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Sample records for albuquerque nm notice

  1. Albuquerque, NM, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Albuquerque, NM (35.0N, 106.5W) is situated on the edge of the Rio Grande River and flood plain which cuts across the image. The reddish brown surface of the Albuquerque Basin is a fault depression filled with ancient alluvial fan and lake bed sediments. On the slopes of the Manzano Mountains to the east of Albuquerque, juniper and other timber of the Cibola National Forest can be seen as contrasting dark tones of vegetation.

  2. 76 FR 54799 - Flowserve Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Flowserve Corporation, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Negative... 14, 2011 (76 FR 21040). Workers at the subject firm manufactured industrial pumps. The petitioner (a... resulted in a negative determination based on the findings that Section 222(a) of the Trade Act of 1974,...

  3. 75 FR 65526 - Xilinx, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers of TEKsystems, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Revised...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... job advertisement dated May 19, 2009, for integrated circuit test engineers and test equipment... Notice was published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7031). The workers are...

  4. 76 FR 2148 - Xilinx, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers of TEKsystems, Albuquerque, NM; Notice of Revised...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... job advertisement dated May 19, 2009, for integrated circuit test engineers and test equipment... Notice was published in the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7031). The workers are...

  5. Predicting wood pellet stove ownership and acquisition in Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Lansford, R.; Skaggs, R.; Owensby, F.

    1994-12-31

    Wood pellet stove (WPS) ownership and acquisition in Albuquerque, New Mexico was predicted using a model of qualitative choice. Using data obtained from a telephone survey, households were divided into four groups: current WPS owners, non-owners considering ownership, non-owners not considering ownership, and those who had not heard of WPS technology. Variables used to predict what category a household will be in include homeowners` socioeconomic and home-heating characteristics. Results indicate few WPS stoves are currently in use in Albuquerque. However, current WPS owners and those considering WPS acquisition tend to have higher incomes, more years of education, larger homes, and use their fireplaces more frequently than average. Clean air regulations in Albuquerque will require changes in home woodburning. The WPS is an efficient and clean device; however, lack of knowledge of WPS technology, satisfaction with current heating systems, and limited awareness of the potential impact of clean air regulations indicate WPS usage in Albuquerque will remain limited.

  6. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Artistic Homes of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Describes the first true zero E-scale home in a hot-dry climate with ducts inside, R-50 attic insulation, roof-mounted photovoltaic power system, and solar thermal water heating.

  7. 77 FR 8926 - Board Meeting: March 7, 2012-Albuquerque, NM; The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Will...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD Board Meeting: March 7, 2012--Albuquerque, NM; The U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board... authority under section 5051 of Public Law 100-203, the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board will hold...

  8. 75 FR 68447 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County, NM; Interstate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ...The EPA is approving a revision to the Albuquerque/Bernalillo County, New Mexico State Implementation Plan (SIP) to address the ``good neighbor'' provisions of the Clean Air Act (CAA) section 110(a)(2)(D)(i), for the 1997 ozone and the 1997 fine particulate matter (PM2.5) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) as it applies to Albuquerque/Bernalillo County. The revision......

  9. 75 FR 5698 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Albuquerque-Bernalillo County, NM; Excess...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... into the New Mexico SIP for Albuquerque- Bernalillo County on April 10, 1980 (42 FR 24468) at 40 CFR 52...), April 27, 1977 (42 FR 21472); EPA's final rule for Idaho's sulfur dioxide control strategy, November 8, 1977 (42 FR 58171); and the latest clarification of EPA's policy issued on December 5, 2001...

  10. Project DEEP STEAM: fourth meeting of the technical advisory panel, Albuquerque, NM, November 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, R.L.; Donaldson, A.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Hart, C.M.; Johnson, D.R.; Mulac, A.J.; Wayland, J.R.; Weirick, L.J.

    1981-07-01

    The Fourth Project DEEP STEAM Technical Advisory Panel Meeting was held on 5 and 6 November 1980 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to review the status of project DEEP STEAM. This Proceedings, following the order of the meeting, is divided into five main sections: the injection string modification program, the downhole steam generator program, supporting activities, field testing, and the Advisory Panel recommendations and discussion. Each of the 17 presentations is summarized, and a final Discussion section has been added, when needed, for inclusion of comments and replies related to specific presentations. Finally, the Advisory Panel recommendations and the ensuing discussion are summarized in the closing section.

  11. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Richard B.

    2010-02-23

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  12. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOEpatents

    Ewsuk, Kevin G.; Arguello, Jr., Jose G.

    2006-01-31

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  13. Albuquerque's Environmental Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner, Joan; And Others

    This teachers' resource guide contains four sections in addition to an introduction. The first section is an interdisciplinary look at the major natural areas in and around Albuquerque. This is followed by a review of the city's cultural history and a glimpse into the interactions people of Albuquerque have had with their natural environment. The…

  14. Albuquerque Basin seismic network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaksha, Lawrence H.; Locke, Jerry; Thompson, J.B.; Garcia, Alvin

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently completed the installation of a seismic network around the Albuquerque Basin in New Mexico. The network consists of two seismometer arrays, a thirteen-station array monitoring an area of approximately 28,000 km 2 and an eight-element array monitoring the area immediately adjacent to the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This report describes the instrumentation deployed in the network.

  15. 18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Detail sheet - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  16. 14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, N&, 1934 Foundation Plan - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  17. 16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 first floor mechanical plan - heating - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  18. 15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 First Floor - plumbing - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  19. 17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area Indian Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Elevations - Taos Indian Health Center, 0.3 mile south-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM

  20. 78 FR 41420 - Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale NMNM-126813, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Competitive Coal Lease Sale NMNM-126813, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Land... Office, will offer certain coal resources in the tract described below in McKinley County, New Mexico... receive a reply during normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This coal lease sale is...

  1. The Albuquerque High School Moonwatch Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, Joel M.

    2007-12-01

    In the mid-1950s, a remarkable pair of high school teachers, Mrs. Vi Hefferan and (later) Mr. John Bartholdi, organized an astronomy club and Moonwatch satellite tracking team open to students from all Albuquerque high schools. The Albuquerque team distinguished itself as one of the best in the worldwide network. Among other tasks, they found some satellites that had been "lost" by professional trackers. The team provided a variety of interesting and exciting activities for science-interested students from the whole city. Among the most meaningful was the ability to make observations that were scientifically useful. By 1966 when I joined as a 10th grader, the excitement of the early days was gone but the sense of participation in a large and fascinating enterprise was still keen. I will discuss the techniques and technologies used to track satellites from the high school and from my front yard, including slide rules, rulers, telegrams, special delivery mail, short-wave radio time signals, tape recorders, stop watches, star maps, computers, and a five-inch rich-field "apogee" refractor. After a year of intense effort at satellite tracking for Moonwatch, I had the opportunity to visit a then-secret 48-inch Air Force satellite tracking telescope in southern NM in 1968. This event demonstrated the obsolescence of the amateur (though not amateurish!) techniques that we had been using and provided a fitting end to my participation as I left for college.

  2. 75 FR 60478 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Santa Fe County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Santa Fe County, NM... direct sale to Edward Black pursuant to the Act of December 22, 1928, as amended, and an Interior Board of Land Appeals Settlement Agreement for the amount of $10,000. The sale is to resolve a class...

  3. 77 FR 65403 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New Mexico...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New... to be culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology.... Heather Edgar, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM...

  4. 75 FR 11194 - Notice of Filing of Plats of Survey, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ..., for Group 1096 NM. The plat representing the dependent resurvey and survey, in Township 11 ] South, Range 22 East, of the New Mexico Principal Meridian, accepted January 15, 2010, for Group 1096 NM. If...

  5. Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This document has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) in order to highlight research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Albuquerque Operations Office. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information has been assembled from recently produced OTD documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OTD program elements. These integrated program summaries include: Volatile Organic Compounds in Non-Arid Soils, Volatile Organic Compounds in Arid Soils, Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration, Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology, In Situ Remediation, Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration, Underground Storage Tank, Efficient Separations and Processing, Mixed Waste Integrated Program, Rocky Flats Compliance Program, Pollution Prevention Program, Innovation Investment Area, and Robotics Technology.

  6. 78 FR 77096 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    .... SUMMARY: This notice lists the newspapers that will be used by all Ranger Districts, Grasslands, Forests... affecting New Mexico Forests:--``Albuquerque Journal'', Albuquerque, New Mexico, for National Forest System... are published in:--``Albuquerque Journal'', Albuquerque, New Mexico. Forest Supervisor...

  7. 76 FR 6155 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Sandoval County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Sandoval County... of Land Management (BLM) proposes to offer, by competitive sale, a parcel of Federally owned land near Golden, New Mexico, containing approximately 130.56 acres. The sale will be subject to...

  8. 77 FR 15800 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Southwest Regional Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... Wildlife Service and in the possession of the Maxwell Museum, Albuquerque, NM. The human remains were... remains from the excavations are housed at the Maxwell Museum in Albuquerque, NM. No known individual...

  9. 77 FR 20690 - Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Albuquerque, New Mexico AGENCY... the Interstate 25 and Paseo del Norte Interchange in Albuquerque, New Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Greg Heitmann, Environmental Specialist, Federal Highway Administration, New Mexico...

  10. Escape from Albuquerque: An Apache Memorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Clarence Hawkins, a White Mountain Apache, escaped from the Albuquerque Indian School around 1920. His 300-mile trip home, made with two other boys, exemplifies the reaction of many Indian youths to the American government's plans for cultural assimilation. The tale is told in the form of traditional Apache narrative. (TD)

  11. 78 FR 53780 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Doña Ana County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... were no known mineral values on the land proposed for sale. The BLM proposes the conveyance of the Federal mineral interests would occur simultaneously with the sale of the land. In addition to this Notice... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Do a Ana County,...

  12. 77 FR 73412 - Newspapers Used for Publication of Legal Notices in the Southwestern Region, Which Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    .... SUMMARY: This notice lists the newspapers that will be used by all Ranger Districts, Grasslands, Forests... Availability for Comment and Decisions and Objections affecting New Mexico Forests:--``Albuquerque Journal... the National Grasslands are published in:--``Albuquerque Journal'', Albuquerque, New Mexico....

  13. Tiger Team assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SNL, Albuquerque, is operated by the Sandia Corporation (a wholly owned subsidiary of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The environmental assessment also included DOE tenant facilities at Ross Aviation, Albuquerque Microelectronics Operation, and the Central Training Academy. The assessment was conducted from April 15 to May 24, 1991, under the auspices of DOE's Office of Special Projects under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health (ES H). The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing ES H disciplines, management, self-assessments, and quality assurance; transportation; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal SNL, Albuquerque, requirements were assessed. In addition, an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of DOE and SNL, Albuquerque management of ES H programs was conducted.

  14. Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory--50 years of global seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutt, C.R.; Peterson, Jon; Gee, Lind; Derr, John; Ringler, Adam; Wilson, David

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory is about 15 miles southeast of Albuquerque on the Pueblo of Isleta, adjacent to Kirtland Air Force Base. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory supports the Global Seismographic Network Program and the Advanced National Seismic System through the installation, operation, and maintenance of seismic stations around the world and serves as the premier seismological instrumentation test facility for the U.S. Government.

  15. The Albuquerque City Center Schools. Program Evaluation, 1984-85.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Jennifer S.; Panofsky, Carolyn

    The Albuquerque City Center Schools (ACCS) project, begun in 1983, was designed to increase the effectiveness of 12 schools in the Albuquerque High School cluster by creating a climate of high expectations, improving academic achievement, encouraging a climate of positive discipline, promoting student, community and private sector participation,…

  16. Ground-water monitoring in the Albuquerque area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Condé R.

    1996-01-01

    At present (1996), all drinking water for Albuquerque residents comes from ground-water reserves. The Albuquerque area is the largest population center in the State and the largest consumer of ground water. Recent reports concerning the water resources of the Albuquerque area suggest that the Albuquerque Basin may soon face serious water-availability and water-quality problems due to anticipated ground-water development. Recent studies completed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have improved the understanding of the ground-water resources in the Albuquerque Basin. These studies have indicated that the more permeable units within the aquifer system--the upper Santa Fe Group--are less extensive than previously thought, and that water-levels have declined as much as 160 feet.

  17. 1989 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Chavez, G.; Phelan, J.; Parsons, A.; Yeager, G.; Dionne, D.; Schwartz, B.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Gray, C.; Thompson, D.

    1990-05-01

    This 1989 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 8.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} mrem. The total Albuquerque population received a collective dose of 0.097 person-rem during 1989 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, SNL, Albuquerque, operations in 1989 had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. 46 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. 1991 Environmental monitoring report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, S.; Jones, A.; Longley, S.; Parsons, A.; Wolff, T.; Fish, J.; Ward, S.

    1992-11-01

    This 1991 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration (ER), and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of SNL, Albuquerque, received a collective dose of 0.53 person-rem during 1991 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1991 operations at SNL, Albuquerque, had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  19. Opioid use in Albuquerque, New Mexico: a needs assessment of recent changes and treatment availability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New Mexico has consistently high rates of drug-induced deaths, and opioid-related treatment admissions have been increasing over the last two decades. Youth in New Mexico are at particular risk: they report higher rates of nonmedical prescription opioid use than those over age 25, are more likely than their national counterparts to have tried heroin, and represent an increasing proportion of heroin overdoses. Methods Commissioned by the City of Albuquerque, semistructured interviews were conducted from April to June of 2011 with 24 substance use treatment agencies and eight key stakeholders in Albuquerque to identify recent changes in the treatment-seeking population and gaps in treatment availability. Themes were derived using template analysis and data were analyzed using NVivo 9 software. Results Respondents reported a noticeable increase in youth seeking treatment for opioid use and a general increase in nonmedical prescription opioid use. Most noted difficulties with finding buprenorphine providers and a lack of youth services. Additionally, stigma, limited interagency communication and referral, barriers to prescribing buprenorphine, and a lack of funding were noted as preventing opioid users from quickly accessing effective treatment. Conclusions Recommendations for addressing these issues include developing youth-specific treatment programs, raising awareness about opioid use among youth, increasing the availability of buprenorphine through provider incentives and education, developing a resource guide for individuals seeking treatment in Albuquerque, and prioritizing interagency communication and referrals. PMID:24942534

  20. Flooding and conservation in the Albuquerque bosque

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C. Jr.; Valett, H.M.

    1995-12-31

    Interest in the conservation of the Middle Rio Grande bosque has grown rapidly in the last decade. During that period, private organizations as well as governmental agencies have sharpened their focus on the issue, and in doing so have contributed to the development of a bosque biological management plan for the river reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir. This increased regional attention reflects a growing national and international concern about human impacts on fluvial processes in large floodplain rivers. Because they impound large amounts of a river`s discharge and interfere with its natural flooding regime, dams can seriously disrupt the relationship between river basin hydrology and riparian zone functioning. In western North America, this interference reduces cottonwood germination and survival and, as will be discussed, negatively affects key ecological processes in riparian communities. In this paper the authors first review how the decoupling of basin hydrology from riparian forest processes has begun to affect the integrity of the Middle Rio Grande bosque ecosystem. Then they propose an alternative management scheme, with emphasis on the Albuquerque bosque, that centers on restoring its ecosystem functioning.

  1. The Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory Data Quality Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringler, A. T.; Hagerty, M.; Holland, J.; Gee, L. S.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL) has several efforts underway to improve data quality at its stations. The Data Quality Analyzer (DQA) is one such development. The DQA is designed to characterize station data quality in a quantitative and automated manner. Station quality is based on the evaluation of various metrics, such as timing quality, noise levels, sensor coherence, and so on. These metrics are aggregated into a measurable grade for each station. The DQA consists of a website, a metric calculator (Seedscan), and a PostgreSQL database. The website allows the user to make requests for various time periods, review specific networks and stations, adjust weighting of the station's grade, and plot metrics as a function of time. The website dynamically loads all station data from a PostgreSQL database. The database is central to the application; it acts as a hub where metric values and limited station descriptions are stored. Data is stored at the level of one sensor's channel per day. The database is populated by Seedscan. Seedscan reads and processes miniSEED data, to generate metric values. Seedscan, written in Java, compares hashes of metadata and data to detect changes and perform subsequent recalculations. This ensures that the metric values are up to date and accurate. Seedscan can be run in a scheduled task or on demand by way of a config file. It will compute metrics specified in its configuration file. While many metrics are currently in development, some are completed and being actively used. These include: availability, timing quality, gap count, deviation from the New Low Noise Model, deviation from a station's noise baseline, inter-sensor coherence, and data-synthetic fits. In all, 20 metrics are planned, but any number could be added. ASL is actively using the DQA on a daily basis for station diagnostics and evaluation. As Seedscan is scheduled to run every night, data quality analysts are able to then use the

  2. 1990 Environmental Monitoring Report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.; Yeager, G.; Wolff, T.; Parsons, A.; Dionne, D.; Massey, C.; Schwartz, B.; Fish, J.; Thompson, D. ); Goodrich, M. )

    1991-05-01

    This 1990 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress such as National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (SNL, Albuquerque) are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mrem. The total 50-mile population received a collective dose of 0.82 person-rem during 1990 from SNL, Albuquerque, operations. As in the previous year, the 1990 SNL operations had no adverse impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the US Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1. 97 refs., 30 figs., 137 tabs.

  3. 77 FR 46114 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, University of New...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... Archaeology, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01 1050, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131... should contact David Phillips, Curator of Archaeology, Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, MSC01...

  4. Calendar year 2004 annual site environmental report:Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Amber L.; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Wagner, Katrina; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and managed by the Sandia Site Office (SSO), Albuquerque, New Mexico. Sandia Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates SNL/NM. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation's environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2004. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004a). (DOE 2004a).

  5. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  6. RESPECT: Gang Mediation at Albuquerque, New Mexico's Washington Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabish, Kenneth R.; Orell, Linda Henry

    1996-01-01

    Presents conflict resolution and mediation techniques used to resolve conflicts among rival gangs at Washington Middle School, an inner-city school in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Discusses formal mediation techniques and mediation for both male and female gang members. Focuses on preserving self-respect and dignity for gang members in all conflict…

  7. Evaluation of the Albuquerque Indian School Motivational Environment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiat, Albert B.; And Others

    In order to evaluate the impact of a token economy behavior modification program implemented from 1970-71 in the Albuquerque Indian School (AIS), a secondary institution, a five-member evaluation team assessed standardized test results, behavioral data, and student and staff attitudes. A battery of tests (Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, SRA…

  8. Wastewater reclamation and recharge: A water management strategy for Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    Gorder, P.J.; Brunswick, R.J.; Bockemeier, S.W.

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 61,000 acre-feet of the pumped water is annually discharged to the Rio Grande as treated wastewater. Albuquerque`s Southside Water Reclamation Plant (SWRP) is the primary wastewater treatment facility for most of the Albuquerque area. Its current design capacity is 76 million gallons per day (mgd), which is expected to be adequate until about 2004. A master plan currently is being prepared (discussed here in Wastewater Master Planning and the Zero Discharge Concept section) to provide guidelines for future expansions of the plant and wastewater infrastructure. Construction documents presently are being prepared to add ammonia and nitrogen removal capability to the plant, as required by its new discharge permit. The paper discusses water management strategies, indirect potable reuse for Albuquerque, water quality considerations for indirect potable reuse, treatment for potable reuse, geohydrological aspects of a recharge program, layout and estimated costs for a conceptual reclamation and recharge system, and work to be accomplished under phase 2 of the reclamation and recharge program.

  9. The Albuquerque Indian School: Culture, Environment and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Anne; Swentzel, Rina

    1979-01-01

    The architectural renovation project at Albuquerque Indian School not only reclaimed dilapidated buildings but involved students and community in planning their learning environment and taught students practical career skills, such as plumbing, landscape and interior design, and woodworking. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural…

  10. 76 FR 10389 - Reopening the Call for Nominations for the New Mexico Albuquerque and Farmington District...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Reopening the Call for Nominations for the New Mexico Albuquerque and... (BLM) Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Farmington, New Mexico, Resource Advisory Councils (RAC). The RACs... within the Albuquerque and Farmington Districts. The Farmington, New Mexico, RAC is only...

  11. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.83 Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) is revised...

  12. 40 CFR 81.83 - Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate... Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.83 Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Albuquerque-Mid Rio Grande Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (New Mexico) is revised...

  13. Computer Network Availability at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM: Measurement and Perception

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON,SPENCER D.; TOLENDINO,LAWRENCE F.

    1999-11-01

    The desire to provide a measure of computer network availability at Sandia National Laboratories has existed for along time. Several attempts were made to build this measure by accurately recording network failures, identifying the type of network element involved, the root cause of the problem, and the time to repair the fault. Recognizing the limitations of available methods, it became obvious that another approach of determining network availability had to be defined. The chosen concept involved the periodic sampling of network services and applications from various network locations. A measure of ''network'' availability was then calculated based on the ratio of polling success to failure. The effort required to gather the information and produce a useful metric is not prohibitive and the information gained has verified long held feelings regarding network performance with real data.

  14. 75 FR 5707 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Albuquerque-Bernalillo County, NM; Excess...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ...: The EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the New Mexico State Implementation Plan (SIP) submitted... a letter dated September 23, 2009 (the September 23, 2009 SIP submittal). The September 23, 2009 SIP... activities. We are proposing to approve the September 23, 2009 SIP submittal in accordance with...

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes — Palo Duro Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder was honored for Most DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes Built in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards. By July 2014, Palo Duro had completed 152 homes since the program began in 2013 (under the original program title DOE Challenge Home), all of them certified to the stringent efficiency requirements of DOE’s Zero Energy Ready Home program.

  16. 75 FR 44731 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County, NM; Interstate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... (Clean Air Interstate Rule); Revisions to Acid Rain Program; Revisions to the NO X SIP Call; Final Rule,'' 70 FR 25162 (May 12, 2005). Information regarding CAA section 110(a)(2)(D) SIPs can be found... other state. In a separate action, EPA approved this revision for the remainder of the State. (75...

  17. 1990 SEM Spring Conference on Experimental Mechanics, Albuquerque, NM, June 4-6, 1990, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on experimental mechanics encompasses industrial applications of photoelasticity, measurement techniques for residual stress, applications for the strain gage, digital image analysis, optical methods such as acoustoelasticity, smart structures, noncontacting sensing techniques, photoelasticity, and the fracture of engineered materials. Specific issues addressed include the energy-density approach to inelastic strain, techniques for measuring fiber response to transient moisture exposure, the application of photoelasticity to analyzing shaft splines, the yield behavior of polyethylene tubes, the calibration of composite-embedded fiber-optic strain sensors, and the design of a force transducer. Also addressed are applications of morphological filters to digital image processing, the testing of miniatures, the hardness testing of metals, stress concentrations in tube intersections, and crack propagation in a composite solid propellant.

  18. 78 FR 78300 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Albuquerque, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does..., 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The...

  19. 2009 fault tolerance for extreme-scale computing workshop, Albuquerque, NM - March 19-20, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, D. S.; Daly, J.; DeBardeleben, N.; Elnozahy, M.; Kramer, B.; Lathrop, S.; Nystrom, N.; Milfeld, K.; Sanielevici, S.; Scott, S.; Votta, L.; Louisiana State Univ.; Center for Exceptional Computing; LANL; IBM; Univ. of Illinois; Shodor Foundation; Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center; Texas Advanced Computing Center; ORNL; Sun Microsystems

    2009-02-01

    This is a report on the third in a series of petascale workshops co-sponsored by Blue Waters and TeraGrid to address challenges and opportunities for making effective use of emerging extreme-scale computing. This workshop was held to discuss fault tolerance on large systems for running large, possibly long-running applications. The main point of the workshop was to have systems people, middleware people (including fault-tolerance experts), and applications people talk about the issues and figure out what needs to be done, mostly at the middleware and application levels, to run such applications on the emerging petascale systems, without having faults cause large numbers of application failures. The workshop found that there is considerable interest in fault tolerance, resilience, and reliability of high-performance computing (HPC) systems in general, at all levels of HPC. The only way to recover from faults is through the use of some redundancy, either in space or in time. Redundancy in time, in the form of writing checkpoints to disk and restarting at the most recent checkpoint after a fault that cause an application to crash/halt, is the most common tool used in applications today, but there are questions about how long this can continue to be a good solution as systems and memories grow faster than I/O bandwidth to disk. There is interest in both modifications to this, such as checkpoints to memory, partial checkpoints, and message logging, and alternative ideas, such as in-memory recovery using residues. We believe that systematic exploration of these ideas holds the most promise for the scientific applications community. Fault tolerance has been an issue of discussion in the HPC community for at least the past 10 years; but much like other issues, the community has managed to put off addressing it during this period. There is a growing recognition that as systems continue to grow to petascale and beyond, the field is approaching the point where we don't have any choice but to address this through R&D efforts.

  20. 77 FR 43111 - Notice of Extension of Temporary Closure to All Public Use on Public Land in Doña Ana County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... INFORMATION: The BLM published its original closure notice in the Federal Register on June 28, 2010 (76 FR... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Extension of Temporary Closure to All Public Use on Public Land in Do... years to all public use, including casual use, to protect persons, property, and public land...

  1. 75 FR 21584 - Notice of Solicitation of Applications (NOSA) for Inviting Applications for Renewable Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ...) 787-7752, Victoria.Fekete@nj.usda.gov New Mexico Jesse Bopp, USDA Rural Development, 6200 Jefferson Street, NE., Room 255, Albuquerque, NM 87109, (505) 761-4952, Jesse.bopp@nm.usda.gov New York...

  2. Geothermal studies at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, L.; Grant, B.

    1981-05-01

    Due to an effort by government installations to discontinue use of natural gas, alternative energy sources are being investigated at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico. New Mexico has geologic characteristics favorable for geothermal energy utilization. Local heat flow and geochemical studies indicate a normal subsurface temperature regime. The alluvial deposits, however, extend to great depths where hot fluids, heated by the normal geothermal gradient, could be encountered. Two potential models for tapping geothermal energy are presented: the basin model and the fault model.

  3. 76 FR 20943 - Notice of Funds Availability (NOFA) Inviting Applications for the Rural Energy for America Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... 08054, (856) 787-7752, Victoria.Fekete@nj.usda.gov . New Mexico Jesse Bopp, USDA Rural Development, 6200 Jefferson Street, NE., Room 255, Albuquerque, NM 87109, (505) 761-4952, Jesse.bopp@nm.usda.gov . New...

