEG. Previous synthetic approaches to PEG-protected surfaces are compromised by issues of reproducibility. We describe two rapid and efficient approaches to silicone surface modification by PEG-linked adhesion peptides that overcome this problem: SiH groups are introduced throughout a silicone elastomer during elastomer synthesis or only at the surface after cure; then, in either case, protein-repellent PEG brushes at the surface are introduced by hydrosilylation to give surfaces that can be stored for extensive periods of time without degradation. Activation of the free alcohol with an NSC group followed by immediate conjugation to relevant biological molecules occurs in high yields, as shown for RGDS and GYRGDS. High surface grafting density of the peptides was demonstrated using radiolabeling techniques. Biological activity was demonstrated by a 5-fold increase in cell adhesion on the peptide-modified surfaces when compared to unmodified PDMS control surfaces.

  14. Spatial Heterogeneity and Peptide Availability Determine CTL Killing Efficiency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Thea; Kadolsky, Ulrich; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict; Yates, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The rate at which a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) can survey for infected cells is a key ingredient of models of vertebrate immune responses to intracellular pathogens. Estimates have been obtained using in vivo cytotoxicity assays in which peptide-pulsed splenocytes are killed by CTL in the spleens of immunised mice. However the spleen is a heterogeneous environment and splenocytes comprise multiple cell types. Are some cell types intrinsically more susceptible to lysis than others? Quantitatively, what impacts are made by the spatial distribution of targets and effectors, and the level of peptide-MHC on the target cell surface? To address these questions we revisited the splenocyte killing assay, using CTL specific for an epitope of influenza virus. We found that at the cell population level T cell targets were killed more rapidly than B cells. Using modeling, quantitative imaging and in vitro killing assays we conclude that this difference in vivo likely reflects different migratory patterns of targets within the spleen and a heterogeneous distribution of CTL, with no detectable difference in the intrinsic susceptibilities of the two populations to lysis. Modeling of the stages involved in the detection and killing of peptide-pulsed targets in vitro revealed that peptide dose influenced the ability of CTL to form conjugates with targets but had no detectable effect on the probability that conjugation resulted in lysis, and that T cell targets took longer to lyse than B cells. We also infer that incomplete killing in vivo of cells pulsed with low doses of peptide may be due to a combination of heterogeneity in peptide uptake and the dissociation, but not internalisation, of peptide-MHC complexes. Our analyses demonstrate how population-averaged parameters in models of immune responses can be dissected to account for both spatial and cellular heterogeneity. PMID:25233372

  15. Synergy between cell-penetrating peptides and singlet oxygen generators leads to efficient photolysis of membranes.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT or R9 labeled with small organic fluorophores can lyse endosomes upon light irradiation. The photoendosomolytic activity of these compounds can in turn be used to deliver proteins and nucleic acids to the cytosol of live cells with spatial and temporal control. In this report, we examine the mechanisms by which such fluorescent peptides exert a photolytic activity using red blood cells as a membrane model. We show that the peptides TAT and R9 labeled with tetramethylrhodamine photolyze red blood cells by promoting the formation of singlet oxygen in the vicinity of the cells' membranes. In addition, unlabeled TAT and R9 accelerate the photolytic activity of the membrane-bound photosensitizer Rose bengal in trans, suggesting that the cell-penetrating peptides participate in the destabilization of photo-oxidized membranes. Peptides and singlet oxygen generators therefore act in synergy to destroy membranes upon irradiation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  16. Efficient backbone cyclization of linear peptides by a recombinant asparaginyl endopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Karen S.; Durek, Thomas; Kaas, Quentin; Poth, Aaron G.; Gilding, Edward K.; Conlan, Brendon F.; Saska, Ivana; Daly, Norelle L.; van der Weerden, Nicole L.; Craik, David J.; Anderson, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclotides are diverse plant backbone cyclized peptides that have attracted interest as pharmaceutical scaffolds, but fundamentals of their biosynthetic origin remain elusive. Backbone cyclization is a key enzyme-mediated step of cyclotide biosynthesis and confers a measure of stability on the resultant cyclotide. Furthermore, cyclization would be desirable for engineered peptides. Here we report the identification of four asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs), proteases implicated in cyclization, from the cyclotide-producing plant Oldenlandia affinis. We recombinantly express OaAEP1b and find it functions preferably as a cyclase by coupling C-terminal cleavage of propeptide substrates with backbone cyclization. Interestingly, OaAEP1b cannot cleave at the N-terminal site of O. affinis cyclotide precursors, implicating additional proteases in cyclotide biosynthesis. Finally, we demonstrate the broad utility of this enzyme by cyclization of peptides unrelated to cyclotides. We propose that recombinant OaAEP1b is a powerful tool for use in peptide engineering applications where increased stability of peptide products is desired. PMID:26680698

  17. Green-lighting green fluorescent protein: Faster and more efficient folding by eliminating a cis–trans peptide isomerization event

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, David J; Huang, Yao-ming; Xia, Ke; Fraser, Keith; Jones, Victoria E; Lamberson, Colleen M; Van Roey, Patrick; Colón, Wilfredo; Bystroff, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP) folds on a time scale of minutes. The slow step in folding is a cis–trans peptide bond isomerization. The only conserved cis-peptide bond in the native GFP structure, at P89, was remodeled by the insertion of two residues, followed by iterative energy minimization and side chain design. The engineered GFP was synthesized and found to fold faster and more efficiently than its template protein, recovering 50% more of its fluorescence upon refolding. The slow phase of folding is faster and smaller in amplitude, and hysteresis in refolding has been eliminated. The elimination of a previously reported kinetically trapped state in refolding suggests that X-P89 is trans in the trapped state. A 2.55 Å resolution crystal structure revealed that the new variant contains only trans-peptide bonds, as designed. This is the first instance of a computationally remodeled fluorescent protein that folds faster and more efficiently than wild type. PMID:24408076

  18. Efficient Subcellular Targeting to the Cell Nucleus of Quantum Dots Densely Decorated with a Nuclear Localization Sequence Peptide.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-27

    Organelle-targeted drug delivery can enhance the efficiency of the intracellularly acting drugs and reduce their toxicity. We generated core-shell type CdSe-ZnS quantum dots (QDs) densely decorated with NLS peptidic targeting residues using a 3-stage decoration approach and investigated their endocytosis and nuclear targeting efficiencies. The diameter of the generated QDs increased following the individual decoration stages (16.3, 18.9, and 21.9 nm), the ζ-potential became less negative (-33.2, -17.5, and -11.9 mV), and characteristic changes appeared in the FTIR spectra following decoration with the linker and NLS peptides. Quantitative analysis of the last decoration stage revealed that 37.9% and 33.2% of the alkyne-modified NLS groups that were added to the reaction mix became covalently attached or adsorbed to the QDs surface, respectively. These numbers correspond to 63.6 and 55.7 peptides conjugated or adsorbed to a single QD (the surface density of 42 and 37 conjugated and adsorbed peptides per 1000 nm(2) of the QDs surface), which is higher than in the majority of previous studies that reported decoration efficiencies of formulations intended for nuclear-targeted drug delivery. QDs decorated with NLS peptides undergo more efficient endocytosis, as compared to other investigated QDs formulations, and accumulated to a higher extent in the cell nucleus or in close vicinity to it (11.9%, 14.6%, and 56.1% of the QDs endocytosed by an average cell for the QD-COOH, QD-azide, and QD-NLS formulations, respectively). We conclude that dense decoration of QDs with NLS residues increased their endocytosis and led to their nuclear targeting (preferential accumulation in the cells nuclei or in close vicinity to them). The experimental system and research tools that were used in this study allow quantitative investigation of the mechanisms that govern the QDs nuclear targeting and their dependence on the formulation properties. These findings will contribute to the

  19. An Efficient Method for the In Vitro Production of Azol(in)e-Based Cyclic Peptides**

    PubMed Central

    Houssen, Wael E; Bent, Andrew F; McEwan, Andrew R; Pieiller, Nathalie; Tabudravu, Jioji; Koehnke, Jesko; Mann, Greg; Adaba, Rosemary I; Thomas, Louise; Hawas, Usama W; Liu, Huanting; Schwarz-Linek, Ulrich; Smith, Margaret C M; Naismith, James H; Jaspars, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Heterocycle-containing cyclic peptides are promising scaffolds for the pharmaceutical industry but their chemical synthesis is very challenging. A new universal method has been devised to prepare these compounds by using a set of engineered marine-derived enzymes and substrates obtained from a family of ribosomally produced and post-translationally modified peptides called the cyanobactins. The substrate precursor peptide is engineered to have a non-native protease cleavage site that can be rapidly cleaved. The other enzymes used are heterocyclases that convert Cys or Cys/Ser/Thr into their corresponding azolines. A macrocycle is formed using a macrocyclase enzyme, followed by oxidation of the azolines to azoles with a specific oxidase. The work is exemplified by the production of 17 macrocycles containing 6–9 residues representing 11 out of the 20 canonical amino acids. PMID:25331823

  20. Nuclear and perinuclear targeting efficiency of quantum dots depends on density of peptidic targeting residues on their surface.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-12-29

    Targeted delivery to the cell nucleus can enhance the efficiency of drugs with nuclear site of action (some anti-cancer agents, DNA drugs, etc.), and can reduce their toxicity. Such targeting can be attained using nano-drug delivery systems (nano-DDSs) decorated with nuclear targeting sequences (such as nuclear localization sequence peptides, NLS). Several types of nano-DDSs decorated with NLS peptides were designed, but their investigation usually did not include quantitate analysis of the decoration efficiency and its correlation with the nano-DDSs intracellular localization. Thus, the major mechanisms and limiting factors of the nano-DDSs nuclear targeting are largely unknown yet. In this study, we report quantitative data for specific nano-formulation (CdSe-ZnS quantum dots) that include the efficiencies of its decoration with NLS residues and of its nuclear and perinuclear targeting, and demonstrate correlation between these parameters. For instance, QDs decorated with 83, 246, and 265 NLS peptides accumulated efficiently in the nucleus of HeLa cells or its vicinity (an average of 30.4%, 43.3%, and 49.0% of the intracellular QDs, respectively). On the other hand, QDs decorated with 63, 231, and 308 scrambled peptides accumulated in the nucleus of HeLa cells or its vicinity to a much lower extent (an average of 17.3%, 21.1%, and 25.5% of the intracellular QDs, respectively). Thus, results of our study provide important insights into the structure-activity correlations (i.e., the relationships between the formulation properties and the intracellular fate of nano-DDSs) of nuclear-targeted drug delivery. We plan to apply the research tools that were developed in the course of this and our previous studies to investigate the nuclear and perinuclear targeting activities of different NLS sequences, and to investigate the effects of nano-DDSs size, charge, shape, decoration efficiency with nuclear targeting sequences, and other structural factors on nuclear and

  1. High-Efficiency Synthesis of Human α-Endorphin and Magainin in the Erythrocytes of Transgenic Mice: A Production System for Therapeutic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ajay; Khoury-Christianson, Anastasia M.; White, Steven P.; Dhanjal, Nirpal K.; Huang, Wen; Paulhiac, Clara; Friedman, Eric J.; Manjula, Belur N.; Kumar, Ramesh

    1994-09-01

    Chemical synthesis of peptides, though feasible, is hindered by considerations of cost, purity, and efficiency of synthesizing longer chains. Here we describe a transgenic system for producing peptides of therapeutic interest as fusion proteins at low cost and high purity. Transgenic hemoglobin expression technology using the locus control region was employed to produce fusion hemoglobins in the erythrocytes of mice. The fusion hemoglobin contains the desired peptide as an extension at the C end of human α-globin. A protein cleavage site is inserted between the C end of the α-globin chain and the N-terminal residue of the desired peptide. The peptide is recovered after cleavage of the fusion protein with enzymes that recognize this cleavage signal as their substrate. Due to the selective compartmentalization of hemoglobin in the erythrocytes, purification of the fusion hemoglobin is easy and efficient. Because of its compact and highly ordered structure, the internal sites of hemoglobin are resistant to protease digestion and the desired peptide is efficiently released and recovered. The applicability of this approach was established by producing a 16-mer α-endorphin peptide and a 26-mer magainin peptide in transgenic mice. Transgenic animals and their progeny expressing these fusion proteins remain healthy, even when the fusion protein is expressed at >25% of the total hemoglobin in the erythrocytes. Additional applications and potential improvements of this methodology are discussed.

  2. Efficient Secretion of Recombinant Proteins from Rice Suspension-Cultured Cells Modulated by the Choice of Signal Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Fen; Tan, Chia-Chun; Yeh, Ju-Fang; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Liu, Yu-Kuo; Ho, Shin-Lon; Lu, Chung-An

    2015-01-01

    Plant-based expression systems have emerged as a competitive platform in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins. By adding a signal peptide, αAmy3sp, the desired recombinant proteins can be secreted outside transgenic rice cells, making them easy to harvest. In this work, to improve the secretion efficiency of recombinant proteins in rice expression systems, various signal peptides including αAmy3sp, CIN1sp, and 33KDsp have been fused to the N-terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and introduced into rice cells to explore the efficiency of secretion of foreign proteins. 33KDsp had better efficiency than αAmy3sp and CIN1sp for the secretion of GFP from calli and suspension-cultured cells. 33KDsp was further applied for the secretion of mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (mGM-CSF) from transgenic rice suspension-cultured cells; approximately 76%–92% of total rice-derived mGM-CSF (rmGM-CSF) was detected in the culture medium. The rmGM-CSF was bioactive and could stimulate the proliferation of a murine myeloblastic leukemia cell line, NSF-60. The extracellular yield of rmGM-CSF reached 31.7 mg/L. Our study indicates that 33KDsp is better at promoting the secretion of recombinant proteins in rice suspension-cultured cell systems than the commonly used αAmy3sp. PMID:26473722

  3. DNA Subtraction of In Vivo Selected Phage Repertoires for Efficient Peptide Pathology Biomarker Identification in Neuroinflammation Multiple Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Sanchez, Karina; Vekris, Antonios; Petry, Klaus G.

    2016-01-01

    To streamline in vivo biomarker discovery, we developed a suppression subtractive DNA hybridization technique adapted for phage-displayed combinatorial libraries of 12 amino acid peptides (PhiSSH). Physical DNA subtraction is performed in a one-tube-all-reactions format by sequential addition of reagents, producing the enrichment of specific clones of one repertoire. High-complexity phage repertoires produced by in vivo selections in the multiple sclerosis rat model (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) and matched healthy control rats were used to evaluate the technique. The healthy repertoire served as a physical DNA subtractor from the EAE repertoire to produce the subtraction repertoire. Full next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the three repertoires was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the subtraction technique. More than 96% of the clones common to the EAE and healthy repertoires were absent from the subtraction repertoire, increasing the probability of randomly selecting various specific peptides for EAE pathology to about 70%. Histopathology experiments were performed to confirm the quality of the subtraction repertoire clones, producing distinct labeling of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) affected by inflammation among healthy nervous tissue or the preferential binding to IL1-challenged vs. resting human BBB model. Combining PhiSSH with NGS will be useful for controlled in vivo screening of small peptide combinatorial libraries to discover biomarkers of specific molecular alterations interspersed within healthy tissues. PMID:26917946

  4. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Linde A.; Brennen, W. Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M.; Poirier, John T.

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M-1s-1), was further optimized by a P2’ N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M-1s-1). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development. PMID:26069962

  5. Seneca Valley Virus 3Cpro Substrate Optimization Yields Efficient Substrates for Use in Peptide-Prodrug Therapy.

    PubMed

    Miles, Linde A; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Rudin, Charles M; Poirier, John T

    2015-01-01

    The oncolytic picornavirus Seneca Valley Virus (SVV-001) demonstrates anti-tumor activity in models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), but may ultimately need to be combined with cytotoxic therapies to improve responses observed in patients. Combining SVV-001 virotherapy with a peptide prodrug activated by the viral protease 3Cpro is a novel strategy that may increase the therapeutic potential of SVV-001. Using recombinant SVV-001 3Cpro, we measured cleavage kinetics of predicted SVV-001 3Cpro substrates. An efficient substrate, L/VP4 (kcat/KM = 1932 ± 183 M(-1)s(-1)), was further optimized by a P2' N→P substitution yielding L/VP4.1 (kcat/KM = 17446 ± 2203 M(-1)s(-1)). We also determined essential substrate amino acids by sequential N-terminal deletion and substitution of amino acids found in other picornavirus genera. A peptide corresponding to the L/VP4.1 substrate was selectively cleaved by SVV-001 3Cpro in vitro and was stable in human plasma. These data define an optimized peptide substrate for SVV-001 3Cpro, with direct implications for anti-cancer therapeutic development.

  6. Efficient identification of murine M2 macrophage peptide targeting ligands by phage display and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gary W.; Livesay, Brynn R.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Lutz, Emi; Waalkes, Adam; Jensen, Michael C.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide ligands are used to increase the specificity of drug carriers to their target cells and to facilitate intracellular delivery. One method to identify such peptide ligands, phage display, enables high-throughput screening of peptide libraries for ligands binding to therapeutic targets of interest. However, conventional methods for identifying target binders in a library by Sanger sequencing are low-throughput, labor-intensive, and provide a limited perspective (< 0.01%) of the complete sequence space. Moreover, the small sample space can be dominated by non-specific, preferentially amplifying “parasitic sequences” and plastic-binding sequences, which may lead to the identification of false positives or exclude the identification of target-binding sequences. To overcome these challenges, we employed next-generation Illumina sequencing to couple high-throughput screening and high-throughput sequencing, enabling more comprehensive access to the phage display library sequence space. In this work, we define the hallmarks of binding sequences in next-generation sequencing data, and develop a method that identifies several target-binding phage clones for murine, alternatively-activated (M2) macrophages with a high (100%) success rate: sequences and binding motifs were reproducibly present across biological replicates; binding motifs were identified across multiple unique sequences; and an unselected, amplified library accurately filtered out parasitic sequences. In addition, we validate the Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation tool as an efficient and principled means of discovering binding sequences. PMID:26161996

  7. Systematic amino acid substitutions improved efficiency of GD2-peptide mimotope vaccination against neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bleeke, Matthias; Fest, Stefan; Huebener, Nicole; Landgraf, Christiane; Schraven, Burkhart; Gaedicke, Gerhard; Volkmer, Rudolf; Lode, Holger N

    2009-11-01

    The likelihood of identifying peptides of sufficient quality for the development of effective cancer vaccines by screening of phage display libraries is low. Here, we introduce the sequential application of systematic amino acid substitution by SPOT synthesis. After the substitution of two amino acids within the sequence of a phage display-derived mimotope of disialoganglioside GD2 (mimotope MA), the novel mimotope C3 showed improved GD2 mimicry in vitro. Peptide vaccination with the C3 mimotope induced an 18-fold increased anti-GD2 serum response associated with reduction of primary tumour growth and spontaneous metastasis in contrast to MA mimotope controls in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model. In summary, SPOT provides an ideal optimisation tool for the development of phage display-derived cancer vaccines.

  8. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  9. Efficient siRNA Delivery by Lipid Nanoparticles Modified with a Nonstandard Macrocyclic Peptide for EpCAM-Targeting.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yu; Mizumura, Wataru; Murata, Manami; Hada, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Shoshiro; Ito, Kenichiro; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro; Katoh, Takayuki; Goto, Yuki; Takagi, Asako; Kohara, Michinori; Suga, Hiroaki; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2017-08-25

    The development of a specific, effective method for the delivery of therapeutics including small molecules and nucleic acids to tumor tissue remains to be solved. Numerous types of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have been developed in attempts to achieve this goal. However, LNPs are probably not taken up by target cells because cancer-targeting LNPs are typically modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which inhibits the cellular uptake of LNPs, to passively accumulate in tumor tissue via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. It would clearly be important to develop a LNP with both a prolonged circulation and cancer-specific efficient uptake for use in an innovative nanodrug delivery system. Herein, we assessed the effect of nonstandard macrocyclic peptides against the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) Epi-1, which was discovered by a random nonstandard peptides integrated discovery (RaPID) system, on the cellular uptake and therapeutics delivery of LNPs. A liposomal siRNA delivery system (MEND) was modified with an Epi-1 lipid-derivative (EpCAM-targeting MEND; ET-MEND). The resulting ET-MEND showed a more than 27-fold increase in cellular uptake in EpCAM-positive cell lines. In the case of negative cells, cellular uptake and the efficiency of the ET-MEND for delivering therapeutics were comparable with those of nonmodified MEND. In addition, when systemically injected, the ET-MEND successfully inhibited gene expression in the tumor tissue at a dose of 0.5 mg siRNA/kg without any obvious toxicity. These results suggest that a combination of a specific peptide ligand can be used to identify a RaPID system and that the use of such a MEND for liposomal drug delivery has the potential for use in developing a system for the efficacious delivery of pharmaceuticals to various cancer cells.

  10. Highly Efficient and Safe Delivery of VEGF siRNA by Bioreducible Fluorinated Peptide Dendrimers for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaojun; Zhu, Haofang; Zhang, Yanmei; Gu, Zhongwei

    2017-03-22

    RNA interference (RNAi) has a great promise in treating various acquired and hereditary diseases. However, it remains highly desirable to develop new delivery system to circumvent complex extra- and intracellular barriers for successful clinical translation. Here, we report on a versatile polymeric vector, bioreducible fluorinated peptide dendrimers (BFPD), for efficient and safe small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery. In virtue of skillfully integrating all of the unique advantages of reversible cross-linking, fluorination, and peptide dendrimers, this novel vector can surmount almost all extra- and intracellular barriers associated with local siRNA delivery through highly improved physiological stability and serum resistance, significantly increased intratumoral enrichment, cellular internalization, successful facilitation of endosomal escape, and cytosolic siRNA release. BFPD polyplexes, carrying small interfering vascular endothelial growth factor (siVEGF), demonstrated excellent VEGF silencing efficacy (∼65%) and a strong capability for inhibiting HeLa cell proliferation. More importantly, these polyplexes showed superior performance in long-term enrichment in the tumor sites and had a high level of tumor growth inhibition. Furthermore, these polyplexes not only exhibited excellent in vivo antitumor efficacy but also demonstrated superior biocompatibility, compared with LPF2000, both in vivo and in vitro. These findings indicate that BFPD is an efficient and safe siRNA delivery system and has remarkable potential for RNAi-based cancer treatment.

  11. Degradable and biocompatible nanoparticles decorated with cyclic RGD peptide for efficient drug delivery to hepatoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Loyer, Pascal; Bedhouche, Wahib; Huang, Zhi Wei; Cammas-Marion, Sandrine

    2013-10-01

    Amphiphilic derivatives of poly(benzyl malate) were synthesized and characterized with the aim of being used as degradable and biocompatible building blocks for the design of functional nanoparticles (NPs). An anti-cancer model drug, doxorubicin, has been successfully encapsulated into the prepared NPs and its release profile has been evaluated in water and in culture medium. NPs bearing biotin molecules were prepared either for site-specific drug delivery via the targeting of biotin receptors overexpressed on the surface of several cancer cells, or for grafting biotinylated cyclic RGD peptide onto their surface using the strong and highly specific interactions between biotin and the streptavidin protein. We have shown that this binding did not affect dramatically the physico-chemical properties of the corresponding NPs. Cyclic RGD grafted fluorescent NPs were more efficiently uptaken by the HepaRG hepatoma cells than biotinylated fluorescent NPs. Furthermore, the targeting of HepaRG hepatoma cells with NPs bearing cyclic RGD was very efficient and much weaker for HeLa and HT29 cell lines confirming that cyclic RGD is a suitable targeting agent for liver cells. Our results also provide a new mean for rapid screening of short hepatotropic peptides in order to design NPs showing specific liver targeting properties.

  12. Synthetic peptides for efficient discrimination of anti-enterovirus antibodies at the serotype level.

    PubMed

    Routsias, John G; Mavrouli, Maria D; Antonaki, Georgia; Spanakis, Nikolaos; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-08-01

    Enteroviruses are important human pathogens, causing a broad spectrum of diseases from minor common colds to fatal myocarditis. However, certain disease syndromes are caused by one or few serotypes. Serotype identification is difficult due to the laborious neutralization tests that lack of sensitivity, while in commercial ELISAs homotypic antibodies' activities are largely masked by the recognition of genera-specific epitopes by heterotypic antibodies. In the present study homotypic assays were developed with the ability to discriminate different enterovirus serotypes. Seventy-three children sera, positive for IgM antibodies against enterovirus genus and 49 healthy children were examined for the presence of antibodies against 14 synthetic peptides derived from a non-conserved region of the VP1 protein of coxsackieviruses B2, B3, B4, B5, A9, A16, A24, echoviruses 6, 7, 9, 11, 30, enterovirus 71 and parechovirus 1. 50% of the anti-enterovirus IgM positive sera (>150 BU) reacted with the peptides with the majority of them to preferentially recognize one of them, supporting the homotypic nature of our assay. Inhibition studies yielded homologous inhibition rates 67-95% suggesting that specific peptide recognition actually occurred. The diagnostic value of our assay was tested in blood samples drawn over a 1.5-year period from a 5-year old patient. The anti-enterovirus reactivity was clearly attributed to echovirus serotype 11. The IgM/IgG antibody ratio was reversed 4 months later and subsequently IgM antibodies dropped below the cutoff point. In this paper we demonstrate that our assay can be used to discriminate between antibodies targeting different enterovirus serotypes.

  13. Controlled release of GAG-binding enhanced transduction (GET) peptides for sustained and highly efficient intracellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Abu-Awwad, Hosam Al-Deen M; Thiagarajan, Lalitha; Dixon, James E

    2017-07-15

    Controlled release systems for therapeutic molecules are vital to allow the sustained local delivery of their activities which direct cell behaviour and enable novel regenerative strategies. Direct programming of cells using exogenously delivered transcription factors can by-pass growth factor signalling but there is still a requirement to deliver such activity spatio-temporally. We previously developed a technology termed GAG-binding enhanced transduction (GET) to efficiently deliver a variety of cargoes intracellularly, using GAG-binding domains which promote cell targeting, and cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which allow cell entry. Herein we demonstrate that GET system can be used in controlled release systems to mediate sustained intracellular transduction over one week. We assessed the stability and activity of GET peptides in poly(dl-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) prepared using a S/O/W double emulsion method. Efficient encapsulation (∼65%) and tailored protein release profiles could be achieved, however intracellular transduction was significantly inhibited post-release. To retain GET peptide activity we optimized a strategy of co-encapsulation of l-Histidine, which may form a complex with the PLGA degradation products under acidic conditions. Simulations of the polymer microclimate showed that hydrolytic acidic PLGA degradation products directly inhibited GET peptide transduction activity, and use of l-Histidine significantly enhanced released protein delivery. The ability to control the intracellular transduction of functional proteins into cells will facilitate new localized delivery methods and allow approaches to direct cellular behaviour for many regenerative medicine applications. The goal for regenerative medicine is to restore functional biological tissue by controlling and augmenting cellular behaviour. Either Transcription (TFs) or growth factors (GFs) can be presented to cells in spatio-temporal gradients for

  14. A Biodegradable Polyethylenimine-Based Vector Modified by Trifunctional Peptide R18 for Enhancing Gene Transfection Efficiency In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jing; Zhu, Manman; Liu, Kehai; Fan, Hua; Zhao, Wenfang; Mao, Yuan; Zhang, Yaguang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of capacity to cross the nucleus membrane seems to be one of the main reasons for the lower transfection efficiency of gene vectors observed in vivo study than in vitro. To solve this problem, a new non-viral gene vector was designed. First, a degradable polyethylenimine (PEI) derivate was synthesized by crosslinking low-molecular-weight (LMW) PEI with N-octyl-N-quaternary chitosan (OTMCS), and then adopting a designed trifunctional peptide (RGDC-TAT-NLS) with good tumor targeting, cell uptake and nucleus transport capabilities to modify OTMCS-PEI. The new gene vector was termed as OTMCS-PEI-R18 and characterized in terms of its chemical structure and biophysical parameters. Gene transfection efficiency and nucleus transport mechanism of this vector were also evaluated. The polymer showed controlled degradation and remarkable buffer capabilities with the particle size around 100-300 nm and the zeta potential ranged from 5 mV to 40 mV. Agraose gel electrophoresis showed that OTMCS-PEI-R18 could effectively condensed plasmid DNA at a ratio of 1.0. Besides, the polymer was stable in the presence of sodium heparin and could resist digestion by DNase I at a concentration of 63U DNase I/DNA. OTMCS-PEI-R18 also showed much lower cytotoxicity and better transfection rates compared to polymers OTMCS-PEI-R13, OTMCS-PEI and PEI 25 KDa in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, OTMCS-PEI-R18/DNA complexes could accumulate in the nucleus well soon and not rely on mitosis absolutely due to the newly incorporated ligand peptide NLS with the specific nuclear delivery pathway indicating that the gene delivery system OTMCS-PEI-R18 could reinforce gene transfection efficiency in vivo.

  15. A Biodegradable Polyethylenimine-Based Vector Modified by Trifunctional Peptide R18 for Enhancing Gene Transfection Efficiency In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Zhu, Manman; Fan, Hua; Zhao, Wenfang; Mao, Yuan; Zhang, Yaguang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of capacity to cross the nucleus membrane seems to be one of the main reasons for the lower transfection efficiency of gene vectors observed in vivo study than in vitro. To solve this problem, a new non-viral gene vector was designed. First, a degradable polyethylenimine (PEI) derivate was synthesized by crosslinking low-molecular-weight (LMW) PEI with N-octyl-N-quaternary chitosan (OTMCS), and then adopting a designed trifunctional peptide (RGDC-TAT-NLS) with good tumor targeting, cell uptake and nucleus transport capabilities to modify OTMCS-PEI. The new gene vector was termed as OTMCS-PEI-R18 and characterized in terms of its chemical structure and biophysical parameters. Gene transfection efficiency and nucleus transport mechanism of this vector were also evaluated. The polymer showed controlled degradation and remarkable buffer capabilities with the particle size around 100–300 nm and the zeta potential ranged from 5 mV to 40 mV. Agraose gel electrophoresis showed that OTMCS-PEI-R18 could effectively condensed plasmid DNA at a ratio of 1.0. Besides, the polymer was stable in the presence of sodium heparin and could resist digestion by DNase I at a concentration of 63U DNase I/DNA. OTMCS-PEI-R18 also showed much lower cytotoxicity and better transfection rates compared to polymers OTMCS-PEI-R13, OTMCS-PEI and PEI 25 KDa in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, OTMCS-PEI-R18/DNA complexes could accumulate in the nucleus well soon and not rely on mitosis absolutely due to the newly incorporated ligand peptide NLS with the specific nuclear delivery pathway indicating that the gene delivery system OTMCS-PEI-R18 could reinforce gene transfection efficiency in vivo. PMID:27935984

  16. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  17. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  18. Highly efficient peptide formation from N-acetylaminoacyl-AMP anhydride and free amino acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of formation of the N-blocked dipeptide, N-acetylglycylglycine, from N-acetylglycyl adenylate anhydride and glycine in aqueous solution at 25 C, and at various PH's are reported. The reaction is of interest in that over a physiologically relevant pH range (6-8), peptide synthesis proceeds more rapidly than hydrolysis, even at those pH's at which this compound becomes increasingly susceptible to base-catalyzed hydrolysis. Under similar conditions, the corresponding unblocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides are considerably more unstable, and undergo appreciable hydrlysis in the presence of free amino acid. Because N-blocked aminoacyl adenylate anhydrides serve as model compounds of peptidyl adenylate anhydrides, these results suggest that primitive amino acid polymerization systems may have operated by cyclic reactivation of the peptidyl carboxyl group, rather than that of the incoming amino acid.

  19. Facile synthesis of yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres for efficient enrichment of low abundance peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Hao; Qin, Hongqiang; Xiong, Zhichao; Zhang, Weibing; Zou, Hanfa

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres with a yolk-shell structure (YSMMCS) have been prepared via a new in situ carbon source strategy. The material was fabricated by two shells coated onto the Fe3O4 particles; the inner dense and thick silica shell could protect the magnetic core from harsh acidic solvents as well as induce the void between the core and the outer shell for the yolk-shell structure, while the outer organosilica shell was used as the template and carbon source for in situ preparation of a carbon shell with mesoporous structure. A C18-alkyl chain was incorporated in situ as the carbon precursor efficiently, avoiding the conventional infiltration step, which was very difficult to manipulate and time-consuming with the possibility of losing the carbon precursor. The resulting yolk-shell magnetic mesoporous carbon microspheres exhibited a high surface area (273.15 m2 g-1), a large pore volume (0.31 cm3 g-1), and a strong magnetic response (a saturation magnetization value of 34.57 emu g-1). As a result of the void between the core and the outer shell and the π-π stacking effect, adsorption capacity reached 191.64 mg g-1 by using Rhodamine B as a standard analyte, indicating the great potential application of the material as drug carriers. Owing to the inherent hydrophobicity and high surface area, the composite material showed better performance in the enrichment of peptides than a magnetic mesoporous silica material (Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2). According to the LC-MS/MS results, about 51 and 29 nonredundant peptides were identified from tryptic digests of 5 nM BSA. Additionally, taking advantage of the mesoporous structure and strong magnetic response, the material was utilized to selectively extract low abundance endogenous peptides from human serum in the presence of high abundance proteins. Based on the LC-MS/MS results, 962 endogenous peptides were obtained by 2.5 mg YSMMCS relative to 539 endogenous peptides by 5 mg Fe2O3@nSiO2@mSiO2, confirming the

  20. Dual-function synthetic peptide derived from BMP4 for highly efficient tumor targeting and antiangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Suk Hyun; Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Park, Yoon Shin; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in the growth and metastasis of cancer, and growth factors released from cancer promote blood-vessel formation in the tumor microenvironment. The angiogenesis is accelerated via interactions of growth factors with the high-affinity receptors on cancer cells. In particular, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) on the surface of cancer cells have been shown to be important in many aspects of determining a tumor’s phenotype and development. Specifically, the regulation of the interactions between HSPGs and growth factors results in changes in tumor progression. A peptide with heparin-binding (HBP) activity has been developed and synthesized to inhibit tumor growth via the prevention of angiogenesis. We hypothesized that HBP could inhibit the interaction of growth factors and HSPGs on the surface of cancer cells, decrease paracrine signaling in endothelial cells (ECs), and finally decrease angiogenesis in the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we found that HBP had antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. The conditioned media obtained from a breast cancer cell line treated with HBP were used to culture human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of HBP on ECs. HBP effectively inhibited the migration, invasion, and tube formation of HUVECs in vitro. In addition, the expressions of angiogenesis-mediating factors, including ERK, FAK, and Akt, were considerably decreased. HBP also decreased the levels of invasive factors, including MMP2 and MMP9, secreted by the HUVECs. We demonstrated significant suppression of tumor growth in a breast cancer xenograft model and enhanced distribution of HBP at the site of tumors. Taken together, our results show that HBP has antiangiogenic effects on ECs, and suggest that it may serve as a potential antitumor agent through control of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27695323

  1. Efficient expression of nattokinase in Bacillus licheniformis: host strain construction and signal peptide optimization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuetuan; Zhou, Yinhua; Chen, Jingbang; Cai, Dongbo; Wang, Dan; Qi, Gaofu; Chen, Shouwen

    2015-02-01

    Nattokinase (NK) possesses the potential for prevention and treatment of thrombus-related diseases. In this study, high-level expression of nattokinase was achieved in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02 via host strain construction and signal peptides optimization. First, ten genes (mpr, vpr, aprX, epr, bpr, wprA, aprE, bprA, hag, amyl) encoding for eight extracellular proteases, a flagellin and an amylase were deleted to obtain B. licheniformis BL10, which showed no extracellular proteases activity in gelatin zymography. Second, the gene fragments of P43 promoter, Svpr, nattokinase and TamyL were combined into pHY300PLK to form the expression vector pP43SNT. In BL10 (pP43SNT), the fermentation activity and product activity per unit of biomass of nattokinase reached 14.33 FU/mL and 2,187.71 FU/g respectively, which increased by 39 and 156 % compared to WX-02 (pP43SNT). Last, Svpr was replaced with SsacC and SbprA, and the maximum fermentation activity (33.83 FU/mL) was achieved using SsacC, which was 229 % higher than that of WX-02 (pP43SNT). The maximum NK fermentation activity in this study reaches the commercial production level of solid state fermentation, and this study provides a promising engineered strain for industrial production of nattokinase, as well as a potential platform host for expression of other target proteins.

  2. RGD peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles enable highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingdan; Alves, Carla S; Hou, Wenxiu; Qiu, Jieru; Möhwald, Helmuth; Tomás, Helena; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-04

    We report the use of arginine-glycine-aspartic (Arg-Gly-Asp, RGD) peptide-modified dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) for highly efficient and specific gene delivery to stem cells. In this study, generation 5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers modified with RGD via a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer and with PEG monomethyl ether were used as templates to entrap gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The native and the RGD-modified PEGylated dendrimers and the respective well characterized Au DENPs were used as vectors to transfect human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with plasmid DNA (pDNA) carrying both the enhanced green fluorescent protein and the luciferase (pEGFPLuc) reporter genes, as well as pDNA encoding the human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (hBMP-2) gene. We show that all vectors are capable of transfecting the hMSCs with both pDNAs. Gene transfection using pEGFPLuc was demonstrated by quantitative Luc activity assay and qualitative evaluation by fluorescence microscopy. For the transfection with hBMP-2, the gene delivery efficiency was evaluated by monitoring the hBMP-2 concentration and the level of osteogenic differentiation of the hMSCs via alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin secretion, calcium deposition, and von Kossa staining assays. Our results reveal that the stem cell gene delivery efficiency is largely dependent on the composition and the surface functionality of the dendrimer-based vectors. The coexistence of RGD and AuNPs rendered the designed dendrimeric vector with specific stem cell binding ability likely via binding of integrin receptor on the cell surface and improved three-dimensional conformation of dendrimers, which is beneficial for highly efficient and specific stem cell gene delivery applications.

  3. WT1 peptide vaccination combined with BCG-CWS is more efficient for tumor eradication than WT1 peptide vaccination alone.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hiroko; Kawasaki, Kotomi; Oka, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Kawakami, Manabu; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Hoshida, Yoshihiko; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Nakano, Akiko; Masuda, Tomoki; Wu, Fei; Taniguchi, Yuki; Yoshihara, Satoshi; Elisseeva, Olga A; Oji, Yusuke; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Azuma, Ichiro; Kawase, Ichiro; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Sugiyama, Haruo

    2004-07-01

    A Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is expressed at high levels not only in most types of leukemia but also in various types of solid tumors, including lung and breast cancer. WT1 protein has been reported to serve as a target antigen for tumor-specific immunotherapy both in vitro in human systems and in vivo in murine models. We have shown that mice immunized with WT1 peptide or WT1 cDNA could reject a challenge from WT1-expressing tumor cells (a "prophylactic" model). However, it was not examined whether WT1 peptide vaccination had the potency to reject tumor cells in a "therapeutic" setting. In the present study, we demonstrated for the first time that WT1 peptide vaccination combined with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin cell wall skeleton (BCG-CWS) was more effective for eradication of WT1-expressing tumor cells that had been implanted into mice before vaccination (a "therapeutic" model) compared with WT1 peptide vaccination alone. An intradermal injection of BCG-CWS into mice, followed by that of WT1 peptide at the same site on the next day, generated WT1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and led to rejection of WT1-expressing leukemia or lung cancer cells. These results showed that BCG-CWS, which was well known to enhance innate immunity, could enhance WT1-specific immune responses (acquired immunity) in combination with WT1 peptide vaccination. Therefore, WT1 peptide vaccination combined with BCG-CWS may be applied to cancer immunotherapy in clinical settings.

  4. Bioactive Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H.; Lee, Byong H.

    2017-01-01

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development. PMID:28445415

  5. Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  6. Efficient routes to carbon-silicon bond formation for the synthesis of silicon-containing peptides and azasilaheterocycles.

    PubMed

    Min, Geanna K; Hernández, Dácil; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2013-02-19

    product. We demonstrated that a variety of Ar(2)SiH(2) compounds with methyl substituents on the aromatic core could effectively undergo hydrosilylation and reductive lithiation with a soluble reducing agent, lithium naphthalenide. The electron-rich aromatic groups were more acid labile and, depending on the conditions, could produce either the silane diol or the silanol. In an alternative strategy, we used a highly regioselective Rh-catalyzed sequential double hydrosilylation to form the two C-Si bonds with a single catalyst. This approach is a more efficient, atom economical way to synthesize a wider range of highly functionalized organosilanes with the added possibility of extending this method into an asymmetric protocol. By this method, various functional groups that were not previously tolerated in the lithiation protocol, including OBn, OAc, furyl, and thiophenes, could now be incorporated. Hydrosilylation of a terminal olefin and a peptide functionalized with an enamide at the C-terminus achieved the desired silane in high yields in a one pot reaction without compromising the stereochemical integrity of the peptide. As an extension of this work, we used these methods to efficiently generate a variety of chiral azasilaheterocycles, including silapiperidines and silaindolizidines.

