Science.gov

Sample records for albuquerque area indian

  1. 17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Elevations - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  2. 14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, N&, 1934 Foundation Plan - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  3. 18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Detail sheet - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  4. 15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 First Floor - plumbing - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  5. 16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 first floor mechanical plan - heating - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  6. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 4: Albuquerque Area, 1966-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The fourth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Albuquerque Area Office. Included in this report are: (1) The Context (geographic distribution; IHS facilities; population served;…

  7. Evaluation of the Albuquerque Indian School Motivational Environment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiat, Albert B.; And Others

    In order to evaluate the impact of a token economy behavior modification program implemented from 1970-71 in the Albuquerque Indian School (AIS), a secondary institution, a five-member evaluation team assessed standardized test results, behavioral data, and student and staff attitudes. A battery of tests (Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, SRA…

  8. Albuquerque Indian School Land Transfer Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Udall, Tom [D-NM

    2014-06-11

    10/01/2014 By Senator Tester from Committee on Indian Affairs filed written report under authority of the order of the Senate of 09/18/2014. Report No. 113-267. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Report & Evaluations on Opportunities Conference (Albuquerque Indian School, New Mexico, January 19, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Eulynda

    The conference was attended by 53 high school seniors and 65 parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors from Albuquerque Public Schools, Los Lunas, Bernalillo, Jemez, Grants, and Albuquerque Indian School. After an opening address and two speakers, participants attended three workshops. In the first workshop, a panel of students presented…

  10. Evaluation of the geothermal resource in the area of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Jiracek, G.R.; Swanberg, C.A.; Morgan, P.; Parker, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    Factors indicating a potential geothermal resource near Albuquerque are: (1) nearby volcanoes active as recently as 120,000 years ago, (2) gravity interpretation indicating a potential reservoir averaging 1.5 km thickness, (3) high heat flow near the city, (4) warm waters (>30/sup 0/C) in municipal wells, (5) recent seismicity indicating active faulting, thereby, allowing the possibility of deep hydrothermal circulation, (6) high shallow (<30 m) temperature gradients (>100/sup 0/C/km) discovered in our drillholes, (7) deeper (<500 m) gradients from water wells exceeding 80/sup 0/C/km, and (8) chemical analyses of 88 groundwater samples yielding estimated base reservoir temperatures as high as 190/sup 0/C. An area of elevated shallow temperature gradients (less than or equal to 140/sup 0/C/km) was discovered a few kilometers west of Albuquerque by our 69 hole drilling program. Resistivity, magnetic, and gravity measurements combined with computer modeling suggests that heated ground water is forced closer to the surface here by flow over a buried ridge. A well drilled nearby yielded the highest recorded temperature in the Albuquerque area at its maximum depth (32.8/sup 0/C at 364 m). The deep gradient is 35/sup 0/C/km. An oil test well close by reported large volumes of water at 1 km; therefore, the possibility of a low temperature (>50/sup 0/C) geothermal resource exists west of Albuquerque at less than 1 km depth.

  11. Description of piezometers installed in the Duranes well field area, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1993, the aquifer system in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and particularly in the Albuquerque area, has been the focus of studies to further define the extent of the most productive parts of the aquifer and to gain a better understanding of ground-water/surface-water interactions. Twenty-one piezometers were installed during January and February 1997 at five sites in the Duranes well field area in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to allow for concentrated collection of hydraulic-head data. This concentrated collection of shallow hydraulic-head data may lead to a better understanding of the effects of ground-water production on the Rio Grande near a City of Albuquerque well field. Each piezometer was installed in a hole augered by a rig using hollow-stem auger flights. All piezometers are constructed of flush-joint polyvinyl chloride casing with 5-foot polyvinyl chloride screens. The uppermost 2 feet of the piezometer casing is covered by a steel casing with a locking lid. Driller's logs and geophysical logs were collected from the deepest hole and piezometer, respectively, at each site. This report describes the piezometers installed and presents initial water- level data for all piezometers.

  12. Proceedings of a Conference on Early Childhood Education for American Indians (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N. Mexico, March 5-7, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The Conference on Early Childhood Education was held during Early Childhood Education Week (March 1968) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Conference participants included Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA) school personnel responsible for the establishment and coordination of proposed BIA kindergartens, representatives of National, public, and voluntary…

  13. Education as Power. Report of Americans for Indian Opportunity Title IV, Part A, Technical Assistance Conference (Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 4-6, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    Included in this report on the 1977 Title IV Part A Technical Assistance conference held in Albuquerque are: (1) a descriptive narrative of conference events; (2) a summary of the 120 evaluation responses; and (3) the resolutions adopted by conference participants as a specific vehicle to make their concerns known to the Office of Indian Education…

  14. Albuquerque's Environmental Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Joan; And Others

    This teachers' resource guide contains four sections in addition to an introduction. The first section is an interdisciplinary look at the major natural areas in and around Albuquerque. This is followed by a review of the city's cultural history and a glimpse into the interactions people of Albuquerque have had with their natural environment. The…

  15. Albuquerque Basin seismic network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaksha, Lawrence H.; Locke, Jerry; Thompson, J.B.; Garcia, Alvin

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently completed the installation of a seismic network around the Albuquerque Basin in New Mexico. The network consists of two seismometer arrays, a thirteen-station array monitoring an area of approximately 28,000 km 2 and an eight-element array monitoring the area immediately adjacent to the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This report describes the instrumentation deployed in the network.

  16. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.C.; Mahan, S.A.; Stone, B.D.; Shroba, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley. The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47-40 ka. Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90-98 ka (based on dated basalt flows). Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka). The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1.47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft (Primero Alto) above the modern flood-plain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  17. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James Channing Cole; Mahan, Shannon; Stone, Byron D.; Shroba, Ralph R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley . The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47–40 ka . Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90–98 ka (based on dated basalt flows) . Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka) . The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1 .47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft. (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft. (Primero Alto) above the modern floodplain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  18. 76 FR 29675 - Assumption of Concurrent Federal Criminal Jurisdiction in Certain Areas of Indian Country

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... factors, including the nature of the crime; whether the alleged offender, the victim, or both are Indian... Albuquerque, New Mexico October 28, 2010, in Miami, Florida November 16, 2010, in Albuquerque, New Mexico... practice and procedure, Crime, Indians. Accordingly, for the reasons set forth in the preamble, part 50...

  19. Development of Vocational Education Programs for American Indians, Conference Proceedings (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, August 18-22, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D., Ed.; Hocker, Phillip, Ed.

    The purpose of the 5-day institute was to encourage the development of more vocational education programs for the American Indians. Persons in attendance included educators from Federal, state and local levels (both from public schools and the Bureau of Indian Affairs), business and industry representatives, Indian leaders, and employment…

  20. Rainfall, runoff, and water-quality data for the urban storm-water program in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metropolitan area, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Todd; Romero, Orlando; Jimenez, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Urbanization has dramatically increased precipitation runoff to the system of drainage channels and natural stream channels in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metropolitan area. Rainfall and runoff data are important for planning and designing future storm-water conveyance channels in newly developing areas. Storm-water quality also is monitored in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority, the City of Albuquerque, and the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative program to collect hydrologic data to assist in assessing the quality and quantity of surface-water resources in the Albuquerque area. This report presents water-quality, streamflow, and rainfall data collected from October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004 (water year 2004). Also provided is a station analysis for each of the 18 streamflow-gaging sites and 39 rainfall-gaging sites, which includes a description of monitoring equipment, problems associated with data collection during the year, and other information used to compute streamflow discharges or rainfall records. A hydrographic comparison shows the effects that the largest drainage channel in the metropolitan area, the North Floodway Channel, has on total flow in the Rio Grande.

  1. The Indian Family--Foundation for the Future. Report of the National Indian Child Conference (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 17-21, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Informative Evaluation, Tucson, AZ.

    To facilitate awareness in Indian child services by identifying perennial needs and pointing out developing responses at as many levels as possible the conference was divided into five major sections. Each workshop summary includes names of presenters, purpose of workshop, major points made during workshop, and available materials and human…

  2. Electromagnetic surveys to detect clay-rich sediment in the Rio Grande inner valley, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Sterling, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the presence of clay-rich layers in the inner-valley alluvium is essential for quantifying the amount of water transmitted between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. This report describes a study that used electromagnetic surveys to provide this information. In the first phase of the study, electromagnetic soundings were made using time-domain and frequency-domain electro- magnetic methods. On the basis of these initial results, the time- domain method was judged ineffective because of cultural noise in the study area, so subsequent surveys were made using the frequency-domain method. For the second phase of the study, 31 frequency-domain electromagnetic surveys were conducted along the inner valley and parallel to the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area in the spring and summer of 1997 to determine the presence of hydrologically significant clay-rich layers buried in the inner-valley alluvium. For this report, the 31 survey sections were combined into 10 composite sections for ease of interpretation. Terrain-conductivity data from the surveys were modeled using interpretation software to produce geoelectric cross sections along the survey lines. This modeling used lithologic logs from two wells installed near the survey lines: the Bosque South and Rio Bravo 5 wells. Because of cultural interference, location of the wells and soundings, complex stratigraphy, and difficulty interpreting lithology, such interpretation was inconclusive. Instead, a decision process based on modeling results was developed using vertical and horizontal dipole 40-meter intercoil spacing terrain-conductivity values. Values larger than or equal to 20 millisiemens per meter were interpreted to contain a hydrologically significant thickness of clay-rich sediment. Thus, clay-rich sediment was interpreted to underlie seven segments of the 10 composited survey lines, totaling at least 2,660 meters of the Rio Grande inner valley. The longest of these clay

  3. Use of air-pressurized slug tests to estimate hydraulic conductivity at selected piezometers completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.; Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque Public Works Department, Water Resources Management (City), is interested in quantifying aquifer hydraulic properties in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to better understand and manage water resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In 1998, the City and the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative program to determine hydraulic properties of aquifer material adjacent to screened intervals of piezometers in the Albuquerque area. Investigators conducted slug tests from March 8 through April 8, 1999, to estimate hydraulic conductivity of aquifer material adjacent to the screened intervals of 25 piezometers from 11 nested- piezometer sites in the Albuquerque area. At 20 of the piezometers, slug-test responses were typical; at 2 piezometers, tests were prematurely terminated because the tests were taking too long to complete; and at 3 piezometers, test responses were oscillatory. Methods used to estimate hydraulic conductivity were the Bouwer and Rice method or the Cooper, Bredehoeft, and Papadopulos method for most tests; the Shapiro and Greene method for prematurely terminated tests; and the van der Kamp method for oscillatory tests. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from about 0.15 to 92 feet per day. In general, the smaller estimated values are associated with fine-grained aquifer materials and the larger estimated hydraulic-conductivity values are associated with coarse- grained aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals of the piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from 0.15 to 8.2 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 12 piezometers and from 12 to 41 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 10 piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates at four piezometers were greater than 41 feet per day.

  4. Estimated 2012 groundwater potentiometric surface and drawdown from predevelopment to 2012 in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Rachel I.; McKean, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico were met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. In response to water-level declines, the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA) began diverting water from the San Juan-Chama Drinking Water Project in December 2008 to reduce the use of groundwater to meet municipal demand. Modifications in the demand for water and the source of the supply of water for the Albuquerque metropolitan area have resulted in a variable response in the potentiometric surface of the production zone (the interval of the aquifer, from within about 200 feet below the water table to 900 feet or more, in which supply wells generally are screened) of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Analysis of the magnitude and spatial distribution of water-level change can help improve the understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies’ efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the ABCWUA, has developed an estimate of the 2012 potentiometric surface of the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area. This potentiometric surface is the latest in a series of reports depicting the potentiometric surface of the area. This report presents the estimated potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of water year 2012 and the estimated changes in potentiometric surface between predevelopment (pre-1961) and water year 2012 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area. Hydrographs from selected piezometers are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were

  5. Relocated American Indians in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablon, Joan

    1964-01-01

    American Indians who come to the San Francisco Bay Area choose to associate primarily with other Indians of their own or differing tribes in both informal and formal social interaction. Urbanization of Indians occurs on a large scale because of government relocation programs; however, the background in small rural folk communities creates a…

  6. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  7. Estimated 2008 groundwater potentiometric surface and predevelopment to 2008 water-level change in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falk, Sarah E.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico have historically been met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Previous studies have indicated that the large quantity of groundwater withdrawal relative to recharge has resulted in water-level declines in the aquifer system throughout the metropolitan area. Analysis of the magnitude and pattern of water-level change can help improve understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies' efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, presents the estimated groundwater potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of the 2008 water year and the estimated changes in water levels between predevelopment and water year 2008 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque and surrounding metropolitan and military areas. Hydrographs from selected wells are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were measured in small-diameter observation wells screened over short intervals and were considered to best represent the potentiometric head in the production zone-the interval of the aquifer, about 300 feet below land surface to 1,100 feet or more below land surface, in which production wells generally are screened. Water-level measurements were collected by various local and Federal agencies. The 2008 water year potentiometric surface map was created in a geographic information system, and the change in water-level elevation from predevelopment to water year 2008 was calculated. The 2008 water-level contours indicate that the general direction of

  8. Portland Area Office Bureau of Indian Affairs: 1980 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Portland, OR.

    In 1980 the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Portland Area Office served 43,500 Indians of 33 federally recognized tribes, bands, and groups living on or near 4 million acres of reservation land in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon. Highlights of the fiscal 1980 BIA/tribal partnership included the joint review of overall Office operations and…

  9. Caring, Coping, Change: Challenges for the 80's. A Report of the National Indian Child Conference (4th, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 12-16, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Save the Children, Albuquerque, NM.

    The report of the fourth National Indian Child Conference (1982), sponsored by Save the Children, contains a statistical portrait of the American Indian child, synopses of 7 major presentations and 64 workshops, recommendations, a conference evaluation, and lists of conference staff, presenters, and tribal representation. Topics of major…

  10. American Indian Exceptional Children and Youth. Report of a Symposium (Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 6-8, 1985). An ERIC Exceptional Child Education Report. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J., Ed.; Ramirez, Bruce A., Ed.

    The intent of this symposium report is to share information with educators and other professionals who work with American Indian exceptional children. In this monograph, most symposium presentations, and in some cases the ensuring discussion, are summarized. Introductory remarks are provided by Gil Pena of the All-Indian Pueblo Council, and this…

  11. May the Circle Be Unbroken: A New Decade. Final Report on the National Indian Conference on Aging (3rd, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 8-10, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    Focusing on six major topics to be addressed at the 1981 White House Conference (economic security, physical and mental health, social well being, older Americans as a national resource, creating an age-integrated society, and research), the National Indian Conference attracted 1,165 persons from more than 140 tribes (592 being Indian elders over…

  12. Comprehensive Implementation Processes for Special Education Services in the Bureau of Indian Affairs with Public Law 94-142 Compliances: Conference Proceedings (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 8-12, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jean J., Comp.

    Designed as a reference book, this publication reflects the efforts of almost 100 American Indian parents, educators, diagnosticians, social workers, etc., and representatives from each of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Area Offices in attendance at the 1976 conference on the comprehensive implementation process for special education services…

  13. Area Handbook for the Indian Ocean Territories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Theodore L.; And Others

    This volume, one of a series of handbooks on foreign culture, is intended as a reference tool for military and other personnel requiring an objective, comprehensive, and balanced description of the Indian Ocean Territories, namely, the two republics of Meldives and Mauritius, and the two European dependencies of Seychelles and Reunion. An…

  14. UV - ALBUQUERQUE NM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brewer 109 is located in Albuquerque NM, measuring ultraviolet solar radiation. Irradiance and column ozone are derived from this data. Ultraviolet solar radiation is measured with a Brewer Mark IV, single-monochrometer, spectrophotometer manufactured by SCI-TEC Instruments, Inc....

  15. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas: Shallow ground-water quality and land use in the Albuquerque Area, Central New Mexico, 1993. National water quality assessment program. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water and the relations between land use and the quality of that shallow ground water in an urban area in and adjacent to Albuquerque, New Mexico. Water samples were collected from 24 shallow wells for analysis of selected common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), and pesticides. The results of the chemical analyses are presented in appendices.

  16. Successful remediation of four uranium calibration pits at Technical Area II, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, R.; Wade, M.; Tharp, T.; Copland, J.

    1994-12-31

    The first remediation of an Environmental Restoration (ER) Project site at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was successfully conducted in May and June 1994 at Technical Area II. The removal action involved four Uranium Calibration Pits (UCPs) filled with radioactive or hazardous materials. The concrete culvert pits were used to test and calibrate borehole radiometric logging tools for uranium exploration. The removal action consisted of excavating and containerizing the pit contents and contaminated soil beneath the culverts, removing the four culverts, and backfilling the excavation. Each UCP removal had unique complexities. Sixty 208-L drums of solid radioactive waste and eight 208-L drums of liquid hazardous waste were generated during the VCM. Two of the concrete culverts will be disposed as radioactive waste and two as solid waste. Uranium-238 was detected in UCP-2 ore material at 746 pci/g, and at 59 pci/g in UCP-1 silica sand. UCP-4 was empty; sludge from UCP-3 contained 122 mg/L (ppm) chromium.

  17. Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Albuquerque Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. These integrated program summaries include: Volatile Organic Compounds in Non-Arid Soils, Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils, Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration, Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology, In Situ Remediation, Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration, Underground Storage Tank, Efficient Separations and Processing, Mixed Waste Integrated Program, Rocky Flats Compliance Program, Pollution Prevention Program, Innovation Investment Area, and Robotics Technology.

  18. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    An initial network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. The network currently (2014) consists of 125 wells and piezometers. (A piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer, often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths.) The USGS, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, currently (2014) measures and reports water levels from the 125 wells and piezometers in the network; this report presents water-level data collected by USGS personnel at those 125 sites through water year 2014 (October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2014).

  19. 43 CFR 6302.18 - How may American Indians use wilderness areas for traditional religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How may American Indians use wilderness... Penalties Use of Wilderness Areas § 6302.18 How may American Indians use wilderness areas for traditional religious purposes? In accordance with the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (42 U.S.C. 1996),...

  20. 43 CFR 6302.18 - How may American Indians use wilderness areas for traditional religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How may American Indians use wilderness... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Use of Wilderness Areas, Prohibited Acts, and Penalties Use of Wilderness Areas § 6302.18 How may American Indians use wilderness areas for...

  1. 43 CFR 6302.18 - How may American Indians use wilderness areas for traditional religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How may American Indians use wilderness... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Use of Wilderness Areas, Prohibited Acts, and Penalties Use of Wilderness Areas § 6302.18 How may American Indians use wilderness areas for...

  2. 43 CFR 6302.18 - How may American Indians use wilderness areas for traditional religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How may American Indians use wilderness... CONSERVATION (6000) MANAGEMENT OF DESIGNATED WILDERNESS AREAS Use of Wilderness Areas, Prohibited Acts, and Penalties Use of Wilderness Areas § 6302.18 How may American Indians use wilderness areas for...

  3. Summary of U.S. Geological Survey and City of Albuquerque hydrologic investigations program

    SciTech Connect

    McAda, D.

    1995-12-31

    The US Geological Survey and Albuquerque have been cooperating in data collection programs and interpretive studies since 1982. The paper presents summaries on recently completed and ongoing projects, detailing the objectives, principal investigator, period of the project, and reports released or reports in progress on each study. Project names are: Ground-water-level monitoring network in the Albuquerque Basin; Water budget of the Rio Grande flood plain in the Albuquerque area; Modeling of groundwater flow in the Albuquerque Basin; Continuation of ground water flow modeling in the Albuquerque Basin; Evaluation of methods to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, near Albuquerque; Aquifer compaction and land subsidence in the Albuquerque, NM area; Aquifer test at the Griegos Well Field, Albuquerque, NM; Quality of urban stormwater runoff; Rio Grande water quality; Determining accurate concentrations and loads of trace elements and other selected chemical constituents in the Rio Grande, Albuquerque, NM; Digital geophysical-log data base; and Water quality data for the Albuquerque Basin.

  4. 33 CFR 334.1270 - Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area. 334.1270 Section 334.1270 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....1270 Port Townsend, Indian Island, Walan Point; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of...

  5. Outing, Relocation, and Employment Assistance: The Impact of Federal Indian Population Dispersal Programs in the Bay Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willard, William

    1997-01-01

    Educational and employment programs implemented by the Bureau of Indian Affairs during the 1950s and 1960s relocated thousands of American Indians to urban areas with the assurance of a better life. Focuses on the current status of the American Indian population in the San Francisco Bay area including Indian organizations, tribal group…

  6. 25 CFR 150.4 - Locations and service areas for land titles and records offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... jurisdiction of the Aberdeen and Minneapolis Area Offices, except for Indian land on the White Earth, Isabella... offices. Shown below are present Land Titles and Records Offices and the jurisdictional area served by... land located under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque, Navajo, and Phoenix Area Offices. (c)...

  7. 25 CFR 150.4 - Locations and service areas for land titles and records offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... jurisdiction of the Aberdeen and Minneapolis Area Offices, except for Indian land on the White Earth, Isabella... offices. Shown below are present Land Titles and Records Offices and the jurisdictional area served by... land located under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque, Navajo, and Phoenix Area Offices. (c)...

  8. 25 CFR 150.4 - Locations and service areas for land titles and records offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... jurisdiction of the Aberdeen and Minneapolis Area Offices, except for Indian land on the White Earth, Isabella... offices. Shown below are present Land Titles and Records Offices and the jurisdictional area served by... land located under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque, Navajo, and Phoenix Area Offices. (c)...

  9. 25 CFR 150.4 - Locations and service areas for land titles and records offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... jurisdiction of the Aberdeen and Minneapolis Area Offices, except for Indian land on the White Earth, Isabella... offices. Shown below are present Land Titles and Records Offices and the jurisdictional area served by... land located under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque, Navajo, and Phoenix Area Offices. (c)...

  10. 25 CFR 150.4 - Locations and service areas for land titles and records offices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... jurisdiction of the Aberdeen and Minneapolis Area Offices, except for Indian land on the White Earth, Isabella... offices. Shown below are present Land Titles and Records Offices and the jurisdictional area served by... land located under the jurisdiction of the Albuquerque, Navajo, and Phoenix Area Offices. (c)...

  11. 1983 environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, G.C.; Gray, C.E.; O'Neal, B.L.

    1984-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is located south of Albuquerque on Kirtland Air Force Base. Because radionuclides are potentially released from its research activities, SNL has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitters, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with local background in 1983. The Albuquerque population received an estimated 0.250 person-rem from airborne radioactive releases, whereas it received greater than 49,950 person-rem from naturally occurring radionuclides. 23 references, 6 figures, 15 tables.

  12. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Juneau Area Activities Report, 1975-76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Joan E.

    Reflecting the changing role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), this 1975-76 annual report on the BIA's Juneau Area Office and its activities focuses upon the BIA resources, services, and technical assistance afforded Alaska Natives in the Juneau area. Highlights of Juneau Area Office Activities are presented in conjunction with the office's…

  13. Wastewater reclamation and recharge: A water management strategy for Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    Gorder, P.J.; Brunswick, R.J.; Bockemeier, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 61,000 acre-feet of the pumped water is annually discharged to the Rio Grande as treated wastewater. Albuquerque`s Southside Water Reclamation Plant (SWRP) is the primary wastewater treatment facility for most of the Albuquerque area. Its current design capacity is 76 million gallons per day (mgd), which is expected to be adequate until about 2004. A master plan currently is being prepared (discussed here in Wastewater Master Planning and the Zero Discharge Concept section) to provide guidelines for future expansions of the plant and wastewater infrastructure. Construction documents presently are being prepared to add ammonia and nitrogen removal capability to the plant, as required by its new discharge permit. The paper discusses water management strategies, indirect potable reuse for Albuquerque, water quality considerations for indirect potable reuse, treatment for potable reuse, geohydrological aspects of a recharge program, layout and estimated costs for a conceptual reclamation and recharge system, and work to be accomplished under phase 2 of the reclamation and recharge program.

  14. Age estimation in Indians from pulp/tooth area ratio of mandibular canines.

    PubMed

    Babshet, Medha; Acharya, Ashith B; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G

    2010-04-15

    In India, age estimation of living individuals is gaining importance, particularly in cases of child labour, ascertaining majority status and to assess disputed age in criminals. Previous studies on adult age prediction in Indians have focused on histological parameters, which are invasive in nature and not feasible in the living. Methods for age estimation in living adults make use of radiographs to indirectly measure the rate of secondary dentine deposition and studies have focused on ratios of linear measurements rather than absolute dimensions per se. Recently, the ratio of the pulp/tooth area of canines was suggested by a group in Italy who developed regression formulas for age estimation. The present study has assessed the usefulness of one of the formulas on an Indian sample and also examined the use of an India-specific equation in age prediction. Intraoral periapical digital radiographs of mandibular canines were obtained from 143 individuals (aged 20-70 years) using the paralleling technique; pulp and tooth areas were measured using a commercially available computer software programme and the pulp/tooth area ratio was computed. Age was calculated using the Italian formula which revealed a mean absolute error (MAE) of 11.01 years in Indians, an error recognisably greater than the 4.38 years reported in the Italian sample. The divergence may be explained on account of population differences that exist between Italians and Indians as well as variation in the pattern of secondary dentine deposition in Indians. The Indian formula derived (age=64.413-(195.265 x PTR), where PTR is the pulp/tooth area ratio) was applied on a control group of 35 radiographs. The Italian formula was also applied on the control sample to ascertain if the Indian formula markedly improved age prediction. No apparent difference was observed between the two (MAE was 10.76 and 11.58 years, respectively, using the Indian and Italian formula) however, the Indian formula had a tendency to

  15. Estimation of hydraulic characteristics in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system using computer simulations of river and drain pulses in the Rio Bravo study area, near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roark, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a hydrologic investigation of the surface-water/ground-water interaction of the Rio Grande and the surrounding alluvium and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in an area near the Rio Bravo Bridge, south of Albu- querque, New Mexico. A set of existing wells and new wells were instrumented to monitor water levels in a section perpendicular to the Rio Grande on the east side of the river. Equipment to measure stream stage was installed at two sites--on the Albuquerque Riverside Drain and on the Rio Grande. A short-duration river pulse and a long-duration river pulse were used to stress the ground-water system while the changes in water levels were monitored. A ground- water flow-model simulation using the principle of superposition was used to estimate the hydraulic characteristics of the local ground-water system. Simulated horizontal hydraulic conductivities varied from 0.03 to 100 feet per day, and vertical hydraulic conductivities varied from 1.5 x 10-6 to 0.01 foot per day. The specific yield of layer 1 was estimated to be 0.3. Specific storage for layers 2 through 11 was 1.0 x 10-6. Water entering the model from the river along a 300-foot-wide cross section during simulation of the short-duration pulse averaged 7.46 x 10-3 cubic foot per second and during the long-duration pulse was 1.66 x 10-3 cubic foot per second. The average flux from the model to the drain during the short-duration pulse was 3.18 x 10-3 cubic foot per second. The average flux for the long-duration pulse was 7.14 x 10-3 cubic foot per second from the drain to the model.