  4. 76 FR 21401 - Notice of Availability of the Draft EIS for the HB In-Situ Solution Mine Project, Eddy County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... methods: Web site: http://www.nm.blm.gov/cfo/HBIS/index.html E-mail: nmcfo_comment@blm.gov Fax: 575-885... operate a solution mining project in an existing deep mine located approximately 20 miles northeast...

  5. 76 FR 81836 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ...; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County; Prevention of Significant Deterioration; Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule... Albuquerque/Bernalillo County's PSD permitting requirements for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. EPA is... FR 59334). The comment period was open for thirty days and no comments were received. II. What...

  6. 77 FR 65821 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque... Implementation Plan for Air Quality for the City of Albuquerque/Bernalillo County area pursuant to the Clean Air... the VPMD Procedures Manual; reorganizes 20.11.100 NMAC; and makes numerous non- substantive changes...

  7. Report & Evaluations on Opportunities Conference (Albuquerque Indian School, New Mexico, January 19, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo, Eulynda

    The conference was attended by 53 high school seniors and 65 parents, teachers, administrators, and counselors from Albuquerque Public Schools, Los Lunas, Bernalillo, Jemez, Grants, and Albuquerque Indian School. After an opening address and two speakers, participants attended three workshops. In the first workshop, a panel of students presented…

  8. 77 FR 30900 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Fees; and 0 b. Adding a new entry for Part 2 (20.11.2 NMAC) in numerical order by part number to read... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque... revisions to the applicable State Implementation Plan (SIP) for New Mexico Albuquerque/Bernalillo...

  9. 1993 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.A.; Cheng, C.F.; Cox, W.; Durand, N.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Lauffer, F.; Lincoln, M.; McClellan, Y.; Molley, K.

    1994-11-01

    This 1993 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0016 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile (80 kilometer) radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.027 person-rem during 1993 from the laboratories operations, As in the previous year, the 1993 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  10. 1994 Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Wiggins, T.; White, B.B.

    1995-09-01

    This 1994 report contains data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum off-site dose impact from air emissions was calculated to be 1.5 x 10{sup -4} millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.012 person-rem during 1994 from the laboratories` operations. This report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1.

  11. Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. 1992 Environmental monitoring report, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, T.; Cox, W.; Hwang, H.; Irwin, M.; Jones, A.; Matz, B.; Molley, K.; Rhodes, W.; Stermer, D.; Wolff, T.

    1993-09-01

    This 1992 report contains monitoring data from routine radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance activities. summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, envirorunental restoration, and various waste management programs for Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included. The maximum offsite dose impact was calculated to be 0.0034 millirem. The total population within a 50-mile radius of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico received an estimated collective dose of 0.019 person-rem during 1992 from the laboratories` operations. As in the previous year, the 1992 operations at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico had no discernible impact on the general public or on the environment.

  13. Summary of urban stormwater quality in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storms, Erik F.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; Locke, Evan A.; Stevens, Michael R.; Romero, Orlando C.

    2015-01-01

    The stormwater quality in Albuquerque was compared with that of six other Western U.S. cities (Phoenix, Arizona; Tucson, Arizona; Las Vegas, Nevada; Denver, Colorado; Salt Lake City, Utah; and Boise, Idaho) for selected constituents. In general, water-quality data for stormwater samples from these six other Western U.S. cities were similar to water-quality data for the stormwater samples from the Albuquerque outfalls. Median concentrations for suspended solids, total phosphorus, and bacteria (E. coli and fecal coliform) in stormwater samples from the Albuquerque outfalls, as a whole, were higher than those in samples from the other Western U.S. cities except for Las Vegas.

  14. Rainfall-runoff in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area: Measurements, analyses and comparisons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, C.E.; Ward, T.J.; Kelly, T.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Albuquerque, New Mexico, has experienced significant growth over the last 20 years like many other cities in the Southwestern United States. While the US population grew by 37% between the 1970 and 2000 censuses, the growth for Albuquerque was 83%. More people mean more development and increased problems of managing runoff from urbanizing watersheds. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Albuquerque Arroyo Metropolitan Flood Control Authority (AMAFCA) and the City of Albuquerque has maintained a rainfall-runoff data collection program since 1976. The data from measured precipitation events can be used to verify hydrologic modeling. In this presentation, data from a representative gaged watershed is analyzed and discussed to set the overall framework for the rainfall-runoff process in the Albuquerque area. Of particular interest are the basic relationships between rainfall and watershed runoff response and an analysis of curve numbers as an indicator of runoff function. In urbanized areas, four land treatment types (natural, irrigated lawns, compacted soil, and impervious) are used to define surface infiltration conditions. Rainfall and runoff gage data are used to compare curve number (CN) and initial abstraction/uniform infiltration (IA/INF) techniques in an Albuquerque watershed. The IA/INF method appears to produce superior results over the CN method for the measured rainfall events.

  15. Small-scale hydropower from irrigation canals near Albuquerque, NM. Final report, 1 January 1981-31 December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Heggen, R.J.

    1982-04-01

    Although intermittent stream flows restrict hydroelectric potential throughout New Mexico, there exists a possibility for small-scale hydroelectric (SSH) development. One area of current interest involves irrigation canals. Generally the flows in such canals are seasonal with low volume and low power potential. The environmentally sound nature SSH and the proximity of canal sites to irrigation pumping stations make canal SSH a possible source of hydropower for pumps or other remote, small, seasonal electric demands. The Middle Rio Grande Conservancy District system consists of irrigation canals paralleling the Rio Grande from Cochiti Dam to Bosque del Apache, New Mexico. Assessments of engineering and economic feasibility for two demonstration sites meeting institutional, regulatory, environmental, and legal restrictions were carried out. Design parameters, required equipment and its sizing, power plant layout, power production and the plant operating criteria were evaluated. The canal sites were selected on the basis of available flow and head values to demonstrate the different types of SSH layouts and uses of generated power. One of the sites would require the retrofit of the SSH power plant into the existing concrete canal structure and could use the generated power to operate a nearby irrigation pump. At the second site, the unit would be placed on new site construction.

  16. Verification Survey of Rooms 113, 114, and 208 of the Inhalation Toxicology Laboratory, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Vitkus

    2008-06-25

    The objectives of the verification survey were to confirm that accessible surfaces of the three laboratories meet the DOE’s established criteria for residual contamination. Drain pipes and ductwork were not included within the survey scope.

  17. Engineering, construction, and operations in space; Proceedings of the Space '88 Conference, Albuquerque, NM, Aug. 29-31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Wetzel, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The broad topics considered are extraterrestrial basing, the Space Station and orbiting structures, and areas of special interest. The section on extraterrestrial basing considers the processing of lunar soils, lunar surface construction and operations, lunar base design, and Martian basing. The section on the Space Station and orbiting structures considers the mechanics of space structures and materials, space environmental effects, robotic construction and planning, and maintenance and operations associated with the Space Station. Areas of special interest include space power, life support systems, human factors, astronomy, education, and management and planning of systems for space facilities.

  18. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Artistic Homes of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Standard features of their homes include advanced framed 2x6 24-inch on center walls, R-21 blown insulation in the walls, and high-efficiency windows.

  19. Technological In-Migration and Curricular Change; Educational Politics in Albuquerque, 1945-1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hales, William M., Jr.; Burlingame, Martin

    The impact of a large in-migration of scientists and technicians on the educational policies of the Albuquerque, New Mexico, public school system from 1945 to 1965 was investigated for the purpose of analyzing the educational politics of a system related to an increasing tempo of demands for a more academic curriculum. A case study design which…

  20. Financial administration of work for nonfederal sponsors, DOE Field Office (AL), Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Field Office, Albuquerque (AL) is responsible for managing and controlling nonfederally sponsored work done by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The audit objective was to determine whether the funding of, and accounting for, work done under a 1984 funds-in agreement and work for others in Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 complied with laws, regulations, and policies.

  1. Evaluation of the geothermal resource in the area of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Jiracek, G.R.; Swanberg, C.A.; Morgan, P.; Parker, M.D.

    1983-07-01

    Factors indicating a potential geothermal resource near Albuquerque are: (1) nearby volcanoes active as recently as 120,000 years ago, (2) gravity interpretation indicating a potential reservoir averaging 1.5 km thickness, (3) high heat flow near the city, (4) warm waters (>30/sup 0/C) in municipal wells, (5) recent seismicity indicating active faulting, thereby, allowing the possibility of deep hydrothermal circulation, (6) high shallow (<30 m) temperature gradients (>100/sup 0/C/km) discovered in our drillholes, (7) deeper (<500 m) gradients from water wells exceeding 80/sup 0/C/km, and (8) chemical analyses of 88 groundwater samples yielding estimated base reservoir temperatures as high as 190/sup 0/C. An area of elevated shallow temperature gradients (less than or equal to 140/sup 0/C/km) was discovered a few kilometers west of Albuquerque by our 69 hole drilling program. Resistivity, magnetic, and gravity measurements combined with computer modeling suggests that heated ground water is forced closer to the surface here by flow over a buried ridge. A well drilled nearby yielded the highest recorded temperature in the Albuquerque area at its maximum depth (32.8/sup 0/C at 364 m). The deep gradient is 35/sup 0/C/km. An oil test well close by reported large volumes of water at 1 km; therefore, the possibility of a low temperature (>50/sup 0/C) geothermal resource exists west of Albuquerque at less than 1 km depth.

  2. 76 FR 72001 - Notice of Public Meeting, Albuquerque District Resource Advisory Council Meeting, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... and operating procedures, and presentations by the Socorro and Rio Puerco Field Office Managers. The... comment and time available, the time for individual oral comments may be limited. Robert A. Casias,...

  3. 1996 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.H.; Duncan, D.; Sanchez, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs, and to conduct fundamental research and development (R&D) to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, electronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of this mission, the Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Center at SNL/NM conducts extensive environmental monitoring, surveillance, and compliance activities to assist SNL`s line organizations in meeting all applicable environmental regulations applicable to the site including those regulating radiological and nonradiological effluents and emissions. Also herein are included, the status of environmental programs that direct and manage activities such as terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring; hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental restoration (ER); oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection.

  4. 77 FR 41874 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of New Mexico dated 07/09... adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Lincoln. Contiguous Counties: New Mexico: Chaves,...

  5. 2003 Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  6. Description of piezometers installed in the Duranes well field area, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    Since 1993, the aquifer system in the Middle Rio Grande Basin, and particularly in the Albuquerque area, has been the focus of studies to further define the extent of the most productive parts of the aquifer and to gain a better understanding of ground-water/surface-water interactions. Twenty-one piezometers were installed during January and February 1997 at five sites in the Duranes well field area in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to allow for concentrated collection of hydraulic-head data. This concentrated collection of shallow hydraulic-head data may lead to a better understanding of the effects of ground-water production on the Rio Grande near a City of Albuquerque well field. Each piezometer was installed in a hole augered by a rig using hollow-stem auger flights. All piezometers are constructed of flush-joint polyvinyl chloride casing with 5-foot polyvinyl chloride screens. The uppermost 2 feet of the piezometer casing is covered by a steel casing with a locking lid. Driller's logs and geophysical logs were collected from the deepest hole and piezometer, respectively, at each site. This report describes the piezometers installed and presents initial water- level data for all piezometers.

  7. Potential for a basin-centered gas accumulation in the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Finn, Thomsa M.; Nuccio, Vito F.

    2001-01-01

    The potential that a basin-centered or continuous-type gas accumulation is present in the Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico was investigated. The Albuquerque Basin is one of the many rift basins that make up the Rio Grand rift system, an area of active extension from Oligocene to recent time. The basin is significantly different from other Rocky Mountain basins that contain basin-centered gas accumulations because it is actively subsiding and is at near maximum burial and heating conditions at the present time. Burial reconstructions suggest that Cretaceous-age source rocks began to generate gas in the deeper parts of the basin about 20 million years ago and are still generating large amounts of gas. The high mud weights typically used while drilling the Cretaceous interval in the deeper areas of the basin suggest some degree of over-pressuring. Gas shows are commonly reported while drilling through the Cretaceous interval; however, attempts to complete gas wells in the Cretaceous have resulted in subeconomic quantities of gas, primarily because of low permeabilities. Little water has been reported. All of these characteristics suggest that a basin-centered gas accumulation of some sort is present in the Albuquerque Basin.

  8. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  9. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin, central New Mexico, 1901-95, with projections to 2020

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The ground-water-flow model of the Albuquerque Basin (Kernodle, J.M., McAda, D.P., and Thorn, C.R., 1995, Simulation of ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin, central New Mexico, with projections to 2020: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report 94-4251, 114 p.) was updated to include new information on the hydrogeologic framework (Hawley, J.W., Haase, C.S., and Lozinsky, R.P., 1995, An underground view of the Albuquerque Basin: Proceedings of the 39th Annual New Mexico Water Conference, November 3-4, 1994, p. 37-55). An additional year of ground-water-withdrawal data was appended to the simulation of the historical period and incorporated into the base for future projections to the year 2020. The revised model projects the simulated ground-water levels associated with an aerally enlarged occurrence of the relatively high hydraulic conductivity in the upper part of the Santa Fe Group east and west of the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area and north to Bernalillo. Although the differences between the two model versions are substantial, the revised model does not contradict any previous conclusions about the effect of City of Albuquerque ground-water withdrawals on flow in the Rio Grande or the net benefits of an effort to conserve ground water. Recent revisions to the hydrogeologic model (Hawley, J.W., Haneberg, W.C., and Whitworth, P.M., in press, Hydrogeologic investigations in the Albuquerque Basin, central New Mexico, 1992-1995: Socorro, New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources Open- File Report 402) of the Albuquerque Basin eventually will require that this model version also be revised and updated.

  10. Integration of RGB "Dust" Imagery to Operations at the Albuquerque Forecast Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuell, Kevin; Guyer, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program has been providing unique Red-Green-Blue (RGB) composite imagery to its operational partners since 2005. In the early years of activity these RGB products were related to a True Color RGB, showing what one's own eyes would see if looking down at earth from space, as well as a Snow-Cloud RGB (i.e. False Color), separating clouds from snow on the ground. More recently SPoRT has used the EUMETSAT Best Practices standards for RGB composites to transition a wide array of imagery for multiple uses. A "Dust" RGB product has had particular use at the Albuquerque, New Mexico WFO. Several cases have occurred where users were able to isolate dust plume locations for mesoscale and microscale events during day and night time conditions. In addition the "Dust" RGB can be used for more than just detection of dust as it is sensitive to the changes in density due to atmospheric moisture content. Hence low-level dry boundaries can often be discriminated. This type of imagery is a large change from the single channel imagery typically used by operational forecast staff and hence, can be a challenge to interpret. This presentation aims to discuss the integration of such new imagery into operational use as well as the benefits assessed by the Albuquerque WFO over several documented events.

  11. 76 FR 11291 - University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility Operating License... No. R-102, held by the University of New Mexico (the licensee), which authorizes continued operation of the University of New Mexico AGN-201M Reactor (UNMR), located in Albuquerque, Bernalillo...

  12. Stormwater Management for TMDLs in an Arid Climate: A Case Study Application of SUSTAIN in Albuquerque, New Mexico - report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This case study for the Albuquerque, New Mexico area was conducted under contract with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development using the System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Integration Analysis (SUSTAIN). The effort focuses on inve...

  13. Service Networks and Patterns of Utilization: Mental Health Programs, Indian Health Service (IHS). Volume 4: Albuquerque Area, 1966-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attneave, Carolyn L.; Beiser, Morton

    The fourth volume in a 10-volume report on the historical development (1966-1973) of the 8 administrative Area Offices of the Indian Health Service (IHS) Mental Health Programs, this report presents information on the Albuquerque Area Office. Included in this report are: (1) The Context (geographic distribution; IHS facilities; population served;…

  14. Proceedings of the 1978 National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 24-27, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Transfer, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This publication contains the proceedings of the National Conference on Technology for Energy Conservation held in January 1978, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The 112 papers included are organized under the following topics: (1) Legal Considerations; (2) Energy from Biomass; (3) Energy Conservation in Agriculture; (4) Status of Energy Conservation;…

  15. Water-table map of the San Jose well field and vicinity, Albuquerque, New Mexico, spring 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Water samples taken from Albuquerque 's San Jose well field during 1980 contained several undesireable organic compounds. An investigation defined the configuration of the water table in the vicinity of these wells. This map shows the direction of ground-water movement and in selecting test wells for water-quality sampling. (USGS)

  16. Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed Explosive Components Facility (ECF) at the Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL). This facility is needed to integrate, centralize, and enhance many of the explosive, neutron generation, and weapons testing programs currently in progress at SNL. In general, there is insufficient space in existing facilities for the development and testing activities required by modern explosives technologies. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed ECF project and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, and CEQ regulations at 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required, and the DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  17. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students` expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  18. Evaluation of Machine Guarding Pilot course taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, March 25--27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-05-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Machine Guarding which was conducted at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This class was the second pilot course taught. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course, and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were lower than normal and reflect problems that were encountered in this class. The course and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded some of the students' expectations of the course and results from the final examination indicated that the majority of students gained significant knowledge from the course while others were distracted and gained little from the course. A graph showing the distribution is included.

  19. Verification testing of the PKI collector at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauger, J. S.; Pond, S. L.

    1982-01-01

    Verification testing of a solar collector was undertaken prior to its operation as part of an industrial process heat plant at Capitol Concrete Products in Topeka, Kansas. Testing was performed at a control plant installed at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNLA). Early results show that plant performance is even better than anticipated and far in excess of test criteria. Overall plant efficiencies of 65 to 80 percent were typical during hours of good insolation. A number of flaws and imperfections were detected during operability testing, the most important being a problem in elevation drive alignment due to a manufacturing error. All problems were corrected as they occurred and the plant, with over 40 hours of operation, is currently continuing operability testing in a wholly-automatic mode.

  20. Surface-wave and refraction tomography at the FACT Site, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert E.; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Pullammanappallil, Satish; Engler, Bruce Phillip

    2006-08-01

    We present a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition and interpretation of both shear-wave and compressive-wave 3-D velocities. The technique requires no special seismic sources or array geometries, and is suited to studies with small source-receiver offsets. The method also effectively deals with unwanted seismic arrivals by using the statistical properties of the data itself to discriminate against spurious picks. We demonstrate the technique with a field experiment at the Facility for Analysis, Calibration, and Testing at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The resulting 3-D shear-velocity and compressive-velocity distributions are consistent with surface geologic mapping. The averaged velocities and V{sub p}/V{sub s} ratio in the upper 30 meters are also consistent with examples found in the scientific literature.

  1. Core drilling provides information about Santa Fe Group aquifer system beneath Albuquerque's West Mesa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, B.D.; Connell, S.D.; Hawley, J.W.; Stone, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Core samples from the upper ???1500 ft of the Santa Fe Group in the Albuquerque West Mesa area provide a first-hand look at the sediments and at subsurface stratigraphic relationships in this important part of the basin-fill aquifer system. Two major hydrostratigraphic subunits consisting of a lower coarse-grained, sandy interval and an overlying fine-grained, interbedded silty sand and clay interval lie beneath the water table at the 98th St core hole. Borehole electrical conductivity measurements reproduce major textural changes observed in the recovered cores and support subsurface correlations of hydrostratigraphic units in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system based on geophysical logs. Comparison of electrical logs from the core hole and from nearby city wells reveals laterally consistent lithostratigraphic patterns over much of the metropolitan area west of the Rio Grande that may be used to delineate structural and related stratigraphic features that have a direct bearing on the availability of ground water.

  2. Paleoearthquake recurrence on the East Paradise fault zone, metropolitan Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, Stephen F.; Mahan, Shannon

    2000-01-01

    A fortuitous exposure of the East Paradise fault zone near Arroyo de las Calabacillas has helped us determine a post-middle Pleistocene history for a long-forgotten Quaternary fault in the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Mapping of two exposures of the fault zone allowed us to measure a total vertical offset of 2.75 m across middle Pleistocene fluvial and eolian deposits and to estimate individual surface-faulting events of about 1, 0.5, and 1.25 m. These measurements and several thermoluminescence ages allow us to calculate a long-term average slip rate of 0.01 ± 0.001 mm/yr and date two surface-faulting events to 208 ± 25 ka and 75 ± 7 ka. The youngest event probably occurred in the late Pleistocene, sometime after 75 ± 7 ka. These data yield a single recurrence interval of 133 ± 26 ka and an average recurrence interval of 90 ± 10 ka. However, recurrence intervals are highly variable because the two youngest events occurred in less than 75 ka. Offsets of 0.5-1.25 m and a fault length of 13-20 km indicate that surface-rupturing paleoearthquakes on the East Paradise fault zone had probable Ms or Mw magnitudes of 6.8-7.0. Although recurrence intervals are long on the East Paradise fault zone, these data are significant because they represent some of the first published slip rate, paleoearthquake magnitude, and recurrence information for any of the numerous Quaternary faults in the rapidly growing Albuquerque-Rio Rancho metropolitan area.

  3. 78 FR 67210 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00038

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00038 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice...: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and...

  4. 76 FR 18289 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00020

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00020 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 1962-DR), dated 03/24/2011. Incident: Severe Winter Storm and Extreme...

  5. 77 FR 55523 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4079-DR), dated 08/24/2012. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period:...

  6. 75 FR 57538 - New Mexico Disaster # NM-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 1936-DR), dated 09/13/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  7. 78 FR 61999 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4148-DR), dated 09/30/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding....

  8. 78 FR 66982 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4152-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe storms, flooding, and...

  9. 76 FR 76801 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of New Mexico (FEMA- 4047-DR), dated 11/23/2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident Period:...

  10. Geologic Map of the Albuquerque 30' x 60' Quadrangle, North-Central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Paul L.; Cole, James C.

    2007-01-01

    The Albuquerque 30' x 60' quadrangle spans the Rio Grande rift between the Colorado Plateau and Great Plains geologic provinces, and includes parts of the Basin and Range and Southern Rocky Mountain physiographic provinces. Geologic units exposed in the quadrangle range in age from Early Proterozoic schist and granite to modern river alluvium. The principal geologic features of the area, however, chiefly reflect contractional folding and thrusting of the Late Cretaceous Laramide orogeny and the Neogene extension of the Rio Grande rift. Significant parts of the history of the rift in this region are displayed and documented by the geology exposed in the Albuquerque quadrangle. Post-Laramide erosion, beginning at about 60 Ma, is recorded by the Diamond Tail and Galisteo Formations (upper Paleocene and Eocene) that are preserved in the Hagan Basin and around the uplifted margins of the younger Rio Grande rift. Intermediate volcaniclastic deposits of the Espinaso Formation (upper Eocene and Oligocene) were shed in and around the contemporaneous volcanic-intrusive complexes of the Ortiz porphyry belt in the northeastern part of the quadrangle. The earliest fluvial sediments attributed to extension in the Rio Grande rift in this area are the Tanos and Blackshare Formations (upper Oligocene and Miocene) in the Hagan Basin, which indicate extension was underway by 25 Ma. Farther west, the oldest rift-filling sediments are eolian sand and interdune silty deposits of the Zia Formation (lower to middle Miocene). Major extension occurred during the Miocene, but subsidence and sedimentation were highly irregular from place to place. Parts of three rift sub-basins are known within the Albuquerque quadrangle, each basin locally as deep as about 14,000 ft, separated by less-extended zones (structural horsts) where the rift fill is much thinner. The geometry of these early, deep rift sub-basins suggests the primary extension direction was oriented northeast-southwest. Significant

  11. Simulation of a long-term aquifer test conducted near the Rio Grande, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, Douglas P.

    2001-01-01

    A long-term aquifer test was conducted near the Rio Grande in Albuquerque during January and February 1995 using 22 wells and piezometers at nine sites, with the City of Albuquerque Griegos 1 production well as the pumped well. Griegos 1 discharge averaged about 2,330 gallons per minute for 54.4 days. A three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow model was used to estimate aquifer properties in the vicinity of the Griegos well field and the amount of infiltration induced into the aquifer system from the Rio Grande and riverside drains as a result of pumping during the test. The model was initially calibrated by trial-and-error adjustments of the aquifer properties. The model was recalibrated using a nonlinear least-squares regression technique. The aquifer system in the area includes the middle Tertiary to Quaternary Santa Fe Group and post-Santa Fe Group valley- and basin-fill deposits of the Albuquerque Basin. The Rio Grande and adjacent riverside drains are in hydraulic connection with the aquifer system. The hydraulic-conductivity values of the upper part of the Santa Fe Group resulting from the model calibrated by trial and error varied by zone in the model and ranged from 12 to 33 feet per day. The hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium was 45 feet per day. The vertical to horizontal anisotropy ratio was 1:140. Specific storage was 4 x 10-6 per foot of aquifer thickness, and specific yield was 0.15 (dimensionless). The sum of squared errors between the observed and simulated drawdowns was 130 feet squared. Not all aquifer properties could be estimated using nonlinear regression because of model insensitivity to some aquifer properties at observation locations. Hydraulic conductivity of the inner-valley alluvium, middle part of the Santa Fe Group, and riverbed and riverside-drain bed and specific yield had low sensitivity values and therefore could not be estimated. Of the properties estimated, hydraulic conductivity of the upper part of

  12. ION GPS-91; Proceedings of the 4th International Technical Meeting of the Satellite Division of the Institute of Navigation, Albuquerque, NM, Sept. 11-13, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Various papers on satellite technology are presented. The general topics addressed include: GPS overview and status, civil receivers and technology, multisensor integration, time and frequency transfer, propagation phenomena and networks, civil navigation applications, military and space, differential navigation applications and performance, range applications and equipment, high precision navigation and positioning, achieving GPS navigation integrity, differential GPS communication methods. (For individual items see A93-21127 to A93-21173)

  13. Space nuclear power systems 1989; Proceedings of the 6th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 8-12, 1989. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Editor); Hoover, Mark D. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    The present conference discusses such space nuclear power (SNP) issues as current design trends for SDI applications, ultrahigh heat-flux systems with curved surface subcooled nucleate boiling, design and manufacturing alternatives for low cost production of SNPs, a lightweight radioisotope heater for the Galileo mission, compatible materials for uranium fluoride-based gas core SNPs, Johnson noise thermometry for SNPs, and uranium nitride/rhenium compatibility studies for the SP-100 SNP. Also discussed are system issues in antimatter energy conversion, the thermal design of a heat source for a Brayton cycle radioisotope power system, structural and thermal analyses of an isotope heat source, a novel plant protection strategy for transient reactors, and beryllium toxicity.