  7. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  8. A highly efficient modified human serum albumin signal peptide to secrete proteins in cells derived from different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Attallah, Carolina; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Oggero, Marcos

    2017-01-10

    Signal peptides (SPs) are key elements in the production of recombinant proteins; however, little information is available concerning different SP in mammalian cells other than CHO. In order to study the efficiency of different SPs to direct the traffic along the secretory pathway of the green fluorescence protein (GFP) and a scFv-Fc fusion protein; CHO-K1, HEK293 and NS0 cell lines were transfected in a transient and stable way. SP of human azurocidin (AZ), modified human albumin (mSA), modified Cricetulus griseus Ig kappa chain V III region MOPC 63 like (mIgκ C) and modified human Ig kappa chain V III region VG (mIgκ H) were evaluated. The efficiency of SPs to translocate a propeptide across the ER membrane was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry for the GFP inside the secretory pathway, and by antigen-specific indirect ELISA for the scFv-Fc outside the cell. The mSA SP was successful in directing the secretion of the active proteins in these different types of mammalian cells, regardless of the transgene copy number. The goal of this work was to demonstrate that a modified version of SA SP might be used in different mammalian cells employing the same expression vector.

  9. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Dixon, James E; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2016-01-19

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application.

  10. Peptide Self-Assembled Biofilm with Unique Electron Transfer Flexibility for Highly Efficient Visible-Light-Driven Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yun-Xiang; Cong, Huai-Ping; Men, Yu-Long; Xin, Sen; Sun, Zheng-Qing; Liu, Chang-Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2015-11-24

    Inspired by natural photosynthesis, biomaterial-based catalysts are being confirmed to be excellent for visible-light-driven photocatalysis, but are far less well explored. Herein, an ultrathin and uniform biofilm fabricated from cold-plasma-assisted peptide self-assembly was employed to support Eosin Y (EY) and Pt nanoparticles to form an EY/Pt/Film catalyst for photocatalytic water splitting to H2 and photocatalytic CO2 reduction with water to CO, under irradiation of visible light. The H2 evolution rate on EY/Pt/Film is 62.1 μmol h(-1), which is about 5 times higher than that on Pt/EY and 1.5 times higher than that on the EY/Pt/TiO2 catalyst. EY/Pt/Film exhibits an enhanced CO evolution rate (19.4 μmol h(-1)), as compared with Pt/EY (2.8 μmol h(-1)) and EY/Pt/TiO2 (6.1 μmol h(-1)). The outstanding activity of EY/Pt/Film results from the unique flexibility of the biofilm for an efficient transfer of the photoinduced electrons. The present work is helpful for designing efficient biomaterial-based catalysts for visible-light-driven photocatalysis and for imitating natural photosynthesis.

  11. On comparison of SimTandem with state-of-the-art peptide identification tools, efficiency of precursor mass filter and dealing with variable modifications.

    PubMed

    Novák, Jiří; Sachsenberg, Timo; Hoksza, David; Skopal, Tomáš; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2013-11-14

    The similarity search in theoretical mass spectra generated from protein sequence databases is a widely accepted approach for identification of peptides from query mass spectra produced by shotgun proteomics. Growing protein sequence databases and noisy query spectra demand database indexing techniques and better similarity measures for the comparison of theoretical spectra against query spectra. We employ a modification of previously proposed parameterized Hausdorff distance for comparisons of mass spectra. The new distance outperforms the original distance, the angle distance and state-of-the-art peptide identification tools OMSSA and X!Tandem in the number of identified peptides even though the q-value is only 0.001. When a precursor mass filter is used as a database indexing technique, our method outperforms OMSSA in the speed of search. When variable modifications are not searched, the search time is similar to X!Tandem. We show that the precursor mass filter is an efficient database indexing technique for high-accuracy data even though many variable modifications are being searched. We demonstrate that the number of identified peptides is bigger when variable modifications are searched separately by more search runs of a peptide identification engine. Otherwise, the false discovery rates are affected by mixing unmodified and modified spectra together resulting in a lower number of identified peptides. Our method is implemented in the freely available application SimTandem which can be used in the framework TOPP based on OpenMS.

  12. Efficient production of active chicken avidin using a bacterial signal peptide in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Chicken avidin is a highly popular tool with countless applications in the life sciences. In the present study, an efficient method for producing avidin protein in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli in the active form is described. Avidin was produced by replacing the native signal sequence of the protein with a bacterial OmpA secretion signal. The yield after a single 2-iminobiotin–agarose affinity purification step was approx. 10 mg/l of virtually pure avidin. Purified avidin had 3.7 free biotin-binding sites per tetramer and showed the same biotin-binding affinity and thermal stability as egg-white avidin. Avidin crystallized under various conditions, which will enable X-ray crystallographic studies. Avidin produced in E. coli lacks the carbohydrate chains of chicken avidin and the absence of glycosylation should decrease the non-specific binding that avidin exhibits towards many materials [Rosebrough and Hartley (1996) J. Nucl. Med. 37, 1380–1384]. The present method provides a feasible and inexpensive alternative for the production of recombinant avidin, avidin mutants and avidin fusion proteins for novel avidin–biotin technology applications. PMID:15324300

  13. Efficient production of active chicken avidin using a bacterial signal peptide in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Laitinen, Olli H; Airenne, Tomi T; Kidron, Heidi; Meltola, Niko J; Porkka, Eevaleena J; Hörhä, Jarno; Paldanius, Tiina; Määttä, Juha A E; Nordlund, Henri R; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Airenne, Kari J; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Kulomaa, Markku S

    2004-12-01

    Chicken avidin is a highly popular tool with countless applications in the life sciences. In the present study, an efficient method for producing avidin protein in the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli in the active form is described. Avidin was produced by replacing the native signal sequence of the protein with a bacterial OmpA secretion signal. The yield after a single 2-iminobiotin-agarose affinity purification step was approx. 10 mg/l of virtually pure avidin. Purified avidin had 3.7 free biotin-binding sites per tetramer and showed the same biotin-binding affinity and thermal stability as egg-white avidin. Avidin crystallized under various conditions, which will enable X-ray crystallographic studies. Avidin produced in E. coli lacks the carbohydrate chains of chicken avidin and the absence of glycosylation should decrease the non-specific binding that avidin exhibits towards many materials [Rosebrough and Hartley (1996) J. Nucl. Med. 37, 1380-1384]. The present method provides a feasible and inexpensive alternative for the production of recombinant avidin, avidin mutants and avidin fusion proteins for novel avidin-biotin technology applications.

  14. Efficient sequence-directed psoralen targeting using pseudocomplementary Peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Fan, Xue-Jun; Nielsen, Peter E

    2007-01-01

    A pair of decameric pseudocomplementary PNAs which bind to their mixed purine-pyrimidine sequence target in duplex DNA by double duplex invasion has been synthesized with a derivative of 8-methoxypsoralen conjugated to one of the PNAs. It is shown that this pair of psoralen-conjugated pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers, which target a site in the pBluescriptKS+ vector, upon irradiation with long-wavelength UV light (UVA) with high efficiency and specificity form photoadducts to an adjacent 5'-TA site, and more than 50% of these adducts are DNA interstrand cross-links. Transcription elongation by T7 or T3 RNA polymerase is specifically arrested at the psoralen cross-linking site, yielding more than 90% arrested product. These results emphasize the potential of pseudocomplementary PNA oligomers for highly specific gene targeting, in particular, with respect to sequence-directed psoralen photomodification of double-stranded DNA. Thus, such psoralen-PNA conjugates could be very useful in a range of biology and drug discovery applications.

  15. A highly efficient route to enantiomerically pure l-N-Bz-Pmp(t-Bu)2-OH and incorporation into a peptide-based protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Caitlin E; Barrios, Amy M

    2008-01-15

    Phosphonomethyl phenylalanine (Pmp), a nonhydrolyzable mimic of phosphotyrosine, is an important building block in the development of peptide-based PTP inhibitors. We have designed a novel, efficient synthesis of N-Bz-Pmp(t-Bu)2-OH. A Pmp-containing peptide based on a known biological substrate of the tyrosine phosphatase CD45 (Ac-TEGQ-Pmp-QPQP-NH2) inhibits CD45 with an IC50 value of approximately 100 microM with virtually no inhibition of TCPTP up to concentrations of 120 microM.

  16. Optimization of encapsulation of a synthetic long peptide in PLGA nanoparticles: low-burst release is crucial for efficient CD8(+) T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silva, A L; Rosalia, R A; Sazak, A; Carstens, M G; Ossendorp, F; Oostendorp, J; Jiskoot, W

    2013-04-01

    Overlapping synthetic long peptides (SLPs) hold great promise for immunotherapy of cancer. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are being developed as delivery systems to improve the potency of peptide-based therapeutic cancer vaccines. Our aim was to optimize PLGA NP for SLP delivery with respect to encapsulation and release, using OVA24, a 24-residue long synthetic antigenic peptide covering a CTL epitope of ovalbumin (SIINFEKL), as a model antigen. Peptide-loaded PLGA NPs were prepared by a double emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. Using standard conditions (acidic inner aqueous phase), we observed that either encapsulation was very low (1-30%), or burst release extremely high (>70%) upon resuspension of NP in physiological buffers. By adjusting formulation and process parameters, we uncovered that the pH of the first emulsion was critical to efficient encapsulation and controlled release. In particular, an alkaline inner aqueous phase resulted in circa 330 nm sized NP with approximately 40% encapsulation efficiency and low (<10%) burst release. These NP showed enhanced MHC class I restricted T cell activation in vitro when compared to high-burst releasing NP and soluble OVA24, proving that efficient entrapment of the antigen is crucial to induce a potent cellular immune response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Peptide Cleavage-Based Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Biosensor with an Ingenious Two-Stage DNA Template for Highly Efficient DNA Exponential Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo

    2017-09-05

    The direct transduction of a peptide cleavage event into DNA detection has always produced output DNA with some amino acid residues, which influence the DNA amplification efficiency in view of their steric hindrance effect. Here an ingenious two-stage DNA template was designed to achieve highly efficient DNA amplification by utilizing the DNA exponential amplification reaction (EXPAR) as a model. The usage of a two-stage DNA template not only accomplished the traditionally inefficient EXPAR triggered by output DNA with some amino acid residues but also simultaneously produced a newly identical DNA trigger without any amino acid residues to induce an extra efficient EXPAR, which significantly improved the DNA amplification efficiency, realizing the ultrasensitive detection of the target. On the basis of the proposed highly efficient DNA amplification strategy, a novel peptide cleavage-based electrochemical biosensor was constructed to ultrasensitively detect matrix metalloproteinases-7 (MMP-7). As a result, this developed assay demonstrated excellent sensitivity with a linear range from 0.1 pg·mL(-1) to 50 ng·mL(-1) and a detection limit down to 0.02 pg·mL(-1), which paved a novel avenue for constructing ultrasensitive peptide cleavage-based biosensors.

  18. pH-Responsive Triblock Copolymeric Micelles Decorated with a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Provide Efficient Doxorubicin Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Khen Eng; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Katas, Haliza; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Butt, Adeel Masood; Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K.

    2016-12-01

    This study developed novel triblock pH-responsive polymeric micelles (PMs) using cholic acid-polyethyleneimine-poly- l-arginine (CA-PEI-pArg) copolymers. PEI provided pH sensitivity, while the hydrophilic cell-penetrating pArg peptide promoted cellular PM internalization. The copolymers self-assembled into PMs in aqueous solution at above the critical micelle concentration (2.98 × 10-7 M) and encapsulated doxorubicin in the core region, with a 34.2% ( w/ w) entrapment efficiency. PMs showed pH-dependent swelling, increasing in size by almost sevenfold from pH 7.4 to 5.0. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent, with about 65% released at pH 5.0, and 32% at pH 7.4. Cellular uptake, assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, was enhanced by using doxorubicin-loaded CA-PEI-pArg PMs, as compared to free doxorubicin and DOX-loaded CA-PEI PMs. Moreover, 24-h incubation of these PMs with a human breast cancer cell line produced greater cytotoxicity than free doxorubicin. These results indicate that pH-responsive CA-PEI-pArg micelles could provide a versatile delivery system for targeted cancer therapy using hydrophobic drugs.

  19. Design of embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acids that efficiently enter and accurately reactivate gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joy; Peterson, Kenneth R; Iancu-Rubin, Camelia; Bieker, James J

    2010-09-28

    Pharmacological treatments designed to reactivate fetal γ-globin can lead to an effective and successful clinical outcome in patients with hemoglobinopathies. However, new approaches remain highly desired because such treatments are not equally effective for all patients, and toxicity issues remain. We have taken a systematic approach to develop an embedded chimeric peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that effectively enters the cell and the nucleus, binds to its target site at the human fetal γ-globin promoter, and reactivates this transcript in adult transgenic mouse bone marrow and human primary peripheral blood cells. In vitro and in vivo DNA-binding assays in conjunction with live-cell imaging have been used to establish and optimize chimeric PNA design parameters that lead to successful gene activation. Our final molecule contains a specific γ-promoter-binding PNA sequence embedded within two amino acid motifs: one leads to efficient cell/nuclear entry, and the other generates transcriptional reactivation of the target. These embedded PNAs overcome previous limitations and are generally applicable to the design of in vivo transcriptional activation reagents that can be directed to any promoter region of interest and are of direct relevance to clinical applications that would benefit from such a need.

  20. A method for concentrating lipid peptide DNA and siRNA nanocomplexes that retains their structure and transfection efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tagalakis, Aristides D; Castellaro, Sara; Zhou, Haiyan; Bienemann, Alison; Munye, Mustafa M; McCarthy, David; White, Edward A; Hart, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Nonviral gene and small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery formulations are extensively used for biological and therapeutic research in cell culture experiments, but less so in in vivo and clinical research. Difficulties with formulating the nanoparticles for uniformity and stability at concentrations required for in vivo and clinical use are limiting their progression in these areas. Here, we report a simple but effective method of formulating monodisperse nanocomplexes from a ternary formulation of lipids, targeting peptides, and nucleic acids at a low starting concentration of 0.2 mg/mL of DNA, and we then increase their concentration up to 4.5 mg/mL by reverse dialysis against a concentrated polymer solution at room temperature. The nanocomplexes did not aggregate and they had maintained their biophysical properties, but, importantly, they also mediated DNA transfection and siRNA silencing in cultured cells. Moreover, concentrated anionic nanocomplexes administered by convection-enhanced delivery in the striatum showed efficient silencing of the β-secretase gene BACE1. This method of preparing nanocomplexes could probably be used to concentrate other nonviral formulations and may enable more widespread use of nanoparticles in vivo. PMID:25878500

  1. Which one among aspartyl protease, metallopeptidase, and artificial metallopeptidase is the most efficient catalyst in peptide hydrolysis?

    PubMed

    Bora, Ram Prasad; Barman, Arghya; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ozbil, Mehmet; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2010-08-26

    In this comparative DFT study, the hydrolysis of a peptide bond (Phe1-Phe2) by the following three types of catalysts has been studied: (1) beta-secretase (BACE2), (2) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), and (3) [Pd(H(2)O)(4)](2+) (I(MPC)) and [Pd(2)(mu-OH)([18]aneN(6))](3+) (I(DPC)). The computed energetics predict that among these catalysts, the Zn(2+) metal center containing MMP is the most efficient in catalyzing this reaction. The two active site aspartate residues containing BACE2 catalyze this reaction with 5.0 kcal/mol higher barrier than MMP. The substitution of a His ligand with Glu in the metal center of MMP generates the active site of IDE that catalyzes the reaction with a 6.9 kcal/mol higher barrier than MMP. Both artificial peptidases I(MPC) and I(DPC) catalyze this reaction with significantly high barriers of 35.4 and 31.0 kcal/mol, respectively. The computed energetics of all the catalysts are in line with the available experimental and theoretical data.

  2. Improving chemotherapeutic efficiency in acute myeloid leukemia treatments by chemically synthesized peptide interfering with CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojin; Guo, Hua; Duan, Hongyang; Yang, Yanlian; Meng, Jie; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chen; Xu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma can protect acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells against chemotherapeutic agents and provide anti-apoptosis and chemoresistance signals through secreting chemokine CXCL12 to activate its receptor CXCR4 on AML cells, resulting in minimal residual leukemia and relapse. Therefore disrupting the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis with antagonists is of great significance for improving chemosensitivity and decreasing relapse rate. In a previous study, we reported a novel synthetic peptide E5 with its remarkable effect on inhibiting CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated adhesion and migration of AML cells. Here we presented E5’s capacity of enhancing the therapeutic efficiency of various chemotherapeutics on AML in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that E5 can diminish bone marrow stromal cell-provided protection to leukemia cells, significantly increasing the apoptosis induced by various chemotherapeutics in multiple AML cell lines. In an AML mouse xenograft model, E5 induced 1.84-fold increase of circulating AML cells out of protective stroma niche. Combined with vincristine or cyclophosphamide, E5 inhibited infiltration of AML cells into bone marrow, liver and spleen, as well as prolonged the lifespan of AML mice compared with mice treated with chemotherapy alone. In addition, E5 presented no toxicity in vivo according to the histological analysis and routine clinical parameters of serum analysis. PMID:26538086

  3. Development of Nanoparticles Incorporating a Novel Liposomal Membrane Destabilization Peptide for Efficient Release of Cargos into Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohgita, Takashi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    In anti-cancer therapy mediated by a nanoparticle-based drug delivery system (DDS), overall efficacy depends on the release efficiency of cargos from the nanoparticles in the cancer cells as well as the specificity of delivery to tumor tissue. However, conventional liposome-based DDS have no mechanism for specifically releasing the encapsulated cargos inside the cancer cells. To overcome this barrier, we developed nanoparticles containing a novel liposomal membrane destabilization peptide (LMDP) that can destabilize membranes by cleavage with intramembranous proteases on/in cancer cells. Calcein encapsulated in liposomes modified with LMDP (LMDP-lipo) was effectively released in the presence of a membrane fraction containing an LMDP-cleavable protease. The release was inhibited by a protease inhibitor, suggesting that LMDP-lipo could effectively release its cargo into cells in response to a cancer-specific protease. Moreover, when LMDP-lipo contained fusogenic lipids, the release of cargo was accelerated, suggesting that the fusion of LMDP-lipo with cellular membranes was the initial step in the intracellular delivery. Time-lapse microscopic observations showed that the release of cargo from LMDP-lipo occurred immediately after association of LMDP-lipo with target cells. Consequently, LMDP-lipo could be a useful nanoparticle capable of effective release of cargos specifically into targeted cancer cells. PMID:25343714

  4. Branched oligomerization of cell-permeable peptides markedly enhances the transduction efficiency of adenovirus into mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, S-H; Doh, J; Park, S I; Lim, J Y; Kim, S M; Youn, J-I; Jin, H-T; Seo, S-H; Song, M-Y; Sung, S Y; Kim, M; Hwang, S J; Choi, J-M; Lee, S-K; Lee, H Y; Lim, C L; Chung, Y J; Yang, D; Kim, H-N; Lee, Z H; Choi, K Y; Jeun, S-S; Sung, Y C

    2010-08-01

    Cell-permeable peptides (CPPs) promote the transduction of nonpermissive cells by recombinant adenovirus (rAd) to improve the therapeutic efficacy of rAd. In this study, branched oligomerization of CPPs significantly enhanced the transduction of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by rAd in a CPP type-independent manner. In particular, tetrameric CPPs increased transduction efficiency at 3000-5000-fold lower concentrations than did monomeric CPPs. Although branched oligomerization of CPPs also increases cytotoxicity, optimal concentrations of tetrameric CPPs required for maximum transduction are at least 300-1000-fold lower than those causing 50% cytotoxicity. Furthermore, although only approximately 60% of MSCs were maximally transduced at 500 muM of monomeric CPPs, >95% of MSCs were transduced with 0.1 muM of tetrameric CPPs. Tetrameric CPPs also significantly increased the formation and net surface charge of CPP/rAd complexes, as well as the binding of rAd to cell membranes at a greater degree than did monomeric CPPs, followed by rapid internalization into MSCs. In a critical-size calvarial defect model, the inclusion of tetrameric CPPs in ex vivo transduction of rAd expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 into MSCs promoted highly mineralized bone formation. In addition, MSCs that were transduced with rAd expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the presence of tetrameric CPPs improved functional recovery in a spinal cord injury model. These results demonstrated the potential for tetrameric CPPs to provide an innovative tool for MSC-based gene therapy and for in vitro gene delivery to MSCs.

  5. MRUniNovo: an efficient tool for de novo peptide sequencing utilizing the hadoop distributed computing framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuang; Chen, Tao; He, Qiang; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Kenli

    2017-03-15

    Tandem mass spectrometry-based de novo peptide sequencing is a complex and time-consuming process. The current algorithms for de novo peptide sequencing cannot rapidly and thoroughly process large mass spectrometry datasets. In this paper, we propose MRUniNovo, a novel tool for parallel de novo peptide sequencing. MRUniNovo parallelizes UniNovo based on the Hadoop compute platform. Our experimental results demonstrate that MRUniNovo significantly reduces the computation time of de novo peptide sequencing without sacrificing the correctness and accuracy of the results, and thus can process very large datasets that UniNovo cannot. MRUniNovo is an open source software tool implemented in java. The source code and the parameter settings are available at http://bioinfo.hupo.org.cn/MRUniNovo/index.php. s131020002@hnu.edu.cn ; taochen1019@163.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. An efficient liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry approach for the optimization of the metabolic stability of therapeutic peptides.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Mele, Riccardo; Ingenito, Raffaele; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Bonelli, Fabio; Monteagudo, Edith; Orsatti, Laura

    2017-04-01

    In drug discovery, there is increasing interest in peptides as therapeutic agents due to several appealing characteristics that are typical of this class of compounds, including high target affinity, excellent selectivity, and low toxicity. However, peptides usually present also some challenging ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) issues such as limited metabolic stability, poor oral bioavailability, and short half-lives. In this context, early preclinical in vitro studies such as plasma metabolic stability assays are crucial to improve developability of a peptidic drug. In order to speed up the optimization of peptide metabolic stability, a strategy was developed for the integrated semi-quantitative determination of metabolic stability of peptides and qualitative identification/structural elucidation of their metabolites in preclinical plasma metabolic stability studies using liquid chromatography-high-resolution Orbitrap™ mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Sample preparation was based on protein precipitation: experimental conditions were optimized after evaluating and comparing different organic solvents in order to obtain an adequate extraction of the parent peptides and their metabolites and to minimize matrix effect. Peptides and their metabolites were analyzed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography: a template gradient (total run time, 6 min) was created to allow retention and good peak shape for peptides of different polarity and isoelectric points. Three LC columns were selected to be systematically evaluated for each series of peptides. Targeted and untargeted HRMS data were simultaneously acquired in positive full scan + data-dependent MS/MS acquisition mode, and then processed to calculate plasma half-life and to identify the major cleavage sites, this latter by using the software Biopharma Finder™. Finally, as an example of the application of this workflow, a study that shows the plasma stability improvement of a series of

  7. Efficient inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth by a synthetic peptide blocking S100A4-methionine aminopeptidase 2 interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochiya, Takahiro; Takenaga, Keizo; Asagiri, Masataka; Nakano, Kazumi; Satoh, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Toshiki; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Endo, Hideya

    2015-01-01

    The prometastatic calcium-binding protein, S100A4, is expressed in endothelial cells, and its downregulation markedly suppresses tumor angiogenesis in a xenograft cancer model. Given that endothelial S100A4 can be a molecular target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis, we addressed here whether synthetic peptide capable of blocking S100A4-effector protein interaction could be a novel antiangiogenic agent. To examine this hypothesis, we focused on the S100A4-binding domain of methionine aminopeptidase 2, an effector protein, which plays a role in endothelial cell growth. Overexpression of the domain in mouse endothelial MSS31 cells reduced DNA synthesis, and the corresponding synthetic peptide (named NBD) indeed interacted with S100A4 and inhibited capillary formation in vitro and new blood vessel formation in vivo. Intriguingly, a single intra-tumor administration of the NBD peptide in human prostate cancer xenografts significantly reduced vascularity, resulting in tumor regression. Mechanistically, the NBD peptide enhanced assembly of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments along with Ser1943 phosphorylation, stimulated formation of focal adhesions without phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, and provoked G1/S arrest of the cell cycle. Altogether, the NBD peptide is a potent inhibitor for tumor angiogenesis, and is the first example of an anticancer peptide drug developed on the basis of an endothelial S100A4-targeted strategy. PMID:26029719

  8. The ermC leader peptide: amino acid alterations leading to differential efficiency of induction by macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayford, M; Weisblum, B

    1990-01-01

    The inducibility of ermC by erythromycin, megalomicin, and celesticetin was tested with both wild-type ermC and several regulatory mutants altered in the 19-amino-acid-residue leader peptide, MGIFSIFVISTVHYQP NKK. In the model test system that was used, the ErmC methylase was translationally fused to beta-galactosidase. Mutational alterations that mapped in the interval encoding Phe-4 through Ile-9 of the leader peptide not only affected induction by individual antibiotics, but did so differentially. The subset of mutations that affected inducibility by the two macrolides erythromycin and megalomicin overlapped and were distinct from the subset of mutations that affected induction by celesticetin. These studies provide a model system for experimentally varying the relative efficiencies with which different antibiotics induce the expression of ermC. The possibility that antibiotics with inducing activity interact directly with the nascent leader peptide was tested by using a chemically synthesized decapeptide, MGIFSIFVIS--, attached at its C-terminus to a solid-phase support. This peptide, however, failed to bind erythromycin in vitro. PMID:2113911

  9. Statically Adsorbed Coatings for High Separation Efficiency and Resolution in CE-MS Peptide Analysis: Strategies and Implementation.

    PubMed

    Pattky, Martin; Barkovits, Katalin; Marcus, Katrin; Weiergräber, Oliver H; Huhn, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Coatings are necessary to prevent protein and peptide adsorption to the capillary surface and obtain high intermediate precision. In this protocol, we first present our basic strategy to address peptide separation using three different coatings: one neutral and two cationic coatings, the latter largely differing in their induced electroosmotic mobility. In detail, we will describe how we apply the statically adsorbed coatings to obtain very high plate numbers and high repeatability.With some model examples, we clearly describe the scope of the method for the analysis of peptide samples: tryptic digests are addressed as well as small glycoproteins and glycopeptides largely differing in their effective electrophoretic mobility. We also show that the method is suitable for a fast screening of peptide samples despite a high matrix load comprising of up to 500 mmol/L sodium chloride. We demonstrate that this basic CE-MS method is rather independent of the polarity of the analytes with a very fast near-baseline separation of very hydrophobic Aβ peptides related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. These examples will give an impression, which coating is most suitable for a specific analytical application.Special attention is paid to difficult aspects of the coating procedure and the CE-MS method, e.g., the potential of cross-contamination when changing the coatings.

  10. A Robust and Efficient Production and Purification Procedure of Recombinant Alzheimers Disease Methionine-Modified Amyloid-β Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hoarau, Marie; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter; Gras, Emmanuel; André, Isabelle; Remaud-Siméon, Magali

    2016-01-01

    An improved production and purification method for Alzheimer’s disease related methionine-modified amyloid-β 1–40 and 1–42 peptides is proposed, taking advantage of the formation of inclusion body in Escherichia coli. A Thioflavin-S assay was set-up to evaluate inclusion body formation during growth and optimize culture conditions for amyloid-β peptides production. A simple and fast purification protocol including first the isolation of the inclusion bodies and second, two cycles of high pH denaturation/ neutralization combined with an ultrafiltration step on 30-kDa cut-off membrane was established. Special attention was paid to purity monitoring based on a rational combination of UV spectrophotometry and SDS-PAGE analyses at the various stages of the process. It revealed that this chromatography-free protocol affords good yield of high quality peptides in term of purity. The resulting peptides were fully characterized and are appropriate models for highly reproducible in vitro aggregation studies. PMID:27532547

  11. Highly efficient purification of protein complexes from mammalian cells using a novel streptavidin-binding peptide and hexahistidine tandem tag system: Application to Bruton's tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yifeng; Franklin, Sarah; Zhang, Michael J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Tandem affinity purification (TAP) is a generic approach for the purification of protein complexes. The key advantage of TAP is the engineering of dual affinity tags that, when attached to the protein of interest, allow purification of the target protein along with its binding partners through two consecutive purification steps. The tandem tag used in the original method consists of two IgG-binding units of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (ProtA) and the calmodulin-binding peptide (CBP), and it allows for recovery of 20–30% of the bait protein in yeast. When applied to higher eukaryotes, however, this classical TAP tag suffers from low yields. To improve protein recovery in systems other than yeast, we describe herein the development of a three-tag system comprised of CBP, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP) and hexa-histidine. We illustrate the application of this approach for the purification of human Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), which results in highly efficient binding and elution of bait protein in both purification steps (>50% recovery). Combined with mass spectrometry for protein identification, this TAP strategy facilitated the first nonbiased analysis of Btk interacting proteins. The high efficiency of the SBP-His6 purification allows for efficient recovery of protein complexes formed with a target protein of interest from a small amount of starting material, enhancing the ability to detect low abundance and transient interactions in eukaryotic cell systems. PMID:21080425

  12. Impact of Thermostats on Folding and Aggregation Properties of Peptides Using the Optimized Potential for Efficient Structure Prediction Coarse-Grained Model.

    PubMed

    Spill, Yannick G; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2011-05-10

    The simulation of amyloid fibril formation is impossible if one takes into account all chemical details of the amino acids and their detailed interactions with the solvent. We investigate the folding and aggregation of two model peptides using the optimized potential for efficient structure prediction (OPEP) coarse-grained model and replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations coupled with either the Langevin or the Berendsen thermostat. For both the monomer of blocked penta-alanine and the trimer of the 25-35 fragment of the Alzheimer's amyloid β protein, we find little variations in the equilibrium structures and heat capacity curves using the two thermostats. Despite this high similarity, we detect significant differences in the populations of the dominant conformations at low temperatures, whereas the configurational distributions remain the same in proximity of the melting temperature. Aβ25-35 trimers at 300 K have an averaged β-sheet content of 12% and are primarily characterized by fully disordered peptides or a small curved two-stranded β-sheet stabilized by a disordered peptide. In addition, OPEP molecular dynamics simulations of Aβ25-35 hexamers at 300 K with a small curved six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet do not show any extension of the β-sheet content. These data support the idea that the mechanism of Aβ25-35 amyloid formation does not result from a high fraction of extended β-sheet-rich trimers and hexamers.

  13. Conjugation with RGD Peptides and Incorporation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Are Equally Efficient for Biofunctionalization of Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Antonova, Larisa V.; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Kutikhin, Anton G.; Sevostyanova, Victoria V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mironov, Andrey V.; Shabaev, Amin R.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Senokosova, Evgeniya A.; Vasyukov, Georgiy Yu.; Krivkina, Evgeniya O.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Barbarash, Leonid S.

    2016-01-01

    The blend of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) has recently been considered promising for vascular tissue engineering. However, it was shown that PHBV/PCL grafts require biofunctionalization to achieve high primary patency rate. Here we compared immobilization of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD)-containing peptides and the incorporation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as two widely established biofunctionalization approaches. Electrospun PHBV/PCL small-diameter grafts with either RGD peptides or VEGF, as well as unmodified grafts were implanted into rat abdominal aortas for 1, 3, 6, and 12 months following histological and immunofluorescence assessment. We detected CD31+/CD34+/vWF+ cells 1 and 3 months postimplantation at the luminal surface of PHBV/PCL/RGD and PHBV/PCL/VEGF, but not in unmodified grafts, with the further observation of CD31+CD34−vWF+ phenotype. These cells were considered as endothelial and produced a collagen-positive layer resembling a basement membrane. Detection of CD31+/CD34+ cells at the early stages with subsequent loss of CD34 indicated cell adhesion from the bloodstream. Therefore, either conjugation with RGD peptides or the incorporation of VEGF promoted the formation of a functional endothelial cell layer. Furthermore, both modifications increased primary patency rate three-fold. In conclusion, both of these biofunctionalization approaches can be considered as equally efficient for the modification of tissue-engineered vascular grafts. PMID:27854352

  14. Design of a peptide-based vector, PepFect6, for efficient delivery of siRNA in cell culture and systemically in vivo

    PubMed Central

    EL Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; Mäger, Imre; Rosenthal-Aizman, Katri; Oprea, Iulian I.; Simonson, Oscar E.; Sork, Helena; Ezzat, Kariem; Copolovici, Dana M.; Kurrikoff, Kaido; Viola, Joana R.; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Sillard, Rannar; Johansson, Henrik J.; Said Hassane, Fatouma; Guterstam, Peter; Suhorutšenko, Julia; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Oskolkov, Nikita; Hälldin, Jonas; Tedebark, Ulf; Metspalu, Andres; Lebleu, Bernard; Lehtiö, Janne; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Langel, Ülo

    2011-01-01

    While small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been rapidly appreciated to silence genes, efficient and non-toxic vectors for primary cells and for systemic in vivo delivery are lacking. Several siRNA-delivery vehicles, including cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), have been developed but their utility is often restricted by entrapment following endocytosis. Hence, developing CPPs that promote endosomal escape is a prerequisite for successful siRNA implementation. We here present a novel CPP, PepFect 6 (PF6), comprising the previously reported stearyl-TP10 peptide, having pH titratable trifluoromethylquinoline moieties covalently incorporated to facilitate endosomal release. Stable PF6/siRNA nanoparticles enter entire cell populations and rapidly promote endosomal escape, resulting in robust RNAi responses in various cell types (including primary cells), with minimal associated transcriptomic or proteomic changes. Furthermore, PF6-mediated delivery is independent of cell confluence and, in most cases, not significantly hampered by serum proteins. Finally, these nanoparticles promote strong RNAi responses in different organs following systemic delivery in mice without any associated toxicity. Strikingly, similar knockdown in liver is achieved by PF6/siRNA nanoparticles and siRNA injected by hydrodynamic infusion, a golden standard technique for liver transfection. These results imply that the peptide, in addition to having utility for RNAi screens in vitro, displays therapeutic potential. PMID:21245043

  15. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michelle W; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration-dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in dissociation efficiency and kinetics of peptide ions induced by basic residues and their mechanistic implication.

    PubMed

    Yoon, So Hee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2011-02-01

    With matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, total abundance of product ions formed by dissociation inside (in-source decay, ISD) and outside (post-source decay, PSD) the source was measured for peptide ions [Y(5)X + H](+), [XY(5) + H](+), [Y 2)XY(3) + H](+), and [XY(4)X + H](+) (X = tyrosine (Y), histidine (H), lysine (K), and arginine (R) with H for the ionizing proton). α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinammic acid was used as matrix. Product abundance became smaller in the presence of basic residues (H, K, and R), in the order Y > H ≈ K > R. In particular, product abundances in ISD of peptide ions with R were smaller than those with H or K by an order of magnitude, which, in turn, were smaller than that for [Y(6) + H](+) by an order of magnitude. Product abundance was affected by the most basic residue when more than one basic residue was present. A kinetic explanation for the data was attempted under the assumption of quasi-thermal equilibrium for peptide ions in MALDI plume which undergoes expansion cooling. Dramatic disparity in product abundance was found to arise from small difference in critical energy and entropy. Results indicate similar transition structures regardless of basic residues present, where the ionizing proton keeps interacting with a basic site. Further implication of the results on the dissociation mechanism along b-y channels is discussed.

  17. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  18. SecA alone can promote protein translocation and ion channel activity: SecYEG increases efficiency and signal peptide specificity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ying-hsin; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Bor-ruei; Cui, Ningren; Na, Bing; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C

    2011-12-30

    SecA is an essential component of the Sec-dependent protein translocation pathway across cytoplasmic membranes in bacteria. Escherichia coli SecA binds to cytoplasmic membranes at SecYEG high affinity sites and at phospholipid low affinity sites. It has been widely viewed that SecYEG functions as the essential protein-conducting channel through which precursors cross the membranes in bacterial Sec-dependent pathways, and that SecA functions as a motor to hydrolyze ATP in translocating precursors through SecYEG channels. We have now found that SecA alone can promote precursor translocation into phospholiposomes. Moreover, SecA-liposomes elicit ionic currents in Xenopus oocytes. Patch-clamp recordings further show that SecA alone promotes signal peptide- or precursor-dependent single channel activity. These activities were observed with the functional SecA at about 1-2 μM. The results show that SecA alone is sufficient to promote protein translocation into liposomes and to elicit ionic channel activity at the phospholipids low affinity binding sites, thus indicating that SecA is able to form the protein-conducting channels. Even so, such SecA-liposomes are less efficient than those with a full complement of Sec proteins, and lose the signal-peptide proofreading function, resembling the effects of PrlA mutations. Addition of purified SecYEG restores the signal peptide specificity and increases protein translocation and ion channel activities. These data show that SecA can promote protein translocation and ion channel activities both when it is bound to lipids at low affinity sites and when it is bound to SecYEG with high affinity. The latter of the two interactions confers high efficiency and specificity.

  19. Pip5 Transduction Peptides Direct High Efficiency Oligonucleotide-mediated Dystrophin Exon Skipping in Heart and Phenotypic Correction in mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yin, HaiFang; Saleh, Amer F; Betts, Corinne; Camelliti, Patrizia; Seow, Yiqi; Ashraf, Shirin; Arzumanov, Andrey; Hammond, Suzan; Merritt, Thomas; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA

    2011-01-01

    Induced splice modulation of pre-mRNAs shows promise to correct aberrant disease transcripts and restore functional protein and thus has therapeutic potential. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) results from mutations that disrupt the DMD gene open reading frame causing an absence of dystrophin protein. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping has been shown to restore functional dystrophin in mdx mice and DMD patients treated intramuscularly in two recent phase 1 clinical trials. Critical to the therapeutic success of AO-based treatment will be the ability to deliver AOs systemically to all affected tissues including the heart. Here, we report identification of a series of transduction peptides (Pip5) as AO conjugates for enhanced systemic and particularly cardiac delivery. One of the lead peptide-AO conjugates, Pip5e-AO, showed highly efficient exon skipping and dystrophin production in mdx mice with complete correction of the aberrant DMD transcript in heart, leading to >50% of the normal level of dystrophin in heart. Mechanistic studies indicated that the enhanced activity of Pip5e-phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO) is partly explained by more efficient nuclear delivery. Pip5 series derivatives therefore have significant potential for advancing the development of exon skipping therapies for DMD and may have application for enhanced cardiac delivery of other biotherapeutics. PMID:21505427

  20. Bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid dendrimers self-assembled from low-generation peptide dendrons for highly efficient gene delivery and biological tracking.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xianghui; Jian, Yeting; Li, Yunkun; Zhang, Xiao; Tu, Zhaoxu; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-09-23

    Currently, supramolecular self-assembly of dendrons and dendrimers emerges as a powerful and challenging strategy for developing sophisticated nanostructures with excellent performances. Here we report a supramolecular hybrid strategy to fabricate a bio-inspired dendritic system as a versatile delivery nanoplatform. With a rational design, dual-functionalized low-generation peptide dendrons (PDs) self-assemble onto inorganic nanoparticles via coordination interactions to generate multifunctional supramolecular hybrid dendrimers (SHDs). These SHDs exhibit well-defined nanostructure, arginine-rich peptide corona, and fluorescent signaling properties. As expected, our bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid strategy largely enhances the gene transfection efficiency of SHDs approximately 50 000-fold as compared to single PDs at the same R/P ratio. Meanwhile the bio-inspired SHDs also (i) provide low cytotoxicity and serum resistance in gene delivery; (ii) provide inherent fluorescence for tracking intracellular pathways including cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and gene release; and (iii) work as an alternative reference for monitoring desired protein expression. More importantly, in vivo animal experiments demonstrate that SHDs offer considerable gene transfection efficiency (in muscular tissue and in HepG2 tumor xenografts) and real-time bioimaging capabilities. These SHDs will likely stimulate studies on bio-inspired supramolecular hybrid dendritic systems for biomedical applications both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Coupling of a bifunctional peptide R13 to OTMCS-PEI copolymer as a gene vector increases transfection efficiency and tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Kewu; Zhu, Manman; Zhao, Wenfang; Mao, Yuan; Liu, Kehai

    2014-01-01

    A degradable polyethylenimine (PEI) derivative coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 was developed to solve the transfection efficiency versus cytotoxicity and tumor-targeting problems of PEI when used as a gene vector. We crossed-linked low molecular weight PEI with N-octyl-N-quaternary chitosan (OTMCS) to synthesize a degradable PEI derivative (OTMCS-PEI), and then used a bifunctional peptide, RGDC-TAT (49-57) called R13 to modify OTMCS-PEI so as to prepare a new gene vector, OTMCS-PEI-R13. This new gene vector was characterized by various physicochemical methods. Its cytotoxicity and gene transfection efficiency were also determined both in vitro and in vivo. The vector showed controlled degradation and excellent buffering capacity. The particle size of the OTMCS-PEI-R13/DNA complexes was around 150-250 nm and the zeta potential ranged from 10 mV to 30 mV. The polymer could protect plasmid DNA from being digested by DNase I at a concentration of 23.5 U DNase I/μg DNA. Further, the polymer was resistant to dissociation induced by 50% fetal bovine serum and 400 μg/mL sodium heparin. Compared with PEI 25 kDa, the OTMCS-PEI-R13/DNA complexes showed higher transfection efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Further, compared with OTMCS-PEI, distribution of OTMCS-PEI-R13 at tumor sites was markedly enhanced, indicating the tumor-targeting specificity of R13. OTMCS-PEI-R13 could be a potential candidate as a safe and efficient gene delivery carrier for gene therapy.