  16. PROFILE: Marine Protected Areas and Dugong Conservation Along Australia's Indian Ocean Coast

    PubMed

    Preen

    1998-03-01

    / The coastal zone of the Indian Ocean is coming under increasing pressure from human activities. Australia may be one of the few countries in this region that can afford to take adequate conservation measures in the near future. As it also has one of the longest Indian Ocean coastlines, Australia has the opportunity, and responsibility, to make a meaningful contribution to the conservation of Indian Ocean biodiversity. Threatened species, including marine turtles, inshore dolphins, and dugongs are an important component of that biodiversity. The dugong has been exterminated from several areas in the Indian Ocean, and it appears to be particularly threatened by mesh netting andhunting. Its long-term survival may depend on adequate protection in Australia, which contains the largest known Indian Ocean populations. This protection will require, in part, an appropriate system of marine protected areas (MPAs). This paper examines the adequacy of MPAs along Australia's Indian Ocean coast. Dugongs occur in two MPAs in Western Australia. The proposed expansion of the system of marine reserves is based primarily on representative samples of ecosystems from each biogeographic region. It is inadequate because it does not take into account the distribution and relative abundance of threatened species. If the conservation of biodiversity is to be maximized, the system of MPAs should incorporate both representativeness and the needs of threatened species. The level of protection provided by MPAs in Western Australia is low. Under current government policy potentially damaging activities, including commercial fishing, seismic surveys, and oil and gas drilling are permitted in protected areas.KEY WORDS: Marine protected areas; Dugongs; Western Australia; Indian Ocean; Conservation; Biodiversity PMID:9465127

  17. 1982 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, G.C.; Gray, C.E.; Simmons, T.N.; O'Neal, B.L.

    1983-04-01

    Because radionuclides are potentially released from its research activities, SNL has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitter, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with local background in 1982. The Albuquerque population received an estimated 0.170 person-rem from airborne radioactive releases, whereas it received greater than 50,400 person-rem from naturally occurring radionuclides.

  18. Education of Indian and Alaska Native Children in Rural Areas: New Horizons?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, David P.

    Recent organizational changes in the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) as well as the formation of Alaska's Rural Education Attendance Areas (REAAs) have important implications for the education of rural Native American children. The Title XI Education Amendments passed in November, 1978 (P.L. 95-561) aim at solving some of the administrative…

  19. AMERICAN INDIAN POPULATION DENSITY AND EPA REGULATED SITES IN THE SEATTLE/TACOMA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded density polygons of 1990 Census Block Data for the American Indian population group plotted with locations of EPA regulated sites (CERCLA, RCRA, NPDES (majors), and TRI) for the Seattle/Tacoma geographic area. Source scale of map is based on the 1990 Cenesus tigerline data...

  20. 77 FR 20690 - Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico AGENCY... the Interstate 25 and Paseo del Norte Interchange in Albuquerque, New Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Greg Heitmann, Environmental Specialist, Federal Highway Administration, New Mexico...

  1. Computers at the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, J.

    1979-01-01

    The Worldwide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN) is managed by the U.S Geological Survey in Albuquerque, N. Mex. It consists of a global network of seismographs housed in seismic observatories throughout the world. An important recent addition to this network are the Seismic Research Observatories (SRO) which combine a borehole seismometer with a modern digital data recording system. 

  2. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 8: Phoenix Area, 1966-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The eighth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Phoenix Area Office and the Tucson Sub-Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context: Political and Geographic (the…

  3. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.83 Section 81.83 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions §...

  4. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.83 Section 81.83 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions §...

  5. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  6. The structure and tectonics of the intraplate deformation area in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neprochnov, Yuri P.; Levchenko, Oleg V.; Merklin, Lev R.; Sedov, Vladimir V.

    1988-12-01

    Intense tectonic deformations of sediments and basement unusual for the interior of the oceanic lithosphere plates can be seen on seismic reflection profiles from the northern Central Indian Basin. 10,000-mile long CSP profiles collected by the P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology of the USSR Academy of Sciences allow delineation of a NE-trending area of these deformations. The intraplate deformation area has a complicated tectonic framework, formed by a mosaic of crustal blocks which have been severely deformed or tilted alternating with less deformed parts of the sea floor. The results of a detailed CSP grid survey reveal that these uplifted faulted blocks are bounded by tectonic faults of two genetic types: old nearly meridional fracture zones, and young NE-striking faults. The seismic refraction results indicate an anomalous structure of the crust and upper mantle within these blocks. Seismological observations from Ocean Bottom Seismographs have proved that there is high-level intraplate seismicity in the northern Central Indian Basin. The intraplate deformation area is supposed to correspond to a large-scale zone of shearing strains that formed as a result of the stress difference in the Indo-Australian plate due to the continued collision of the continents of India and Asia along with spreading in the Central Indian Ridge and normal subduction in the Sunda Island Arc. This continental collision led to an increase in compressional stress in the northernmost part of the plate, while its southern part continuously subducted beneath the Sunda Trench. In the complicated transitional zone between these parts of the plate, NE-SW trending shearing stress abated, apparently in the Late Miocene, as a result of folding and faulting of the sediments and basement, observed on seismic reflection profiles. NE-SW trending wrench-fault tectonics affected the system of ancient failures in the spreading oceanic crust (near-meridional transform faults and, perhaps, near

  7. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 9: Portland Area, 1966-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The ninth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Portland Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context (early history of the Oregon Territory, geography and tribal…

  8. Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory--50 years of global seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, C.R.; Peterson, Jon; Gee, Lind; Derr, John; Ringler, Adam; Wilson, David

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory is about 15 miles southeast of Albuquerque on the Pueblo of Isleta, adjacent to Kirtland Air Force Base. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory supports the Global Seismographic Network Program and the Advanced National Seismic System through the installation, operation, and maintenance of seismic stations around the world and serves as the premier seismological instrumentation test facility for the U.S. Government.

  9. 43 CFR 5.2 - Areas administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... take pictures, including motion pictures, or to make a television production or a sound track of Indian... obtained pursuant to 25 CFR part 131. (d) Employment of Indians. Any motion picture or television producer who obtains a lease or permit for the use of Indian land pursuant to 25 CFR part 131 shall be...

  10. Assessing Potential Conservation and Restoration Areas of Freshwater Fish Fauna in the Indian River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jay P.; Manish, Kumar; Mehta, Rajender; Pandit, Maharaj K.

    2016-05-01

    Conservation efforts globally are skewed toward terrestrial ecosystems. To date, conservation of aquatic ecosystems, in particular fish fauna, is largely neglected. We provide a country-wide assessment of Indian river ecosystems in order to identify and prioritize areas for protection and restoration of freshwater fish fauna. Using various biodiversity and anthropogenic attributes, coupled with tools of ecological modeling, we delineated areas for fish fauna conservation and restoration in the 20 major river basins of India. To do this, we used prioritization analyses and reserve selection algorithms to derive conservation value index (CVI) and vulnerability index (VI) of the river basins. CVI was estimated using endemicity, rarity, conservation value, and taxonomic singularity, while VI was estimated using a disturbance index derived from percent geographic area of the basin under human settlements, human population density, predominant land use, and total number of exotic fish species in each basin. The two indices, CVI and VI, were converted into geo-referenced maps, and each map was super-imposed onto species richness and forest cover maps, respectively. After superimposition, areas with high CVI and low VI shade intensities were delineated for conservation, while areas with high CVI and high VI shade intensities were demarcated for restoration. In view of the importance of freshwater fish for human livelihoods and consumption, and ecosystems of India's rivers, we call for urgent attention to the conservation of their fish fauna along with restoration of their degraded habitats.

  11. Geology and ground water of the Red Lake area, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.; McClymonds, N.E.; Harshbarger, John William

    1962-01-01

    The Red Lake area in the Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine if 1 mgd (mil- lion gallons per day) of water could be obtained for the requirements of a proposed sawmill. Geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies indicated three favorable areas where ground water may be developed. Test holes were drilled under contract in the areas, and pumping tests indicate that 500,000 gpd (gal- lons per day) is available from alluvium along Tohdildonih Wash near Frog Rock, 100,000 gpd is available from the Shinarump member of the Chinle forma- tion and the De Chelly sandstone near Red Lake, and 800,000 gpd is available from alluvium and cinder beds in lapiUi tuff in Buell Park, an eroded diatreme. The diatreme at Buell Park is about 2% miles in diameter. It was formed by several explosions in which lapilli tuff and cinders were erupted. These materials, together with later basaltic intrusive and extrusive rock, now fill the diatreme. The tuff and cinders are water bearing, 'and they receive re- charge from rainwater and snowmelt moving through overlying alluvium and from storage in the De Chelly sandstone which encloses the east half of the diatreme. The quality of water from all areas is suitable for domestic use. However, special treatment may be necessary to make the water suitable for pulp processing.

  12. Rehabilitation of a lignite mine-disturbed area in the Indian Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharma, K.D.; Kumar, P.; Gough, L.P.; SanFilipo, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive lignite mining in the Indian (Thar) Desert commenced within the past decade. Accompanying extraction of this valuable resource there have been visible, important environmental impacts. The resultant land degradation has prompted concern from both public and regulatory bodies. This research assesses the success of rehabilitation plans implemented to revegetate a lignite mine-disturbed area, near the village of Giral in western Rajasthan State. Rehabilitation success was achieved within the environmental constraints of this northwest Indian hot-desert ecosystem using a combination of: (1) backfilling (abandoned pits) with minespoil and of covering the backfilled-surfaces with fresh topsoil to a thickness of about 0??30 m; (2) use of micro-catchment rainwater harvesting (MCWH) technique; (3) soil profile modification approaches; (4) plant establishment methodologies; and (5) the selection of appropriate germplasm material (trees, shrubs and grasses). Preliminary results indicate that the resulting vegetative cover will be capable of self-perpetuation under natural conditions while at the same time meeting the land-use requirements of the local people. The minespoil is alkaline in nature and has high electrical conductance. The average content of organic carbon, N, P and K is lower than in the regional topsoil. However, the concentration of Ca, Mg, Na and total S in the minespoil is much higher than in the topsoil. Further, the spoil material has no biological activity. Enhanced plant growth was achieved in MCWH plots, compared to control plots, where minespoil moisture storage was improved by 18-43 per cent. The rehabilitation protocol used at the site appears to have been successful because, in addition to the planted species, desirable native invasive species have become established. This study developed methods for the rehabilitation of lignite mine-disturbed areas and has also resulted in an understanding of rehabilitation processes in arid regions with

  13. 1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

    1990-05-01

    This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  15. Nitrous acid in Albuquerque, New Mexico, homes

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, J.D.; Brauer, M. ); Samet, J.M.; Lambert, W.E. )

    1993-05-01

    Experimental studies have shown that nitrogen acid species, particularly nitrous acid, are formed indoors during unvented combustion and by heterogeneous reactions of nitrogen dioxide. Limited measurements support the occurrence of nitrous acid production in occupied homes. The authors report additional measurements of HONO and NO[sub 2] in homes located in Albuquerque, NM, and assess the relationship with housing variables. Indoor HONO concentrations were found to be well correlated with indoor NO[sub 2] levels; HONO concentrations ranged from 5% to 15% of the measured NO[sub 2] concentrations. Given the correlation between HONO and NO[sub 2] in indoor environments, and the plausibility of HONO respiratory toxicity, investigations of respiratory health effects of unvented combustion should consider HONO, in addition to NO[sub 2], as a potentially hazardous indoor pollutant. 38 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Towards A Network of Locally Managed Marine Areas (LMMAs) in the Western Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Rocliffe, Steve; Peabody, Shawn; Samoilys, Melita; Hawkins, Julie P.

    2014-01-01

    In the Western Indian Ocean (WIO), local communities are increasingly assuming responsibility for inshore marine resources either on their own or through collaborative management arrangements with governments or non-state actors. In this paper, we trace the evolution and expansion of community management in the WIO and present the first ever inventory and assessment of the region’s locally managed marine areas (LMMAs). We compare the key attributes of these areas to those under government stewardship and assess their relative contributions to progress towards the Convention on Biodiversity (CBD) target of 10% of marine and coastal ecological regions to be effectively conserved by 2020. We also explore the legal frameworks that underpin locally managed marine initiatives in Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique and Tanzania to assess the potential for future expansion. A principal finding is that whilst LMMAs protect more than 11,000 square kilometres of marine resource in the WIO, they are hampered by underdeveloped local and national legal structures and enforcement mechanisms. In our recommendations to improve local management, we suggest establishing a network of LMMA practitioners in the WIO region to share experiences and best practice. PMID:25054340

  17. Title IV Indian Education Program Evaluation 1986-87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque Public Schools, NM. Planning, Research and Accountability.

    Albuquerque (New Mexico) public schools used a Title IV Part A grant to improve academic and behavioral functioning of American Indian elementary and secondary school students. The program's focus was tutoring provided to 899 Indian students from Canoncito Navajo Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, and the city. A project coordinator, a resource…

  18. Mineral resources of the Indian Creek, Bridger Jack Mesa, and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas, San Juan County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, C.G.; Toth, M.I.; Case, J.E.; Barton, H.N.; Green, G.N.; Schreiner, R.A.; Thompson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Indian Creek, Bridger Jack Mesa, and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas are located in San Juan County, southeastern Utah. These areas consist of nearly flat-lying sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age that are in places extensively faulted, forming horsts and grabens, or they are gently domed by flowage of the bedded salts of the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation. Inferred subeconomic resources of potash and halite are present in the Paradox beneath the Indian Creek Wilderness Study Area, but their likelihood for development is low. Inferred subeconomic resources of sandstone and small amounts of sand and gravel exist within these wilderness study areas, but because of their abundance throughout the region, their distance to current markets, and their lack of unique properties, these materials have no current likelihood for development. No uranium resources were identified at the surface in these wilderness study areas. However, the potential for undiscovered resources of uranium and by-products vanadium and copper is high for the north quarter of the Bridger Jack Mesa Wilderness Study Area; the mineral resource potential for these elements is low for the Butler Wash, Indian Creek and the remainder of the Bridger Jack Mesa Wilderness Study Areas. The potential for oil and gas resources is moderate in all three wilderness study areas. The mineral resource potential for potash and halite beneath the Bridger Jack Mesa and Butler Wash Wilderness Study Areas is low. The resource potential for gold and silver is low in all three wilderness study areas and the mineral resource potential for the rare-earth element braitschite is unknown in all three wilderness study areas.

  19. Indian Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weewish Tree, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Answers to questions asked by junior high school students about American Indian reservations are given. The areas covered include nearly every facet of reservation life from the first Federal issuance of particles of land to the American Indians to present conditions on the reservations. (AH)

  20. 77 FR 71119 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; City of Albuquerque-Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ...EPA is approving the City of Albuquerque--Bernalillo County, New Mexico State Implementation Plan (SIP) revisions submitted by the Governor of New Mexico on July 28, 2011 addressing the regional haze requirements for the mandatory Class I areas under 40 CFR 51.309. The EPA finds that these revisions to the State Implementation Plan (SIP) and associated rules meet the requirements of the Clean......

  1. Flooding and conservation in the Albuquerque bosque

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C. Jr.; Valett, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Interest in the conservation of the Middle Rio Grande bosque has grown rapidly in the last decade. During that period, private organizations as well as governmental agencies have sharpened their focus on the issue, and in doing so have contributed to the development of a bosque biological management plan for the river reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir. This increased regional attention reflects a growing national and international concern about human impacts on fluvial processes in large floodplain rivers. Because they impound large amounts of a river`s discharge and interfere with its natural flooding regime, dams can seriously disrupt the relationship between river basin hydrology and riparian zone functioning. In western North America, this interference reduces cottonwood germination and survival and, as will be discussed, negatively affects key ecological processes in riparian communities. In this paper the authors first review how the decoupling of basin hydrology from riparian forest processes has begun to affect the integrity of the Middle Rio Grande bosque ecosystem. Then they propose an alternative management scheme, with emphasis on the Albuquerque bosque, that centers on restoring its ecosystem functioning.

  2. Indian Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lu Celia, Ed.

    Designed in Oklahoma as a teaching aid for teachers in Indian education, this booklet is organized according to the subject areas of the curriculum. It provides a ready resource on Indian culture and should thus be of value to teachers who work with both Indian and non-Indian students. Guidelines for curriculum development in multicultural…

  3. Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: A sunbelt city rapidly outgrowing its aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Turin, H.J.; Gaume, A.N.; Bitner, M.J.

    1997-02-01

    Albuquerque, New Mexico, is located along the Rio Grande in central New Mexico, at an elevation of 5280 feet. Albuquerque`s climate reflects its high desert setting; average annual precipitation in the basin is only 8 to 10 inches. The Albuquerque metropolitan area is part of the rapidly growing {open_quotes}sunbelt{close_quotes} region of the southwestern United States and is undergoing rapid development. The municipal, industrial, and residential water needs of the entire population are currently met by groundwater, while agricultural needs within the basin are met by surface water diverted from the Rio Grande. While the city is blessed with an extremely productive aquifer, current metropolitan area annual groundwater extractions of 170,000 acre-feet far exceed the sustainable yield of the aquifer. Continued drawdown will lead to greater pumping costs, ground surface subsidence problems, and eventual aquifer depletion. At the same time, industrial and non-point-source contamination and naturally occurring arsenic levels are raising concerns about groundwater quality. New Mexico water law has required the City to acquire surface water rights and allocations on the Rio Grande sufficient to offset estimated losses from the river induced by the City`s groundwater extraction. It has become increasingly clear that the induced recharge had been greatly overestimated, and that the City is thus not actually consuming its surface water as intended. The City, in cooperation with local, state, and federal agencies, has explored a variety of conjunctive use proposals, all designed to permit the City to use its surface water more directly. The City Council is presently considering a strategy calling for full use of the city`s surface water resources and creation of a groundwater drought reserve. Implementation of this strategy will require regulatory approval and major capital investment, both of which require political support.

  4. Stormwater Management for TMDLs in an Arid Climate: A Case Study Application of SUSTAIN in Albuquerque, New Mexico - report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This case study for the Albuquerque, New Mexico area was conducted under contract with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development using the System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Integration Analysis (SUSTAIN). The effort focuses on inve...

  5. Native People in Areas of Internal National Expansion: Indians and Inuit in Canada. IWGIA Document 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Douglas Esmond

    In the last few years there have been an increasing number of major development projects which have raised issues of native rights. The list includes the Bennett Dam, the Bighorn Dam, the James Bay project, the flooding of Southern Indian Lake, exploration and resource development in the Arctic and the Mackenzie valley pipeline. All these projects…

  6. Cancer and Cancer Prevention and Control Programs in the Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Describes cancer control activities by the Indian Health Service in North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Nebraska, including risk factor assessment and cancer screening using a modified Health Risk Appraisal; interventions to reduce smoking; community empowerment; development of health education materials; and clinical preventive services. (SV)

  7. 78 FR 55743 - Notice of Service Delivery Area Designation for the Shinnecock Indian Nation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... notice is effective 30 days after date of publication in the Federal Register (FR). ADDRESSES: Comments... establishment of SDAs in the June 21, 2007 FR Notice (72 FR 34262-01). The SDAs function as CHSDAs for the...) (2007). In the Federal Register on June 18, 2010 (75 FR 34760), the Shinnecock Indian Nation...

  8. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Data Quality Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, A. T.; Hagerty, M.; Holland, J.; Gee, L. S.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has several efforts underway to improve data quality at its stations. The Data Quality Analyzer (DQA) is one such development. The DQA is designed to characterize station data quality in a quantitative and automated manner. Station quality is based on the evaluation of various metrics, such as timing quality, noise levels, sensor coherence, and so on. These metrics are aggregated into a measurable grade for each station. The DQA consists of a website, a metric calculator (Seedscan), and a PostgreSQL database. The website allows the user to make requests for various time periods, review specific networks and stations, adjust weighting of the station's grade, and plot metrics as a function of time. The website dynamically loads all station data from a PostgreSQL database. The database is central to the application; it acts as a hub where metric values and limited station descriptions are stored. Data is stored at the level of one sensor's channel per day. The database is populated by Seedscan. Seedscan reads and processes miniSEED data, to generate metric values. Seedscan, written in Java, compares hashes of metadata and data to detect changes and perform subsequent recalculations. This ensures that the metric values are up to date and accurate. Seedscan can be run in a scheduled task or on demand by way of a config file. It will compute metrics specified in its configuration file. While many metrics are currently in development, some are completed and being actively used. These include: availability, timing quality, gap count, deviation from the New Low Noise Model, deviation from a station's noise baseline, inter-sensor coherence, and data-synthetic fits. In all, 20 metrics are planned, but any number could be added. ASL is actively using the DQA on a daily basis for station diagnostics and evaluation. As Seedscan is scheduled to run every night, data quality analysts are able to then use the

  9. Promoting ethical research with American Indian and Alaska Native people living in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Nicole P; Bartgis, Jami; Demers, Deirdre

    2014-11-01

    Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations. There are unique considerations for working with this population. Engaging key stakeholders, including urban Indian health organization leaders, tribal leaders, research scientists and administrators, and policymakers, is critical to promoting ethical research and enhancing capacity of urban AI/AN communities. Recommendations for their involvement may facilitate an open dialogue and promote the development of implementation strategies. Future collaborations are also necessary for establishing research policies aimed at improving the health of the urban AI/AN population. PMID:25211730

  10. Promoting Ethical Research With American Indian and Alaska Native People Living in Urban Areas

    PubMed Central

    Bartgis, Jami; Demers, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations. There are unique considerations for working with this population. Engaging key stakeholders, including urban Indian health organization leaders, tribal leaders, research scientists and administrators, and policymakers, is critical to promoting ethical research and enhancing capacity of urban AI/AN communities. Recommendations for their involvement may facilitate an open dialogue and promote the development of implementation strategies. Future collaborations are also necessary for establishing research policies aimed at improving the health of the urban AI/AN population. PMID:25211730

  11. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. ); Goodrich, M. )

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

  12. Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service Environmental Health Program Review Conducted by: Indian Health Committee of the National Environmental Health Association (Aberdeen, South Dakota, May 23-27, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Aberdeen, SD. Aberdeen Area Office.

    The Indian Health Committee met in Aberdeen, South Dakota, during the week of May 23, 1977 to (1) review the environmental health services provided to the tribal units on the 15 Indian reservations located in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa, and (2) make recommendations for improvement or expansion of current programs, if needed. The…

  13. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Artistic Homes of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Describes the first true zero E-scale home in a hot-dry climate with ducts inside, R-50 attic insulation, roof-mounted photovoltaic power system, and solar thermal water heating.

  14. RESPECT: Gang Mediation at Albuquerque, New Mexico's Washington Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabish, Kenneth R.; Orell, Linda Henry

    1996-01-01

    Presents conflict resolution and mediation techniques used to resolve conflicts among rival gangs at Washington Middle School, an inner-city school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Discusses formal mediation techniques and mediation for both male and female gang members. Focuses on preserving self-respect and dignity for gang members in all conflict…

  15. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  16. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 6: Navajo (Window Rock) Area, 1966-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The sixth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Navajo (Window Rock) Area Office. Included in this document are: (1) The Context (geography and description of the Dine, a tribe and…

  17. Potential of breccia pipes in the Mohawk Canyon Area, Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Billingsley, G.H.; Van Gosen, B.S.

    1990-09-21

    The Hualapai Indian Reservation is on the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Hundreds of solution-collapse breccia pipes crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northern Arizona. The pipes originated in the Mississippian Redwall Limestone and stoped their way upward through the upper Paleozoic strata, locally extending into the Triassic Moenkopi and Chinle Formations. The occurrence of high-grade U ore, associated with potentially economic concentrations of Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, V, Co, and Ni in some of these pipes, has stimulated mining activity in northern Arizona despite the depressed market for most of these metals. Two breccia pipes, 241, and 242, have significant mineralized rock exposed on the Esplanade erosion surface; unfortunately, their economic potential is questionable because of their inaccessibility at the bottom of Mohawk Canyon. All warrant further exploration.