  14. Space nuclear power systems; Proceedings of the 8th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 6-10, 1991. Pts. 1-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (Editor); Hoover, Mark D. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses NASA mission planning for space nuclear power, lunar mission design based on nuclear thermal rockets, inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion for space power, nuclear risk analysis of the Ulysses mission, the role of the interface in refractory metal alloy composites, an advanced thermionic reactor systems design code, and space high power nuclear-pumped lasers. Also discussed are exploration mission enhancements with power-beaming, power requirement estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars rover, SP-100 reactor design, safety, and testing, materials compatibility issues for fabric composite radiators, application of the enabler to nuclear electric propulsion, orbit-transfer with TOPAZ-type power sources, the thermoelectric properties of alloys, ruthenium silicide as a promising thermoelectric material, and innovative space-saving device for high-temperature piping systems. The second volume of this conference discusses engine concepts for nuclear electric propulsion, nuclear technologies for human exploration of the solar system, dynamic energy conversion, direct nuclear propulsion, thermionic conversion technology, reactor and power system control, thermal management, thermionic research, effects of radiation on electronics, heat-pipe technology, radioisotope power systems, and nuclear fuels for power reactors. The third volume discusses space power electronics, space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors, power systems concepts, space power electronics systems, the use of artificial intelligence in space, flight qualifications and testing, microgravity two-phase flow, reactor manufacturing and processing, and space and environmental effects.

  15. Space nuclear power systems; Proceedings of the 8th Symposium, Albuquerque, NM, Jan. 6-10, 1991. Pts. 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Hoover, Mark D.

    1991-07-01

    The present conference discusses NASA mission planning for space nuclear power, lunar mission design based on nuclear thermal rockets, inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion for space power, nuclear risk analysis of the Ulysses mission, the role of the interface in refractory metal alloy composites, an advanced thermionic reactor systems design code, and space high power nuclear-pumped lasers. Also discussed are exploration mission enhancements with power-beaming, power requirement estimates for a nuclear-powered manned Mars rover, SP-100 reactor design, safety, and testing, materials compatibility issues for fabric composite radiators, application of the enabler to nuclear electric propulsion, orbit-transfer with TOPAZ-type power sources, the thermoelectric properties of alloys, ruthenium silicide as a promising thermoelectric material, and innovative space-saving device for high-temperature piping systems. The second volume of this conference discusses engine concepts for nuclear electric propulsion, nuclear technologies for human exploration of the solar system, dynamic energy conversion, direct nuclear propulsion, thermionic conversion technology, reactor and power system control, thermal management, thermionic research, effects of radiation on electronics, heat-pipe technology, radioisotope power systems, and nuclear fuels for power reactors. The third volume discusses space power electronics, space nuclear fuels for propulsion reactors, power systems concepts, space power electronics systems, the use of artificial intelligence in space, flight qualifications and testing, microgravity two-phase flow, reactor manufacturing and processing, and space and environmental effects. (For individual items see A93-13752 to A93-13937)

  16. Consortial Leadership: Cooperation in a Competitive Environment. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (130th, Albuquerque, NM, May 14-16, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The program of the 130th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) explored the leadership challenges posed by the juxtapositions of cooperation and competing priorities in a consortial environment. Following an opening and welcome (Gloria Werner, ARL Presiding President), and a Keynote Address, "Defining Successful Leadership" (David…

  17. 78 FR 52599 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00033 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00033 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration... Administrator's EIDL declaration, applications for economic injury disaster loans may be filed at the...

  18. 78 FR 57922 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00034 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00034 Declaration of Economic Injury AGENCY: Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) declaration for the...'s EIDL declaration, applications for economic injury disaster loans may be filed at the...

  19. Evaluation of light-emitting diode lamps: a report to the city of Albuquerque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Marlene

    2001-12-01

    Sandia assessed white LED lamps for parking lot, security and bike path lighting for the City of Albuquerque. Powering these lamps with photovoltaics was of particular interest to the city. Eight commercially available lamps were tested; one was AC and all others were 12-volt DC. Because DC-only photovoltaic systems do not regulate output voltage, a 12-volt nominal photovoltaic system can see a voltage range from 10.5-15.3 volts. Therefore, the LED lamp must be specified for the DC voltage range expected with a photovoltaic system. We found several failed lamps at the high voltage range of our test, which is below voltages that can be seen in the field. In addition, LED lamps need to be more powerful and cost competitive, and temperature and lifetime issues need to be addressed in order to be more widely useful with photovoltaic systems for illumination applications. We concluded that presently available white LED lighting powered by photovoltaics could be considered for bike path lighting applications where the area is remote, or for security lighting in areas that are difficult to access. We do not recommend LED lamps for much larger flux levels such as parking lot lighting at this time.

  20. Demographic correlates of paternity confidence and pregnancy outcomes among Albuquerque men.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kermyt G; Kaplan, Hillard; Lancaster, Jane B

    2006-12-01

    We examine the demographic correlates of paternity confidence, or men's assessment of the likelihood that they are the genetic father of a particular child. Evolutionary theory predicts that men will provide less parental investment for putative genetic offspring who are unlikely to be their actual offspring, but confidence of paternity has not been as extensively examined as its importance would merit. Using self-reported data on paternity confidence in 3,360 pregnancies reported by men living in Albuquerque, New Mexico, we find that low paternity confidence is more common among unmarried couples and for unplanned pregnancies. We also find that men are more likely not to state paternity confidence (i.e., they refuse to answer the question) if a pregnancy is unplanned. We additionally examine the pregnancy outcomes associated with confidence of paternity. We find that low paternity confidence pregnancies are significantly more likely to be aborted, and pregnancies for which paternity confidence is unstated are more likely to be aborted or to miscarry. Both abortion and miscarriage are associated with unmarried couples, with unplanned pregnancies, and with couples who have fewer children together.

  1. Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scope of the audit at the ITRI was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; soils, sediments, and biota; surface water/drinking water; groundwater; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; quality assurance; radiation; inactive waste sites; environmental management; and environmental monitoring programs. Specifically assessed was the compliance of ITRI operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; internal operating standards; and best management practices. Onsite activities included inspection of ITRI facilities and operations; review of site documents; interviews with DOE and contractor personnel, as well as representatives from state regulatory agencies; and reviews of previous appraisals. Using these sources of information, the environmental audit team developed findings, which fell into two general categories: compliance findings and best management practice findings. Each finding also identifies apparent causal factor(s) that contributed to the finding and will assist line management in developing ``root causes`` for implementing corrective actions.

  2. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  3. Water-Level Data for the Albuquerque Basin and Adjacent Areas, Central New Mexico, Period of Record Through 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWees, R.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25 to 40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompass the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the Albuquerque Basin are obtained solely from ground-water resources. An increase of approximately 20 percent in the population from 1991 to present also resulted in an increased demand for water. From April 1982 through September 1983, a network of wells was established to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the Albuquerque Basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly. Currently (2004), the network consists of 234 wells and piezometers. This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at 155 sites through 2004. Water-level and other data for 71 sites are collected by other agencies. Water-level data for 8 sites of the 155 sites measured by the U.S. Geological Survey were not available for this report.

  4. Organic carbonyl compounds in Albuquerque, New Mexico, air: A preliminary study of the effects of oxygenated fuel use

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Zhang, Lin; Gaffney, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    A suite of inorganic and organic species were analyzed for four 2--4 day time periods over a year in Albuquerque, New Mexico to determine baseline conditions for organic pollutants under the current air pollution control parameters. Concentrations of low molecular weight carbonyl compounds were relatively high compared with areas such as Los Angeles. Formio acid concentrations in air samples were significant even in winter. In addition, ratios of peroxypropionyl nitrate to peroxyacyetyl nitrate are higher than expected and may be related to the use of oxygenated fuels which are used to mitigate CO concentrations. The number of CO violations in Albuquerque has decreased steadily since 1982 and the downward trend has continued since 1989 when oxygenated fuel use was mandated. It is, therefore, difficult to correlate the drop in CO violations directly to the use of oxygenated fuels when such factors as fleet turnover, woodburning controls, emissions testing and meteorological conditions also may be playing significant roles. More detailed studies are needed to determine the specific relationship between the use of oxygenated fuels and the air quality in Albuquerque, New Mexico and similar urban areas in the western United States.

  5. Summary of water-quality data for City of Albuquerque drinking-water supply wells, 1988-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Lindberg, William E.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    1999-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque has collected and analyzed more than 5,000 water-quality samples from 113 water-supply wells in the Albuquerque area, including many drinking-water supply wells, since May of 1988. As a result, a large water-quality data base has been compiled that includes data for major ions, nutrients, trace elements, carbon, volatile organic compounds, radiological constituents, and bacteria. These data are intended to improve the understanding and management of the ground-water resources of the region, rather than demonstrate compliance with Federal and State drinking-water standards. This report gives summary statistics for selected physical properties and chemical constituents for ground water from wells used by the City of Albuquerque for drinking-water supply between 1988 and 1997. Maps are provided to show the general spatial distribution of selected parameters and water types around the region. Although the values of some parameters vary substantially across the city, median values for all parameters included in this report are less than their respective maximum contaminant levels in each drinking-water supply well. The dominant water types are sodium plus potassium / carbonate plus bicarbonate in the western part of the city and calcium / carbonate plus bicarbonate in the eastern part of the city.

  6. Low-flow water-quality and discharge data for lined channels in Northeast Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1990 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, R.L.; McBreen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The water resources of the Albuquerque metropolitan area are under increasing scrutiny by Federal and State regulators. Because of a lack of available low-flow data for use in addressing potential water-quality problems, a project was established to collect low-flow water-quality and discharge data. The project was initiated under a current cooperative program between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority. This report summarizes hydrologic data for that project collected between October 31, 1990, and September 3, 1994, at three sites in the lined channel network in northeast Albuquerque. The data collection network consisted of three sampling sites on Campus Wash, Embudo Arroyo, and the North Floodway Channel. The sites on Campus Wash and the North Floodway Channel were established at existing continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations; the Embudo Arroyo site was established at the site of an abandoned streamflow-gaging station. Data presented include site descriptions, instantaneous stream discharges measured at the time of sampling, and the results of the chemical analyses of the water-quality samples.

  7. Application of nonlinear-regression methods to a ground-water flow model of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Kernodle, J.M.; McAda, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the application of nonlinear-regression methods to a numerical model of ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico. In the Albuquerque Basin, ground water is the primary source for most water uses. Ground-water withdrawal has steadily increased since the 1940's, resulting in large declines in water levels in the Albuquerque area. A ground-water flow model was developed in 1994 and revised and updated in 1995 for the purpose of managing basin ground- water resources. In the work presented here, nonlinear-regression methods were applied to a modified version of the previous flow model. Goals of this work were to use regression methods to calibrate the model with each of six different configurations of the basin subsurface and to assess and compare optimal parameter estimates, model fit, and model error among the resulting calibrations. The Albuquerque Basin is one in a series of north trending structural basins within the Rio Grande Rift, a region of Cenozoic crustal extension. Mountains, uplifts, and fault zones bound the basin, and rock units within the basin include pre-Santa Fe Group deposits, Tertiary Santa Fe Group basin fill, and post-Santa Fe Group volcanics and sediments. The Santa Fe Group is greater than 14,000 feet (ft) thick in the central part of the basin. During deposition of the Santa Fe Group, crustal extension resulted in development of north trending normal faults with vertical displacements of as much as 30,000 ft. Ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin occurs primarily in the Santa Fe Group and post-Santa Fe Group deposits. Water flows between the ground-water system and surface-water bodies in the inner valley of the basin, where the Rio Grande, a network of interconnected canals and drains, and Cochiti Reservoir are located. Recharge to the ground-water flow system occurs as infiltration of precipitation along mountain fronts and infiltration of stream water along tributaries to the Rio Grande; subsurface

  8. Abstracts of the annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting, June 18-19, 2001, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Timothy J.; Tanaka, Kenneth L.; Senske, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The annual Planetary Geologic Mappers Meeting serves two purposes. In addition to giving mappers the opportunity to exchange ideas, experiences, victories, and problems with others, presentations are reviewed by the Geologic Mapping Subcommittee (GeMS) to provide input to the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Mapping Program review panel’s consideration of new proposals and progress reports that include mapping tasks. Funded mappers bring both oral presentation materials (slides or viewgraphs) and map products to post for review by GeMS and fellow mappers. Additionally, the annual meetings typically feature optional field trips offering earth analogs and parallels to planetary mapping problems. The 2001 Mappers Meeting, June 18-19, was convened by Tim Parker, Dave Senske, and Ken Tanaka and was hosted by Larry Crumpler and Jayne Aubele of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Oral presentations were given in the Museum’s Honeywell Auditorium, and maps were posted in the Sandia Room. In addition to active mappers, guests included local science teachers who had successfully competed for the right to attend and listen to the reports. It was a unique pleasure for mappers to have the opportunity to interact with and provide information to teachers responding so enthusiastically to the meeting presentation. On Sunday, June 17, Larry and Jayne conducted an optional pre-meeting field trip. The flanks of Rio Grande Rift, east and west of Albuquerque and Valles Caldera north of town presented tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary examples of the Rift and adjoining areas analogous to observed features on Mars and Venus. The arid but volcanically and tectonically active environment of New Mexico’s rift valley enables focus on features that appear morphologically young and spectacular in satellite images and digital relief models. The theme of the trip was to see what, at orbiter resolution, "obvious" geologic features look like at

  9. 1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and injuries that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Sandia National Laboratory-Albuquerque (SNL-AL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at SNL-AL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The annual report for 1995 has been redesigned from reports for previous years. Most of the information in the previous reports is also in this report, but some material now appears in the appendices instead of the main body of the report. The information presented in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site and the appendices provide more detail. A new section of the report presents trends in health over time. The Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories have been expanded with more examples of diagnoses to illustrate the content of each category. The data presented here apply only to SNL-AL. The DOE sites are varied, so comparisons of SNL-AL with other DOE sites should be made with caution. It is important to keep in mind that many factors can affect the completeness and accuracy of health information collected at the sites as well as affect patterns of illness and injury observed.

  10. The indoor radon problem: Studies in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookins, Douglas G.

    1988-12-01

    Radon buildup in homes is now recognized throughout the world as a potentially major health hazard. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimate 8,000 30,000 fatalities per year in the United States due to indoor radon. The Albuquerque, New Mexico area was chosen for study because it is representative of metropolitan areas in the southwestern United States where slightly uraniferous source rocks (Sandia granite) have provided the very immature soil for much of the area. The granite contains 4.7 ppm U, and limestone capping the granite 5.7 ppm U. Soils in the area average 4.24 ppm U, and Th/U ratios average 3.2. These data suggest some removal of U from the source rocks, but fixation of the U in the soils (that is, as opposed to widespread removal of the U by solution), thus providing a ready source for soil radon. A pilot study of soil radon in the area in winter of 1983 1984 shows high values, 180 pCi/l, relative to the U.S. average (about 100 pCi/l). In the winter of 1986 1987, 180 dwellings were surveyed for their indoor radon levels, including 20 that had been surveyed in summer of 1986. Twenty-eight percent of those in the winter study yielded indoor radon above the EPA suggested maximum permissible level of 4 pCi/l air, well above the EPA estimate of 10 15 dwellings for the U.S. The indoor radon levels show positive correlation with closeness to the Sandia Mountains, to soil radon, to excess insulation, to homes with solar capacities, and other factors. Building materials may provide a very minor source of some indoor radon. Summer readings are lower than winter readings except when the houses possess refrigerated air conditioning.

  11. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Mahan, Shannon; Stone, Byron D.; Shroba, Ralph R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley . The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47–40 ka . Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90–98 ka (based on dated basalt flows) . Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka) . The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1 .47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1 .61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft. (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft. (Primero Alto) above the modern floodplain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  12. Ages of Quaternary Rio Grande terrace-fill deposits, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, J.C.; Mahan, S.A.; Stone, B.D.; Shroba, R.R.

    2007-01-01

    Results from luminescence dating on 13 samples from the Albuquerque area show that major-drainage fluvial deposits represent significant periods of aggradation that formed paired, correlatable terraces on the east and west margins of the Rio Grande valley. The youngest terrace fills (Primero Alto) formed during late Pleistocene as a result of streamflow variations with climate cooling during Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 3; our ages suggest aggradation of the upper part of the fill occurred at about 47-40 ka. Deposits of the second (Segundo Alto) terraces reached maximum height during climate cooling in the early part of Marine Oxygen-Isotope Stage 5 as late as 90-98 ka (based on dated basalt flows). Our luminescence ages show considerable scatter and tend to be younger (range from 63 ka to 162 ka). The third (Tercero Alto) and fourth (Cuarto Alto) terraces are dated on the basis of included volcanic tephra. Tercero Alto terrace-fill deposits contain the Lava Creek B tephra (639 ka), and Cuarto Alto terrace-fill deposits contain tephra of the younger Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.22 Ma), the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (1.47 Ma), and the older Bandelier Tuff eruption (1.61 Ma). These periods of aggradation culminated in fluvial terraces that are preserved at maximum heights of 360 ft (Cuarto Alto), 300 ft (Tercero Alto), 140 ft (Segundo Alto), and 60 ft (Primero Alto) above the modern flood-plain. Despite lithologic differences related to local source-area contributions, these terracefill deposits can be correlated across the Rio Grande and up- and down-valley for tens of miles based on maximum height of the terrace above the modern floodplain.

  13. 469nm Fiber Laser Source

    SciTech Connect

    Drobshoff, A; Dawson, J W; Pennington, D M; Payne, S A; Beach, R

    2005-01-20

    We have demonstrated 466mW of 469nm light from a frequency doubled continuous wave fiber laser. The system consisted of a 938nm single frequency laser diode master oscillator, which was amplified in two stages to 5 Watts using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers and then frequency doubled in a single pass through periodically poled KTP. The 3cm long PPKTP crystal was made by Raicol Crystals Ltd. with a period of 5.9 {micro}m and had a phase match temperature of 47 degrees Centigrade. The beam was focused to a 1/e{sup 2} diameter in the crystal of 29 {micro}m. Overall conversion efficiency was 11% and the results agreed well with standard models. Our 938nm fiber amplifier design minimizes amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing an optimized core to cladding size ratio. This design allows the 3-level transition to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the 1088nm 4-level transition. We have also carefully chosen the fiber coil diameter to help suppress propagation of wavelengths longer than 938 nm. At 2 Watts, the 938nm laser had an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >10:1).

  14. 77 FR 58032 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Albuquerque/Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... discussed in detail in our April 13, 2012 proposal (76 FR 22249). In that notice we proposed to approve..., consistent with EPA's November 29, 2005 Phase 2 rule for the 1997 ozone NAAQS (70 FR 71612). These revisions... permitting, consistent with EPA's 2008 PM 2.5 NSR rule for the 1997 and 2006 PM 2.5 NAAQS (73 FR 28321,...

  15. Paleoearthquakes and Eolian-dominated fault sedimentation along the Hubbell Spring fault zone near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Personius, S.F.; Mahan, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Hubbell Spring fault zone forms the modern eastern margin of the Rio Grande rift in the Albuquerque basin of north-central New Mexico. Knowledge of its seismic potential is important because the fault zone transects Kirtland Air Force Base/Sandia National Laboratories and underlies the southern Albuquerque metropolitan area. No earthquakes larger than ML 5.5 have been reported in the last 150 years in this region, so we excavated the first trench across this fault zone to determine its late Quaternary paleoseismic history. Our trench excavations revealed a complex, 16-m-wide fault zone overlain by four tapered blankets of mixed eolian sand and minor colluvium that we infer were deposited after four large-magnitude, surface-rupturing earthquakes. Although the first (oldest) rupture event is undated, we used luminescence (thermoluminescence and infrared-stimulated luminescence) ages to determine that the subsequent three rupture events occurred about 56 ?? 6, 29 ?? 3, and 12 ?? 1 ka. These ages yield recurrence intervals of 27 and 17 k.y. between events and an elapsed time of 12 k.y. since the latest surface-rupturing paleoearthquake. Slip rates are not well constrained, but our preferred average slip rate since rupture event 2 (post-56 ka) is 0.05 mm/yr, and interval slip rates between the last three events are 0.06 and 0.09 mm/yr, respectively. Vertical displacements of 1-2 m per event and probable rupture lengths of 34-43 km indicate probable paleoearthquake magnitudes (Ms or Mw) of 6.8-7.1. Future earthquakes of this size likely would cause strong ground motions in the Albuquerque metropolitan area.

  16. Summary of Flow Loss between Selected Cross Sections on the Rio Grande in and near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Veenhuis, Jack E.

    2002-01-01

    The upper middle Rio Grande Basin, as defined by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, extends from the headwaters of the Rio Grande in southwestern Colorado to Fort Quitman, Texas. Most of the basin has a semiarid climate typical of the southwestern United States. This climate drives a highly variable streamflow regime that contributes to the complexity of water management in the basin. Currently, rapid population growth in the basin has resulted in increasing demands on the hydrologic system. Water management decisions have become increasingly complex because of the broad range of interests and issues. For these reasons, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, conducted paired flow measurements at two cross sections to determine cross-sectional loss in the Albuquerque reach of the Rio Grande. This report statistically summarizes flow losses in the Albuquerque reach of the Rio Grande during the winter nonirrigation season from December 1996 to February 2000. The two previous flow-loss investigations are statistically summarized. Daily mean flow losses are calculated for the winter nonirrigation season using daily mean flows at three selected Rio Grande streamflow-gaging stations.For the winter nonirrigation season cross-sectional measurements (1996-2000), an average of 210 cubic feet per second was returned to the river between the measurement sites, of which 165 cubic feet per second was intercepted by riverside drains along the 21.9-mile reach from the Rio Grande near Bernalillo to the Rio Grande at Rio Bravo Bridge streamflow-gaging stations. Total cross-sectional losses in this reach averaged about 90 cubic feet per second. Regression equations were determined for estimating downstream total outflow from upstream total inflow for all three paired measurement studies. Regression equations relating the three daily mean flow recording stations also were determined. In each succeeding study, additional outside variables

  17. Aeromagnetic expression of faults that offset basin fill, Albuquerque basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, M.R.; Minor, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over the Albuquerque basin show widespread expression of faults that offset basin fill and demonstrate that the aeromagnetic method can be an important hydrogeologic and surficial mapping tool in sediment-filled basins. Aeromagnetic expression of faults is recognized by the common correspondence of linear anomalies to surficial evidence of faulting across the area. In map view, linear anomalies show patterns typical of extensional faulting, such as anastomosing and en echelon segments. Depths to the tops of faulted magnetic layers showing the most prominent aeromagnetic expression range from 0 to 100 m. Sources related to subtler fault expressions range in depths from 200 to 500 m. We estimate that sources of the magnetic expressions of the near-surface faults likely reside within the upper 500-600 m of the subsurface. The linear anomalies in profile form show a range of shapes, but all of them can be explained by the juxta-position of layers having different magnetic properties. One typical anomaly differs from the expected symmetric fault anomaly by exhibiting an apparent low over the fault zone and more than one inflection point. Although the apparent low could easily be misinterpreted as representing multiple faults or an anomalous fault zone, geophysical analysis, magnetic-property measurements, and geologic considerations lead instead to a "thin-thick model" in which magnetic layers of different thickness are juxtaposed. The general geometry of this model is a thin magnetic layer on the upthrown block and a thick magnetic layer on the downthrown block. The thin-thick model can be represented geologically by growth faulting and syntectonic sedimentation, where relatively coarse-grained sediment (which is more magnetic than fine-grained material) has accumulated in the hanging wall. This implies that the aeromagnetic data have potential for mapping growth faults and locating concentrations of coarse-grained material

  18. Infiltration and quality of water for two arroyo channels, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1988-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.

    1995-01-01

    Selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were studied to collect information about the amount and quality of infiltration through arroyo channels. Infiltration rate was calculated for selected reaches of Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo based on instantaneous streamflow-loss volumes, wetted channel area, and instantaneous evaporation rates measured during 1988-92. Infiltration rates at Grant Line Arroyo ranged from 0.0 to 0.6 foot per day, and at Tijeras Arroyo from 2.28 to 30 feet per day. The evaporation rate ranged from one-tenth of 1 percent to 2 percent of the infiltration rate. Infiltration rates differed with the location of the reach isolated for measurement and with the time of day of the infiltration-rate measurement. Differences in intrinsic permeability of the sediments may be the most important factor affecting spatial variations in infiltration. The most important factor affecting temporal variations in infiltration may be the temperature of the water and sediment where infiltration occurs. Annual evaporation rates were greatest over saturated stream sediments and ranged from 802 to 1,025 millimeters per year or from 31.57 to 40.35 inches per year. Annual evaporation rates were least over unsaturated, unvegetated soil and ranged from 174 to 291 millimeters per year or from 6.85 to 11.46 inches per year. Annual evapotranspiration rates over grasses or shrubs or both were about one-half the rates over saturated stream sediments. Rates were similar for Grant Line and Tijeras Arroyos. The land- surface vegetation, availability of water at the land surface, availability of energy to enable a change of state from water to vapor, existence of a vapor concentration gradient, and a turbulent atmosphere to carry the vapor away may be the factors that determine the amount of evaporation and evapotranspiration. Water in Grant Line Arroyo and Tijeras Arroyo met U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking

  19. Public opinion and interest group positions on open-space issues in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA: Implications for resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannery, Thomas Allan

    1987-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to elicit and compare the open-space preferences of citizens and openspace experts in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. A randomly selected sample of 492 citizens and 35 open-space experts participated in a telephone survey during May 5 18, 1986. The following hypothesis was tested and used as a guideline for the study: HO1: There is no significant difference between respondents' status and preference for open space in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The hypothesis was rejected. Findings confirmed respondents' status affected preference for open space. Of the eight issues on which the citizen and expert groups were compared, five recorded significant differences in response profiles. The open-space expert group was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate offroad vehicle facilities, wildlife preserves, a citywide recreational trail, and a trail system along the arroyos and city ditches. The citizen sample was significantly more supportive of using open space to accommodate overnight camping facilities. Both groups equally supported using open space to accommodate an outdoor amphitheater, outdoor education facilities, and rafting, kayaking, and canoeing facilities. The finding indicated that expert preferences did not represent an aggregate of citizen preferences for managing open-space resources. Understanding both expert and citizen positions will facilitate decision-making processes and help resolve environmental disputes.