  2. Coupling of a bifunctional peptide R13 to OTMCS-PEI copolymer as a gene vector increases transfection efficiency and tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Hui; Zhu, Qing; Liu, Kewu; Zhu, Manman; Zhao, Wenfang; Mao, Yuan; Liu, Kehai

    2014-01-01

    Background A degradable polyethylenimine (PEI) derivative coupled to a bifunctional peptide R13 was developed to solve the transfection efficiency versus cytotoxicity and tumor-targeting problems of PEI when used as a gene vector. Methods We crossed-linked low molecular weight PEI with N-octyl-N-quaternary chitosan (OTMCS) to synthesize a degradable PEI derivative (OTMCS-PEI), and then used a bifunctional peptide, RGDC-TAT (49–57) called R13 to modify OTMCS-PEI so as to prepare a new gene vector, OTMCS-PEI-R13. This new gene vector was characterized by various physicochemical methods. Its cytotoxicity and gene transfection efficiency were also determined both in vitro and in vivo. Results The vector showed controlled degradation and excellent buffering capacity. The particle size of the OTMCS-PEI-R13/DNA complexes was around 150–250 nm and the zeta potential ranged from 10 mV to 30 mV. The polymer could protect plasmid DNA from being digested by DNase I at a concentration of 23.5 U DNase I/μg DNA. Further, the polymer was resistant to dissociation induced by 50% fetal bovine serum and 400 μg/mL sodium heparin. Compared with PEI 25 kDa, the OTMCS-PEI-R13/DNA complexes showed higher transfection efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Further, compared with OTMCS-PEI, distribution of OTMCS-PEI-R13 at tumor sites was markedly enhanced, indicating the tumor-targeting specificity of R13. Conclusion OTMCS-PEI-R13 could be a potential candidate as a safe and efficient gene delivery carrier for gene therapy. PMID:24648730

  3. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  4. Production and characterization of two major Aspergillus oryzae secreted prolyl endopeptidases able to efficiently digest proline-rich peptides of gliadin.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Philippe J; Salamin, Karine; Grouzmann, Eric; Monod, Michel

    2015-12-01

    Prolyl endopeptidases are key enzymes in the digestion of proline-rich proteins. Fungal extracts rich in prolyl endopeptidases produced by a species such as Aspergillus oryzae used in food fermentation would be of particular interest for the development of an oral enzyme therapy product in patients affected by intolerance to gluten. Two major A. oryzae secreted prolyl endopeptidases of the MEROPS S28 peptidase family, AoS28A and AoS28B, were identified when this fungus was grown at acidic pH in a medium containing soy meal protein or wheat gliadin as the sole source of nitrogen. AoS28B was produced by 12 reference A. oryzae strains used in food fermentation. AoS28A was secreted by six of these 12 strains. This protease is the orthologue of the previously characterized Aspergillus fumigatus (AfuS28) and Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP) prolyl endopeptidases which are encoded by genes with a similar intron-exon structure. Large amounts of secreted AoS28A and AoS28B were obtained by gene overexpression in A. oryzae. AoS28A and AoS28B are endoproteases able to cleave N-terminally blocked proline substrates. Both enzymes very efficiently digested the proline-rich 33-mer of gliadin, the most representative immunotoxic peptide deriving from gliadin, with some differences in terms of specificity and optimal pH. Digestion of the gliadin peptide in short peptides with both enzymes was found to occur from its N terminus.

  5. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  6. Antiplatelet Aggregation and Antithrombosis Efficiency of Peptides in the Snake Venom of Deinagkistrodon acutus: Isolation, Identification, and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Xu, Zhenghong; Qian, Chaodong; Jiang, Fusheng; Ding, Xinghong; Ruan, Yeping; Ding, Zhishan; Fan, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two peptides of Pt-A (Glu-Asn-Trp 429 Da) and Pt-B (Glu-Gln-Trp 443 Da) were isolated from venom liquor of Deinagkistrodon acutus. Their antiplatelet aggregation effects were evaluated with platelet-rich human plasma in vitro; the respective IC50 of Pt-A and Pt-B was 66 μM and 203 μM. Both peptides exhibited protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis in mice. After ADP administration, the paralysis time of different concentration of Pt-A and Pt-B lasted as the following: 80 mg/kg Pt-B (152.8 ± 57.8 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-A (163.5 ± 59.8 s) < 20 mg/kg Pt-A (253.5 ± 74.5 s) < 4 mg/kg clopidogrel (a positive control, 254.5 ± 41.97 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-B (400.8 ± 35.9 s) < 10 mg/kg Pt-A (422.8 ± 55.4 s), all of which were statistically shorter than the saline treatment (666 ± 28 s). Pulmonary tissue biopsy confirmed that Pt-A and Pt-B prevented the formation of thrombi in the lung. Unlike ADP injection alone, which caused significant reduction of peripheral platelet count, Pt-A treatment prevented the drop of peripheral platelet counts; interestingly, Pt-B could not, even though the same amount of Pt-B also showed protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis and thrombosis. More importantly, intravenous injection of Pt-A and Pt-B did not significantly increase the hemorrhage risks as clopidogrel.

  7. Effects of the peptide mycotoxin destruxin E on insect haemocytes and on dynamics and efficiency of the multicellular immune reaction.

    PubMed

    Vey, Alain; Matha, Vladimir; Dumas, Christiane

    2002-07-01

    Destruxins (DTXs) are cyclic peptide toxins secreted by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae var. anisopliae. The effects of DTX E, the most active compound of this family on haemocytes, the immunocompetent insect cells, and on the dynamics and efficacy of the multicellular defense of insect hosts have been investigated. Ultrastructural alterations have been observed in circulating plasmatocytes and granular haemocytes, and in attached haemocytes of Galleria mellonella larvae treated with a toxic dose of DTX E (LC50). These changes appear as a consequence of disturbances induced in the cellular calcium balance. An effect on the cell surface of granulocytes was also noted in cells incubated with the toxin and FITC-Con A, even when the concentration of DTX was as low as 0.005 microg/ml. Morphological studies of haemocytic capsules formed in vivo revealed disturbances of the multicellular defense mechanism after toxin treatment However, an attempt to establish if these changes were significant was unsuccessful. In contrast, comparative assays regarding the effect of toxin treatment on the efficacy of the antifungal effect of encapsulation has given conclusive results. The germination of injected Aspergillus niger spores became slightly but significantly increased, and when the granuloma were incubated the fungus escaped more easily from the haemocytic envelope. These results are discussed in terms of significance of the contribution of DTXs to the fungal infection process. It is suggested that the fungal peptides may intervene during the disease by a true immune-inhibitory effect occurring at doses which do not cause paralysis or any general sign of toxicity (e.g., 0.8 microg/g of body weight).

  8. Selective encapsulation of cesium ions using the cyclic peptide moiety of surfactin: Highly efficient removal based on an aqueous giant micellar system.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toshiaki; Yanagisawa, Satohiro; Nagano, Takuto; Zhu, Yanbei; Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Koumura, Nagatoshi; Kitamoto, Dai; Imura, Tomohiro

    2015-10-01

    Cyclic peptide of surfactin (SF) is one of the promising environment-friendly biosurfactants abundantly produced by microorganisms such as Bacillus subtilis. SF is also known to act as an ionophore, wherein alkali metal ions can be trapped in the cyclic peptide. Especially, SF is expected to show high affinity for Cs(+) because of the distinctive cavity size and coordination number. In this study, we reported the specific interaction between SF and Cs(+) and succeeded in the highly efficient removal of Cs(+) from water using giant SF micelles as a natural sorbent. The specific interaction between SF and Cs(+) to form their inclusion complex was revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. We found that SF micelles selectively encapsulate Cs(+), which was suggested by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS). A highly effective separation of Cs(+) immobilized on the surface of the SF micelles was also achieved through facile centrifugal ultrafiltration in 91% even in coexisting with other alkali metal ions such as Na(+) and K(+). Thus, the use of the giant micellar system of SF with its high Cs(+) affinity and distinctive assembling properties would be a new approach for the treatment of contaminated soil and water.

  9. Potential of prodendronic polyamines with modulated segmental charge density as novel coating for fast and efficient analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE and CE-MS.

    PubMed

    Acunha, Tanize; Ibáñez, Clara; Pascual Reguera, María Isabel; Sarò, Mariagiovanna; Navarro, Rodrigo; Alfonso Redondo, Juan; Reinecke, Helmut; Gallardo, Alberto; Simó, Carolina; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the suitability of a new polymer family has been investigated as capillary coatings for the analysis of peptides and basic proteins by CE. This polymer family has been designed to minimize or completely prevent protein-capillary wall interactions and to modify the EOF. These coating materials are linear polymeric chains bearing as side cationizable moiety a dentronic triamine derived from N,N,N',N'-tetraethyldiethylenetriamine (TEDETA), which is linked to the backbone through a spacer (unit labeled as TEDETAMA). Four different polymers have been prepared and evaluated: a homopolymer which comprised only of those cationizable repetitive units of TEDETAMA, and three copolymers that randomly incorporate TEDETAMA together with neutral hydrosoluble units of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) at different molar percentages (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25). It has been demonstrated that the composition of the copolymers influences the EOF and therefore the separation of the investigated biopolymers. Among the novel polymers studied, poly-(TEDETAMA-co-HPMA) 50:50 copolymer was successfully applied as coating material of the inner capillary surface in CE-UV and CE-MS, providing EOF reversing together with fast and efficient baseline separation of peptides and basic proteins. Finally, the feasibility of the polymer-coated capillary was shown through the analysis of lysozyme in a cheese sample. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Efficient therapeutic delivery by a novel cell-permeant peptide derived from KDM4A protein for antitumor and antifibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiao; Qin, Yan-Yan; Zhao, Xue-Li; Wang, Jun; Zou, Li-Li; Wu, Jiang-Feng; Li, Jun-Ming; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) based delivery have provided immense potential for the therapeutic applications, however, most of nonhuman originated CPPs carry the risk of possible cytotoxicity and immunogenicity, thus may restricting to be used. Here, we describe a novel human-derived CPP, denoted hPP10, and hPP10 has cell-penetrating properties evaluated by CellPPD web server, as well as In-Vitro and In-Vivo analysis. In vitro studies showed that hPP10-FITC was able to penetrate into various cells including primary cultured cells, likely through an endocytosis pathway. And functionalized macromolecules, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), tumor-specific apoptosis inducer Apoptin as well as biological active enzyme GCLC (Glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit) can be delivered by hPP10 in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our results suggest that hPP10 provide a novel and versatile tool to deliver exogenous proteins or drugs for clinical applications as well as reprogrammed cell-based therapy. PMID:27081693

  11. Efficient Production of a Bioactive Bevacizumab Monoclonal Antibody Using the 2A Self-cleavage Peptide in Transgenic Rice Callus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Da; Yu, Weichang

    2016-01-01

    Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has been widely used in clinical practice for the treatment of multiple cancers. Bevacizumab was mostly produced by the mammalian cell expression system. We here reported the first plant-derived Bevacizumab by using transgenic rice callus as an alternative gene expression system. Codon-optimized Bevacizumab light chain (BLC) and Bevacizumab heavy chain (BHC) genes were designed, synthesized as a polyprotein with a 2A self-cleavage linker peptide from the Foot-and-mouth disease virus, cloned into a plant binary vector under a constitutive maize ubiquitin promoter, and transformed into rice nuclear genome through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Southern blot and western blot analyses confirmed the integration and expression of BLC and BHC genes in transgenic rice callus. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that the rice-derived Bevacizumab mAb was biologically active and the recombinant mAb was expressed at high levels (160.7–242.8 mg/Kg) in transgenic rice callus. The mAb was purified by using protein A affinity chromatography and the purified antibody was tested for its binding affinity with its target human VEGF (hVEGF) antigen by ELISA. Rice callus produced Bevacizumab and a commercial Bevacizumab (Avastin) were shown to have similar binding affinity to hVEGF. These results indicated that rice callus produced Bevacizumab could have similar biological activity and might potentially be used as a cost-effective biosimilar molecule in future cancer treatment. PMID:27555853

  12. Enhanced Digestion Efficiency, Peptide Ionization Efficiency, and Sequence Resolution for Protein Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Monitored by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui-Min; Kazazic, Saša; Schaub, Tanner M.; Tipton, Jeremiah D.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2009-01-01

    Solution-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) monitored by high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry offers a rapid method to study protein conformations and protein-protein interactions. Pepsin is usually used to digest proteins in HDX and is known as lack of cleavage specificity. To improve digestion efficiency and specificity, we have optimized digestion conditions and cleavage preferences for pepsin and protease type XIII from Aspergillus saitoi. A dilution series of the proteases was used to determine the digestion efficiency for several test proteins. Protease type XIII prefers to cleave on the C-terminal end of basic amino acids and produced the highest number of fragments and the best sequence coverage compared to pepsin or protease type XVIII from Rhizhopus. Furthermore, protease type XIII exhibited much less self-digestion than pepsin, and thus is superior for HDX experiments. Many highly overlapped segments from protease type XIII and pepsin digestion, combined with high-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry, provide high sequence resolution (to as few as one or two amino acids) for the assignment of amide hydrogen exchange rate. Our H/D exchange results correlate well with the secondary and tertiary structure of myoglobin. Such assignments of highly overlapped fragments promise to greatly enhance the accuracy and sequence resolution for determining conformational differences resulting from ligand binding or protein-protein interactions. PMID:19551977

  13. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-07-01

    Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within discrete intracellular compartments. Mitoparan (INLKKLAKL(Aib)KKIL), for example, specifically accumulated

  14. Efficiency of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Directed PCR Clamping and Its Application in the Investigation of Natural Diets of the Japanese Eel Leptocephali

    PubMed Central

    Terahara, Takeshi; Chow, Seinen; Kurogi, Hiroaki; Lee, Sun-Hee; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Mochioka, Noritaka; Tanaka, Hideki; Takeyama, Haruko

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-clamping using blocking primer and DNA-analogs, such as peptide nucleotide acid (PNA), may be used to selectively amplify target DNA for molecular diet analysis. We investigated PCR-clamping efficiency by studying PNA position and mismatch with complementary DNA by designing PNAs at five different positions on the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer 1 of the Japanese eel Anguilla japonica in association with intra-specific nucleotide substitutions. All five PNAs were observed to efficiently inhibit amplification of a fully complementary DNA template. One mismatch between PNA and template DNA inhibited amplification of the template DNA, while two or more mismatches did not. DNA samples extracted from dorsal muscle and intestine of eight wild-caught leptochephalus larvae were subjected to this analysis, followed by cloning, nucleotide sequence analysis, and database homology search. Among 12 sequence types obtained from the intestine sample, six were identified as fungi. No sequence similarities were found in the database for the remaining six types, which were not related to one another. These results, in conjunction with our laboratory observations on larval feeding, suggest that eel leptocephali may not be dependent upon living plankton for their food source. PMID:22069444

  15. An N-terminal peptide extension results in efficient expression, but not secretion, of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mihaly; Burbridge, Emma; Brock, Ian W; Heggie, Laura; Dix, Philip J; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2004-03-01

    Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N-terminal or the C-terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV-35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO-SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N- and C-terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild-type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N-terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C-terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N-terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been generated with greatly elevated cytosolic peroxidase activity, and smaller increases in apoplastic

  16. Microchip bioreactors based on trypsin-immobilized graphene oxide-poly(urea-formaldehyde) composite coating for efficient peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Fan, Huizhi; Yao, Feina; Xu, Shuyuan; Chen, Gang

    2013-12-15

    Trypsin was covalently immobilized to graphene oxide (GO)-poly(urea-formaldehyde) (PUF) composite coated on the channel wall of poly(methyl methacrylate) microchips to fabricate microfluidic bioreactors for highly efficient proteolysis. A mixture solution containing urea-formaldehyde prepolymer and GO nanosheets was allowed to flow through the channels. The modification layer on the channel wall could further polycondense to form GO-PUF composite coating in the presence of ammonium chloride. The primary amino groups of trypsin could react with the carboxyl groups of the GO sheets in the coating with the aid of carboxyl activating agents to realize covalent immobilization. The feasibility and performance of the novel GO-based microchip bioreactors were demonstrated by the digestion of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, and myoglobin. The digestion time was significantly reduced to less than 5s. The obtained digests were identified by MALDI-TOF MS with satisfactory sequence coverages that were comparable to those obtained by using 12-h in-solution digestion. The present proteolysis strategy is simple and efficient, offering great promise for high-throughput protein identification. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Non-classical nuclear localization signal peptides for high efficiency lipofection of primary neurons and neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ma, H; Zhu, J; Maronski, M; Kotzbauer, P T; Lee, V M-Y; Dichter, M A; Diamond, S L

    2002-01-01

    Gene transfer into CNS is critical for potential therapeutic applications as well as for the study of the genetic basis of neural development and nerve function. Unfortunately, lipid-based gene transfer to CNS cells is extremely inefficient since the nucleus of these post-mitotic cells presents a significant barrier to transfection. We report the development of a simple and highly efficient lipofection method for primary embryonic rat hippocampal neurons (up to 25% transfection) that exploits the M9 sequence of the non-classical nuclear localization signal of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 for targeting beta(2)-karyopherin (transportin-1). M9-assistant lipofection resulted in 20-100-fold enhancement of transfection over lipofection alone for embryonic-derived retinal ganglion cells, rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells, embryonic rat ventral mesencephalon neurons, as well as the clinically relevant human NT2 cells or retinoic acid-differentiated NT2 neurons. This technique can facilitate the implementation of promoter construct experiments in post-mitotic cells, stable transformant generation, and dominant-negative mutant expression techniques in CNS cells.

  18. Deuterohemin-Peptide Enzyme Mimic-Embedded Metal-Organic Frameworks through Biomimetic Mineralization with Efficient ATRP Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xinghuo; Chen, Jiawen; Liu, Ying; Han, Haobo; Ding, Yi; Li, Quanshun; Tang, Jun

    2017-08-16

    An enzyme mimic harboring iron porphyrin (DhHP-6) embedded in zeolite imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) was constructed through a biomimetic mineralization approach to obtain composite DhHP-6@ZIF-8. The composite was then used as a catalyst in the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA500) in which poly(PEGMA500) could be synthesized with monomer conversion of 76.1% and Mn of 45 900 g/mol, stronger than that obtained when using free DhHP-6 as a catalyst. More importantly, it could efficiently overcome the drawbacks of free DhHP-6 and achieve the easy separation of DhHP-6 from the catalytic system and the elimination of iron residues in the synthesized polymer. In addition, it exhibited an enhanced recyclability with monomer conversion of 75.7% after five cycles and favorable stability during the ATRP reaction with <3.0% of DhHP-6 release within 100 h. Thus, the enzyme mimic-ZIF-8 composite developed through biomimetic mineralization can be potentially used as an effective catalyst for preparing well-defined polymers with biomedical applications.

  19. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the 'holy grail' in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters.

  20. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  1. Efficient Eradication of Mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm via Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide Combined with Antimicrobial Peptide and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hang; Wu, Jianfeng; Colletta, Alessandro; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Xi, Chuanwu

    2016-01-01

    Fast eradication of mature biofilms is the ‘holy grail’ in the clinical management of device-related infections. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO) produced by macrophages plays an important role in host defense against intracellular pathogens, and NO is a promising agent in preventing biofilms formation in vitro. However, the rate of delivery of NO by various NO donors (e.g., diazeniumdiolates, S-nitrosothiols, etc.) is difficult to control, which hinders fundamental studies aimed at understanding the role of NO in biofilm control. In this study, by using a novel precisely controlled electrochemical NO releasing catheter device, we examine the effect of physiological levels of NO on eradicating mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm (7 days), as well as the potential application of the combination of NO with antimicrobial agents. It is shown that physiological levels of NO exhibit mixed effects of killing bacteria and dispersing ambient biofilm. The overall biofilm-eradicating effect of NO is quite efficient in a dose-dependent manner over a 3 h period of NO treatment. Moreover, NO also greatly enhances the efficacy of antimicrobial agents, including human beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) and several antibiotics, in eradicating biofilm and its detached cells, which otherwise exhibited high recalcitrance to these antimicrobial agents. The electrochemical NO release technology offers a powerful tool in evaluating the role of NO in biofilm control as well as a promising approach when combined with antimicrobial agents to treat biofilm-associated infections in hospital settings, especially infections resulting from intravascular catheters. PMID:27582732

  2. Designing an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine against Vibrio cholerae via combined immunoinformatics and protein interaction based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Karimi, Zeinab; Eslami, Mahboobeh; Mohkam, Milad; Zandian, Sanam; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a major global health concern. Among different Vibrio cholerae strains, only O1 and O139 cause acute diarrheal diseases that are related to epidemic and pandemic outbreaks. The currently available cholera vaccines are mainly lived and attenuated vaccines consisting of V. cholerae virulence factors such as toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), outer membrane proteins (Omps), and nontoxic cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). Nowadays, there is a great interest in designing an efficient epitope vaccine against cholera. Epitope vaccines consisting of immunodominant epitopes and adjuvant molecules enhance the possibility of inciting potent protective immunity. In this study, V. cholerae protective antigens (OmpW, OmpU, TcpA and TcpF) and the CTB, which is broadly used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant, were analyzed using different bioinformatics and immunoinformatics tools. The common regions between promiscuous epitopes, binding to various HLA-II supertype alleles, and B-cell epitopes were defined based upon the aforementioned protective antigens. The ultimately selected epitopes and CTB adjuvant were fused together using proper GPGPG linkers to enhance vaccine immunogenicity. A three-dimensional model of the thus constructed vaccine was generated using I-TASSER. The model was structurally validated using the ProSA-web error-detection software and the Ramachandran plot. The validation results indicated that the initial 3D model needed refinement. Subsequently, a high-quality model obtained after various refinement cycles was used for defining conformational B-cell epitopes. Several linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were determined within the epitope vaccine, suggesting likely antibody triggering features of our designed vaccine. Next, molecular docking was performed between the 3D vaccine model and the tertiary structure of the toll like receptor 2 (TLR2). To gain further insight into the interaction between vaccine and TLR2, molecular dynamics

  3. Efficient production of recombinant cystatin C using a peptide-tag, 4AaCter, that facilitates formation of insoluble protein inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Shigehisa; Sato, Shinya; Sudo, Shigeo; Takagi, Mari; Sakai, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2013-04-01

    Cystatin C is a cysteine protease inhibitor produced by a variety of human tissues. The blood concentration of cystatin C depends on the glomerular filtration rate and is an endogenous marker of renal dysfunction. Recombinant cystatin C protein with high immunogenicity is therefore in demand for the diagnostic market. In this study, to establish an efficient production system, a synthetic cystatin C gene was designed and synthesized in accordance with the codon preference of Escherichia coli genes. Recombinant cystatin C was expressed as a fusion with a peptide-tag, 4AaCter, which facilitates formation of protein inclusion bodies in E. coli cells. Fusion with 4AaCter-tag dramatically increased the production level of cystatin C, and highly purified protein was obtained without the need for complicated purification steps. The purity and yield of the final product was estimated as 87 ± 5% and 7.1 ± 1.1 mg/l culture, respectively. The recombinant cystatin C prepared by our method was as reactive against anti-cystatin C antibodies as native human cystatin C. Our results suggest that protein production systems using 4AaCter-tag could be a powerful means of preparing significant amounts of antigen protein.

  4. Peptide Dendrimer/Lipid Hybrid Systems Are Efficient DNA Transfection Reagents: Structure–Activity Relationships Highlight the Role of Charge Distribution Across Dendrimer Generations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Efficient DNA delivery into cells is the prerequisite of the genetic manipulation of organisms in molecular and cellular biology as well as, ultimately, in nonviral gene therapy. Current reagents, however, are relatively inefficient, and structure–activity relationships to guide their improvement are hard to come by. We now explore peptide dendrimers as a new type of transfection reagent and provide a quantitative framework for their evaluation. A collection of dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic amino acid motifs (such as KK, KA, KH, KL, and LL) distributed across three dendrimer generations was synthesized by a solid-phase protocol that provides ready access to dendrimers in milligram quantities. In conjunction with a lipid component (DOTMA/DOPE), the best reagent, G1,2,3-KL ((LysLeu)8(LysLysLeu)4(LysLysLeu)2LysGlySerCys-NH2), improves transfection by 6–10-fold over commercial reagents under their respective optimal conditions. Emerging structure–activity relationships show that dendrimers with cationic and hydrophobic residues distributed in each generation are transfecting most efficiently. The trigenerational dendritic structure has an advantage over a linear analogue worth up to an order of magnitude. The success of placing the decisive cationic charge patterns in inner shells rather than previously on the surface of macromolecules suggests that this class of dendrimers significantly differs from existing transfection reagents. In the future, this platform may be tuned further and coupled to cell-targeting moieties to enhance transfection and cell specificity. PMID:23682947

  5. Combination of inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction with highly efficient oxime ligation expands the toolbox of site-selective peptide conjugations.

    PubMed

    Hörner, S; Uth, C; Avrutina, O; Frauendorf, H; Wiessler, M; Kolmar, H

    2015-07-14

    A modular approach combining inverse electron-demand Diels-Alder coupling (DARinv) and oxime ligation expands the toolbox of bioorthogonal peptide chemistry. Applicability of versatile site-specific bifunctional building blocks is demonstrated by generation of defined conjugates comprising linear, cystine-bridged and multi-disulfide functional peptides as well as their conjugation with hybrid silsesquioxane nanoparticles.

  6. An N‐terminal Peptide Extension Results in Efficient Expression, but not Secretion, of a Synthetic Horseradish Peroxidase Gene in Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    KIS, MIHALY; BURBRIDGE, EMMA; BROCK, IAN W.; HEGGIE, LAURA; DIX, PHILIP J.; KAVANAGH, TONY A.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N‐terminal and C‐terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. • Methods Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N‐terminal or the C‐terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV‐35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO‐SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium‐mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N‐ and C‐terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. • Key Results Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten‐fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild‐type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N‐terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C‐terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. • Conclusions There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N‐terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been

  7. A rapid and efficient method for the synthesis of selectively S-Trt or S-Mmt protected Cys-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Panagiotis; Papas, Serafim; Sakka, Marianna; Tzakos, Andreas G; Tsikaris, Vassilios

    2014-05-01

    Selective removal of protecting groups under different cleavage mechanisms could be an asset in peptide synthesis, since it provides the feasibility to incorporate different functional groups in similar reactive centres. However, selective protection/deprotection of orthogonal protecting groups in peptides is still challenging, especially for Cys-containing peptides, where protection of the cysteine side-chain is mandatory since the nucleophilic thiol can be otherwise alkylated, acylated or oxidized. Herein, we established a protocol for the synthesis of Cys-selective S-Trt or S-Mmt protected Cys-containing peptides, in a rapid way. This was achieved by, simply fine-tuning the carbocation scavenger in the final acidolytic release of the peptide from the solid support in the classic SPPS.

  8. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  9. Discovery of a novel splice variant of Fcar (CD89) unravels sequence segments necessary for efficient secretion: A story of bad signal peptides and good ones that nevertheless do not make it

    PubMed Central

    Lua, Wai-Heng; Ling, Wei-Li; Su, Chinh Tran-To; Yeo, Joshua Yi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The IgA receptor, Fcar (CD89) consists of 5 sequence segments: 2 segments (S1, S2) forming the potential signal peptide, 2 extracellular EC domains that include the IgA binding site, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail (TM/C) region. Numerous Fcar splice variants have been reported with various combinations of the sequence segments mentioned above. Here, we report a novel splice variant termed variant APD isolated from a healthy volunteer that lacks only the IgA-binding EC1 domain. Despite possessing the complete signal peptide S1+S2, the variant APD is only found in the intracellular space whereas the wild-type variant 1 is efficiently secreted and variant 4 leaks to the extracellular space. Further mutational experiments involving signal peptide replacements, cleavage site modifications, and studies on alternative isoforms demonstrate that despite the completeness of the signal peptide motif, the presence of the EC1 domain is essential for efficient extracellular export. PMID:28103138

  10. Efficient model chemistries for peptides. I. General framework and a study of the heterolevel approximation in RHF and MP2 with Pople split-valence basis sets.

    PubMed

    Echenique, Pablo; Alonso, José Luis

    2008-07-15

    We present an exhaustive study of more than 250 ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the model dipeptide HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). The model chemistries (MCs) investigated are constructed as homo- and heterolevels involving possibly different RHF and MP2 calculations for the geometry and the energy. The basis sets used belong to a sample of 39 representants from Pople's split-valence families, ranging from the small 3-21G to the large 6-311++G(2df,2pd). The reference PES to which the rest are compared is the MP2/6-311++G(2df,2pd) homolevel, which, as far as we are aware, is the most accurate PES in the literature. All data sets have been analyzed according to a general framework, which can be extended to other complex problems and which captures the nearness concept in the space of MCs. The great number of MCs evaluated has allowed us to significantly explore this space and show that the correlation between accuracy and computational cost of the methods is imperfect, thus justifying a systematic search for the combination of features in a MC that is optimal to deal with peptides. Regarding the particular MCs studied, the most important conclusion is that the potentially very cost-saving heterolevel approximation is a very efficient one to describe the whole PES of HCO-L-Ala-NH(2). Finally, we show that, although RHF may be used to calculate the geometry if a MP2 single-point energy calculation follows, pure RHF//RHF homolevels are not recommendable for this problem. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Understanding the highly efficient catalysis of prokaryotic peptide deformylases by shedding light on the determinants specifying the low activity of the human counterpart.

    PubMed

    Fieulaine, Sonia; Desmadril, Michel; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2014-02-01

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs), which are essential and ubiquitous enzymes involved in the removal of the N-formyl group from nascent chains, are classified into four subtypes based on the structural and sequence similarity of specific conserved domains. All PDFs share a similar three-dimensional structure, are functionally interchangeable in vivo and display similar properties in vitro, indicating that their molecular mechanism has been conserved during evolution. The human mitochondrial PDF is the only exception as despite its conserved fold it reveals a unique substrate-binding pocket together with an unusual kinetic behaviour. Unlike human PDF, the closely related mitochondrial PDF1As from plants have catalytic efficiencies and enzymatic parameters that are similar to those of other classes of PDFs. Here, the aim was to identify the structural basis underlying the properties of human PDF compared with all other PDFs by focusing on plant mitochondrial PDF1A. The construction of a chimaera composed of plant PDF1A with the nonrandom substitutions found in a conserved motif of its human homologue converted it into an enzyme with properties similar to the human enzyme, indicating the crucial role of these positions. The crystal structure of this human-like plant PDF revealed that substitution of two residues leads to a reduction in the volume of the ligand-binding site together with the introduction of negative charges, unravelling the origin of the weak affinity of human PDF for its substrate. In addition, the substitution of the two residues of human PDF modifies the transition state of the reaction through alteration of the network of interactions between the catalytic residues and the substrate, leading to an overall reduced reaction rate.

  12. Rational design of DKK3 structure-based small peptides as antagonists of Wnt signaling pathway and in silico evaluation of their efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Poorebrahim, Mansour; Sadeghi, Solmaz; Rahimi, Hamzeh; Karimipoor, Morteza; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mazlomi, Mohammad Ali; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulated Wnt signaling pathway is highly associated with the pathogenesis of several human cancers. Dickkopf proteins (DKKs) are thought to inhibit Wnt signaling pathway through binding to lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5/6. In this study, based on the 3-dimensional (3D) structure of DKK3 Cys-rich domain 2 (CRD2), we have designed and developed several peptide inhibitors of Wnt signaling pathway. Modeller 9.15 package was used to predict 3D structure of CRD2 based on the Homology modeling (HM) protocol. After refinement and minimization with GalaxyRefine and NOMAD-REF servers, the quality of selected models was evaluated utilizing VADAR, SAVES and ProSA servers. Molecular docking studies as well as literature-based information revealed two distinct boxes located at CRD2 which are actively involved in the DKK3-LRP5/6 interaction. A peptide library was constructed conducting the backrub sequence tolerance scanning protocol in Rosetta3.5 according to the DKK3-LRP5/6 binding sites. Seven tolerated peptides were chosen and their binding affinity and stability were improved by some logical amino acid substitutions. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptide-LRP5/6 complexes were carried out using GROMACS package. After evaluation of binding free energies, stability, electrostatic potential and some physicochemical properties utilizing computational approaches, three peptides (PEP-I1, PEP-I3 and PEP-II2) demonstrated desirable features. However, all seven improved peptides could sufficiently block the Wnt-binding site of LRP6 in silico. In conclusion, we have designed and improved several small peptides based on the LRP6-binding site of CRD2 of DKK3. These peptides are highly capable of binding to LRP6 in silico, and may prevent the formation of active Wnt-LRP6-Fz complex. PMID:28234935

  13. The life span of major histocompatibility complex-peptide complexes influences the efficiency of presentation and immunogenicity of two class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 4

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the reactivity to two human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) A11-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes derived from amino acids 416-424 (IVTDFSVIK, designated IVT) and 399-408 (AVFDRKSVAK, designated AVF) of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 4. A strong predominance of CTL clones specific for the IVT epitope was demonstrated in polyclonal cultures generated by stimulation of lymphocytes from the EBV-seropositive donor BK with the autologous B95.8 virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). This was not due to intrinsic differences of CTL efficiency since clones specific for the two epitopes lysed equally well A11- positive phytohemagglutinin blasts and LCLs pulsed with the relevant synthetic peptide. Irrespective of the endogenous levels of EBNA4 expression, untreated LCLs were lysed more efficiently by the IVT- specific effectors, suggesting that a higher density of A11-IVT complexes is presented at the cell surface. In accordance, 10-50-fold higher amounts of IVT peptides were found in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions of acid extracts corresponding to an abundance of about 350-12,800 IVT and 8-760 AVF molecules per cell. Peptide- mediated competition of CTL sensitization, transport assays in streptolysin-O permeabilized cells, and induction of A11 expression in the transporter associated with antigen presentation-deficient T2/A11 transfectant demonstrated that the IVT and AVF peptides bind with similar affinities to A11, are translocated with equal efficiency to the endoplasmic reticulum, and form complexes of comparable stability over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. A rapid surface turnover of A11 molecules containing the AVF peptide was demonstrated in metabolically active T2/A11 cells corresponding to a half-life of approximately 3.5 as compared to approximately 2 h for molecules induced at 26 degrees C in the absence of exogenous peptides and >12 h for IVT

  14. Efficient Atomistic Simulation of Pathways and Calculation of Rate Constants for a Protein-Peptide Binding Process: Application to the MDM2 Protein and an Intrinsically Disordered p53 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zwier, Matthew C; Pratt, Adam J; Adelman, Joshua L; Kaus, Joseph W; Zuckerman, Daniel M; Chong, Lillian T

    2016-09-01

    The characterization of protein binding processes - with all of the key conformational changes - has been a grand challenge in the field of biophysics. Here, we have used the weighted ensemble path sampling strategy to orchestrate molecular dynamics simulations, yielding atomistic views of protein-peptide binding pathways involving the MDM2 oncoprotein and an intrinsically disordered p53 peptide. A total of 182 independent, continuous binding pathways were generated, yielding a kon that is in good agreement with experiment. These pathways were generated in 15 days using 3500 cores of a supercomputer, substantially faster than would be possible with "brute force" simulations. Many of these pathways involve the anchoring of p53 residue F19 into the MDM2 binding cleft when forming the metastable encounter complex, indicating that F19 may be a kinetically important residue. Our study demonstrates that it is now practical to generate pathways and calculate rate constants for protein binding processes using atomistic simulation on typical computing resources.

  15. Gaining efficiency by parallel quantification and identification of iTRAQ-labeled peptides using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD on an LTQ Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Mischerikow, Nikolai; van Nierop, Pim; Li, Ka Wan; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Smit, August B; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2010-10-01

    Isobaric stable isotope labeling of peptides using iTRAQ is an important method for MS based quantitative proteomics. Traditionally, quantitative analysis of iTRAQ labeled peptides has been confined to beam-type instruments because of the weak detection capabilities of ion traps for low mass ions. Recent technical advances in fragmentation techniques on linear ion traps and the hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap allow circumventing this limitation. Namely, PQD and HCD facilitate iTRAQ analysis on these instrument types. Here we report a method for iTRAQ-based relative quantification on the ETD enabled LTQ Orbitrap XL, which is based on parallel peptide quantification and peptide identification. iTRAQ reporter ion generation is performed by HCD, while CID and ETD provide peptide identification data in parallel in the LTQ ion trap. This approach circumvents problems accompanying iTRAQ reporter ion generation with ETD and allows quantitative, decision tree-based CID/ETD experiments. Furthermore, the use of HCD solely for iTRAQ reporter ion read out significantly reduces the number of ions needed to obtain informative spectra, which significantly reduces the analysis time. Finally, we show that integration of this method, both with existing CID and ETD methods as well as with existing iTRAQ data analysis workflows, is simple to realize. By applying our approach to the analysis of the synapse proteome from human brain biopsies, we demonstrate that it outperforms a latest generation MALDI TOF/TOF instrument, with improvements in both peptide and protein identification and quantification. Conclusively, our work shows how HCD, CID and ETD can be beneficially combined to enable iTRAQ-based quantification on an ETD-enabled LTQ Orbitrap XL.

  16. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  17. Sustainable efficient way for opioid peptide LVV-h7 preparation from enzymatic proteolysis in a microfluidic-based reaction-extraction process with solvent recycling.

    PubMed

    Elagli, Adil; Belhacene, Kalim; Dhulster, Pascal; Froidevaux, Renato

    2016-05-01

    LVV-h7 (LVVYPWTQFR) is a bioactive peptide that can be obtained from blood as waste of food industry, more precisely from hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin. This opioid peptide belongs to the hemorphins family and have strong physiological effects that bring its use in pharmaceutics and various therapeutic treatments attractive, in particular for substituting its costly chemically synthetized analogous. Hemoglobin hydrolysis by pepsin generates a huge variety of peptides among whose LVV-h7 can be purified by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Herein, selective preparation of this peptide is proposed by a microfluidic-based continuous reaction-separation process. Hemoglobin hydrolysis in microreactor was firstly coupled to LVV-h7 LLE in octan-1-ol and then coupled to LVV-h7 back LLE in acidic water. This continuous process allowed to prepare pure LVV-h7, as confirmed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The microfluidic circuit also allowed octan-1-ol recycling in a closed loop, making this method more sustainable than similar biphasic batch process.

  18. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  19. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle W.; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. PMID:24743021

  20. An efficient bioorthogonal strategy using CuAAC click chemistry for radiofluorinations of SNEW peptides and the role of copper depletion.