  18. Assessing Potential Conservation and Restoration Areas of Freshwater Fish Fauna in the Indian River Basins.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jay P; Manish, Kumar; Mehta, Rajender; Pandit, Maharaj K

    2016-05-01

    Conservation efforts globally are skewed toward terrestrial ecosystems. To date, conservation of aquatic ecosystems, in particular fish fauna, is largely neglected. We provide a country-wide assessment of Indian river ecosystems in order to identify and prioritize areas for protection and restoration of freshwater fish fauna. Using various biodiversity and anthropogenic attributes, coupled with tools of ecological modeling, we delineated areas for fish fauna conservation and restoration in the 20 major river basins of India. To do this, we used prioritization analyses and reserve selection algorithms to derive conservation value index (CVI) and vulnerability index (VI) of the river basins. CVI was estimated using endemicity, rarity, conservation value, and taxonomic singularity, while VI was estimated using a disturbance index derived from percent geographic area of the basin under human settlements, human population density, predominant land use, and total number of exotic fish species in each basin. The two indices, CVI and VI, were converted into geo-referenced maps, and each map was super-imposed onto species richness and forest cover maps, respectively. After superimposition, areas with high CVI and low VI shade intensities were delineated for conservation, while areas with high CVI and high VI shade intensities were demarcated for restoration. In view of the importance of freshwater fish for human livelihoods and consumption, and ecosystems of India's rivers, we call for urgent attention to the conservation of their fish fauna along with restoration of their degraded habitats. PMID:26872885

  19. Urban American Indian Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Josea

    This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American Indians that are especially pernicious to older American Indians living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American Indian elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes…

  20. Urban Habitat Evaluation For West Nile Virus Surveillance In Mosquitoes In Albuquerque, New Mexico

    PubMed Central

    DiMenna, Mark A.; Bueno, Rudy; Parmenter, Robert R.; Norris, Douglas E.; Sheyka, Jeff M.; Molina, Josephine L.; LaBeau, Elisa M.; Hatton, Elizabeth S.; Roberts, Christine M.; Glass, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    As part of an ongoing mosquito surveillance program, 27 sites in the greater metropolitan Albuquerque area (Bernalillo County, New Mexico) were trapped from May through September 2004. Each site was sampled for 1 night weekly, using a standard CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap and a gravid trap. Captured mosquitoes were catalogued by location, species, and date, and selected pools were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Based on previous surveillance, WNV was already established in the state of New Mexico. Surveillance during 2003, the 1st year of WNV detection in New Mexico mosquitoes, was focused on the bosque forest of the Rio Grande river valley. Surveillance during summer of 2004 was extended to additional areas around the city of Albuquerque, the state's largest population center. In addition to the standard surveillance objectives, a secondary goal was to determine whether foci of WNV activity were detectable in other habitats besides the riparian ecosystem of the Rio Grande, and in other species not previously identified as vectors. There was no demonstrable advantage to extending the traditional trapping area outside of the Rio Grande valley. Sites in the valley area had WNV-positive mosquitoes earlier in the season, and for a longer period than the added sites. In addition, riparian sites had the highest diversity of species, the largest numbers of Culex spp. captured, and the largest proportion of the WNV-positive mosquito pools from the study. Species found in other areas of the metropolitan area were also represented in the valley. Although WNV activity was detected in other areas of the city, its activity began later and ended earlier than in the river valley. We surmise that the greatest benefit to mosquito surveillance could be achieved by focusing on the river valley area. PMID:17847847

  1. Urban habitat evaluation for West Nile virus surveillance in mosquitoes in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    DiMenna, Mark A; Bueno, Rudy; Parmenter, Robert R; Norris, Douglas E; Sheyka, Jeff M; Molina, Josephine L; LaBeau, Elisa M; Hatton, Elizabeth S; Roberts, Christine M; Glass, Gregory E

    2007-06-01

    As part of an ongoing mosquito surveillance program, 27 sites in the greater metropolitan Albuquerque area (Bernalillo County, New Mexico) were trapped from May through September 2004. Each site was sampled for 1 night weekly, using a standard CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap and a gravid trap. Captured mosquitoes were catalogued by location, species, and date, and selected pools were tested for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on previous surveillance, WNV was already established in the state of New Mexico. Surveillance during 2003, the 1st year of WNV detection in New Mexico mosquitoes, was focused on the bosque forest of the Rio Grande river valley. Surveillance during summer of 2004 was extended to additional areas around the city of Albuquerque, the state's largest population center. In addition to the standard surveillance objectives, a secondary goal was to determine whether foci of WNV activity were detectable in other habitats besides the riparian ecosystem of the Rio Grande, and in other species not previously identified as vectors. There was no demonstrable advantage to extending the traditional trapping area outside of the Rio Grande valley. Sites in the valley area had WNV-positive mosquitoes earlier in the season, and for a longer period than the added sites. In addition, riparian sites had the highest diversity of species, the largest numbers of Culex spp. captured, and the largest proportion of the WNV-positive mosquito pools from the study. Species found in other areas of the metropolitan area were also represented in the valley. Although WNV activity was detected in other areas of the city, its activity began later and ended earlier than in the river valley. We surmise that the greatest benefit to mosquito surveillance could be achieved by focusing on the river valley area. PMID:17847847

  2. Application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for controlling subsurface fire area: Indian context

    SciTech Connect

    Mohalik, N.K.; Singh, V.K.; Singh, R.V.K.

    2009-07-15

    In bord and pillar method of mining, the panels are sealed off after depillaring. Depending upon the site specific condition, 40 to 45 % coal are left in depillared panel as stook, loose coal left in goaf, hard coal on floor and roof of the panel. The left out coals in goaf area start oxidation, and this leads to spontaneous heating in side sealed off area. For assessment of fire in underground coal mines, thermo-compositional monitoring plays an important role. This paper presents scientific relevance and selective criteria for use of inert gas for control of subsurface fire. Finally the paper discusses spontaneous heating problem in sealed off area and application of inertisation technology by using CO, to prevent and control sealed off fire at Haripur Colliery, Kenda Area, ECL, India.

  3. Organic carbonyl compounds in Albuquerque, New Mexico, air: A preliminary study of the effects of oxygenated fuel use

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Zhang, Lin; Gaffney, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    A suite of inorganic and organic species were analyzed for four 2--4 day time periods over a year in Albuquerque, New Mexico to determine baseline conditions for organic pollutants under the current air pollution control parameters. Concentrations of low molecular weight carbonyl compounds were relatively high compared with areas such as Los Angeles. Formio acid concentrations in air samples were significant even in winter. In addition, ratios of peroxypropionyl nitrate to peroxyacyetyl nitrate are higher than expected and may be related to the use of oxygenated fuels which are used to mitigate CO concentrations. The number of CO violations in Albuquerque has decreased steadily since 1982 and the downward trend has continued since 1989 when oxygenated fuel use was mandated. It is, therefore, difficult to correlate the drop in CO violations directly to the use of oxygenated fuels when such factors as fleet turnover, woodburning controls, emissions testing and meteorological conditions also may be playing significant roles. More detailed studies are needed to determine the specific relationship between the use of oxygenated fuels and the air quality in Albuquerque, New Mexico and similar urban areas in the western United States.

  4. Concentrations of selected trace elements and other constituents in the Rio Grande and in fish tissue in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    The State of New Mexico and the Pueblo of Isleta have established surface-water standards for trace elements to control discharges of these contaminants. Before these standards can be meaningfully applied, however, ambient concentrations and loads of trace elements, principally arsenic, need to be determined in the Rio Grande and inflow sources. Arsenic concentrations also need to be determined in the edible portion of fish tissue because the Pueblo of Isleta standard for arsenic is based on fish consumption. Eighteen surface-water sampling sites on a reach of the Rio Grande from the Pueblo of San Felipe to Los Lunas, New Mexico, were sampled quarterly from October 1994 to August 1996. The sites include eight Rio Grande sites, one Jemez River site, five riverside drain sites, and four wastewater- treatment plant outfalls. Trace-element protocol was used to collect and process the samples. Field and laboratory quality-control samples were analyzed, and the results are included in this report. Fish-tissue samples were collected from four of the Rio Grande sites and the Albuquerque Riverside Drain, the Atrisco Riverside Drain, and three lakes at a recreational fishing area on the Isleta Indian Reservation. Arsenic in the Rio Grande is nearly all in the dissolved phase. There was little temporal change in arsenic concentration at the Rio Grande sites. The mean dissolved-arsenic concentration in the Rio Grande increased downstream from 1.8 micrograms per liter at the Pueblo of San Felipe to 3.6 micrograms per liter at Los Lunas. Mean dissolved-arsenic concentrations in the riverside drains were slightly higher (2.8 to 4.5 micrograms per liter) than those in the Rio Grande and were higher still in the wastewater-treatment plant outfalls (7.9 to 16.2 micrograms per liter) and the Jemez River (18.2 micrograms per liter). The mean total-arsenic concentration in fish-tissue samples from the Rio Grande and Albuquerque Riverside Drain was 14.53 micrograms per kilogram.

  5. Geochemical studies in the Indian Pass and Picacho Peak Bureau of Land Management Wilderness study areas, imperial county, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, D.B.; Berger, B.R.; Tosdal, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has conducted geochemical studies in the Indian Pass (CDCA-355), 124 km2, and Picacho Peak (CDCA-355A), 23 km2, Wilderness Study Areas (WSA's) as part of a program to evaluate the mineral resource potential of designated areas in the California Desert Conservation Area. These two WSA's are of particular interest because they lie within a region which has intermittently produced significant quantities of Au since the mid-1800's, and is currently the site of much exploration activity for additional Au resources. Within a 15-km radius of the WSA's, there is one actively producing gold mine, a major deposit which began production in 1986, and one recently announced discovery. In the reconnaissance geochemical surveys of the two WSA's - 177 ??m (-80 mesh) stream sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediments, and rocks were prepared and analyzed. Four areas of possible exploration interest were identified within the WSA's. The first area is characterized by anomalous W and Bi in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates, and is underlain primarily by the Mesozoic Orocopia Schist which has been intruded by monzogranite of Oligocene age. Alteration and mineralization appear to be localized near the intrusive contact. The mineralized rock at the surface contains secondary Cu and Fe minerals where the monzogranite intrudes the metabasite horizons of the Orocopia Schist and scheelite where the monzogranite intrudes marble within the Orocopia Schist. The second area is characterized by anomalous As, Sb, Ba, B, and Sr in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates and by anomalous As in - 177 ??m stream sediments. Geologically, this area is underlain by metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of Jurassic(?) age; a biotite monzogranite of Jurassic(?) age; and Tertiary volcanic and hypabyssal rocks composed of flows, domes, and tuffs of intermediate to silicic composition. All these rock types are cut by a set of north-south-striking normal faults

  6. Core drilling provides information about Santa Fe Group aquifer system beneath Albuquerque's West Mesa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, B.D.; Connell, S.D.; Hawley, J.W.; Stone, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Core samples from the upper ???1500 ft of the Santa Fe Group in the Albuquerque West Mesa area provide a first-hand look at the sediments and at subsurface stratigraphic relationships in this important part of the basin-fill aquifer system. Two major hydrostratigraphic subunits consisting of a lower coarse-grained, sandy interval and an overlying fine-grained, interbedded silty sand and clay interval lie beneath the water table at the 98th St core hole. Borehole electrical conductivity measurements reproduce major textural changes observed in the recovered cores and support subsurface correlations of hydrostratigraphic units in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system based on geophysical logs. Comparison of electrical logs from the core hole and from nearby city wells reveals laterally consistent lithostratigraphic patterns over much of the metropolitan area west of the Rio Grande that may be used to delineate structural and related stratigraphic features that have a direct bearing on the availability of ground water.

  7. Summary of water-quality data for City of Albuquerque drinking-water supply wells, 1988-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Lindberg, William E.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    1999-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque has collected and analyzed more than 5,000 water-quality samples from 113 water-supply wells in the Albuquerque area, including many drinking-water supply wells, since May of 1988. As a result, a large water-quality data base has been compiled that includes data for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, carbon, volatile organic compounds, radiological constituents, and bacteria. These data are intended to improve the understanding and management of the ground-water resources of the region, rather than demonstrate compliance with Federal and State drinking-water standards. This report gives summary statistics for selected physical properties and chemical constituents for ground water from wells used by the City of Albuquerque for drinking-water supply between 1988 and 1997. Maps are provided to show the general spatial distribution of selected parameters and water types around the region. Although the values of some parameters vary substantially across the city, median values for all parameters included in this report are less than their respective maximum contaminant levels in each drinking-water supply well. The dominant water types are sodium plus potassium / carbonate plus bicarbonate in the western part of the city and calcium / carbonate plus bicarbonate in the eastern part of the city.

  8. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  9. Assessing patterns of human-wildlife conflicts and compensation around a Central Indian protected area.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Krithi K; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M; DeFries, Ruth; Ballal, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating crop and livestock loss to wildlife and improving compensation distribution are important for conservation efforts in landscapes where people and wildlife co-occur outside protected areas. The lack of rigorously collected spatial data poses a challenge to management efforts to minimize loss and mitigate conflicts. We surveyed 735 households from 347 villages in a 5154 km(2) area surrounding Kanha Tiger Reserve in India. We modeled self-reported household crop and livestock loss as a function of agricultural, demographic and environmental factors, and mitigation measures. We also modeled self-reported compensation received by households as a function of demographic factors, conflict type, reporting to authorities, and wildlife species involved. Seventy-three percent of households reported crop loss and 33% livestock loss in the previous year, but less than 8% reported human injury or death. Crop loss was associated with greater number of cropping months per year and proximity to the park. Livestock loss was associated with grazing animals inside the park and proximity to the park. Among mitigation measures only use of protective physical structures were associated with reduced livestock loss. Compensation distribution was more likely for tiger related incidents, and households reporting loss and located in the buffer. Average estimated probability of crop loss was 0.93 and livestock loss was 0.60 for surveyed households. Estimated crop and livestock loss and compensation distribution were higher for households located inside the buffer. Our approach modeled conflict data to aid managers in identifying potential conflict hotspots, influential factors, and spatially maps risk probability of crop and livestock loss. This approach could help focus allocation of conservation efforts and funds directed at conflict prevention and mitigation where high densities of people and wildlife co-occur. PMID:23227173

  10. Assessing Patterns of Human-Wildlife Conflicts and Compensation around a Central Indian Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Karanth, Krithi K.; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.; DeFries, Ruth; Ballal, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating crop and livestock loss to wildlife and improving compensation distribution are important for conservation efforts in landscapes where people and wildlife co-occur outside protected areas. The lack of rigorously collected spatial data poses a challenge to management efforts to minimize loss and mitigate conflicts. We surveyed 735 households from 347 villages in a 5154 km2 area surrounding Kanha Tiger Reserve in India. We modeled self-reported household crop and livestock loss as a function of agricultural, demographic and environmental factors, and mitigation measures. We also modeled self-reported compensation received by households as a function of demographic factors, conflict type, reporting to authorities, and wildlife species involved. Seventy-three percent of households reported crop loss and 33% livestock loss in the previous year, but less than 8% reported human injury or death. Crop loss was associated with greater number of cropping months per year and proximity to the park. Livestock loss was associated with grazing animals inside the park and proximity to the park. Among mitigation measures only use of protective physical structures were associated with reduced livestock loss. Compensation distribution was more likely for tiger related incidents, and households reporting loss and located in the buffer. Average estimated probability of crop loss was 0.93 and livestock loss was 0.60 for surveyed households. Estimated crop and livestock loss and compensation distribution were higher for households located inside the buffer. Our approach modeled conflict data to aid managers in identifying potential conflict hotspots, influential factors, and spatially maps risk probability of crop and livestock loss. This approach could help focus allocation of conservation efforts and funds directed at conflict prevention and mitigation where high densities of people and wildlife co-occur. PMID:23227173

  11. [In Situ Analysis of Element Geochemistry in Submarine Basalt in Hydrothermal Areas from Ultraslow Spreading Southwest Indian Ridge].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Sun, Xiao-ming; Xu, Li; Liang, Ye-heng; Wu, Zhong-wei; Fu, Yu; Huang, Yi

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we analyze element geochemistry of submarine basalt in situ, which is sampled in hydrothermal areas from ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge, including the fresh basalt rocks (B19-9, B15-13) and altered basalt (B5-2). And we can confirm that altered mineral in B5-2 is celadonite by microscope and Raman Spectrum. Furthermore, amygdaloidal celadonites are analyzed by electron microprobe (EPMA) and EDS-line scanning. The results show that K-contents decrease and Na-contents increase from the core to the edge in these altered minerals, indicating the transition from celadonite to saponite. Celadonite is an altered minerals, forming in low temperature (< 50 degrees C) and oxidizing condition, while saponite form in low water/rock and more reducing condition. As a result, the transition from celadonite to saponite suggests environment change from oxidizing to reducing condition. Using the result of EPMA as internal standard, we can analyze rare earth elements (REE) in altered mineral in situ. Most of result show positive Eu anomaly (Δ(Eu)), indicating hydrothermal fluid transform from oxidizing to reducing, and reducing fluid rework on the early altered minerals. Comparison with REE in matrix feldspar both in altered and unaltered zoning, we find that reducing fluid can leach REE from the matrix feldspar, leading to lower total REE concentrations and positive Eu anomaly. So leaching process play an important role in hydrothermal system. PMID:26117900

  12. Natural resource management in a protected area of the Indian Himalayas: a modeling approach for anthropogenic interactions on ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Sunil; Kaechele, Harald

    2009-06-01

    The concept of ecosystem conservation as a broad theme came into existence during the 1970s under the Man and Biosphere Programme (MAB) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The Indian Government followed this approach and chose the method to segregate the landscape for conservation of the ecosystem as well as for the development of the local economy and its people. We have examined the effect of this policy and concurrently developed a theoretical modeling approach to understand how human behavior is changing under shifting political, socioeconomic and environmental conditions. A specific focus has been on how the landscape is changing in the mountains of the Indian Himalayan region where about 10% of the total geographical area is converted into protected landscape for conservation of biodiversity. For local people living in the Himalayan mountains in India, agriculture is the main land use activity and is strongly linked to the forests in providing sustainability. There are several branches in the rural ecosystems where the local people's economy was centered. These include agriculture, animal husbandry, medicinal and aromatic plants cultivation, forest resource collection, tourism and other occupations. The greatest proportion of the population was engaged in the agriculture sector, whose contribution is high in the rural economy (61%); followed by animal husbandry (19%), forest resource collection for economic gain (18%), and medicinal and aromatic plants cultivation (1.5%). However, three decades ago the animal husbandry branch of the rural ecosystem was contributing the maximum share towards rural household income (40%) followed by tourism (35.2%), and lastly agriculture (14%). The desire of farmers to secure the optimum output from agricultural land use has resulted in an increase for resource collection from the forests. The people's perception (n = 1,648) regarding overall changes occurring in the region was

  13. Living with Wildlife and Mitigating Conflicts Around Three Indian Protected Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanth, Krithi K.; Naughton-Treves, Lisa; DeFries, Ruth; Gopalaswamy, Arjun M.

    2013-12-01

    Crop and livestock losses to wildlife are a concern for people neighboring many protected areas (PAs) and can generate opposition to conservation. Examining patterns of conflict and associated tolerance is important to devise policies to reduce conflict impacts on people and wildlife. We surveyed 398 households from 178 villages within 10 km of Ranthambore, Kanha, and Nagarahole parks in India. We compared different attitudes toward wildlife, and presented hypothetical response scenarios, including killing the problem animal(s). Eighty percent of households reported crop losses to wildlife and 13 % livestock losses. Higher crop loss was associated with more cropping months per year, greater crop variety, and more harvest seasons per year but did not vary with proximity to the PA, suggesting that PAs are not necessarily "sources" for crop raiders. By contrast, complaints of "depredating carnivores" were associated with people-grazing animals and collecting resources from PAs. Many households (83 %) engaged in mitigation efforts. We found that only fencing and guard animals reduce crop losses, and no efforts to lower livestock losses. Contrary to our expectations, carnivores were not viewed with more hostility than crop-raiding wildlife. Households reported greater inclination to kill herbivores destroying crops or carnivores harming people, but not carnivores preying on livestock. Our model estimated crop loss was 82 % across surveyed households (highest in Kanha), while the livestock loss experienced was 27 % (highest in Ranthambore). Our comparative study provides insights into factors associated with conflict loss and tolerance, and aids in improving ongoing conservation and compensation efforts.

  14. Development of a digital model of ground-water flow in deeply weathered crystalline rock, Indian Creek area, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, C.C. III; Eimers, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    The digital ground-water model of the regolith-bedrock aquifer system in the Indian Creek area is based on the US Geological Survey's modular finite-difference ground-water flow model (MODFLOW). Use of MODFLOW assumes porous media equivalence; however, special approaches have been used to account for non-uniform fracture distribution. The model is divided into a uniformly spaced grid having 196 rows, 140 columns, and a 500-foot spacing. Rows are oriented parallel to fractures (N 72 E) and columns are oriented parallel to foliation (N 18 W). The area represented by active model cells is 146 square miles and has about 17,400 cells. The model has 11 layers of different thickness; the top layer represents the regolith and the lower 10 layers represent bedrock. The regolith-bedrock contact is at a uniform depth of 50 feet. The base of the model is 850 feet below land surface. Hydraulic properties of regolith are based on diffusivity calculated from streamflow recession and are assumed to be areally constant. The steady-state model simulates recharge to, flow through, and discharge from the regolith-bedrock aquifer system. The mass balance between inflow and outflow differs by less than 1%. Along select sections, computed travel times from drainage divides to streams range from less than 4 years in the regolith to as much as 300 years for flow passing through the bottom layer of bedrock. The volume of ground water that flows through the bottom layer is only about 2% of the flow through the regolith.

  15. Statement of Hubert Velarde, Jicarilla Apache Tribe to United States Commission on Civil Rights at Albuquerque Convention Center (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 14, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velarde, Hubert

    The statement by the President of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe emphasizes reservation problems that need to be examined. Presented at a 1972 Civil Rights Commission hearing on Indian Concerns, Velarde's statement listed employment, education, the administration of justice, water rights, and medical services as areas for investigation. (KM)

  16. Glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas--from an area-wide glacial lake inventory to on-site and modeling based risk assessment of critical glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Glacial lake hazards and glacial lake distributions are investigated in many glaciated regions of the world, but comparably little attention has been given to these topics in the Indian Himalayas. In this study we present a first area-wide glacial lake inventory, including a qualitative classification at 251 glacial lakes >0.01 km(2). Lakes were detected in the five states spanning the Indian Himalayas, and lake distribution pattern and lake characteristics were found to differ significantly between regions. Three glacial lakes, from different geographic and climatic regions within the Indian Himalayas were then selected for a detailed risk assessment. Lake outburst probability, potential outburst magnitudes and associated damage were evaluated on the basis of high-resolution satellite imagery, field assessments and through the use of a dynamic model. The glacial lakes analyzed in the states of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh were found to present moderate risks to downstream villages, whereas the lake in Sikkim severely threatens downstream locations. At the study site in Sikkim, a dam breach could trigger drainage of ca. 16×10(6)m(3) water and generate maximum lake discharge of nearly 7000 m(3) s(-). The identification of critical glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas and the detailed risk assessments at three specific sites allow prioritizing further investigations and help in the definition of risk reduction actions. PMID:23218457

  17. Age estimation by pulp/tooth area ratio in canines: Cameriere's method assessed in an Indian sample using radiovisiography.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, M B; Kale, Alka D; Angadi, Punnya V; Hallikerimath, Seema

    2011-01-30

    Age estimation of an individual whether living or dead is an intimidating task in forensic investigations. Since teeth are more resistant to most peri- and post-mortem changes, they are frequently used for identification and age estimation when skeletal remains are in poor condition. However, most methods are destructive and warrant extraction of teeth which is not feasible in living individuals. Cameriere's et al. put forth a radiographic method of age estimation by pulp to tooth area ratio (AR) in canines and revealed a linear regression between age and the AR. In the present study, we estimated the AR in 456 canines (upper, lower and both) in an Indian sample (114 males and 114 females) using radiovisiography technique. Linear regression equations were derived for upper canine, lower canine and both using the AR to estimate chronological age. Additionally, the efficacy of these equations was also evaluated in younger age group (<45 years). The formulas derived, i.e., age=96.795-513.561x(1) (Eq. (1)) for upper canine, age=88.308-458.137x(2) (Eq. (2)) for lower canine and age=99.190-283.537x(1)-306.902x(2)+400.873x(1)x(2) (Eq. (3)) for both the canines were applied to predict the chronological age. The mean value of residuals using these regression equations ranged from 4.28 to 6.39 years with upper canine equation generally giving a precise result. When these equations were applied for younger ages (<45 years), the regression equation derived from both canines gave a better result (mean residual 2.70 years). Overall these equations were better able to predict the age in younger ages, i.e., up to 45 years. PMID:20869824

  18. Application of nonlinear-regression methods to a ground-water flow model of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Kernodle, J.M.; McAda, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the application of nonlinear-regression methods to a numerical model of ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico. In the Albuquerque Basin, ground water is the primary source for most water uses. Ground-water withdrawal has steadily increased since the 1940's, resulting in large declines in water levels in the Albuquerque area. A ground-water flow model was developed in 1994 and revised and updated in 1995 for the purpose of managing basin ground- water resources. In the work presented here, nonlinear-regression methods were applied to a modified version of the previous flow model. Goals of this work were to use regression methods to calibrate the model with each of six different configurations of the basin subsurface and to assess and compare optimal parameter estimates, model fit, and model error among the resulting calibrations. The Albuquerque Basin is one in a series of north trending structural basins within the Rio Grande Rift, a region of Cenozoic crustal extension. Mountains, uplifts, and fault zones bound the basin, and rock units within the basin include pre-Santa Fe Group deposits, Tertiary Santa Fe Group basin fill, and post-Santa Fe Group volcanics and sediments. The Santa Fe Group is greater than 14,000 feet (ft) thick in the central part of the basin. During deposition of the Santa Fe Group, crustal extension resulted in development of north trending normal faults with vertical displacements of as much as 30,000 ft. Ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin occurs primarily in the Santa Fe Group and post-Santa Fe Group deposits. Water flows between the ground-water system and surface-water bodies in the inner valley of the basin, where the Rio Grande, a network of interconnected canals and drains, and Cochiti Reservoir are located. Recharge to the ground-water flow system occurs as infiltration of precipitation along mountain fronts and infiltration of stream water along tributaries to the Rio Grande; subsurface

  19. 76 FR 81836 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County; Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule... Albuquerque/Bernalillo County's PSD permitting requirements for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. EPA is... FR 59334). The comment period was open for thirty days and no comments were received. II. What...

  20. 40 CFR 62.7856 - Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Board. 62.7856 Section 62.7856 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board. (a) Identification of Plan. Albuquerque-Bernalillo... County Air Quality Control Board on November 9, 2005. (b) Identification of Sources. The plan applies...

  1. 40 CFR 62.7856 - Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Board. 62.7856 Section 62.7856 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Albuquerque/Bernalillo County Air Quality Control Board. (a) Identification of Plan. Albuquerque-Bernalillo... County Air Quality Control Board on November 9, 2005. (b) Identification of Sources. The plan applies...

  2. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1983-01-01

    The N aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. The N aquifer consists of the Navajo Sandstone and parts of the underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone of Jurassic and Triassic age. Maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 1,050 feet in the northwestern part of the area, and the aquifer thins to extinction to the southeast. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles of the area. To the east, north, and west of Black Mesa, the aquifer is exposed at the surface, and water is unconfined. The aquifer was in equilibrium before about 1965. Recharge of about 13,000 acre-feet per year was balanced primarily by discharge near Moenkopi Wash and Laguna Creek and by evapotranspiration. At least 180 million acre-feet of water was in storage. The estimated average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 0.65 foot per day. The confined storage coefficient is estimated to be about 0.0004 where the aquifer is thickest, and the estimated unconfined storage coefficient ranges from 0.10 to 0.15. Ground-water withdrawals that averaged 5,300 acre-feet per year from 1976 to 1979 have caused water levels to decline in wells in the confined part of the aquifer. Withdrawals include an average of 3,700 acre-feet per year to supply a coal-slurry pipeline from a coal mine on Black Mesa. Six observation wells equipped with water-level recorders have been used to monitor aquifer response. The water level in one well 32 miles south of the mine declined 17 feet from 1972 through 1979 and 3.5 feet during 1979. A mathematical model of the N aquifer was developed and calibrated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The model was used in part to improve estimates of aquifer characteristics and the water budget, and it successfully reproduced the observed response of the aquifer through 1979. The model results indicate that about 95 percent of

  3. 77 FR 8926 - Board Meeting: March 7, 2012-Albuquerque, NM; The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Will...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... public meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on Wednesday, March 7, 2012. The meeting will focus on... Yale Blvd. SE., Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106; (Tel) 505-843-7000; (Fax) 505-843-6307. A block of...