  20. Plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system near Albuquerque, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground water from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system of the Albuquerque Basin is the principal source of water for municipal, domestic, commercial, and industrial uses in the Albuquerque area, an area of about 410 square miles. Ground- water withdrawal in the basin has increased from about 97,000 acre-feet in 1970 to about 171,000 acre-feet in 1994. About 92 percent of the 1994 total was withdrawn in the Albuquerque area. Management of ground water in the Albuquerque Basin is related to the surface water in the Rio Grande. Because the aquifer system is hydraulically connected to the Rio Grande and water in the river is fully appropriated, the ability to reliably estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the river is important. This report describes the components of the Rio Grande/Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area and the data availability and data and interpretation needs relating to those components, and presents a plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. The information needs related to the components of the river/aquifer system are prioritized. Information that is necessary to improve the understanding or quantification of a component in the river/aquifer system is prioritized as essential. Information that could add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, is prioritized as useful. The study elements are prioritized in the same manner as the information needs; study elements designed to provide information considered necessary to improve the quantification of the system are prioritized as essential, and those designed to provide information that would add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, are prioritized as useful.

  1. Photoionization of Nitromethane at 355nm and 266nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Denhi; Betancourt, Francisco; Poveda, Juan Carlos; Guerrero, Alfonso; Cisneros, Carmen; Álvarez, Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    Nitromethane is one of the high-yield clean liquid fuels, i.e., thanks to the oxygen contained in nitromethane, much less atmospheric oxygen is burned compared to hydrocarbons such as gasoline, making the nitromethane an important prototypical energetic material, the understanding of its chemistry is relevant in other fields such as atmospheric chemistry or biochemistry. In this work we present the study of photoionization dynamics by multiphoton absorption with 355 nm and 266 nm wavelength photons, using time of flight spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the observed ion products appear for both wavelength and other only in one of them; both results were compared with preview observations and new ions were detected. This work is supported by CONACYT grant 165410 and DGAPA-UNAM grants IN-107-912 and IN-102-613.

  2. 77 FR 71119 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; City of Albuquerque-Bernalillo County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ....8 West Elk Wilderness CO 9.0 9.0 San Pedro Parks Wilderness... NM 9.8 9.8 Arches National Park... FR 36043 (June 15, 2012). National conservation organizations paired with organizations local to each... National Park have visibility impairment of 11.1 deciviews, while the other EPA proposals show...

  3. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is operated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) mission to provide weapon component technology and hardware for national security needs. SNL/NM also conducts fundamental research and development to advance technology in energy research, computer science, waste management, microelectronics, materials science, and transportation safety for hazardous and nuclear components. In support of SNL's mission, the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Center and the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at SNL/NM have established extensive environmental programs to assist SNL's line organizations in meeting all applicable local, State, and Federal environmental regulations and DOE requirements. This annual report for calendar year 1998 (CY98) summarizes the compliance status of environmental regulations applicable to SNL site operations. Environmental program activities include terrestrial surveillance; ambient air and meteorological monitoring hazardous, radioactive, and solid waste management; pollution prevention and waste minimization; environmental remediation; oil and chemical spill prevention; and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) activities. This report has been prepared in compliance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990).

  4. Chicanos in Higher Education: Proceedings of a National Institute on Access to Higher Education for the Mexican American (Albuquerque, New Mexico, July 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casso, Henry J., Ed.; Roman, Gilbert D., Ed.

    In July 1975, a national institute was held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to propose ways of improving Chicano access to higher education. The institute, dedicated to the memory of New Mexico educator Dr. Dolores Gonzales, brought together Chicano educators and representatives of public and private universities, state governments, and the Federal…

  5. Rainfall, runoff, and water-quality data for the urban storm-water program in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metropolitan area, water year 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Todd; Romero, Orlando; Jimenez, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Urbanization has dramatically increased precipitation runoff to the system of drainage channels and natural stream channels in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metropolitan area. Rainfall and runoff data are important for planning and designing future storm-water conveyance channels in newly developing areas. Storm-water quality also is monitored in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System mandated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority, the City of Albuquerque, and the U.S. Geological Survey began a cooperative program to collect hydrologic data to assist in assessing the quality and quantity of surface-water resources in the Albuquerque area. This report presents water-quality, streamflow, and rainfall data collected from October 1, 2003, to September 30, 2004 (water year 2004). Also provided is a station analysis for each of the 18 streamflow-gaging sites and 39 rainfall-gaging sites, which includes a description of monitoring equipment, problems associated with data collection during the year, and other information used to compute streamflow discharges or rainfall records. A hydrographic comparison shows the effects that the largest drainage channel in the metropolitan area, the North Floodway Channel, has on total flow in the Rio Grande.

  6. Technological Alternatives in Learning; Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Western College Reading Association (6th; Albuquerque, April 12-14, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerstiens, Gene, Ed.

    The thirty papers in this Annual Proceedings of the Western College Reading Association (WCRA) were originally delivered at the Sixth Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Topics covered include self-programed control, increasing study-concentration behavior, individualizing a college reading program, human options for human beings,…

  7. Task Force on Women, Minorities and the Handicapped in Science and Technology: Public Hearing. Report of the Proceedings (Albuquerque, New Mexico, September 22, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology, Washington, DC.

    The Task Force on Women, Minorities, and the Handicapped in Science and Technology was established by the U.S. Congress in Public Law 99-383 with the purpose of developing a long-range plan for broadening participation in science and engineering. Public hearings were held in Albuquerque (New Mexico), Atlanta (Georgia), Baltimore (Maryland), Boston…

  8. Simulation of ground-water flow in the Albuquerque Basin, central New Mexico, 1901-1994, with projections to 2020

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.; McAda, D.P.; Thorn, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water-flow model of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque Basin, which comprises the Santa Fe Group (late Oligocene to middle Pleistocene age) and overlying valley and basin-fill deposits (Pleistocene to Holocene age). The model is designed to be flexible and adaptive to new geologic and hydrologic information as it becomes available by using a geographic information system as a data-base manager to interface with the model. The aquifer system was defined and quantified in the model consistent with the current (July 1994) understanding of the structural and geohydrologic framework of the basin. Rather than putting the model through a rigorous calibration process, dis- crepancies between simulated and measured responses in hydraulic head were taken to indicate that the understanding of a local part of the aquifer system was incomplete or incorrect. The model simulates ground-water flow over an area of about 2,400 square miles to a depth of 1,730 to about 2,020 feet below the water table with 244 rows, 178 columns, and 11 layers. Of the 477,752 cells in the model, 310,376 are active. The top four model layers approximate the 80-foot thickness of alluvium in the incised and refilled valley of the Rio Grande to provide detail of the effect of ground-water withdrawals on the surface- water system. Away from the valley these four layers represent the interval within the Santa Fe Group aquifer system between the com- puted predevelopment water table and a level 80 feet below the grade of the Rio Grande. The simulations include initial condi- tions (steady-state), the 1901-1994 historical period, and four possible ground-water withdrawal scenarios from 1994 to 2020. The model indicates that for the year ending in March 1994, net surface-water loss in the basin resulting from the City of Albuquerque's ground-water withdrawal totaled about 53,000 acre- feet. The balance of the about 123

  9. Human factors evaluation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Regina Lee; Whitehurst, Hugh O.

    2003-11-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. Mixed waste may also be handled at the AHCF. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, was required to perform this mission. A checklist procedure was used to perform a human-factors evaluation of the AHCF modifications. This evaluation resulted in two recommendations, both of which have been implemented.

  10. Analytical results of a long-term aquifer test conducted near the Rio Grande, Albuquerque, New Mexico, with a section on piezometric-extensometric test results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Conde R.; Heywood, Charles E.

    2001-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque, New Mexico, is interested in gaining a better understanding, both quantitative and qualitative, of the aquifer system in and around Albuquerque. Currently (2000), the City of Albuquerque and surrounding municipalities are completely dependent on ground-water reserves for their municipal water supply. This report presents the results of a long-term aquifer test conducted near the Rio Grande in Albuquerque. The long-term aquifer test was conducted during the winter of 1994-95. The City of Albuquerque Griegos 1 water production well was pumped continuously for 54 days at an average pumping rate of 2,331 gallons per minute. During the 54-day pumping and a 30-day recovery period, water levels were recorded in a monitoring network that consisted of 3 production wells and 19 piezometers located at nine sites. These wells and piezometers were screened in river alluvium and (or) the upper and middle parts of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. In addition to the measurement of water levels, aquifer-system compaction was monitored during the aquifer test by an extensometer. Well-bore video and flowmeter surveys were conducted in the Griegos 1 water production well at the end of the recovery period to identify the location of primary water- producing zones along the screened interval. Analytical results from the aquifer test presented in this report are based on the methods used to analyze a leaky confined aquifer system and were performed using the computer software package AQTESOLV. Estimated transmissivities for the Griegos 1 and 4 water production wells ranged from 10,570 to 24,810 feet squared per day; the storage coefficient for the Griegos 4 well was 0.0025. A transmissivity of 13,540 feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 0.0011 were estimated from the data collected from a piezometer completed in the production interval of the Griegos 1 well.

  11. 32nm overlay improvement capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, Brad; Huang, Kevin; O'Brien, Kelly; Tien, David; Tsai, Frank; Minvielle, Anna; Singh, Lovejeet; Schefske, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The industry is facing a major challenge looking forward on the technology roadmap with respect to overlay control. Immersion lithography has established itself as the POR for 45nm and for the next few nodes. As the gap closes between scanner capability and device requirements new methodologies need to be taken into consideration. Double patterning lithography is an approach that's being considered for 32 and below, but it creates very strict demands for overlay performance. The fact that a single layer device will need to be patterned using two sequential single processes creates a strong coupling between the 1st and 2nd exposure. The coupling effect during the double patterning process results in extremely tight tolerances for overlay error and scanner capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to explore a new modeling method to improve lithography performance for the 32nm node. Not necessarily unique for double patterning, but as a general approach to improve overlay performance regardless of which patterning process is implemented. We will achieve this by performing an in depth source of variance analysis of current scanner performance and project the anticipated improvements from our new modeling approach. Since the new modeling approach will involve 2nd and 3rd order corrections we will also provide and analysis that outlines current metrology capabilities and sampling optimizations to further expand the opportunities of an efficient implementation of such approach.

  12. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  13. Annual Site Environmental Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Calendar year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Agogino, Karen; Sanchez, Rebecca

    2008-09-30

    Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a government-owned/contractor-operated facility. Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, manages and operates the laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The DOE/NNSA Sandia Site Office (SSO) administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of Sandia Corporation’s environmental protection and monitoring programs through December 31, 2007. Major environmental programs include air quality, water quality, groundwater protection, terrestrial surveillance, waste management, pollution prevention (P2), environmental restoration (ER), oil and chemical spill prevention, and implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2007).

  14. Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

  15. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2015-10-21

    An initial network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. The network currently (2014) consists of 125 wells and piezometers. (A piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer, often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths.) The USGS, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, currently (2014) measures and reports water levels from the 125 wells and piezometers in the network; this report presents water-level data collected by USGS personnel at those 125 sites through water year 2014 (October 1, 2013, to September 30, 2014).

  16. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.; Bryant, Christina F.

    2016-10-27

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25–40 miles wide. The basin is hydrologically defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompasses the structural Rio Grande Rift between San Acacia to the south and Cochiti Lake to the north. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA) began treatment and distribution of surface water from the Rio Grande through the San Juan-Chama Drinking Water Project. A 20-percent population increase in the basin from 1990 to 2000 and a 22-percent population increase from 2000 to 2010 may have resulted in an increased demand for water in areas within the basin.An initial network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the Albuquerque Basin. In 1983, this network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly. The network currently (2015) consists of 124 wells and piezometers. (A piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer, often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths.) The USGS, in cooperation with the ABCWUA, currently (2015) measures and reports water levels from the 124 wells and piezometers in the network; this report presents water-level data collected by USGS personnel at those 124 sites through water year 2015 (October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015).

  17. Use of air-pressurized slug tests to estimate hydraulic conductivity at selected piezometers completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Carole L.; Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    The City of Albuquerque Public Works Department, Water Resources Management (City), is interested in quantifying aquifer hydraulic properties in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to better understand and manage water resources in the Middle Rio Grande Basin. In 1998, the City and the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative program to determine hydraulic properties of aquifer material adjacent to screened intervals of piezometers in the Albuquerque area. Investigators conducted slug tests from March 8 through April 8, 1999, to estimate hydraulic conductivity of aquifer material adjacent to the screened intervals of 25 piezometers from 11 nested- piezometer sites in the Albuquerque area. At 20 of the piezometers, slug-test responses were typical; at 2 piezometers, tests were prematurely terminated because the tests were taking too long to complete; and at 3 piezometers, test responses were oscillatory. Methods used to estimate hydraulic conductivity were the Bouwer and Rice method or the Cooper, Bredehoeft, and Papadopulos method for most tests; the Shapiro and Greene method for prematurely terminated tests; and the van der Kamp method for oscillatory tests. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from about 0.15 to 92 feet per day. In general, the smaller estimated values are associated with fine-grained aquifer materials and the larger estimated hydraulic-conductivity values are associated with coarse- grained aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals of the piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates ranged from 0.15 to 8.2 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 12 piezometers and from 12 to 41 feet per day for aquifer materials adjacent to the screened intervals at 10 piezometers. Hydraulic-conductivity estimates at four piezometers were greater than 41 feet per day.

  18. Description of piezometer nests and water levels in the Rio Grande Valley near Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.; Bullard, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four piezometers were installed from mid-October 1984 to mid-January 1985 in two sections of the Rio Grande valley near Albuquerque, New Mexico. Each cross section is comprised of four piezometer nests and each nest is comprised of three piezometers completed at different depths. The purpose of this report is to describe the piezometers nests and present some of the water level data collected from the piezometers. The piezometers were drilled using the hydraulic rotary method. The piezometers were completed with 5 feet of 60-slot wire-wound stainless steel well screen and flush joint PVC well casing. The description of each piezometer nest consists of the location of the particular piezometer nest; a figure showing the location, depth altitude, and station identification number of the piezometers in each nest; and a driller 's log, geophysical logs, and description of the well cuttings from the deepest borehole in each piezometer nest. Water level altitudes generally increased from February until June 1985 in the piezometers in the Rio Bravo section. Water level altitudes in piezometers completed at different depths in a particular nest are about the same in all of the Rio Bravo nests and in the Montano 1 nest. In several of the piezometer nests, especially the Montano nests, water level altitudes decrease with depth. (USGS)

  19. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination: Rio Grande aquifer system in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Heywood, Charles E.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “the study well”). The study well produces about 3,000 gallons of water per minute from the Rio Grande aquifer system. Water samples were collected at the study well, at two other nearby public-supply wells, and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the study well. Untreated water samples from the study well contained arsenic at concentrations exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrate also were detected, although at concentrations at least an order of magnitude less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary influences on the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Albuquerque: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) groundwater development (introduction of manmade recharge and discharge sources), (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer, and (4) seasonal pumping stresses. Concentrations of the isotope carbon-14 indicate that groundwater from most sampled wells in the local study area is predominantly water that entered, or recharged, the aquifer more than 6,000 years ago. However, the additional presence of the age tracer tritium in several groundwater samples at concentrations above 0.3 tritium units indicates that young (post-1950) recharge is reaching the aquifer across broad areas beneath Albuquerque. This young recharge is mixing with the thousands-of-years-old water, is migrating to depths as great as 245 feet below the water table, and is traveling to some (but not all) of the public-supply wells sampled. Most groundwater samples containing a

  20. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  1. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination: Rio Grande aquifer system in Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Heywood, Charles E.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico (hereafter referred to as “the study well”). The study well produces about 3,000 gallons of water per minute from the Rio Grande aquifer system. Water samples were collected at the study well, at two other nearby public-supply wells, and at monitoring wells installed in or near the simulated zone of contribution to the study well. Untreated water samples from the study well contained arsenic at concentrations exceeding the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter (µg/L) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrate also were detected, although at concentrations at least an order of magnitude less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, study findings point to four primary influences on the movement and (or) fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well in Albuquerque: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) groundwater development (introduction of manmade recharge and discharge sources), (3) natural geochemical conditions of the aquifer, and (4) seasonal pumping stresses. Concentrations of the isotope carbon-14 indicate that groundwater from most sampled wells in the local study area is predominantly water that entered, or recharged, the aquifer more than 6,000 years ago. However, the additional presence of the age tracer tritium in several groundwater samples at concentrations above 0.3 tritium units indicates that young (post-1950) recharge is reaching the aquifer across broad areas beneath Albuquerque. This young recharge is mixing with the thousands-of-years-old water, is migrating to depths as great as 245 feet below the water table, and is traveling to some (but not all) of the public-supply wells sampled. Most groundwater samples containing a

  2. Ground displacements caused by aquifer-system water-level variations observed using interferometric synthetic aperture radar near Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.; Galloway, Devin L.; Stork, Sylvia V.

    2002-01-01

    Six synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images were processed to form five unwrapped interferometric (InSAR) images of the greater metropolitan area in the Albuquerque Basin. Most interference patterns in the images were caused by range displacements resulting from changes in land-surface elevation. Loci of land- surface elevation changes correlate with changes in aquifer-system water levels and largely result from the elastic response of the aquifer-system skeletal material to changes in pore-fluid pressure. The magnitude of the observed land-surface subsidence and rebound suggests that aquifer-system deformation resulting from ground-water withdrawals in the Albuquerque area has probably remained in the elastic (recoverable) range from July 1993 through September 1999. Evidence of inelastic (permanent) land subsidence in the Rio Rancho area exists, but its relation to compaction of the aquifer system is inconclusive because of insufficient water-level data. Patterns of elastic deformation in both Albuquerque and Rio Rancho suggest that intrabasin faults impede ground- water-pressure diffusion at seasonal time scales and that these faults are probably important in controlling patterns of regional ground-water flow.

  3. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25–40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompasses the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when surface water from the Rio Grande began being treated and integrated into the system. An increase of about 20 percent in the basin human population from 1990 to 2000 and of about 22 percent increase from 2000 to 2010 also resulted in an increased demand for water. A network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2011), the network consists of 126 wells and piezometers (a piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer and is often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths). This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at those 126 sites through water year 2011 to better help the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority manage water use.

  4. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25-40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompasses the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when surface water from the Rio Grande began being treated and integrated into the system. An increase of about 20 percent in the basin human population from 1990 to 2000 and about a 22 percent increase from 2000 to 2010 also resulted in an increased demand for water. A network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin from April 1982 through September 1983. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2010), the network consists of 124 wells and piezometers (a piezometer is a small-diameter subwell usually nested within a larger well). To better help the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority manage water use, this report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at those 124 sites through water year 2010.

  5. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25-40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompasses the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when surface water from the Rio Grande began being treated and integrated into the system. A population increase of about 20 percent in the basin from 1990 to 2000 and a 22 percent increase from 2000 to 2010 resulted in an increased demand for water. An initial network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2012), the network consists of 126 wells and piezometers. (A piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer, often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths.) The USGS, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA), currently (2012) measures and reports water levels from the 126 wells and piezometers in the network; this report presents water-level data collected by USGS personnel at those 126 sites through water year 2012.

  6. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25–40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompasses the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when treatment and distribution of surface water from the Rio Grande began. A population increase of about 20 percent in the basin from 1990 to 2000 and a 22-percent increase from 2000 to 2010 resulted in an increased demand for water. An initial network of wells was established by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque from April 1982 through September 1983 to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2013), the network consists of 123 wells and piezometers. (A piezometer is a specialized well open to a specific depth in the aquifer, often of small diameter and nested with other piezometers open to different depths.) The USGS, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, currently (2013) measures and reports water levels from the 123 wells and piezometers in the network; this report presents water-level data collected by USGS personnel at those 123 sites through water year 2013.

  7. Proposed expansion of the City of Albuquerque/U.S. Geological Survey ground-water-level monitoring network for the middle Rio Grande Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Middle Rio Grande Basin in central New Mexico, extending from Cochiti Lake on the north to San Acacia on the south, covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground-water withdrawals in the basin are concentrated in and around the city of Albuquerque. Because of rapid increases in population and associated ground-water pumpage, a network of wells was established cooperatively by the City of and the U.S. Geological Survey between April 1982 and September 1983 to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin. Expansion of this network has been identified as an essential element in plans to study the relation between surface water and ground water in the basin. An inventory of existing wells in the Albuquerque metropolitan area has brought together information on about 400 wells that either are being monitored for water levels or would be good candidates for monitoring. About 115 wells or well sites are proposed as additions to the current 128-well ground-water-level monitoring network for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. Despite the extensive network that would be created by the addition of the proposed existing wells, however, certain parts of the Albuquerque metropolitan area would remain without adequate coverage areally and/or with depth in the Santa Fe Group aquifer until the installation of the proposed new monitoring wells.

  8. Reconnaissance of hydrology, land use, ground-water chemistry, and effects of land use on ground-water chemistry in the Albuquerque-Belen basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey began regional assessments of groundwater contamination in 14 areas, one of which was the Albuquerque-Belen basin. Groundwater recharge occurs along the basin margins. Groundwater discharge occurs as evapotranspiration in the Rio Grande valley, pumpage, and groundwater flow to the Socorro basin. Open-space land use, which primarily is used for grazing livestock, occupies the majority of the basin. In the Rio Grande valley, agricultural and residential land uses are predominant; in the area near Albuquerque, the land also is used for commercial, institutional , and industrial purposes. The Albuquerque-Belen basin was divided into seven zones on the basis of water chemistry. These water-chemistry zones indicate that large variations in water chemistry exist in the basin as the result of natural processes. Groundwater in the majority of the Albuquerque-Belen basin has a relatively low susceptibility to contamination because the depth to water is > 100 ft and there is virtually no natural mechanism for recharge to the groundwater system. Groundwater in the Rio Grande valley has a relatively high susceptibility to contamination because the depth to water is generally < 30 ft and there are many types of recharge to the groundwater system. Changes in land use may cause changes in the chemical composition of recharge to the groundwater system. The relatively large concentrations of dissolved iron in the Rio Grande valley near Albuquerque may result from the change from agricultural land use to residential land use. Recharge associated with agricultural land use is relatively oxidized because the water is in equilibrium with the atmosphere, whereas recharge associated with residential land use (onsite waste-disposal effluent) is relatively reduced and has larger concentrations of organic carbon, biological oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. The constituents in the onsite waste-disposal effluent could cause reducing conditions in

  9. Estimated 2012 groundwater potentiometric surface and drawdown from predevelopment to 2012 in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Rachel I.; McKean, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, the water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico were met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. In response to water-level declines, the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA) began diverting water from the San Juan-Chama Drinking Water Project in December 2008 to reduce the use of groundwater to meet municipal demand. Modifications in the demand for water and the source of the supply of water for the Albuquerque metropolitan area have resulted in a variable response in the potentiometric surface of the production zone (the interval of the aquifer, from within about 200 feet below the water table to 900 feet or more, in which supply wells generally are screened) of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Analysis of the magnitude and spatial distribution of water-level change can help improve the understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies’ efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the ABCWUA, has developed an estimate of the 2012 potentiometric surface of the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area. This potentiometric surface is the latest in a series of reports depicting the potentiometric surface of the area. This report presents the estimated potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of water year 2012 and the estimated changes in potentiometric surface between predevelopment (pre-1961) and water year 2012 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque metropolitan area. Hydrographs from selected piezometers are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were

  10. An 40Ar/39Ar age for Geomagnetic Instability Recorded at the Albuquerque Volcanoes and Pringle Falls, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, B. S.; Jicha, B. R.; Kirby, B. T.; Zhang, X.; Geissman, J. W.; Herrero-Bervera, E.