    PubMed

    Pretze, Marc; Kuchar, Manuela; Bergmann, Ralf; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2013-06-01

    The EphB2 receptor is known to be overexpressed in various types of cancer and is therefore a promising target for tumor cell imaging by positron emission tomography (PET). In this regard, imaging could facilitate the early detection of EphB2-overexpressing tumors, monitoring responses to therapy directed toward EphB2, and thus improvement in patient outcomes. We report the synthesis and evaluation of several fluorine-18-labeled peptides containing the SNEW amino acid motif, with high affinity for the EphB2 receptor, for their potential as radiotracers in the non-invasive imaging of cancer using PET. For the purposes of radiofluorination, EphB2-antagonistic SNEW peptides were varied at the C terminus by the introduction of L-cysteine, and further by alkyne- or azide-modified amino acids. In addition, two novel bifunctional and bioorthogonal labeling building blocks [(18)F]AFP and [(18)F]BFP were applied, and their capacity to introduce fluorine-18 was compared with that of the established building block [(18)F]FBAM. Copper-assisted Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition, which belongs to the set of bioorthogonal click chemistry reactions, was used to introduce both novel building blocks into azide- or alkyne-modified SNEW peptides under mild conditions. Finally, the depletion of copper immediately after radiolabeling is a highly important step of this novel methodology.

  1. A genital tract peptide epitope vaccine targeting TLR-2 efficiently induces local and systemic CD8 + T cells and protects against herpes simplex virus type 2 challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, G; Nesburn, AB; Wu, M; Zhu, X; Carpenter, D; Wechsler, SL; You, S; BenMohamed, L

    2015-01-01

    The next generation of needle-free mucosal vaccines is being rationally designed according to rules that govern the way in which the epitopes are recognized by and stimulate the genital mucosal immune system. We hypothesized that synthetic peptide epitopes extended with an agonist of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2), that are abundantly expressed by dendritic and epithelial cells of the vaginal mucosa, would lead to induction of protective immunity against genital herpes. To test this hypothesis, we intravaginally (IVAG) immunized wild-type B6, TLR-2 (TLR2 −/−) or myeloid differentiation factor 88 deficient (MyD88 −/−) mice with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) CD8 + T-cell peptide epitope extended by a palmitic acid moiety (a TLR-2 agonist). IVAG delivery of the lipopeptide generated HSV-2-specific memory CD8 + cytotoxic T cells both locally in the genital tract draining lymph nodes and systemically in the spleen. Moreover, lipopeptide-immunized TLR2 −/− and MyD88 −/− mice developed significantly less HSV-specific CD8 + T-cell response, earlier death, faster disease progression, and higher vaginal HSV-2 titers compared to lipopeptide-immunized wild-type B6 mice. IVAG immunization with self-adjuvanting lipid-tailed peptides appears to be a novel mucosal vaccine approach, which has attractive practical and immunological features. PMID:19129756

  2. Novel Cysteine Tags for the Sequencing of Non-Tryptic Disulfide Peptides of Anurans: ESI-MS Study of Fragmentation Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samgina, Tatyana Y.; Vorontsov, Egor A.; Gorshkov, Vladimir A.; Artemenko, Konstantin A.; Nifant'ev, Ilya E.; Kanawati, Basem; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Zubarev, Roman A.; Lebedev, Albert T.

    2011-12-01

    Mass spectrometry faces considerable difficulties in de novo sequencing of long non-tryptic peptides with S-S bonds. Long disulfide-containing peptides brevinins 1E and 2Ec from frog Rana ridibunda were reduced and alkylated with nine novel and three known derivatizing agents. Eight of the novel reagents are maleimide derivatives. Modified samples were subjected to MS/MS studies on FT-ICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers using CAD/HCD or ECD/ETD techniques. Procedures, fragmentation patterns, and sequence coverage for two peptides modified with 12 tags are described. ECD/ETD and CAD fragmentation revealed complementary sequence information. Higher-energy collisionally activated dissociation (HCD) sufficiently enhanced y-ions formation for brevinin 1E, but not for brevinin 2Ec. Some novel tags [ N-benzylmaleimide, N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)maleimide] along with known N-phenylmaleimide and iodoacetic acid showed high total sequence coverage taking into account combined ETD and HCD fragmentation. Moreover, modification of long (34 residues) brevinin 2Ec with N-benzylmaleimide or N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)maleimide yielded high sequence coverage and full C-terminal sequence determination with ECD alone.

  3. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  4. High-level secretion and very efficient isotopic labeling of tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP) expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Laroche, Y; Storme, V; De Meutter, J; Messens, J; Lauwereys, M

    1994-11-01

    Tick anticoagulant peptide (TAP) is a potent and specific inhibitor of the blood coagulation protease Factor Xa. We designed and assembled a synthetic TAP-encoding gene (tapo) based on codons preferentially observed in the highly expressed Pichia pastoris alcohol oxidase 1 gene (AOX1), and fused it to a novel hybrid secretory prepro leader sequence. Expression from this gene yielded biologically active rTAP, which was correctly processed at the amino-terminal fusion site, and accumulated in the medium to approximately 1.7 g/l. This corresponds to a molar concentration of 0.24 mM, and is the highest yet described for a recombinant product secreted from P. pastoris. It also represents a seven-fold improvement in productivity compared to rTAP secretion from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making P. pastoris an attractive host for the industrial-scale production of this potential therapeutic agent. This system was also used to prepare 21 mg 15N-rTAP, 11 mg 13C-rTAP and 27 mg 15N/13C-rTAP, with isotope incorporation levels higher than 98%, and purities sufficient to allow their use in determining the solution structure of the tick anticoagulant peptide using high field NMR.

  5. N-Terminal 2,3-diaminopropionic acid (Dap) peptides as efficient methylglyoxal scavengers to inhibit advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, N André; Garcia-Alvarez, Maria Concepcion; Wang, Qian; Ermolenko, Ludmila; Franck, Gisèle; Nhiri, Naïma; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Audic, Nicolas; Potier, Pierre

    2009-03-15

    2,3-Diaminopropionic acid (Dap) and N-terminal Dap peptides have been found to inhibit in vitro protein-modifications by methylglyoxal (MG), one of the highly reactive alpha-dicarbonyl compounds. MG scavenging potency of the newly synthesized N-terminal Dap peptides is demonstrated by RP-HPLC, SDS-PAGE and non-denaturing PAGE analysis, assays for enzymatic activity and cell viability study and was compared with that of known AGE inhibitors, such as aminoguanidine, pyridoxamine, metformin and carnosine. Two addition products of MG and L-Dap-L-Leu are separated by HPLC and their chemical structures are characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy to indicate that both of them are pyrazines derived from 2 molecules of MG and 1 molecule of L-Dap-L-Leu. Mutagenic activities of L-Dap-L-Leu and L-Dap-L-Val and their metabolites according to the Ames assay are found to be negative.

  6. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  7. Engineered regulatory T cells coexpressing MHC class II:peptide complexes are efficient inhibitors of autoimmune T cell function and prevent the development of autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhaohui; Latham, Kary A; Whittington, Karen B; Miller, David C; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F

    2013-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical homeostatic components in preventing the development of autoimmunity, and are a major focus for their therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases. To enhance the efficacy of Tregs in adoptive therapy, we developed a strategy for generating engineered Tregs that have the capacity to target autoimmune T cells in an Ag-specific manner. Using a retroviral expression system encoding Foxp3 and HLA-DR1 covalently linked to the immunodominant peptide of the autoantigen type II collagen (DR1-CII), naive T cells were engineered to become Tregs that express DR1-CII complexes on their surface. When these cells were tested for their ability to prevent the development of collagen induced arthritis, both the engineered DR1-CII-Foxp3 and Foxp3 only Tregs significantly reduced the severity and incidence of disease. However, the mechanism by which these two populations of Tregs inhibited disease differed significantly. Disease inhibition by the DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs was accompanied by significantly lower numbers of autoimmune CII-specific T cells in vivo and lower levels of autoantibodies in comparison with engineered Tregs expressing Foxp3 alone. In addition, the numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-expressing T cells in mice treated with DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs were also significantly reduced in comparison with mice treated with Foxp3 engineered Tregs or vector control cells. These data indicate that the coexpression of class II autoantigen-peptide complexes on Tregs provides these cells with a distinct capacity to regulate autoimmune T cell responses that differs from that used by conventional Tregs.

  8. Engineered Tregulatory cells co-expressing MHC class II:peptide complexes are efficient inhibitors of autoimmune T cell function and prevent the development of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhaohui; Latham, Kary A.; Whittington, Karen B.; Miller, David C.; Brand, David D.; Rosloniec, Edward F.

    2013-01-01

    Treg cells are critical homeostatic components in preventing the development of autoimmunity, and are a major focus for their therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases. In order to enhance the efficacy of Treg cells in adoptive therapy, we developed a strategy for generating engineered Tregs that have the capacity to target autoimmune T cells in an antigen specific manner. Using a retroviral expression system encoding Foxp3 and HLA-DR1 covalently linked to the immunodominant peptide of the autoantigen type II collagen (DR1-CII), naïve T cells were engineered to become Treg cells that express DR1-CII complexes on their surface. When these cells were tested for their ability to prevent the development of collagen induced arthritis, both the engineered DR1-CII-Foxp3 and Foxp3 only Treg cells significantly reduced the severity and incidence of disease. However, the mechanism buy which these two populations of Treg cells inhibited disease differed significantly. Disease inhibition by the DR1-CII-Foxp3 Treg cells was accompanied by significantly lower numbers of autoimmune CII-specific T cells in vivo and lower levels of autoantibodies in comparison to engineered Tregs expressing Foxp3 alone. Additionally, the numbers of IFN-γ and IL-17 expressing T cells in mice treated with DR1-CII-Foxp3 Tregs were also significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with Foxp3 engineered Treg cells or vector control cells. These data indicate that the co-expression of class II autoantigen-peptide complexes on Treg cells provides these cells with a distinct capacity to regulate autoimmune T cell responses that differs from that used by conventional Treg cells. PMID:23630354

  9. Facile synthesis of peptide nucleic acids and peptide nucleic acid-peptide conjugates on an automated peptide synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra; Jha, Deepti; Su, Wu; Engelmann, Joern

    2011-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are DNA mimics with a neutral peptide backbone instead of the negatively charged sugar phosphates. PNAs exhibit several attractive features such as high chemical and thermal stability, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and stable binding to their RNA or DNA targets in a sequence-specific manner. Therefore, they are widely used in molecular diagnosis of antisense-targeted therapeutic drugs or probes and in pharmaceutical applications. However, the main hindrance to the effective use of PNAs is their poor uptake by cells as well as the difficult and laborious chemical synthesis. In order to achieve an efficient delivery of PNAs into cells, there are already many published reports of peptides being used for transport across the cell membrane. In this protocol, we describe the automated as well as cost-effective semi-automated synthesis of PNAs and PNA-peptide constructs on an automated peptide synthesizer. The facile synthesis of PNAs will be helpful in generating PNA libraries usable, e.g. for high-throughput screening in biomolecular studies. Efficient synthetic schemes, the automated procedure, the reduced consumption of costly reagents, and the high purity of the products are attractive features of the reported procedure. Copyright © 2010 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  11. Methyl 2-((succinimidooxy)carbonyl)benzoate (MSB): a new, efficient reagent for N-phthaloylation of amino acid and peptide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Casimir, J Richard; Guichard, Gilles; Briand, Jean-Paul

    2002-05-31

    A new, efficient, and readily available reagent, methyl 2-((succinimidooxy)carbonyl)benzoate (MSB), for N-phthaloylation of amino acids and amino acid derivatives is described. The phthaloylation procedure is simple and racemization-free and gives excellent results with alpha-amino acids, alpha-amino alcohols, dipeptides, alpha-amino carboxamides, and alpha-amino esters.

  12. Larger scale multipin peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maeji, N J; Bray, A M; Valerio, R M; Wang, W

    1995-01-01

    The multipin peptide synthesis approach originated as an immunological tool for epitope mapping. However, continuing evolution of the basic technology has allowed synthesis at scales up to 10 mumol per pin. At this loading, the methodology can no longer be considered just a screening tool. The overall synthesis efficiency of this approach was assessed by the synthesis of 2913 different peptides having little or no sequence homology and ranging up to a 46-mer in length. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the crude peptides indicates overall quality of synthesis was high. The method is suitable for multi-milligram synthesis of peptides without sacrificing any of the inherent advantages of the 96-well format.

  13. Efficient preparation and site-directed immobilization of VHH antibodies by genetic fusion of poly(methylmethacrylate)-binding peptide (PMMA-Tag).

    PubMed

    Kumada, Yoichi; Kang, Bongmun; Yamakawa, Kagenari; Kishimoto, Michimasa; Horiuchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    A PMMA-binding peptide (PMMA-tag) was genetically fused with the C-terminal region of an anti-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) single-domain antibody (VHH). It was over-expressed in an insoluble fraction of E. coli cells, and recovered in the presence of 8 M urea via one-step IMAC purification. Monomeric and denatured PMMA-tag-fused VHH (VHH-PM) was successfully prepared via the reduction and oxidation of VHH-PM at a concentration less than 1 mg/mL in the presence of 8 M of urea. Furthermore, the VHH-PM was refolded with a recovery of more than 95% by dialysis against 50 mM TAPS at pH 8.5, because the genetic fusion of PMMA-tag resulted in a decrease in the apparent isoelectric point (pI) of the fusion protein, and its solubility at weak alkaline pH was considerably increased. The antigen-binding activities of VHH-PM in the adsorptive state were 10-fold higher than that of VHH without a PMMA-tag. The density of VHH-PM on a PMMA plate was twice that of VHH, indicating that the site-directed attachment of a PMMA-tag resulted in positive effects to the adsorption amount as well as to the orientation of VHH-PM in its adsorptive state. The preparation and immobilization methods for VHH-PM against hCG developed in the present study were further applied to VHH-PMs against four different antigens, and consequently, those antigens with the concentrations lower than 1 ng/mL were detected by the sandwich ELISA. Thus, the VHH-PMs developed in the present study are useful for preparation of high-performance and economical immunosorbent for detection of biomarkers. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  15. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  16. Peptide regulation of aging: 35-year research experience.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V Kh; Anisimov, V N

    2009-07-01

    The authors sum up the results of many-year studies of mechanisms of aging and efficiency of peptide bioregulators in the prevention of age-specific diseases. Data on the effects of peptides, evaluated by the up-to-date methods, are presented. A molecular model of complementary interactions between short peptides and gene promotor sites, underlying the initiation of protein synthesis, is proposed. Prospects of peptide bioregulators in prevention of early aging are discussed.

  17. Preparation of peptide microspheres using tumor antigen-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Santwana; Naqvi, Raza Ali; Ali, Riyasat; Rao, D N

    2014-01-01

    Due to its distinct biological attributes, poly(D,L lactide-co glycolide) (PLGA) is one of the most preferred methods for DNA/protein/peptide encapsulation for therapeutics. Importantly, PLGA acts as an adjuvant for weakly immunogenic antigens and mimics booster responses after a single dose of administration, thereby serving as a single-shot vaccine delivery vehicle. Efficient delivery of antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC) has been made possible by the use of a PLGA particle-based vaccine delivery system. Also, the plasma half-life of the PLGA-encapsulated vaccine increases as it is protected from degradation, prior to its further release. PLGAs are reported to be catabolized into individual nontoxic units once inside the host and further degraded via normal metabolic pathways. In this chapter, we have described the preparation and characterization of tumor peptide encapsulated PLGA microparticles as a model for controlled-release peptide delivery system.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  19. Antimicrobial peptides from marine proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-09-30

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of "classical" antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  20. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  1. Combinatorial discovery of tumor targeting peptides using phage display.

    PubMed

    Landon, Linda A; Deutscher, Susan L

    2003-10-15

    Peptides possess appropriate pharmacokinetic properties to serve as cancer imaging or therapeutic targeting agents. Currently, only a small number of rationally-derived, labeled peptide analogues that target only a limited subset of antigens are available. Thus, finding new cancer targeting peptides is a central goal in the field of molecular targeting. Novel tumor-avid peptides can be efficiently identified via affinity selections using complex random peptide libraries containing millions of peptides that are displayed on bacteriophage. In vitro and in situ affinity selections may be used to identify peptides with high affinity for the target antigen in vitro. Unfortunately, it has been found that peptides selected in vitro or in situ may not effectively target tumors in vivo due to poor peptide stability and other problems. To improve in vivo targeting, methodological combinatorial chemistry innovations allow selections to be conducted in the environment of the whole animal. Thus, new targeting peptides with optimal in vivo properties can be selected in vivo in tumor-bearing animals. In vivo selections have been proven successful in identifying peptides that target the vasculature of specific organs. In addition, in vivo selections have identified peptides that bind specifically to the surface of or are internalized into tumor cells. In the future, direct selection of peptides for cancer imaging may be expedited using genetically engineered bacteriophage libraries that encode peptides with intrinsic radiometal-chelation or fluorescent sequences.

  2. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  3. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of residue conformations in peptides in Cambridge structural database and protein-peptide structural complexes.

    PubMed

    Raghavender, Upadhyayula Surya

    2017-03-01

    A comprehensive statistical analysis of the geometric parameters of peptide chains in a reduced dataset of protein-peptide complexes in Protein Data Bank (PDB) is presented. The angular variables describing the backbone conformations of amino acid residues in peptide chains shed insights into the conformational preferences of peptide residues interacting with protein partners. Nonparametric statistical approaches are employed to evaluate the interrelationships and associations in structural variables. Grouping of residues based on their structure into chemical classes reveals characteristic trends in parameter relationships. A comparison of canonical amino acid residues in free peptide structures in Cambridge structural database (CSD) with identical residues in PDB complexes, suggests that the information can be integrated from both the structural repositories enabling efficient and accurate modeling of biologically active peptides. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Copper-Aβ Peptides and Oxidation of Catecholic Substrates: Reactivity and Endogenous Peptide Damage.

    PubMed

    Pirota, Valentina; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Monzani, Enrico; Nicolis, Stefania; Casella, Luigi

    2016-11-14

    The oxidative reactivity of copper complexes with Aβ peptides 1-16 and 1-28 (Aβ16 and Aβ28) against dopamine and related catechols under physiological conditions has been investigated in parallel with the competitive oxidative modification undergone by the peptides. It was found that both Aβ16 and Aβ28 markedly increase the oxidative reactivity of copper(II) towards the catechol compounds, up to a molar ratio of about 4:1 of peptide/copper(II). Copper redox cycling during the catalytic activity induces the competitive modification of the peptide at selected amino acid residues. The main modifications consist of oxidation of His13/14 to 2-oxohistidine and Phe19/20 to ortho-tyrosine, and the formation of a covalent His6-catechol adduct. Competition by the endogenous peptide is rather efficient, as approximately one peptide molecule is oxidized every 10 molecules of 4-methylcatechol.

  6. Current Trends and Perspectives of Bioactive Peptides.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Lee, Byong H; Oh, Deog H

    2017-06-12

    The remarkable growth of therapeutic peptide development in the past decade has led to a large number of market approvals and the market value is expected to hit $25 billion by 2018. This significant market increase is driven by the increasing incidences of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and technological advancements in peptide synthesis. For this reason, the search for bioactive peptides has also increased exponentially. Many bioactive peptides from food and nonfood sources have shown positive health effects yet, obstacles such as the need to implement efficient and cost-effective strategies for industrial scale production, good manufacturing practices as well as well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for supporting health claims continue to exist. Several other factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, toxicity and the stability of biological functions of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed.

  7. Formation of peptide radical ions through dissociative electron transfer in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ivan K; Laskin, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals, including the canonical radical cations, M(+•), radical dications, [M+H](2+•), radical anions, [M-2H](-•) and phosphorylated radical cations. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side-chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information regarding the role of charge and location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT) and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of these complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  8. Regulatory Peptides in Plants.

    PubMed

    Vanyushin, B F; Ashapkin, V V; Aleksandrushkina, N I

    2017-02-01

    Many different peptides regulating cell differentiation, growth, and development are found in plants. Peptides participate in regulation of plant ontogenesis starting from pollination, pollen tube growth, and the very early stages of embryogenesis, including formation of embryo and endosperm. They direct differentiation of meristematic stem cells, formation of tissues and individual organs, take part in regulation of aging, fruit maturation, and abscission of plant parts associated with apoptosis. Biological activity of peptides is observed at very low concentrations, and it has mainly signal nature and hormonal character. "Mature" peptides appear mainly due to processing of protein precursors with (or without) additional enzymatic modifications. Plant peptides differ in origin, structure, and functional properties. Their specific action is due to binding with respective receptors and interactions with various proteins and other factors. Peptides can also regulate physiological functions by direct peptide-protein interactions. Peptide action is coordinated with the action of known phytohormones (auxins, cytokinins, and others); thus, peptides control phytohormonal signal pathways.

  9. Nanotechnology for delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anisha; Bahal, Raman; Gupta, Meera; Glazer, Peter M; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-10-28

    Over the past three decades, peptide nucleic acids have been employed in numerous chemical and biological applications. Peptide nucleic acids possess enormous potential because of their superior biophysical properties, compared to other oligonucleotide chemistries. However, for therapeutic applications, intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids remains a challenge. In this review, we summarize the progress that has been made in delivering peptide nucleic acids to intracellular targets. In addition, we emphasize recent nanoparticle-based strategies for efficient delivery of conventional and chemically-modified peptides nucleic acids.

  10. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting for proteome analysis: identification efficiency after on-blot or in-gel digestion with and without desalting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lamer, S; Jungblut, P R

    2001-03-10

    In theory, peptide mass fingerprinting by matrix assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) has the potential to identify all of the proteins detected by silver staining on gels. In practice, if the genome of the organism investigated is completely sequenced, using current techniques, all proteins stained by Coomassie Brilliant Blue can be identified. This loss of identification sensitivity of ten to hundred-fold is caused by loss of peptides by surface contacts. Therefore, we performed digestion and transfer of peptides in the lower microl range and reduced the number of steps. The peptide mix obtained from in-gel or on-blot digestion was analyzed directly after digestion or after concentration on POROS R2 beads. Eight protein spots of a 2-DE gel from Mycobacterium bovis BCG were identified using these four preparation procedures for MALDI-MS. Overall, on-blot digestion was as effective as in-gel digestion. Whereas higher signal intensities resulted after concentration, hydrophilic peptides are better detected by direct measurement of the peptide mix without POROS R2 concentration.

  11. TRH-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Bílek, R; Bičíková, M; Šafařík, L

    2011-01-01

    TRH-like peptides are characterized by substitution of basic amino acid histidine (related to authentic TRH) with neutral or acidic amino acid, like glutamic acid, phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, leucin, valin, aspartic acid and asparagine. The presence of extrahypothalamic TRH-like peptides was reported in peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract, placenta, neural tissues, male reproductive system and certain endocrine tissues. Work deals with the biological function of TRH-like peptides in different parts of organisms where various mechanisms may serve for realisation of biological function of TRH-like peptides as negative feedback to the pituitary exerted by the TRH-like peptides, the role of pEEPam such as fertilization-promoting peptide, the mechanism influencing the proliferative ability of prostatic tissues, the neuroprotective and antidepressant function of TRH-like peptides in brain and the regulation of thyroid status by TRH-like peptides.

  12. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  13. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    DOEpatents

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  15. Preparation of Peptide p-Nitroanilides using an Aryl Hydrazine Solid Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Y; Welsh, K; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2004-08-05

    Peptide p-nitroanilides are useful compounds for studying protease activity, however the poor nucleophilicity of p-nitroaniline makes their preparation difficult. We describe a new efficient approach for the Fmoc-based synthesis of peptide p-nitroanilides using an aryl hydrazine resin. Mild oxidation of the peptide hydrazide resin yields a highly reactive acyl diazene, which efficiently reacts with weak nucleophiles. We have prepared several peptide p-nitroanilides, including substrates for the Lethal Factor protease from B. anthracis.

  16. Naturally processed peptides spanning the HPA-1a polymorphism are efficiently generated and displayed from platelet glycoprotein by HLA-DRB3*0101-positive antigen-presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Anani Sarab, Gholamreza; Moss, Michael; Barker, Robert N; Urbaniak, Stanislaw J

    2009-08-27

    In neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, almost all human platelet antigen (HPA)-1b1b mothers who produce anti-HPA-1a antibody through carrying an HPA-1a fetus are human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB3*0101 positive. It is predicted that the HPA-1a Leu(33) polymorphism forms part of an HLA-DRB3*0101-restricted T-helper epitope, and acts as an anchor residue for binding this class II molecule. However, it is not known whether any corresponding peptides are naturally processed and presented from platelet glycoprotein. In this study, peptides displayed by a homozygous HLA-DRB3*0101 antigen-presenting cell line were identified after pulsing with recombinant HPA-1a (Leu(33) plexin-semaphorin-integrin domain). The peptides were eluted from HLA-DR molecules, fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography, and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. A "nested set" of naturally presented HPA-1a-derived peptides, each containing the Trp(25)-Leu(33) core epitope, was identified, with the most abundant member being the 16-mer Met(22)-Arg(37). These peptides may provide the basis for novel treatments to tolerize the corresponding T-helper response in women at risk of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

  17. Characterization of a possible uptake mechanism of selective antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Sordo, Marili Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Selective antibacterial peptides containing less than 30 amino acid residues, cationic, with amphipathic properties, have been the subject of several studies due to their active participation and beneficial effects in strengthening the immune system of all living organisms. This manuscript reports the results of a comparison between the group of selective antibacterial peptides and another group called "cell penetrating peptides". An important number of the selective antibacterial peptides are cell penetrating peptides, suggesting that their toxicity is related to their uptake mechanism. The verification of this observation also includes the adaptation of a method previously published, called Polarity index, which reproduces and confirms the action of this new set of peptides. The efficiency of this method was verified based on four different databases, yielding a high score. The verification was based exclusively on the peptides already reported in the databases which have been experimentally verified.

  18. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  19. Peptides homing to tumor vasculature: imaging and therapeutics for cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiguo; Wu, Kaichun

    2008-11-01

    A major obstacle to advances in anti-vascular therapy is the lack of molecule candidates that are effective in selectively targeting cancer tissues while sparing normal ones. Phage display peptide library greatly eases the discovery of peptides with specific homing capacity. Many novel peptides homing to angiogenic vessels were isolated recently. Notably, many such peptides showed relatively specific affinity with particular tumor types. These peptides appear to be able to accumulate in the target vascular site of tumor, making them particularly efficient to deliver drugs or other therapeutic and imaging agents. Some homing peptides could not only target to the desired location, but also be internalized into targeted cells, or even induce destruction in desired cells all by the same peptide sequence itself. Accumulating evidence has shown that by tumor specific targeting delivery, improved local effect can be achieved with well tolerated side effects. In the current review, recent literatures and patents in this field have been summarized.

  20. Peptide signaling in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Hayakawa, Eisuke

    2012-01-01

    Peptides play a number of crucial roles as signaling molecules in metazoans. In order to elaborate a more complete picture of the roles played by peptides in a single organism, we launched the "Hydra Peptide Project". For this project, we used Hydra magnipapillata, a species belonging to Cnidaria, one of the most basal metazoan phyla, and using a peptidomic approach, we systematically identified a number of peptide signaling molecules, their encoding genes and their functions. In this article, we report the peptides isolated from Hydra and other cnidarians, as well as their synthesis, processing and release from the cells to the target. Possible peptide signaling pathways are overviewed and finally we discuss the evolution of the peptide signaling system.

  1. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  2. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    PubMed

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here.

  3. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    PubMed Central

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  4. Evaluation of basic amphipathic peptides for cellular delivery of antisense peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Maier, Martin A; Esau, Christine C; Siwkowski, Andrew M; Wancewicz, Edward V; Albertshofer, Klaus; Kinberger, Garth A; Kadaba, Neena S; Watanabe, Tanya; Manoharan, Muthiah; Bennett, C Frank; Griffey, Richard H; Swayze, Eric E

    2006-04-20

    Cellular permeation peptides have been used successfully for the delivery of a variety of cargoes across cellular membranes, including large hydrophilic biomolecules such as proteins, oligonucleotides, or plasmid DNA. For the present work, a series of short amphipathic peptides was designed to elucidate the structural requirements for efficient and nontoxic delivery of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs). On the basis of an idealized alpha-helical structure, the helical parameters were modulated systematically to yield peptides within a certain range of hydrophobicity and amphipathicity. The corresponding PNA conjugates were synthesized and characterized in terms of secondary structure, enzymatic stability, and antisense activity. The study revealed correlations between the physicochemical and biophysical properties of the conjugates and their biological activity and led to the development of potent peptide vectors for the cellular delivery of antisense PNAs. Two representative compounds were radiolabeled and evaluated for their biodistribution in healthy mice.

  5. Multiplex De Novo Sequencing of Peptide Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Liu, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Liang; Gaudêncio, Susana P.; Fenical, William; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    Proliferation of drug-resistant diseases raises the challenge of searching for new, more efficient antibiotics. Currently, some of the most effective antibiotics (i.e., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. The isolation and sequencing of cyclic peptide antibiotics, unlike the same activity with linear peptides, is time-consuming and error-prone. The dominant technique for sequencing cyclic peptides is NMR-based and requires large amounts (milligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Given these facts, there is a need for new tools to sequence cyclic NRPs using picograms of material. Since nearly all cyclic NRPs are produced along with related analogs, we develop a mass spectrometry approach for sequencing all related peptides at once (in contrast to the existing approach that analyzes individual peptides). Our results suggest that instead of attempting to isolate and NMR-sequence the most abundant compound, one should acquire spectra of many related compounds and sequence all of them simultaneously using tandem mass spectrometry. We illustrate applications of this approach by sequencing new variants of cyclic peptide antibiotics from Bacillus brevis, as well as sequencing a previously unknown familiy of cyclic NRPs produced by marine bacteria.

  6. Peptide consensus sequence determination for the enhancement of the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Ajingi, Ya’u; Abualhaijaa, Ahmad; Tarazi, Shadi; Alshar’i, Nizar; Al-Balas, Qosay

    2017-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria is causing a serious threat to the world’s human population. Recent reports have identified bacterial strains displaying pan drug resistance against antibiotics and generating fears among medical health specialists that humanity is on the dawn of entering a post-antibiotics era. Global research is currently focused on expanding the lifetime of current antibiotics and the development of new antimicrobial agents to tackle the problem of antimicrobial resistance. In the present study, we designed a novel consensus peptide named “Pepcon” through peptide consensus sequence determination among members of a highly homologous group of scorpion antimicrobial peptides. Members of this group were found to possess moderate antimicrobial activity with significant toxicity against mammalian cells. The aim of our design method was to generate a novel peptide with an enhanced antimicrobial potency and selectivity against microbial rather than mammalian cells. The results of our study revealed that the consensus peptide displayed potent antibacterial activities against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our membrane permeation studies displayed that the peptide efficiently induced membrane damage and consequently led to cell death through the process of cell lysis. The microbial DNA binding assay of the peptide was found to be very weak suggesting that the peptide is not targeting the microbial DNA. Pepcon induced minimal cytotoxicity at the antimicrobial concentrations as the hemolytic activity was found to be zero at the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The results of our study demonstrate that the consensus peptide design strategy is efficient in generating peptides. PMID:28096686

  7. Peptide consensus sequence determination for the enhancement of the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Almaaytah, Ammar; Ajingi, Ya'u; Abualhaijaa, Ahmad; Tarazi, Shadi; Alshar'i, Nizar; Al-Balas, Qosay

    2017-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria is causing a serious threat to the world's human population. Recent reports have identified bacterial strains displaying pan drug resistance against antibiotics and generating fears among medical health specialists that humanity is on the dawn of entering a post-antibiotics era. Global research is currently focused on expanding the lifetime of current antibiotics and the development of new antimicrobial agents to tackle the problem of antimicrobial resistance. In the present study, we designed a novel consensus peptide named "Pepcon" through peptide consensus sequence determination among members of a highly homologous group of scorpion antimicrobial peptides. Members of this group were found to possess moderate antimicrobial activity with significant toxicity against mammalian cells. The aim of our design method was to generate a novel peptide with an enhanced antimicrobial potency and selectivity against microbial rather than mammalian cells. The results of our study revealed that the consensus peptide displayed potent antibacterial activities against a broad range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Our membrane permeation studies displayed that the peptide efficiently induced membrane damage and consequently led to cell death through the process of cell lysis. The microbial DNA binding assay of the peptide was found to be very weak suggesting that the peptide is not targeting the microbial DNA. Pepcon induced minimal cytotoxicity at the antimicrobial concentrations as the hemolytic activity was found to be zero at the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The results of our study demonstrate that the consensus peptide design strategy is efficient in generating peptides.

  8. Dual-targeted peptide-conjugated multifunctional fluorescent probe with AIEgen for efficient nucleus-specific imaging and long-term tracing of cancer cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures, structural characterization data, and additional figures and scheme. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00402h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yong; Sun, Chunli; Ou, Xiaowen; Liu, Bifeng

    2017-01-01

    Precisely targeted transportation of a long-term tracing regent to a nucleus with low toxicity is one of the most challenging concerns in revealing cancer cell behaviors. Here, we report a dual-targeted peptide-conjugated multifunctional fluorescent probe (cNGR-CPP-NLS-RGD-PyTPE, TCNTP) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristic, for efficient nucleus-specific imaging and long-term and low-toxicity tracing of cancer cells. TCNTP mainly consists of two components: one is a functionalized combinatorial peptide (TCNT) containing two targeted peptides (cNGR and RGD), a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS), which can specifically bind to a cell surface and effectively enter into the nucleus; the other one is an AIE-active tetraphenylethene derivative (PyTPE, a typical AIEgen) as fluorescence imaging reagent. In the presence of aminopeptidase N (CD13) and integrin αvβ3, TCNTP can specifically bind to both of them using cNGR and RGD, respectively, lighting up its yellow fluorescence. Because it contains CPP, TCNTP can be effectively integrated into the cytoplasm, and then be delivered into the nucleus with the help of NLS. TCNTP exhibited strong fluorescence in the nucleus of CD13 and integrin αvβ3 overexpression cells due to the specific targeting ability, efficient transport capacity and AIE characteristic in a more crowded space. Furthermore, TCNTP can be applied for long-term tracing in living cells, scarcely affecting normal cells with negligible toxicity in more than ten passages. PMID:28626568

  9. Polymer-Peptide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, He; Shu, Jessica Y.; Xu, Ting

    2010-03-01

    Conjugation of synthetic polymers to peptides offers an efficient way to produce novel supramolecular structures. Herein, we report an attempt to prepare synthetic micellar nanoparticles using amphiphilic peptide-polymer conjugates as molecular building blocks. Spherical nanoparticles were formed upon dissolution of peptides in PBS buffer through the segregation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments. Both molecular and nano- structures were thoroughly investigated by a variety of biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results demonstrate that structural properties of these biohybrid materials depend on both the geometry of the hydrophobic domain and the size of synthetic polymers. Given the diversity of functional peptide sequences, hydrophilic polymers and hydrophobic moieties, these materials would be expected to self-assemble into various types of nanostructures to cover a wide range of biological applications.

  10. Large-scale synthesis of peptides.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Blomberg, L; Flegel, M; Lepsa, L; Nilsson, B; Verlander, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent advances in the areas of formulation and delivery have rekindled the interest of the pharmaceutical community in peptides as drug candidates, which, in turn, has provided a challenge to the peptide industry to develop efficient methods for the manufacture of relatively complex peptides on scales of up to metric tons per year. This article focuses on chemical synthesis approaches for peptides, and presents an overview of the methods available and in use currently, together with a discussion of scale-up strategies. Examples of the different methods are discussed, together with solutions to some specific problems encountered during scale-up development. Finally, an overview is presented of issues common to all manufacturing methods, i.e., methods used for the large-scale purification and isolation of final bulk products and regulatory considerations to be addressed during scale-up of processes to commercial levels. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 55: 227-250, 2000

  11. Lipid-based nanoformulations for peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Matougui, Nada; Boge, Lukas; Groo, Anne-Claire; Umerska, Anita; Ringstad, Lovisa; Bysell, Helena; Saulnier, Patrick

    2016-04-11

    Nanoformulations have attracted a lot of attention because of their size-dependent properties. Among the array of nanoformulations, lipid nanoformulations (LNFs) have evoked increasing interest because of the advantages of their high degree of biocompatibility and versatility. The performance of lipid nanoformulations is greatly influenced by their composition and structure. Therapeutic peptides represent a growing share of the pharmaceutical market. However, the main challenge for their development into commercial products is their inherent physicochemical and biological instability. Important peptides such as insulin, calcitonin and cyclosporin A have been incorporated into LNFs. The association or encapsulation of peptides within lipid-based carriers has shown to protect the labile molecules against enzymatic degradation. This review describes strategies used for the formulation of peptides and some methods used for the assessment of association efficiency. The advantages and drawbacks of such carriers are also described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  13. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  14. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  15. Stabilization of exosome-targeting peptides via engineered glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N

    2015-03-27

    Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles that mediate intercellular transfer of cellular contents and are attractive vehicles for therapeutic delivery of bimolecular cargo such as nucleic acids, proteins, and even drugs. Efficient exosome-mediated delivery in vivo requires targeting vesicles for uptake by specific recipient cells. Although exosomes have been successfully targeted to several cellular receptors by displaying peptides on the surface of the exosomes, identifying effective exosome-targeting peptides for other receptors has proven challenging. Furthermore, the biophysical rules governing targeting peptide success remain poorly understood. To evaluate one factor potentially limiting exosome delivery, we investigated whether peptides displayed on the exosome surface are degraded during exosome biogenesis, for example by endosomal proteases. Indeed, peptides fused to the N terminus of exosome-associated transmembrane protein Lamp2b were cleaved in samples derived from both cells and exosomes. To suppress peptide loss, we engineered targeting peptide-Lamp2b fusion proteins to include a glycosylation motif at various positions. Introduction of this glycosylation motif both protected the peptide from degradation and led to an increase in overall Lamp2b fusion protein expression in both cells and exosomes. Moreover, glycosylation-stabilized peptides enhanced targeted delivery of exosomes to neuroblastoma cells, demonstrating that such glycosylation does not ablate peptide-target interactions. Thus, we have identified a strategy for achieving robust display of targeting peptides on the surface of exosomes, which should facilitate the evaluation and development of new exosome-based therapeutics.

  16. [The review of the peptides used in dermatocosmetology].

    PubMed

    Fridman, N V; Fetisova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The review of the peptides used in dermatocosmetology is represented. The purpose of this review is a search of results of the basic scientific researches confirming or disproving efficiency and/or safety of peptide molecules used in a modern dermatocosmetology. Questions of forms of application, biological availability, reliability of the rendered anti-aging effects are considered.

  17. Selective enrichment and desalting of hydrophilic peptides using graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Qi, Linyu; Liu, Peiru; Wang, Zijun; Duan, Zhigui; Wang, Ying; Liu, Zhonghua; Chen, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The wide variety and low abundance of peptides in tissue brought great difficulties to the separation and identification of peptides, which is not in favor of the development of peptidomics. RP-HPLC, which could purify small molecules based on their hydrophobicity, has been widely used in the separation and enrichment of peptide due to its fast, good reproducibility and high resolution. However, RP-HPLC requires the instrument and expensive C18 column and its sample capacity is also limited. Recently, graphene oxide has been applied to the adsorption of amino acids. However, the enrichment efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide for peptides remain unclear. In this study, the adsorption efficiency and selectivity of graphene oxide and RP-C18 matrix were compared on trypsinized α-actin and also on tissue extracts from pituitary gland and hippocampus. For α-actin, there exhibit similar elution peaks for total trypsinized products and those adsorpted by GO and C18 matrix. But peptides adsorbed by GO showed the higher hydrophilic peaks than which adsorbed by C18 matrix. The resulted RP-HPLC profile showed that most of peptides enriched by graphene oxide were eluted at low concentration of organic solvent, while peptides adsorbed by RP-C18 matrix were mostly eluted at relatively high concentration. Moreover, mass spectrometry analysis suggested that, in pituitary sample, there were 495 peptides enriched by graphene oxide, 447 peptides enriched by RP-C18 matrix while in hippocampus sample 333 and 243 peptides respectively. The GRAVY value analysis suggested that the graphene oxide has a stronger adsorption for highly hydrophilic peptides compared to the RP-C18 matrix. Furthermore, the combination of these two methods could notably increase the number of identification peptides but also the number of predicted protein precursors. Our study provided a new thought to the role of graphene oxide during the enrichment of peptides from tissue which should be useful for

  18. Characterization of reducible peptide oligomers as carriers for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton; Egorova, Anna; Laukkanen, Antti; Baranov, Vladislav; Urtti, Arto

    2013-01-30

    The stability of DNA-polyplexes and intracellular DNA release are important features of gene delivery systems. To study these features, we have evaluated reducible cysteine-flanked linear lysine and arginine-rich peptides, modified with histidine residues. The reducible disulfide bonds in cysteine flanked peptides and histidine residues should augment DNA release from the peptide-DNA complexes upon disintegration of the reducible bonds. Template polymerization and oxidative polycondensation were applied to obtain peptide oligomers used for DNA-polyplex preparation. The peptides and DNA-peptide complexes were investigated with physical, chemical and transfection measurements. Physicochemical and transfection properties of DNA-polyplexes depended on the amino acid sequence of the peptidic polymers and type of the polymerization. MALDI-TOF analysis of oxidatively polycondensed products revealed several forms of peptide oligomers corresponding to 5-8 amino acid monomers. DNA-peptide particles based on template-polymerized complexes were more resistant to relaxation by negatively charged heparan sulfate than polyplexes formed with oxidatively condensed peptides. Complexes of DNA with the polycations prepared by oxidative polycondensation exhibited a 100-1000-fold higher level of gene expression compared to DNA/template-polymerized peptide complexes. The most efficient transgene expression was shown with arginine-rich polyplexes. Transfection efficacy of the arginine-rich polyplexes was even 10-fold better than that of DNA/PEI complexes. On average, polyplexes based on cysteine-flanked peptide oligomers showed lower cytotoxicity than non-reducible high molecular weight polylysine/DNA particles. We conclude that reducible peptide oligomers provide efficient DNA transfection and have the potential as vehicles for gene delivery.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  20. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals.