  4. Surface water and groundwater for growth in the Albuquerque Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Balleau, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    The current situation is one of increasing water demand for municipal, industrial, recreational and environmental maintenance. Municipal use is increasing at about 25,000 a-f/y per decade. Each new purpose of use is bidding to obtain water used by existing purposes. Agricultural water is susceptible to transfer. The theme of this conference, The Water Future of Albuquerque and Middle Rio Grande Basin, arises from concern about the aquifer`s capacity and longevity, the limitations on Rio Grande impacts, and access to water rights for future consumption. The author`s perspective on managing these three components of the situation is presented, while acknowledging other important issues about water quality, environmental goals, land subsidence, Bosque preservation and economic burdens and benefits.

  5. 1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K.

    1994-11-01

    This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  6. Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  8. 1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B.

    1995-09-01

    This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  9. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  10. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  11. 75 FR 20608 - Notice of Re-Designation of the Service Delivery Area for the Cowlitz Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... designated as the Tribe's SDA in 67 FR 46329. It is proposed that Columbia County, Oregon, and Wahkiakum and... of this FR notice is to notify the public of the request of the Cowlitz Indian Tribe to expand their... (43 FR 35654), the following findings are made: 1. Columbia County, Oregon is contiguous with...

  12. Summary of urban stormwater quality in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storms, Erik F.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; Locke, Evan A.; Stevens, Michael R.; Romero, Orlando C.

    2015-01-01

    The stormwater quality in Albuquerque was compared with that of six other Western U.S. cities (Phoenix, Arizona; Tucson, Arizona; Las Vegas, Nevada; Denver, Colorado; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Boise, Idaho) for selected constituents. In general, water-quality data for stormwater samples from these six other Western U.S. cities were similar to water-quality data for the stormwater samples from the Albuquerque outfalls. Median concentrations for suspended solids, total phosphorus, and bacteria (E. coli and fecal coliform) in stormwater samples from the Albuquerque outfalls, as a whole, were higher than those in samples from the other Western U.S. cities except for Las Vegas.

  13. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  14. 76 FR 10389 - Reopening the Call for Nominations for the New Mexico Albuquerque and Farmington District...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... natural resources, land or water; representatives of Indian tribes within or adjacent to the area for which the council is organized; representatives of academia who are employed in natural resource management or the natural sciences; and representatives of the affected public-at-large. Individuals...

  15. Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world’s largest no-take marine protected area

    PubMed Central

    SHEPPARD, C. R. C.; ATEWEBERHAN, M.; BOWEN, B. W.; CARR, P.; CHEN, C. A.; CLUBBE, C.; CRAIG, M. T.; EBINGHAUS, R.; EBLE, J.; FITZSIMMONS, N.; GAITHER, M. R.; GAN, C-H.; GOLLOCK, M.; GUZMAN, N.; GRAHAM, N. A. J.; HARRIS, A.; JONES, R.; KESHAVMURTHY, S.; KOLDEWEY, H.; LUNDIN, C. G.; MORTIMER, J. A.; OBURA, D.; PFEIFFER, M.; PRICE, A. R. G.; PURKIS, S.; RAINES, P.; READMAN, J. W.; RIEGL, B.; ROGERS, A.; SCHLEYER, M.; SEAWARD, M. R. D; SHEPPARD, A. L. S.; TAMELANDER, J.; TURNER, J. R.; VISRAM, S.; VOGLER, C.; VOGT, S.; WOLSCHKE, H.; YANG, J. M-C.; YANG, S-Y.; YESSON, C.

    2014-01-01

    The Chagos Archipelago was designated a no-take marine protected area (MPA) in 2010; it covers 550 000 km2, with more than 60 000 km2 shallow limestone platform and reefs. This has doubled the global cover of such MPAs.It contains 25–50% of the Indian Ocean reef area remaining in excellent condition, as well as the world’s largest contiguous undamaged reef area. It has suffered from warming episodes, but after the most severe mortality event of 1998, coral cover was restored after 10 years.Coral reef fishes are orders of magnitude more abundant than in other Indian Ocean locations, regardless of whether the latter are fished or protected.Coral diseases are extremely low, and no invasive marine species are known.Genetically, Chagos marine species are part of the Western Indian Ocean, and Chagos serves as a ‘stepping-stone’ in the ocean.The no-take MPA extends to the 200 nm boundary, and. includes 86 unfished seamounts and 243 deep knolls as well as encompassing important pelagic species.On the larger islands, native plants, coconut crabs, bird and turtle colonies were largely destroyed in plantation times, but several smaller islands are in relatively undamaged state.There are now 10 ‘important bird areas’, coconut crab density is high and numbers of green and hawksbill turtles are recovering.Diego Garcia atoll contains a military facility; this atoll contains one Ramsar site and several ‘strict nature reserves’. Pollutant monitoring shows it to be the least polluted inhabited atoll in the world. Today, strict environmental regulations are enforced.Shoreline erosion is significant in many places. Its economic cost in the inhabited part of Diego Garcia is very high, but all islands are vulnerable.Chagos is ideally situated for several monitoring programmes, and use is increasingly being made of the archipelago for this purpose. PMID:25505830

  16. Ground displacements caused by aquifer-system water-level variations observed using interferometric synthetic aperture radar near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.; Galloway, Devin L.; Stork, Sylvia V.

    2002-01-01

    Six synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images were processed to form five unwrapped interferometric (InSAR) images of the greater metropolitan area in the Albuquerque Basin. Most interference patterns in the images were caused by range displacements resulting from changes in land-surface elevation. Loci of land- surface elevation changes correlate with changes in aquifer-system water levels and largely result from the elastic response of the aquifer-system skeletal material to changes in pore-fluid pressure. The magnitude of the observed land-surface subsidence and rebound suggests that aquifer-system deformation resulting from ground-water withdrawals in the Albuquerque area has probably remained in the elastic (recoverable) range from July 1993 through September 1999. Evidence of inelastic (permanent) land subsidence in the Rio Rancho area exists, but its relation to compaction of the aquifer system is inconclusive because of insufficient water-level data. Patterns of elastic deformation in both Albuquerque and Rio Rancho suggest that intrabasin faults impede ground- water-pressure diffusion at seasonal time scales and that these faults are probably important in controlling patterns of regional ground-water flow.

  17. Proposed expansion of the City of Albuquerque/U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level monitoring network for the middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Middle Rio Grande Basin in central New Mexico, extending from Cochiti Lake on the north to San Acacia on the south, covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground-water withdrawals in the basin are concentrated in and around the city of Albuquerque. Because of rapid increases in population and associated ground-water pumpage, a network of wells was established cooperatively by the City of and the U.S. Geological Survey between April 1982 and September 1983 to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin. Expansion of this network has been identified as an essential element in plans to study the relation between surface water and ground water in the basin. An inventory of existing wells in the Albuquerque metropolitan area has brought together information on about 400 wells that either are being monitored for water levels or would be good candidates for monitoring. About 115 wells or well sites are proposed as additions to the current 128-well ground-water-level monitoring network for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. Despite the extensive network that would be created by the addition of the proposed existing wells, however, certain parts of the Albuquerque metropolitan area would remain without adequate coverage areally and/or with depth in the Santa Fe Group aquifer until the installation of the proposed new monitoring wells.

  18. 75 FR 7031 - Xilinx, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Xilinx, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Affirmative Determination... firm. In the request for reconsideration, the petitioners alleged that Xilinx, Inc. shifted...

  19. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  20. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey maps and data, East Poplar Oil Field area, August 2004, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Cain, Michael J.; Tyrrell, Christa; Hill, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a data release for a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during August 2004 in a 275-square-kilometer area that includes the East Poplar oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic resistivity data were converted to six electrical conductivity grids, each representing different approximate depths of investigation. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. Areas of high conductivity in shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field area are being delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, in order to map areas of saline-water plumes. Ground electromagnetic methods were first used during the early 1990s to delineate more than 31 square kilometers of high conductivity saline-water plumes in a portion of the East Poplar oil field area. In the 10 years since the first delineation, the quality of water from some wells completed in the shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field changed markedly. The extent of saline-water plumes in 2004 likely differs from that delineated in the early 1990s. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies is being used by resource managers to develop ground-water resource plans for the area.

  1. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  2. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  3. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  4. A reconnaissance of the water resources of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, Pacific County, Washington, 1978-1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A 1978-79 reconnaissance of the quantity and quality of water in the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation yielded information needed by the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe to plan future use of these resources. Ground water from the local artesian aquifer is suitable for most uses and it is estimated that yield can be as much as 100 to 500 gallons per minute. Long-term yields cannot be calculated from available data. Data from 1968-80 show no measurable declines in water levels or rates of flow due to pumping from the aquifer. Analysis of ground-water samples indicated no seawater intrusion into the aquifer. Mean monthly flows of two streams in the study area ranged from 0.53 to 3.28 cubic feet per second in February 1979. Estimated average 7-day low flows with a recurrance interval of 2 years ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 cubic feet per second. Analyses of surface-water samples indicated concentrations of Aldrin, DDD, DDT, Dieldrin, Diazinon , and Ethyl Parathion that exceeded EPA limits for protection of marine life. Samples of the stream-bottom material in one stream had high concentrations of Aldrin, DDD, DDE, DDT, Dichlobenil, and Dieldrin. Tribally owned tidelands into which these streams flow may be contaminated by these toxic chemicals. (USGS)

  5. Timing of vegetation changes at the end of the Holocene Humid Period in desert areas at the northern edge of the Atlantic and Indian monsoon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lézine, Anne-Marie

    2009-08-01

    This article aims at discussing the ecological response of the terrestrial and fresh water dependant environments to the installation of arid conditions at the end of the Holocene Humid Period in the Atlantic and Indian monsoon domains. It is mainly focused on dry environments from Chad, Oman and Pakistan where new, high-resolution pollen sequences have been provided. Pollen data show that local hydrological conditions have played a major role in the destruction or survival of tropical tree populations at the end of the Holocene Humid Period, as well as partly explaining the asynchronous pattern of recorded environmental changes in most tropical regions. In desert areas, the response of the fresh water dependant systems to the shift from humid to arid climate conditions appears to have followed a threshold-like pattern. In contrast, terrestrial ecosystems have gradually adapted to increased drought, as shown by the progressive decrease of tropical tree species at Yoa or the gradual expansion in dry plant types in Oman and Pakistan from 6000 cal yrs BP to the present. A remarkable synchroneity in environmental change is recorded at the northern edge of the Atlantic and Indian monsoon systems, with the extreme end of the Holocene Humid Period corresponding to the last occurrence of tropical trees in the desert and the last record of prolonged SW monsoon rainfall over north-western Asia around 4700-4500 cal yrs BP.

  6. Water management policy for the Albuquerque Basin: What can we learn from Tucson?

    SciTech Connect

    McGuckin, M.

    1995-12-31

    Albuquerque long believed itself to be a uniquely gifted city, an enchanted exotic anomaly, a desert metropolis with plentiful water stored in the deep alluvial sand and gravel sloughed off the Sandia Mountains. That is, until 1992, when the US Geological Survey`s report entitled Geohydrologic Framework and Hydrologic Conditions in the Albuquerque Basin in Central New Mexico revealed a fault, or rather several, in their water plan. The aquifer is not all of a piece. Instead of a veritable lake underfoot, there is a series of ponds or isolated cells of water. Tucson and Albuquerque have long been, in a sense, sister cities; they share similar physical situations, but with one major difference: in Tucson it has always been understood there wasn`t much water, not in the upland Sonoran Desert. The author outlines the recent history of water management policy in Tucson with possible lessons for Albuquerque. There are some very important differences between the two cities. The first is that in Tucson, water is, for the most part, a local issue. What Albuquerque decides to do with their water affects every community along the Rio Grande, but in addition, by rippling through the economy what they decide to do impacts every community in the state. And secondly, Tucson is the terminus of the Central Arizona Project (CAP).

  7. Seasonal neuronal plasticity in song-control and auditory forebrain areas in subtropical nonmigratory and palearctic-indian migratory male songbirds.

    PubMed

    Surbhi; Rastogi, Ashutosh; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-10-01

    This study examines whether differences in annual life-history states (LHSs) among the inhabitants of two latitudes would have an impact on the neuronal plasticity of the song-control system in songbirds. At the times of equinoxes and solstices during the year (n = 4 per year) corresponding to different LHSs, we measured the volumetric changes and expression of doublecortin (DCX; an endogenous marker of the neuronal recruitment) in the song-control nuclei and higher order auditory forebrain regions of the subtropical resident Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) and Palearctic-Indian migratory redheaded buntings (Emberiza bruniceps). Area X in basal ganglia, lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN), HVC (proper name), and robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) were enlarged during the breeding LHS. Both round and fusiform DCX-immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells were found in area X and HVC but not in LMAN or RA, with a significant seasonal difference. Also, as shown by increase in volume and by dense, round DCX-ir cells, the neuronal incorporation was increased in HVC alone during the breeding LHS. This suggests differences in the response of song-control nuclei to photoperiod-induced changes in LHSs. Furthermore, DCX immunoreactivity indicated participation of the cortical caudomedial nidopallium and caudomedial mesopallium in the song-control system, albeit with differences between the weaverbirds and the buntings. Overall, these results show seasonal neuronal plasticity in the song-control system closely associated with annual reproductive LHS in both of the songbirds. Differences between species probably account for the differences in the photoperiod-response system between the relative refractory weaverbirds and absolute refractory redheaded buntings. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2914-2929, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991695

  8. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Indian Gulch burn area, near Golden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Indian Gulch wildfire near Golden, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from 2 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall to a high of 76 percent in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 840 cubic meters to a high of 26,000 cubic meters, indicating a considerable hazard should debris flows occur.

  9. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  10. Geohydrology and water resources of the Papago Farms-Great Plain area, Papago Indian Reservation, Arizona, and the upper Rio Sonoyta area, Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollett, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Papago Farms-Great Plain and upper Rio Sonoyta study area includes about 490 square miles in south-central Arizona and north-central Sonora, Mexico. In the study area 23,700 acre-feet of ground water from the basin-fill deposits was used to irrigate more than 5,000 acres in 1981. Surface water is not a reliable source for irrigation or public supply. Ground water enters the area as underflow from the north and east and as recharge from the montains, moves through basin-margin sediments , around the basin-center clays, and exits the area to the west beneath the Rio Sonoyta. Ground-water withdrawals in the upper Rio Sonoyta area do not appear to have an effect on water levels in the Papago Farms-Great Plain area. Depth to water ranges from 500 feet near the southern boundary to 150 feet in the center of study area. About 10 million acre-feet of recoverable ground water is stored in the upper 400 feet of the aquifer. Storage is being depleted at a rate of 19,000 acre-feet per year. The ground water is a sodium and bicarbonate type and has an anomalously high content of arsenic and fluoride. (USGS)

  11. Role of regional thermal contrast over West Asia in interannual variation in atmospheric moisture transportation over the Indian Ocean and neighboring areas at summer monsoon onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    The low-level temperature contrast over West Asia influences the interannual variation in water vapor transportation over the northern and equatorial Indian Ocean and neighboring monsoon area. A composite analysis that takes into account the thermal contrast over West Asia during the monsoon seasonal transition is performed based on the reanalysis and merged observational precipitation data sets. The positive (negative) low-level thermal contrast anomaly over the Iranian Plateau (IP) strengthens (weakens) the thermal contrast over the Arabian Sea. The low-level westerly anomaly develops earlier in the positive IP thermal contrast years than in the negative years. As a result, water vapor transport varies. This variation in water vapor transport in turn has an influence on the abrupt increase in precipitation over South Asia and the Arabian Sea and the decrease over equatorial East Africa. The variation in low-level temperature over the IP precedes the variation of precipitation over these regions by a few pentads. A numerical experiment using the Lagrangian particle dispersion model agrees with the results of the composite analysis. Particles are emitted from the western tropical Indian Ocean region from the preonset to onset period. Results of numerical experiments concerning positive IP thermal contrast years show that particles can be transported into South Asia and the Arabian Sea before the climatological Asian summer monsoon onset pentad. However, small amounts of particles arrive in South Asia and the Arabian Sea at the onset period in negative IP years. The transport into equatorial East Africa becomes weak earlier in positive IP years.

  12. Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  13. Education and the Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joann Sebastian

    Due to the Federal relocation programs, American Indian migration to urban areas has intensified over the past 20 years. The Indian who moves from the reservation to the city encounters an alien culture and, consequently, experiences immense difficulties in securing employment, housing, health services, and fair, unprejudiced treatment from law…

  14. California Indian Food and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  15. Borehole geophysical data for the East Poplar oil field area, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana, 1993, 2004, and 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Tyrrell, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Areas of high electrical conductivity in shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field area were delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, in order to interpret areas of saline-water contamination. Ground, airborne, and borehole geophysical data were collected in the East Poplar oil field area from 1992 through 2005 as part of this delineation. This report presents borehole geophysical data for thirty-two wells that were collected during, 1993, 2004, and 2005 in the East Poplar oil field study area. Natural-gamma and induction instruments were used to provide information about the lithology and conductivity of the soil, rock, and water matrix adjacent to and within the wells. The well logs were also collected to provide subsurface controls for interpretation of a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over most of the East Poplar oil field in 2004. The objective of the USGS studies was to improve understanding of aquifer hydrogeology particularly in regard to variations in water quality.

  16. 7 CFR 25.500 - Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 25.500 Indian reservations. (a) An area in an Indian reservation shall be treated as nominated by a State and a local government if it is nominated by the reservation governing body. (b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, a reservation governing body must be the governing body of an Indian...

  17. Evaluation of School Uniform Policy at John Adams and Truman Middle Schools for Albuquerque Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, Deborah L.

    A uniform policy at two Albuquerque middle schools became a reality as a result of parent initiative. Parents provided input through attending meetings and a fashion show, serving on the uniform task force, completing surveys, voting, and revisiting the policy. Parents not only initiated the development of the policy, but were active participants…

  18. Financial administration of work for nonfederal sponsors, DOE Field Office (AL), Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Field Office, Albuquerque (AL) is responsible for managing and controlling nonfederally sponsored work done by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The audit objective was to determine whether the funding of, and accounting for, work done under a 1984 funds-in agreement and work for others in Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 complied with laws, regulations, and policies.

  19. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Artistic Homes of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Standard features of their homes include advanced framed 2x6 24-inch on center walls, R-21 blown insulation in the walls, and high-efficiency windows.

  20. 78 FR 69874 - Notice of Public Meeting, Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council Meeting, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Public Meeting, Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council Meeting, New Mexico AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act and the Federal Advisory Committee...

  1. 77 FR 58032 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque... 1997 and 2006 PM2.5 NAAQS AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule....

  2. 76 FR 54799 - Flowserve Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Flowserve Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Negative... 14, 2011 (76 FR 21040). Workers at the subject firm manufactured industrial pumps. The petitioner (a... resulted in a negative determination based on the findings that Section 222(a) of the Trade Act of 1974,...

  3. 77 FR 30900 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... administrative expenses incurred by the Department in implementing the New Mexico Air Quality Control Act, the joint Air Quality Control Board (AQCB) ordinances, and the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County AQCB... action is discussed in detail in our November 4, 2011, proposal (76 FR 68385). In that notice,...

  4. 75 FR 5698 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Albuquerque-Bernalillo County, NM; Excess...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... into the New Mexico SIP for Albuquerque- Bernalillo County on April 10, 1980 (42 FR 24468) at 40 CFR 52...), April 27, 1977 (42 FR 21472); EPA's final rule for Idaho's sulfur dioxide control strategy, November 8, 1977 (42 FR 58171); and the latest clarification of EPA's policy issued on December 5, 2001...

  5. Abstracts of the annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting, June 18-19, 2001, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Timothy J., (Edited By); Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Senske, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting serves two purposes. In addition to giving mappers the opportunity to exchange ideas, experiences, victories, and problems with others, presentations are reviewed by the Geologic Mapping Subcommittee (GeMS) to provide input to the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Mapping Program review panel’s consideration of new proposals and progress reports that include mapping tasks. Funded mappers bring both oral presentation materials (slides or viewgraphs) and map products to post for review by GeMS and fellow mappers. Additionally, the annual meetings typically feature optional field trips offering earth analogs and parallels to planetary mapping problems. The 2001 Mappers Meeting, June 18-19, was convened by Tim Parker, Dave Senske, and Ken Tanaka and was hosted by Larry Crumpler and Jayne Aubele of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Oral presentations were given in the Museum’s Honeywell Auditorium, and maps were posted in the Sandia Room. In addition to active mappers, guests included local science teachers who had successfully competed for the right to attend and listen to the reports. It was a unique pleasure for mappers to have the opportunity to interact with and provide information to teachers responding so enthusiastically to the meeting presentation. On Sunday, June 17, Larry and Jayne conducted an optional pre-meeting field trip. The flanks of Rio Grande Rift, east and west of Albuquerque and Valles Caldera north of town presented tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary examples of the Rift and adjoining areas analogous to observed features on Mars and Venus. The arid but volcanically and tectonically active environment of New Mexico’s rift valley enables focus on features that appear morphologically young and spectacular in satellite images and digital relief models. The theme of the trip was to see what, at orbiter resolution, "obvious" geologic features look like at

  6. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  7. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  8. The Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Winona DuBray

    The document presents six articles that provide a glimpse of the uniqueness of American Indian cultural conflict, focusing on aspects of the culture which warrant special attention. Since there are over 100 tribes, an effort was made to enumerate commonalities amongst the tribal cultures in looking at issues raised in the urban areas throughout…

  9. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1981-01-01

    The main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area is the N aquifer, which consists of the Navajo Sandstone and underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles. Transmissivity is less than 1,000 feet squared per day. Storage coefficient is less than 0.0004 in the confined part of the aquifer and at least 0.1 in the unconfined part. Recharge is about 13,000 acre-feet per year, and storage at equilibrium, which was before 1965, was at least 180 million acre-feet. Ground-water withdrawals were less than 400 acre-feet per year before 1970 and increased to 5,300 acre-feet per year 1976-1979. By 1980, municipal-supply pumpage is expected to exceed that for a coal-slurry pipeline. Water levels have declined throughout the confined part of the aquifer. Decline of more than 100 feet was calculated for an area of 200 square miles through 1979 and was projected for 440 square miles through 2001. In the unconfined part, project declines averaged less than 1 foot. If pumping for coal slurry stopped, most of the decline would recover within 10 years. (USGS)

  10. Geohydrology and water resources of the Papago Farms--Great Plain area, Papago Indian Reservation, Arizona, and the upper Rio Sonoyta area, Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollett, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    The Papago Farms-Great Plain and upper Rio Sonoyta study area includes about 490 square miles in south-central Arizona and north-central Sonora, Mexico. The area is characterized by a broad, deep, sediment-filled basin bounded by low, jagged fault-block mountains. The climate is arid to semiarid. The climate and abundant ground water provide favorable conditions for irrigated agriculture. Annual precipitation averages 5 to 8 inches per year on the desert floor. Runoff, which occurs as intermittent streamflow and sheetflow, is too short lived and too laden with suspended sediment to be a reliable source for irrigation or public supply. Nearly all the water used to irrigate more than 5,000 cultivated acres in the study area is withdrawn from the unconsolidated to partly consolidated basin fill. The ground water occurs in the deposits under unconfined (water-table) conditions with a saturated thickness that ranges from zero along the mountain fronts to more than 8,000 feet in the center of the basin. The amount of recoverable ground water in storage to a depth of 400 feet below the 1978-80 water table is estimated to be about 10 million acre-feet. Depths to water range from about 500 feet near the southern boundary of the study area to about 150 feet in the center of the study area. Ground water enters the area principally as underflow beneath the San Simon and Chukut Kuk Washes and as recharge along the mountain fronts. On the basis of model results, annual inflow to the ground-water system is estimated to be about 4,390 acre-feet. Ground water moves through the study area along paths that encircle a virtually impermeable unit in the basin center, termed 'the lakebed-clay deposits,' and moves westward to an outflow point beneath the Rio Sonoyta south of Cerro La Nariz. Rates of water movement range from less than I foot per year in clays to about 160 feet per year in well-sorted, coarse stream-channel deposits. Transmissivities along the basin margins range from 10

  11. Source Document of Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Indian Council, Denver, CO.

    A source document on American Indians and Alaska Natives in urban areas, produced by the National Urban Indian Council, provides historical background on relocation to cities, comments on the trust relationship for off-reservation American Indians, discusses urban Indian organizations, and gives statistical information on American Indian…

  12. Aeromagnetic expression of faults that offset basin fill, Albuquerque basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, M.R.; Minor, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over the Albuquerque basin show widespread expression of faults that offset basin fill and demonstrate that the aeromagnetic method can be an important hydrogeologic and surficial mapping tool in sediment-filled basins. Aeromagnetic expression of faults is recognized by the common correspondence of linear anomalies to surficial evidence of faulting across the area. In map view, linear anomalies show patterns typical of extensional faulting, such as anastomosing and en echelon segments. Depths to the tops of faulted magnetic layers showing the most prominent aeromagnetic expression range from 0 to 100 m. Sources related to subtler fault expressions range in depths from 200 to 500 m. We estimate that sources of the magnetic expressions of the near-surface faults likely reside within the upper 500-600 m of the subsurface. The linear anomalies in profile form show a range of shapes, but all of them can be explained by the juxta-position of layers having different magnetic properties. One typical anomaly differs from the expected symmetric fault anomaly by exhibiting an apparent low over the fault zone and more than one inflection point. Although the apparent low could easily be misinterpreted as representing multiple faults or an anomalous fault zone, geophysical analysis, magnetic-property measurements, and geologic considerations lead instead to a "thin-thick model" in which magnetic layers of different thickness are juxtaposed. The general geometry of this model is a thin magnetic layer on the upthrown block and a thick magnetic layer on the downthrown block. The thin-thick model can be represented geologically by growth faulting and syntectonic sedimentation, where relatively coarse-grained sediment (which is more magnetic than fine-grained material) has accumulated in the hanging wall. This implies that the aeromagnetic data have potential for mapping growth faults and locating concentrations of coarse-grained material

  13. The Albuquerque Story. Future Schools Study Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Robert L.; And Others

    This report summarizes chronologically a three-year ESEA Title III project to study the types of schools needed for the future. The major recommendation of the study was that an educational park should be established in the downtown area to provide enriched opportunities for pupils from widely different backgrounds and to serve as an experimental…

  14. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  15. Health and aging of urban American Indians.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, B J

    1992-01-01

    Although half of the American Indian population resides off the reservation, mostly in the western states, research on the health of urban American Indians remains sparse. American Indians living in urban areas are not eligible for the federally mandated health care provided by the Indian Health Service and receive health care services in a variety of settings. This population is at high risk for many health problems, especially cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Social, cultural, and economic barriers that impede access to health care for this group, particularly for elders living in an urban setting, could be reduced if physicians improved their understanding of and communication with American Indian patients. PMID:1413770

  16. 2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  17. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). Elevations. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  18. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). Second floor plan. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  19. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). Details. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  20. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). Entrance details. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  1. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). Basement Plan. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  2. Selenium distribution and speciation in plant parts of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) from a seleniferous area of Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Eiche, E; Bardelli, F; Nothstein, A K; Charlet, L; Göttlicher, J; Steininger, R; Dhillon, K S; Sadana, U S

    2015-02-01

    The concentration, distribution, and speciation of selenium in different parts of wheat and Indian mustard, grown in a seleniferous area in Punjab, were investigated using synchrotron based (XAS) and classical acid digestion and extraction methods. The analyses revealed a high Se enrichment in all investigated plant parts, with Se levels in the range of 133-931 mg/kg (dry weight, dw). Such high Se enrichment is mainly due to the considerable amounts of easily available Se detected in the soil, which are renewed on a yearly basis to some extent via irrigation. Speciation analysis in soil and plants indicated selenate and organic Se as major Se species taken up by plants, with a minor presence of selenite. The analyses also revealed that the highest Se enrichment occurs in the upper plant parts, in agreement with the high uptake rate and mobility of selenate within plants. In both wheat and mustard, highest Se enrichments were found in leaves (387 mg/kg·dw in wheat and 931 mg/kg·dw in mustard). Organic species (dimethylselenide and methylselenocysteine) were found in different parts of both plants, indicating that an active detoxification response to the high Se uptake is taking place through methylation and/or volatilization. The high proportion of selenate in wheat and mustard leaves (47% and 70%, respectively) is the result of the inability of the plant metabolism to completely transform selenate to non-toxic organic forms, if oversupplied. Methylselenocysteine, a common Se species in accumulating plants, was detected in wheat, suggesting that, in the presence of high Se concentration, this plant develops similar response mechanisms to accumulator plants. PMID:25461096

  3. Infiltration and quality of water for two arroyo channels, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1988-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.