    2005-12-01

    The timing and frequency of short-lived geomagnetic events, including excursions and aborted reversal attempts, provide important observational constraints on models of geodynamo behavior as well as calibration points for stratigraphic and paleoclimatic age models derived from marine sediments. The number of potential geomagnetic events during the Quaternary period has proliferated as more detailed paleodirectional and paleointensity data have emerged from sediments worldwide. Yet, determining ages for these events remains a challenge because astronomical dating of sediment cores is subject to assumptions and non-systematic errors that are difficult to quantify and vary from core to core. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology applied to lava flows or ash falls that record geomagnetic excursions can yield radioisotopic ages sufficiently precise to verify individual events, test correlations among seemingly disparate events, and quantify periods between events. Seventeen furnace incremental heating experiments on 100-200 mg groundmass samples from six sites in the transitionally magnetized basalt of the Albuquerque Volcanoes yield an isochron of 211 ± 22 ka* that is within error of previous K-Ar (155 ± 94 ka) and U-Th isochron (156 ± 58 ka) age determinations, but is 3 to 4 times more precise. At Pringle Falls, Oregon, Ash D was deposited during the onset of an excursion recorded by a lacustrine sediment sequence. Sixteen laser incremental heating experiments on 20-40 mg samples of plagioclase crystals from Ash D gave 64 concordant plateau age points that define an 40Ar/39Ar isochron of 211 ± 13 ka which is an order of magnitude more precise than the isochron (198 ± 118 ka) associated with the published plateau age from a single plagioclase age spectrum (221 ± 20 ka). Although the Virtual Geomagnetic Pole (VGP) recorded by the Albuquerque Volcanoes lies near, bot not on, the VGP path of the Pringle Falls excursion, these two sites are 15 arc degrees apart and need not record

  11. Electromagnetic surveys to detect clay-rich sediment in the Rio Grande inner valley, Albuquerque area, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.; Sterling, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the presence of clay-rich layers in the inner-valley alluvium is essential for quantifying the amount of water transmitted between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. This report describes a study that used electromagnetic surveys to provide this information. In the first phase of the study, electromagnetic soundings were made using time-domain and frequency-domain electro- magnetic methods. On the basis of these initial results, the time- domain method was judged ineffective because of cultural noise in the study area, so subsequent surveys were made using the frequency-domain method. For the second phase of the study, 31 frequency-domain electromagnetic surveys were conducted along the inner valley and parallel to the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area in the spring and summer of 1997 to determine the presence of hydrologically significant clay-rich layers buried in the inner-valley alluvium. For this report, the 31 survey sections were combined into 10 composite sections for ease of interpretation. Terrain-conductivity data from the surveys were modeled using interpretation software to produce geoelectric cross sections along the survey lines. This modeling used lithologic logs from two wells installed near the survey lines: the Bosque South and Rio Bravo 5 wells. Because of cultural interference, location of the wells and soundings, complex stratigraphy, and difficulty interpreting lithology, such interpretation was inconclusive. Instead, a decision process based on modeling results was developed using vertical and horizontal dipole 40-meter intercoil spacing terrain-conductivity values. Values larger than or equal to 20 millisiemens per meter were interpreted to contain a hydrologically significant thickness of clay-rich sediment. Thus, clay-rich sediment was interpreted to underlie seven segments of the 10 composited survey lines, totaling at least 2,660 meters of the Rio Grande inner valley. The longest of these clay

  12. Low-flow appliances and household water demand: an evaluation of demand-side management policy in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    PubMed

    Price, James I; Chermak, Janie M; Felardo, Jeff

    2014-01-15

    Residential rebate programs for low-flow water devices have become increasingly popular as a means of reducing urban water demand. Although program specifics vary, low-flow rebates are available in most U.S. metropolitan areas, as well as in many smaller municipalities. Despite their popularity, few statistical analyses have been conducted regarding the effects of low-flow rebates on household water use. In this paper, we consider the effects of rebates from the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (ABCWUA). Using panel regression techniques with a database of rebate recipients, we estimate the marginal effects of various low-flow devices on household water demand. Results indicate a negative correlation between household water use and the presence of most low-flow devices, after controlling for water price and weather conditions. Low-flow toilets have the greatest impact on water use, while low-flow washing machines, dishwashers, showerheads, and xeriscape have smaller but significant effects. In contrast, air conditioning systems, hot water recirculators, and rain barrels have no significant impact on water use. We also test for possible rebound effects (i.e. whether low-flow appliances become less-effective over time due to poor rates of retention or behavioral changes) and compare the cost effectiveness of each rebate using levelised-costs. We find no evidence of rebound effects and substantial variation in levelised-costs, with low-flow showerheads being the most cost-effective device under the current ABCWUA rebate program. The latter result suggests that water providers can improve the efficiency of rebate programs by targeting the most cost-effective devices.

  13. 76 FR 24021 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ...-875-1131 EIS No. 20110130, Draft Supplement, NNSA, NM, Nuclear Facility of the Chemistry and... Francisco, CA, Comment Period Ends: 05/30/2011, Contact: Sherwin Smith 415-561-4947 Revision to FR Notice.../06/2011, Contact: Ronald Bochenek 619-532-0906 Revision of FR Notice Published 02/25/2011:...

  14. 76 FR 40744 - Notice of Realty Action: Notice of Receipt of Conveyance of Federally Owned Mineral Interests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Mineral Interests Application, Do a Ana County, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... mineral interest on a 444-acre tract of land in Do a Ana County, New Mexico, which is described in this notice. Publication of this notice temporarily segregates the mineral interests in the land...

  15. Rock magnetic characterization of faulted sediments with associated magnetic anomalies in the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, M.R.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Minor, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in rock magnetic properties are responsible for the many linear, short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies that are spatially associated with faults that cut Neogene basin sediments in the Rio Grande rift, including the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic-susceptibility measurements from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of the Santa Fe Group and prerift Eocene and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks document large variations of magnetic properties juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault. Mean volume magnetic susceptibilities generally increase upsection through eight map units: from 1.7 to 2.2E-4 in the prerift Eocene and Cretaceous rocks to 9.9E-4-1.2E-3 in three members of the Miocene Zia Formation of the Santa Fe Group to 1.5E-3-3.5E-3 in three members of the Miocene-Pleistocene Arroyo Ojito Formation of the Santa Fe Group. Rock magnetic measurements and petrography indicate that the amount of detrital magnetite and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite within the Santa Fe Group sediments are the predominant controls of their magnetic property variations. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size within the members of the Arroyo Ojito Formation (deposited in fluvial environments) but within members of the Zia Formation (deposited in mostly eolian environments) reaches highest values in fine to medium sands. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite is spatially associated with calcite cementation in the Santa Fe Group. Both oxidation and cementation probably reflect past flow of groundwater through permeable zones. Magnetic models for geologic cross sections that incorporate mean magnetic susceptibilities for the different stratigraphic units mimic the aeromagnetic profiles across the San Ysidro fault and demonstrate that the stratigraphic level of dominant magnetic contrast changes with

  16. Simultaneous triple 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm operation of a diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Liu, Huilong; Pu, Xiaoyun

    2014-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped continuous-wave (cw) triple-wavelength Nd:YVO4 laser operating at 914, 1084, and 1086 nm. A theoretical analysis has been introduced to determine the threshold conditions for simultaneous triple-wavelength laser. Using a T-shaped cavity, we realized an efficient triple-wavelength operation at 4F3/2→4I9/2 and 4F3/2→4I11/2 transitions for Nd:YVO4 crystal, simultaneously. At an absorbed pump power of 16 W (or 25 W of incident pump power), the maximum output power was 2.3 W, which included 914 nm, 1084 nm, and 1086 nm three wavelengths, and the optical conversion efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 14.4%.

  17. Sub-10 nm nanopantography

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Siyuan Donnelly, Vincent M. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Economou, Demetre J. E-mail: economou@uh.edu; Ruchhoeft, Paul

    2015-11-09

    Nanopantography, a massively parallel nanopatterning method over large areas, was previously shown to be capable of printing 10 nm features in silicon, using an array of 1000 nm-diameter electrostatic lenses, fabricated on the substrate, to focus beamlets of a broad area ion beam on selected regions of the substrate. In the present study, using lens dimensional scaling optimized by computer simulation, and reduction in the ion beam image size and energy dispersion, the resolution of nanopantography was dramatically improved, allowing features as small as 3 nm to be etched into Si.

  18. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  19. Laser Damage Growth in Fused Silica with Simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, M A; Carr, A V; Carr, C W; Donohue, E E; Feit, M D; Hollingsworth, W G; Liao, Z; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Wegner, P J

    2008-10-24

    Laser-induced growth of optical damage often determines the useful lifetime of an optic in a high power laser system. We have extended our previous work on growth of laser damage in fused silica with simultaneous 351 nm and 1053 nm laser irradiation by measuring the threshold for growth with various ratios of 351 nm and 1053 nm fluence. Previously we reported that when growth occurs, the growth rate is determined by the total fluence. We now find that the threshold for growth is dependent on both the magnitude of the 351 nm fluence as well as the ratio of the 351 nm fluence to the 1053 nm fluence. Furthermore, the data suggests that under certain conditions the 1053 nm fluence does not contribute to the growth.

  20. Results of well-bore flow logging for six water-production wells completed in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Conde R.

    2000-01-01

    Over the last several years, an improved conceptual understanding of the aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, New Mexico, has lead to better knowledge about the location and extent of the aquifer system. This information will aid with the refinement of ground-water simulation and with the location of sites for future water-production wells. With an impeller-type flowmeter, well-bore flow was logged under pumping conditions along the screened interval of the well bore in six City of Albuquerque water-production wells: the Ponderosa 3, Love 6, Volcano Cliffs 1, Gonzales 2, Zamora 2, and Gonzales 3 wells. From each of these six wells, a well-bore flow log was collected that represents the cumulative upward well-bore flow. Evaluation of the well-bore flow log for each well allowed delineation of the more productive zones supplying water to the well along the logged interval. Yields from the more productive zones in the six wells ranged from about 70 to 880 gallons per minute. The lithology of these zones is predominantly gravel and sand with varying amounts of sandy clay.

  1. Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Presentations at the 1997 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Sponsored by the Research and Theory Division (19th, Albuquerque, NM, February 14-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Omalley, Ed.; And Others

    This proceedings volume contains 57 papers. Subjects addressed include: cooperative technology education; children's learning strategies with hypermedia lessons; problem-based learning; instructional methodologies for lifelong learning; interactive television (ITV) design; theoretical bases for Human Performance Technology (HPT); use of cognitive…

  2. Native American Children, Youth, and Families. Part 3. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (Albuquerque, NM, January 10, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    As part of a weeklong investigation into conditions among Native American families and children, the House of Representatives Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families met to hear testimony from tribal leaders, parents, young adults, and service providers from reservations and pueblos in New Mexico and Colorado. Topics include unemployment…

  3. Potential Chemical Effects of Changes in the Source of Water Supply for the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical modeling was used by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority (henceforth, Authority), to gain insight into the potential chemical effects that could occur in the Authority's water distribution system as a result of changing the source of water used for municipal and industrial supply from ground water to surface water, or to some mixture of the two sources. From historical data, representative samples of ground-water and surface-water chemistry were selected for modeling under a range of environmental conditions anticipated to be present in the distribution system. Mineral phases calculated to have the potential to precipitate from ground water were compared with the compositions of precipitate samples collected from the current water distribution system and with mineral phases calculated to have the potential to precipitate from surface water and ground-water/surface-water mixtures. Several minerals that were calculated to have the potential to precipitate from ground water in the current distribution system were identified in precipitate samples from pipes, reservoirs, and water heaters. These minerals were the calcium carbonates aragonite and calcite, and the iron oxides/hydroxides goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite. Several other minerals that were indicated by modeling to have the potential to precipitate were not found in precipitate samples. For most of these minerals, either the kinetics of formation were known to be unfavorable under conditions present in the distribution system or the minerals typically are not formed through direct precipitation from aqueous solutions. The minerals with potential to precipitate as simulated for surface-water samples and ground-water/surface-water mixtures were quite similar to the minerals with potential to precipitate from ground-water samples. Based on the modeling results along with kinetic considerations, minerals that appear most likely to

  4. Radiation Failures in Intel 14nm Microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossev, Dobrin P.; Duncan, Adam R.; Gadlage, Matthew J.; Roach, Austin H.; Kay, Matthew J.; Szabo, Carl; Berger, Tammy J.; York, Darin A.; Williams, Aaron; LaBel, K.; Ingalls, James D.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the 14 nm Intel Broadwell 5th generation core series 5005U-i3 and 5200U-i5 was mounted on Dell Inspiron laptops, MSI Cubi and Gigabyte Brix barebones and tested with Windows 8 and CentOS7 at idle. Heavy-ion-induced hard- and catastrophic failures do not appear to be related to the Intel 14nm Tri-Gate FinFET process. They originate from a small (9 m 140 m) area on the 32nm planar PCH die (not the CPU) as initially speculated. The hard failures seem to be due to a SEE but the exact physical mechanism has yet to be identified. Some possibilities include latch-ups, charge ion trapping or implantation, ion channels, or a combination of those (in biased conditions). The mechanism of the catastrophic failures seems related to the presence of electric power (1.05V core voltage). The 1064 nm laser mimics ionization radiation and induces soft- and hard failures as a direct result of electron-hole pair production, not heat. The 14nm FinFET processes continue to look promising for space radiation environments.

  5. 810nm, 980nm, 1470nm and 1950nm diode laser comparison: a preliminary "ex vivo" study on oral soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Sozzi, Michele; Selleri, Stefano; Vescovi, Paolo; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2015-02-01

    The introduction of diode lasers in dentistry has several advantages, mainly consisting on the reduced size, reduced cost and possibility to beam delivering by optical fibers. At the moment the two diode wavelengths normally utilized in the dental field are 810 and 980 nm for soft tissues treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of four different diode wavelengths: 810, 980, 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser for the ablation of soft tissues. Several samples of veal tongue were exposed to the four different wavelengths, at different fluences. The internal temperature of the soft tissues, in the area close to the beam, was monitored with thermocouple during the experiment. The excision quality of the exposed samples have been characterized by means of an optical microscope. Tissue damages and the cut regularity have been evaluated on the base of established criteria. The lowest thermal increase was recorded for 1950 nm laser. Best quality and speed of incision were obtained by the same wavelength. By evaluating epithelial, stromal and vascular damages for all the used wavelengths, the best result, in terms of "tissue respect", have been obtained for 1470 and 1950 nm exposures. From the obtained results 1470 and 1950 nm diode laser showed to be the best performer wavelengths among these used in this "ex vivo" study, probably due to their greatest affinity to water.

  6. Diode laser (980nm) cartilage reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kharbotly, A.; El Tayeb, T.; Mostafa, Y.; Hesham, I.

    2011-03-01

    Loss of facial or ear cartilage due to trauma or surgery is a major challenge to the otolaryngologists and plastic surgeons as the complicated geometric contours are difficult to be animated. Diode laser (980 nm) has been proven effective in reshaping and maintaining the new geometric shape achieved by laser. This study focused on determining the optimum laser parameters needed for cartilage reshaping with a controlled water cooling system. Harvested animal cartilages were angulated with different degrees and irradiated with different diode laser powers (980nm, 4x8mm spot size). The cartilage specimens were maintained in a deformation angle for two hours after irradiation then released for another two hours. They were serially measured and photographed. High-power Diode laser irradiation with water cooling is a cheep and effective method for reshaping the cartilage needed for reconstruction of difficult situations in otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Key words: cartilage,diode laser (980nm), reshaping.

  7. Resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Seiro; Naito, Takuya; Yamazaki, Tamio; Watanabe, Manabu; Itani, Toshiro

    2001-08-01

    Fluoropolymers are key materials for single layer resists of 157nm lithography. We have been studying fluoropolymers to identify their potential for base resins of 157nm photoresist. Many fluoropolymers showed high optical transparencies, with absorption coefficients of 0.01micrometers -1 to 2micrometers -1 at 157nm, and dry- etching resistance comparable to an ArF resist, and non- swelling solubility in the standard developer. Positive- tone resists were formulated using fluoropolymers that fulfill practical resist requirements. They showed good sensitivities, from 1 mJ/cm(superscript 2 to 10 mJ/cm2, and contrast in the sensitivity curves. They were able to be patterned using a F2 laser microstepper.

  8. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  9. Estimated 2008 groundwater potentiometric surface and predevelopment to 2008 water-level change in the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falk, Sarah E.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anderholm, Scott K.

    2011-01-01

    The water-supply requirements of the Albuquerque metropolitan area of central New Mexico have historically been met almost exclusively by groundwater withdrawal from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. Previous studies have indicated that the large quantity of groundwater withdrawal relative to recharge has resulted in water-level declines in the aquifer system throughout the metropolitan area. Analysis of the magnitude and pattern of water-level change can help improve understanding of how the groundwater system responds to withdrawals and variations in the management of the water supply and can support water-management agencies' efforts to minimize future water-level declines and improve sustainability. This report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Albuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority, presents the estimated groundwater potentiometric surface during winter (from December to March) of the 2008 water year and the estimated changes in water levels between predevelopment and water year 2008 for the production zone of the Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque and surrounding metropolitan and military areas. Hydrographs from selected wells are included to provide details of historical water-level changes. In general, water-level measurements used for this report were measured in small-diameter observation wells screened over short intervals and were considered to best represent the potentiometric head in the production zone-the interval of the aquifer, about 300 feet below land surface to 1,100 feet or more below land surface, in which production wells generally are screened. Water-level measurements were collected by various local and Federal agencies. The 2008 water year potentiometric surface map was created in a geographic information system, and the change in water-level elevation from predevelopment to water year 2008 was calculated. The 2008 water-level contours indicate that the general direction of

  10. Sub-10 nm carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Aaron D; Luisier, Mathieu; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George; Breslin, Chris M; Gignac, Lynne; Lundstrom, Mark S; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-02-01

    Although carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors have been promoted for years as a replacement for silicon technology, there is limited theoretical work and no experimental reports on how nanotubes will perform at sub-10 nm channel lengths. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the first sub-10 nm CNT transistor, which is shown to outperform the best competing silicon devices with more than four times the diameter-normalized current density (2.41 mA/μm) at a low operating voltage of 0.5 V. The nanotube transistor exhibits an impressively small inverse subthreshold slope of 94 mV/decade-nearly half of the value expected from a previous theoretical study. Numerical simulations show the critical role of the metal-CNT contacts in determining the performance of sub-10 nm channel length transistors, signifying the need for more accurate theoretical modeling of transport between the metal and nanotube. The superior low-voltage performance of the sub-10 nm CNT transistor proves the viability of nanotubes for consideration in future aggressively scaled transistor technologies.

  11. Radiation Tolerance of 65nm CMOS Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Krohn, M.; Bentele, B.; Christian, D. C.; Cumalat, J. P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.; Shenai, A.; Wagner, S. R.

    2015-12-11

    We report on the effects of ionizing radiation on 65 nm CMOS transistors held at approximately -20°C during irradiation. The pattern of damage observed after a total dose of 1 Grad is similar to damage reported in room temperature exposures, but we observe less damage than was observed at room temperature.

  12. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  13. Negative-tone 193-nm resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sungseo; Vander Heyden, Anthony; Byers, Jeff D.; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-06-01

    A great deal of progress has been made in the design of single layer positive tone resists for 193 nm lithography. Commercial samples of such materials are now available from many vendors. The patterning of certain levels of devices profits from the use of negative tone resists. There have been several reports of work directed toward the design of negative tones resists for 193 nm exposure but, none have performed as well as the positive tone systems. Polymers with alicyclic structures in the backbone have emerged as excellent platforms from which to design positive tone resists for 193 nm exposure. We now report the adaptation of this class of polymers to the design of high performance negative tone 193 nm resists. New systems have been prepared that are based on a polarity switch mechanism for modulation of the dissolution rate. The systems are based on a polar, alicyclic polymer backbone that includes a monomer bearing a glycol pendant group that undergoes the acid catalyzed pinacol rearrangement upon exposure and bake to produce the corresponding less polar ketone. This monomer was copolymerized with maleic anhydride and a norbornene bearing a bis-trifluoromethylcarbinol. The rearrangement of the copolymer was monitored by FT-IR as a function of temperature. The synthesis of the norbornene monomers will be presented together with characterization of copolymers of these monomers with maleic anhydride. The lithographic performance of the new resist system will also be presented.

  14. MEPHISTO spectromicroscope reaches 20 nm lateral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Perfetti, Luca; Gilbert, B.; Fauchoux, O.; Capozi, M.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Tonner, B. P.

    1999-03-01

    The recently described tests of the synchrotron imaging photoelectron spectromicroscope MEPHISTO (Microscope à Emission de PHotoélectrons par Illumination Synchrotronique de Type Onduleur) were complemented by further resolution improvements and tests, which brought the lateral resolution down to 20 nm. Images and line plot profiles demonstrate such performance.

  15. 1541nm GmAPD LADAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutteruf, Mary R.; Lebow, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The single photon sensitivity of Geiger-mode avalanche photo diodes (GmAPDs) has facilitated the development of LADAR systems that operate at longer stand-off distances, require lower laser pulse powers and are capable of imaging through a partial obscuration. In this paper, we describe a GmAPD LADAR system which operates at the eye-safe wavelength of 1541 nm. The longer wavelength should enhance system covertness and improve haze penetration compared to systems using 1064 nm lasers. The system is comprised of a COTS 1541 nm erbium fiber laser producing 4 ns pulses at 80 kHz to 450 kHz and a COTS camera with a focal plane of 32x32 InGaAs GmAPDs band-gap optimized for 1550 nm. Laboratory characterization methodology and results are discussed. We show that accurate modeling of the system response, allows us to achieve a depth resolution which is limited by the width of the camera's time bin (.25 ns or 1.5 inches) rather than by the duration of the laser pulse (4 ns or 2 ft.). In the presence of obscuration, the depth discrimination is degraded to 6 inches but is still significantly better than that dictated by the laser pulse duration. We conclude with a discussion of future work.

  16. Dropout Prevention. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Albuquerque, New Mexico, January 24, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This hearing, which occurred at New Mexico Technical Vocational Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico, heard from state and local officials about what was working and not working in education. Included are statements on dropout prevention by Congressional representatives and by the Deputy Director of the New Mexico Children, Youth, and Families…

  17. Water-Level Data for the Albuquerque Basin and Adjacent Areas, Central New Mexico, Period of Record Through September 30, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2007-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25 to 40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompass the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin are currently (2007) obtained solely from ground-water resources. An increase of about 20 percent in the population from 1990 to 2000 also resulted in an increased demand for water. From April 1982 through September 1983, a network of wells was established to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly. Currently (2007), the network consists of 133 wells and piezometers. This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at 133 sites through 2007.

  18. Evaluation of S-101 course ``Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE`` taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 16, 1991--December 19, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE, `` (S-101) which was conducted December 16-19, 1991 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. One instructor and a course administrator presented in the course to twenty-eight Sandia National Laboratory and Cortez III personnel. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students` expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  19. Evaluation of S-101 course Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE'' taught in Albuquerque, New Mexico, December 16, 1991--December 19, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.S.

    1992-02-01

    This section summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE, '' (S-101) which was conducted December 16-19, 1991 at Sandia National Laboratory, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. One instructor and a course administrator presented in the course to twenty-eight Sandia National Laboratory and Cortez III personnel. This report summarizes the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course and provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments. Numeric course ratings were generally positive and show that the course material and instruction were very effective. Written comments supported the positive numeric ratings. The course content and knowledge gained by the trainees exceeded most of the students' expectations of the course. Results from the final examination showed that students gained significant knowledge from the course.

  20. U.S. Geological Survey middle Rio Grande basin study; proceedings of the third annual workshop, Albuquerque, New Mexico, February 24-25, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartolino, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 40 percent (about 600,000 people) of the total population of New Mexico lives within the Middle Rio Grande Basin, which includes the City of Albuquerque. Ongoing analyses of the central portion of the Middle Rio Grande Basin by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the City of Albuquerque and other agencies have shown that ground water in the basin is not as readily accessible as earlier studies indicated. A more complete characterization of the ground-water resources of the entire Middle Rio Grande Basin is hampered by a scarcity of data in the northern and southern areas of the basin. The USGS Middle Rio Grande Basin study is a 5-year effort by the USGS and other agencies to improve the understanding of the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the Middle Rio Grande Basin. The primary objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the water resources of the basin. Of particular interest is to determine the extent of hydrologic connection between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer. Additionally, ground-water quality affects the availability of water supplies in the basin. Improving the existing USGS-constructed ground-water flow model of the Middle Rio Grande Basin will integrate all the various tasks that improve our knowledge of the various components of the Middle Rio Grande water budget. Part of this improvement will be accompanied by extended knowledge of the aquifer system beyond the Albuquerque area into the northern and southern reaches of the basin. Other improvements will be based on understanding gained through process-oriented research and improved geologic characterization of the deposits. The USGS and cooperating agencies will study the hydrology, geology, and land-surface characteristics of the basin to provide the scientific information needed for water-resources management and for managers to plan for water supplies needed for a growing population. To facilitate exchange of

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Thorium spectrum from 250nm to 5500nm (Redman+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, S. L.; Nave, G.; Sansonetti, C. J.

    2014-04-01

    We observed the spectrum of a commercial sealed Th/Ar HCL running at 25mA for almost 15hr starting on 2011 November 2. The region of observation was limited to between 8500/cm and 28000/cm (360nm and 1200nm) by the sensitivity of the silicon photodiode detector. (5 data files).

  2. Three-dimensional model simulation of steady-state ground-water flow in the Albuquerque-Belen Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kernodle, J.M.; Scott, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    As part of the Southwest Alluvial Basins study, model was constructed to simulate the alluvial aquifer system underlying the Albuquerque-Belen Basin. The model was used to simulate the steady-state flow condition assumed to have existed prior to 1960. Until this time there apparently were no long-term groundwater level changes of a significant magnitude outside the immediate vicinity of Albuquerque. Therefore, the construction of a steady-state flow model of the aquifer system based on reported hydrologic data predating 1960 was justified. During construction of the steady-state model, simulated hydraulic conductivity values were adjusted, within acceptable physical limits, until a best fit between measured or reported and computed heads at 34 control wells was achieved. The modeled area was divided into six sub-areas, or zones, within each of which hydraulic conductivity was assumed to be uniform. The model consisted of six layers for each of which simulated transmissivity was proportional to the layer thickness. Adjustments to simulated hydraulic conductivity values in the different zones resulted in final values that ranged from a low of 0.25 ft/day in the west to 50 ft/day in the eastern part of the basin. The error of the simulation, defined as the absolute difference between the computed and the measured or reported water level at the corresponding point in the physical system being modeled, ranged from 0.6 ft to 36 ft, with an average of 14.6 ft for the 34 control wells. (Author 's abstract)

  3. 120 nm resolution and 55 nm structure size in STED-lithography.

    PubMed

    Wollhofen, Richard; Katzmann, Julia; Hrelescu, Calin; Jacak, Jaroslaw; Klar, Thomas A

    2013-05-01

    Two-photon direct laser writing (DLW) lithography is limited in the achievable structure size as well as in structure resolution. Adding stimulated emission depletion (STED) to DLW allowed overcoming both restrictions. We now push both to new limits. Using visible light for two-photon DLW (780 nm) and STED (532 nm), we obtain lateral structure sizes of 55 nm, a Sparrow limit of around 100 nm and we present two clearly separated lines spaced only 120 nm apart. The photo-resist used in these experiments is a mixture of tri- and tetra-acrylates and 7-Diethylamino-3-thenoylcoumarin as a photo-starter which can be readily quenched via STED.

  4. Photoresist outgassing at 157 nm exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Stefan; Angood, Steve; Ashworth, Dominic; Basset, Steve; Bloomstein, Theodore M.; Dean, Kim R.; Kunz, Roderick R.; Miller, Daniel A.; Patel, Shashikant; Rich, Georgia K.