    PubMed

    Pai, Varadraj Vasant; Bhandari, Prasana; Shukla, Pankaj

    2017-01-01

    Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  2. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  3. Functions of Cationic Host Defense Peptides in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Anaparti, Vidyanand; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2016-01-01

    Cationic host defense peptides are a widely distributed family of immunomodulatory molecules with antimicrobial properties. The biological functions of these peptides include the ability to influence innate and adaptive immunity for efficient resolution of infections and simultaneous modulation of inflammatory responses. This unique dual bioactivity of controlling infections and inflammation has gained substantial attention in the last three decades and consequent interest in the development of these peptide mimics as immunomodulatory therapeutic candidates. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the wide range of functions of cationic host defense peptides in the context of the mammalian immune system. PMID:27384571

  4. Enzyme-mediated ligation technologies for peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Marcel; Toplak, Ana; Quaedflieg, Peter Jlm; Nuijens, Timo

    2017-02-18

    With the steadily increasing complexity and quantity requirements for peptides in industry and academia, the efficient and site-selective ligation of peptides and proteins represents a highly desirable goal. Within this context, enzyme-mediated ligation technologies for peptides and proteins have attracted great interest in recent years as they represent an extremely powerful extension to the scope of chemical methodologies (e.g. native chemical ligation) in basic and applied research. Compared to chemical ligation methods, enzymatic strategies using ligases such as sortase, butelase, peptiligase or omniligase generally feature excellent chemoselectivity, therefore making them valuable tools for protein and peptide chemists.

  5. Suppressing the epimerization of endothioamide peptides during Fmoc/t-Bu-based solid phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Chatterjee, Jayanta

    2016-11-01

    Despite a number of intriguing utilities associated with thioamide-containing peptides and proteins in the context of biophysics, pharmacology and chemical biology, it has hitherto remained as one of the underexplored territories of peptidomimetics. The synthesis of long mono to multiply substituted endothioamide peptides is invariably accompanied with severe epimerization, oxoamide formation and various other undesired side reactions, resulting in messy product profiles. This has completely restrained their use as novel chemical tools for biological studies. During the chain elongation of an N-terminally located thioamide peptide using the Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry, it becomes vulnerable to the repetitive basic treatments as required for such chemistry. The incompatibility of thioamide moiety with bases as well as strong coupling reagents leads to epimerization as well as other side reactions due to its nucleophilicity, resulting in the loss of the stereochemical identity of the thioamidated amino acid residue. An easy-to-implement and efficient protocol to synthesize long (>10-mer) endothioamide peptides, significantly suppressing epimerization and other side reactions using 10% piperidine/dimethylformamide for 1 min, is reported herein. The novelty of the protocol is shown through the efficient synthesis of a number of 10-12-mer mono to multiply thioamide-substituted peptides with broad substrate scopes. The utility of the protocol in the context of protein engineering and chemical protein synthesis is also shown through the synthesis of a thioamide version of the 16-mer peptide from the B1 domain of protein G. Such a protocol to synthesize long endothioamide peptides would open up avenues toward engineering and accessing novel thiopeptide and thioprotein-based chemical tools, the synthesis of which had been a serious hurdle thus far. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley

  6. Assaying peptide translocation by the peptide transporter TAP.

    PubMed

    Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Neefjes, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    MHC class I molecules display peptides at the cell surface that are mostly derived from cytosolic or nuclear proteins. Since peptide loading of MHC class I molecules occurs in the ER lumen, cytosolic peptides have to pass the ER membrane. The peptide transporter TAP translocates peptides over this ER membrane which is critical for successful MHC class I antigen presentation. How peptide translocation by TAP can be assayed and inhibitors of chemical or viral origin can be identified, will be described here.

  7. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring the microbiological safety of biological therapeutics remains an important concern. Our group has recently reported small trimeric peptides that have the ability to bind and remove a model non-enveloped virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. In an effort to improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, we created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contain two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY. This library was screened and several hexamer peptides were discovered that also removed PPV from solution, but there was no marked improvement in removal efficiency when compared to the trimeric peptides. Based on simulated docking experiments, it appeared that hexamer peptide binding is dictated more by secondary structure, whereas the binding of trimeric peptides is dominated by charge and hydrophobicity. This study demonstrates that trimeric and hexameric peptides may have different, matrix-specific roles to play in virus removal applications. In general, the hexamer ligand may perform better for binding of specific viruses, whereas the trimer ligand may have more broadly reactive virus-binding properties. PMID:21751387

  8. Ubiquitin fusion technology: bioprocessing of peptides.

    PubMed

    Pilon, A; Yost, P; Chase, T E; Lohnas, G; Burkett, T; Roberts, S; Bentley, W E

    1997-01-01

    Ubiquitin fusion technology represents an emerging method for economically producing peptides and small proteins in the bacterium Escherichia coli. Our focus is on peptide production where the need for cost-effective, scaleable processes has recently been highlighted by Kelley (1996). There are two principal features: (1) the expression system consists of a suitable E. coli host strain paired with a plasmid that encodes the ubiquitin fusion and (2) an ubiquitin-specific protease, UCH-L3, which cleaves only C-terminal extensions from ubiquitin. In this work, multigram yields were obtained of four ubiquitin fusions derived from cell paste generated in single 10-L fermentations. All were expressed intracellularly and remained soluble at extremely high levels of expression. Bacterial freeze--thaw lysates contained over 95% pure ubiquitin fusion protein. All four fusions were efficiently cleaved to ubiquitin and the peptide products. In one case, the final yield of peptide was 1.08 g from 3 L of low cell density bacterial culture. The combination of exceptional overexpression of the ubiquitin--peptide fusion proteins and a robust and specific protease are unique advantages contributing to a cost-effective, scaleable, and generic bioprocess for peptide production.

  9. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  10. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  11. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-06

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described.

  12. Photodissociation of Non-Covalent Peptide-Crown Ether Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Kirkovits, Gregory J.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Highly chromogenic 18-crown-6-dipyrrolylquinoxaline coordinates primary amines of peptides, forming non-covalent complexes that can be transferred to the gas phase by electrospray ionization. The appended chromogenic crown ether facilitates efficient energy transfer to the peptide upon ultraviolet irradiation in the gas phase, resulting in diagnostic peptide fragmentation. Collisional activated dissociation (CAD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) of these non-covalent complexes results only in their disassembly with the charge retained on either the peptide or crown ether, yielding no sequence ions. Upon UV photon absorption the intermolecular energy transfer is facilitated by the fast activation time scale of UVPD (< 10 ns) and by the collectively strong hydrogen bonding between the crown ether and peptide, thus allowing effective transfer of energy to the peptide moiety prior to disruption of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. PMID:18077179

  13. Characterization of Selective Antibacterial Peptides by Polarity Index

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, C.; Samaniego, J. L.; Buhse, T.; Mosqueira, F. G.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.; Castanon-Gonzalez, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the recent decades, antibacterial peptides have occupied a strategic position for pharmaceutical drug applications and became subject of intense research activities since they are used to strengthen the immune system of all living organisms by protecting them from pathogenic bacteria. This work proposes a simple and easy statistical/computational method through a peptide polarity index measure by which an antibacterial peptide subgroup can be efficiently identified, that is, characterized by a high toxicity to bacterial membranes but presents a low toxicity to mammal cells. These peptides also have the feature not to adopt to an alpha-helicoidal structure in aqueous solution. The double-blind test carried out to the whole Antimicrobial Peptide Database (November 2011) showed an accuracy of 90% applying the polarity index method for the identification of such antibacterial peptide groups. PMID:22611416

  14. Rapid profiling of peptide stability in proteolytic environments.

    PubMed

    Gorris, Hans H; Bade, Steffen; Röckendorf, Niels; Albers, Eike; Schmidt, M Alexander; Fránek, Milan; Frey, Andreas

    2009-02-15

    The notorious degradation susceptibility of peptides is a major obstacle to their use as medicinal drugs. Assays with which the stability of peptides in complex proteolytic environments can be determined are thus indispensable for peptide drug development. Herein, we describe a new peptide proteolysis assay that meets that demand. It unites the high-throughput capacity of heterogeneous with the well-defined kinetic characteristics of homogeneous assay formats and operates on the cleavage-caused loss of a detection handle. We have confirmed the assay's accuracy with well-defined model interactions and proved its high versatility and robustness with a representative application where we determined the half-lives of 375 different peptides in a crude intestinal protease preparation. With this reliable, reproducible, and efficient assay the enzyme kinetics of any peptide-protease interaction is accessible even for complex protease solutions.

  15. Structure of HLA-A*1101 in complex with a hepatitis B peptide homologue

    PubMed Central

    Blicher, Thomas; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Buus, Søren; Gajhede, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution structure of the human MHC-I molecule HLA-A*1101 is presented in which it forms a complex with a sequence homologue of a peptide that occurs naturally in hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase. The sequence of the bound peptide is AIMPARFYPK, while that of the corresponding natural peptide is LIMPARFYPK. The peptide does not make efficient use of the middle E pocket for binding, which leads to a rather superficial and exposed binding mode for the central peptide residues. Despite this, the peptide binds with high affinity (IC50 of 31 nM). PMID:17142892

  16. Structure of HLA-A*1101 in complex with a hepatitis B peptide homologue.

    PubMed

    Blicher, Thomas; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Buus, Søren; Gajhede, Michael

    2006-12-01

    A high-resolution structure of the human MHC-I molecule HLA-A*1101 is presented in which it forms a complex with a sequence homologue of a peptide that occurs naturally in hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase. The sequence of the bound peptide is AIMPARFYPK, while that of the corresponding natural peptide is LIMPARFYPK. The peptide does not make efficient use of the middle E pocket for binding, which leads to a rather superficial and exposed binding mode for the central peptide residues. Despite this, the peptide binds with high affinity (IC50 of 31 nM).

  17. Ribosomal synthesis of dehydroalanine-containing peptides.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Florian P; Szostak, Jack W

    2006-06-07

    Dehydroalanine is a nonproteinogenic amino acid, but it is a component of a wide variety of natural products with therapeutic activities. Indeed, this alpha,beta-unsaturated residue is a highly versatile building block due to its rigidifying effect on peptide backbones and its electrophilicity which allows site-specific thiol ligations of peptides with small molecules or proteins. To harness such versatility in genetically encoded, combinatorial peptide libraries, we report a simple and robust method for the ribosomal synthesis of dehydroalanine-containing peptides. Selenalysine, a selenium-containing lysine analogue, was recruited as a masked dehydroalanine equivalent. This residue is efficiently incorporated by a reconstituted Escherichia coli translation system at high fidelity and efficiency despite the presence of low levels of lysine. Mild oxidative conditions were used to convert selenalysine into dehydroalanine post-translationally. Using this method, we demonstrate the preparation of polyunsaturated and highly decorated peptides. This report is an important step toward the preparation and selection of large libraries of protein-reactive compounds with potential use as novel drugs or as analytical tools.

  18. The Specificity of Peptide Chain Extension by N-Carboxyanhydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ke; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-06-01

    We have used amino acids activated by carbonyldiimidazole to study the enantiospecificity of peptide elongation in aqueoussolution. Peptide `primers' Glu10 and Ala3Glu10were elongated with the enantiomers of arginine, glutamic acid,asparagine, phenylalanine, serine and valine. The homochiral addition was always the more efficient reaction; the enantiospecificity was large in some cases but very small in others. In every case Ala3Glu10 was elongated more efficiently than Glu10.

  19. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  20. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  1. Peptide synthesis on glass substrate using acoustic droplet ejector.

    PubMed

    Youngki Choe; Shih-Jui Chen; Eun Sok Kim

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of a 9-mers-long peptide ladder structure of glycine on a modified glass surface using a nanoliter droplet ejector. To synthesize peptide on a glass substrate, SPOT peptide synthesis protocol was followed with a nozzleless acoustic droplet ejector being used to eject about 300 droplets of preactivated amino acid solution to dispense 60 nL of the solution per mer. The coupling efficiency of each mer was measured with FITC fluorescent tag to be 96%, resulting in net 70% efficiency for the whole 9-mer-long peptide of glycine. Usage of a nanoliter droplet ejector for SPOT peptide synthesis increases the density of protein array on a chip.

  2. Polar characterization of antifungal peptides from APD2 Database.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego-Mendoza, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Leopold-Sordo, Marili

    2014-11-01

    The increase in the number of pathogens due to fungi that are tolerant to therapies does not grow at the same speed than the advance on new antifungal drugs. In this sense, it is imperative to find anti-fungi peptides that are not detrimental to mammalian cells and have an effective toxicity to fungi. In this work, we use a method called polarity index, to identify anti-fungi peptides with an efficiency of 70 %. This method already published, initially identified selective antibacterial peptides from APD2 Database, and was characterized by developing a comprehensive analysis of the polar dynamics of a peptide from its linear sequence. Discriminating tests showed that in addition to being efficient in this identification, it was also good at rejecting other classifications of peptides found in that same database.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  4. Domino Process Achieves Site-Selective Peptide Modification with High Optical Purity. Applications to Chain Diversification and Peptide Ligation.

    PubMed

    Romero-Estudillo, Ivan; Boto, Alicia

    2015-10-02

    The development of peptide libraries by site-selective modification of a few parent peptides would save valuable time and materials in discovery processes but still is a difficult synthetic challenge. Herein, we introduce natural hydroxyproline as a convertible unit for the production of a variety of optically pure amino acids, including expensive N-alkyl amino acids, homoserine lactones, and Agl lactams, and to achieve the mild, efficient, and site-selective modification of peptides. A domino process is used to cleave the customizable Hyp unit under mild, metal-free conditions. Both terminal and internal positions can be modified, and similar customizable units can be differentiated. The resulting products possess two reactive chains which can be manipulated independently. The versatility and scope of this process is highlighted by its application to the ligation of two peptide chains, and the generation of peptides with several chains and peptides with conformational restrictions.

  5. Oligomerization enhances the binding affinity of a silver biomineralization peptide and catalyzes nanostructure formation.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Tatsuya; Janairo, Jose Isagani B; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Wada, Junya; Omichinski, James G; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2017-05-03

    Binding affinity and specificity are crucial factors that influence nanostructure control by biomineralization peptides. In this paper, we analysed the role that the oligomeric state of a silver biomineralization peptide plays in regulating the morphology of silver nanostructure formation. Oligomerization was achieved by conjugating the silver specific TBP biomineralization peptide to the p53 tetramerization domain peptide (p53Tet). Interestingly, the TBP-p53Tet tetrameric peptide acted as a growth catalyst, controlling silver crystal growth, which resulted in the formation of hexagonal silver nanoplates without consuming the peptide. The TBP-p53Tet peptide caps the surface of the silver crystals, which enhances crystal growth on specific faces and thereby regulates silver nanostructure formation in a catalytic fashion. The present findings not only provide an efficient strategy for controlling silver nanostructure formation by biomineralization peptides, but they also demonstrate that in this case the oligomeric peptides play a unique catalytic role.

  6. HLA-DM mediates peptide exchange by interacting transiently and repeatedly with HLA-DR1

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Kedar; Su, Katherine W.; Chou, Chih-Ling; Khoruzhenko, Stanislav

    2009-01-01

    The peptide editor HLA-DM (DM) catalyzes the exchange of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules within antigen presenting cells by generating a “peptide-receptive” MHC class II conformation (MHCreceptive) to which peptides readily bind and rapidly unbind. While recent work has uncovered the determinants of DM recognition and effector functions, the nature of MHCreceptive and its interaction with DM remains unclear. Here, we show that DM induces but does not stabilize MHCreceptive in the absence of peptides. We demonstrate that DM is out-competed by certain superantigens, and increasing solvent viscosity inhibits DM-induced peptide association. We suggest that DM mediates peptide exchange by interacting transiently and repeatedly with MHC class II molecules, continually generating MHCreceptive. The simultaneous presence of peptide and DM in the milieu is thus crucial for the efficient generation of specific peptide-MHC class II complexes over time. PMID:19647320

  7. Review: Formation of Peptide Radical Ions Through Dissociative Electron Transfer in Ternary Metal-Ligand-Peptide Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Ivan K.; Laskin, Julia

    2011-12-31

    The formation and fragmentation of odd-electron ions of peptides and proteins is of interest to applications in biological mass spectrometry. Gas-phase redox chemistry occurring during collision-induced dissociation of ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes enables the formation of a variety of peptide radicals including the canonical radical cations, M{sup +{sm_bullet}}, radical dications, [M{sup +}H]{sup 2+{sm_bullet}}, radical anions, [M-2H]{sup -{sm_bullet}}. In addition, odd-electron peptide ions with well-defined initial location of the radical site are produced through side chain losses from the radical ions. Subsequent fragmentation of these species provides information on the role of charge and the location of the radical site on the competition between radical-induced and proton-driven fragmentation of odd-electron peptide ions. This account summarizes current understanding of the factors that control the efficiency of the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) in ternary metal-ligand-peptide complexes resulting in formation of odd-electron peptide ions. Specifically, we discuss the effect of the metal center, the ligand and the peptide structure on the competition between the ET, proton transfer (PT), and loss of neutral peptide and neutral peptide fragments from the complex. Fundamental studies of the structures, stabilities, and the energetics and dynamics of fragmentation of such complexes are also important for detailed molecular-level understanding of photosynthesis and respiration in biological systems.

  8. Phage-displayed peptide library screening for preferred human substrate peptide sequences for transglutaminase 7.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Katsuma; Yamasaki, Risa; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka

    2013-09-01

    Transglutaminases are a family of enzymes that catalyze cross-linking reactions between proteins. Among the members, there is currently no information regarding the substrate preferences of transglutaminase 7 (TG7), that would clarify its physiological significance. We previously obtained several highly reactive substrate peptide sequences of transglutaminases from a random peptide library. In this study, we screened for preferred substrate sequences for TG7 from a phage-displayed 12-mer peptide library. The most preferred sequence was selected based on reactivity and isozyme specificity. We firstly exhibited the tendency for the preference of substrate sequence for TG7. Then, using the most efficient peptide, Z3S, we established an in vitro assay system to assess enzymatic activity of TG7.

  9. Gold Ion-Angiotensin Peptide Interaction by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P.; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2012-05-01

    Stimulated by the interest in developing gold compounds for treating cancer, gold ion-angiotensin peptide interactions are investigated by mass spectrometry. Under the experimental conditions used, the majority of gold ion-angiotensin peptide complexes contain gold in the oxidation states I and III. Both ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF MS detect singly/multiply charged ions for mononuclear/multinuclear gold-attached peptides, which are represented as [peptide + a Au(I) + b Au(III) + (e - a -3b) H]e+, where a,b ≥ 0 and e is charge. ESI-MS data shows singly/multiply charged ions of Au(I)-peptide and Au(III)-peptide complexes. This study reveals that MALDI-TOF MS mainly detects singly charged Au(I)-peptide complexes, presumably due to the ionization process. The electrons in the MALDI plume seem to efficiently reduce Au(III) to Au(I). MALDI also tends to enhance the higher polymeric forms of gold-peptide complexes regardless of the laser power used. Collision-induced dissociation experiments of the mononuclear and dinuclear gold-attached peptide ions for angiotensin peptides show that the gold ion (a soft acid) binding sites are in the vicinity of Cys (a soft ligand), His (a major anchor of peptide for metal ion chelation), and the basic residue Arg. Data also suggests that the abundance of gold-attached peptides increases with higher gold concentration until saturation, after which an increase in gold ion concentration leads to the aggregation and/or precipitation of gold-bound peptides.

  10. Postdiffusion of oligo-peptide within exponential growth multilayer films for localized peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefei; Ji, Jian

    2009-10-06

    efficient than the equivalent amount of free TAT peptide in the TAT uptake test. The postdiffusion of oligo-peptide within an exponential growth multilayer can serve as an effective approach for localized and sustained peptide delivery.

  11. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  12. Rational design of a series of novel amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Regberg, Jakob; Srimanee, Artita; Erlandsson, Mikael; Sillard, Rannar; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Karelson, Mati; Langel, Ulo

    2014-04-10

    A series of novel, amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides was developed based on a combination of the model amphipathic peptide sequence and modifications based on the strategies developed for PepFect and NickFect peptides. The aim was to study the role of amphipathicity for peptide uptake and to investigate if the modifications developed for PepFect peptides could be used to improve the uptake of another class of cell-penetrating peptides. The peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis and characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Non-covalent peptide-plasmid complexes were formed by co-incubation of the peptides and plasmids in water solution. The complexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering and cellular uptake of the complexes was studied in a luciferase-based plasmid transfection assay. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model of cellular uptake was developed using descriptors including hydrogen bonding, peptide charge and positions of nitrogen atoms. The peptides were found to be non-toxic and could efficiently transfect cells with plasmid DNA. Cellular uptake data was correlated to QSAR predictions and the predicted biological effects obtained from the model correlated well with experimental data. The QSAR model could improve the understanding of structural requirements for cell penetration, or could potentially be used to predict more efficient cell-penetrating peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeted Peptide Specificity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-31

    the conformation of small natural peptide ligands. In the last year two peptides were investigaýed by 2D-NMR,(j2.- conotoxin SI, which targets to the...targets. Although these venoms are very complex, we have focused on three groups of peptide toxins, the a, j and w- conotoxins which target to nicotinic...grant period are summarized below.) In addition, the 2D-NMR work is continuing and in addition to examining one of the conotoxins specific for the

  14. Blocking peptides and molecular mimicry as treatment for kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Havasi, Andrea; Lu, Weining; Cohen, Herbert T; Beck, Laurence; Wang, Zhiyong; Igwebuike, Chinaemare; Borkan, Steven C

    2017-06-01

    Protein mimotopes, or blocking peptides, are small therapeutic peptides that prevent protein-protein interactions by selectively mimicking a native binding domain. Inexpensive technology facilitates straightforward design and production of blocking peptides in sufficient quantities to allow preventive and therapeutic trials in both in vitro and in vivo experimental disease models. The kidney is an ideal peptide target, since small molecules undergo rapid filtration and efficient bulk absorption by tubular epithelial cells. Because the half-life of peptides is markedly prolonged in the kidneys compared with the bloodstream, blocking peptides are an attractive tool for treating diverse renal diseases, including ischemia, proteinuric states, such as membranous nephropathy and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, and renal cell carcinoma. Therapeutic peptides represent one of the fastest-growing reagent classes for novel drug development in human disease, partly because of their ease of administration, high binding affinity, and minimal off-target effects. This review introduces the concepts of blocking peptide design, production, and administration and highlights the potential use of therapeutic peptides to prevent or treat specific renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Analytical model of peptide mass cluster centres with applications

    PubMed Central

    Wolski, Witold E; Farrow, Malcolm; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Lehrach, Hans; Lalowski, Maciej; Reinert, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Background The elemental composition of peptides results in formation of distinct, equidistantly spaced clusters across the mass range. The property of peptide mass clustering is used to calibrate peptide mass lists, to identify and remove non-peptide peaks and for data reduction. Results We developed an analytical model of the peptide mass cluster centres. Inputs to the model included, the amino acid frequencies in the sequence database, the average length of the proteins in the database, the cleavage specificity of the proteolytic enzyme used and the cleavage probability. We examined the accuracy of our model by comparing it with the model based on an in silico sequence database digest. To identify the crucial parameters we analysed how the cluster centre location depends on the inputs. The distance to the nearest cluster was used to calibrate mass spectrometric peptide peak-lists and to identify non-peptide peaks. Conclusion The model introduced here enables us to predict the location of the peptide mass cluster centres. It explains how the location of the cluster centres depends on the input parameters. Fast and efficient calibration and filtering of non-peptide peaks is achieved by a distance measure suggested by Wool and Smilansky. PMID:16995952

  16. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  17. Insulin C-peptide

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  18. A viral peptide for intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Cantisani, Marco; Della Pepa, Maria Elena; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2012-10-01

    Biological membranes represent a critical hindrance for administering active molecules which are often unable to reach their designated intracellular target sites. In order to overcome this barrier-like behavior not easily circumvented by many pharmacologically-active molecules, synthetic transporters have been exploited to promote cellular uptake. Linking or complexing therapeutic molecules to peptides that can translocate through the cellular membranes could enhance their internal delivery, and consequently, a higher amount of active compound would reach the site of action. Use of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is one of the most promising strategy to efficiently translocate macromolecules through the plasma membrane, and have attracted a lot of attention. New translocating peptides are continuously described and in the present review, we will focus on viral derived peptides, and in particular a peptide (gH625) derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein H (gH) that has proved to be a useful delivery vehicle due to its intrinsic properties of inducing membrane perturbation.

  19. Functionalized periodic mesoporous organosilicas for enhanced and selective peptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jingjing; Qian, Kun; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yunhua; Yang, Pengyuan; Liu, Baohong; Yu, Chengzhong

    2010-05-18

    The analysis of peptides by the mass spectrometry (MS) technique is important in modern life science. The enrichment of peptides can increase the detection efficiency and is sometimes indispensable for collecting the information on proteins with low-abundance. Herein, we first report that functionalized periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) materials have a superior peptide enrichment property. It is demonstrated that the PMO materials with an organo-bridged (-CH(2)-) hybrid wall composition display a highly enhanced peptide enrichment ability compared to the pure silica material (SBA-15) with similar mesostructured parameters and morphology. More importantly, by surface modification of PMO with amino groups (denoted NH(2)-PMO), PMO and NH(2)-PMO with opposite charged surfaces (-25.2 and +39.0 mV, respectively) show selective affinities for positively and negatively charged peptides, respectively. By directly adding PMO, NH(2)-PMO as well as pure silica materials to the peptides solution with a low concentration (1-2 fmol/microL), 36 and 28 peptides can be detected from the BSA digestion in the presence of PMO and NH(2)-PMO, respectively, while only 6 and 4 are monitored in the case of SBA-15 enrichment and from solution without enrichment, respectively. Moreover, 69.4% (25 of 36) of enriched peptides by PMO have pI > or = 6 and 80% (21 of 28) of enriched peptides by NH(2)-PMO possess pI < or = 6. Combining the results from the NH(2)-PMO and PMO enrichment together, 51 peptides can be identified with a MOWSE score of 333. It is also noted that similar conclusions can also be obtained from the peptides solution originated from other proteins. This might be an important contribution to the understanding of the interaction between peptides and porous hosts, and the proposed method is promising for the development of both material science and biotechnology.

  20. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  2. Diversity-Oriented Peptide Stapling: A Third Generation Copper-Catalysed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition Stapling and Functionalisation Strategy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong Thu; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias; De Foresta, Martina; Kunze, Micha B A; Marek, Ales; Løper, Jacob Hartvig; Boyhus, Lotte-Emilie; Knuhtsen, Astrid; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer

    2017-01-20

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, which can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access to radiolabelled stapled peptides by catalytic tritiation of the alkyne positioned on the staple.

  3. Responses of peptide-specific T cells to stimulation with polystyrene beads carrying HLA class I molecules loaded with single peptides.

    PubMed

    Chersi, Alberto; Galati, Rossella; Accapezzato, Daniele; Francavilla, Vittorio; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Butler, Richard H; Tanigaki, Nobuyuki

    2004-08-01

    Cell-sized microbeads carrying single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules were prepared for HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 by a simple procedure which transfers single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules from cultured cells to polystyrene beads using anti-peptide antibodies directed to an intracellular segment of HLA-A alpha chains. The surface density of peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules on beads was comparable to that on the peptide-loaded cells. HLA-A2 beads loaded with an HCV peptide HCV1073 were tested for stimulation activity on an HCV1073-specific CD8+ T cell clone NS3-1. A substantial level of gamma-IFN production was induced. The stimulation was peptide-specific. The efficiency was dependent on the bead concentration and the surface HLA class I density on beads and enhanced significantly by co-coupling of anti-CD28 to peptide-loaded beads. The peptide-loading efficiency on HLA class I molecules and the transfer efficiency of HLA class I molecules to polystyrene beads were reasonably high for HLA-A2 and HLA-B7. Thus, polystyrene beads carrying these single peptide-loaded HLA class I molecules are potentially useful in further analysis of the co-stimulatory or inhibitory factors involved in CD8+ T cell responses and eventually in detection of cytotoxic T cells in PBLs.

  4. Methods for peptide identification by spectral comparison

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Bell, Alexander W; Bergeron, John JM; Yanofsky, Corey M; Carrillo, Brian; Beaudrie, Christian EH; Kearney, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry followed by database search is currently the predominant technology for peptide sequencing in shotgun proteomics experiments. Most methods compare experimentally observed spectra to the theoretical spectra predicted from the sequences in protein databases. There is a growing interest, however, in comparing unknown experimental spectra to a library of previously identified spectra. This approach has the advantage of taking into account instrument-dependent factors and peptide-specific differences in fragmentation probabilities. It is also computationally more efficient for high-throughput proteomics studies. Results This paper investigates computational issues related to this spectral comparison approach. Different methods have been empirically evaluated over several large sets of spectra. First, we illustrate that the peak intensities follow a Poisson distribution. This implies that applying a square root transform will optimally stabilize the peak intensity variance. Our results show that the square root did indeed outperform other transforms, resulting in improved accuracy of spectral matching. Second, different measures of spectral similarity were compared, and the results illustrated that the correlation coefficient was most robust. Finally, we examine how to assemble multiple spectra associated with the same peptide to generate a synthetic reference spectrum. Ensemble averaging is shown to provide the best combination of accuracy and efficiency. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that when combined, these methods can boost the sensitivity and specificity of spectral comparison. Therefore they are capable of enhancing and complementing existing tools for consistent and accurate peptide identification. PMID:17227583

  5. The Use of Aryl Hydrazide Linkers for the Solid Phase Synthesis of Chemically Modified Peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Y; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2006-11-03

    Since Merrifield introduced the concept of solid phase synthesis in 1963 for the rapid preparation of peptides, a large variety of different supports and resin-linkers have been developed that improve the efficiency of peptide assembly and expand the myriad of synthetically feasible peptides. The aryl hydrazide is one of the most useful resin-linkers for the synthesis of chemically modified peptides. This linker is completely stable during Boc- and Fmoc-based solid phase synthesis and yet it can be cleaved under very mild oxidative conditions. The present article reviews the use of this valuable linker for the rapid and efficient synthesis of C-terminal modified peptides, head-to-tail cyclic peptides and lipidated peptides.

  6. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations.

  7. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-14

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.

  8. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Søren; Thorn, Mette; Stryhn, Anette; Leisner, Christian; Claesson, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Development of methods for efficient in vitro stimulation and expansion of peptide specific CD8(+) T cells is compelling not only with respect to adoptive T cell therapy but also regarding analysis of T cell responses and search for new immunogenic peptides. In the present study, a new approach to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NA-PBMCs) with PB-MHC/CMVp resulted in significant expansion of CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, which was comparable to that achieved by CMVp pulsed mature dendritic cells (DCs). By repeated exposure of NA-PBMCs to PB-MHC/CMVp more than 60% CMVp specific CD8(+) T cells, representing a 240-fold expansion, were reached after only two stimulations. Although stimulation with PB-MHC/CMVp clearly demonstrated efficient peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells, there was a tendency to proliferative exhaustion of the cells after 3-4 stimulations. Thus, it will be of interest to examine the effect of new stimulatory cocktails, e.g. cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, by use of the present rapid and easy-to-use method of expanding peptide specific T cells.

  9. Macrocyclic peptides self-assemble into robust vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo-jin; Lim, Yong-beom

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we developed macrocyclic peptide building blocks that formed self-assembled peptide vesicles with molecular recognition capabilities. Macrocyclic peptides were significantly different from conventional amphiphiles, in that they could self-assemble into vesicles at very high hydrophilic-to-total mass ratios. The flexibility of the hydrophobic self-assembly segment was critical for vesicle formation. The unique features of this peptide vesicle system include a homogeneous size distribution, unusually small size, and robust structural and thermal stability. The peptide vesicles successfully entrapped a hydrophilic model drug, released the payload very slowly, and were internalized by cells in a highly efficient manner. Moreover, the peptide vesicles exhibited molecular recognition capabilities, in that they selectively bound to target RNA through surface-displayed peptides. This study demonstrates that self-assembled peptide vesicles can be used as strong intracellular delivery vehicles that recognize specific biomacromolecular targets.

  10. Conformational Restriction of Peptides Using Dithiol Bis-Alkylation.

    PubMed

    Peraro, L; Siegert, T R; Kritzer, J A

    2016-01-01

    Macrocyclic peptides are highly promising as inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. While many bond-forming reactions can be used to make cyclic peptides, most have limitations that make this chemical space challenging to access. Recently, a variety of cysteine alkylation reactions have been used in rational design and library approaches for cyclic peptide discovery and development. We and others have found that this chemistry is versatile and robust enough to produce a large variety of conformationally constrained cyclic peptides. In this chapter, we describe applications, methods, mechanistic insights, and troubleshooting for dithiol bis-alkylation reactions for the production of cyclic peptides. This method for efficient solution-phase macrocyclization is highly useful for the rapid production and screening of loop-based inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Encapsulation of cationic peptides into polymersomes through in situ gelatinization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Pang, Zhiqing; Lu, Wei; Pan, Shuaiqi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulation of peptides and proteins remains an obstacle in drug nanoformulations. Here, we established an alternative method to encapsulate peptides and proteins into polymersomes (POs). NC-1900, a type of cationic peptide that can induce the gelatinization of deacetylated gellan gum (DGG), was selected as a model peptide. DGG was first trapped in POs to serve as a reservoir to capture NC-1900. Analysis of the optimized formulation revealed that the drug-loading capability of NC-1900-loaded POs was 1.20%, and the encapsulation efficiency was 30%. The release of NC-1900 from the gel was the rate-limiting step and could be expressed by Fick's law of diffusion. These results indicated that the preparation of POs encapsulated with gelatin could be employed as an effective loading method for ionic peptides and proteins.

  12. Peptide synthesis in neat organic solvents with novel thermostable proteases.

    PubMed

    Toplak, Ana; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J L M; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-06-01

    Biocatalytic peptide synthesis will benefit from enzymes that are active at low water levels in organic solvent compositions that allow good substrate and product solubility. To explore the use of proteases from thermophiles for peptide synthesis under such conditions, putative protease genes of the subtilase class were cloned from Thermus aquaticus and Deinococcus geothermalis and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes were highly thermostable and catalyzed efficient peptide bond synthesis at 80°C and 60°C in neat acetonitrile with excellent conversion (>90%). The enzymes tolerated high levels of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a cosolvent (40-50% v/v), which improved substrate solubility and gave good conversion in 5+3 peptide condensation reactions. The results suggest that proteases from thermophiles can be used for peptide synthesis under harsh reaction conditions.

  13. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage-displayed peptides.

    PubMed

    Ng, Simon; Tjhung, Katrina F; Paschal, Beth M; Noren, Christopher J; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-01-01

    Phage-displayed peptide library has fueled the discovery of novel ligands for diverse targets. A new type of phage libraries that displays not only linear and disulfide-constrained cyclic peptides but moieties that cannot be encoded genetically or incorporated easily by bacterial genetic machinery has emerged recently. Chemical posttranslational modification of phage library is one of the simplest approaches to encode nonnatural moieties. It confers the library with new functionality and makes it possible to select and evolve molecules with properties not found in the peptides, for instance, glycopeptides recognized by carbohydrate-binding protein and peptides with photoswitching capability. To this end, we describe the newly emerging techniques to chemically modify the phage library and quantify the efficiency of the reaction with a biotin-capture assay. Finally, we provide the methods to construct N-terminal Ser peptide library that allows site-selective modification of phage.

  14. Fast conventional Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis with HCTU.

    PubMed

    Hood, Christina A; Fuentes, German; Patel, Hirendra; Page, Karen; Menakuru, Mahendra; Park, Jae H

    2008-01-01

    1H-Benzotriazolium 1-[bis(dimethyl-amino)methylene]-5-chloro-hexafluorophosphate (1-),3-oxide (HCTU) is a nontoxic, nonirritating and noncorrosive coupling reagent. Seven biologically active peptides (GHRP-6, (65-74)ACP, oxytocin, G-LHRH, C-peptide, hAmylin(1-37), and beta-amyloid(1-42)) were synthesized with reaction times reduced to deprotection times of 3 min or less and coupling times of 5 min or less using HCTU as the coupling reagent. Expensive coupling reagents or special techniques were not used. Total peptide synthesis times were dramatically reduced by as much as 42.5 h (1.8 days) without reducing the crude peptide purities. It was shown that HCTU can be used as an affordable, efficient coupling reagent for fast Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

  15. Low-Cost Peptide Microarrays for Mapping Continuous Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Law, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for understanding antibody specificity in antibody and vaccine research, pepscan assays provide a rapid method for mapping and profiling antibody responses to continuous epitopes. We have developed a relatively low-cost method to generate peptide microarray slides for studying antibody binding. Using a setup of an IntavisAG MultiPep RS peptide synthesizer, a Digilab MicroGrid II 600 microarray printer robot, and an InnoScan 1100 AL scanner, the method allows the interrogation of up to 1536 overlapping, alanine-scanning, and mutant peptides derived from the target antigens. Each peptide is tagged with a polyethylene glycol aminooxy terminus to improve peptide solubility, orientation, and conjugation efficiency to the slide surface.

  16. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of Linear and Branched Cationic Peptides: Evaluation as Gene Carriers.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose Manuel; Chuah, Jo-Ann; Numata, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Cationic peptides such as poly(l-lysine) and poly(l-arginine) are important tools for gene delivery since they can efficiently condense DNA. It is difficult to produce cationic peptides by recombinant bacterial expression, and its chemical synthesis requires several steps of protection/deprotection and toxic agents. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of peptides is a clean chemistry technique that allows fast production under mild conditions. With the aim to simplify the production of cationic peptides, the present work develops an enzymatic reaction which enables the synthesis of linear cationic peptides and, through terminal functionalization with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine, of branched cationic peptide conjugates, which show improved DNA complex formation. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency of all the chemo-enzymatically synthesized cationic peptides are evaluated for their novel use as gene delivery agents. Synthesized peptides exhibit transfection efficiencies comparable to previously reported monodisperse peptides. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis opens the door for efficient production of cationic peptides for their use as gene delivery carriers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Linear Peptides in Intracellular Applications.