    1995-01-01

    Selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were studied to collect information about the amount and quality of infiltration through arroyo channels. Infiltration rate was calculated for selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo based on instantaneous streamflow-loss volumes, wetted channel area, and instantaneous evaporation rates measured during 1988-92. Infiltration rates at Grant Line Arroyo ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 foot per day, and at Tijeras Arroyo from 2.28 to 30 feet per day. The evaporation rate ranged from one-tenth of 1 percent to 2 percent of the infiltration rate. Infiltration rates differed with the location of the reach isolated for measurement and with the time of day of the infiltration-rate measurement. Differences in intrinsic permeability of the sediments may be the most important factor affecting spatial variations in infiltration. The most important factor affecting temporal variations in infiltration may be the temperature of the water and sediment where infiltration occurs. Annual evaporation rates were greatest over saturated stream sediments and ranged from 802 to 1,025 millimeters per year or from 31.57 to 40.35 inches per year. Annual evaporation rates were least over unsaturated, unvegetated soil and ranged from 174 to 291 millimeters per year or from 6.85 to 11.46 inches per year. Annual evapotranspiration rates over grasses or shrubs or both were about one-half the rates over saturated stream sediments. Rates were similar for Grant Line and Tijeras Arroyos. The land- surface vegetation, availability of water at the land surface, availability of energy to enable a change of state from water to vapor, existence of a vapor concentration gradient, and a turbulent atmosphere to carry the vapor away may be the factors that determine the amount of evaporation and evapotranspiration. Water in Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo met U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking

  4. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  5. Results of well-bore flow logging for six water-production wells completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last several years, an improved conceptual understanding of the aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, New Mexico, has lead to better knowledge about the location and extent of the aquifer system. This information will aid with the refinement of ground-water simulation and with the location of sites for future water-production wells. With an impeller-type flowmeter, well-bore flow was logged under pumping conditions along the screened interval of the well bore in six City of Albuquerque water-production wells: the Ponderosa 3, Love 6, Volcano Cliffs 1, Gonzales 2, Zamora 2, and Gonzales 3 wells. From each of these six wells, a well-bore flow log was collected that represents the cumulative upward well-bore flow. Evaluation of the well-bore flow log for each well allowed delineation of the more productive zones supplying water to the well along the logged interval. Yields from the more productive zones in the six wells ranged from about 70 to 880 gallons per minute. The lithology of these zones is predominantly gravel and sand with varying amounts of sandy clay.

  6. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  7. 25 CFR 900.183 - Do Indian tribes and tribal organizations need to be aware of areas which FTCA does not cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort Claims Act Coverage... FTCA does not cover? Yes. There are claims against self-determination contractors which are not covered....189, claims against subcontractors arising out of the performance of subcontracts with a...

  8. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  9. Urban Indian Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greymountain, Gus; And Others

    The second of a 2 phase study, this project provided information for the non-Indian population about problems and needs of urban American Indians. Phase I (1971) discussed urban Indian experiences and trends; compared differences and highlighted issues of Indian urbanization. Phase II focused entirely on the urban Indian community. The thrust was…

  10. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  11. Project DEEP STEAM: fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel, Albuquerque, NM, November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.; Donaldson, A.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Hart, C.M.; Johnson, D.R.; Mulac, A.J.; Wayland, J.R.; Weirick, L.J.

    1981-07-01

    The Fourth Project DEEP STEAM Technical Advisory Panel Meeting was held on 5 and 6 November 1980 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to review the status of project DEEP STEAM. This Proceedings, following the order of the meeting, is divided into five main sections: the injection string modification program, the downhole steam generator program, supporting activities, field testing, and the Advisory Panel recommendations and discussion. Each of the 17 presentations is summarized, and a final Discussion section has been added, when needed, for inclusion of comments and replies related to specific presentations. Finally, the Advisory Panel recommendations and the ensuing discussion are summarized in the closing section.

  12. Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of construction drawing, U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Indian Affairs, Supervising Construction Engineer, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque, New Mexico, 7 August 1936 (original print located at Albuquerque Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Albuquerque, New Mexico). First floor plan. - Southern Ute Boarding School, Boy's Dormitory, Ouray & Capote Drives, Ignacio, La Plata County, CO

  13. Geology and ground-water resources of the Two Medicine unit and adjacent areas, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, with a section on chemical quality of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Q.F.; Zimmerman, Tom V.; Langford, Russell H.

    1965-01-01

    The Two Medicine Irrigation Unit, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of northern Montana, is irrigated by water diverted from Two Medicine Creek. Waterlogging because of overapplication of water and locally inadequate subsurface drainage is a serious problem. This study was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs to evaluate the problem and to suggest remedies. For this study, the geology was mapped, and data concerning 129 wells and test holes were gathered. The water level in 63 wells was measured periodically. Three test holes were drilled and 4 single-well and 1 multiple-well pump tests were made. Nineteen samples of ground water were collected and analyzed chemically, and applied irrigation water was analyzed periodically.

  14. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination: Rio Grande aquifer system in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Heywood, Charles E.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “the study well”). The study well produces about 3,000 gallons of water per minute from the Rio Grande aquifer system. Water samples were collected at the study well, at two other nearby public-supply wells, and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the study well. Untreated water samples from the study well contained arsenic at concentrations exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrate also were detected, although at concentrations at least an order of magnitude less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary influences on the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Albuquerque: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) groundwater development (introduction of manmade recharge and discharge sources), (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer, and (4) seasonal pumping stresses. Concentrations of the isotope carbon-14 indicate that groundwater from most sampled wells in the local study area is predominantly water that entered, or recharged, the aquifer more than 6,000 years ago. However, the additional presence of the age tracer tritium in several groundwater samples at concentrations above 0.3 tritium units indicates that young (post-1950) recharge is reaching the aquifer across broad areas beneath Albuquerque. This young recharge is mixing with the thousands-of-years-old water, is migrating to depths as great as 245 feet below the water table, and is traveling to some (but not all) of the public-supply wells sampled. Most groundwater samples containing a

  15. Integration of RGB "Dust" Imagery to Operations at the Albuquerque Forecast Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Guyer, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program has been providing unique Red-Green-Blue (RGB) composite imagery to its operational partners since 2005. In the early years of activity these RGB products were related to a True Color RGB, showing what one's own eyes would see if looking down at earth from space, as well as a Snow-Cloud RGB (i.e. False Color), separating clouds from snow on the ground. More recently SPoRT has used the EUMETSAT Best Practices standards for RGB composites to transition a wide array of imagery for multiple uses. A "Dust" RGB product has had particular use at the Albuquerque, New Mexico WFO. Several cases have occurred where users were able to isolate dust plume locations for mesoscale and microscale events during day and night time conditions. In addition the "Dust" RGB can be used for more than just detection of dust as it is sensitive to the changes in density due to atmospheric moisture content. Hence low-level dry boundaries can often be discriminated. This type of imagery is a large change from the single channel imagery typically used by operational forecast staff and hence, can be a challenge to interpret. This presentation aims to discuss the integration of such new imagery into operational use as well as the benefits assessed by the Albuquerque WFO over several documented events.

  16. USDA Programs of Interest to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to familiarize American Indian tribal leaders, planners, and community leaders with the programs available to Indians through the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this brochure provides information on program benefits, application procedures, and who to contact for further information for 49 programs in the areas of agriculture, community…

  17. Indian Child Welfare: A Multicultural Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wares, Dale M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports descriptive characteristics of American Indian child welfare programs organized to deal with new tribal responsibilities under the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978. Develops a profile of tribal program administrators based on 121 survey responses. Offers policy recommendations in areas of tribal politics, government policies and funding…

  18. Office of Indian Affairs 1985 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Commission on Indian Affairs, Santa Fe.

    The major goals of the New Mexico Office of Indian Affairs (OIA) in 1985 were to enhance Indian education concerns, aid tribes in economic development, and effectuate a smooth working relationship between state, local, and tribal governments in the spirit of and through the use of the Joint Powers Act. Advancement is reflected in all these areas.…

  19. Contemporary American Indian Women: Careers And Contributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellanger, Patricia; Reese, Lillian

    Biographies of 77 Indian women highlight professional and personal accomplishments as well as contributions to the Indian community. Biographies are arranged by area of professional achievement in eight chapters: tribal government and politics, law, administration, education, communications, special fields (the arts, armed forces, and independent…

  20. The American Indian and Environmental Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costo, Rupert

    1980-01-01

    Traces the development of federal-Indian relations as a prelude to current Indian environmental issues. Illustrates the exploitation of reservation economies by energy corporations and the federal government, especially in the area of water rights. Notes problems within tribal governments as they attempt to coexist with the 20th century. (SB)

  1. Indian Outreach Program Needs Assessment Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Don

    The Indian Outreach Program developed a questionnaire to determine the perceived postsecondary educational needs of Indian high school students and the students' perceptions of Yavapai College and its services. Nine hundred fifty surveys were mailed to high schools in the area served by the college; 328 useable questionnaires were obtained from…

  2. Three-dimensional model simulation of steady-state ground-water flow in the Albuquerque-Belen Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.; Scott, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Southwest Alluvial Basins study, model was constructed to simulate the alluvial aquifer system underlying the Albuquerque-Belen Basin. The model was used to simulate the steady-state flow condition assumed to have existed prior to 1960. Until this time there apparently were no long-term groundwater level changes of a significant magnitude outside the immediate vicinity of Albuquerque. Therefore, the construction of a steady-state flow model of the aquifer system based on reported hydrologic data predating 1960 was justified. During construction of the steady-state model, simulated hydraulic conductivity values were adjusted, within acceptable physical limits, until a best fit between measured or reported and computed heads at 34 control wells was achieved. The modeled area was divided into six sub-areas, or zones, within each of which hydraulic conductivity was assumed to be uniform. The model consisted of six layers for each of which simulated transmissivity was proportional to the layer thickness. Adjustments to simulated hydraulic conductivity values in the different zones resulted in final values that ranged from a low of 0.25 ft/day in the west to 50 ft/day in the eastern part of the basin. The error of the simulation, defined as the absolute difference between the computed and the measured or reported water level at the corresponding point in the physical system being modeled, ranged from 0.6 ft to 36 ft, with an average of 14.6 ft for the 34 control wells. (Author 's abstract)

  3. 75 FR 55824 - Land Acquisitions; Nisqually Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions; Nisqually Indian Tribe AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... accountability for approximately 179.14 acres of land at the Fort Lewis Military Reservation, Thurston County... land comprising a net area of 179.14 acres of land, more or less, situated within Thurston...

  4. Native Avatars, Online Hubs, and Urban Indian Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Gabriel S.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching American Indian literature with online resources can help diverse urban Indian and multicultural students connect with American Indian cultures, histories, and Nations. This online-enriched pedagogy adopts Susan Lobo's sense of the city as an "urban hub," or activist community center, an urban area linked to reservations in which Native…

  5. Indian Ocean analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Gary

    1992-01-01

    The background and goals of Indian Ocean thermal sampling are discussed from the perspective of a national project which has research goals relevant to variation of climate in Australia. The critical areas of SST variation are identified. The first goal of thermal sampling at this stage is to develop a climatology of thermal structure in the areas and a description of the annual variation of major currents. The sampling strategy is reviewed. Dense XBT sampling is required to achieve accurate, monthly maps of isotherm-depth because of the high level of noise in the measurements caused by aliasing of small scale variation. In the Indian Ocean ship routes dictate where adequate sampling can be achieved. An efficient sampling rate on available routes is determined based on objective analysis. The statistical structure required for objective analysis is described and compared at 95 locations in the tropical Pacific and 107 in the tropical Indian Oceans. XBT data management and quality control methods at CSIRO are reviewed. Results on the mean and annual variation of temperature and baroclinic structure in the South Equatorial Current and Pacific/Indian Ocean Throughflow are presented for the region between northwest Australia and Java-Timor. The mean relative geostrophic transport (0/400 db) of Throughflow is approximately 5 x 106 m3/sec. A nearly equal volume transport is associated with the reference velocity at 400 db. The Throughflow feeds the South Equatorial Current, which has maximum westward flow in August/September, at the end of the southeasterly Monsoon season. A strong semiannual oscillation in the South Java Current is documented. The results are in good agreement with the Semtner and Chervin (1988) ocean general circulation model. The talk concludes with comments on data inadequacies (insufficient coverage, timeliness) particular to the Indian Ocean and suggestions on the future role that can be played by Data Centers, particularly with regard to quality

  6. "A Limited Range of Motion?": Multiculturalism, "Human Questions," and Urban Indian Identity in Sherman Alexie's "Ten Little Indians"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladino, Jennifer K.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the fact that more than two-thirds of American Indians live in urban areas, many readers and scholars of American Indian literature continue to associate Indigenous peoples with natural environments rather than urban ones. Highlighting literary texts written by Native authors that reflect the multifaceted dimensions of urban Indian life is…

  7. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  8. Indian Ledger Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  9. Indians of the Dakotas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief history of Indian tribes in the States of North and South Dakota is presented. Discussion centers around individual Indian tribes, such as Chippewas and Sioux, which are representative of early and modern Indian life in these States. A section devoted to Indians in these states today offers an indication of the present condition of the…

  10. KNOW YOUR NEVADA INDIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE INDIANS OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO INDIAN EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-INDIAN SOCIETY AND THE INDIAN SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE…

  11. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  12. 25 CFR 265.1 - Definition of roadless area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Definition of roadless area. 265.1 Section 265.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE PRESERVATION ESTABLISHMENT OF ROADLESS AND WILD AREAS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 265.1 Definition of roadless area. A roadless area has been...

  13. 25 CFR 265.1 - Definition of roadless area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of roadless area. 265.1 Section 265.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE PRESERVATION ESTABLISHMENT OF ROADLESS AND WILD AREAS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 265.1 Definition of roadless area. A roadless area has been...

  14. 25 CFR 265.1 - Definition of roadless area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Definition of roadless area. 265.1 Section 265.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE PRESERVATION ESTABLISHMENT OF ROADLESS AND WILD AREAS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 265.1 Definition of roadless area. A roadless area has been...

  15. 25 CFR 265.1 - Definition of roadless area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Definition of roadless area. 265.1 Section 265.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE PRESERVATION ESTABLISHMENT OF ROADLESS AND WILD AREAS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 265.1 Definition of roadless area. A roadless area has been...

  16. 25 CFR 265.1 - Definition of roadless area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Definition of roadless area. 265.1 Section 265.1 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HERITAGE PRESERVATION ESTABLISHMENT OF ROADLESS AND WILD AREAS ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 265.1 Definition of roadless area. A roadless area has been...

  17. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  18. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  19. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian Values" relates…

  20. Title IX Program Evaluation: Corresponding with FY 98 Application for Grants. Albuquerque Public Schools, 1997-98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearns, Curt

    Title IX and Johnson O'Malley services were provided to 1,495 Native American students at 10 Albuquerque (New Mexico) elementary, middle, and high schools and the Homework Center during the 1997-98 school year. The five goals of the Title IX program were to provide: (1) intervention assistance for students, in which students, parents, and staff…

  1. Capital assets management process (CAMP) prioritization exercise for FY 1994 and FY 1995 projects at Field Office, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-16

    This report presents figures derived from a rating process to determine budget needs for projects for 1994 and 1995 at the Albuquerque Field Office. Projects for 1994 include plant life safety code upgrades, roads and parking lot upgrades, and emergency system notification replacement. Projects for 1995 include reconfiguration of inert operations, steam and condensate system upgrades, and site drainage control.

  2. Proceedings of the 1978 National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 24-27, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Transfer, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This publication contains the proceedings of the National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation held in January 1978, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The 112 papers included are organized under the following topics: (1) Legal Considerations; (2) Energy from Biomass; (3) Energy Conservation in Agriculture; (4) Status of Energy Conservation;…

  3. Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

  4. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  5. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  6. Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2006-08-01

    We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

  7. Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Pond, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode.

  8. Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  9. Cooperative Monitoring Center Occasional Paper/13: Cooperative monitoring for confidence building: A case study of the Sino-Indian border areas

    SciTech Connect

    SIDHU,WAHEGURU PAL SINGH; YUAN,JING-DONG; BIRINGER,KENT L.

    1999-08-01

    This occasional paper identifies applicable cooperative monitoring techniques and develops models for possible application in the context of the border between China and India. The 1993 and 1996 Sino-Indian agreements on maintaining peace and tranquility along the Line of Actual Control (LAC) and establishing certain confidence building measures (CBMs), including force reductions and limitation on military exercises along their common border, are used to examine the application of technically based cooperative monitoring in both strengthening the existing terms of the agreements and also enhancing trust. The paper also aims to further the understanding of how and under what conditions technology-based tools can assist in implementing existing agreements on arms control and confidence building. The authors explore how cooperative monitoring techniques can facilitate effective implementation of arms control agreements and CBMS between states and contribute to greater security and stability in bilateral, regional, and global contexts.

  10. 76 FR 73658 - Reopening the Call for Nominations for the Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... natural resources management or the natural sciences; or the public-at-large. Individuals may nominate... responsible for management of natural resources, land, or water; representatives of Indian tribes within...

  11. An Index of the Social Indicators of the American Indian in Oklahoma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.

    Facts and figures relating to American Indians in Oklahoma are presented in this manual for use by Indian tribes and by others working in the area of Indian affairs. The historical background of Oklahoma Indians is discussed, and information is presented on various characteristics, such as population, education, health and welfare, and crime and…

  12. 25 CFR 170.167 - How does a tribe obtain services from an Indian LTAP center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Local Technical Assistance Program § 170.167 How does a tribe obtain services from an Indian LTAP center? A tribe that wants to obtain services should contact the Indian LTAP center serving its service area... center? 170.167 Section 170.167 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND...

  13. Relocation and Urbanization: An Educational History of the American Indian Experience in Chicago, 1952-1972

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laukaitis, John J.

    2005-01-01

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) created the Relocation Program in 1952 to sever Indian federal trust status and impose Euro-American values on Indians all under the guise of benevolence. Led from reservations to urban areas, Indians found the problems of their reservations in their new locations: few employment opportunities, poor housing…

  14. 76 FR 33314 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Indian communities in such areas as sexually transmitted disease control and cancer prevention. They also... Urban Indian Communities Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention; Epidemiology Program for... managed by the IHS Division of Epidemiology and Disease Prevention (DEDP). This program is...

  15. 25 CFR 175.4 - Authority of area director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Authority of area director. 175.4 Section 175.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.4 Authority of area director. The Area Director may delegate authority under...

  16. 25 CFR 175.4 - Authority of area director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Authority of area director. 175.4 Section 175.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.4 Authority of area director. The Area Director may delegate authority under...

  17. 25 CFR 175.4 - Authority of area director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Authority of area director. 175.4 Section 175.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN ELECTRIC POWER UTILITIES General Provisions § 175.4 Authority of area director. The Area Director may delegate authority under...

  18. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  19. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those Bureau...

  20. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  1. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  2. 25 CFR 33.5 - Area education functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Area education functions. 33.5 Section 33.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION TRANSFER OF INDIAN EDUCATION FUNCTIONS § 33.5 Area education functions. A Bureau Area Education Programs Director shall perform those...

  3. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director. 23.34 Section 23.34 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian...

  4. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director. 23.34 Section 23.34 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian...

  5. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director. 23.34 Section 23.34 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian...

  6. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director. 23.34 Section 23.34 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian...

  7. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director. 23.34 Section 23.34 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian...

  8. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  9. Reflecting on the Past: Some Important Aspects of Indian Education To Consider as We Look toward the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tippeconnic, John W., III

    2000-01-01

    Discusses American Indian education in four critical areas: tribal control, focus and priority, language and culture, and research. These areas are complex and political due to treaty rights; sovereignty; and relationships between Indian tribes and federal, state, and local governments. Unity among Indians and making Indian education a priority at…

  10. "Indian Education in the Bureau of Indian Affairs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, James E.

    The role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in American Indian education is discussed in this speech. At the present time, this role is limited to federally recognized Indians living on reservations or Indian trust land; for other Indian students, the BIA's role is that of an advocate, helping Indian people get what they want and need in regard…

  11. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Goeff J.M. Moret; Jeffery A. Worthington; Kimberly M. Bandy-Baldwin

    2016-01-01

    The Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: (1) groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, and (2) surface water from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline more than 120 feet while water-level declines along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque were generally less than 40 feet. These differences in water-level declines in the Albuquerque area have resulted in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande.In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, acting as fiscal agent for the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico. The study provides hydrologic data in order to enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to riverside drains. The study area extends about 20 miles along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area. Piezometers and surface-water gages were installed in paired transects at eight locations. Nested piezometers, completed at various depths in the alluvial aquifer, and surface-water gages, installed in the Rio Grande and riverside drains, were instrumented with pressure transducers. Water-level and water-temperature data were collected from 2009 to 2010.Water levels from the piezometers indicated that groundwater movement was usually away from the river towards the riverside drains. Annual mean horizontal groundwater gradients in the inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.0024 (I-25 East) to 0.0144 (Pajarito East). The median hydraulic conductivity values of the inner valley alluvial aquifer, determined from slug tests, ranged from 30

  12. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  13. 78 FR 16685 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ]...

  14. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...

  15. Indian Education Project: An Abridgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Sharon

    Synthesizing two priority proposals identified by the Indian Education Project of Michigan, this report outlines a proposal for establishing an Indian Education Center (staffed by American Indians and advised by a University Advisory Committee made up of Indian parents and the Indian community) to meet the needs of Indian students and…

  16. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  17. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  18. National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen Kay

    2006-01-01

    This report includes information from the National Indian Education Study of American Indian/Alaska Native students in grades 4 and 8 on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) in reading and mathematics. The national sample includes both public and private schools (i.e. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Defense Education…

  19. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  20. Minnesota Indian Resources Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Catherine M., Comp.; And Others

    The second edition of the directory of organizations operating in the Indian communities throughout the State of Minnesota is an attempt to compile all current information on resources available to the Minnesota Indian. The introductory section discusses the problems faced by the Indian American in urban sectors with reference to their life styles…

  1. Vicariant patterns of fragmentation among gekkonid lizards of the genus Teratoscincus produced by the Indian collision: A molecular phylogenetic perspective and an area cladogram for Central Asia.

    PubMed

    Macey, J R; Wang, Y; Ananjeva, N B; Larson, A; Papenfuss, T J

    1999-08-01

    A well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis is presented for gekkonid lizards of the genus Teratoscincus. Phylogenetic relationships of four of the five species are investigated using 1733 aligned bases of mitochondrial DNA sequence from the genes encoding ND1 (subunit one of NADH dehydrogenase), tRNA(Ile), tRNA(Gln), tRNA(Met), ND2, tRNA(Trp), tRNA(Ala), tRNA(Asn), tRNA(Cys), tRNA(Tyr), and COI (subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase). A single most parsimonious tree depicts T. przewalskii and T. roborowskii as a monophyletic group, with T. scincus as their sister taxon and T. microlepis as the sister taxon to the clade containing the first three species. The aligned sequences contain 341 phylogenetically informative characters. Each node is supported by a bootstrap value of 100% and the shortest suboptimal tree requires 29 additional steps. Allozymic variation is presented for proteins encoded by 19 loci but these data are largely uninformative phylogenetically. Teratoscincus species occur on tectonic plates of Gondwanan origin that were compressed by the impinging Indian Subcontinent, resulting in massive montane uplifting along plate boundaries. Taxa occurring in China (Tarim Block) form a monophyletic group showing vicariant separation from taxa in former Soviet Central Asia and northern Afghanistan (Farah Block); alternative biogeographic hypotheses are statistically rejected. This vicariant event involved the rise of the Tien Shan-Pamir and is well dated to 10 million years before present. Using this date for separation of taxa occurring on opposite sides of the Tien Shan-Pamir, an evolutionary rate of 0.57% divergence per lineage per million years is calculated. This rate is similar to estimates derived from fish, bufonid frogs, and agamid lizards for the same region of the mitochondrial genome ( approximately 0.65% divergence per lineage per million years). Evolutionary divergence of the mitochondrial genome has a surprisingly stable rate across vertebrates. PMID

  2. 77 FR 21568 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Overview Information: Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health...

  3. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; McCoy, Kurt J.; More, Geoff J.M.; Worthington, Jeffrey A.; Bandy-Baldwin, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque, New Mexico, area has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system and surface water from the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project. From 1960 to 2002, groundwater withdrawals from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system have caused water levels to decline more than 120 feet in some places within the Albuquerque area, resulting in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a detailed characterization of the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande riparian corridor in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to provide hydrologic data and enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to the riverside drains. A simple conceptual model of flow indicates that the groundwater table gently slopes from the Rio Grande towards riverside drains and the outer boundaries of the inner valley. Water infiltrating from the Rio Grande initially moves vertically below the river, but, as flow spreads farther into the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer, flow becomes primarily horizontal. The slope of the water-table surface may be strongly controlled by the riverside drains and influenced by other more distal hydrologic boundary conditions, such as groundwater withdrawals by wells. Results from 35 slug tests performed in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer during January and February 2009 indicate that hydraulic-conductivity values ranged from 5 feet per day to 160 feet per day with a median hydraulic-conductivity for all transects of 40 feet per day. Median annual horizontal hydraulic gradients in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.011 to 0

  4. Geostatistical analysis of hydraulic conductivity of the Upper Santa Fe Group, Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskauff, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    A regional groundwater flow model has been developed to be used as a management tool for the Albuquerque Basin. It is crucial to recognize the impact of the inherent uncertainty in aquifer hydrogeology when applying the model, and an understanding of the effects of uncertainty can be accomplished using a probabilistic approach to address the role of natural variability of aquifer properties on management strategies. Statistical analysis shows that the hydraulic conductivity data is moderately skewed to the right, but is not lognormal. Geostatistical analysis revealed zonal anisotropy oriented due north-south, which is directly related to the flow direction of the ancestral Rio Grande which laid down the Upper Santa Fe Group deposits. The presence of multiple depositional environments within the Upper Santa Fe Group violates the assumption of stationarity. This can be circumvented by choosing the simulation search radius so that local stationarity holds, or by separating the basin into two portions to be simulated separately and then combined for flow model analysis.