    2001-08-01

    Contamination of optical elements during photoresist exposure is a serious issue in optical lithography. The outgassing of photoresist has been identified as a problem at 248nm and 193nm in production because the organic films that can be formed on an exposure lens can cause transmission loss and sever image distortion. At these exposure energies, the excitation of the photo acid generator, formation of acid, and cleavage of the protecting group are highly selective processes. At 157nm, the exposure energy is much higher (7.9 eV compared to 6.4 eV at 193nm) and it is known from laser ablation experiments that direct laser cleavage of sigma bonds occurs. The fragments formed during this irradiation can be considered as effective laser deposition precursors even in the mid ppb level. In this study, methods to quantify photoresist outgassing at 157 nm are discussed. Three criteria have been set up at International SEMATECH to protect lens contamination and to determine the severity of photoresist outgassing. First, we measured film thickness loss as a function of exposure dose for a variety of materials. In a second test we studied the molecular composition of the outgassing fragments with an exposure chamber coupled to a gas chromatograph and a mass spectrometer detector. Our third method was a deposition test of outgassing vapors on a CaF2 proof plate followed by analysis using VUV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS). With this technique we found deposits for many different resists. Our main focus is on F- and Si- containing resists. Both material classes form deposits especially if these atoms are bound to the polymer side chains. Whereas the F-containing films can be cleaned off under 157nm irradiation, cleaning of Si-containing films mainly produces SiO2. Our cleaning studies of plasma deposited F-containing organic films on SiO2 did not indicate damage of this surface by the possible formation of HF. Despite that we strongly recommend engineering

  5. The Effect of Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm Laser in the Treatment of Onychomycosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kalokasidis, Kostas; Onder, Meltem; Trakatelli, Myrto-Georgia; Richert, Bertrand; Fritz, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser (Light Age, Inc., Somerset, NJ, USA) was used on 131 onychomycosis subjects (94 females, 37 males; ages 18 to 68 years). Mycotic cultures were taken and fungus types were detected. The laser protocol included two sessions with a one-month interval. Treatment duration was approximately 15 minutes per session and patients were observed over a 3-month time period. Laser fluencies of 14 J/cm2 were applied at 9 billionths of a second pulse duration and at 5 Hz frequency. Follow-up was performed at 3 months with mycological cultures. Before and after digital photographs were taken. Adverse effects were recorded and all participants completed “self-evaluation questionnaires” rating their level of satisfaction. All subjects were well satisfied with the treatments, there were no noticeable side effects, and no significant differences were found treating men versus women. At the 3-month follow-up 95.42% of the patients were laboratory mycologically cured of fungal infection. This clinical study demonstrates that fungal nail infections can be effectively and safely treated with Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser. It can also be combined with systemic oral antifungals providing more limited treatment time. PMID:24396343

  6. The Effect of Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm Laser in the Treatment of Onychomycosis In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kalokasidis, Kostas; Onder, Meltem; Trakatelli, Myrto-Georgia; Richert, Bertrand; Fritz, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser (Light Age, Inc., Somerset, NJ, USA) was used on 131 onychomycosis subjects (94 females, 37 males; ages 18 to 68 years). Mycotic cultures were taken and fungus types were detected. The laser protocol included two sessions with a one-month interval. Treatment duration was approximately 15 minutes per session and patients were observed over a 3-month time period. Laser fluencies of 14 J/cm(2) were applied at 9 billionths of a second pulse duration and at 5 Hz frequency. Follow-up was performed at 3 months with mycological cultures. Before and after digital photographs were taken. Adverse effects were recorded and all participants completed "self-evaluation questionnaires" rating their level of satisfaction. All subjects were well satisfied with the treatments, there were no noticeable side effects, and no significant differences were found treating men versus women. At the 3-month follow-up 95.42% of the patients were laboratory mycologically cured of fungal infection. This clinical study demonstrates that fungal nail infections can be effectively and safely treated with Q-Switched Nd:YAG 1064 nm/532 nm laser. It can also be combined with systemic oral antifungals providing more limited treatment time.

  7. Loss of transmittance in fluoropolymer films due to laser-induced damage at 1053 and 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P.; Milam, D.; Norton, M.; Sell, W.

    1997-12-01

    Thick fluoropolymer films are being evaluated as a potential `disposable` debris shield to protect high-peak-power laser optics from x-ray and target debris generated in inertial-confinement fusion-ignition experiments, Two obstacles to implementation are optical uniformity and damage threshold. To understand the damage characteristics, transmittance of single 1053- or 351-nm laser pulses has been measured for commercial fluoropolymer films in vacuum. Samples were tested at fluences up to 105 J/cm2 at 1053-nm and 13 J/cm2 at 351-nm. Both the total transmitted energy for a single shot and the temporal energy transmittance profile during the shot were measured as a function of fluence. In addition, the total focusable transmitted energy was recorded for 351 -nm pulses. Results show that transmittance decreases slowly during a single-pulse irradiation, allowing much of the energy to be transmitted at fluences which cause noticeable degradation to the film. The film transmits greater than 90% of the 351-nm energy delivered in a beam with spatial average fluence of 8 J/cm2 with modulation up to 15 J/cm2. For 1053-nm laser light, the films do not begin to exhibit noticeable transmittance loss until average fluences exceed 40 J/cm2.

  8. Radiation Status of Sub-65 nm Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Ultra-scaled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) includes commercial foundry capabilities at and below the 65 nm technology node Radiation evaluations take place using standard products and test characterization vehicles (memories, logic/latch chains, etc.) NEPP focus is two-fold: (1) Conduct early radiation evaluations to ascertain viability for future NASA missions (i.e. leverage commercial technology development). (2) Uncover gaps in current testing methodologies and mechanism comprehension -- early risk mitigation.

  9. Laser damage database at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, F.; Gonzales, R.P.; Morgan, A.J.

    1990-03-01

    In conjunction with our diversification of laser damage testing capabilities, we have expanded upon a database of threshold measurements and parameter variations at 1064 nm. This includes all tests at low pulse-repetition frequencies (PRF) ranging from single shots to 120 Hz. These tests were conducted on the Reptile laser facility since 1987 and the Variable Pulse Laser (VPL) facility since 1988. Pulse durations ranged from 1 to 16 ns. 10 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Patterning polymeric structures with 2 nm resolution at 3 nm half pitch in ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Martínez, R V; Losilla, N S; Martinez, J; Huttel, Y; Garcia, R

    2007-07-01

    The miniaturization limits of electronic and mechanical devices depend on the minimum pattern periodicity that is stable in ambient conditions. Here we demonstrate an atomic force microscopy lithography that enables the patterning of 2 nm organic structures with 6 nm periodicities in air. We also demonstrate that the lithography can be up-scaled for parallel patterning. The method is based on the formation of a nanoscale octane meniscus between a sharp conductive protrusion and a silicon (100) surface. The application of a high electrical field ( approximately 10 V/nm) produces the polymerization and cross-linking of the octane molecules within the meniscus followed by their deposition. The resulting pattern periodicities are very close to the ultimate theoretical limits achievable in air ( approximately 3 nm). The chemical composition of the patterns has been characterized by photoemission spectroscopy.

  11. 981 nm Yb:KYW laser intracavity pumped at 912 nm and frequency-doubling for an emission at 490.5 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. F.; Zhang, X. H.; Xia, J.; Chen, R.; Jin, G. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Li, C. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2010-05-01

    We present an Yb:KY(WO4)2 (Yb:KYW) laser emitting at 981 nm intracavity pumped by a 912 nm diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser. A 808 nm diode laser is used to pump the Nd:GdVO4 crystal emitting at 912 nm, and the Yb:KYW laser emitting at 981 nm intracavity pumped at 912 nm. This configuration enabled us to indirectly diode-pump this ytterbium doped crystal, and to obtain 1.12 W output power at 981 nm for 19.6 W of incident pump power at 808 nm. Furthermore, intracavity second harmonic generation has also been demonstrated with a power of 106 mW at 490.5 nm by using a LBO nonlinear crystal.

  12. Deep ultraviolet (254 nm) focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Erdem; Vashaei, Zahra; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2011-10-01

    We report the synthesis, fabrication and testing of a 320 × 256 focal plane array (FPA) of back-illuminated, solarblind, p-i-n, AlxGa1-xN-based detectors, fully realized within our research laboratory. We implemented a novel pulsed atomic layer deposition technique for the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) growth of crackfree, thick, and high Al composition AlxGa1-xN layers. Following the growth, the wafer was processed into a 320 × 256 array of 25 μm × 25 μm pixels on a 30 μm pixel-pitch and surrounding mini-arrays. A diagnostic mini-array was hybridized to a silicon fan-out chip to allow the study of electrical and optical characteristics of discrete pixels of the FPA. At a reverse bias of 1 V, an average photodetector exhibited a low dark current density of 1.12×10-8 A/cm2. Solar-blind operation is observed throughout the array with peak detection occurring at wavelengths of 256 nm and lower and falling off three orders of magnitude by 285 nm. After indium bump deposition and dicing, the FPA is hybridized to a matching ISC 9809 readout integrated circuit (ROIC). By developing a novel masking technology, we significantly reduced the visible response of the ROIC and thus the need for external filtering to achieve solar- and visible-blind operation is eliminated. This allowed the FPA to achieve high external quantum efficiency (EQE): at 254 nm, average pixels showed unbiased peak responsivity of 75 mA/W, which corresponds to an EQE of ~37%. Finally, the uniformity of the FPA and imaging properties are investigated.

  13. Quantitative comparison of the OCT imaging depth at 1300 nm and 1600 nm

    PubMed Central

    Kodach, V. M.; Kalkman, J.; Faber, D. J.; van Leeuwen, T. G.

    2010-01-01

    One of the present challenges in optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the visualization of deeper structural morphology in biological tissues. Owing to a reduced scattering, a larger imaging depth can be achieved by using longer wavelengths. In this work, we analyze the OCT imaging depth at wavelengths around 1300 nm and 1600 nm by comparing the scattering coefficient and OCT imaging depth for a range of Intralipid concentrations at constant water content. We observe an enhanced OCT imaging depth for 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for Intralipid concentrations larger than 4 vol.%. For higher Intralipid concentrations, the imaging depth enhancement reaches 30%. The ratio of scattering coefficients at the two wavelengths is constant over a large range of scattering coefficients and corresponds to a scattering power of 2.8 ± 0.1. Based on our results we expect for biological tissues an increase of the OCT imaging depth at 1600 nm compared to 1300 nm for samples with high scattering power and low water content. PMID:21258456

  14. Photolysis of formic acid at 355 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Denhi; Bautista, Teonanacatl; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2015-05-01

    Formic acid is well known as a food additive and recently an application on fuel cell technology has emerged. In this work we have studied the dissociative ionization process by multiphoton absorption of formic acid molecules at 355nm wavelength photons, using TOF spectrometry in reflectron mode (R-TOF). Some of the most abundant ionic fragments produced are studied at different settings of the laser harmonic generator. The dependence of the products on these conditions is reported. This work was supported by CONACYT Project 165410 and PAPIIT IN102613 and IN101215.

  15. 248nm silicon photoablation: Microstructuring basics

    SciTech Connect

    Poopalan, P.; Najamudin, S. H.; Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.

    2015-05-15

    248nm pulses from a KrF excimer laser was used to ablate a Si wafer in order to ascertain the laser pulse and energy effects for use as a microstructuring tool for MEMS fabrication. The laser pulses were varied between two different energy levels of 8mJ and 4mJ while the number of pulses for ablation was varied. The corresponding ablated depths were found to range between 11 µm and 49 µm, depending on the demagnified beam fluence.

  16. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Goeff J.M. Moret,; Jeffery A. Worthington,; Kimberly M. Bandy-Baldwin,

    2016-03-17

    The Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: (1) groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, and (2) surface water from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline more than 120 feet while water-level declines along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque were generally less than 40 feet. These differences in water-level declines in the Albuquerque area have resulted in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande.In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, acting as fiscal agent for the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico. The study provides hydrologic data in order to enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to riverside drains. The study area extends about 20 miles along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area. Piezometers and surface-water gages were installed in paired transects at eight locations. Nested piezometers, completed at various depths in the alluvial aquifer, and surface-water gages, installed in the Rio Grande and riverside drains, were instrumented with pressure transducers. Water-level and water-temperature data were collected from 2009 to 2010.Water levels from the piezometers indicated that groundwater movement was usually away from the river towards the riverside drains. Annual mean horizontal groundwater gradients in the inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.0024 (I-25 East) to 0.0144 (Pajarito East). The median hydraulic conductivity values of the inner valley alluvial aquifer, determined from slug tests, ranged from 30

  17. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2009–10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; Oelsner, Gretchen P.; McCoy, Kurt J.; Goeff J.M. Moret,; Jeffery A. Worthington,; Kimberly M. Bandy-Baldwin,

    2016-03-17

    The Albuquerque area of New Mexico has two principal sources of water: (1) groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system, and (2) surface water from the Rio Grande. From 1960 to 2002, pumping from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system caused groundwater levels to decline more than 120 feet while water-level declines along the Rio Grande in Albuquerque were generally less than 40 feet. These differences in water-level declines in the Albuquerque area have resulted in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande.In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, acting as fiscal agent for the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, began a study to characterize the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer in the Albuquerque area of New Mexico. The study provides hydrologic data in order to enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to riverside drains. The study area extends about 20 miles along the Rio Grande in the Albuquerque area. Piezometers and surface-water gages were installed in paired transects at eight locations. Nested piezometers, completed at various depths in the alluvial aquifer, and surface-water gages, installed in the Rio Grande and riverside drains, were instrumented with pressure transducers. Water-level and water-temperature data were collected from 2009 to 2010.Water levels from the piezometers indicated that groundwater movement was usually away from the river towards the riverside drains. Annual mean horizontal groundwater gradients in the inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.0024 (I-25 East) to 0.0144 (Pajarito East). The median hydraulic conductivity values of the inner valley alluvial aquifer, determined from slug tests, ranged from 30

  18. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; McCoy, Kurt J.; More, Geoff J.M.; Worthington, Jeffrey A.; Bandy-Baldwin, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque, New Mexico, area has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system and surface water from the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project. From 1960 to 2002, groundwater withdrawals from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system have caused water levels to decline more than 120 feet in some places within the Albuquerque area, resulting in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a detailed characterization of the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande riparian corridor in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to provide hydrologic data and enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to the riverside drains. A simple conceptual model of flow indicates that the groundwater table gently slopes from the Rio Grande towards riverside drains and the outer boundaries of the inner valley. Water infiltrating from the Rio Grande initially moves vertically below the river, but, as flow spreads farther into the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer, flow becomes primarily horizontal. The slope of the water-table surface may be strongly controlled by the riverside drains and influenced by other more distal hydrologic boundary conditions, such as groundwater withdrawals by wells. Results from 35 slug tests performed in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer during January and February 2009 indicate that hydraulic-conductivity values ranged from 5 feet per day to 160 feet per day with a median hydraulic-conductivity for all transects of 40 feet per day. Median annual horizontal hydraulic gradients in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.011 to 0

  19. Groundwater hydrology and estimation of horizontal groundwater flux from the Rio Grande at selected locations in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2003-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Dale R.; McCoy, Kurt J.; More, Geoff J.M.; Worthington, Jeffrey A.; Bandy-Baldwin, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    The Albuquerque, New Mexico, area has two principal sources of water: groundwater from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system and surface water from the San Juan-Chama Diversion Project. From 1960 to 2002, groundwater withdrawals from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system have caused water levels to decline more than 120 feet in some places within the Albuquerque area, resulting in a great deal of interest in quantifying the river-aquifer interaction associated with the Rio Grande. In 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation, the Middle Rio Grande Endangered Species Collaborative Program, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began a detailed characterization of the hydrogeology of the Rio Grande riparian corridor in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area to provide hydrologic data and enhance the understanding of rates of water leakage from the Rio Grande to the alluvial aquifer, groundwater flow through the aquifer, and discharge of water from the aquifer to the riverside drains. A simple conceptual model of flow indicates that the groundwater table gently slopes from the Rio Grande towards riverside drains and the outer boundaries of the inner valley. Water infiltrating from the Rio Grande initially moves vertically below the river, but, as flow spreads farther into the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer, flow becomes primarily horizontal. The slope of the water-table surface may be strongly controlled by the riverside drains and influenced by other more distal hydrologic boundary conditions, such as groundwater withdrawals by wells. Results from 35 slug tests performed in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer during January and February 2009 indicate that hydraulic-conductivity values ranged from 5 feet per day to 160 feet per day with a median hydraulic-conductivity for all transects of 40 feet per day. Median annual horizontal hydraulic gradients in the Rio Grande inner valley alluvial aquifer ranged from 0.011 to 0

  20. Low-intensity LED (625 and 405 nm) and laser (805 nm) killing of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2009-02-01

    In the present work we have investigated in vitro sensitivity of microorganisms P. acnes and S. epidermidis to action of red (625 nm and 405 nm) and infrared (805 nm) radiations in combination with photosensitizes Methylene Blue and Indocyanine Green.

  1. Electrically-pumped 850-nm micromirror VECSELs.

    SciTech Connect

    Geib, Kent Martin; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Mar, Alan

    2005-02-01

    Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) combine high optical power and good beam quality in a device with surface-normal output. In this paper, we describe the design and operating characteristics of an electrically-pumped VECSEL that employs a wafer-scale fabrication process and operates at 850 nm. A curved micromirror output coupler is heterogeneously integrated with AlGaAs-based semiconductor material to form a compact and robust device. The structure relies on flip-chip bonding the processed epitaxial material to an aluminum nitride mount; this heatsink both dissipates thermal energy and permits high frequency modulation using coplanar traces that lead to the VECSEL mesa. Backside emission is employed, and laser operation at 850 nm is made possible by removing the entire GaAs substrate through selective wet etching. While substrate removal eliminates absorptive losses, it simultaneously compromises laser performance by increasing series resistance and degrading the spatial uniformity of current injection. Several aspects of the VECSEL design help to mitigate these issues, including the use of a novel current-spreading n type distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). Additionally, VECSEL performance is improved through the use of a p-type DBR that is modified for low thermal resistance.

  2. DNA charge transport over 34 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason D.; Muren, Natalie B.; Renfrew, Sara E.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2011-03-01

    Molecular wires show promise in nanoscale electronics, but the synthesis of uniform, long conductive molecules is a significant challenge. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of precise length, by contrast, is synthesized easily, but its conductivity over the distances required for nanoscale devices has not been explored. Here we demonstrate DNA charge transport (CT) over 34 nm in 100-mer monolayers on gold. Multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100-mer DNA yield sizable electrochemical signals from a distal, covalent Nile Blue redox probe. Significant signal attenuation upon incorporation of a single base-pair mismatch demonstrates that CT is DNA-mediated. Efficient cleavage of these 100-mers by a restriction enzyme indicates that the DNA adopts a native conformation accessible to protein binding. Similar electron-transfer rates measured through 100-mer and 17-mer monolayers are consistent with rate-limiting electron tunnelling through the saturated carbon linker. This DNA-mediated CT distance of 34 nm surpasses that of most reports of molecular wires.

  3. Photodissociation of Methyl Iodide at 193 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the photodissociation of CH3I at 193 nm is reported in which we use a combination of vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and velocity map ion imaging. The iodine photofragments are probed by single-photon ionization at photon energies above and below the photoionization threshold of I(2P3/2) . The relative I(2P3/2) and I*(2P1/2) photoionization cross sections are determined at these wavelengths by using the known branching fractions for the photodissociation at 266 nm. Velocity map ion images indicate that the branching fraction for I(2P3/2) atoms is non-zero, and yield a value of 0.07 +/- 0.01. Interestingly, the translational energy distribution extracted from the image shows that the translational energy of the I(2P3/2) fragments is significantly smaller than that of the I*(2P1/2) atoms. This observation indicates the internal rotational/vibrational energy of the CH3 co-fragment is very high in the I(2P3/2) channel. The results can be interpreted in a manner consistent with the previous measurements, and provide a more complete picture of the dissociation dynamics of this prototypical molecule. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. 78 FR 53476 - Notice of Realty Action: Classification for Lease and Subsequent Conveyance for Recreation and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Classification for Lease and Subsequent Conveyance for Recreation and Public Purposes of Public Land for an Elementary School and Middle School, Eddy County, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Realty Action. SUMMARY: The Bureau of...

  5. New perspectives on the geometry of the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande rift, New Mexico: Insights from geophysical models of rift-fill thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V. J.; Connell, Sean D.

    2013-01-01

    Discrepancies among previous models of the geometry of the Albuquerque Basin motivated us to develop a new model using a comprehensive approach. Capitalizing on a natural separation between the densities of mainly Neogene basin fill (Santa Fe Group) and those of older rocks, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) geophysical model of syn-rift basin-fill thickness that incorporates well data, seismic-reflection data, geologic cross sections, and other geophysical data in a constrained gravity inversion. Although the resulting model does not show structures directly, it elucidates important aspects of basin geometry. The main features are three, 3–5-km-deep, interconnected structural depressions, which increase in size, complexity, and segmentation from north to south: the Santo Domingo, Calabacillas, and Belen subbasins. The increase in segmentation and complexity may reflect a transition of the Rio Grande rift from well-defined structural depressions in the north to multiple, segmented basins within a broader region of crustal extension to the south. The modeled geometry of the subbasins and their connections differs from a widely accepted structural model based primarily on seismic-reflection interpretations. Key elements of the previous model are an east-tilted half-graben block on the north separated from a west-tilted half-graben block on the south by a southwest-trending, scissor-like transfer zone. Instead, we find multiple subbasins with predominantly easterly tilts for much of the Albuquerque Basin, a restricted region of westward tilting in the southwestern part of the basin, and a northwesterly trending antiform dividing subbasins in the center of the basin instead of a major scissor-like transfer zone. The overall eastward tilt indicated by the 3D geophysical model generally conforms to stratal tilts observed for the syn-rift succession, implying a prolonged eastward tilting of the basin during Miocene time. An extensive north-south synform in the

  6. Concentrations of selected trace elements and other constituents in the Rio Grande and in fish tissue in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    The State of New Mexico and the Pueblo of Isleta have established surface-water standards for trace elements to control discharges of these contaminants. Before these standards can be meaningfully applied, however, ambient concentrations and loads of trace elements, principally arsenic, need to be determined in the Rio Grande and inflow sources. Arsenic concentrations also need to be determined in the edible portion of fish tissue because the Pueblo of Isleta standard for arsenic is based on fish consumption. Eighteen surface-water sampling sites on a reach of the Rio Grande from the Pueblo of San Felipe to Los Lunas, New Mexico, were sampled quarterly from October 1994 to August 1996. The sites include eight Rio Grande sites, one Jemez River site, five riverside drain sites, and four wastewater- treatment plant outfalls. Trace-element protocol was used to collect and process the samples. Field and laboratory quality-control samples were analyzed, and the results are included in this report. Fish-tissue samples were collected from four of the Rio Grande sites and the Albuquerque Riverside Drain, the Atrisco Riverside Drain, and three lakes at a recreational fishing area on the Isleta Indian Reservation. Arsenic in the Rio Grande is nearly all in the dissolved phase. There was little temporal change in arsenic concentration at the Rio Grande sites. The mean dissolved-arsenic concentration in the Rio Grande increased downstream from 1.8 micrograms per liter at the Pueblo of San Felipe to 3.6 micrograms per liter at Los Lunas. Mean dissolved-arsenic concentrations in the riverside drains were slightly higher (2.8 to 4.5 micrograms per liter) than those in the Rio Grande and were higher still in the wastewater-treatment plant outfalls (7.9 to 16.2 micrograms per liter) and the Jemez River (18.2 micrograms per liter). The mean total-arsenic concentration in fish-tissue samples from the Rio Grande and Albuquerque Riverside Drain was 14.53 micrograms per kilogram.

  7. Comparison of 980-nm and 1070-nm in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Tabakoglu, Ozgur; Ergenoglu, Mehmet U.; Gülsoy, Murat

    2009-07-01

    The use of endovenous laser treatment for varicose veins has been increasing in recent years. It is a safer technique than surgical vein stripping. Its complications (e.g. bruising, pain) are less than the complications of surgical vein stripping. But best parameters such as optimum wavelength, power, and application duration are still under investigation to clarify uncertainties about this technique. To prevent its complications and improve its clinical outcomes, the exact mechanism of it has to be known. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of different laser wavelengths on endovenous laser therapy. In this study 980-nm diode laser and 1070-nm fiber laser were used. Human veins were irradiated with 980-nm and 1070-nm lasers at 8 W and 10 W to find the optimal power and wavelength. After laser application, remarkable shrinkage was observed. Inner and outer diameters of the veins also narrowed for both of the laser types. 10 W of 980-nm laser application led to better shrinkage results.

  8. Dual illumination OCT at 1050nm and 840nm for whole eye segment imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shanhui; Qin, Lin; Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing

    2014-11-01

    We presented an improved dual channel dual focus spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with two illuminations at 840 nm and 1050 nm for whole eye segment imaging and biometry in vivo. The two light beams were coupled and optically optimized to scan the anterior and posterior segment of the eye simultaneously. This configuration with dichroic mirrors integrated in the sample arm enables us to acquire images from the anterior segment and retina effectively with minimum loss of sample signal. In addition, the full resolved complex (FRC) method was applied to double the imaging depth for the whole anterior segment imaging by eliminating the mirror image. The axial resolution for 1050 nm and 840 nm OCT was 14 μm and 8 μm in air, respectively. Finally, the system was successfully tested in imaging the unaccommodated and accommodated eyes. The preliminary results demonstrated the significant improvements comparing with our previous dual channel SD-OCT configuration in which the two probing beams had the same central wavelength of 840 nm.

  9. TCSPC FLIM in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1700 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Wolfgang; Shcheslavsky, Vladislav

    2016-03-01

    Excitation and detection in the wavelength range above 800nm is a convenient and relatively inexpensive way to increase the penetration depth in optical microscopy. Moreover, detection at long wavelength avoids the problem that tissue autofluorescence contaminates the signals from endogenous fluorescence probes. FLIM at NIR wavelength may therefore be complementary to multiphoton microscopy, especially if the lifetimes of NIR fluorophores report biological parameters of the tissue structures they are bound to. Unfortunately, neither the excitation sources nor the detectors of standard confocal and multiphoton laser scanning systems are directly suitable for excitation and detection of NIR fluorescence. Most of these problems can be solved, however, by using ps diode lasers or Ti:Sapphire lasers at their fundamental wavelength, and NIR-sensitive detectors. With NIR-sensitive PMTs the detection wavelength range can be extended up to 900 nm, with InGaAs SPAD detectors up to 1700 nm. Here, we demonstrate the use of a combination of laser scanning, multi-dimensional TCSPC, and advanced excitation sources and detectors for FLIM at up to 1700 nm. The performance was tested at tissue samples incubated with NIR dyes. The fluorescence lifetimes generally get shorter with increasing absorption and emission wavelengths of the dyes. For the cyanine dye IR1061, absorbing around 1060 nm, the lifetime was found to be as short as 70 ps. Nevertheless the fluorescence decay could still be clearly detected. Almost all dyes showed clear lifetime changes depending on the binding to different tissue constituents.