    PubMed

    Zuconelli, Cristiane R; Brock, Roland; Adjobo-Hermans, Merel J W

    2017-01-01

    To this point, efforts to develop therapeutic peptides for intracellular applications were guided by the perception that unmodified linear peptides are highly unstable and therefore structural modifications are required to reduce proteolytic breakdown. Largely, this concept is a consequence of the fact that most research on intracellular peptides hitherto has focused on peptide degradation in the context of antigen processing, rather than on peptide stability. Interestingly, inside cells, endogenous peptides lacking any chemical modifications to enhance stability escape degradation to the point that they may even modulate intracellular signaling pathways. In addition, many unmodified synthetic peptides designed to interfere with intracellular signaling, following introduction into cells, have the expected activity demonstrating that biologically relevant concentrations can be reached. This review provides an overview of results and techniques relating to the exploration and application of linear, unmodified peptides. After an introduction to intracellular peptide turnover, the review mentions examples for synthetic peptides as modulators of intracellular signaling, introduces endogenous peptides with bioactivity, techniques to measure peptide stability, and peptide delivery. Future experiments should elucidate the rules needed to predict promising peptide candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. pCAP-Based Peptide Substrates: The New Tool in the Box of Tyrosine Phosphatase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Kulkarni, Rhushikesh A.; Karver, Caitlin E.; Bruenger, Eveline; Walker, Logan M.; Ma, Chen-Ting; Chung, Thomas D. Y.; Sergienko, Eduard; Bottini, Nunzio; Barrios, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Robust, facile high throughput assays based on non-peptidic probes are available to detect the enzyme activity of protein tyrosine phosphatases. However, these assays cannot replace the use of peptide-based probes in many applications; for example when a closer mimic of the physiological target is desired or in substrate profiling expeditions. Phosphotyrosine peptides are often used in these assays, but their use is complicated by either poor sensitivity or the need for indirect detection methods, among other pitfalls. Novel peptide-based probes for protein tyrosine phosphatases are needed to replace phosphotyrosine peptides and accelerate the field of tyrosine phosphatase substrate profiling. Here we review a type of peptidic probe for tyrosine phosphatases, which is based on the incorporation of the phosphotyrosine-mimic phosphocoumaryl amino propionic acid (pCAP) into peptides. The resulting fluorogenic pCAP peptides are dephosphorylated by tyrosine phosphatases with similar efficiency as the homologous phosphotyrosine peptides. pCAP peptides outperform phosphotyrosine peptides, providing an assay that is as robust, sensitive and facile as the non-peptidic fluorogenic probes on the market. Finally the use of pCAP can expand the range of phosphatase assays, facilitating the investigation of multiphosphorylated peptides and providing an in-gel assay for phosphatase activity. PMID:23886911

  19. Electron transfer in peptides.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  20. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  2. Tulane/Xavier Vaccine Peptide Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    influenza A ( H1N1 ) emerged in April 2009, and that strain also demonstrated efficient person-to-person transmission. CDC estimates that there were between...viruses, including the novel influenza A ( H1N1 ). We have recently identified a candidate anti-viral therapeutic peptide, designated Flufirvitide-3. We...modification techniques, in vitro immunoplaque assays will be performed. Influenza A/ H1N1 will be used since we have previously demonstrated the

  3. Monolithic capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate for peptide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherenko, E. V.; Melnik, D. M.; Korolev, A. A.; Kanateva, A. Yu.; Pirogov, A. V.; Kurganov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    Monolythic medium-polar capillary columns based on pentaerythritol tetraacrylate were optimized for separation of peptides. The synthesis temperature and time, the fraction of monomer in the initial polymerization mixture, and the nature of alcohol contained in the complex porogen were chosen as optimization parameters. The highest efficiency was attained for columns obtained with 33 and 34% monomer at a polymerization time of 75 min and a temperature of 75°C. The columns with the optimum structure were effective in separation of a model mixture of five peptides. The sensitivity of the method was 200 ng of peptide per column.

  4. Peptide promiscuity: an evolutionary concept for plant defense.

    PubMed

    Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2011-04-06

    The phenomenon of protein promiscuity, in which multiple functions are associated with a single peptide structure, has gained attention in several research fields, including the plant defense field. With this in mind, this report intends to link various plant defense peptides with common scaffolds (defensins, cyclotides and 2S albumins), and multiple activities with the processes of promiscuity generation and protein evolvability. This link seems to create an efficient system of plant defense against insect pests and pathogens, and is thus essential to plant survival and evolution. This review also identifies future possibilities for the use of peptide promiscuity in designing novel drugs and synthetic biotechnological products.

  5. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  6. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  7. Antimicrobial peptides in the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won Gi; Lee, Joon Ha; Shin, Younhee; Shim, Jae-Young; Jung, Myunghee; Kang, Byeong-Chul; Oh, Jaedon; Seong, Jiyeon; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kong, Hong Sik; Song, Ki-Duk; Yun, Eun-Young; Kim, In-Woo; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Dong Gun; Hwang, Ui-Wook; Park, Junhyung; Hwang, Jae Sam

    2014-06-01

    The centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans is an environmentally beneficial and medically important arthropod species. Although this species is increasingly applied as a reliable source of new antimicrobial peptides, the transcriptome of this species is a prerequisite for more rational selection of antimicrobial peptides. In this report, we isolated total RNA from the whole body of adult centipedes, S. subspinipes mutilans, that were nonimmunized and immunized against Escherichia coli, and we generated a total of 77,063 pooled contigs and singletons using high-throughput sequencing. To screen putative antimicrobial peptides, in silico analyses of the S. subspinipes mutilans transcriptome were performed based on the physicochemical evidence of length, charge, isoelectric point, and in vitro and in vivo aggregation scores together with the existence of continuous antimicrobial peptide stretches. Moreover, we excluded some transcripts that showed similarity with both previously known antimicrobial peptides and the human proteome, had a proteolytic cleavage site, and had downregulated expression compared with the nonimmunized sample. As a result, we selected 17 transcripts and tested their antimicrobial activity with a radial diffusion assay. Among them, ten synthetic peptides experimentally showed antimicrobial activity against microbes and no toxicity to mouse erythrocytes. Our results provide not only a useful set of antimicrobial peptide candidates and an efficient strategy for novel antimicrobial peptide development but also the transcriptome data of a big centipede as a valuable resource.

  8. Cullin3 - BTB Interface: A Novel Target for Stapled Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3–BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the “stapling” with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49–68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300–600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3. PMID:25848797

  9. Machine learning study for the prediction of transdermal peptide.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Shin, Jae-Min; Choi, Kihang; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2011-04-01

    In order to develop a computational method to rapidly evaluate transdermal peptides, we report approaches for predicting the transdermal activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Partial Least Squares (PLS) and Support Vector Machine (SVM). We identified 269 transdermal peptides by the phage display technique and use them as the positive controls to develop and test machine learning models. Combinations of three descriptors with neural network architectures, the number of latent variables and the kernel functions are tried in training to make appropriate predictions. The capacity of models is evaluated by means of statistical indicators including sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC score). In the ROC score-based comparison, three methods proved capable of providing a reasonable prediction of transdermal peptide. The best result is obtained by SVM model with a radial basis function and VHSE descriptors. The results indicate that it is possible to discriminate between transdermal peptides and random sequences using our models. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to prediction of transdermal peptide for large peptide database for facilitating efficient transdermal drug delivery through intact skin.

  10. Detection of selective antibacterial peptides by the Polarity Profile method.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Buhse, Thomas; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides occupy a prominent place in the production of pharmaceuticals, because of their effective contribution to the protection of the immune system against almost all types of pathogens. These peptides are thoroughly studied by computational methods designed to shed light on their main functions. In this paper, we propose a computational approach, named the Polarity Profile method that represents an improvement to the former Polarity Index method. The Polarity Profile method is very effective in detecting the subgroup of antibacterial peptides called selective cationic amphipathic antibacterial peptides (SCAAP) that show high toxicity towards bacterial membranes and exhibit almost zero toxicity towards mammalian cells. Our study was restricted to the peptides listed in the antimicrobial peptides database (APD2) of December 19, 2012. Performance of the Polarity Profile method is demonstrated through a comparison to the former Polarity Index method by using the same sets of peptides. The efficiency of the Polarity Profile method exceeds 85% taking into account the false positive and/or false negative peptides.

  11. Cullin3-BTB interface: a novel target for stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    de Paola, Ivan; Pirone, Luciano; Palmieri, Maddalena; Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; Russo, Luigi; Mazzà, Daniela; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Emilia; Zaccaro, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cullin3 (Cul3), a key factor of protein ubiquitination, is able to interact with dozens of different proteins containing a BTB (Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack and Broad Complex) domain. We here targeted the Cul3-BTB interface by using the intriguing approach of stabilizing the α-helical conformation of Cul3-based peptides through the "stapling" with a hydrocarbon cross-linker. In particular, by combining theoretical and experimental techniques, we designed and characterized stapled Cul3-based peptides embedding the helix 2 of the protein (residues 49-68). Intriguingly, CD and NMR experiments demonstrate that these stapled peptides were able to adopt the helical structure that the fragment assumes in the parent protein. We also show that some of these peptides were able to bind to the BTB of the tetrameric KCTD11, a substrate adaptor involved in HDAC1 degradation, with high affinity (~ 300-600 nM). Cul3-derived staple peptides are also able to bind the BTB of the pentameric KCTD5. Interestingly, the affinity of these peptides is of the same order of magnitude of that reported for the interaction of full-length Cul3 with some BTB containing proteins. Moreover, present data indicate that stapling endows these peptides with an increased serum stability. Altogether, these findings indicate that the designed stapled peptides can efficiently mimic protein-protein interactions and are potentially able to modulate fundamental biological processes involving Cul3.

  12. A Highly Scalable Peptide-Based Assay System for Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Igor A.; Thomsen, Elliot R.; Munchel, Sarah E.; Villegas, Patricia; Capek, Petr; Gower, Austin J.; K. Pond, Stephanie J.; Chudin, Eugene; Chee, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a scalable and cost-effective technology for generating and screening high-complexity customizable peptide sets. The peptides are made as peptide-cDNA fusions by in vitro transcription/translation from pools of DNA templates generated by microarray-based synthesis. This approach enables large custom sets of peptides to be designed in silico, manufactured cost-effectively in parallel, and assayed efficiently in a multiplexed fashion. The utility of our peptide-cDNA fusion pools was demonstrated in two activity-based assays designed to discover protease and kinase substrates. In the protease assay, cleaved peptide substrates were separated from uncleaved and identified by digital sequencing of their cognate cDNAs. We screened the 3,011 amino acid HCV proteome for susceptibility to cleavage by the HCV NS3/4A protease and identified all 3 known trans cleavage sites with high specificity. In the kinase assay, peptide substrates phosphorylated by tyrosine kinases were captured and identified by sequencing of their cDNAs. We screened a pool of 3,243 peptides against Abl kinase and showed that phosphorylation events detected were specific and consistent with the known substrate preferences of Abl kinase. Our approach is scalable and adaptable to other protein-based assays. PMID:22701568

  13. Phage Selection of Chemically Stabilized α-Helical Peptide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Diderich, Philippe; Bertoldo, Davide; Dessen, Pierre; Khan, Maola M; Pizzitola, Irene; Held, Werner; Huelsken, Joerg; Heinis, Christian

    2016-05-20

    Short α-helical peptides stabilized by linkages between constituent amino acids offer an attractive format for ligand development. In recent years, a range of excellent ligands based on stabilized α-helices were generated by rational design using α-helical peptides of natural proteins as templates. Herein, we developed a method to engineer chemically stabilized α-helical ligands in a combinatorial fashion. In brief, peptides containing cysteines in position i and i + 4 are genetically encoded by phage display, the cysteines are modified with chemical bridges to impose α-helical conformations, and binders are isolated by affinity selection. We applied the strategy to affinity mature an α-helical peptide binding β-catenin. We succeeded in developing ligands with Kd's as low as 5.2 nM, having >200-fold improved affinity. The strategy is generally applicable for affinity maturation of any α-helical peptide. Compared to hydrocarbon stapled peptides, the herein evolved thioether-bridged peptide ligands can be synthesized more easily, as no unnatural amino acids are required and the cyclization reaction is more efficient and yields no stereoisomers. A further advantage of the thioether-bridged peptide ligands is that they can be expressed recombinantly as fusion proteins.

  14. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  15. An integrated artificial photosynthesis system based on peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Chunfeng; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2014-07-21

    A peptide nanotube platform that integrates both light-harvesting and catalytic units was successfully engineered for artificial photosynthesis. Peptide nanotubes not only serve as a hub for physically combining both units, but also work as mediators that transfer the energy from photo-excited chromophores to catalytic centers. The direct conversion of NAD(+) to NADH upon light illumination was demonstrated. This represents a promising step towards efficient and fully integrated artificial photosynthesis systems.

  16. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting toward intracellular targets, which increases their success compartively to one-target specific drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials. PMID:28271058

  17. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  18. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  19. Novel peptides functionally targeting in vivo human lung cancer discovered by in vivo peptide displayed phage screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Jin; Lee, Jae Hee; Chung, Hye Kyung; Choi, Jinhyang; Park, Jaesook; Park, Seok Soon; Ju, Eun Jin; Park, Jin; Shin, Seol Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Ko, Eun Jung; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, InKi; Hwang, Jung Jin; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-02-01

    Discovery of the cancer-specific peptidic ligands have been emphasized for active targeting drug delivery system and non-invasive imaging. For the discovery of useful and applicable peptidic ligands, in vivo peptide-displayed phage screening has been performed in this study using a xenograft mouse model as a mimic microenvironment to tumor. To seek human lung cancer-specific peptides, M13 phage library displaying 2.9 × 10(9) random peptides was intravenously injected into mouse model bearing A549-derived xenograft tumor through the tail vein. Then the phages emerged from a course of four rounds of biopanning in the xenograft tumor tissue. Novel peptides were categorized into four groups according to a sequence-homology phylogenicity, and in vivo tumor-targeting capacity of these peptides was validated by whole body imaging with Cy5.5-labeled phages in various cancer types. The result revealed that novel peptides accumulated only in adenocarcinoma lung cancer cell-derived xenograft tissue. For further confirmation of the specific targeting ability, in vitro cell-binding assay and immunohistochemistry in vivo tumor tissue were performed with a selected peptide. The peptide was found to bind intensely to lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, which was efficiently compromised with unlabeled phages in an in vitro competition assay. In conclusion, the peptides specifically targeting human lung cancer were discovered in this study, which is warranted to provide substantive feasibilities for drug delivery and imaging in terms of a novel targeted therapeutics and diagnostics.

  20. Constructing thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via on-resin intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingchuan; Zhang, Qingzhou; Li, Zigang

    2016-08-01

    Thiol-ene reactions have been used in a variety of applications that mostly involve an inter-molecular pathway. Herein, we report a facile method to construct thioether-tethered cyclic peptides via an intra-molecular thiol-ene reaction. This reaction is efficient, selective, and has good residue compatibility. Short peptides with thioether tethers were constructed and were used to construct longer cyclic peptides. This synthetic method may be useful for constructing bioactive peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Separation of structurally related synthetic peptides by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanzhong; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chen, Jenny I-Chen; Keah, Hooi Hong; Hearn, Milton T W

    2003-08-15

    The separation of two different sets of synthetic peptides has been investigated by high-performance capillary zone electrophoresis utilising naked, fused silica capillaries. The effects of electrolyte pH, buffer concentration, capillary length and electric field strength on the separation efficiency and selectivity were systematically varied, with the highest resolution achieved with buffer electrolytes of low pH and relatively high ionic strength. Under optimised separation conditions utilising the "short end injection" separation approach with negative electric field polarity, a series of eight structurally-related synthetic peptides were baseline resolved within 4 min without addition of any modifier of the background electrolyte with separation efficiencies in the vicinity of 600000 theoretical plates/m. Further significant enhancement of separation efficiencies could be achieved by taking advantage of the "long end injection" approach with positive electric field polarity. The outcome of these experimental variations parallels the "sweeping" effect that has been observed in the capillary electrochromatographic and micellar electrokinetic separations of polar molecules and permits rapid resolution of peptides with focusing effects. In addition, small changes in the electrolyte buffer pH and concentration were found to have a significant impact on the selectivity of synthetic peptides of similar intrinsic charge. These observations indicate that multi-modal separation mechanisms operated under these conditions with the unmodified fused silica capillaries. This study, moreover, documents additional examples of peptide-specific multi-zoning behaviour in the high-performance capillary zone electrophoretic separation of synthetic peptides.

  2. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  3. Quantitative evaluation of peptide-extraction methods by HPLC-triple-quad MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Wu, Dapeng; Wu, Qian; Guan, Yafeng

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the efficiency of five peptide-extraction methods—acetonitrile (ACN) precipitation, ultrafiltration, C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE), dispersed SPE with mesoporous carbon CMK-3, and mesoporous silica MCM-41—was quantitatively investigated. With 28 tryptic peptides as target analytes, these methods were evaluated on the basis of recovery and reproducibility by using high-performance liquid chromatography-triple-quad tandem mass spectrometry in selected-reaction-monitoring mode. Because of the distinct extraction mechanisms of the methods, their preferences for extracting peptides of different properties were revealed to be quite different, usually depending on the pI values or hydrophobicity of peptides. When target peptides were spiked in bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution, the extraction efficiency of all the methods except ACN precipitation changed significantly. The binding of BSA with target peptides and nonspecific adsorption on adsorbents were believed to be the ways through which BSA affected the extraction behavior. When spiked in plasma, the performance of all five methods deteriorated substantially, with the number of peptides having recoveries exceeding 70% being 15 for ACN precipitation, and none for the other methods. Finally, the methods were evaluated in terms of the number of identified peptides for extraction of endogenous plasma peptides. Only ultrafiltration and CMK-3 dispersed SPE performed differently from the quantitative results with target peptides, and the wider distribution of the properties of endogenous peptides was believed to be the main reason.

  4. Synthesis and In Vitro Testing of New Potent Polyacridine-Melittin Gene Delivery Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Baumhover, Nicholas J.; Anderson, Kevin; Fernandez, Christian A.; Rice, Kevin G.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of a polyacridine peptide modified with a melittin fusogenic peptide results in a potent gene transfer agent. Polyacridine peptides of the general formula (Acr-X)n-Cys were prepared by solid phase peptide synthesis, where Acr is Lys modified on its ε-amine with acridine, X is Arg, Leu or Lys and n is 2, 3 or 4 repeats. The Cys residue was modified by either a maleimide-melittin or a thiolpyridine-Cys-melittin fusogenic peptide resulting in reducible or non-reducible polyacridine-melittin peptides. Hemolysis assays established that polyacridine-melittin peptides retained their membrane lytic potency relative to melittin at pH 7.4 and 5. When combined with plasmid DNA, the membrane lytic potency of polyacridine-melittin peptides was neutralized. Gene transfer experiments in multiple cell lines established polyacridine-melittin peptides mediate expression as efficiently as PEI. The expression was very dependent upon a disulfide bond linking polyacridine to melittin. The gene transfer was most efficient when X is Arg and n is 3 or 4 repeats. These studies establish polyacridine peptides as a novel DNA binding anchor peptide. PMID:19968269

  5. On the mechanisms of the internalization of S413-PV cell-penetrating peptide

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides have been shown to translocate across eukaryotic cell membranes through a temperature-insensitive and energy-independent mechanism that does not involve membrane receptors or transporters. Although cell-penetrating peptides have been successfully used to mediate the intracellular delivery of a wide variety of molecules of pharmacological interest both in vitro and in vivo, the mechanisms by which cellular uptake occurs remain unclear. In the face of recent reports demonstrating that uptake of cell-penetrating peptides occurs through previously described endocytic pathways, or is a consequence of fixation artifacts, we conducted a critical re-evaluation of the mechanism responsible for the cellular uptake of the S413-PV karyophilic cell-penetrating peptide. We report that the S413-PV peptide is able to accumulate inside live cells very efficiently through a rapid, dose-dependent and non-toxic process, providing clear evidence that the cellular uptake of this peptide cannot be attributed to fixation artifacts. Comparative analysis of peptide uptake into mutant cells lacking heparan sulphate proteoglycans demonstrates that their presence at the cell surface facilitates the cellular uptake of the S413-PV peptide, particularly at low peptide concentrations. Most importantly, our results clearly demonstrate that, in addition to endocytosis, which is only evident at low peptide concentrations, the efficient cellular uptake of the S413-PV cell-penetrating peptide occurs mainly through an alternative, non-endocytic mechanism, most likely involving direct penetration across cell membranes. PMID:15907190

  6. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  8. Self-assembly of fibronectin mimetic peptide-amphiphile nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rexeisen, Emilie Lynn

    Many therapeutic strategies incorporate peptides into their designs to mimic the natural protein ligands found in vivo. A few examples are the short peptide sequences RGD and PHSRN that mimic the primary and synergy-binding domains of the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, which is recognized by the cell surface receptor, alpha5beta 1 integrin. Even though scaffold modification with biomimetic peptides remains one of the most promising approaches for tissue engineering, the use of these peptides in therapeutic tissue-engineered products and drug delivery systems available on the commercial market is limited because the peptides are not easily able to mimic the natural protein. The design of a peptide that can effectively target the alpha5beta1 integrin would greatly increase biomimetic scaffold therapeutic potential. A novel peptide containing both the RGD primary binding domain and PHSRN synergy-binding domain for fibronectin joined with the appropriate linker should bind alpha 5beta1 integrin more efficiently and lead to greater cell adhesion over RGD alone. Several fibronectin mimetic peptides were designed and coupled to dialkyl hydrocarbon tails to make peptide-amphiphiles. The peptides contained different linkers connecting the two binding domains and different spacers separating the hydrophobic tails from the hydrophilic headgroups. The peptide-amphiphiles were deposited on mica substrates using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Langmuir isotherms indicated that the peptide-amphiphiles that contained higher numbers of serine residues formed a more tightly packed monolayer, but the increased number of serines also made transferring the amphiphiles to the mica substrate more difficult. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of the bilayers showed that the headgroups might be bent, forming small divots in the surface. These divots may help expose the PHSRN synergy-binding domain. Parallel studies undertaken by fellow group members showed that human

  9. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  10. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  11. Roles of Hydrophobicity and Charge Distribution of Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides in Peptide-Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Lois M.; Edwards, Michelle A.; Li, Jessica; Yip, Christopher M.; Deber, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) occur as important innate immunity agents in many organisms, including humans, and offer a viable alternative to conventional antibiotics, as they physically disrupt the bacterial membranes, leading to membrane lysis and eventually cell death. In this work, we studied the biophysical and microbiological characteristics of designed CAPs varying in hydrophobicity levels and charge distributions by a variety of biophysical and biochemical approaches, including in-tandem atomic force microscopy, attenuated total reflection-FTIR, CD spectroscopy, and SDS-PAGE. Peptide structural properties were correlated with their membrane-disruptive abilities and antimicrobial activities. In bacterial lipid model membranes, a time-dependent increase in aggregated β-strand-type structure in CAPs with relatively high hydrophobicity (such as KKKKKKALFALWLAFLA-NH2) was essentially absent in CAPs with lower hydrophobicity (such as KKKKKKAAFAAWAAFAA-NH2). Redistribution of positive charges by placing three Lys residues at both termini while maintaining identical sequences minimized self-aggregation above the dimer level. Peptides containing four Leu residues were destructive to mammalian model membranes, whereas those with corresponding Ala residues were not. This finding was mirrored in hemolysis studies in human erythrocytes, where Ala-only peptides displayed virtually no hemolysis up to 320 μm, but the four-Leu peptides induced 40–80% hemolysis at the same concentration range. All peptides studied displayed strong antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 4–32 μm). The overall findings suggest optimum routes to balancing peptide hydrophobicity and charge distribution that allow efficient penetration and disruption of the bacterial membranes without damage to mammalian (host) membranes. PMID:22253439

  12. [Biosynthesis of human calcitonin and mini-proinsulin in bacterial cells in the form of hybrid proteins with corresponding antisense peptides and a metal-binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Efimov, V A; Buriakova, A A; Fradkov, A F; Chakhmakhcheva, O G

    1996-07-01

    To verify experimentally the molecular recognition theory, plasmids were constructed that provided the efficient synthesis of hybrid proteins composed of human calcitonin or miniproinsulin, the corresponding antisense peptides, and a histidine-rich metal-binding peptide. A method for isolation of the hybrid proteins by metal-chelating chromatography, cleavage, and renaturation was developed.

  13. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  14. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    PubMed Central

    Caboche, Ségolène; Pupin, Maude; Leclère, Valérie; Jacques, Phillipe; Kucherov, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents). NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at . Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database. PMID:19296847

  15. PASSEL: the PeptideAtlas SRMexperiment library.

    PubMed

    Farrah, Terry; Deutsch, Eric W; Kreisberg, Richard; Sun, Zhi; Campbell, David S; Mendoza, Luis; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Schiess, Ralph; Selevsek, Nathalie; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-04-01

    Public repositories for proteomics data have accelerated proteomics research by enabling more efficient cross-analyses of datasets, supporting the creation of protein and peptide compendia of experimental results, supporting the development and testing of new software tools, and facilitating the manuscript review process. The repositories available to date have been designed to accommodate either shotgun experiments or generic proteomic data files. Here, we describe a new kind of proteomic data repository for the collection and representation of data from selected reaction monitoring (SRM) measurements. The PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL) allows researchers to easily submit proteomic data sets generated by SRM. The raw data are automatically processed in a uniform manner and the results are stored in a database, where they may be downloaded or browsed via a web interface that includes a chromatogram viewer. PASSELenables cross-analysis of SRMdata, supports optimization of SRMdata collection, and facilitates the review process of SRMdata. Further, PASSELwill help in the assessment of proteotypic peptide performance in a wide array of samples containing the same peptide, as well as across multiple experimental protocols.

  16. Synthesis of peptide analogues using the multipin peptide synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Valerio, R M; Benstead, M; Bray, A M; Campbell, R A; Maeji, N J

    1991-08-15

    Modification of the multipin peptide synthesis method which allows the simultaneous synthesis of large numbers of different peptide analogues is described. Peptides were assembled on polyethylene pins derivatized with a 4-(beta-alanyloxymethyl)benzoate (beta-Ala-HMB) handle. For comparative purposes, peptides were also assembled on the diketopiperazine-forming handle N epsilon-(beta-alanyl)lysylprolyloxylactate. In model studies it was demonstrated that beta-Ala-HMB-linked peptides were cleaved from polyethylene pins with dilute sodium hydroxide or 4% methylamine/water to yield analogues with beta-Ala-free acid (beta-Ala-CO2H) and beta-Ala-methylamide (beta-Ala-CONHCH3), respectively. To assess the suitability of this approach for T-cell determinant analysis, analogues of a known T-cell determinant were synthesized with the various C-terminal endings. Peptides were characterized by amino acid analysis and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. HPLC of the crude cleaved peptides indicated that 22 of the 24 peptides were greater than 95% pure. These crude peptide solutions were nontoxic in sensitive cell culture assays without further purification. All three cleavage procedures gave comparable activities in T-cell proliferation assays. These results demonstrate the potential of the multipin peptide synthesis method for the production of large numbers of different peptide analogues.

  17. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  18. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  19. Optimization for Peptide Sample Preparation for Urine Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-02-25

    Analysis of native or endogenous peptides in biofluids can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms. Furthermore, the detected peptides may also have utility as potential biomarkers for non-invasive monitoring of human diseases. The non-invasive nature of urine collection and the abundance of peptides in the urine makes analysis by high-throughput ‘peptidomics’ methods , an attractive approach for investigating the pathogenesis of renal disease. However, urine peptidomics methodologies can be problematic with regards to difficulties associated with sample preparation. The urine matrix can provide significant background interference in making the analytical measurements that it hampers both the identification of peptides and the depth of the peptidomics read when utilizing LC-MS based peptidome analysis. We report on a novel adaptation of the standard solid phase extraction (SPE) method to a modified SPE (mSPE) approach for improved peptide yield and analysis sensitivity with LC-MS based peptidomics in terms of time, cost, clogging of the LC-MS column, peptide yield, peptide quality, and number of peptides identified by each method. Expense and time requirements were comparable for both SPE and mSPE, but more interfering contaminants from the urine matrix were evident in the SPE preparations (e.g., clogging of the LC-MS columns, yellowish background coloration of prepared samples due to retained urobilin, lower peptide yields) when compared to the mSPE method. When we compared data from technical replicates of 4 runs, the mSPE method provided significantly improved efficiencies for the preparation of samples from urine (e.g., mSPE peptide identification 82% versus 18% with SPE; p = 8.92E-05). Additionally, peptide identifications, when applying the mSPE method, highlighted the biology of differential activation of urine peptidases during acute renal transplant rejection with distinct laddering of specific peptides, which was obscured for most proteins

  20. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  1. Octaarginine-modified liposomes enhance cross-presentation by promoting the C-terminal trimming of antigen peptide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ono, Kouhei; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Moriguchi, Rumiko; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-04

    Exogenous antigen proteolysis by proteasomes and amino peptidases is essential for the production of mature major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) peptides to induce cross-presentation. We report here that when liposomes are modified with octaarginine (R8-Lip), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, the production of the mature MHC-I peptide is enhanced by promoting the C-terminal trimming of the antigen peptide. The efficiency of cross-presentation of ovalbumin (OVA) using the R8-Lip was dramatically higher than that by octalysine modified liposomes (K8-Lip) in mouse bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), although the physical characters of both liposomes were comparable. In this study, we investigated the mechanism responsible for the enhancement in cross-presentation by R8-Lip. Although the efficiencies of cellular uptake, endosomal escape, proteolysis of OVA and DC maturation between the two systems were essentially the same, an analysis of peptide trimming to SIINFEKL (mature MHC-I peptide of OVA) by using R8-Lip and K8-Lip encapsulating peptides of various length clearly indicates that the use of R8-Lip enhances the efficiency of the C-terminal cleavage of antigen-derived peptides. This finding provides a new strategy for achieving efficient cross-presentation by using R8 peptide and arginine-rich peptides. Moreover, this result may contribute to the development of a new paradigm regarding the machinery associated with antigen peptide production.

  2. The Specificity of Peptide Chain Extension by N-Carboxyanhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Ke; Orgel, Leslie E.

    2001-01-01

    We have used amino acids activated by carbonyldiimidazole to study the enantiospecificity of peptide elongation in aqueous solution. Peptide primers Glu(sub 10) and Ala3Glulo were elongated with the enantiomers of arginine, glutamic acid, asparagine, phenylalanine, serine and valine. The homochiral addition was always the more efficient reaction; the enantiospecificity was large in some cases but very small in others. In every case Ala(sub 3)Glu(sub l0) was elongated more efficiently than Glu(sub 10).

  3. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  4. Semienzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P; Schroeder, Christina I; Craik, David J

    2014-03-07

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we demonstrate that sortase A can successfully be used to cyclize a variety of small disulfide-rich peptides, including the cyclotide kalata B1, α-conotoxin Vc1.1, and sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1. These peptides range in size from 14 to 29 amino acids and contain three, two, or one disulfide bond, respectively, within their head-to-tail cyclic backbones. Our findings provide proof of concept for the potential broad applicability of enzymatic cyclization of disulfide-rich peptides with therapeutic potential.

  5. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  6. Peptides conjugated to gold nanoparticles induce macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Bastús, Neus G; Sánchez-Tilló, Ester; Pujals, Silvia; Farrera, Consol; Kogan, Marcelo J; Giralt, Ernest; Celada, Antonio; Lloberas, Jorge; Puntes, Victor

    2009-02-01

    Macrophages that react against pathogenic organisms can also be activated with artificial nanometric units consisting of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) with a peptide coating. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages, here we show that these cells have the capacity to recognize Au NPs once conjugated to two biomedically relevant peptides, the amyloid growth inhibitory peptide (AGIP) and the sweet arrow peptide (SAP), while they do not recognize peptides or NPs alone. The recognition of these conjugates by macrophages is mediated by a pattern recognition receptor, the TLR-4. Consequently, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6, as well as nitric oxide synthase were induced and macrophage proliferation was stopped when exposed to the peptide-conjugated Au NPs. Contamination by lipopolysaccharide in our experimental system was excluded. Furthermore, macrophage activation appeared to be independent of peptide length and polarity. As a result of macrophage activation, conjugated Au NPs were internalized and processed. These results open up a new avenue in the world of adjuvants and illustrate the basic requirements for the design of NP conjugates that efficiently reach their target.

  7. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  8. NisT, the transporter of the lantibiotic nisin, can transport fully modified, dehydrated, and unmodified prenisin and fusions of the leader peptide with non-lantibiotic peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Anneke; de Boef, Esther; Rink, Rick; Fekken, Susan; Kluskens, Leon D; Driessen, Arnold J M; Leenhouts, Kees; Kuipers, Oscar P; Moll, Gert N

    2004-05-21

    Lantibiotics are lanthionine-containing peptide antibiotics. Nisin, encoded by nisA, is a pentacyclic lantibiotic produced by some Lactococcus lactis strains. Its thioether rings are posttranslationally introduced by a membrane-bound enzyme complex. This complex is composed of three enzymes: NisB, which dehydrates serines and threonines; NisC, which couples these dehydrated residues to cysteines, thus forming thioether rings; and the transporter NisT. We followed the activity of various combinations of the nisin enzymes by measuring export of secreted peptides using antibodies against the leader peptide and mass spectroscopy for detection. L. lactis expressing the nisABTC genes efficiently produced fully posttranslationally modified prenisin. Strikingly, L. lactis expressing the nisBT genes could produce dehydrated prenisin without thioether rings and a dehydrated form of a non-lantibiotic peptide. In the absence of the biosynthetic NisBC enzymes, the NisT transporter was capable of excreting unmodified prenisin and fusions of the leader peptide with non-lantibiotic peptides. Our data show that NisT specifies a broad spectrum (poly)peptide transporter that can function either in conjunction with or independently from the biosynthetic genes. NisT secretes both unmodified and partially or fully posttranslationally modified forms of prenisin and non-lantibiotic peptides. These results open the way for efficient production of a wide range of peptides with increased stability or novel bioactivities.

  9. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  10. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  11. Peptide Synthesis through Cell-Free Expression of Fusion Proteins Incorporating Modified Amino Acids as Latent Cleavage Sites for Peptide Release.

    PubMed

    Liutkus, Mantas; Fraser, Samuel A; Caron, Karine; Stigers, Dannon J; Easton, Christopher J

    2016-05-17

    Chlorinated analogues of Leu and Ile are incorporated during cell-free expression of peptides fused to protein, by exploiting the promiscuity of the natural biosynthetic machinery. They then act as sites for clean and efficient release of the peptides simply by brief heat treatment. Dehydro analogues of Leu and Ile are similarly incorporated as latent sites for peptide release through treatment with iodine under cold conditions. These protocols complement enzyme-catalyzed methods and have been used to prepare calcitonin, gastrin-releasing peptide, cholecystokinin-7, and prolactin-releasing peptide prohormones, as well as analogues substituted with unusual amino acids, thus illustrating their practical utility as alternatives to more traditional chemical peptide synthesis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Preferential labeling of alpha-amino N-terminal groups in peptides by biotin: application to the detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies by enzyme immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Sélo, I; Négroni, L; Créminon, C; Grassi, J; Wal, J M

    1996-12-15

    Experimental conditions (pH 6.5, 24 h reaction, peptide:biotin ratio 1:5) were defined for preferential incorporation of the biotin molecule in the N-terminal alpha-amino group of peptides. This strategy could be helpful in numerous applications when an entire peptide chain must remain accessible for antibody or receptor binding. We illustrate this advantage in a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay designed to detect antibodies specific for bovine beta-lactoglobulin present in rabbit or human sera. This test involves synthetic peptides biotinylated in different positions and immobilized on a solid phase. The use of biotin/streptavidin interactions permitted more efficient detection of specific anti-peptide antibodies than solid phases prepared using conventional passive-adsorption techniques. The highest levels of antibody binding were measured when biotinylation occurred at the N-terminal extremity of immobilized peptides.

  13. Prediction and interpretation of the lipophilicity of small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visconti, Alessia; Ermondi, Giuseppe; Caron, Giulia; Esposito, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Peptide-based drug discovery has considerably expanded and solid in silico tools for the prediction of physico-chemical properties of peptides are urgently needed. In this work we tested some combinations of descriptors/algorithms to find the best model to predict log D_{ {oct}} of a series of peptides. To do that we evaluate the models statistical performances but also their skills in providing a reliable deconvolution of the balance of intermolecular forces governing the partitioning phenomenon. Results prove that a PLS model based on VolSurf+ descriptors is the best tool to predict log D_{ {oct}} of neutral and ionised peptides. The mechanistic interpretation also reveals that the inclusion in the chemical structure of a HBD group is more efficient in decreasing lipophilicity than the inclusion of a HBA group.

  14. Bioinformatics Tools for the Discovery of New Nonribosomal Peptides.

    PubMed

    Leclère, Valérie; Weber, Tilmann; Jacques, Philippe; Pupin, Maude

    2016-01-01

    This chapter helps in the use of bioinformatics tools relevant to the discovery of new nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) produced by microorganisms. The strategy described can be applied to draft or fully assembled genome sequences. It relies on the identification of the synthetase genes and the deciphering of the domain architecture of the nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In the next step, candidate peptides synthesized by these NRPSs are predicted in silico, considering the specificity of incorporated monomers together with their isomery. To assess their novelty, the two-dimensional structure of the peptides can be compared with the structural patterns of all known NRPs. The presented workflow leads to an efficient and rapid screening of genomic data generated by high throughput technologies. The exploration of such sequenced genomes may lead to the discovery of new drugs (i.e., antibiotics against multi-resistant pathogens or anti-tumors).

  15. A new fingerprint to predict nonribosomal peptides activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, Ammar; Caboche, Ségolène; Leclère, Valérie; Jacques, Philippe; Pupin, Maude

    2012-10-01

    Bacteria and fungi use a set of enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases to provide a wide range of natural peptides displaying structural and biological diversity. So, nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are the basis for some efficient drugs. While discovering new NRPs is very desirable, the process of identifying their biological activity to be used as drugs is a challenge. In this paper, we present a novel peptide fingerprint based on monomer composition (MCFP) of NRPs. MCFP is a novel method for obtaining a representative description of NRP structures from their monomer composition in fingerprint form. Experiments with Norine NRPs database and MCFP show high prediction accuracy (>93 %). Also a high recall rate (>82 %) is obtained when MCFP is used for screening NRPs database. From this study it appears that our fingerprint, built from monomer composition, allows an effective screening and prediction of biological activities of NRPs database.

  16. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  17. Click chemistry in peptide-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyuan; Aneja, Rachna; Chaiken, Irwin

    2013-08-16

    Click chemistry is an efficient and chemoselective synthetic method for coupling molecular fragments under mild reaction conditions. Since the advent in 2001 of methods to improve stereochemical conservation, the click chemistry approach has been broadly used to construct diverse chemotypes in both chemical and biological fields. In this review, we discuss the application of click chemistry in peptide-based drug design. We highlight how triazoles formed by click reactions have been used for mimicking peptide and disulfide bonds, building secondary structural components of peptides, linking functional groups together, and bioconjugation. The progress made in this field opens the way for synthetic approaches to convert peptides with promising functional leads into structure-minimized and more stable forms.

  18. Click Chemistry in Peptide-Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huiyuan; Aneja, Rachna; Chaiken, Irwin

    2014-01-01

    Click chemistry is an efficient and chemoselective synthetic method for coupling molecular fragments under mild reaction conditions. Since the advent in 2001 of methods to improve stereochemical conservation, the click chemistry approach has been broadly used to construct diverse chemotypes in both chemical and biological fields. In this review, we discuss the application of click chemistry in peptide-based drug design. We highlight how triazoles formed by click reactions have been used for mimicking peptide and disulfide bonds, building secondary structural components of peptides, linking functional groups together, and bioconjugation. The progress made in this field opens the way for synthetic approaches to convert peptides with promising functional leads into structure-minimized and more stable forms. PMID:23959192

  19. BT cationic peptides: small peptides that modulate innate immune responses of chicken heterophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kogut, Michael H; Genovese, Kenneth J; He, Haiqi; Swaggerty, Christina L; Jiang, Yi Wei

    2012-01-15

    Neonatal poultry exhibit a transient susceptibility to infectious diseases during the first week of life that stems from inefficient host defense mechanisms. Yet, the initial host immune response to pathogens is a critical determinant of disease resistance and susceptibility. With this context in mind, novel ways to stimulate or modulate the hosts' natural immune response is emerging as an important area of interest for food animal producers including the poultry industry. Specifically, we have been investigating new modulation strategies tailored around the selective stimulation of the host's immune system, and particularly rapid acting innate immunity, as an alternative to direct targeting of microbial pathogens. One such approach that we have been investigating is the use of a group of cationic peptides produced by a Gram-positive soil bacterium, Brevibacillus texasporus (BT peptides). We have previously shown that, provided as a feed additive, BT peptides significantly induced a concentration-dependent protection against cecal colonization and extraintestinal colonization by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE). This protection is not the result of direct antibacterial activity of the BT peptides on the SE since the concentrations used were below the minimum inhibitory concentration for SE. We also found that BT are not absorbed in the intestine, but still induce a significant up-regulation in the functional efficiency of peripheral blood heterophils and monocytes. The mechanisms of this immune modulation are unknown. Here, using in vitro models for measuring: (1) leukocyte oxidative burst, (2) changes in leukocyte cytokine and chemokines gene expression profiles, and (3) phosphorylation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in leukocytes, we evaluated the role of BT peptides as priming mediators for heterophil and monocyte responses at the level of cell function, gene transcription/expression, and cell phosphorylation following stimulation

  20. Cobalt(III)-ligated peptides as acyl acceptors in peptide synthesis catalyzed by chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, M F; Bagger, S; Sørensen, A M; Wagner, K

    1995-03-01

    The efficiency of cobalt(III)-ligated peptides as acceptor nucleophiles in acyl transfer reactions catalyzed by alpha-chymotrypsin was examined. A series of metallopeptides with the general formula [H-(Gly)n-OCo(NH3)5]2+ (1 < or = n < or = 4) was tested. The aminolysis rate of acyl-chymotrypsin was measured spectrophotometrically by monitoring the concentration of unreacted nucleophile. The rate of the competing hydrolysis of acyl-chymotrypsin was obtained by automatic titration with base, using a pH-stat. The main result was that the positively charged metallopeptides, in general, were more efficient nucleophiles than the corresponding amides and free peptides that were examined for comparison. A binding model that rationalizes the findings is given.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  2. Investigation on cellular uptake and pharmacodynamics of DOCK2-inhibitory peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Umemoto, Tadashi; Fukuda, Yasunori; Tani, Akiyoshi; Asami, Taiji

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interaction between dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is an attractive intracellular target for transplant rejection and inflammatory diseases. Recently, DOCK2-selective inhibitory peptides have been discovered, and conjugation with oligoarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) improved inhibitory activity in a cell migration assay. Although a number of CPPs have been reported, oligoarginine was only one example introduced to the inhibitory peptides. In this study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility of CPP-conjugation approach for DOCK2-inhibitory peptides, and select preferable sequences as CPP moiety. First, we evaluated cell permeability of thirteen known CPPs and partial sequences of influenza A viral protein PB1-F2 using an internalization assay system based on luciferin-luciferase reaction, and then selected four CPPs with efficient cellular uptake. Among four conjugates of these CPPs and a DOCK2-inhibitory peptide, the inhibitory activity of a novel CPP, PB1-F2 fragment 5 (PF5), conjugate was comparable to oligoarginine conjugate and higher than that of the non-conjugated peptide. Finally, internalization assay revealed that oligoarginine and PF5 increased the cellular uptake of inhibitory peptides to the same extent. Hence, we demonstrated that CPP-conjugation approach is applicable to the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs based on DOCK2 inhibition by investigating both cellular uptake and bioactivity.