  5. Demographic correlates of paternity confidence and pregnancy outcomes among Albuquerque men.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kermyt G; Kaplan, Hillard; Lancaster, Jane B

    2006-12-01

    We examine the demographic correlates of paternity confidence, or men's assessment of the likelihood that they are the genetic father of a particular child. Evolutionary theory predicts that men will provide less parental investment for putative genetic offspring who are unlikely to be their actual offspring, but confidence of paternity has not been as extensively examined as its importance would merit. Using self-reported data on paternity confidence in 3,360 pregnancies reported by men living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, we find that low paternity confidence is more common among unmarried couples and for unplanned pregnancies. We also find that men are more likely not to state paternity confidence (i.e., they refuse to answer the question) if a pregnancy is unplanned. We additionally examine the pregnancy outcomes associated with confidence of paternity. We find that low paternity confidence pregnancies are significantly more likely to be aborted, and pregnancies for which paternity confidence is unstated are more likely to be aborted or to miscarry. Both abortion and miscarriage are associated with unmarried couples, with unplanned pregnancies, and with couples who have fewer children together. PMID:16685730

  6. Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. National Register of Historic Places.

    This guide provides history and social studies teachers, at all grade levels, with information and activities about the American Indians of the Northern Plains who lived in the area of the Knife River where it enters the Missouri River. Located in what is now North Dakota, this area is the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. The…

  7. Rock magnetic characterization of faulted sediments with associated magnetic anomalies in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in rock magnetic properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies that are spatially associated with faults that cut Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of the Santa Fe Group and prerift Eocene and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks document large variations of magnetic properties juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault. Mean volume magnetic susceptibilities generally increase upsection through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the prerift Eocene and Cretaceous rocks to 9.9E-4-1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group to 1.5E-3-3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Rock magnetic measurements and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite within the Santa Fe Group sediments are the predominant controls of their magnetic property variations. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size within the members of the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within members of the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group. Both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of groundwater through permeable zones. Magnetic models for geologic cross sections that incorporate mean magnetic susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault and demonstrate that the stratigraphic level of dominant magnetic contrast changes with

  8. Analyzing the Broken Ridge area of the Indian Ocean using magnetic and gravity anomaly maps and geoid undulation and bathymetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazarewicz, A. R.; Sailor, R. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A higher resolution anomaly map of the Broken Ridge area (2 degree dipole spacing) was produced and reduced to the pole using quiet time data for this area. The map was compared with equally scaled maps of gravity anomaly, geoid undulation, and bathymetry. The ESMAP results were compared with a NASA MAGSAT map derived by averaging data in two-degree bins. A survey simulation was developed to model the accuracy of MAGSAT anomaly maps as a function of satellite altitude, instrument noise level, external noise model, and crustal anomaly field model. A preliminary analysis of the geophysical structure of Broken Ridge is presented and unresolved questions are listed.

  9. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  10. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  11. Conceptual and numerical models of groundwater flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation area, South Dakota, water years 1980-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Kyle W.; Putnam, Larry D.; LaBelle, Anneka R.

    2015-01-01

    The numerical model is a tool that could be used to better understand the flow system of the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers, to approximate hydraulic heads in the aquifer, and to estimate discharge to rivers, springs, and seeps in the Pine Ridge Reservation area in Bennett, Jackson, and Shannon Counties. The model also is useful to help assess the response of the aquifer to additional stress, including potential increased well withdrawals and potential drought conditions.

  12. The Indian Child Welfare Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Katy Jo

    The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (I.C.W.A.) is federal legislation which preempts state law whenever Indian children may be removed from their families. The I.C.W.A. permits Indian tribal courts to decide the future of Indian children, establishes minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children from their families, requires that…

  13. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C....

  14. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  15. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  16. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and injuries that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque (SNL-AL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at SNL-AL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The annual report for 1995 has been redesigned from reports for previous years. Most of the information in the previous reports is also in this report, but some material now appears in the appendices instead of the main body of the report. The information presented in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site and the appendices provide more detail. A new section of the report presents trends in health over time. The Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories have been expanded with more examples of diagnoses to illustrate the content of each category. The data presented here apply only to SNL-AL. The DOE sites are varied, so comparisons of SNL-AL with other DOE sites should be made with caution. It is important to keep in mind that many factors can affect the completeness and accuracy of health information collected at the sites as well as affect patterns of illness and injury observed.

  17. Indians: An Introduction to Canada's Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Hope

    An introduction to Canada Natives briefly identifies the seven different culture areas which existed in Canada before the white man came, and the Indian tribes who lived in those areas. The booklet then gives more extensive description of the history and culture of the Huron (farmers of the Eastern Woodlands), the Blackfoot (Plains), the Ojibwa…

  18. Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-09-01

    This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

  19. Superficial mineral resources of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiquie, H. N.; Gujar, A. R.; Hashimi, N. H.; Valsangkar, A. B.

    The sea floor of the Indian Ocean and the continental margins bordering the ocean are covered by a wide variety of terrigenous, biogenous and anthigenic mineral deposits The humid tropical climate of some of the land areas bordering the Indian Ocean accelerates weathering of the source rocks. This coupled with the large river runoff and wave and current conditions favour the formation of a variety of placer deposits. The beach and offshore placer deposits of the Indian Ocean may be some of the largest in the world. The biogenous deposits in the Indian Ocean comprise the corals on shallow banks and on the continental shelves and the oozes in the deep sea. A study of these deposits is needed to acquire a better understanding of their formation, turnover, regeneration rates and sustainable yields. The anthigenic deposits in the Indian Ocean comprise the phosphorites and the polymetallic nodules. Occurrences of phosphorite deposits have been found both along continental margins (South Africa and Western India) and around seamounts (Eastern and Western Indian Ocean). The continental margins of South Africa, East Africa, Southern Arabia, Western India and the Andamans are marked by strong upwelling and provide non-depositional environments which are conducive to the formation of phosphorite. The polymetallic nodules in the Indian Ocean cover an area of 10-15. 10 6 km 2 and the resources are estimated to be about 1.5 .10 11 tonnes. A study of over 900 chemical analyses from 350 stations shows that the deposits in most of the basins are submarginal; in the Central Indian Ocean they are paramarginal (Ni + Cu + Co > 2.4% and concentrations > 5 kg.m -2). Most of the exploration for minerals even on the continental margins of the Indian Ocean has been carried out by the developed countries from outside the region and little work has been carried out by the countries bordering the Indian Ocean. The development of capabilities within the region for exploration of the mineral

  20. Geology of the Early Arikareean sharps formation on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and surrounding areas of South Dakota and Nebraska.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Thomas H; Dibenedetto, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    Based on geologic mapping, measured sections, and lithologic correlations, the local features of the upper and lower type areas of the Early Arikareean (30.8-20.6 million years ago) Sharps Formation are revised and correlated. The Sharps Formation above the basal Rockyford Member is divided into two members of distinct lithotypes. The upper 233 feet of massive siltstones and sandy siltstones is named the Gooseneck Road Member. The middle member, 161 feet of eolian volcaniclastic siltstones with fluvially reworked volcaniclastic lenses and sandy siltstone sheets, is named the Wolff Camp Member. An ashey zone at the base of the Sharps Formation is described and defined as the Rockyford Ash Zone (RAZ) in the same stratigraphic position as the Nonpareil Ash Zone (NPAZ) in Nebraska. Widespread marker beds of fresh water limestones at 130 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation and a widespread reddish-brown clayey siltstone at 165 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation are described. The Brown Siltstone Beds of Nebraska are shown to be a southern correlative of the Wolff Camp Member and the Rockyford Member of the Sharps Formation. Early attempts to correlate strata in the Great Plains were slow in developing. Recognition of the implications of the paleomagnetic and lithologic correlations of this paper will provide an added datum assisting researchers in future biostratigraphic studies. Based on similar lithologies, the Sharps Formation, currently assigned to the Arikaree Group, should be reassigned to the White River Group. PMID:23110098

  1. Geology of the Early Arikareean Sharps Formation on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and Surrounding Areas of South Dakota and Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, Thomas H.; DiBenedetto, Joseph N.

    2012-01-01

    Based on geologic mapping, measured sections, and lithologic correlations, the local features of the upper and lower type areas of the Early Arikareean (30.8–20.6 million years ago) Sharps Formation are revised and correlated. The Sharps Formation above the basal Rockyford Member is divided into two members of distinct lithotypes. The upper 233 feet of massive siltstones and sandy siltstones is named the Gooseneck Road Member. The middle member, 161 feet of eolian volcaniclastic siltstones with fluvially reworked volcaniclastic lenses and sandy siltstone sheets, is named the Wolff Camp Member. An ashey zone at the base of the Sharps Formation is described and defined as the Rockyford Ash Zone (RAZ) in the same stratigraphic position as the Nonpareil Ash Zone (NPAZ) in Nebraska. Widespread marker beds of fresh water limestones at 130 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation and a widespread reddish-brown clayey siltstone at 165 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation are described. The Brown Siltstone Beds of Nebraska are shown to be a southern correlative of the Wolff Camp Member and the Rockyford Member of the Sharps Formation. Early attempts to correlate strata in the Great Plains were slow in developing. Recognition of the implications of the paleomagnetic and lithologic correlations of this paper will provide an added datum assisting researchers in future biostratigraphic studies. Based on similar lithologies, the Sharps Formation, currently assigned to the Arikaree Group, should be reassigned to the White River Group. PMID:23110098

  2. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  3. Protecting American Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act has caused concern and misunderstanding among social workers. The Act is seen as a victory for tribal sovereignty but must be viewed within the context of American Indian culture and child rearing practices. (Author/JAC)

  4. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  5. The Tarascan Indian House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces K-grade three students to Mexican Indian architecture. Students will become familiar with the cultural context of the Indian treasure house; discuss the use of wood as the sole building material; compare the treasure house with present day structures; and create miniature treasure houses using wood materials. (GEA)

  6. America's Indian Statues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E., Comp.

    A comprehensive compilation of facts and photographs of statues honoring or memorializing the American Indians is presented in this paperback. The vignettes accompanying the photographs are the result of extensive research. Examples of the American Indian statues include "The Signal of Peace,""The Protest,"" The Medicine Man,""Appeal to the Great…

  7. The (East) Indian Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Josephine

    The focus of this paper is on the social, cultural, and psychological problems women of East Indian origin share with other immigrant women in Canada. Also examined are problems that are unique to the East Indian woman and the ways in which she deals with the challenges, conflicting cultural values, and expectations that confront her. The…

  8. Pima Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  9. The Omaha Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly recounting the history of the Omaha American Indians, this article makes a plea for relocation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs local Agency in Macy near the Omaha reservation, suggesting that the Returned Students movement is a response to this need for the Agency's relocation. (JC)

  10. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  11. Indian Inuit Pottery '73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A unique exhibit of Canadian Native Ceramics which began touring various art galleries in September 1973 is described both verbally and photographically. The Indian Inuit Pottery '73 display, part of the 1973 International Ceramics Exhibition, includes 110 samples of craftsmanship from Indian and Inuit artists across Canada. (KM)

  12. Indians in Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollow, Kitty, Ed.; Heuving, Jeanne, Ed.

    Every student in high school is faced with the question of what to do after graduation. American Indian students, whether on or off reservations, need ideas as to what is available to them. This compilation of interviews with 10 individuals who are maintaining their "Indian identity" and making contributions in the working world provides role…

  13. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1972-73 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    The Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs (ACIA) 1972-73 Annual Report studies conditions among American Indians residing in Arizona. The commission also has the responsibility for improving communications, understanding, and working relationships between all concerned. Another goal is to promote understanding and fellowship in the areas of Indian…

  14. Making Sense of Work on the Wind River Indian Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Garth M.

    2004-01-01

    The cycle of employment and unemployment among Indians living on the Wind River Indian Reservation (WRIR), a two-million-acre reservation in west central Wyoming, is examined. Five areas of inquiry are analyzed quantitatively: the structure of employment and unemployment, contributing factors to unemployment, obstacles to re-employment,…

  15. Expanding the Circle: Decreasing American Indian Mental Health Disparities through Culturally Competent Teaching about American Indian Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mays, Vickie M.; Gallardo, Miguel; Shorter-Gooden, Kumea; Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Smith, Monique; McClure, Faith; Puri, Siddarth; Methot, Laurel; Ahhaitty, Glenda

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing that there has been a lack of systematic teaching about the unique mental health experiences of urban American Indians, this article examines data from national studies and specific case studies to illustrate some issues regarding the mental health of American Indians in urban areas. Some studies have reported that when American…

  16. 25 CFR 273.25 - Deadline for Area Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deadline for Area Office action. 273.25 Section 273.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT Application Process § 273.25...

  17. 25 CFR 273.23 - Submitting application to Area Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Submitting application to Area Office. 273.23 Section 273.23 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT Application Process §...

  18. 25 CFR 273.25 - Deadline for Area Office action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deadline for Area Office action. 273.25 Section 273.25 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT Application Process § 273.25...

  19. 25 CFR 273.23 - Submitting application to Area Office.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Submitting application to Area Office. 273.23 Section 273.23 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT Application Process §...

  20. 78 FR 15797 - Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster #NC-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Disaster NC-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration... Assistance Only for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (FEMA-4103-DR), dated 03/01/2013. Incident: Severe... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Areas: Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Associated...

  1. Report of the Subcommittee on Indian Education to the Federal Interagency Committee on Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Interagency Committee on Education, Washington, DC. Subcommittee on Indian Education.

    Five areas concern the Subcommittee on Indian Education for 1979. First, there is lack of coordination at the funding level and the operations level among the many federal agencies and programs involved in providing early childhood education services to Indians. The feasibility of establishing a National Center for Early Childhood Indian Education…

  2. West Indians in New York City and London: A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foner, Nancy

    1979-01-01

    Several factors help to explain why West Indians in the United States are occupationally more successful than West Indians in Britain: (1) the history of West Indian migration to Britain and the United States; (2) the occupational background and achievements of the migrants; and (3) race relations in the two receiving areas. (Author/MC)

  3. Ohoyo Training Manual. Leadership: Self Help American Indian-Alaska Native Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verble, Sedelta D.; Walton, M. Frances

    The training manual provides self-help in six areas of leadership development for American Indian and Alaska Native women. Following an introduction describing how to use the manual are six chapters focusing on the theories and development of leadership skills, the vulnerability of Indian women to poverty, nontraditional careers for Indian women,…

  4. Public opinion and interest group positions on open-space issues in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Implications for resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannery, Thomas Allan

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to elicit and compare the open-space preferences of citizens and openspace experts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. A randomly selected sample of 492 citizens and 35 open-space experts participated in a telephone survey during May 5 18, 1986. The following hypothesis was tested and used as a guideline for the study: HO1: There is no significant difference between respondents' status and preference for open space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis was rejected. Findings confirmed respondents' status affected preference for open space. Of the eight issues on which the citizen and expert groups were compared, five recorded significant differences in response profiles. The open-space expert group was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate offroad vehicle facilities, wildlife preserves, a citywide recreational trail, and a trail system along the arroyos and city ditches. The citizen sample was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate overnight camping facilities. Both groups equally supported using open space to accommodate an outdoor amphitheater, outdoor education facilities, and rafting, kayaking, and canoeing facilities. The finding indicated that expert preferences did not represent an aggregate of citizen preferences for managing open-space resources. Understanding both expert and citizen positions will facilitate decision-making processes and help resolve environmental disputes.

  5. Information About Indians of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toothman, Maryann; Jensen, Denise

    An intermediate or junior high level unit on Indians indigenous to Iowa focuses on history, culture, and cultural conflict between the Indians and white Americans. Many of the materials can be adapted for use in other states or for a more general unit on American Indians. Twenty lessons cover the location of Iowa; prehistoric Iowa; Indian society…

  6. 75 FR 68823 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendment. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Amendments to the Class III Gaming Compact (Amendment) between the State of Oregon and the Siletz Indians...

  7. 78 FR 11221 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  8. 78 FR 15738 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  9. 77 FR 76513 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  10. 77 FR 43110 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  11. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approved Compact between... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy...

  12. 75 FR 8108 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Tribal-State Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada Governing Class III...

  13. 75 FR 55823 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  14. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming..., 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  15. 76 FR 8375 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Gaming..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  16. 76 FR 52968 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  17. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  18. 77 FR 45371 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  19. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  20. 76 FR 65208 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an Approval of the Gaming..., Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic...

  1. 76 FR 33341 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  2. 78 FR 44146 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Amended and Restated Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians and...

  3. 78 FR 26801 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin and...

  4. 76 FR 56466 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming...: September 13, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian...

  5. New Indian Tribalism. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Kathleen

    The purposes of this paper are to identify the problems Washington State Indians face and to provide considerations that might assist in promoting the welfare and well-being of American Indians. It is stated that the major barrier to the Indian's success in American society is the attitude of the Anglo towards the Indian. Thus, the programs and…

  6. Federal Financing of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loon, Eric Van

    Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American Indian education under Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, Indian Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of Indian education. However, factors contributing to abuse of…

  7. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  8. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  9. 76 FR 8743 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ] CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, and 93.972. DATES:...

  10. 78 FR 78976 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, AND 93.972 Key...

  11. Inhabiting Indianness: Colonial Culs-de-Sac

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnd, Natchee Blu

    2010-01-01

    This article offers original research on the national use of Indian-themed street names in residential areas, with an analysis of the content and commentary on the spatial implications. In addition to the research on the quality and quantity of such spatial markers, the author situates this data in relation to the racial composition of the…

  12. Telepsychiatry for Treating Rural American Indian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin, Daniel; Garry, Mark T.; Zuccaro, Paula; Novins, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Of all of the medical specialties, child and adolescent psychiatry has the most severe shortage of practitioners. This shortage is even more pronounced in economically disadvantaged and rural areas. The American Indian population is younger, more economically disadvantaged, and more rural than the general U.S. population (United States Census…

  13. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  14. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  15. Indian Alcoholism and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Wayne; Patch, Kenneth

    1981-01-01

    Educational programs about alcohol should be presented in the formal school setting for Indian youth and in the communities for the general population. The primary outcome of these programs would be the development of self-management skills. (Author)

  16. ARIZONA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Arizona. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. A...

  17. REGION 9 INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada). Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location...

  18. NEVADA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Nevada. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. As...

  19. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  20. Tourism and Indian Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    A cursory review of Federal support to the Eastern Cherokees shows that the Cherokee Historical Association and not the Cherokee Indians are the recipients and beneficiaries of many Federal grants. (JC)

  1. Meningococcal disease among children of Indian subcontinent ethnic origin.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J M; Doughty, I; Marshall, R; Benson, J

    2000-06-10

    The rate of meningococcal septicaemia and meningitis was significantly lower in children of Indian subcontinent ethnic origin than in children of other origins over 12 years in the Blackburn area of the UK. PMID:10885362

  2. Science with Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, T. P.; Anupama, G. C.

    Indian Astronomical Observatory, Hanle, is the high altitude (4500 m above msl) observatory operated by the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore. The 2-m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) installed in the autumn of 2000 as a first step towards a national large telescope is operated remotely from Bangalore. HCT data has resulted in 70 research publications till date, with average citations of 9.2 per paper. Some of the results are described in this brief review. The development of this high altitude site has also attracted other facilities in the area of Very High Energy gamma ray astronomy using atmospheric Čerenkov technique, and also in earth sciences.

  3. 75 FR 38112 - Organization, Functions, and Delegations of Authority; Part G; Indian Health Service; Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...; Indian Health Service; Proposed Functional Statement Program Integrity and Ethics Staff (PIES) (GAL1) (1... the IHS Director, to functional area managers at IHS Headquarters in developing, modifying,...

  4. The Aberdeen Indian Health Service Infant Mortality Study: Design, Methodology, and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Leslie L.; Krogh, Christopher; Welty, Thomas K.; Willinger, Marian; Iyasu, Solomon

    2001-01-01

    Of all Indian Health Service areas, the Aberdeen Area has consistently had the highest infant mortality rate. Among some tribes in this area the rate has exceeded 30/1000 live birth and half the infant deaths have been attributed to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a rate four to five times higher than the national average. The Indian Health Service,…

  5. Simulated Groundwater Flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree Aquifers, Rosebud Indian Reservation Area, South Dakota-Revisions with Data Through Water Year 2008 and Simulations of Potential Future Scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.

    2010-01-01

    The Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers are important water resources in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area and are used extensively for irrigation, municipal, and domestic water supplies. Drought or increased withdrawals from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area have the potential to affect water levels in these aquifers. This report documents revisions and recalibration of a previously published three-dimensional, numerical groundwater-flow model for this area. Data for a 30-year period (water years 1979 through 2008) were used in steady-state and transient numerical simulations of groundwater flow. In the revised model, revisions include (1) extension of the transient calibration period by 10 years, (2) the use of inverse modeling for steady-state calibration, (3) model calibration to base flow for an additional four surface-water drainage basins, (4) improved estimation of transient aquifer recharge, (5) improved delineation of vegetation types, and (6) reduced cell size near large capacity water-supply wells. In addition, potential future scenarios were simulated to assess the potential effects of drought and increased groundwater withdrawals. The model comprised two layers: the upper layer represented the Ogallala aquifer and the lower layer represented the Arikaree aquifer. The model's grid had 168 rows and 202 columns, most of which were 1,640 feet (500 meters) wide, with narrower rows and columns near large water-supply wells. Recharge to the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers occurs from precipitation on the outcrop areas. The average recharge rates used for the steady-state simulation were 2.91 and 1.45 inches per year for the Ogallala aquifer and Arikaree aquifer, respectively, for a total rate of 255.4 cubic feet per second (ft3/s). Discharge from the aquifers occurs through evapotranspiration, discharge to streams as base flow and spring flow, and well withdrawals. Discharge rates for the steady-state simulation were 171

  6. Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), Albuquerque Service Center (ASC) Dispute Resolution in Special Education through Mediation. Parent/School and Mediator's Manual. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John

    2007-01-01

    Parents and school staff usually agree upon issues regarding evaluation, eligibility, program, and placement of students with disabilities. However, there are times when disagreement occurs. Disagreements and conflict are often inevitable, but they need not produce negative results. Mediation in special education is a process to assist parents and…

  7. Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), Albuquerque Service Center (ASC) Due Process Hearing Officer Manual. Resolution Session and Due Process Hearing Procedures in Special Education. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copenhaver, John

    2007-01-01

    Due process is a set of procedures that seeks to ensure fairness of education decisions and accountability, for both parents and educational professionals. The due process hearing provides a forum where disagreements about the identification, evaluation, educational placement, and provision of a free appropriate public education for students with…

  8. A Report of the Final Session of the National Bilingual/Bicultural Institute (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 28-December 1, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, Elias R., Comp.

    Attending the National Bilingual Bicultural Education Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico on November 28-December 1, 1973, were 1,300 representatives from 25 states. Among the institute's objectives were: (1) to review present and pending state bilingual bicultural education legislation and appropriations; and (2) to develop new directions for…

  9. Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  10. Technological Alternatives in Learning; Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western College Reading Association (6th; Albuquerque, April 12-14, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerstiens, Gene, Ed.

    The thirty papers in this Annual Proceedings of the Western College Reading Association (WCRA) were originally delivered at the Sixth Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Topics covered include self-programed control, increasing study-concentration behavior, individualizing a college reading program, human options for human beings,…

  11. Evaluation of machine guarding pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 9, 1991--December 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted December 9--13 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the first pilot course taught. Additionally, this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Included is a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  12. Evaluation of machine guarding pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 9, 1991--December 13, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted December 9--13 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the first pilot course taught. Additionally, this report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Included is a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  13. Evaluation of American Indian Science and Engineering Society Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl Project

    SciTech Connect

    AISES, None

    2013-09-25

    Engineering Fair (NAISEF) and EXPO at the Albuquerque, NM Convention Center. Albuquerque is also the home of the AISES national office. The AISES staff also recruits volunteers to assist with implementation of the science and math bowl event. In 2011, there were 7 volunteers; in 2012, 15 volunteers, and in 2013, 19 volunteers. Volunteers are recruited from a variety of local sources, including Sandia Laboratories, Southwest Indian Polytechnic Institute students, Department of Defense, as well as family members of AISES staff. For AISES, the goals of the Intertribal Middle School Science and Math Bowl project are to have more Native students learn science, for them to gain confidence in competing, and to reward their effort in order to motivate them to pursue studies in the sciences and engineering. For DOE, the goals of the project are to get more Native students to compete at the National Science Bowl, held in Washington, DC.

  14. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  15. Young Once, Indian Forever: Youth Gangs in Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James; Lim, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Not unlike mainstream society of the United States, Indian Country faces new challenges regarding the values, mores, and behavior of its young people. Since their first encounters with European explorers, American Indians have fought to preserve their culture and traditions. Federal policies that addressed the "Indian problem" by establishing…

  16. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  17. Indian Tales of the Northern Rockies. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Coyote, Sally; Toineeta, Joy Yellowtail

    Part of the Montana Council for Indian Education's Indian Culture Series, the book contains six folk stories recorded on reservations and by headstart teachers. The stories are: "The Owl", a Gros Ventre tale; "How the Robin Got a Red Breast", from the Flathead Tribe; "Old Man Coyote and the Wild Geese", a Crow Indian folk story; "How the Animals…

  18. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation... Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...