  10. 308-nm excimer laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liesenhoff, Tim

    1992-06-01

    Root canal preparation was performed on 20 extracted human teeth. After opening the coronal pulp, the root canals were prepared by 308 nm excimer laser only. All root canals were investigated under SEM after separation in the axial direction. By sagittal separation of the mandibles of freshly slaughtered cows, it was possible to get access to the tissues and irradiate under optical control. Under irradiation of excimer laser light, tissue starts to fluoresce. It was possible to demonstrate that each tissue (dentin, enamel, bone, pulpal, and connective tissue) has a characteristic spectral pattern. The SEM analyses showed that it is well possible to prepare root canals safely. All organic soft tissue has been removed by excimer laser irradiation. There was no case of via falsa. The simultaneous spectroscopic identification of the irradiated tissue provides a safe protection from overinstrumentation. First clinical trials on 20 patients suffering of chronical apical parodontitis have been carried out successfully.

  11. 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser nucleotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Snyder, Wendy J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1993-07-01

    The high incidence of patients with clinical and neurological symptoms of lumbar disc herniation has spurred the development of less invasive and more cost efficient methods to treat patients. In this study we evaluated pulsed and continuous wave (cw) 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation and induced thermal damage in sheep intervertebral disc. We used the Heraeus LaserSonics Hercules 5040 (Nd:YAG) laser system and 400 micrometers bare and 600 micrometers ball-tipped fibers in cw and pulsed mode. For the laser parameters and fibers used in this study, ablation of the intervertebral disc was successful and thermal damage did not exceed 0.5 mm. Varying beam diameters and focusing abilities (i.e., bare and ball) did not produce any difference in the coagulation thermal effect.

  12. Micromachining with femtosecond 250-nm laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Argument, Michael A.; Tsui, Ying Y.; Fedosejevs, Robert

    2000-12-01

    Laser micromachining is a flexible technique for precision patterning of surfaces in microelectronics, microelectromechanical devices and integrated optical devices. Typical applications include drilling of holes, cutting of conducting lines or shaping of micro component surfaces. The resolution, edge finish and residual damage to the surrounding and underlying structures depend on a variety of parameters including laser energy, intensity, pulse width and wavelength. Femtosecond pulses are of particular interest because the limited time of interaction limits the lateral expansion of the plasma and the inward propagation of the heat front. Thus, very small spot size can be achieved and minimal heating and damage of underlying layers can be obtained. An additional advantage of femtosecond pulses is that multiphoton absorption leads to efficient coupling of energy to many materials independent of the linear reflectivity of the surface. Thus metals and transmitting dielectrics, which are difficult to micromachine, may be machined with such pulses. The coupling is improved further by employing ultraviolet wavelength laser pulses where the linear absorption typically is much higher than for visible and infrared laser pulses. To explore these advantages, we have initiated a study of the interaction of 250nm femtosecond laser pulses with metals. The laser pulses are obtained by generating the third harmonic from a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser operating at 750nm. The pulses are focused to various intensities in the range of 1010Wcm2 to 1015 Wcm2 using reflective and refractive microscope objectives and ablation thresholds and ablation rates have been determined for a few metals. In addition the ability to control feature size and produce submicron holes and lines have been investigated. The results are presented and compared to results obtained using infrared and visible femtosecond laser pulses.

  13. 1.86 W cw single-frequency 1319 nm ring laser pumped at 885 nm.

    PubMed

    Li, M L; Zhao, W F; Zhang, S B; Guo, L; Hou, W; Li, J M; Lin, X C

    2012-03-20

    A 1.86 W cw single-frequency 1319 nm laser was produced by using an 885 nm-pumped Nd:YAG crystal with a compact four-mirror ring cavity, for the first time to our knowledge. The Nd:YAG produced a slope efficiency of 21% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 18% with respect to the absorbed diode pump power. A near-diffraction-limited beam with M(2)=1.2 was achieved under the maximum output power. PMID:22441467

  14. Measurement of 100 nm and 60 nm Particle Standards by Differential Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, George W.; Donnelly, Michelle K.; Hagwood, Charles R.; Kukuck, Scott R.; Hackley, Vincent A.; Pui, David Y. H.

    2006-01-01

    The peak particle size and expanded uncertainties (95 % confidence interval) for two new particle calibration standards are measured as 101.8 nm ± 1.1 nm and 60.39 nm ± 0.63 nm. The particle samples are polystyrene spheres suspended in filtered, deionized water at a mass fraction of about 0.5 %. The size distribution measurements of aerosolized particles are made using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) system calibrated using SRM® 1963 (100.7 nm polystyrene spheres). An electrospray aerosol generator was used for generating the 60 nm aerosol to almost eliminate the generation of multiply charged dimers and trimers and to minimize the effect of non-volatile contaminants increasing the particle size. The testing for the homogeneity of the samples and for the presence of multimers using dynamic light scattering is described. The use of the transfer function integral in the calibration of the DMA is shown to reduce the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak particle size compared to the approach based on the peak in the concentration vs. voltage distribution. A modified aerosol/sheath inlet, recirculating sheath flow, a high ratio of sheath flow to the aerosol flow, and accurate pressure, temperature, and voltage measurements have increased the resolution and accuracy of the measurements. A significant consideration in the uncertainty analysis was the correlation between the slip correction of the calibration particle and the measured particle. Including the correlation reduced the expanded uncertainty from approximately 1.8 % of the particle size to about 1.0 %. The effect of non-volatile contaminants in the polystyrene suspensions on the peak particle size and the uncertainty in the size is determined. The full size distributions for both the 60 nm and 100 nm spheres are tabulated and selected mean sizes including the number mean diameter and the dynamic light scattering mean diameter are computed. The use of these particles for calibrating DMAs and for

  15. The Doubling of 846 nm Light to Produce 423 nm Light for use in Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, James; Birrell, Jeremey; Tang, Rebecca; Erickson, Chris; Goggins, Landon; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-10-01

    We present progress on a 423 nm fluorescence probe/cooling laser for use in our neutral calcium atom interferometer. The finished system will include an 846 nm diode laser that is coupled to a tapered amplifier. This light will be sent to a buildup cavity where we will achieve second-harmonic generation (SHG) using either a BBO non-linear crystal or a periodically-poled KTP crystal. We will discuss the theoretical considerations relating to the doubling of light in a crystal and the construction of our buildup cavity. We will also discuss its proposed application for use in atom interferometry.

  16. Absorption Measurements of Periodically Poled Potassium Titanyl Phosphate (PPKTP) at 775 nm and 1550 nm

    PubMed Central

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Ast, Stefan; Krüger, Christoph; Singh, Amrit Pal; Eberle, Tobias; Händchen, Vitus; Schnabel, Roman

    2013-01-01

    The efficient generation of second-harmonic light and squeezed light requires non-linear crystals that have low absorption at the fundamental and harmonic wavelengths. In this work the photo-thermal self-phase modulation technique is exploited to measure the absorption coefficient of periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP) at 1,550 nm and 775 nm. The measurement results are (84±40) ppm/cm and (127±24) ppm/cm, respectively. We conclude that the performance of state-of-the-art frequency doubling and squeezed light generation in PPKTP is not limited by absorption. PMID:23291574

  17. Use of diode laser energy (808 nm) for selective photothermolysis of contaminated wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.; Morton, Rebecca J.; Dickey, D. Thomas; Stair, Ernest L.; Payne, Marie E.; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of selective laser treatments on contaminated wounds. Comparisons were made using the diode (808 nm) laser with and without an accompanying chromophore, Nd:YAG (1064 nm), and KTP (532 nm) lasers. A known quantity (mean concentration of 7.9 +/- 1.9 CFU/ml X 108) of bacterial organisms (Staphylococcus intermedius) was inoculated into skin incisions aseptically made on the backs of experimental rabbits. The bacteria were allowed to adhere/colonize for one hour, and each site was then treated with various laser modalities. Tissue samples were taken at one and forty-eight hours after treatment. The number of viable bacteria was then quantitated (CFU/ml) by a spot-plate counting technique. Initial results illustrated the fact that selective photothermolysis of superficial cellular layers of targeted tissue occurred with an accompanying decrease of bacterial numbers that virtually created a `clean' (organisms numbers less than 105 per gram of tissue) wound. This effect was especially noticeable using the diode laser (808 nm) and an accompanying chromophore, indocyanine green.

  18. 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 laser intracavity pumped at 912 nm and sum-frequency mixing for an emission at 491 nm.

    PubMed

    Herault, Emilie; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick; Georges, Thierry

    2008-07-15

    We present for the first time a Nd:YVO(4) laser emitting at 1064 nm intracavity pumped at 912 nm by a Nd:GdVO(4) laser. We carried out a model to design the system properly, and laser performance was experimentally investigated. Intracavity sum-frequency mixing at 912 and 1064 nm was then realized in a BiBO crystal to reach the blue range. We obtained a cw output power of 155 mW at 491 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 20 W at 808 nm. PMID:18628821

  19. Water-level data for the Albuquerque Basin and adjacent areas, central New Mexico, period of record through September 30, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.; Torres, Leeanna T.

    2010-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25 to 40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompass the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin were obtained solely from groundwater resources until December 2008, when surface water from the Rio Grande began being treated and integrated into the system. An increase of about 20 percent in the population from 1990 to 2000 also resulted in an increased demand for water. A network of wells was established to monitor changes in groundwater levels throughout the basin from April 1982 through September 1983. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2009), the network consists of 131 wells and piezometers. This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at 123 sites through water year 2009. In addition, data from four wells (Sites 140, 147, 148, and 149) owned, maintained, and measured by Sandia National Laboratories and three from Kirtland Air Force Base (Sites 119, 125, and 126) are presented in this report.

  20. Water-Level Data for the Albuquerque Basin and Adjacent Areas, Central New Mexico, Period of Record Through September 30, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25 to 40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompass the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin are currently (2007) obtained solely from ground-water resources. An increase of about 20 percent in the population from 1990 to 2000 also resulted in an increased demand for water. A network of wells was established to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin from April 1982 through September 1983. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2007), the network consists of 131 wells and piezometers. This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at 131 sites through water-year 2007. Data from five sites (Sites 9, 10, 31, 71 and 78) were not measured during the 2007 water-year, but are included in this report because recent data are useful for comparison and (or) data have been collected that will be included in the water-year 2008 report.

  1. Water-Level Data for the Albuquerque Basin and Adjacent Areas, Central New Mexico, Period of Record Through September 30, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beman, Joseph E.

    2009-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin, located in central New Mexico, is about 100 miles long and 25 to 40 miles wide. The basin is defined as the extent of consolidated and unconsolidated deposits of Tertiary and Quaternary age that encompass the structural Rio Grande Rift within the basin. Drinking-water supplies throughout the basin are currently (2008) obtained soley from ground-water resources. An increase of about 20 percent in the population from 1990 to 2000 also resulted in an increased demand for water. A network of wells was established to monitor changes in ground-water levels throughout the basin from April 1982 through September 1983. This network consisted of 6 wells with analog-to-digital recorders and 27 wells where water levels were measured monthly in 1983. Currently (2008), the network consists of 144 wells and piezometers. This report presents water-level data collected by U.S. Geological Survey personnel at 125 sites through water-year 2008. In addition, data from 19 wells (Sites 127-30, 132-134, 136, 138-142 and 144-149) owned, maintained, and measured by Sandia National Laboratories are presented in this report.

  2. Report of the workshop on Arctic oil and gas recovery held at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, June 30-July 2, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-09-01

    This report is the result of a workshop on Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery, held at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, on June 30-July 2, 1980. Research priorities for the technology related to Arctic offshore oil and gas production were defined. The workshop was preceded by a report entitled, A Review of Technology for Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Recovery, authored by Dr. W. M. Sackinger. The mission of the workshop was to identify research priorities without considering whether the research should be conducted by government or by industry. Nevertheless, at the end of the meeting the general discussion did consider this, and the concensus was that environmental properties should certainly be of concern to the government, that implementation of petroleum operations was the province of industry, and that overlapping, coordinated areas of interest include both environment and interactions of the environment with structures, transport systems, and operations. An attempt to establish relative importance and a time frame was made after the workshop through the use of a survey form. The form and a summary of its results, and a discussion of its implications, are given.

  3. Chemical analyses of ground-water samples from the Rio Grande Valley in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 1993 through January 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, D.W.; Schlottmann, J.L.; Ferree, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate general ground-water- quality conditions and contaminant locations in the Rio Grande Valley in the vicinity of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Water samples from 36 observation wells in 12 well nests were analyzed. The well nests are located along three roads near the Rio Grande--two well nests near Paseo del Norte, five well nests near Monta?o Road, and five well nests near Rio Bravo Boulevard. The water samples were collected from October 19, 1993, through January 18, 1994. Water-quality types by major-ion composition were calcium bicarbonate (found in most samples), sodium sulfate, calcium sulfate, and calcium sulfate chloride. Nutrients were detected in all but one sample. Ammonia was detected in 34 samples, nitrite in 4 samples, and nitrate in 17 samples. Orthophosphate was detected in 31 samples. Organic carbon was detected in all samples collected. The trace elements arsenic and barium were detected in all samples and zinc in 31 samples. Fourteen samples contained detectable copper. Cadmium was detected in one sample, chromium in two samples, lead in four samples, and selenium in two samples. Mercury and silver were not detected.

  4. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  5. Evaluation of the Diode laser (810nm,980nm) on dentin tubule diameter following internal bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Salim, Soheil; Sarraf, Pegah; Javad-Kharazifard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diode laser irradiation and bleaching materials on the dentinal tubule diameter after laser bleaching. Material and Methods The dentin discs of 40 extracted third molar were used in this experiment. Each disc surface was divided into two halves by grooving. Half of samples were laser bleached at different wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Other half of each disc with no laser bleaching remained as a negative control. Dentin discs were assigned randomly into four groups (n=10) with following hydrogen peroxide and diode laser wavelength specifications; Group 1 (30% - 810 nm), group 2 (30% - 980 nm), group 3 (46% - 810 nm) and group 4 (46% - 980 nm). All specimens were sent for scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in order to measure tubular diameter in laser treated and control halves. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Results A significant reduction in dentin tubule diameter was observed in groups 1, 2 and 4. There was no significant difference between groups 1 and 2 and between groups 3 and 4 after bleaching. Conclusions The SEM results showed that diode laser was able to reduce dentin tubule diameter and its effect on dentin was dependent on chemical action of bleaching material. Key words:Laser, diode, dentin, tubule, diameter. PMID:27398172

  6. NXT:1980Di immersion scanner for 7nm and 5nm production nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Roelof; Weichselbaum, Stefan; Droste, Richard; McLaren, Matthew; Koek, Bert; de Boeij, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Immersion scanners remain the critical lithography workhorses in semiconductor device manufacturing. When progressing towards the 7nm device node for logic and D18 device node for DRAM production, pattern-placement and layer-to-layer overlay requirements keep progressively scaling down and consequently require system improvements in immersion scanners. The on-product-overlay requirements are approaching levels of only a few nanometers, imposing stringent requirements on the scanner tool design in terms of reproducibility, accuracy and stability. In this paper we report on the performance of the NXT:1980Di immersion scanner. The NXT:1980Di builds upon the NXT:1970Ci, that is widely used for 16nm, 14nm and 10nm high-volume manufacturing. We will discuss the NXT:1980Di system- and sub-system/module enhancements that drive the scanner overlay, focus and productivity performance. Overlay, imaging, focus, productivity and defectivity data will be presented for multiple tools. To further reduce the on-product overlay system performance, alignment sensor contrast improvements as well as active reticle temperature conditioning are implemented on the NXT:1980Di. Reticle temperature conditioning will reduce reticle heating overlay and the higher contrast alignment sensor will improve alignment robustness for processed alignment targets. Due to an increased usage of multiple patterning techniques, an increased number of immersion exposures is required. NXT:1980Di scanner design modifications raised productivity levels from 250wph to 275wph. This productivity enhancement provides lower cost of ownership (CoO) for customers using immersion technology.

  7. THE SPECTRUM OF THORIUM FROM 250 nm TO 5500 nm: RITZ WAVELENGTHS AND OPTIMIZED ENERGY LEVELS

    SciTech Connect

    Redman, Stephen L.; Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, Craig J.

    2014-03-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly, and doubly ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19, 874 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40, 000 cm{sup –1} to 1800 cm{sup –1}). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer and Engleman and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. We also found a large scatter with respect to the thorium line list of Lovis and Pepe. We anticipate that our Ritz wavelengths will lead to improved measurement accuracy for current and future spectrographs that make use of thorium-argon or thorium-neon lamps as calibration standards.

  8. Faster qualification of 193-nm resists for 100-nm development using photo cell monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Chris M.; Kallingal, Chidam; Zawadzki, Mary T.; Jeewakhan, Nazneen N.; Kaviani, Nazila N.; Krishnan, Prakash; Klaum, Arthur D.; Van Ess, Joel

    2003-05-01

    The development of 100-nm design rule technologies is currently taking place in many R&D facilities across the world. For some critical alyers, the transition to 193-nm resist technology has been required to meet this leading edge design rule. As with previous technology node transitions, the materials and processes available are undergoing changes and improvements as vendors encounter and solve problems. The initial implementation of the 193-nm resits process did not meet the photolithography requirements of some IC manufacturers due to very high Post Exposure Bake temperature sensitivity and consequently high wafer to wafer CD variation. The photoresist vendors have been working to improve the performance of the 193-nm resists to meet their customer's requirements. Characterization of these new resists needs to be carried out prior to implementation in the R&D line. Initial results on the second-generation resists evaluated at Cypress Semicondcutor showed better CD control compared to the aelrier resist with comparable Depth of Focus (DOF), Exposure Latitute, Etch Resistance, etc. In addition to the standard lithography parameters, resist characterization needs to include defect density studies. It was found that the new resists process with the best CD control, resulted in the introduction of orders of magnitude higher yield limiting defects at Gate, Contact adn Local Interconnect. The defect data were shared with the resists vendor and within days of the discovery the resist vendor was able to pinpoint the source of the problem. The fix was confirmed and the new resists were successfully released to production. By including defect monitoring into the resist qualification process, Cypress Semiconductor was able to 1) drive correction actions earlier resulting in faster ramp and 2) eliminate potential yield loss. We will discuss in this paper how to apply the Micro Photo Cell Monitoring methodology for defect monitoring in the photolithogprhay module and the

  9. 34 nm Charge Transport through DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slinker, Jason; Muren, Natalie; Renfrew, Sara; Barton, Jacqueline

    2011-03-01

    Long-range charge transport through DNA has broad-reaching implications due to its inherent biological recognition capabilities and unmatched capacity to be patterned into precise, nanoscale shapes. We have observed charge transport through 34 nm DNA monolayers (100 base pairs) using DNA-mediated electrochemistry. Cyclic voltammetry of multiplexed gold electrodes modified with 100mer DNAs reveal sizable peaks from distally-bound Nile Blue redox probes for well matched duplexes but highly attenuated redox peaks from 100mer monolayers containing a single base pair mismatch, demonstrating that the charge transfer is DNA-mediated. The 100mers on the gold surface are efficiently cleaved by the restriction enzyme RsaI. The 100mers in the DNA film thus adopt conformations that are readily accessible to protein binding and restriction. The ability to assemble well-characterized DNA films with these 100mers permits the demonstration of charge transport over distances surpassing most reports of molecular wires. Supported by funding from the NIH/NIBIB.

  10. Illumination optimization for 65nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ching-Heng; Liu, Qingwei; Zhang, Liguo; Hung, Chi-Yuan

    2006-10-01

    The most important task of the microlithography process is to make the manufacturable process latitude/window, including dose latitude and Depth of Focus, as wide as possible. Thus, to perform a thorough source optimization during process development is becoming more critical as moving to high NA technology nodes. Furthermore, Optical proximity correction (OPC) are always used to provide a common process window for structures that would, otherwise, have no overlapping windows. But as the critical dimension of the IC design shrinks dramatically, the flexibility for applying OPC also decreases. So a robust microlithography process should also be OPC-friendly. This paper demonstrates our work on the illumination optimization during the process development. The Calibre ILO (Illumination Optimization) tool was used to perform the illumination optimization and provided plots of DOF vs. various parametric illumination settings. This was used to screen the various illumination settings for the one with optimum process margins. The resulting illumination conditions were then implemented and analyzed at a real wafer level on our 90/65nm critical layers, such as Active, Poly, Contact and Metal. In conclusion, based on these results, a summary is provided highlighting how OPC can get benefit from proper illumination optimization.

  11. OPC structures for maskshops qualification for the CMOS65nm and CMOS45nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundermann, Frank; Trouiller, Yorick; Urbani, Jean-Christophe; Couderc, Christophe; Belledent, Jérôme; Borjon, Amandine; Foussadier, Franck; Gardin, Christian; LeCam, Laurent; Rody, Yves; Saied, Mazen; Yesilada, Emek; Martinelli, Catherine; Wilkinson, Bill; Vautrin, Florent; Morgana, Nicolo; Robert, Frederic; Montgomery, Patrick; Kerrien, Gurwan; Planchot, Jonathan; Farys, Vincent; Di Maria, Jean-Luc

    2007-02-01

    Several qualification stages are required for new maskshop tools, first step is done by the maskshop internally. Taking a new writer for example, the maskshop will review the basic factory and site acceptance tests, including CD uniformity, CD linearity, local CD errors and registration errors. The second step is to have dedicated OPC (Optical Proximity Correction) structures from the wafer fab. These dedicated OPC structures will be measured by the maskshop to get a reticle CD metrology trend line. With this trend line, we can: - ensure the stability at reticle level of the maskshop processes - put in place a matching procedure to guarantee the same OPC signature at reticle level in case of any internal maskshop process change or new maskshop evaluation. Changes that require qualification could be process changes for capacity reasons, like introducing a new writer or a new manufacturing line, or for capability reasons, like a new process (new developer tool for example) introduction. Most advanced levels will have dedicated OPC structures. Also dedicated maskshop processes will be monitored with these specific OPC structures. In this paper, we will follow in detail the different reticle CD measurements of dedicated OPC structures for the three advanced logic levels of the 65nm node: poly level, contact level and metal level. The related maskshop's processes are - for poly: eaPSM 193nm with a nega CAR (Chemically Amplified Resist) process for Clear Field L/S (Lines & Space) reticles - for contact: eaPSM 193nm with a posi CAR process for Dark Field Holes reticles - for metal1: eaPSM 193nm with a posi CAR process for Dark Field L/S reticles. For all these structures, CD linearity, CD through pitch, length effects, and pattern density effects will be monitored. To average the metrology errors, the structures are placed twice on the reticle. The first part of this paper will describe the different OPC structures. These OPC structures are close to the DRM (Design Rule

  12. 77 FR 76070 - Notice of Proposed Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease NMNM 126063, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) received a petition for... out in Section 31(d) and (e) of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 (30 U.S.C. 188). The BLM is...

  13. 75 FR 65644 - Notice of Application for a Recordable Disclaimer of Interest; NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Survey that the east boundary of the parcel is riparian and extends to the medial line of the current... title status to a parcel of land that is within the exterior boundary of the Carson National Forest. The authority to issue a Disclaimer of Interest for lands within the boundaries of the National Forest...

  14. 75 FR 39273 - Notice of Realty Action: Proposed Direct Sale of Public Land, Chaves County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    ... parcels are being proposed for direct sale to the Roswell Gun Club at no less than the appraised fair... property is currently owned by the New Mexico Military Institute and the Roswell Gun Club. The unauthorized... Roswell Gun Club, firing ranges, sightings-in range, small arms firing range, and various earthen...

  15. Multi-watt 589nm fiber laser source

    SciTech Connect

    DAWSON, J W; DROBSHOFF, A D; BEACH, R J; MESSERLY, M J; PAYNE, S A; BROWN, A; PENNINGTON, D M; BAMFORD, D J; SHARPE, S J; COOK, D J

    2006-01-19

    We have demonstrated 3.5W of 589nm light from a fiber laser using periodically poled stoichiometric Lithium Tantalate (PPSLT) as the frequency conversion crystal. The system employs 938nm and 1583nm fiber lasers, which were sum-frequency mixed in PPSLT to generate 589nm light. The 938nm fiber laser consists of a single frequency diode laser master oscillator (200mW), which was amplified in two stages to >15W using cladding pumped Nd{sup 3+} fiber amplifiers. The fiber amplifiers operate at 938nm and minimize amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm by employing a specialty fiber design, which maximizes the core size relative to the cladding diameter. This design allows the 3-level laser system to operate at high inversion, thus making it competitive with the competing 1088nm 4-level laser transition. At 15W, the 938nm laser has an M{sup 2} of 1.1 and good polarization (correctable with a quarter and half wave plate to >15:1). The 1583nm fiber laser consists of a Koheras 1583nm fiber DFB laser that is pre-amplified to 100mW, phase modulated and then amplified to 14W in a commercial IPG fiber amplifier. As a part of our research efforts we are also investigating pulsed laser formats and power scaling of the 589nm system. We will discuss the fiber laser design and operation as well as our results in power scaling at 589nm.

  16. Polarization properties of lidar scattering from clouds at 347 nm and 694 nm.

    PubMed

    Pal, S R; Carswell, A I

    1978-08-01

    The polarization characteristics of lidar scattering from cumulus and low-lying shower clouds have been measured with a system operating at 694 nm (red) and 347 nm (blue). The backscatter profiles of the polarization components as well as of the total intensity of the return are presented and discussed for the two wavelengths. The linear depolarization ratio delta, which can be used as a measure of the unpolarized multiple scattering, has been obtained at both wavelengths. This quantity has a very low value at cloud base for both wavelengths and increases with pulse penetration. The blue registers generally higher values of a within the cloud. The measured total intensity backscatter functions for both wavelengths are presented and discussed in relation to theoretical calculations of cloud models.