  3. Design and implementation of a high yield production system for recombinant expression of peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Making peptide pharmaceuticals involves challenging processes where many barriers, which include production and manufacture, need to be overcome. A non common but interesting research area is related to peptides with intracellular targets, which opens up new possibilities, allowing the modulation of processes occurring within the cell or interference with signaling pathways. However, if the bioactive sequence requires fusion to a carrier peptide to allow access into the cell, the resulting peptide could be such a length that traditional production could be difficult. The goal of the present study was the development of a flexible recombinant expression and purification system for peptides, as a contribution to the discovery and development of these potentially new drugs. Results In this work, a high throughput recombinant expression and purification system for production of cell penetrating peptides in Escherichia coli has been designed and implemented. The system designed produces target peptides in an insoluble form by fusion to a hexahistidine tagged ketosteroid isomerase which is then separated by a highly efficient thrombin cleavage reaction procedure. The expression system was tested on the anticancer peptides p53pAnt and PNC27. These peptides comprise the C-terminal region and the N-terminal region of the protein p53, respectively, fused by its carboxyl terminal extreme to the cell penetrating peptide Penetratin. High yields of purified recombinant fused peptides were obtained in both cases; nevertheless, thrombin cleavage reaction was successful only for p53pAnt peptide release. The features of the system, together with the procedure developed, allow achievement of high production yields of over 30 mg of highly pure p53pAnt peptide per g of dry cell mass. It is proposed that the system could be used for production of other peptides at a similar yield. Conclusions This study provides a system suitable for recombinant production of peptides for

  4. In vitro determination of the short-chain synthetic peptide RP13 antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Adrián; Calderón, Ernesto; Castañón-Alonso, Sandra L; Santos, Araceli; Hernández, Beatriz; Vázquez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, along with the lack of new drugs against them, has elicited the interest of the scientific community on the study and development of endogenous synthetic compounds with bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. In recent years, several short-chain, low molecular weight peptides isolated from natural sources such as plants and animals have demonstrated an array of antimicrobial activities. Despite having structural characteristics similar to microbicidal peptides isolated from human platelets, peptide RP11 does not exhibit antimicrobial activity. In vitro determination of the antimicrobial activity of the synthetic peptide RP13. Peptide RP13 was prepared modifying the original amino acids sequence of peptide RP11, reversing the position of the amino acids lysine and tyrosine in order to modify the conformation of the original peptide. These amino acids are localized close to the N-terminus of the peptidic chain. Peptide RP13 was prepared in solution using conventional methods for peptide synthesis. The antimicrobial activity of RP13 was assessed against the microorganisms S. aureus, E. faecalis and E. coli in a test solution and later evaluated by cultivation of plates during the first 2 h after inoculation of bacteria. RP13 activity antimicrobial was compared against tetracycline, a broad-spectrum antibiotic. The new peptide RP13, resulting form the structural modification of the amino acid sequence of peptide RP11, displayed antimicrobial activity. RP13 demonstrated to be more efficient inhibiting the growth of gram-positive than gramnegative bacteria. The structural modification of peptide RP11, obtained from human platelets, resulted in a new peptide with improved antimicrobial activity. These results clearly demonstrate that peptides of natural origin, as well as their synthetic analogs, represent an attractive alternative against pathogenic agents.

  5. Enzyme-Assisted Discovery of Antioxidant Peptides from Edible Marine Invertebrates: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Law, Yew-Chye; Wong, Fai-Chu; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    Marine invertebrates, such as oysters, mussels, clams, scallop, jellyfishes, squids, prawns, sea cucumbers and sea squirts, are consumed as foods. These edible marine invertebrates are sources of potent bioactive peptides. The last two decades have seen a surge of interest in the discovery of antioxidant peptides from edible marine invertebrates. Enzymatic hydrolysis is an efficient strategy commonly used for releasing antioxidant peptides from food proteins. A growing number of antioxidant peptide sequences have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysates of edible marine invertebrates. Antioxidant peptides have potential applications in food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. In this review, we first give a brief overview of the current state of progress of antioxidant peptide research, with special attention to marine antioxidant peptides. We then focus on 22 investigations which identified 32 antioxidant peptides from enzymatic hydrolysates of edible marine invertebrates. Strategies adopted by various research groups in the purification and identification of the antioxidant peptides will be summarized. Structural characteristic of the peptide sequences in relation to their antioxidant activities will be reviewed. Potential applications of the peptide sequences and future research prospects will also be discussed. PMID:28212329

  6. Machine Learning on Signal-to-Noise Ratios Improves Peptide Array Design in SAMDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Emerging peptide array technologies are able to profile molecular activities within cell lysates. However, the structural diversity of peptides leads to inherent differences in peptide signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). These complex effects can lead to potentially unrepresentative signal intensities and can bias subsequent analyses. Within mass spectrometry-based peptide technologies, the relation between a peptide’s amino acid sequence and S/N remains largely nonquantitative. To address this challenge, we present a method to quantify and analyze mass spectrometry S/N of two peptide arrays, and we use this analysis to portray quality of data and to design future arrays for SAMDI mass spectrometry. Our study demonstrates that S/N varies significantly across peptides within peptide arrays, and variation in S/N is attributable to differences of single amino acids. We apply supervised machine learning to predict peptide S/N based on amino acid sequence, and identify specific physical properties of the amino acids that govern variation of this metric. We find low peptide–S/N concordance between arrays, demonstrating that different arrays require individual characterization and that global peptide–S/N relationships are difficult to identify. However, with proper peptide sampling, this study illustrates how machine learning can accurately predict the S/N of a peptide in an array, allowing for the efficient design of arrays through selection of high S/N peptides. PMID:28719743

  7. Enzyme-Assisted Discovery of Antioxidant Peptides from Edible Marine Invertebrates: A Review.

    PubMed

    Chai, Tsun-Thai; Law, Yew-Chye; Wong, Fai-Chu; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2017-02-16

    Marine invertebrates, such as oysters, mussels, clams, scallop, jellyfishes, squids, prawns, sea cucumbers and sea squirts, are consumed as foods. These edible marine invertebrates are sources of potent bioactive peptides. The last two decades have seen a surge of interest in the discovery of antioxidant peptides from edible marine invertebrates. Enzymatic hydrolysis is an efficient strategy commonly used for releasing antioxidant peptides from food proteins. A growing number of antioxidant peptide sequences have been identified from the enzymatic hydrolysates of edible marine invertebrates. Antioxidant peptides have potential applications in food, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. In this review, we first give a brief overview of the current state of progress of antioxidant peptide research, with special attention to marine antioxidant peptides. We then focus on 22 investigations which identified 32 antioxidant peptides from enzymatic hydrolysates of edible marine invertebrates. Strategies adopted by various research groups in the purification and identification of the antioxidant peptides will be summarized. Structural characteristic of the peptide sequences in relation to their antioxidant activities will be reviewed. Potential applications of the peptide sequences and future research prospects will also be discussed.

  8. Recombinant self-assembling peptides as biomaterials for tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Stuart; Aggeli, Amalia; Ingham, Eileen; McPherson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic nanostructures based on self-assembling systems that aim to mimic natural extracellular matrix are now being used as substrates in tissue engineering applications. Peptides are excellent starting materials for the self-assembly process as they can be readily synthesised both chemically and biologically. P11-4 is an 11 amino acid peptide that undergoes triggered self-assembly to form a self-supporting hydrogel. It exists as unimers of random coil conformations in water above pH 7.5 but at low pH adopts an antiparallel β-sheet conformation. It also self-assembles under physiological conditions in a concentration-dependent manner. Here we describe an unimer P11-4 production system and the use of a simple site-directed mutagenesis approach to generate a series of other P11-family peptide expression vectors. We have developed an efficient purification strategy for these peptide biomaterials using a simple procedure involving chemical cleavage with cyanogen bromide then repeated filtration, lyophilisation and wash steps. We report peptide-fusion protein yields of ca. 4.64 g/L and we believe the highest reported recovery of a recombinant self-assembling peptide at 203 mg/L of pure recombinant P11-4. This peptide forms a self-supporting hydrogel under physiological conditions with essentially identical physico-chemical properties to the chemically synthesised peptide. Critically it also displays excellent cytocompatibility when tested with primary human dermal fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that high levels of a series of recombinant self-assembling peptides can be purified using a simple process for applications as scaffolds in tissue engineering. PMID:20932572

  9. Rational Design of a Polymer with Robust Efficacy for Intracellular Protein and Peptide Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hong; Lv, Jia; Gao, Xin; Wang, Xing; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hui; He, Xu; Li, Lei; Cheng, Yiyun

    2017-03-08

    The efficient delivery of biopharmaceutical drugs such as proteins and peptides into the cytosol of target cells poses substantial challenges owing to their large size and susceptibility to degradation. Current protein delivery vehicles have limitations such as the need for protein modification, insufficient delivery of large-size proteins or small peptides, and loss of protein function after the delivery. Here, we adopted a rational approach to design a polymer with robust efficacy for intracellular protein and peptide delivery. The polymer is composed of a dendrimer scaffold, a hydrophobic membrane-disruptive region, and a multivalent protein binding surface. It allows efficient protein/peptide binding, endocytosis, and endosomal disruption and is capable of efficiently delivering various biomacromolecules including bovine serum albumin, R-phycoerythrin, p53, saporin, β-galactosidase, and peptides into the cytosol of living cells. Transduction of apoptotic proteins and peptides successfully induces apoptosis in cancer cells, suggesting that the activities of proteins and peptides are maintained during the delivery. This technology represents an efficient and useful tool for intracellular protein and peptide delivery and has broad applicability for basic research and clinical applications.

  10. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  11. T-cell receptors: tugging on the anchor for a tighter hold on the tumor-associated peptide.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Julian

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been shown that human tumor-associated, HLA anchor residue modified "heteroclitic" peptides may induce stronger immune responses than wild-type peptides in cancer vaccine trials, it has also been shown that some T cells primed with these heteroclitic peptides subsequently fail to recognize the natural, tumor-expressed peptide efficiently. This may provide a molecular reason for why clinical trials of these peptides have been thus far unsuccessful. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Madura et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 584-591] highlight a novel twist on T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of HLA-peptide complexes. Tumor-associated peptides often lack canonical anchor residues, which can be substituted for the optimal residue to improve their antigenicity. T-cell cross-reactivity between the natural and modified (heteroclitic) peptides is essential for this approach to work and depends on whether the anchor residue substitution influences peptide conformation. The Melan-A/MART-126-35 peptide epitope is an example where T cells can make this distinction, with the natural peptide stimulating higher affinity CD8(+) T cells than the heteroclitic peptide, despite the heteroclitic peptide's more stable association with HLA-A2. The molecular basis for peptide discrimination is identified through the structure of the TCR bound to the natural peptide; TCR engagement of the natural peptide "lifts" its amino-terminus partly away from the HLA peptide binding groove, forming a higher affinity interface with the TCR than is formed with the anchor residue "optimized" heteroclitic peptide, which cannot be "pulled" from the HLA groove.

  12. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  13. Tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA using fatty acyl-CGKRK peptide conjugates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Do, Hung; Parang, Keykavous; Tiwari, Rakesh Kumar; Aliabadi, Hamidreza Montazeri

    2017-07-21

    Tumor-targeted carriers provide efficient delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumor tissue. CGKRK is one of the well-known tumor targeting peptides with significant specificity for angiogenic blood vessels and tumor cells. Here, we designed fatty acyl conjugated CGKRK peptides, based on the hypothesis that hydrophobically-modified CGKRK peptide could enhance cellular permeation and delivery of siRNA targeted to tumor cells for effective silencing of selected proteins. We synthesized six fatty acyl-peptide conjugates, using a diverse chain of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids to study the efficiency of this approach. At peptide:siRNA weight/weight ratio of 10:1 (N/P ≈ 13.6), almost all the peptides showed complete binding with siRNA, and at a w/w ratio of 20:1 (N/P ≈ 27.3), complete protection of siRNA from early enzymatic degradation was observed. Conjugated peptides and peptide/siRNA complexes did not show significant cytotoxicity in selected cell lines. The oleic acid-conjugated peptide showed the highest efficiency in siRNA uptake and silencing of kinesin spindle protein at peptide:siRNA w/w ratio of 80:1 (N/P ≈ 109). The siRNA internalization into non-tumorigenic kidney cells was negligible with all fatty acyl-peptide conjugates. These results indicate that conjugation of fatty acids to CGKRK could create an efficient delivery system for siRNA silencing specifically in tumor cells.

  14. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  15. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  16. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  17. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  18. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  19. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  20. Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes using HER2 targeted peptide-lipid derivatives for targeted delivery in breast cancer cells: The effect of serine-glycine repeated peptides as a spacer.

    PubMed

    Suga, Tadaharu; Fuchigami, Yuki; Hagimori, Masayori; Kawakami, Shigeru

    2017-02-22

    Ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes have been widely studied for targeted drug delivery systems. Because ligand peptides are commonly grafted using PEG as a spacer on the surface of PEGylated liposomes, the interaction between ligand peptides and their corresponding receptors can be interrupted by steric hindrance of the PEG layer. Therefore, we aimed to develop ligand peptide-lipid derivatives to enhance the targeting efficiency of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes, and designed a new ligand peptide-lipid derivatives having serine-glycine repeats (SG)n as a spacer based on the peptide length calculated by PyMol (v0.99). We selected KCCYSL (KCC) as the ligand peptide for binding to human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). We synthesized new KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7) and evaluated their cellular association in breast cancer cells. KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes dramatically increased cellular association on HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The results suggest that KCC can be grafted on the surface of KCC-(SG)n/PEGylated liposomes prepared from KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives (n=3, 5, 7). In summary, we succeeded in developing KCC-(SG)n-lipid derivatives for the preparation of ligand peptide-grafted PEGylated liposomes.

  1. Peptide Assembly-Driven Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) Motors for Micro Electric Generator

    PubMed Central

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Fang, Justin; Wasik, Tomasz L.; Uemura, Takashi; Zheng, Yongtai; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-MOF motors, whose motions are driven by anisotropic surface gradients created via peptide self-assembly around nanopores of MOFs, can rotate microscopic rotors and magnet fast enough to generate electric power of 0.1 µW. To make the peptide-MOF generator recyclable, a new MOF is applied as a host motor engine, which has a more rigid framework with higher H2O affinity so that peptide release occurs more efficiently via guest exchange without the destruction of MOF. PMID:25418936

  2. Stereochemical effects of all-hydrocarbon tethers in i,i+4 stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Woo; Verdine, Gregory L

    2009-05-01

    The stereochemical effects of the hydrocarbon crosslink on the conformation and cellular uptake of i,i+4 stapled peptides were studied. Compared to its S,S-configurated counterpart, the crosslink bearing the R,R-configuration provided a significantly diminished helix stabilizing effect and conferred less efficient cellular uptake on the stapled peptides. These results suggest that the vesicular trafficking pathway employed by cells to take up stapled peptides is sensitive to the extent of helical character in the peptide, with greater helicity conferring increased cellular uptake.

  3. A photolabile linker for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide hydrazides and heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Qvortrup, Katrine; Komnatnyy, Vitaly V; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2014-09-19

    A photolabile hydrazine linker for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide hydrazides and hydrazine-derived heterocycles is presented. The developed protocols enable the efficient synthesis of structurally diverse peptide hydrazides derived from the standard amino acids, including those with side-chain protected residues at the C-terminal of the resulting peptide hydrazide, and are useful for the synthesis of dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazoles. The linker is compatible with most commonly used coupling reagents and protecting groups for solid-phase peptide synthesis.

  4. Peptide synthesis beyond DMF: THF and ACN as excellent and friendlier alternatives.

    PubMed

    Jad, Yahya E; Acosta, Gerardo A; Khattab, Sherine N; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; El-Faham, Ayman; Albericio, Fernando

    2015-02-28

    To date, DMF has been considered as the only solvent suitable for peptide synthesis. Here we demonstrate the capacity of THF and ACN, which are friendlier solvents than DMF, to yield the product in higher purity than DMF. Using various peptide models, both THF and ACN reduced racemization in solution-phase and solid-phase synthesis when compared with DMF. Moreover, the use of ACN and THF in the solid-phase peptide synthesis of hindered peptides, such as Aib-enkephalin pentapeptide and Aib-ACP decapeptide, in combination with a complete polyethylene glycol resin (ChemMatrix), gave a better coupling efficiency than DMF.

  5. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  6. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  7. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  8. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  9. Bacterial sensing of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Otto, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form a crucial part of human innate host defense, especially in neutrophil phagosomes and on epithelial surfaces. Bacteria have a variety of efficient resistance mechanisms to human AMPs, such as efflux pumps, secreted proteases, and alterations of the bacterial cell surface that are aimed to minimize attraction of the typically cationic AMPs. In addition, bacteria have specific sensors that activate AMP resistance mechanisms when AMPs are present. The prototypical Gram-negative PhoP/PhoQ and the Gram-positive Aps AMP-sensing systems were first described and investigated in Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus epidermidis, respectively. Both include a classical bacterial two-component sensor/regulator system, but show many structural, mechanistic, and functional differences. The PhoP/PhoQ regulon controls a variety of genes not necessarily limited to AMP resistance mechanisms, but apparently aimed to combat innate host defense on a broad scale. In contrast, the staphylococcal Aps system predominantly upregulates AMP resistance mechanisms, namely the D-alanylation of teichoic acids, inclusion of lysyl-phosphati-dylglycerol in the cytoplasmic membrane, and expression of the putative VraFG AMP efflux pump. Notably, both systems are crucial for virulence and represent possible targets for antimicrobial therapy. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. De Novo Peptide Design and Experimental Validation of Histone Methyltransferase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smadbeck, James; Peterson, Meghan B.; Zee, Barry M.; Garapaty, Shivani; Mago, Aashna; Lee, Christina; Giannis, Athanassios; Trojer, Patrick; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-01-01

    Histones are small proteins critical to the efficient packaging of DNA in the nucleus. DNA–protein complexes, known as nucleosomes, are formed when the DNA winds itself around the surface of the histones. The methylation of histone residues by enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) maintains gene repression over successive cell generations. Overexpression of EZH2 can silence important tumor suppressor genes leading to increased invasiveness of many types of cancers. This makes the inhibition of EZH2 an important target in the development of cancer therapeutics. We employed a three-stage computational de novo peptide design method to design inhibitory peptides of EZH2. The method consists of a sequence selection stage and two validation stages for fold specificity and approximate binding affinity. The sequence selection stage consists of an integer linear optimization model that was solved to produce a rank-ordered list of amino acid sequences with increased stability in the bound peptide-EZH2 structure. These sequences were validated through the calculation of the fold specificity and approximate binding affinity of the designed peptides. Here we report the discovery of novel EZH2 inhibitory peptides using the de novo peptide design method. The computationally discovered peptides were experimentally validated in vitro using dose titrations and mechanism of action enzymatic assays. The peptide with the highest in vitro response, SQ037, was validated in nucleo using quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. This peptide had an IC50 of 13.5 M, demonstrated greater potency as an inhibitor when compared to the native and K27A mutant control peptides, and demonstrated competitive inhibition versus the peptide substrate. Additionally, this peptide demonstrated high specificity to the EZH2 target in comparison to other histone methyltransferases. The validated peptides are the first computationally designed peptides that directly inhibit EZH2. These inhibitors should

  11. Development of Peptide Vaccines in Dengue.

    PubMed

    Reginald, Kavita; Chan, Yanqi; Plebanski, Magdalena; Poh, Chit Laa

    2017-09-13

    Dengue is one of the most important arboviral infection worldwide, infecting up to 390 million people and causing 25,000 deaths annually. Although a licensed dengue vaccine is available, it is not efficacious against dengue serotypes that infect people living in South East Asia, where dengue is an endemic disease. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop an efficient dengue vaccine for this region. Data from different clinical trials indicate that a successful dengue vaccine must elicit both neutralizing antibodies and cell mediated immunity. This can be achieved by designing a multi-epitope peptide vaccine comprising B, CD8+ and CD4+ T cell epitopes. As recognition of T cell epitopes are restricted by human leukocyte antigens (HLA), T cell epitopes which are able to recognize several major HLAs will be preferentially included in the vaccine design. While peptide vaccines are safe, biocompatible and cost-effective, it is poorly immunogenic. Strategies to improve its immunogenicity by the use of long peptides, adjuvants and nanoparticle delivery mechanisms are discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of anti-microbial peptides.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Laszlo

    2016-09-01

    Anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) were originally thought to exert protecting actions against bacterial infection by disintegrating bacterial membranes. Upon identification of internal bacterial targets, the view changed and moved toward inhibition of prokaryote-specific biochemical processes. However, the level of none of these activities can explain the robust efficacy of some of these peptides in animal models of systemic and cutaneous infections. A rapidly growing panel of reports suggests that AMPs, now called host-defense peptides (HDPs), act through activating the immune system of the host. This includes recruitment and activation of macrophages and mast cells, inducing chemokine production and altering NF-κB signaling processes. As a result, both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses are elevated together with activation of innate and adaptive immunity mechanisms, wound healing, and apoptosis. HDPs sterilize the systemic circulation and local injury sites significantly more efficiently than pure single-endpoint in vitro microbiological or biochemical data would suggest and actively aid recovering from tissue damage after or even without bacterial infections. However, the multiple and, often opposing, immunomodulatory functions of HDPs require exceptional care in therapeutic considerations.

  13. Increasing entrapment of peptides within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles prepared from water-in-oil microemulsions by copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingtao; Davies, Nigel M; Toth, Istvan

    2008-10-01

    Low molecular hydrophilic actives such as peptides are typically poorly encapsulated within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles when prepared from micellar or microemulsion templates. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the entrapment of peptides within poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles could be increased by functionalizing the peptide so that it could copolymerize with the alkyl cyanoacrylate monomer. Peptide and acryloyl functionalized peptide representing the antigenic epitope of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV(33-41)) were synthesized using solid-phase peptide synthesis. Poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles were prepared to encapsulate either peptide or functionalized peptide using both an aqueous micellar and a water-in-oil microemulsion polymerization template. Using the micellar template, nanoparticles could not be produced in the presence of acryloyl peptide. Rather an agglomerated mass formed on the stirrer. In contrast, nanoparticles could be prepared using both acryloyl and parent peptide using the water-in-oil microemulsion template. Encapsulation efficiency was more than twofold greater for functionalized peptide, being greater than 90%. Encapsulation efficiency of functionalized peptide was also observed to increase with increasing the amount of alkyl cyanoacrylate monomer used for polymerization. A biphasic release profile was observed for the nanoparticles entrapping the non-functionalized peptide with greater than 50% of peptide being released during the first 10 min and with around 90% being released at 6h. In contrast, less than 10% of the total amount of acryloyl LCMV(33-41) entrapped within the nanoparticles was detected in the release media following the initial 10 min, and no further release of peptide was observed up to the termination of the release study at 360 min. The difference in entrapment and release kinetics between the parent and functionalized peptide strongly supports the

  14. Site-selective recognition of peptide phosphorylation by a terbium(III) complex in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Tao; Luo, Jian; Yang, Liu; Yao, Cheng

    2015-05-11

    A terbium(III) complex exhibits efficient selectivity for proximal diphosphorylation of peptides, accompanied with remarkable luminescence enhancement in the presence of Zn(II) ions in both buffer and protein extraction solutions from brain homogenates of mice.

  15. The identification of affinity peptide ligands specific to the variable region of human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Nogami, Masahiro; Ozawa, Kazumichi; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Sakura, Naoki; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Of all potential biological therapeutics, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies are becoming the dominant focus of clinical research. In particular, smaller recombinant antibody fragments such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have become the subject of intense focus. However, an efficient affinity ligand for antibody fragment purification has not been developed. In the present study, we designed a consensus sequence for the human antibody heavy or light chain-variable regions (Fv) based on the antibody sequences available in the ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), and synthesized these consensus sequences as template Fv antibodies. We then screened peptide ligands that specifically bind to the repertoire-derived human Fv consensus antibody using a 12-mer-peptide library expressed-phage display method. Subsequently, 1 peptide for the VH template and 8 peptides for the VK template were selected as the candidate ligands after 4 rounds of panning the phage display. Using peptide-bead-based immunoprecipitation, the code-4 and code-13 peptides showed recovery rates of the VH and VK templates that were 20-30% and 40-50%, respectively. Both peptides exhibited better recovery rates for trastuzumab scFv (approximately 40%). If it were possible to identify the best combination of VH and VK-binding peptides among the ligand peptides suitable for the human mAb Fv sequence, the result could be a promising purification tool that might greatly improve the cost efficiencies of the purification process.

  16. Development of a lytic peptide derived from BH3-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Q; Zhao, H; Jiang, Y; Wu, M; Tian, Y; Wang, D; Lao, Y; Xu, N; Li, Z

    2016-01-01

    Despite great advances in cancer therapy, drug resistance is a difficult hurdle to overcome that requires development of anticancer agents with novel and effective modes of action. In a number of studies, lytic peptides have shown remarkable ability to eliminate cancer cells through a different way from traditional treatments. Lytic peptides are positively charged, amphiphilic, and are efficient at binding and disrupting the negatively charged cell membrane of cancer cells. In this study, we described the anticancer properties of a lytic peptide that was developed on the basis of the alignment of amphiphilic BH3 peptides. Our results demonstrated that the positive charge and conformation constraint were favourable for efficient cancer cell elimination. Artificial BCL-2 homology 3 peptides (ABH3) exhibited effective anticancer effects against a series of cancer cell lines in vitro and in HeLa human cervical tumour xenografts in vivo. ABH3 induced cell death in an apoptosis-independent manner through the lytic properties of the peptide that caused disruption of cell membrane. Our results showed that charge tuning and conformation constraining in a lytic peptide could be applied to optimise the anticancer activity of lytic peptides. These results also suggest that ABH3 may be a promising beginning for the development of additional lytic peptides as anticancer reagents. PMID:27551502

  17. Targeted drug delivery to tumor vasculature by a carbohydrate mimetic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Toshiaki K.; Nakayama, Jun; Akama, Tomoya O.; Tamura, Naoaki; Wong, Shuk-Man; Bobkov, Andrey A.; Takano, Yutaka; Ohyama, Chikara; Fukuda, Minoru; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2011-01-01

    Although numerous carbohydrates play significant roles in mammalian cells, carbohydrate-based drug discovery has not been explored due to the technical difficulty of chemically synthesizing complex carbohydrate structures. Previously, we identified a series of carbohydrate mimetic peptides and found that a 7-mer peptide, designated I-peptide, inhibits hematogenous carbohydrate-dependent cancer cell colonization. During analysis of the endothelial surface receptor for I-peptide, we found that I-peptide bound to annexin 1 (Anxa1). Because Anxa1 is a highly specific tumor vasculature surface marker, we hypothesized that an I-peptide-like peptide could target anticancer drugs to the tumor vasculature. This study identifies IFLLWQR peptide, designated IF7, as homing to tumors. When synthetic IF7 peptide was conjugated to fluorescent Alexa 488 (A488) and injected intravenously into tumor-bearing mice, IF7-A488 targeted tumors within minutes. IF7 conjugated to the potent anticancer drug SN-38 and injected intravenously into nude mice carrying human colon HCT116 tumors efficiently suppressed tumor growth at low dosages with no apparent side effects. These results suggest that IF7 serves as an efficient drug delivery vehicle by targeting Anxa1 expressed on the surface of tumor vasculature. Given its extremely specific tumor-targeting activity, IF7 may represent a clinically relevant vehicle for anticancer drugs. PMID:22114188

  18. Absolute peptide quantification by lutetium labeling and nanoHPLC-ICPMS with isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The need of analytical methods for absolute quantitative protein analysis spurred research on new developments in recent years. In this work, a novel approach was developed for accurate absolute peptide quantification based on metal labeling with lutetium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Lu-DTPA) and nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (nanoHPLC-ICP-IDMS). In a two-step procedure peptides were derivatized at amino groups with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (DTPAA) followed by chelation of lutetium. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of the reaction product demonstrated highly specific peptide labeling. Under optimized nanoHPLC conditions the labeled peptides were baseline-separated, and the excess labeling reagent did not interfere. A 176Lu-labeled spike was continuously added to the column effluent for quantification by ICP-IDMS. The recovery of a Lu-DTPA-labeled standard peptide was close to 100% indicating high labeling efficiency and accurate absolute quantification. The precision of the entire method was 4.9%. The detection limit for Lu-DTPA-tagged peptides was 179 amol demonstrating that lutetium-specific peptide quantification was by 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than detection by natural sulfur atoms present in cysteine or methionine residues. Furthermore, the application to peptides in insulin tryptic digest allowed the identification of interfering reagents decreasing the labeling efficiency. An additional advantage of this novel approach is the analysis of peptides, which do not naturally feature ICPMS-detectable elements.

  19. Cyclic peptide-polymer complexes and their self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Dominique; Tong, Xia; Soumaré, Sadia; Dory, Yves L; Zhao, Yue

    2009-01-01

    The efficient synthesis of novel chiral cyclic peptides cyclo[NHCHX-CH=CHCH(2)CO(NHCH(2)CH=CHCH(2)CO)(2)] designed to develop hydrogen-bonding interactions with suitable polymers is described. Complexation of a carboxylic acid derivatized cyclic peptide 2 (X = CH(2)OCOCH(2)CH(2)CO(2)H) capable of self-assembling as "endless" tubes, with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) led to a vast weak-interaction network, in which the cyclopeptide developed extensive hydrogen-bonding interactions with the hydroxyl groups of PVA through not only the carboxylic acid, but also its ester carbonyl and amide groups. In aqueous solution, the peptide/PVA complexes self-assemble into long-grain ricelike aggregates compatible with the stacking of cyclic peptides through intercycle hydrogen bonds. Upon casting on silicon wafer, the anisotropic aggregates can coalesce to form filaments tens of micrometers long. The study demonstrates that complexing functionalized cyclic peptides with polymers through hydrogen bonding is a useful approach for using polymers to mediate the self-assembly and self-organization of cyclic peptides.

  20. Production of Bioactive Peptides in an In Vitro System

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Cai, Yang; Lindberg, Iris

    2007-01-01

    An in vitro system for the preparation of bioactive peptides is described below. This system couples three different post-translational modification enzymes, prohormone convertases (PCs), carboxypeptidase E, and peptidyl α-amidating enzyme, to transform recombinant precursors into bioactive peptides. Three different precursors, mouse proopiomelanocortin (mPOMC), rat proenkephalin (rPE) and human proghrelin were used as model systems. The conversion of mPOMC and rPE to smaller peptide products was measured by radioimmunoassay. After optimization of the system, excellent efficiency was obtained: about 85% of starting mPOMC was converted to des-acetyl α-MSH. For proenkephalin, 75% and 96% yields were obtained for the opioid peptides Met-RGL and Met-enk respectively. Cell-based assays demonstrated that in vitro-generated des-acetyl α-MSH successfully activated the melanocortin 4 receptor. Proghrelin digestion was used to screen the specificity of PC cleavage as well as to confirm the cleavage site by mass spectroscopy. Mature ghrelin was produced by human furin, mouse prohormone convertase 1, and human prohormone convertase 7, but not by mouse prohormone convertase 2. These results demonstrate that our in vitro system 1) can produce peptides in quantities sufficient to carry out functional analyses; 2) can be used to determine the specificity of proprotein convertases on recombinant precursors; and 3) has the potential to identify novel peptide functions on both known and orphan GPCRs. PMID:17540328

  1. Production of bioactive peptides in an in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Cai, Yang; Lindberg, Iris

    2007-07-15

    An in vitro system for the preparation of bioactive peptides is described. This system couples three different posttranslational modification enzymes, prohormone convertases (PCs), carboxypeptidase E, and peptidyl alpha-amidating enzyme, to transform recombinant precursors into bioactive peptides. Three different precursors, mouse proopiomelanocortin (mPOMC), rat proenkephalin (rPE), and human proghrelin, were used as model systems. The conversion of mPOMC and rPE to smaller peptide products was measured by radioimmunoassay. After optimization of the system, excellent efficiency was obtained: about 85% of starting mPOMC was converted to des-acetyl alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). For proenkephalin, 75 and 96% yields were obtained for the opioid peptides Met-RGL and Met-enk, respectively. Cell-based assays demonstrated that in-vitro-generated des-acetyl alpha-MSH successfully activated the melanocortin 4 receptor. Proghrelin digestion was used to screen the specificity of PC cleavage and to confirm the cleavage site by mass spectroscopy. Mature ghrelin was produced by human furin, mouse prohormone convertase 1, and human prohormone convertase 7 but not by mouse prohormone convertase 2. These results demonstrate that our in vitro system (1) can produce peptides in quantities sufficient to carry out functional analyses, (2) can be used to determine the specificity of proprotein convertases on recombinant precursors, and (3) has the potential to identify novel peptide functions on both known and orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

  2. Peptide Directed 3D Assembly of Nanoparticles through Biomolecular Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Prerna

    The current challenge of the 'bottom up' process is the programmed self-assembly of nanoscale building blocks into complex and larger-scale superstructures with unique properties that can be integrated as components in solar cells, microelectronics, meta materials, catalysis, and sensors. Recent trends in the complexity of device design demand the fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) superstructures from multi-nanomaterial components in precise configurations. Bio mimetic assembly is an emerging technique for building hybrid materials because living organisms are efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally benign material generators, allowing low temperature fabrication. Using this approach, a novel peptide-directed nanomaterial assembly technology based on bio molecular interaction of streptavidin and biotin is presented for assembling nanomaterials with peptides for the construction of 3D peptide-inorganic superlattices with defined 3D shape. We took advantage of robust natural collagen triple-helix peptides and used them as nanowire building blocks for 3D peptide-gold nanoparticles superlattice generation. The type of 3D peptide superlattice assembly with hybrid NP building blocks described herein shows potential for the fabrication of complex functional device which demands precise long-range arrangement and periodicity of NPs.

  3. Highly Flexible Protein-Peptide Docking Using CABS-Dock.

    PubMed

    Ciemny, Maciej Paweł; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kozak, Konrad Jakub; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Protein-peptide molecular docking is a difficult modeling problem. It is even more challenging when significant conformational changes that may occur during the binding process need to be predicted. In this chapter, we demonstrate the capabilities and features of the CABS-dock server for flexible protein-peptide docking. CABS-dock allows highly efficient modeling of full peptide flexibility and significant flexibility of a protein receptor. During CABS-dock docking, the peptide folding and binding process is explicitly simulated and no information about the peptide binding site or its structure is used. This chapter presents a successful CABS-dock use for docking a potentially therapeutic peptide to a protein target. Moreover, simulation contact maps, a new CABS-dock feature, are described and applied to the docking test case. Finally, a tutorial for running CABS-dock from the command line or command line scripts is provided. The CABS-dock web server is available from http://biocomp.chem.uw.edu.pl/CABSdock/ .

  4. Marine Fish Proteins and Peptides for Cosmeceuticals: A Review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Anil, Sukumaran; Kim, Se-Kwon; Shim, Min Suk

    2017-05-18

    Marine fish provide a rich source of bioactive compounds such as proteins and peptides. The bioactive proteins and peptides derived from marine fish have gained enormous interest in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, and cosmeceutical industries due to their broad spectrum of bioactivities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-aging activities. Recently, the development of cosmeceuticals using marine fish-derived proteins and peptides obtained from chemical or enzymatical hydrolysis of fish processing by-products has increased rapidly owing to their activities in antioxidation and tissue regeneration. Marine fish-derived collagen has been utilized for the development of cosmeceutical products due to its abilities in skin repair and tissue regeneration. Marine fish-derived peptides have also been utilized for various cosmeceutical applications due to their antioxidant, antimicrobial, and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory activities. In addition, marine fish-derived proteins and hydrolysates demonstrated efficient anti-photoaging activity. The present review highlights and presents an overview of the current status of the isolation and applications of marine fish-derived proteins and peptides. This review also demonstrates that marine fish-derived proteins and peptides have high potential for biocompatible and effective cosmeceuticals.

  5. Marine Fish Proteins and Peptides for Cosmeceuticals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Anil, Sukumaran; Kim, Se-Kwon; Shim, Min Suk

    2017-01-01

    Marine fish provide a rich source of bioactive compounds such as proteins and peptides. The bioactive proteins and peptides derived from marine fish have gained enormous interest in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, and cosmeceutical industries due to their broad spectrum of bioactivities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-aging activities. Recently, the development of cosmeceuticals using marine fish-derived proteins and peptides obtained from chemical or enzymatical hydrolysis of fish processing by-products has increased rapidly owing to their activities in antioxidation and tissue regeneration. Marine fish-derived collagen has been utilized for the development of cosmeceutical products due to its abilities in skin repair and tissue regeneration. Marine fish-derived peptides have also been utilized for various cosmeceutical applications due to their antioxidant, antimicrobial, and matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory activities. In addition, marine fish-derived proteins and hydrolysates demonstrated efficient anti-photoaging activity. The present review highlights and presents an overview of the current status of the isolation and applications of marine fish-derived proteins and peptides. This review also demonstrates that marine fish-derived proteins and peptides have high potential for biocompatible and effective cosmeceuticals. PMID:28524092

  6. Differential Age-Dependent Import Regulation by Signal Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yi-Shan; Chan, Po-Ting; Li, Hsou-min

    2012-01-01

    Gene-specific, age-dependent regulations are common at the transcriptional and translational levels, while protein transport into organelles is generally thought to be constitutive. Here we report a new level of differential age-dependent regulation and show that chloroplast proteins are divided into three age-selective groups: group I proteins have a higher import efficiency into younger chloroplasts, import of group II proteins is nearly independent of chloroplast age, and group III proteins are preferentially imported into older chloroplasts. The age-selective signal is located within the transit peptide of each protein. A group III protein with its transit peptide replaced by a group I transit peptide failed to complement its own mutation. Two consecutive positive charges define the necessary motif in group III signals for older chloroplast preference. We further show that different members of a gene family often belong to different age-selective groups because of sequence differences in their transit peptides. These results indicate that organelle-targeting signal peptides are part of cells' differential age-dependent regulation networks. The sequence diversity of some organelle-targeting peptides is not a result of the lack of selection pressure but has evolved to mediate regulation. PMID:23118617

  7. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  8. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide

  9. Western blot analysis of Src kinase assays using peptide substrates ligated to a carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2004-06-01

    We have applied intein-mediated peptide ligation (IPL) to the use of peptide substrates for kinase assays and subsequent Western blot analysis. IPL allows for the efficient ligation of a synthetic peptide with an N-terminal cysteine residue to an intein-generated carrier protein containing a cysteine reactive C-terminal thioester through a native peptide bond. A distinct advantage of this procedure is that each carrier protein molecule ligates only one peptide, ensuring that the ligation product forms a sharp band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach by mutational analysis of peptide substrates derived from human cyclin-dependent kinase, Cdc2, which contains a phosphorylation site of human c-Src protein tyrosine kinase.