  19. Hamlin Garland and the Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Lonnie E.

    1974-01-01

    Written to stimulate interest in an evaluation of Hamlin Garland's total production of work on the American Indian, this article suggests a reevaluation of some of Garland's work in light of the current interest in American Indian studies. (JC)

  20. Teaching about Indians? Use the Real Stuff!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldkamp-Price, Betsy; Smith, David Lee

    1994-01-01

    Provides suggestions for teaching students about American Indians. Teachers need to learn more about Indians; confront misconceptions and stereotypes; have students make Indian crafts and foods; play Indian games; learn about contemporary Indian culture; be critical of resources; and contact local Indian or cultural groups. (MDM)

  1. Indian womanhood: some psychological concepts.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  2. Indian Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts*

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  3. The impact of North Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures on the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Richard; Turner, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The relationship between sea surface temperature (SST) in the North Indian Ocean and Indian monsoon rainfall is investigated in both observational/re-analyses and climate model simulations. We focus on the partially land-enclosed Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal, where SSTs are found to have significant correlations with All Indian Rainfall (AIR). This part of the Indian Ocean is therefore important for monsoon predictions, while this area tends to provide significant problems in coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations. The observational variability of the SST-rainfall relationship is investigated on seasonal to decadal time-scales. This highlights a predominantly negative correlation over the monsoon trough area in North East India and a positive correlation over the rest of India, while these relationships are found to be weakened by the ENSO-monsoon teleconnection. Mechanisms are further investigated by performing a series of atmosphere-only model simulations using the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM). In these experiments we determine the response of the atmosphere to forced cold SST anomalies over isolated areas, which we also extend out into the equatorial Indian Ocean. The cold SSTs in the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal lead to a dramatic reduction in Indian rainfall, while cold biases in the equatorial Indian Ocean have the opposite effect, highlighting the competition between oceanic and continental Tropical Convergence Zones (TCZ). However, the impacts for the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal experiments are found to change between the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon onset periods.The impact on monsoon rainfall for cold SST biases in these regions is found to be the result of a balance between changes in regional low-level temperature gradients and the availability of moisture over the oceans, which determine the pathway of the monsoon jet and the moisture transport towards India. These experiments suggest that the intra-seasonal variability of the relationship

  4. Partnering in Research: A National Research Trial Exemplifying Effective Collaboration With American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q.; Copeland, Kenneth C.; Daniel, Mary R.; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A.; Felton, Beverly A.; Khan, Sohail I.; Saunkeah, Bobby R.; Wharton, David F.; Payan, Marisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  5. Partnering in research: a national research trial exemplifying effective collaboration with American Indian Nations and the Indian Health Service.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Jennifer Q; Copeland, Kenneth C; Daniel, Mary R; Erb-Alvarez, Julie A; Felton, Beverly A; Khan, Sohail I; Saunkeah, Bobby R; Wharton, David F; Payan, Marisa L

    2014-12-15

    Despite the fact that numerous major public health problems have plagued American Indian communities for generations, American Indian participation in health research traditionally has been sporadic in many parts of the United States. In 2002, the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) and 5 Oklahoma American Indian research review boards (Oklahoma City Area Indian Health Service, Absentee Shawnee Tribe, Cherokee Nation, Chickasaw Nation, and Choctaw Nation) agreed to participate collectively in a national research trial, the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescence and Youth (TODAY) Study. During that process, numerous lessons were learned and processes developed that strengthened the partnerships and facilitated the research. Formal Memoranda of Agreement addressed issues related to community collaboration, venue, tribal authority, preferential hiring of American Indians, and indemnification. The agreements aided in uniting sovereign nations, the Indian Health Service, academics, and public health officials to conduct responsible and ethical research. For more than 10 years, this unique partnership has functioned effectively in recruiting and retaining American Indian participants, respecting cultural differences, and maintaining tribal autonomy through prereview of all study publications and local institutional review board review of all processes. The lessons learned may be of value to investigators conducting future research with American Indian communities. PMID:25389367

  6. End-of-life care: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Himanshu; Jagdish, Vankar; Anusha, Prabhakaran; Bharti, Sharma

    2013-01-01

    According to Hinduism, the main religion of India, the end-of-life (EOL) deals with good and bad death. The WHO definition of palliative care stresses on improving not only the quality of life of patients facing incurable diseases but also their families by providing relief from the pain and suffering that includes the psychosocial and spiritual needs as well. The Indian Society of Palliative Care has been doing a commendable work and appreciable efforts are being done by the Kerala model of delivering the EOL care. The spiritual, ethical issues and ethical challenges raised when the patients are in terminal phase are also reviewed keeping in mind the socio-cultural norms. The Indian Penal Code (IPC) has lacunae, which hamper the physicians from taking proper decision in the EOL care. Some of the sections like IPC 309 are defunct and need to be changed. The Indian Society for Critical Care Medicine has developed a position statement on the patient management of the terminally ill patient in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) which states that the society should move from the paternalistic model to the share based decision model of the West when deciding the fate of such patients. The literature review on the Indian research on palliative care shows very little emphatic results and the medical under graduates show illiteracy. To strengthen it Medical Council of India has included the palliative care in its curriculum by starting a PG course. Literature review revealed that more research from Indian perspective should be done in this area. This article studies the core issues of developing palliative care in Indian setting keeping in mind the ethical, spiritual and legal issues. PMID:23858271

  7. End-of-life care: Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Himanshu; Jagdish, Vankar; Anusha, Prabhakaran; Bharti, Sharma

    2013-01-01

    According to Hinduism, the main religion of India, the end-of-life (EOL) deals with good and bad death. The WHO definition of palliative care stresses on improving not only the quality of life of patients facing incurable diseases but also their families by providing relief from the pain and suffering that includes the psychosocial and spiritual needs as well. The Indian Society of Palliative Care has been doing a commendable work and appreciable efforts are being done by the Kerala model of delivering the EOL care. The spiritual, ethical issues and ethical challenges raised when the patients are in terminal phase are also reviewed keeping in mind the socio-cultural norms. The Indian Penal Code (IPC) has lacunae, which hamper the physicians from taking proper decision in the EOL care. Some of the sections like IPC 309 are defunct and need to be changed. The Indian Society for Critical Care Medicine has developed a position statement on the patient management of the terminally ill patient in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) which states that the society should move from the paternalistic model to the share based decision model of the West when deciding the fate of such patients. The literature review on the Indian research on palliative care shows very little emphatic results and the medical under graduates show illiteracy. To strengthen it Medical Council of India has included the palliative care in its curriculum by starting a PG course. Literature review revealed that more research from Indian perspective should be done in this area. This article studies the core issues of developing palliative care in Indian setting keeping in mind the ethical, spiritual and legal issues. PMID:23858271

  8. Indian Child Welfare in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull Knife Memorial Coll., Lame Deer, MT.

    This report is based upon a 1985-86 survey conducted by the Dull Knife Memorial College Indian Child Welfare Project. A series of workshops were conducted throughout Montana to acquaint providers of services for abused and neglected Indian children with the requirements of and issues associated with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.…

  9. Directory of American Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. Inst. for Human Development.

    This directory provides general information on American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and lands. The information was compiled from several resources including the "Federal Register," the Bureau of Indian Affairs, "The Native American Almanac" (A. Hirschfelder, M. K. de Montano), the "Atlas of North American Indian Tribes" (Carl Waldman), the…

  10. Literature of the Indian Subcontinent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimock, Edward C., Jr.

    Indian literature is intimately bound up with the Indian religious system. The earliest sacred writings are the Vedas. In addition to being poetry on nature, and later on, ritual formulae for controlling the universe, the Vedas have philosophical speculation. A large part of classical Indian literature consists of writing commentaries on…

  11. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  12. The Indian in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The treatment of American Indians is discussed historically with reference to the 4 principal methods used to create or perpetuate false impressions: obliteration, defamation, disembodiment, and disparagement. Indian contributions to American civilization are cited in contrast with historical references to Indians in textbooks. The author suggests…

  13. 78 FR 33435 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendments. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of an Agreement to Amend the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Salt River Pima- Maricopa...

  14. 78 FR 54670 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  15. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... of Approval in the Federal Register on February 23, 2010 (47 FR 44678). This agreement allows for the... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the...

  16. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the agreement between the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and the State of Montana concerning Class III Gaming (Compact)....

  17. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Tribal-State gaming compact between the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES: Effective...

  18. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  19. 77 FR 41200 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the Department of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the State of California and the...

  20. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval of the Amendment to the Amended and Restated Tribal-State Compact for Regulation of Class III...

  1. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Gaming... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  2. 78 FR 54908 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Wiyot Tribe and the State of California. DATES:...

  3. 77 FR 5566 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact Taking Effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  4. 78 FR 17428 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and the State of...

  5. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Amended Gaming Compact between the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe and the State of North Dakota; the Amended Gaming...

  6. 78 FR 62650 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  7. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact (Amendment), between the Tunica- Biloxi Tribe...

  8. 78 FR 78377 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  9. A History of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon; Eder, Jeanne

    The goal of assimilating American Indians into an alien culture seemed inevitable as superior weaponry and foreign diseases conquered the Indians. Only in the 20th century has serious consideration been given to allowing Indians to choose their own destiny. Using many excerpts from historical accounts, this book describes educational efforts by…

  10. Index to Literature on the American Indian, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jeannette, Ed.

    An alphabetical index by author and subject area, this volume indexes both popular and scholarly periodical and book literature published about the American Indian for the year 1973. The volume covers 88 subject areas and 119 periodicals. Periodicals in existence for less than a year and newspapers are not included. Among the subject areas are:…

  11. Resisting the Script of Indian Education: Zitkala Sa and the Carlisle Indian School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enoch, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    Offers a "definition" of Zitkala Sa as an Indian teacher who, at the turn of the 20th century, challenged and countered educational norms that silenced Indian voices and erased Indian culture. Examines her autobiographical essays, "Impressions of an Indian Childhood,""The School Days of an Indian Girl," and "An Indian Teacher among Indians," in…

  12. 25 CFR 36.51 - Standard XVIII-Office of Indian Education Programs and Agency monitoring and evaluation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Agency monitoring and evaluation responsibilities. 36.51 Section 36.51 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS... AND NATIONAL CRITERIA FOR DORMITORY SITUATIONS Evaluation of Educational Standards § 36.51 Standard... Office of Indian Education Programs shall monitor and evaluate the conformance of each Agency or Area,...

  13. 76 FR 13431 - Major Portion Prices and Due Date for Additional Royalty Payments on Indian Gas Production in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Indian Leases'' (64 FR 43506). The gas valuation regulations apply to all gas production from Indian... 30 CFR, chapter XII (75 FR 61051), effective October 1, 2010.) If additional royalties are due based... Indian Gas Production in Designated Areas Not Associated With an Index Zone AGENCY: Office of...

  14. College Bound American Indian Math and Science Enrichment Program (AIMS). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI), was founded in 1971 and is located on 164 acres in northwest Albuquerque, New Mexico in the center of New Mexico`s agricultural and high-tech corridors. SIPI became accredited as a community college in 1993, serves Native Americans nationwide, and is governed by a nationally-tribally appointed Board of Regents (Jicarilla Apache, Joint Oklahoma Tribes, Mescalero Apache, Navajo Nation-Arizona, Navajo Nation-New Mexico, Ten Southern Pueblos, and Eight Northern Pueblos, Southern Ute, Inter-tribal Council of Arizona, and Oglala Sioux). In 1993, The US Department of Education, TRIO Programs no longer funded the Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI) Summer Math and Science Enrichment Program. However, with US Department of Energy funding SIPI was able to continue service to the Native American community under the new title of College Bound American Indian Math and Science (AIMS) Enrichment Program. This new program continued the goals and objectives of the TRIO program with an expanded focus that included students from more Native American communities nationwide. The program also interfaced with a teacher enrichment program (Rural American Indian Science Education-RAISE) sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Sandia National Labs (SNL). SIPI in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National (LLNL) Laboratory established a mathematics and science enrichment program at SIPI for students attending rural high schools serving predominantly Native American populations. The primary goal of the program was to provide 9th--12th grade students, mostly Native American, the skills and knowledge, interest and motivation, and strategies to remain in high school and pursue a college education in a math, science, or technology based field. Each year, the program included a six-week intensive residential summer program located at SIPI as well as academic year support activities at the

  15. Native Indian Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Felicity

    1988-01-01

    Identifies valued qualities and behaviors of Indian leaders through a literature review and unstructured interviews with three British Columbian tribal elders. Develops a model of Native leadership emphasizing connection to the people, wisdom, humility, personal integrity, service orientation, and the facilitator role. Contains 22 references. (SV)

  16. Indians of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The booklet gives a general introduction to American Indians in New Mexico. Covering historical background and present status, reports are given for these tribes: the 19 Pueblos (i.e., Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, and Zuni), the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apaches, and the Navajos. Also included are 26 places of interest such as Acoma…

  17. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  18. Early Indian People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doermann, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Using bits and pieces of the past such as charred bits of wood from campfires, broken pieces of clay pots, stone spearpoints and arrowheads, and shell or copper ornaments, the archaeologist tries to put together the story of early Indian people in the Minnesota region. A short story, one of eight articles, re-creates the kill of an Itasca bison…

  19. Indian Reserved Water Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the distribution, ownership, and water usage associated with lands in the Colville Reservation in Washington State. Cites specific cases which addressed the reserved water rights doctrine. Assesses the impact of court decisions on insuring water rights for Indians living on the Colville Reservation. (ML)

  20. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  1. Indians of the Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Bannock, Cayuse, Coeur d'Alene, Kutenia, Kalispel, Palouse, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Yakima, Spokane, Klamath, Sanpoil, Nespelem, Colville, Quinault, Quileute, Makahs, Klallam, Lummi, Cowlit, Puyallup, Nisqually, and Nez Perce Indian tribes of the Northwestern United States are…

  2. Downriver Indians' Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Exline, Jesse

    Yurok Indian legends in Yurok Unifon text include English translations of the entire texts in order to produce fluent reading for English speakers and a continuous text for Yurok readers. Although corresponding sentences are numbered, translation is not word-for-word or sentence-for-sentence. The five stories refer to a time when animals could…

  3. Indian School Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age from 4 to…

  4. Great Indian Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastron, Allen

    Brief biographies and pen and ink portraits of over 40 chiefs and other distinguised American Indians comprise this book. Each page contains a full page portrait and a biography that notes tribal affiliation, important dates, geographical location, major accomplishments, and dealings with other tribes, white settlers, and the United States or…

  5. Indians of Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Health and Welfare, Augusta.

    The relationships between the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy Indian Tribes and the State of Maine began in the 1820's. Treaties have left the Penobscot tribe with ownership of 146 islands in the Penobscot River while the Passamaquoddy tribe lives on land owned by the State. Both tribes presently have trust funds derived from the sale of land, and use…

  6. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Navajo, Apache, Hopi, Pima, Papago, Yuma, Maricopa, Mohave, Cocopah, Havasupai, Hualapai, Yavapai, and Paiute Indian tribes of Arizona are presented. Further information is given concerning the educational, housing, employment, and economic development taking place on the…

  7. American Indian Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  8. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Published by the U.S. Department of the Interior, this brief booklet on the historical development of the Cherokee Nation emphasizes the Tribe's relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its improved economy. Citing tourism as the major tribal industry, tribal enterprises are named and described (a 61 unit motor court in existence since…

  9. American Indian Education: One Indian Teacher's View or New Directions in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiger, Flo

    1987-01-01

    Flo Wiger, Chairperson, Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota/Minneapolis, shares her experiences and views on Indian Education. Dropout rates; higher enrollment; more relevant curricula; increased Indian faculty and staff availability; and community, tribal, and governmental involvement are included. Educational change to…

  10. Indian naval development: Power projection in the Indian Ocean. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, A.M.

    1990-12-01

    This thesis examines the U.S.-India relationship in the context of a world power interacting with the predominant regional power. The growing Indian military's power projection and nuclear weapons capability make the Indian Ocean region a critical area for American foreign policy during the next decade. New Delhi's desire to be a hegemonic power in the region combined with the U.S. military drawdown in reaction to the changing strategic environment could threaten long-term U.S. interests. The United States can no longer afford to remain relatively disinterested in the region and must develop a comprehensive policy to promote regional security and stability.

  11. 1980 Census Supplementary Questionnaire Program. A Statistical Profile of the American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of the Census (DOC), Suitland, MD. Population Div.

    This profile provides data from the 1980 census on American Indians, Eskimos, and Aleuts in the total U.S. population, on American Indian reservations, and in historic areas of Oklahoma (excluding urbanized areas). Bar graphs illustrate data on (1) the overall population; (2) population by geographic region; (3) population by standard federal…

  12. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, INDIAN CREEK (CANYON COUNTY), IDAHO 1976-1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indian Creek drainage (17050114) is located in the Boise River Basin of Southwest Idaho. This study was concerned with the portion of Indian Creek near the Nampa and Caldwell urban areas. Major land uses in the area are associated with urban development and irrigated agricu...

  13. Special Report of the Ombudsman for Alberta Re: Complaints of the Lubicon Lake Indian Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Office of the Ombudsman, Edmonton.

    The Ombudsman for Alberta investigated five allegations raised by the Lubicon Lake Indian Band: (1) that provincial officials had deliberately allowed fires in the Band's traditional area to rage unchecked; (2) that provincial and oil company workers had been instructed to bulldoze deliberately Indian traplines and to scare game out of the area by…

  14. Feeling Blue in the South Valley: A Case Study of Nitrate Contamination in Albuquerque's South Valley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines, by way of a case study, a community where groundwater has been highly contaminated with nitrate and how that situation brings together matters of public policy, environmental justice, and emerging technology. The Mountain View community lies in an unincorporated area of Bernalillo County, New Mexico; the neighborhood is 77%…

  15. 75 FR 6813 - Approval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-11

    ... nonattainment area for carbon monoxide (CO) on November 6, 1991 (see 56 FR 56694). As a moderate nonattainment..., 1993 (58 FR 62535). On April 14, 1995, the Governor of New Mexico submitted a request to EPA to... 13, 1996 (61 FR 29970). On July 21, 2005,\\1\\ we approved revisions to the New Mexico SIP...

  16. Computer simulation of storm runoff for three watersheds in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutilla, R.L.; Veenhuis, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Rainfall-runoff data from three watersheds were selected for calibration and verification of the U.S. Geological Survey's Distributed Routing Rainfall-Runoff Model. The watersheds chosen are residentially developed. The conceptually based model uses an optimization process that adjusts selected parameters to achieve the best fit between measured and simulated runoff volumes and peak discharges. Three of these optimization parameters represent soil-moisture conditions, three represent infiltration, and one accounts for effective impervious area. Each watershed modeled was divided into overland-flow segments and channel segments. The overland-flow segments were further subdivided to reflect pervious and impervious areas. Each overland-flow and channel segment was assigned representative values of area, slope, percentage of imperviousness, and roughness coefficients. Rainfall-runoff data for each watershed were separated into two sets for use in calibration and verification. For model calibration, seven input parameters were optimized to attain a best fit of the data. For model verification, parameter values were set using values from model calibration. The standard error of estimate for calibration of runoff volumes ranged from 19 to 34 percent, and for peak discharge calibration ranged from 27 to 44 percent. The standard error of estimate for verification of runoff volumes ranged from 26 to 31 percent, and for peak discharge verification ranged from 31 to 43 percent.

  17. Description of piezometer nests and water levels in the Rio Grande Valley near Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.; Bullard, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four piezometers were installed from mid-October 1984 to mid-January 1985 in two sections of the Rio Grande valley near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Each cross section is comprised of four piezometer nests and each nest is comprised of three piezometers completed at different depths. The purpose of this report is to describe the piezometers nests and present some of the water level data collected from the piezometers. The piezometers were drilled using the hydraulic rotary method. The piezometers were completed with 5 feet of 60-slot wire-wound stainless steel well screen and flush joint PVC well casing. The description of each piezometer nest consists of the location of the particular piezometer nest; a figure showing the location, depth altitude, and station identification number of the piezometers in each nest; and a driller 's log, geophysical logs, and description of the well cuttings from the deepest borehole in each piezometer nest. Water level altitudes generally increased from February until June 1985 in the piezometers in the Rio Bravo section. Water level altitudes in piezometers completed at different depths in a particular nest are about the same in all of the Rio Bravo nests and in the Montano 1 nest. In several of the piezometer nests, especially the Montano nests, water level altitudes decrease with depth. (USGS)

  18. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Nursing Program Announcement Type: Competing Continuation. Funding... (OPHS) is accepting competitive cooperative agreement applications for the American Indians into...

  19. Indian scales and inventories.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, S

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  20. Indian scales and inventories

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, S.

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  1. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  2. 25 CFR 273.45 - Indian preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian preference. 273.45 Section 273.45 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT General Contract Requirements § 273.45...

  3. 25 CFR 273.45 - Indian preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian preference. 273.45 Section 273.45 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT General Contract Requirements § 273.45...

  4. Ecological organization of Indian society.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, M

    1991-01-01

    Some of the factors involved in securing the well being of an Indian rural population in a sustainable and environmentally sound fashion are discussed. Population pressure on the land and declining productivity threaten the balance between man and nature. The options are to provide outside technological inputs and/or to empower the rural population who may be able to provide an intimate knowledge of the local environment and must be organized and motivated to value and protect their resource base. Attention in paid to the Indian caste system, resource use diversification, group size and range, group dynamics, elites and the ecosystem, the drain on rural resources, the iron triangle of beneficiaries of subsidies, of administrators of subsidies, and of politicians, and the growing strife. The Indian caste system is differentiated by its subgroups which maintain communication within the subgroup, and resource access is determined by an individual's affiliation with the subgroup. It is not a smooth continuum between subgroups. Inequalities in resource access can create social tensions and/or partitioning of resources. The example is given of the subgroups Gavlis and Kunbis, in the Western Ghats in Pune district of Maharashtra, where exchanges are made for livestock or surplus grain, and the multicaste system of 40 subgroups in Uttara Kannada, with occupations specific to each subgroup. In order to function effectively as a subgroup the numbers must be limited or splinter groups develop. Several estimates of possible ranges are given, i.e., an upper limit of 10,000 or the equivalent of a subcaste and 10-20 endogenous groups/larger village with an area of 1000 km. Mergers and group splits are described among the Gavlis in Western Ghat and Tirumal Nadivallas and settlers of the Andaman Islands. Historically, communities were self-sufficient and surrounded elite communities; they had their own self-government and organized local resources for sustainable use, even though

  5. 76 FR 58076 - Designation of the Indian Mujahideen, Also Known as Indian Mujahedeen, Also Known as Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM), as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant... known as Indian Mujahidin, also known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM). Therefore,...

  6. 24 CFR 1003.101 - Area ONAP allocation of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... funds will be allocated based upon each Area ONAP's share of the total eligible Indian population; (ii... of poverty among the eligible Indian population; and (iii) Twenty percent (20%) of the funds will be... Indian population. (b) HUD will use other criteria to determine an allocation formula for...

  7. Complex network analysis of extreme precipitation over the Indian subcontinent.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Indian monsoon is a large scale pattern in the climate system of the Earth. The motivation of our work was to reveal spatial structures in strong precipitation over the Indian subcontinent, and their evolution during the year, because it is crucial as for understanding of monsoon regularities as well for India's agriculture and economy. We present an analysis of extreme rainfall over the Indian peninsula and Sri Lanka. Using the method of event synchronization we constructed networks of extreme rainfall events(heavier than the 90-th percentile) for three time periods: during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM, June-September), the Northeast monsoon (NEM, October - December, so called winter monsoon) and period before the summer monsoon (January - May). Obtained networks show how extreme rainfall for specific areas in India is synchronized with extreme rainfall for other areas in India. Analysis of degree centrality of the networks reveals clusters of extreme rainfall events in India which are strongly connected to maximal number of other areas with extreme rainfall events, e.g., North Pakistan and the Eastern Ghats. Additionally, betweenness centrality shows areas that are important in the sense of water transport in the networks (e.g. the Himalayas, Western Ghats, Eastern Ghats etc.). By comparison of networks before the summer monsoon, during summer and winter monsoon season we determined how spatial patterns of rainfalls synchronization change during the year. These changes play a crucial role in the organization of the rainfall all over the Indian subcontinent.

  8. Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

  9. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  10. Spatial patterns and temporal variability in water quality from City of Albuquerque drinking-water supply wells and piezometer nests, with implications for the ground-water flow system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2002-01-01

    Water-quality data for 93 City of Albuquerque drinking-water supply wells, 7 deep piezometer nests, and selected additional wells were examined to improve understanding of the regional ground-water system and its response to pumpage. Plots of median values of several major parameters showed discernible water-quality differences both areally and with depth in the aquifer. Areal differences were sufficiently large to enable delineation of five regions of generally distinct water quality, which are consistent with areas of separate recharge defined by previous investigators. Data for deep piezometer nests indicate that water quality generally degrades somewhat with depth, except in areas where local recharge influenced by evapotranspiration or contamination could be affecting shallow water. The orientations of the five water-quality regions indicate that the direction of ground-water flow has historically been primarily north to south. This is generally consistent with maps of predevelopment hydraulic heads, although some areas lack consistency, possibly because of differences in time scales or depths represented by water quality as opposed to hydraulic head. The primary sources of recharge to ground water in the study area appear to be mountain-front recharge along the Sandia Mountains to the east and the Jemez Mountains to the north, seepage from the Rio Grande, and infiltration through Tijeras Arroyo. Elevated concentrations of many chemical constituents in part of the study area appear to be associated with a source of water having large dissolved solids, possibly moving upward from depth. Hydraulic-head data for deep piezometer nests indicate that vertical head gradients differ in direction and magnitude across the study area. Hydraulic-head gradients are downward in the central and western parts of the study area and upward across much of the eastern part, except at the mountain front. Water-quality data for the piezometers indicate that the ground water is not

  11. An 40Ar/39Ar age for Geomagnetic Instability Recorded at the Albuquerque Volcanoes and Pringle Falls, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Kirby, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Geissman, J. W.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2005-12-01

    The timing and frequency of short-lived geomagnetic events, including excursions and aborted reversal attempts, provide important observational constraints on models of geodynamo behavior as well as calibration points for stratigraphic and paleoclimatic age models derived from marine sediments. The number of potential geomagnetic events during the Quaternary period has proliferated as more detailed paleodirectional and paleointensity data have emerged from sediments worldwide. Yet, determining ages for these events remains a challenge because astronomical dating of sediment cores is subject to assumptions and non-systematic errors that are difficult to quantify and vary from core to core. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology applied to lava flows or ash falls that record geomagnetic excursions can yield radioisotopic ages sufficiently precise to verify individual events, test correlations among seemingly disparate events, and quantify periods between events. Seventeen furnace incremental heating experiments on 100-200 mg groundmass samples from six sites in the transitionally magnetized basalt of the Albuquerque Volcanoes yield an isochron of 211 ± 22 ka* that is within error of previous K-Ar (155 ± 94 ka) and U-Th isochron (156 ± 58 ka) age determinations, but is 3 to 4 times more precise. At Pringle Falls, Oregon, Ash D was deposited during the onset of an excursion recorded by a lacustrine sediment sequence. Sixteen laser incremental heating experiments on 20-40 mg samples of plagioclase crystals from Ash D gave 64 concordant plateau age points that define an 40Ar/39Ar isochron of 211 ± 13 ka which is an order of magnitude more precise than the isochron (198 ± 118 ka) associated with the published plateau age from a single plagioclase age spectrum (221 ± 20 ka). Although the Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) recorded by the Albuquerque Volcanoes lies near, bot not on, the VGP path of the Pringle Falls excursion, these two sites are 15 arc degrees apart and need not record

  12. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen to the northern Indian Ocean from the Indian monsoonal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, M. S.; Prasad, V. R.; Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Reddy, N. P. C.; Hemalatha, K. P. J.; Rao, Y. V.

    2015-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON) were measured in 27 major and medium monsoonal estuaries along the Indian coast during southwest monsoon in order to understand the spatial variability in their concentrations and fluxes to the northern Indian Ocean. A strong spatial variability (~20-fold) in DOC and DON was observed in the Indian monsoonal estuaries due to variable characteristics of the catchment area and volume of discharge. It is estimated that the Indian monsoonal estuaries transport ~2.37 ± 0.47 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g) of DOC and ~0.41 ± 0.08 Tg of DON during wet period to the northern Indian Ocean. The Bay of Bengal receives 3 times higher DOC and DON (1.82 and 0.30 Tg, respectively) than the Arabian Sea (0.55 and 0.11 Tg). Catchment area normalized fluxes of DOC and DON were found to be higher in the estuaries located in the southwestern than the estuaries from other regions of India. It was attributed to relatively higher soil organic carbon, biomass carbon, and heavy rainfall in catchment areas of the rivers from the former region. It has been noticed that neither catchment area nor discharge volume of the river controls the fluxes of DOC and DON to the northern Indian Ocean. Since the total load of DOC and DON is strongly linked to the volume of discharge, alterations in the freshwater discharge due to natural or anthropogenic activities may have significant influence on organic matter fluxes to the Indian coastal waters and its impact on microbial food web dynamics needs further evaluation.

  13. Three-dimensional model simulation of transient ground-water flow in the Albuquerque-Belen Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.; Miller, Ryan S.; Scott, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    A three-dimensional digital model that simulates transient flow in the alluvial aquifer system underlying the Albuquerque-Belen Basin, New Mexico, was constructed as part of a regional aquifer study of the southwest alluvial basins. The model simulates hydraulic heads and changes in hydraulic heads for 1907 to 1979. Hydraulic-conductivity values used in the accepted model range from 0.25 ft/day in part of the Santa Fe Group to 50 ft/day in the fluvial deposits in the Rio Grande flood plain. The majority of the basin-fill material of the Santa Fe group of Tertiary and Quaternary age was modeled as having a horizontal hydraulic conductivity of either 30 or 40 ft/day. The simulated specific storage of the aquifer was 0.000001/ft and the simulated specific yield was 0.10. The aquifer was simulated as being vertically anisotropic with a ratio of vertical to horizontal hydraulic conductivity of 1:500. Simulations for 1976-79 indicated that of the 100,000 acre-ft of groundwater withdrawn annually from the basin-fill deposits outside of the Rio Grande flood plain, 68% was obtained from recharge around the basin margin, depletion of streams that are tributary to the Rio Grande, and the stream-aquifer system in the Rio Grande flood plain. Depletion of aquifer storage accounted for 25% of the groundwater supply to wells outside of the flood plain, and the remaining 7% was obtained by induced groundwater inflow from the Santo Domingo Basin. The model displayed an acceptable performance throughout the period of simulation. However, by the end of the simulation period, 1979, the portrayal of the Rio Grande flood-plain system as a specified hydraulic-head boundary was having adverse effects on the simulation. (Author 's abstract)

  14. Indians as Resources: The Changing Relationship between Indians and Anthropologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    Traditional academic or curatorial associations with North American Indians--treating them as informants, subjects, students, or specimens--is no longer sufficient because these associations imply unequal relations with anthropologists and curators in the superior position. Indians now want, expect, and demand equality; and new relationships are…

  15. Tishomingo folio, Indian Territory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taff, Joseph A.

    1903-01-01

    The Tishomingo quadrangle is bounded by meridians 96° 30' and 97° and parallels 34° and 34° 30', and occupies one-quarter of a square degree of the earth's surface.  It is 34.5 miles long north and south and 28.58 miles wide, and contains about 986 square miles.  It lies in the southeastern part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory, the eastern edge being nearly 3 miles west of the Choctaw-Chickasaw boudary line, and the southern side about 3 miles north of the nearest approach of Red River.

  16. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  17. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  18. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  19. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians. DATES: Effective Date: December 28, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION..., the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians and the State of California submitted Amendment I to the Class... Amendment to the Tribal-State Compact between the State of California and the Coyote Valley Band of...

  20. Hemoglobin patterns in American Indians.

    PubMed

    POLLITZER, W S; CHERNOFF, A I; HORTON, L L; FROEHLICH, M

    1959-01-23

    Two populations of North Carolina have been analyzed for hemoglobin patterns by paper electrophoresis. Of 534 Cherokee Indians, both mixed and full bloods, all showed normal hemoglobin. Lumbee Indians of less certain ethnic status had 1.7 percent of hemoglobin S, an equal amount of hemoglobin C, and one possible hemoglobin D trait among 1332 bloods studied. PMID:13624709

  1. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  2. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  3. Teaching English to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    Many practices in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools were negative, but this paper emphasizes the positive efforts that were made throughout their history, especially in regard to teaching English. The Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879, encouraged the use of English through an English language student newspaper and frequently…

  4. Handbook for Indian Parent Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louise; Gelardi, Sal

    The 1980 handbook defines parental involvement and elaborates on the functions and authority of parent committees. Funding sources which are most likely to require American Indian parent committees are identified as: Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title I; Johnson-O'Malley; and Indian Education, Title IV-A. Information is provided on:…

  5. American Indian Literacy and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    2004-01-01

    Literacy, which has only positive connotations in most cultures, has long been associated in Native communities with colonial education, "the reculturing and reeducation of American Indians by the secular and religious institutions of colonizing nations." Early educators imposed literacy on Indian children attending government-organized boarding…

  6. NEW APPROACH TO INDIAN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRYDE, JOHN F.

    RECENT RESEARCH INDICATES THAT THE EXCESSIVE NATIONAL INDIAN DROPOUT RATE IS NOT WHOLLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE VALUE CONFLICT CREATED WHEN INDIAN YOUTH ENTER THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM, BUT IS ALSO RELATED TO THE IDENTIFICATION PROBLEM EXPERIENCED BY THESE YOUNGSTERS. THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS RESEARCH WAS TO DETERMINE THE POSSIBLE CAUSES OF WHAT IS…

  7. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Approved Amendment to the Tribal-State Compact between the State of Oregon and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua... engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. On July 12, 2012, the State of Oregon and the Cow... February 8, 2007. Amendment I re-configures the Board of Trustees of the Cow Creek Umpqua Indian...

  8. Trends in Indian Health, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives living on or near federal reservations (about 60 percent of the Native population). This publication is composed primarily of data tables and graphs that describe…

  9. "Red Power" and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, G. Louis

    The document is the result of research conducted on 14 Indian reservations and one settlement in the Southwest, Midwest, West, and Pacific Northwest by Illinois State University in the summer of 1970. Some 124 Indians were interviewed, many of whom were leaders and participants in various Red Power organizations. As noted, the dominant impression…

  10. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Anita

    The Carlisle Indian Industrial School was the first off-reservation boarding school and began the social experiment of assimilation of Native Americans into American culture. For almost 40 years, from 1879 to 1918, the school sought to civilize "savage" Indian children. Richard H. Pratt, founder of the school, believed that the school was the…

  11. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…

  12. American Indians and the Urban Experience. Contemporary Native American Communities 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, Susan, Ed.; Peters, Kurt, Ed.

    Over half of all American Indian people living in the United States now live in urban areas, but few books and little research have addressed urban Indian themes. This book compiles research, scholarly writing, poetry, prose, and artwork concerned with the Native urban experience. Of specific educational interest are chapters on the role of…

  13. 78 FR 52987 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has concluded that existing exemptions from its regulations, ``Fire Protection Program for Nuclear Power Facilities Operating Prior to January 1, 1979,'' for Fire Areas ETN-4 and PAB-2, issued to Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (the licensee), for operation of Indian Point Nuclear Generating Unit 3 (Indian Point 3), located in Westchester County,......

  14. Adolescence--A Tough Time for Indian Youth. What Can We Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Nancy

    This brief booklet, based on interviews with Gay Munsell, a Native American child development specialist, with the National Resource Center for Youth Services at the University of Oklahoma, examines the difficulties experienced by Indian youth in confronting the problems and changes of adolescence. In urban areas, 80% of Indian youth drop out of…

  15. 33 CFR 110.73b - Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla. 110.73b Section 110.73b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.73b Indian River at Vero Beach, Fla. (a)...

  16. 77 FR 21793 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; Loan Guarantee for Indian Housing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ..., rehabilitation or refinance of 1- to 4-family homes to be owned by Native Americans in restricted Indian lands or... as a result lenders would be unable to provide financing to Native Americans. Members of affected... lenders to Native American borrowers on ``Indian areas.'' DATES: Comments due date: June 11,...

  17. Astronomy in Indian Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, V. B.

    Tradition of astronomy in India goes back to ancient times. Many festivals and rituals are associated with astronomical phenomena. Indian children start learning rudiments of astronomy from primary classes. But primary teachers are not equipped to handle this subject so not much learning actually takes place. The first serious interface with astronomy occurs when children reach class X when they are 15 years old. Till last year astronomy was there in class XII also but it has now been dropped. This is a serious setback for the study of astronomy. In class X astronomy forms part of general science. Since children at this stage are not proficient in physics and mathematics the subject remains descriptive though there are useful activities for children to do. However the teachers are not equipped to handle this subject and there is no help in the form of visual material. So the subject remains neglected. The Indian astronomical community can help by training teachers and providing visual material. It must also urge authorities to reintroduce astronomy in class XII if astronomy is to flourish in India. Moreover India needs to network with developing countries share experiences with them and evolve a strategy that promotes astronomy.

  18. West Indian amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Fasler, J. J.; Rose, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    A series of 21 patients admitted to St Thomas' Hospital, Medical Ophthalmology Unit, with a diagnosis of West Indian or West African amblyopia is reported. Patients were investigated for haematological, biochemical, serological, and radiological abnormalities and particular attention was paid to dietary history. Patients admitted in recent years also underwent neurophysiological investigations. No definite correlation between visual loss and dietary or family history was found, and there was no evidence that the improvement in vision which occurred in just under half the patients on follow-up was related to treatment with hydroxocobalamin or multivitamins. Visual-evoked responses in 4 patients showed a prolonged latency suggesting optic nerve demyelination, while in only one case was the electro-oculogram definitely subnormal. These findings contrast with those in 'toxic' amblyopias and suggest that the syndrome of West Indian amblyopoa may be due to bilateral optic nerve demyelination of unknown aetiology rather than the effect of toxic substances or nutritional deficiency on the retina. PMID:7443605

  19. Indian Tribes as Developing Nations; A Question of Power: Indian Control of Indian Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    The report discusses how Indian tribes can conserve and develop their own resources at their own pace and explores the options available to them as owners of valuable natural resources. Discussed are problems encountered by tribal leaders with various government agencies; the basic precepts of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; how the problems of…

  20. Assessment of controls layout of Indian tractors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Adarsh; Bhaskar, Gaikwad; Singh, J K

    2009-01-01

    Tractors in low-income countries are used both for farm and non-farm activities. Most of the tractors being manufactured in India are products of collaboration with other countries. The design of tractors manufactured in India has not changed much in the past five decades especially from an ergonomics point of view, because of economic considerations. This paper describes a tractor control layout assessment with respect to the Indian population and compares the location of controls with workspace envelopes and the IS12343 standard for commonly used tractors on Indian farms. Controls like steering, foot clutch, foot brake, foot accelerator are located in areas defined by IS12343 standard in some tractors but these are not placed in the workspace envelopes of the Indian population. This results in a mismatch between the workspace envelope and location of controls as defined by the standard. The controls need a complete change in their layout to be in the workspace envelopes, as this cannot be achieved by providing seat movement in the horizontal and vertical directions in the present tractor design. PMID:18339354

  1. Pirate attacks affect Indian Ocean climate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Shawn R.; Bourassa, Mark A.; Long, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Pirate attacks in the Gulf of Aden and the Indian Ocean off the coast of Somalia nearly doubled from 111 in 2008 to 217 in 2009 [International Maritime Bureau, 2009, International Maritime Bureau, 2010]. Consequently, merchant vessel traffic in the area around Somalia significantly decreased. Many of these merchant vessels carry instruments that record wind and other weather conditions near the ocean surface, and alterations in ship tracks have resulted in a hole sized at about 2.5 million square kilometers in the marine weather-observing network off the coast of Somalia. The data void exists in the formation region of the Somali low-level jet, a wind pattern that is one of the main drivers of the Indian summer monsoon. Further, a stable, multidecadal record has been interrupted, and consequently, long-term analyses of the jet derived from surface wind data are now showing artificial anomalies that will affect efforts by scientists to identify interannual to decadal variations in the climate of the northwestern Indian Ocean.

  2. Lithospheric Mantle Deformation beneath the Indian Cratons.

    PubMed

    Pandey; Agrawal

    1999-11-01

    The nature of deformation of the deep continental roots beneath the Archean-Early Proterozoic terrains opens the question whether these ancient terrains have had stable roots since the Precambrian or whether recent plate motions have deformed them. In view of this, we make an attempt to study the thermal structure beneath the cratonic regions of the Indian shield, which vary in lithospheric thickness from 65 km in the Singhbhum craton to 148 km in the Archean Dharwars. The average depth of 104 km to the top of the underlying asthenosphere is consistent with other termination methods and is in fact less than half the 200-400-km depth found in other stable areas of the earth. Similarly, the average reduced heat flow of about 35 mW/m2 and Moho temperature of about 550 degrees C (range: 400 degrees -730 degrees C) for the Indian cratons are also much higher than their counterparts elsewhere. Our study indicates a large-scale deformation of the cratonic mantle lithosphere beneath the Indian shield since the Mesoproterozoic caused by various geodynamic causes, challenging the idea of stability of deep continental roots. PMID:10517883

  3. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: Indian enigma

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vatsala; Pandey, Renu; Misra, Sri Prakash; Dwivedi, Manisha

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram negative microaerophilic bacterium which resides in the mucous linings of the stomach. It has been implicated in the causation of various gastric disorders including gastric cancer. The geographical distribution and etiology of gastric cancer differ widely in different geographical regions and H. pylori, despite being labeled as a grade I carcinogen, has not been found to be associated with gastric cancer in many areas. Studies in Asian countries such as Thailand, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Iran, Saudi Arabian countries, Israel and Malaysia, have reported a high frequency of H. pylori infection co-existing with a low incidence of gastric cancer. In India, a difference in the prevalence of H. pylori infection and gastric cancer has been noted even in different regions of the country leading to a puzzle when attempting to find the causes of these variations. This puzzle of H. pylori distribution and gastric cancer epidemiology is known as the Indian enigma. In this review we have attempted to explain the Indian enigma using evidence from various Indian studies and from around the globe. This review covers aspects of epidemiology, the various biological strains present in different parts of the country and within individuals, the status of different H. pylori-related diseases and the molecular pathogenesis of the bacterium. PMID:24587625

  4. Growing Up Indian: Stories from the Life of Louie Gingras, an 82 Year Old Kootenai Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Louie

    Eleven short stories from the life of Louie Gingras, an 82-year-old Kootenai Indian, illustrate many aspects of Indian culture. Accompanied by black and white drawings, ths stories describe daily life, mission schools, the Carlisle Indian School, Indian medicine, discipline for children, spiritual powers, beliefs, and several ceremonies. The book…

  5. Report on Indian Education--Task Force Five: Indian Education--Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirbeck, Helen Maynor; And Others

    The report of the Task Force on Indian Education to the American Indian Policy Review Commission delineates the interweaving of past policies and practices with present needs and concerns of Indian education. Reviewing 400 years of Indian education, the report was compiled from federal, state, local, and private records, public hearings,…

  6. Report to the Governor and the Legislature by the Nevada Indian Affairs Commission for the Period, 1 July 1968 thru 30 June 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada Indian Affairs Commission, Carson City.

    The administration and activities of the American Indian Affairs Commission for the State of Nevada are covered in this fourth report, which also gives an accounting of funds for which the Commission is responsible. The report discusses problems in the following 5 areas: (1) national Indian policy; (2) jurisdiction of the Indian reservations; (3)…

  7. Parental Involvement. INAR/NACIE Joint Issues Sessions. National Indian Education Association (NIEA) Annual Conference (22nd, San Diego, California, October 16, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Indian Education, Washington, DC.

    This report summarizes two joint sessions held by the Indian Nations At Risk Task Force and the National Advisory Council on Indian Education to hear testimony on issues related to parent participation in American Indian education. Issues and problems were in the areas of: (1) the importance of parent involvement for student achievement; (2) the…

  8. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOEpatents

    Ewsuk, Kevin G.; Arguello, Jr., Jose G.

    2006-01-31

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  9. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B.

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  10. 25 CFR 2.19 - Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials on appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...—Indian Affairs/Director (Indian Education Programs) shall render written decisions in all cases appealed... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Action by Area Directors and Education Programs officials... AND PRACTICE APPEALS FROM ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS § 2.19 Action by Area Directors and...

  11. 77 FR 57104 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB; Loan Guarantees for Indian Housing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... homes to be owned by Native Americans in restricted Indian lands or service areas. Mortgage lenders... unable to provide financing to Native Americans. DATES: Comments Due Date: October 17, 2012. ADDRESSES...-family homes to be owned by Native Americans in restricted Indian lands or service areas....

  12. American Indian Education: Separation, Amalgamation, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zephier, Richard

    This essay examines American Indian education from a historical perspective and analyzes the role of the school as an institution in an Indian community. Since the arrival of the white man in America, Indians have faced a world of cultural conflict. Throughout the history of Indian education, their values and way of life have been demeaned. The…

  13. Minnesota Indian Education Hearings Report, November 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ramona

    Summarizing the analyses of testimonies presented before the Minnesota Subcommittee on Indian Education by both Indians and nonIndians concerned and/or involved with national, state, or local Indian education, this report focuses on findings at the statewide and individual site levels (Minneapolis, St. Paul, Red Wing, Cass Lake, Duluth, White…

  14. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  15. American Indian Studies Is for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1996-01-01

    Reviews issues related to American Indian studies programs from Native and non-Native perspectives. Discusses who should study American Indians, the value of American Indian studies for Native and non-Native students, the feasibility of Indian advisory boards for funding agencies and mass media producers, and issues of scholarly review. (SV)

  16. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  17. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  18. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Neena; Rasool, Seemab

    2011-01-01

    Facial melanoses (FM) are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl's melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP), erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl's melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ), which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion. PMID:21860153

  19. Best outcomes for Indian children.

    PubMed

    Porter, Loa L; Zink, Patina Park; Gebhardt, Angela R; Ells, Mark; Graef, Michelle I

    2012-01-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families and the Midwest Child Welfare Implementation Center are collaborating with Wisconsin's tribes and county child welfare agencies to improve outcomes for Indian children by systemically implementing the Wisconsin Indian Child Welfare Act (WICWA). This groundbreaking collaboration will increase practitioners' understanding of the requirements of WICWA and the need for those requirements, enhance communication and coordination between all stakeholders responsible for the welfare of Indian children in Wisconsin; it is designed to effect the systemic integration of the philosophical underpinnings of WICWA. PMID:23444793

  20. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  1. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained or...

  2. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  3. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  4. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  5. 25 CFR 140.24 - Cash payments only to Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cash payments only to Indians. 140.24 Section 140.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LICENSED INDIAN TRADERS § 140.24 Cash payments only to Indians. Traders must not pay Indians in tokens, tickets, store...

  6. American Indian Law: Relationship to Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baurley, Marion E.; Street, Matthew H.

    Designed to provide the reader with general background information in the area of American Indian child abuse and neglect law and to present a framework in which individual abuse or neglect cases may be analyzed, this report is divided into four sections. The first section describes features of the jurisdictional conflicts encountered in American…

  7. Trunkline preserves indian artifacts while developing gas storage field

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.G.

    1981-10-01

    Not only is Poverty Point, La, a potential underground gas storage field, but it also is the site of the earliest Indian society yet discovered in the Lower Mississippi Valley. The report, recounts Trunkline Gas Company's experience in studying and preserving archeological data in an area it proposed for an underground gas storage facility.

  8. First on the Land: The North Carolina Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetmore, Ruth Y.

    Written for students at the secondary level, this book details the historical development (10,000 B.C. to the present) of the 3 American Indian linguistic groups located in the 4 geographical areas of North Carolina (the Algonquians on the coast, the Iroquoians, including the Tuscarora on the coastal plain and the Cherokee in the mountains, and…

  9. Photographs of Indians in the United States: Select Audiovisual Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC. National Audiovisual Center.

    Selected from pictorial records deposited in the National Archives by government agencies, the leaflet lists 194 photographs or copies of artworks portraying American Indians, their homes, and activities. The picture descriptions are grouped by such subject areas as the following: agency buildings (4 citations), agriculture (6), basketwork (3),…

  10. American Indian Youth: Personal, Familial, and Environmental Strengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiffman, Arlene Rubin; Brown, Eddie; Freedenthal, Stacey; House, Laura; Ostmann, Emily; Yu, Man Soo

    2007-01-01

    We present data from interviews with 401 youths on the relationship of personal, familial, and environmental strengths to the outcomes of urban and reservation American Indian youths. Urban youths consistently nominated more strengths than tribal youths, except in the area of tribal strengths. Quantitative data show how those strengths relate to…

  11. Alcoholism and Co-Morbid Psychiatric Disorders among American Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westermeyer, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Much of the data reported here regarding American Indian (AI) people has originated from specific areas with particular peoples. Thus, one must be cautious in applying information from one tribe to the hundreds of tribes living across the United States. As with any people, psychiatric disorder may be a pre-existing rationale for using alcohol. Or…

  12. Geohydrology of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, Lewis W.

    1979-01-01

    The cooperation and courtesy extended by many farmers, ranchers, and residents of the area contributed greatly to the success of the study.  Special thanks are due to Mr. John Wall, U.S. Public Health Service, Eagle Butte, and to the personnel of the Land Operations and Conservation Unites of the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Eagle Butte.

  13. A Study of the Socioeconomic Status of Michigan Indians, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Commission on Indian Affairs, Lansing.

    The primary objective of this survey was to gather basic information concerning the socioeconomic status and problems of the American Indians in Michigan. The major areas surveyed were education, employment and income, housing conditions, health, and general household characteristics. The survey also attempted to probe attitudes which are…

  14. Ft. McDowell Indian Community Preschool Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurster, Stanley R.

    During the four years of its operation, the Fort McDowell Indian (Reservation) Community preschool and kindergarten program has been directed toward three major areas of emphasis: (1) to provide activities and experiences that focus specific attention on meeting the special education needs of Fort McDowell youngsters; (2) to offer supportive…

  15. The Indians of the Subarctic, A Critical Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, June

    The present volume is a strong reminder that culture areas exist in their own right, sprawling across national or tribal territories, and that the range of culture includes more than survival traits. The Indians of the Subarctic have adapted to a physical habitat that imposes taxation in terms of time and energy far beyond the demands of most…

  16. Indians and Southern Colonial Statutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Yasuhide

    1974-01-01

    Southern statutes, with their dual nature of uniformity and diversity, were doubtlessly an essential source of law for the examination of complex legal relations between American Indians and Anglo Americans in the colonial South. (FF)

  17. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  18. 76 FR 11258 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The compact authorizes up to 2,000 video lottery terminals, up to 70 table games, and establishes the Oregon Benefit Fund to receive payments from...

  19. Tropical Indian Ocean Variability Driving Southeast Australian Droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, C. C.; England, M. H.; McIntosh, P. C.; Meyers, G. A.; Pook, M. J.; Risbey, J. S.; Sen Gupta, A.; Taschetto, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    Variability in the tropical Indian Ocean has widespread effects on rainfall in surrounding countries, including East Africa, India and Indonesia. The leading mode of tropical Indian Ocean variability, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), is a coupled ocean-atmosphere mode characterized by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of opposite sign in the east and west of the basin with an associated large-scale atmospheric re-organisation. Earlier work has often focused on the positive phase of the IOD. However, we show here that the negative IOD phase is an important driver of regional rainfall variability and multi-year droughts. For southeastern Australia, we show that it is actually a lack of the negative IOD phase, rather than the positive IOD phase or Pacific variability, that provides the most robust explanation for recent drought conditions. Since 1995, a large region of Australia has been gripped by the most severe drought in living memory, the so-called "Big Dry". The ramifications for affected regions are dire, with acute water shortages for rural and metropolitan areas, record agricultural losses, the drying-out of two of Australia's major river systems and far-reaching ecosystem damage. Yet the drought's origins have remained elusive. For Southeast Australia, we show that the "Big Dry" and other iconic 20th Century droughts, including the Federation Drought (1895-1902) and World War II drought (1937-1945), are driven by tropical Indian Ocean variability, not Pacific Ocean conditions as traditionally assumed. Specifically, a conspicuous absence of characteristic Indian Ocean temperature conditions that are conducive to enhanced tropical moisture transport has deprived southeastern Australia of its normal rainfall quota. In the case of the "Big Dry", its unprecedented intensity is also related to recent above-average temperatures. Implications of recent non-uniform warming trends in the Indian Ocean and how that might affect ocean characteristics and climate in

  20. Potential Chemical Effects of Changes in the Source of Water Supply for the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical modeling was used by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (henceforth, Authority), to gain insight into the potential chemical effects that could occur in the Authority's water distribution system as a result of changing the source of water used for municipal and industrial supply from ground water to surface water, or to some mixture of the two sources. From historical data, representative samples of ground-water and surface-water chemistry were selected for modeling under a range of environmental conditions anticipated to be present in the distribution system. Mineral phases calculated to have the potential to precipitate from ground water were compared with the compositions of precipitate samples collected from the current water distribution system and with mineral phases calculated to have the potential to precipitate from surface water and ground-water/surface-water mixtures. Several minerals that were calculated to have the potential to precipitate from ground water in the current distribution system were identified in precipitate samples from pipes, reservoirs, and water heaters. These minerals were the calcium carbonates aragonite and calcite, and the iron oxides/hydroxides goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite. Several other minerals that were indicated by modeling to have the potential to precipitate were not found in precipitate samples. For most of these minerals, either the kinetics of formation were known to be unfavorable under conditions present in the distribution system or the minerals typically are not formed through direct precipitation from aqueous solutions. The minerals with potential to precipitate as simulated for surface-water samples and ground-water/surface-water mixtures were quite similar to the minerals with potential to precipitate from ground-water samples. Based on the modeling results along with kinetic considerations, minerals that appear most likely to