  10. Histidine-containing peptide catalysts developed by a facile library screening method.

    PubMed

    Akagawa, Kengo; Sakai, Nobutaka; Kudo, Kazuaki

    2015-02-02

    Although peptide catalysts have a high potential for the use as organocatalysts, the optimization of peptide sequences is laborious and time-consuming. To address this issue, a facile screening method for finding efficient aminocatalysts from a peptide library has been developed. In the screening for the Michael addition of a malonate to an enal, a dye-labeled product is immobilized on resin-bound peptides through reductive amination to visualize active catalysts. This procedure allows for the monitoring of the reactivity of entire peptides without modifying the resin beads beforehand. Peptides containing histidine at an appropriate position were identified by this method. A novel function of the histidyl residue, which enhances the binding of a substrate to the catalyst by capturing an iminium intermediate, was indicated.

  11. A Fluorescent Protein Scaffold for Presenting Structurally Constrained Peptides Provides an Effective Screening System to Identify High Affinity Target-Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kadonosono, Tetsuya; Yabe, Etsuri; Furuta, Tadaomi; Yamano, Akihiro; Tsubaki, Takuya; Sekine, Takuya; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae

    2014-01-01

    Peptides that have high affinity for target molecules on the surface of cancer cells are crucial for the development of targeted cancer therapies. However, unstructured peptides often fail to bind their target molecules with high affinity. To efficiently identify high-affinity target-binding peptides, we have constructed a fluorescent protein scaffold, designated gFPS, in which structurally constrained peptides are integrated at residues K131–L137 of superfolder green fluorescent protein. Molecular dynamics simulation supported the suitability of this site for presentation of exogenous peptides with a constrained structure. gFPS can present 4 to 12 exogenous amino acids without a loss of fluorescence. When gFPSs presenting human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-targeting peptides were added to the culture medium of HER2-expressing cells, we could easily identify the peptides with high HER2-affinity and -specificity based on gFPS fluorescence. In addition, gFPS could be expressed on the yeast cell surface and applied for a high-throughput screening. These results demonstrate that gFPS has the potential to serve as a powerful tool to improve screening of structurally constrained peptides that have a high target affinity, and suggest that it could expedite the one-step identification of clinically applicable cancer cell-binding peptides. PMID:25084350

  12. Design of a Multicomponent Peptide-Woven Nanocomplex for Delivery of siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Eunsung; Kim, Soyoun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Cha, Kiweon; So, In-Seop; Son, Hye-Nam; Lee, Byung-Heon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2015-01-01

    We developed and tested a multicomponent peptide-woven siRNA nanocomplex (PwSN) comprising different peptides designed for efficient cellular targeting, endosomal escape, and release of siRNA. To enhance tumor-specific cellular uptake, we connected an interleukin-4 receptor-targeting peptide (I4R) to a nine-arginine peptide (9r), yielding I4R-9r. To facilitate endosomal escape, we blended endosomolytic peptides into the I4R-9r to form a multicomponent nanocomplex. Lastly, we modified 9r peptides by varying the number and positions of positive charges to obtain efficient release of siRNA from the nanocomplex in the cytosol. Using this step-wise approach for overcoming the biological challenges of siRNA delivery, we obtained an optimized PwSN with significant biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, surface plasmon resonance analyses and three-dimensional peptide models demonstrated that our designed peptide adopted a unique structure that was correlated with faster complex disassembly and a better gene-silencing effect. These studies further elucidate the siRNA nanocomplex delivery pathway and demonstrate the applicability of our stepwise strategy to the design of siRNA carriers capable of overcoming multiple challenges and achieving efficient delivery. PMID:25705892

  13. Design of a multicomponent peptide-woven nanocomplex for delivery of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Jun, Eunsung; Kim, Soyoun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Cha, Kiweon; So, In-Seop; Son, Hye-Nam; Lee, Byung-Heon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, In-San

    2015-01-01

    We developed and tested a multicomponent peptide-woven siRNA nanocomplex (PwSN) comprising different peptides designed for efficient cellular targeting, endosomal escape, and release of siRNA. To enhance tumor-specific cellular uptake, we connected an interleukin-4 receptor-targeting peptide (I4R) to a nine-arginine peptide (9r), yielding I4R-9r. To facilitate endosomal escape, we blended endosomolytic peptides into the I4R-9r to form a multicomponent nanocomplex. Lastly, we modified 9r peptides by varying the number and positions of positive charges to obtain efficient release of siRNA from the nanocomplex in the cytosol. Using this step-wise approach for overcoming the biological challenges of siRNA delivery, we obtained an optimized PwSN with significant biological activity in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, surface plasmon resonance analyses and three-dimensional peptide models demonstrated that our designed peptide adopted a unique structure that was correlated with faster complex disassembly and a better gene-silencing effect. These studies further elucidate the siRNA nanocomplex delivery pathway and demonstrate the applicability of our stepwise strategy to the design of siRNA carriers capable of overcoming multiple challenges and achieving efficient delivery.

  14. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  15. Tryptophan within basic peptide sequences triggers glycosaminoglycan-dependent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Zaltsman, Yefim; Burlina, Fabienne; Alves, Isabel D; Lequin, Olivier; Sagan, Sandrine

    2013-02-01

    Deciphering the structural requirements and mechanisms for internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is required to improve their delivery efficiency. Herein, a unique role of tryptophan (Trp) residues in the interaction and structuring of cationic CPP sequences with glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) has been characterized, in relation with cell internalization. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism, NMR, mass spectrometry, and phase-contrast microscopy, we compared the interaction of 7 basic CPPs with 5 classes of GAGs. We found that the affinity of CPPs for GAGs increases linearly with the number of Trp residues, from 30 nM for a penetratin analog with 1 Trp residue to 1.5 nM for a penetratin analog with 6 Trp residues for heparin (HI); peptides with Trp residues adopt a predominantly β-strand structure in complex with HI and form large, stable β-sheet aggregates with GAGs; and in the absence of any cytotoxicity effect, the quantity of peptide internalized into CHO cells increased 2 times with 1 Trp residue, 10 times with 2 Trp residues, and 20 times with 3 Trp residues, compared with +6 peptides with no Trp residues. Therefore, Trp residues represent molecular determinants in basic peptide sequences not only for direct membrane translocation but also for efficient endocytosis through GAGs.

  16. Polar profile of antiviral peptides from AVPpred Database.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of viral origin in humans are among the most serious threats to health and the global economy. As recent history has shown the virus has a high pandemic potential, among other reasons, due to its ability to spread by air, hence the identification, investigation, containment, and treatment of viral diseases should be considered of paramount importance. In this sense, the bioinformatics research has focused on finding fast and efficient algorithms that can identify highly toxic antiviral peptides and to serve as a first filter, so that trials in the laboratory are substantially reduced. The work presented here contributes to this effort through the use of an algorithm already published by this team, called polarity index method, which identifies with high efficiency antiviral peptides from the exhaustive analysis of the polar profile, using the linear sequence of the peptide. The test carried out included all peptides in APD2 Database and 60 antiviral peptides identified by Kumar and co-workers (Nucleic Acids Res 40:W199-204, 2012), to build its AVPpred algorithm. The validity of the method was focused on its discriminating capacity so we included the 15 sub-classifications of both Databases.

  17. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Diana; Veiga, A. Salomé; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs) in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective, and more efficient drugs is evident. Even though ACPs are expected to be selective toward tumor cells without impairing the normal body physiological functions, the development of a selective ACP has been a challenge. It is not yet possible to predict antitumor activity based on ACPs structures. ACPs are unique molecules when compared to the actual chemotherapeutic arsenal available for cancer treatment and display a variety of modes of action which in some types of cancer seem to co-exist. Regardless the debate surrounding the definition of structure-activity relationships for ACPs, great effort has been invested in ACP design and the challenge of improving effective killing of tumor cells remains. As detailed studies on ACPs mechanisms of action are crucial for optimizing drug development, in this review we provide an overview of the literature concerning peptides' structure, modes of action, selectivity, and efficacy and also summarize some of the many ACPs studied and/or developed for targeting different solid and hematologic malignancies with special emphasis on the first group. Strategies described for drug development and for increasing peptide selectivity toward specific cells while reducing toxicity are also discussed. PMID:24101917

  18. Macrocyclization and labeling of helix-loop-helix peptide with intramolecular bis-thioether linkage.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Toshio; Kitada, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-11-04

    Conformationally constrained peptides have been developed as an inhibitor for protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and we have de novo designed cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide with a disulfide bond consisting of 40 amino acids to generate molecular-targeting peptides. However, synthesis of long peptides has sometimes resulted in low yield according to the respective amino acid sequences. Here we developed a method for efficient synthesis and labeling for cHLH peptides. First, we synthesized two peptide fragments and connected them by the copper-mediated alkyne and azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Cyclization was performed by bis-thioether linkage using 1,3-dibromomethyl-5-propargyloxybenzene, and subsequently, the cHLH peptide was labeled with an azide-labeled probe. Finally, we designed and synthesized a peptide inhibitor for the p53-HDM2 interaction using a structure-guided design and successfully labeled it with a fluorescent probe or a functional peptide, respectively, by click chemistry. This macrocyclization and labeling method for cHLH peptide would facilitate the discovery of de novo bioactive ligands and therapeutic leads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 415-421, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Nano-liposomal entrapment of bioactive peptidic fraction from fish gelatin hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Fakhreddin; Ramezanzade, Leila; Nikkhah, Maryam

    2017-05-25

    This study guided the potential of nanoliposomal vesicles for the encapsulation of an active peptidic fraction from the fish skin gelatin by enzymatic hydrolysis using alcalase. The average particle size of peptide-loaded nanoliposomes was found to be in the range 134-621nm, with a ζ-potential of 0.06-8.65mV and a polydispersity index of 0.27-0.49, when the initial peptide content was 0-10mg/ml. The FTIR analysis showed that there was an effective hydrophobic interaction as well as hydrogen bonding between phosphatidylcholine and peptidic fraction. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) was remarkably influenced by peptide concentration and the maximum EE (84.5%) was achieved with 1mg/ml peptide concentration. A prolonged release of peptide from nanoliposomes was also observed as compared to free peptidic fraction. The results showed that the encapsulation of gelatin peptidic fraction using liposomal nanocarrier could represent a useful approach to overcome the issues associated with direct application of these antioxidant peptides in foodstuffs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of peptide designing strategy against subunit reassociation in mucin 1: A steered molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Lesitha Jeeva Kumari, J; Jesu Jaya Sudan, R; Sudandiradoss, C

    2017-01-01

    Subunit reassociation in mucin 1, a breast cancer tumor marker, is reported as one of the critical factors for its cytoplasmic activation. Inhibition of its heterodimeric association would therefore result in loss of its function and alter disease progression. The present study aimed at evaluating peptide inhibitor designing strategies that may serve as antagonist against this receptor-ligand alliance. Several peptides and their derivatives were designed based on native residues, subunit interface, hydrogen bonding and secondary structure. Docking studies with the peptides were carried on the receptor subunit and their binding affinities were evaluated using steered molecular dynamics simulation and umbrella sampling. Our results showed that among all the different classes of peptides evaluated, the receptor based peptide showed the highest binding affinity. This result was concurrent with the experimental observation that the receptor-ligand alliance in mucin 1 is highly specific. Our results also show that peptide ligand against this subunit association is only stabilized through native residue inter-protein interaction irrespective of the peptide structure, peptide length and number of hydrogen bonds. Consistency in binding affinity, pull force and free energy barrier was observed with only the receptor derived peptides which resulted in favorable interprotein interactions at the interface. Several observations were made and discussed which will eventually lead to designing efficient peptide inhibitors against mucin 1 heterodimeric subunit reassociation.

  1. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  2. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  3. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  4. Systematic screening for bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Maeji, N J; Bray, A M; Valerio, R M; Seldon, M A; Wang, J X; Geysen, H M

    1991-01-01

    Using simultaneous multiple peptide synthesis by the multipin approach, the feasibility of systematic large-scale pharmacological screening of peptide ligands was investigated. The method involves the assembly of small quantities of peptides (ca. 50 nmol) on plastic pins derivatized with an ester linker based on glycolate and 4-(hydroxymethyl)benzoate. These esters are stable under peptide synthesis and side-chain deprotection conditions but cleave under relatively mild basic conditions to generate peptides having C-terminal acid, amide and methylamide. A two-step approach to side-chain deprotection and cleavage from the solid support allows potentially toxic reagents to be removed (washed) from the peptide prior to cleavage. Consequently, the resulting peptide solutions can be used in bioassays with minimal processing. A series of angiotensin II and substance P analogs were synthesized and evaluated in an in vivo rat model and in vitro radioreceptor assay, respectively. Structure-activity studies on analogs of these bioactive peptides are well documented. The data obtained were consistent with that reported in the literature.

  5. Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides into Candida fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zifan; Karlsson, Amy J

    2017-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides capable of crossing cellular membranes while carrying molecular cargo. Although they have been widely studied for their ability to translocate nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins into mammalian cells, studies of their interaction with fungal cells are limited. In this work, we evaluated the translocation of eleven fluorescently labeled peptides into the important human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata and explored the mechanisms of translocation. Seven of these peptides (cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, MAP, SynB, (KFF)3 K, and MPG) exhibited substantial translocation (>80% of cells) into both species in a concentration-dependent manner, and an additional peptide (TP-10) exhibiting strong translocation into only C. glabrata. Vacuoles were involved in translocation and intracellular trafficking of the peptides in the fungal cells and, for some peptides, escape from the vacuoles and localization in the cytosol were correlated to toxicity toward the fungal cells. Endocytosis was involved in the translocation of cecropin B, MAP, SynB, MPG, (KFF)3 K, and TP-10, and cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, and MAP caused membrane permeabilization during translocation. These results indicate the involvement of multiple translocation mechanisms for some CPPs. Although high levels of translocation were typically associated with toxicity of the peptides toward the fungal cells, SynB was translocated efficiently into Candida cells at concentrations that led to minimal toxicity. Our work highlights the potential of CPPs in delivering antifungal molecules and other bioactive cargo to Candida pathogens. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  6. Engineered peptide-based nanobiomaterials for electrochemical cell chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafi, Md. Abdul; Cho, Hyeon-Yeol; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials having cell adhesion ability are considered to be integral part of a cell chip. A number of researches have been carried out to search for a suitable material for effective immobilization of cell on substrate. Engineered ECM materials or their components like collagen, Poly- l-Lysine (PLL), Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide have been extensively used for mammalian cell adhesion and proliferation with the aim of tissue regeneration or cell based sensing application. This review focuses on the various approaches for two- and three-dimensionally patterned nanostructures of a short peptide i.e. RGD peptide on chip surfaces together with their effects on cell behaviors and electrochemical measurements. Most of the study concluded with positive remarks on the well-oriented engineered RGD peptide over their homogenous thin film. The engineered RGD peptide not only influences cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation but also their periodic nano-arrays directly influence electrochemical measurements of the chips. The electrochemical signals found to be enhanced when RGD peptides were used in well-defined two-dimensional nano-arrays. The topographic alteration of three-dimensional structure of engineered RGD peptide was reported to be suitably contacted with the integrin receptors of cellular membrane which results indicated the enhanced cell-electrode adhesion and efficient electron exchange phenomenon. This enhanced electrochemical signal increases the sensitivity of the chip against the target analytes. Therefore, development of engineered cellular recognizable peptides and its 3D topological design for fabrication of cell chip will provide the synergetic effect on bio-affinity, sensitivity and accuracy for the in situ real-time monitoring of analytes.

  7. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  8. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  9. Peptides and peptidomimetics as immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Ameya S; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama

    2014-01-01

    Peptides and peptidomimetics can function as immunomodulating agents by either blocking the immune response or stimulating the immune response to generate tolerance. Knowledge of B- or T-cell epitopes along with conformational constraints is important in the design of peptide-based immunomodulating agents. Work on the conformational aspects of peptides, synthesis and modified amino acid side chains have contributed to the development of a new generation of therapeutic agents for autoimmune diseases and cancer. The design of peptides/peptidomimetics for immunomodulation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and HIV infection is reviewed. In cancer therapy, peptide epitopes are used in such a way that the body is trained to recognize and fight the cancer cells locally as well as systemically. PMID:25186605

  10. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  11. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods.

  12. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  13. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  14. Short Antimicrobial Peptides and Peptide Scaffolds as Promising Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Domalaon, Ronald; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have recently garnered significant attention as an emerging source of potential antibiotics, due to the swift emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and a dwindling antibiotic pipeline. The vast majority of antimicrobial peptides are long, comprised of more than 10 amino acids, resulting in significant production costs for their synthesis while simultaneously displaying metabolic instability and relatively poor pharmacological profiles. To counter these problems, efforts have been shifted to shorter molecules and the development of new peptidomimetic approaches. In this paper, we review promising short, naturally-isolated or synthetic, antimicrobial peptides, along with their mimics, and discuss their merits as potential antibacterial agents.

  15. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  16. Cell-penetrating peptides: strategies for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Raucher, Drazen; Ryu, Jung Su

    2015-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) provide an efficient strategy for the intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules in various biomedical applications. This review focuses on recent advances in the use of CPPs to deliver anticancer therapeutics and imaging reagents to cancer cells, along with CPP contributions to novel tumor-targeting techniques. CPPs are now used extensively to deliver a variety of therapeutics, despite lacking cell specificity and having a short duration of action. Resolution of these shortcomings to enable increased cancer cell and/or tumor specificity could improve CPP-based drug delivery strategies, expand combined drug delivery possibilities, and strengthen future clinical applications of these peptides.

  17. Analysis of Intrinsic Peptide Detectability via Integrated Label-Free and SRM-Based Absolute Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jarnuczak, Andrew F; Lee, Dave C H; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W; Eyers, Claire E; Hubbard, Simon J

    2016-09-02

    Quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics of complex biological samples remains challenging in part due to the variability and charge competition arising during electrospray ionization (ESI) of peptides and the subsequent transfer and detection of ions. These issues preclude direct quantification from signal intensity alone in the absence of a standard. A deeper understanding of the governing principles of peptide ionization and exploitation of the inherent ionization and detection parameters of individual peptides is thus of great value. Here, using the yeast proteome as a model system, we establish the concept of peptide F-factor as a measure of detectability, closely related to ionization efficiency. F-factor is calculated by normalizing peptide precursor ion intensity by absolute abundance of the parent protein. We investigated F-factor characteristics in different shotgun proteomics experiments, including across multiple ESI-based LC-MS platforms. We show that F-factors mirror previously observed physicochemical predictors as peptide detectability but demonstrate a nonlinear relationship between hydrophobicity and peptide detectability. Similarly, we use F-factors to show how peptide ion coelution adversely affects detectability and ionization. We suggest that F-factors have great utility for understanding peptide detectability and gas-phase ion chemistry in complex peptide mixtures, selection of surrogate peptides in targeted MS studies, and for calibration of peptide ion signal in label-free workflows. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003472.

  18. RPM peptide conjugated bioreducible polyethylenimine targeting invasive colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Mi; Lee, Duhwan; Kim, Jihoon; Park, Hansoo; Kim, Won Jong

    2015-05-10

    CPIEDRPMC (RPM) peptide is a peptide that specifically targets invasive colorectal cancer, which is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In this study, we exploited RPM peptide as a targeting ligand to produce a novel and efficient gene delivery system that could potentially be used to treat invasive colon cancer. In order to achieve enhanced specificity to colon cancer cells, the RPM peptide was conjugated to a bioreducible gene carrier consisting of a reducible moiety of disulfide-crosslinked low molecular weight polyethylenimine, IR820 dye, and polyethylene glycol. Here, we examined the physiochemical properties, cytotoxicity, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo biodistribution of the RPM-conjugated polyplex. Our results showed that the RPM-conjugated gene carrier formed a compact polyplex with pDNA that had low toxicity. Furthermore, the RPM-conjugated polymer not only had higher cellular uptake in invasive colon cancer than the non-targeted polymer, but also showed enhanced transfection efficiency in invasive colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancement of gene delivery using novel homodimeric tat peptide formed by disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Doh, Kyung-Oh

    2011-08-01

    Cationic liposomes have been actively used as gene delivery vehicle because of their minimal toxicity, but their relatively low efficiency of gene delivery is the major disadvantage of these vectors. Recently, cysteine residue incorporation to HIV-1 Tat peptide increased liposomemediated transfection compared with unmodified Tat peptide. Therefore, we designed a novel modified Tat peptide having a homodimeric (Tat-CTHD, Tat-NTHD) and closed structure (cyclic Tat) simply by using the disulfide bond between cysteines to develop a more efficient and safe nonviral gene delivery system. The mixing of Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine increased the transfection efficiency compared with unmodified Tat peptide and lipofectamine only in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and rat vascular smooth muscle cells. However, cyclic Tat did not show any improvement in the transfection efficiency. In the gel retardation assay, Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD showed more strong binding with DNA than unmodified Tat and cyclic Tat peptide. This enhancement was only shown when Tat-CTHD and Tat-NTHD were mixed with DNA before mixing with lipofectamine. The effects of Tat- CTHD and Tat-NTHD were also valid in the experiment using DOTAP and DMRIE instead of lipofectamine. We could not find any significant cytotoxicity in the working concentration and more usage of these peptides. In conclusion, we have designed a novel transfection-enhancing peptide by easy homodimerization of Tat peptide, and the simple mix of these novel peptides with DNA increased the gene transfer of cationic lipids more efficiently with no additional cytotoxicity.

  20. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  1. Highly Efficient Proteolysis Accelerated by Electromagnetic Waves for Peptide Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwen; Liu, Ting; Chen, Gang

    2011-01-01

    Proteomics will contribute greatly to the understanding of gene functions in the post-genomic era. In proteome research, protein digestion is a key procedure prior to mass spectrometry identification. During the past decade, a variety of electromagnetic waves have been employed to accelerate proteolysis. This review focuses on the recent advances and the key strategies of these novel proteolysis approaches for digesting and identifying proteins. The subjects covered include microwave-accelerated protein digestion, infrared-assisted proteolysis, ultraviolet-enhanced protein digestion, laser-assisted proteolysis, and future prospects. It is expected that these novel proteolysis strategies accelerated by various electromagnetic waves will become powerful tools in proteome research and will find wide applications in high throughput protein digestion and identification. PMID:22379392

  2. Characterization of the triphenylphosphonium derivative of peptides by fast atom bombardment-tandem mass spectrometry, and investigations of the mechanisms of fragmentation of peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    Fast atom bombardment collisionally activated dissociation tandem mass spectrometry is a powerful technique for the determination of the primary structure of peptides. However, there are factors that frequently prevent successful sequence analysis by mass spectrometry. Two such factors are the poor ionization efficiency of some hydrophilic peptides and, for many peptides, ambiguities in interpretation of the spectra when key sequence ions are weak or absent. Novel and simple procedures for preparing ethyl-triphenylphosphonium derivatives of peptides are described. These procedures allow an ethyl-triphenylphosphonium moiety to be selectively attached to either the N- or C-terminus. Modification of peptides by these chemical methods significantly enhances the efficiency of fast atom bombardment ionization. Moreover, upon collisionally activated dissociation, the derivatized peptides generate a predictable series of sequence ions from either the C-terminus or the N-terminus, depending on the location of the ethyl-triphenylphosphonium moiety. The potential utility of the ethyl-triphenylphosphonium derivative in structure elucidation is illustrated by a comparison of the mass spectra of underivatized and derivatized peptides containing up to 20 amino acid residues, or contain an N-terminal blocking group, or contain a phosphate group, or contain a disulfide bond, or contain a backbone modification. When protonated peptide molecules and cationized peptide molecules are subjected to high-energy collisionally activated dissociation, skeletal bonds cleave generating sequence-specific fragment ions. These bond cleavages usually involve H-shifts. The utility of selective deuterium labeling was applied here to elucidate fragmentation mechanisms. Skeletal bond cleavages in the ionized peptide H-VGVAPG-OH were investigated, in which the molecule was analyzed in the protonated form, cationized form, or as the charge-localized ethyl-triphenylphosphonium derivative.

  3. Evidence that transporters associated with antigen processing translocate a major histocompatibility complex class I-binding peptide into the endoplasmic reticulum in an ATP-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Androlewicz, M J; Anderson, K S; Cresswell, P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the putative peptide transporters associated with antigen processing (TAP) by using a permeabilized-cell system. The main objective was to determine whether these molecules, which bear homology to the ATP-binding cassette family of transporters, translocate antigenic peptides across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane for assembly with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and beta 2-microglobulin light chain. The pore-forming toxin streptolysin O was used to generate permeabilized cells, and peptide translocation was determined by measuring the amount of added radiolabeled peptide bound to endogenous class I molecules. No radiolabeled peptide was associated with MHC class I glycoproteins from unpermeabilized cells. We found that efficient peptide binding to MHC class I molecules in permeabilized cells is both transporter dependent and ATP dependent. In antigen-processing mutant cells lacking a functional transporter, uptake occurs only through a less-efficient transporter and ATP-independent pathway. In addition, short peptides (8-10 amino acids) known to bind MHC class I molecules compete efficiently with a radiolabeled peptide for TAP-dependent translocation, whereas longer peptides and a peptide derived from an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence do not compete efficiently. This result indicates that the optimal substrates for TAP possess the characteristics of MHC-binding peptides. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8415666

  4. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  5. Peptide modified gold nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, nuclear transport, and intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Uertz, J.; Yohan, D.; Chithrani, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP complex. The peptide-capped GNPs showed a five-fold increase in NP uptake followed by effective nuclear localization. The fraction of NPs exocytosed was less for peptide-capped NPs as compared to citrate-capped ones. Enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention of peptide-capped GNPs could allow NPs to perform their desired applications more efficiently in cells. These studies will provide guidelines for developing NPs for therapeutic applications, which will require ``controlling'' of the NP accumulation rate while maintaining low toxicity.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP

  6. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Methods Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Results Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Conclusions Network analysis is a

  7. Understanding and predicting binding between human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and peptides by network analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Heng; Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Mattes, William; Mendrick, Donna; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    As the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are one of the most polymorphic genes in humans. Patients carrying certain HLA alleles may develop adverse drug reactions (ADRs) after taking specific drugs. Peptides play an important role in HLA related ADRs as they are the necessary co-binders of HLAs with drugs. Many experimental data have been generated for understanding HLA-peptide binding. However, efficiently utilizing the data for understanding and accurately predicting HLA-peptide binding is challenging. Therefore, we developed a network analysis based method to understand and predict HLA-peptide binding. Qualitative Class I HLA-peptide binding data were harvested and prepared from four major databases. An HLA-peptide binding network was constructed from this dataset and modules were identified by the fast greedy modularity optimization algorithm. To examine the significance of signals in the yielded models, the modularity was compared with the modularity values generated from 1,000 random networks. The peptides and HLAs in the modules were characterized by similarity analysis. The neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm (Nebula) was developed for predicting HLA-peptide binding. Leave-one-out (LOO) validations and two-fold cross-validations were conducted to evaluate the performance of Nebula using the constructed HLA-peptide binding network. Nine modules were identified from analyzing the HLA-peptide binding network with a highest modularity compared to all the random networks. Peptide length and functional side chains of amino acids at certain positions of the peptides were different among the modules. HLA sequences were module dependent to some extent. Nebula archived an overall prediction accuracy of 0.816 in the LOO validations and average accuracy of 0.795 in the two-fold cross-validations and outperformed the method reported in the literature. Network analysis is a useful approach for analyzing large and

  8. Spontaneous intermolecular amide bond formation between side chains for irreversible peptide targeting.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Bijan; Howarth, Mark

    2010-04-07

    Peptides and synthetic peptide-like molecules are powerful tools for analysis and control of biological function. One major limitation of peptides is the instability of their interactions with biomolecules, because of the limited accessible surface area for noncovalent interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of peptides. Peptide tags are nonetheless fundamental for protein detection and purification, because their small size minimizes the perturbation to protein function. Here we have designed a 16 amino acid peptide that spontaneously forms an amide bond to a protein partner, via reaction between lysine and asparagine side chains. This depended upon splitting a pilin subunit from a human pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes, which usually undergoes intramolecular amide bond formation to impart mechanical and proteolytic stability to pili. Reaction of the protein partner was able to proceed to 98% conversion. The amide bond formation was independent of redox state and occurred at pH 5-8. The reaction was efficient in phosphate buffered saline and a wide range of biological buffers. Surprisingly, amide bond formation occurred at a similar rate at 4 and 37 degrees C. Both peptide and protein partners are composed of the regular 20 amino acids and reconstituted efficiently inside living E. coli. Labeling also showed high specificity on the surface of mammalian cells. Irreversible targeting of a peptide tag may have application in bioassembly, in cellular imaging, and to lock together proteins subject to high biological forces.

  9. Incorporation of liposomes containing squid tunic ACE-inhibitory peptides into fish gelatin.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Mauricio; Giménez, Begoña; Montero, Pilar; Gómez-Guillén, Maria Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Hydrolysates from collagen of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) tunics have shown excellent angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity. However, peptides directly included in food systems may suffer a decrease in activity, which could be minimized by loading them into nanoliposomes. A fraction of peptides with molecular weights <1 kDa obtained from hydrolyzed squid tunics, with reasonably high ACE-inhibitory activity (half-maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 = 0.096 g L(-1)), was encapsulated in phosphatidylcholine nanoliposomes. The peptide concentration affected the encapsulation efficiency and the stability of the resulting liposomes, which remained with a high zeta potential value (-54.3 mV) for at least 1 week at the most suitable peptide concentration. The optimal peptide concentration was established as 1.75 g L(-1). Liposomes obtained with this peptide concentration showed an encapsulation efficiency of 53%, a zeta potential of -59 mV, an average diameter of 70.3 nm and proved to be stable in the pH range 3-7 at 4 °C. Liposomes containing ACE-inhibitory peptides were incorporated in fish gelatin without detriment to the rheological properties and thermal stability of the resulting cold-induced gel. The ACE-inhibitory activity of the peptide fraction, which was not affected by the encapsulation process, conferred the bioactive potential to the nanoliposome-containing gelatin gel. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Mechanism Matters: A Taxonomy of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, W. Berkeley; Fuselier, Taylor; He, Jing; Wimley, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The permeability barrier imposed by cellular membranes limits the access of exogenous compounds to the interior of cells. Researchers and patients alike would benefit from efficient methods for intracellular delivery of a wide range of membrane-impermeant molecules, including biochemically active small molecules, imaging agents, peptides, peptide nucleic acids, proteins, RNA, DNA, and nanoparticles. There has been a sustained effort to exploit cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the delivery of such useful cargoes in vitro and in vivo because of their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and controllable physical chemistry. Here, we discuss the many mechanisms by which CPPs can function, and describe a taxonomy of mechanisms that could be help organize future efforts in the field. PMID:26545486

  11. Separation of Peptides on HALO 2-Micron Particles.

    PubMed

    Mant, Colin T; Hodges, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) is of fundamental importance to the isolation and separation of peptides, proteins, and other biomolecules. Hence, there is a continuing high demand for the development of RP-HPLC stationary-phase materials with enhanced separation efficiency. HALO packing materials began the revolution in "core-shell" technology with the advantages of faster separations, higher resolution and peak capacity, high temperature stability, and rugged reliable performance compared to traditional HPLC and UHPLC. These materials are characterized by a solid core surrounded by a thin layer of porous material, and represent a technology for the future with continuing refinements. Such refinements are aided via the use of designed synthetic peptide standards during stationary-phase development. Concomitantly, such standards also enable the researcher to monitor RP-HPLC column performance and develop optimized separation protocols for peptides from a wide array of sources. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Facile synthesis of peptide-porphyrin conjugates: Towards artificial catalase.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Naoki; Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Iwama, Shinsuke; Kato, Nobuki; Higuchi, Tsunehiko

    2010-09-01

    A facile synthetic method for peptide-porphyrin conjugates containing four peptide units on one porphyrin was developed using chemoselective reactions. The key building blocks, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3-azidophenyl)porphyrin 1 and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(5-azido-3-pyridyl)porphyrin 2, were efficiently synthesized and used as substrates for two well-known chemoselective reactions, traceless Staudinger ligation and copper-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition (so-called click chemistry). Both reactions gave the desired compounds, and click chemistry was superior for our purpose. To confirm the value of the established methodology, nine peptide-porphyrin conjugates were synthesized, and their catalase- and peroxidase-like activity in water was evaluated. Our synthetic strategy is expected to be valuable for the preparation of artificial heme protein models. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  14. MULTIVALENT DISPLAY OF PENDANT PRO-APOPTOTIC PEPTIDES INCREASES CYTOTOXIC ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Bocek, Michael J.; Shi, Julie; Ta, Anh; Ngambenjawong, Chayanon; Rostomily, Robert C.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Several cationic antimicrobial peptides have been investigated as potential anti-cancer drugs due to their demonstrated selective toxicity towards cancer cells relative to normal cells. For example, intracellular delivery of KLA, a pro-apoptotic peptide, results in toxicity against a variety of cancer cell lines; however, the relatively low activity and small size leads to rapid renal excretion when applied in vivo, limiting its therapeutic potential. In this work, apoptotic peptide-polymer hybrid materials were developed to increase apoptotic peptide activity via multivalent display. Multivalent peptide materials were prepared with comb-like structure by RAFT copolymerization of peptide macromonomers with N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA). Polymers displayed a GKRK peptide sequence for targeting p32, a protein often overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells, either fused with or as a comonomer to a KLA macromonomer. In three tested cancer cell lines, apoptotic polymers were significantly more cytotoxic than free peptides as evidenced by an order of magnitude decrease in IC50 values for the polymers compared to free peptide. The uptake efficiency and intracellular trafficking of one polymer construct was determined by radiolabeling and subcellular fractionation. Despite their more potent cytotoxic profile, polymeric KLA constructs have poor cellular uptake efficiency (<1%). A significant fraction (20%) of internalized constructs localize with intact mitochondrial fractions. In an effort to increase cellular uptake, polymer amines were converted to guanidines by reaction with O-methylisourea. Guanidinylated polymers disrupted function of isolated mitochondria more than their lysine-based analogs, but overall toxicity was decreased, likely due to inefficient mitochondrial trafficking. Thus, while multivalent KLA polymers are more potent than KLA peptides, these materials can be substantially improved by designing next generation materials with improved

  15. Fully Blind Docking at the Atomic Level for Protein-Peptide Complex Structure Prediction.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2016-10-04

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. In silico prediction of protein-peptide complex structure is highly desirable for mechanistic investigation of these processes and for therapeutic design. However, predicting all-atom structures of protein-peptide complexes without any knowledge about the peptide binding site and the bound peptide conformation remains a big challenge. Here, we present a docking-based method for predicting protein-peptide complex structures, referred to as MDockPeP, which starts with the peptide sequence and globally docks the all-atom, flexible peptide onto the protein structure. MDockPeP was tested on the peptiDB benchmarking database using both bound and unbound protein structures. The results show that MDockPeP successfully generated near-native peptide binding modes in 95.0% of the bound docking cases and in 92.2% of the unbound docking cases. The performance is significantly better than other existing docking methods. MDockPeP is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antiviral Drug Discovery Strategy Using Combinatorial Libraries of Structurally Constrained Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Real, Eléonore; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Battaglia, Véronique; Jallet, Corinne; Perrin, Pierre; Tordo, Noël; Chrisment, Peggy; D'Alayer, Jacques; Legrain, Pierre; Jacob, Yves

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for antiviral peptide discovery by using lyssaviruses (rabies virus and rabies-related viruses) as models. Based on the mimicry of natural bioactive peptides, two genetically encoded combinatorial peptide libraries composed of intrinsically constrained peptides (coactamers) were designed. Proteomic knowledge concerning the functional network of interactions in the lyssavirus transcription-replication complex highlights the phosphoprotein (P) as a prime target for inhibitors of viral replication. We present an integrated, sequential drug discovery process for selection of peptides with antiviral activity directed against the P. Our approach combines (i) an exhaustive two-hybrid selection of peptides binding two phylogenetically divergent lyssavirus P's, (ii) a functional analysis of protein interaction inhibition in a viral reverse genetic assay, coupled with a physical analysis of viral nucleoprotein-P complex by protein chip mass spectrometry, and (iii) an assay for inhibition of lyssavirus infection in mammalian cells. The validity of this strategy was demonstrated by the identification of four peptides exhibiting an efficient antiviral activity. Our work highlights the importance of P as a target in anti-rabies virus drug discovery. Furthermore, the screening strategy and the coactamer libraries presented in this report could be considered, respectively, a general target validation strategy and a potential source of biologically active peptides which could also help to design pharmacologically active peptide-mimicking molecules. The strategy described here is easily applicable to other pathogens. PMID:15220414

  17. Intracellular delivery of tumor antigenic peptides in biodegradable-polymer adjuvant for enhancing cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Ma, W

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy; advantages include convenient synthesis and modification of antigenic peptides, as well as little toxicity associated with its administration. Vaccination of the peptides derived from tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was specifically designed for T cells in the context of MHC molecules. In the past decades, tumor antigenic peptides have been examined in clinic but numbered success has been obtained because of the stability of peptide and delivery approaches, consequently leading to an inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in cancer patients. Thus, the appropriate and efficient peptide vaccine carrier systems still continue to be a major obstacle. However, both sipuleucel-T vaccine and anti-CTLA-4 antibody have been approved by FDA for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively. PLGA has been recently used as the adjuvant to elicit enhanced immune responses while delivering tumor antigenic peptides. Intracellular delivery of the peptides derived from TAA into DCs would prolong antigen presentation of APC to T cells. This article aims to describe a new delivery method regarding tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of DCs-based vaccination.

  18. Evaluation of a cell penetrating prenylated peptide lacking an intrinsic fluorophore via in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Mullen, Daniel G; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of either a farnesyl (C(15)) or geranylgeranyl (C(20)) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of many proteins. This natural modification serves to direct a protein to the plasma membrane of the cell. A recently discovered application of prenylated peptides is that they have inherent cell-penetrating ability, and are hence termed cell penetrating prenylated peptides. These peptides are able to efficiently cross the cell membrane in an ATP independent, non-endocytotic manner and it was found that the sequence of the peptide does not affect uptake, so long as the geranylgeranyl group is still present [Wollack, J. W.; Zeliadt, N. A.; Mullen, D. G.; Amundson, G.; Geier, S.; Falkum, S.; Wattenberg, E. V.; Barany, G.; Distefano, M. D. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131, 7293-7303]. The present study investigates the effect of removing the fluorophore from the peptides and investigating the uptake by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Our results show that the fluorophore is not necessary for uptake of these peptides. This information is significant because it indicates that the prenyl group is the major determinant in allowing these peptides to enter cells; the hydrophobic fluorophore has little effect. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the utility of the Cu-catalyzed click reaction for monitoring the entry of nonfluorescent peptides into cells.

  19. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  20. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  1. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    PubMed

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-06-29

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products.

  3. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  4. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  5. Semienzymatic Cyclization of Disulfide-rich Peptides Using Sortase A*

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinying; Kwon, Soohyun; Wang, Ching-I Anderson; Huang, Yen-Hua; Chan, Lai Y.; Tan, Chia Chia; Rosengren, K. Johan; Mulvenna, Jason P.; Schroeder, Christina I.; Craik, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides have generated great interest in the development of peptide-based therapeutics due to their exceptional stability toward chemical, enzymatic, or thermal attack. In particular, they have been used as scaffolds onto which bioactive epitopes can be grafted to take advantage of the favorable biophysical properties of disulfide-rich cyclic peptides. To date, the most commonly used method for the head-to-tail cyclization of peptides has been native chemical ligation. In recent years, however, enzyme-mediated cyclization has become a promising new technology due to its efficiency, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Sortase A (SrtA) is a bacterial enzyme with transpeptidase activity. It recognizes a C-terminal penta-amino acid motif, LPXTG, and cleaves the amide bond between Thr and Gly to form a thioacyl-linked intermediate. This intermediate undergoes nucleophilic attack by an N-terminal poly-Gly sequence to form an amide bond between the Thr and N-terminal Gly. Here, we d