  17. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  18. TUNABLE DIODE LASER MEASUREMENTS OF NO2 NEAR 670 NM AND 395 NM. (R823933)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two single-mode diode lasers were used to record high-resolution absorption spectra of NO2 (dilute in Ar) near 670.2 and 394.5 nm over a range of temperatures (296 to 774 K) and total pressures (2.4 x 10(-2) to 1 atm). A commercial InGaAsP laser was tuned 1.3 cm(-1) at a repetiti...

  19. Performance comparison of bismuth/erbium co-doped optical fibre by 830 nm and 980 nm pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Binbin; Luo, Yanhua; Zareanborji, Amirhassan; Xiao, Gui; Peng, Gang-Ding; Wen, Jianxiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of bismuth/erbium co-doped fibre (BEDF) by 830 nm and 980 nm pumping has been studied in detail, including the small signal absorption, pump absorption, emission, gain and excited state absorption (ESA). Based on the study, energy transition diagrams of BEDF under 830 nm or 980 nm pumping are proposed to clarify the spectroscopic properties. The results demonstrate the advantages of 830 nm pumping for BEDF over 980 nm pumping when considering the absorption, pumping efficiency, excited state absorption and optical amplification.

  20. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    DOE PAGES

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; et al

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environmentsmore » for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.« less

  1. Electron-induced single event upsets in 28 nm and 45 nm bulk SRAMs

    SciTech Connect

    Trippe, J. M.; Reed, R. A.; Austin, R. A.; Sierawski, B. D.; Weller, R. A.; Funkhouser, E. D.; King, M. P.; Narasimham, B.; Bartz, B.; Baumann, R.; Schrimpf, R. D.; Labello, R.; Nichols, J.; Weeden-Wright, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence of single electron-induced upsets in commercial 28 nm and 45 nm CMOS SRAMs from a monoenergetic electron beam. Upsets were observed in both technology nodes when the SRAM was operated in a low power state. The experimental cross section depends strongly on both bias and technology node feature size, consistent with previous work in which SRAMs were irradiated with low energy muons and protons. Accompanying simulations demonstrate that δ-rays produced by the primary electrons are responsible for the observed upsets. Additional simulations predict the on-orbit event rates for various Earth and Jovian environments for a set of sensitive volumes representative of current technology nodes. The electron contribution to the total upset rate for Earth environments is significant for critical charges as high as 0.2 fC. This value is comparable to that of sub-22 nm bulk SRAMs. Similarly, for the Jovian environment, the electron-induced upset rate is larger than the proton-induced upset rate for critical charges as high as 0.3 fC.

  2. 77 FR 42727 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    .../27/2012, Contact: Thomas Bonetti 413-253-8307. Revision to FR Notice Published 06/08/2012; Extending...-motorized Areas, Beaverhead and Jefferson Counties, MT, Comment Period Ends: 09/04/2012, Contact: Patty..., NM, Comment Period Ends: 09/07/2012, Contact: Dave Warnack 575-257-4095 Revision to FR...

  3. 76 FR 12108 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... 409-766-3039. EIS No. 20110060, Draft EIS, DOE, WV, Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and... County, CA, Comment Period Ends: 04/12/2011, Contact: Marvin Keller 703-390-6470. Revision to FR Notice... Counties, NM, Review Period Ends: 04/04/2011, Contact: Sharon Brown 505-988-6717. Revision to FR...

  4. 76 FR 66925 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ...: Carey Case (907) 772-3871. EIS No. 20110361, Draft EIS, BLM, 00, Programmatic--Solar Energy Development...-Scale Solar Energy Development on Public Land, AZ, CA, NV, CO, UT and NM, Comment Period Ends: 01/27... Ends: 11/ 21/2011, Contact: Rodney N. Barry (404) 562-3630. Revision to FR Notice Published...

  5. Regional Survey of Structural Properties and Cementation Patterns of Fault Zones in the Northern Part of the Albuquerque Basin, New Mexico - Implications for Ground-Water Flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, Scott A.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the need to document and evaluate the types and variability of fault zone properties that potentially affect aquifer systems in basins of the middle Rio Grande rift, we systematically characterized structural and cementation properties of exposed fault zones at 176 sites in the northern Albuquerque Basin. A statistical analysis of measurements and observations evaluated four aspects of the fault zones: (1) attitude and displacement, (2) cement, (3) lithology of the host rock or sediment, and (4) character and width of distinctive structural architectural components at the outcrop scale. Three structural architectural components of the fault zones were observed: (1) outer damage zones related to fault growth; these zones typically contain deformation bands, shear fractures, and open extensional fractures, which strike subparallel to the fault and may promote ground-water flow along the fault zone; (2) inner mixed zones composed of variably entrained, disrupted, and dismembered blocks of host sediment; and (3) central fault cores that accommodate most shear strain and in which persistent low- permeability clay-rich rocks likely impede the flow of water across the fault. The lithology of the host rock or sediment influences the structure of the fault zone and the width of its components. Different grain-size distributions and degrees of induration of the host materials produce differences in material strength that lead to variations in width, degree, and style of fracturing and other fault-related deformation. In addition, lithology of the host sediment appears to strongly control the distribution of cement in fault zones. Most faults strike north to north-northeast and dip 55? - 77? east or west, toward the basin center. Most faults exhibit normal slip, and many of these faults have been reactivated by normal-oblique and strike slip. Although measured fault displacements have a broad range, from 0.9 to 4,000 m, most are <100 m, and fault zones appear to

  6. Improved performance 1590 nm Er:YLF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marchbanks, R.D.; Petrin, R.R.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-12-01

    We present an improvement in the performance of a 1590 nm ER:YLF laser through simultaneous laser operation at 2717 nm. A slope efficiency of 7.0% with an output of 13.2 mW has been achieved with 971 nm pumping.

  7. Continuous-wave simultaneous dual-wavelength operation at 912 nm and 1063 nm in Nd:GdVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lünstedt, K.; Pavel, N.; Petermann, K.; Huber, G.

    2007-01-01

    A continuous-wave, diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 thin disk laser with simultaneous dual-wavelength emission at the 912 nm 4 F 3/2→4 I 9/2 quasi-three-level transition and the 1063 nm 4 F 3/2→4 I 11/2 four-level transition is demonstrated and analyzed. Output powers of 1.7 W at 912 nm and of 1.6 W at 1063 nm were achieved simultaneously from a 0.3-at.%, 300-μm thick Nd:GdVO4 crystal that was multi-pass excited with 26.8 W of available diode pump power. Second harmonic generation to 456 nm with LiB3O5 yielded 0.96 W in 912 nm single-wavelength operation and 0.73 W in 912 nm/1063 nm dual-wavelength operation.

  8. From the nm to the Mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, I. M.

    2003-12-01

    Tectonic models for the evolution of an orogen start at the Mm scale, and use field work on smaller subunits at the km scale and rocks collected at the m scale. At the mm scale, minerals are identified, analyzed by mass spectrometry, their "cooling ages" assigned to a specific closure temperature, a cooling rate attributed to a particular tectonic regime, and a large body of self-referential literature is the product of an oiled machinery. Problems become apparent if one attempts to harmonize mm-scale science with the nasty little details at even smaller scales. Atoms are invisible to the naked eye (unlike the minerals mentioned above) and their actual behavior is, or was, only accessible to indirect argumentations and simplified calculations. Increased computing power now allows calculating the transport of atoms in a crystal from the Schr”dinger equation: results do not fit 19th century continuum physics for infinitely dilute solutions (Fick's and Arrhenius' "laws"). Moreover, improved nanochemical analyses allow characterizing the supposedly homogeneous mineral matrix. TEM images show how layers or chains in pristine minerals are substituted in a non-periodic way by alteration products. EMP analyses show the almost ubiquitous presence of razor-sharp boundaries rather than Erf profiles. Disequilibrium recrystallization textures thus prevail over diffusive reequilibration; diffusion sensu stricto is shown to be a much slower process than heterochemical replacement. Alterability sequences are well known to surface scientists: e.g. halite, olivine, biotite, muscovite, zircon. Such sequences are reflected in the isotopic retentivity. The link only becomes clear at the nm scale: isotopic exchange occurs during the replacement reactions that affect all rocks on their retrograde P-T evolution. This is sufficient to explain why zircons record higher isotopic ages than muscovites, which in turn undergo less isotope exchange than biotites etc. While there is a vague

  9. Picosecond laser texturization of mc-silicon for photovoltaics: A comparison between 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm radiation wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binetti, Simona; Le Donne, Alessia; Rolfi, Andrea; Jäggi, Beat; Neuenschwander, Beat; Busto, Chiara; Frigeri, Cesare; Scorticati, Davide; Longoni, Luca; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Self-organized surface structures were produced by picosecond laser pulses on multi-crystalline silicon for photovoltaic applications. Three different laser wavelengths were employed (i.e. 1064 nm, 532 nm and 355 nm) and the resulting morphologies were observed to effectively reduce the reflectivity of the samples after laser irradiation. Besides, a comparative study of the laser induced subsurface damage generated by the three different wavelengths was performed by confocal micro-Raman, photoluminescence and transmission electron microscopy. The results of both the structural and optical characterization showed that the mc-Si texturing performed with the laser at 355 nm provides surface reflectivity between 11% and 8% over the spectral range from 400 nm to 1 μm, while inducing the lowest subsurface damage, located above the depletion region of the p-n junction.

  10. Interference patterning of gratings with a period of 150 nm at a wavelength of 157 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuetterer, Gerald; Herbst, Waltraud; Rottstegge, Joerg; Ferstl, Margit; Sebald, Michael; Schwider, Johannes

    2002-07-01

    A system producing an optical pattern with a high spatial frequency at (lambda) equals 157 nm has been built to be used as a photoresist tool for the 157 nm lithography. In order to generate a test pattern with a high spatial frequency, two-beam interference was used to overcome the limits of existing mask-projection systems using numerical apertures up to 0.65. In order to work without phase lock techniques a e-beam phase grating was used for providing the two interfering wave fronts for the generation of 150 nm-structures. The phase grating is illuminated under the Bragg-angle. Only two diffraction orders propagate and the other orders are evanescent. The interference pattern resulting in the region of the overlap of the propagated orders is a true two-beam pattern of the same period as the e-beam mask. The photoresist coated wafer is placed in the plane of the interference pattern and is rigidly held by a mechanical fixture. The contrast of the interference pattern depends on the degree of spatial coherence of the excimer laser, on the coherence length, the polarization state of the beam used to illuminate the surface relief phase grating, and on the distance between the wafer and the surface relief phase grating. The degree of spatial coherence was increased by a restriction of the plane wave spectrum which has been attained at the cost of energy throughput. In addition, the TM-polarization was blocked. This was done by a polarizer and a spatial filter. The theoretical background of the experiment will be discussed as well as practical problems.

  11. 9nm node wafer defect inspection using three-dimensional scanning, a 405nm diode laser, and a broadband source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Bryniarski, Casey A.; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2015-03-01

    We recently built a 405nm laser based optical interferometry system for 9nm node patterned wafer defect inspection. Defects with volumes smaller than 15nm by 90nm by 35nm have been detected. The success of defect detection relied on accurate mechanical scanning of the wafer and custom engineered image denoising post-processing. To further improve the detection sensitivity, we designed a higher precision XYZ scanning stage and replaced the laser source with an incoherent LED to remove the speckle noise. With these system modifications, we successfully detected both defects and surface contamination particles in bright-field imaging mode. Recently, we have upgraded this system for interferometric defect inspection.

  12. Polymer and Material Design for Lithography From 50 nm Node to the sub-16 nm Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefonas, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Microlithography is one of the technologies which enabled the Information Age. Developing at the intersection of optical physics, polymer science and photochemistry, the need for ever smaller high fidelity patterns to build integrated circuits is currently pushing the technology evolution from 193 nm immersion lithography to extreme ultraviolet lithography (13.5 nm) to alternate patterning technologies such as directed self assembly (DSA) of block copolymers. Essential to the success of this progression is a rapid application of new concepts and materials in polymer science. We will discuss the requirements for 193 immersion lithography and how advanced acrylic random polymers are being designed with chemical amplification functionality to meet these needs. The special requirements of a water immersion lithography led to the invention and rapid commercial application of surface assembled embedded barrier layer polymers. Design of polymers for EUV lithography is having to respond to much different challenges, prominent being the dearth of photons in the exposure step, and the other being how to maximize the efficiency of photoacid production. In parallel, alternative lithographic approaches are being developed using directed self assembly of block copolymers which realize pattern frequency multiplication. We will update with our progress in the applications of polymers designed for DSA.

  13. Comparison between HMME mediated photodynamic therapy using 413nm and 532nm for port wine stains: a mathematical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Gu, Y.; Chen, R.; Xu, L. Q.; Liao, X. H.; Huang, N. Y.; Wang, Y. Y.

    2007-11-01

    Introduction: As it is always difficult to find the optimal combination of photosensitizer and of laser wavelength to achieve selective vascular damage in PWS-PDT, the selective vascular effects of HMME (Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether) mediated PDT with 413 nm and with 532 nm were compared by mathematical simulation in this study. Materials & Methods: Firstly, distribution of 413 nm, 532 nm light in PWS tissue was simulated by Monte Carlo model. Two energy density groups were set, one is 80mW/cm2x40min for both 413 nm and 532 nm, the other is 80mW/cm2x40min for 532 nm while 80mW/cm2x20min in for 413 nm. Secondly, the productivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in target vessels and normal tissue were simulated using a simulation system for PDT of PWS established in our lab, which considering the amount of light and photosensitizer in tissue, the molar extinction coefficient of photosensitizer, and quantum yield of ROS. Concentration of HMME for each wavelength were same. Finally, the productivity of ROS n in target vessels and normal tissue were compared between 413 nm PDT and 532 nm PDT under different energy density. Result: Under the same energy density, ROS productivity in target vessels of 413 nm PDT was significantly higher than that of 532 nm PDT. Moreover, it was still higher at low energy density than that of 532nm PDT with high energy density. Conclusion: HMME mediated PDT using 413 nm has the potential to increase the selective vascular effect of PDT for PWS by shortening treatment time.

  14. Two new species of Xestoblatta Hebard, 1916 from Brazil, a redescription of Xestoblatta roppai Rocha e Silva Albuquerque & Fraga, 1975 and a key for the species of the buscki group (Blattodea, Ectobiidae, Blattellinae)

    PubMed Central

    Silva-da-Silva, Luiz Rafael; Lopes, Sonia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two new species of Xestoblatta from northern Brazil are described, Xestoblatta buhrnheimi sp. n. and Xestoblatta rondonensis sp. n., included in the buscki group Gurney (1939), and new characters are added to the description of Xestoblatta mamorensis Lopes & Oliveira, 2006. Xestoblatta roppai Rocha e Albuquerque-Silva & Fraga, 1975, from midwestern Brazil is redescribed, including its genital characters which were not previously described. Additionally, a key for the species of this group is provided, and photographs are given of the species in the habitus, of tergal modifications, and of the genitalia. PMID:26487828

  15. 9nm node wafer defect inspection using visible light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Edwards, Chris; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2014-04-01

    Over the past 2 years, we have developed a common optical-path, 532 nm laser epi-illumination diffraction phase microscope (epi-DPM) and successfully applied it to detect different types of defects down to 20 by 100 nm in a 22nm node intentional defect array (IDA) wafer. An image post-processing method called 2DISC, using image frame 2nd order differential, image stitching, and convolution, was used to significantly improve sensitivity of the measured images. To address 9nm node IDA wafer inspection, we updated our system with a highly stable 405 nm diode laser. By using the 2DISC method, we detected parallel bridge defects in the 9nm node wafer. To further enhance detectability, we are exploring 3D wafer scanning, white-light illumination, and dark-field inspection.

  16. Fault Networks in the Northwestern Albuquerque Basin and Their Potential Role in Controlling Mantle CO2 Degassing and Fluid Migration from the Valles Caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. R.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Fischer, T. P.; Lee, H.; McGibbon, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Grande rift (RGR) has Quaternary and active volcanism and faulting that provide a field laboratory for examining links between mantle degassing and faults as fluid conduits. Diffuse and spring CO2 flux measurements were taken at 6 sites in the northwestern Albuquerque Basin (NWAB) and Valles caldera geothermal system. All sites progress to the southwest from the 1.25 Ma Valles caldera, down the rift-related Jemez fault network, to intersect with the Nacimiento fault system. Mantle CO2 and He degassing are well documented at 5 of 6 sites, with decreasing 3He/4He ratios away from the caldera. The instrument used to measure CO2 flux was an EGM-4 CO2 gas analyzer (PP systems) with an accumulation chamber. Carbonic springs at Penasco Springs (PS) and San Ysidro (SY), and the carbonate-cemented Sand Hill Fault (SHF) were targeted, all near the western border of the RGR. The SHF has no spring activity, had the smallest maximum flux of all the sites (8 g/m2d), but carbonate along the fault zone (<2 m wide) attest to past CO2 flux. The other two sites are equal distance (30-40 km) between the SHF site and Valles caldera sites. These sites have active carbonic springs that precipitate travertine mounds. Our work suggests these sites reflect intersections of the Nacimiento fault with NE trending faults that connect to the Jemez fault network. The maximum diffuse flux recorded at SY (297 g/m2d) and PS (25 g/m2d) are high, especially along the fault and near springs. At SY and PS the instruments capacity was exceeded (2,400 g/m2d) at 6 of 9 springs. Interpretations indicate a direct CO2 flux through a fault-related artesian aquifer system that is connected to magmatic gases from the caldera. Maximum diffuse flux measurements of Alamo Canyon (20,906 g/m2d), Sulphur Springs (2,400 g/m2d) and Soda Dam (1,882 g/m2d) at Valles caldera geothermal sites are comparable to Yellowstone geothermal systems. We use geospatial analysis and local geologic mapping to examine

  17. Characteristics and properties of the basin-fill aquifer determined from three test wells west of Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkins, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Three test wells were drilled west of Albuquerque; two are on the mesa west of the city, the third well is near the Rio Grande flood plain, west of the river. Test well 1, was drilled to a depth of 1,204 ft. Transmissivity of perforated intervals in the alluvial zone (980-1121 ft) ranged from 3.1 to 3.9 ft sq/day, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity from .02 to .03 ft/day. Vertical hydraulic conductivity of the semiconfining layer between the alluvial and volcanic zones is estimated to range from .00031 to .0031 ft/day. Transmissivity of the volcanic zone (1139-1179 ft) is about 81 ft sq/day, and horizontal hydraulic conductivity is about 2.0 ft/day. Dissolved-iron and manganese concentrations exceed recommended constituent limits for a public water supply. Vertical flow is upward; the potentiometric surface in the volcanic zone is about 2 ft higher than in the alluvial zone. Water levels are about 883 ft below land surface. Test well 2 was drilled to a depth of 1,828 ft below land surface with seven intervals open to the aquifer. During development, fine sand and silt entered the casing, filling it to a depth of 1,500 ft. The dissolved-cadmium concentration exceeds the maximum contaminant level and the dissolved-manganese concentration exceeds the recommended constituent limit for a public water supply. The vertical flow gradient is downward; the potentiometric surface in the middle and lower zones is about 17 ft lower than in the upper zones. Depth to water in the upper zone is about 767 below land surface and in the lower two zones the depth to water is about 784 ft below land surface. Test well 3 was drilled to a depth of 1,050 ft. Only the interval from 490 to 590 ft below land surface could be used to calculate transmissivity which was about 1,300 ft sq/day; horizontal hydraulic conductivity is about 13 ft/day. Quality of water is acceptable for a public water supply. Vertical flow is downward; the potentiometric surface in the deepest interval is about 7

  18. Surface modification during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning of organic fibrous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strlič, Matija; Kolar, Jana; Šelih, Vid-Simon; Marinček, Marko

    2003-02-01

    Formation of yellow chromophores on artificially soiled surfaces of cellulose sheets, rag paper, linen, cotton, wool and silk during Nd:YAG (1064 nm) pulsed laser cleaning was followed using Vis and FTIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Content of reducing carbonyl groups and changes in FTIR reflectance spectra of cellulose are indicative of surface chemical modifications typical of thermal degradation at elevated temperatures. Two types of soiling were used: well-characterised natural dust and carbon powder and no difference in laser-induced formation of chromophores on material surface was observed at low deposit densities. The influence of laser fluence and number of repetitions was studied and a single pulse of a higher fluence (1 J cm -1) is in general more advisable. No bleaching of the chromophores formed was noticed after repeated treatments.

  19. Characterization of strain in sub-100 nm silicon transistors by convergent-beam electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng

    As silicon devices shrink further beyond the 65 nm technology node, strain is increasingly important for the fabrication and operation of nano-devices. According to the latest International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, however, the detection and mapping of strain at the required nanometer spatial resolution has yet to be achieved. The project is to evaluate the convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) technique in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) as a nanoscale strain metrology. In this work, by using energy-filtered CBED under scanning TEM (STEM) mode, we have successfully measured strain in two types of sub-100 nm semiconductor structures: 90 nm node and 65 nm node shallow trench isolation (STI) structures, and a 65 nm node locally strained p-type metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (P-MOSFET, or PMOS) featuring SiGe source and drain (S/D). In the 90 nm STI structures, the strain is generally less than 0.1%. Nevertheless, CBED is sensitive enough to tell the strain difference in two 90 nm STI structures with different oxide trench filling conditions. In the 65 nm STI structure, the strain tensors at different positions around the oxide trench filling are measured. The experimental results are compared with finite element modeling based on isotropic elasticity theory. A large discrepancy is found between experiments and simulation, which suggests that a more sophisticated model is necessary for accurate modeling, and more importantly that CBED strain measurements can be used to check the applicability of models at nanometer scale. In the 65 nm node uniaxially strained PMOS, the lattice parameters of silicon at a distance of 25 nm to 55nm below the gate are measured. It is found that at 25 below the gate, the major stress component, 1.1 GPa, is compressive along the source-drain axis. It is also noticed that in the strained silicon area, all three diagonal components of the strain tensor are compressive. Thus the CBED strain

  20. Segmentation of the macular choroid in OCT images acquired at 830nm and 1060nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sieun; Beg, Mirza F.; Sarunic, Marinko V.

    2013-06-01

    Retinal imaging with optical coherence tomography (OCT) has rapidly advanced in ophthalmic applications with the broad availability of Fourier domain (FD) technology in commercial systems. The high sensitivity afforded by FD-OCT has enabled imaging of the choroid, a layer of blood vessels serving the outer retina. Improved visualization of the choroid and the choroid-sclera boundary has been investigated using techniques such as enhanced depth imaging (EDI), and also with OCT systems operating in the 1060-nm wavelength range. We report on a comparison of imaging the macular choroid with commercial and prototype OCT systems, and present automated 3D segmentation of the choroid-scleral layer using a graph cut algorithm. The thickness of the choroid is an important measurement to investigate for possible correlation with severity, or possibly early diagnosis, of diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  1. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  2. 7nm logic optical lithography with OPC-Lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Mikami, Koji

    2015-03-01

    The CMOS logic 22nm node was the last one done with single patterning. It used a highly regular layout style with Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have required the same regular layout style but with multiple patterning for critical layers. A "line/cut" approach is being used to achieve good pattern fidelity and process margin.[1] As shown in Fig. 1, even with "line" patterns, pitch division will eventually be necessary. For the "cut" pattern, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective at the 20nm node and below.[2,3,4] Single patterning was found to be suitable down to 16nm, while double patterning extended optical lithography for cuts to the 10-12nm nodes. Design optimization avoided the need for triple patterning. Lines can be patterned with 193nm immersion with no complex OPC. The final line dimensions can be achieved by applying pitch division by two or four.[5] In this study, we extend the scaling using simplified OPC to the 7nm node for critical FEOL and BEOL layers. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous experiments. Simulation results show that for cuts at 7nm logic dimensions, the gate layer can be done with single patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, possibly some of the 1x metal layers can be done with double patterning whose minimum pitch is 53nm, and the contact layer will require triple patterning whose minimum pitch is 68nm. These pitches are less than the resolution limit of ArF NA=1.35 (72nm). However these patterns can be separated by a combination of innovative SMO for less than optical resolution limit and a process trick of hole-repair technique. An example of triple patterning coloring is shown in Fig 3. Fin and local interconnect are created by lines and trims. The number of trim patterns are 3 times (min. pitch=90nm) and twice (min. pitch=120nm), respectively. The small number of masks, large pitches, and

  3. Pulsed blue laser at 491 nm by nonlinear cavity dumping.

    PubMed

    Herault, Emilie; Lelek, Mickaël; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick

    2008-11-24

    A nonlinear cavity dumping process is applied for the first time to generate kW peak power pulses at 491 nm. The system is based on efficient sum-frequency mixing of 1063 nm and 912 nm radiations in a BiBO nonlinear crystal placed inside a Nd:GdVO4 laser oscillator with a high finesse cavity at 912 nm. The nonlinear cavity dumping process is triggered by high peak power nanosecond pulses from a 1063 nm Q-switched Nd:GdVO4 laser operating at 10 kHz. To reach the kW range at 491 nm a key point is to Q-switch the high finesse 912 nm cavity instead of continuous wave operation. Thus, the peak power (9.3 kW for 3 ns pulses) and the average power (280 mW) obtained at 491 nm are 14 times higher than the one obtained when the 912 nm laser operated in continuous wave. PMID:19030029

  4. 40nm tunable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingsong; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Dong, Keyan; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A Brillouin-Erbium multi-wavelength tunable fiber laser at C-band is demostrated. A 10 km long singlemode fiber(SMF), a 6 m long Erbium-doped fiber, two couplers, a wavelength division multiplexer, a isolator, an optical circulator, a 980nm pump laser and a narrow linewidth tunable laser are included in the structure. A segment of 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) between the two ports of a 1×2 coupler is used as Brillouin gain. Ebiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) consists of a segment of 6m er-doped fiber pumped by 980nm laser dioder . A narrow linewidth tunable laser from 1527 to 1607 nm as Brillouin bump, At the Brillouin pump power of 8mW and the 980 nm pump power of 400 mw, 16 output channels with 0.08 nm spacing and tuning range of 40 nm from 1527 nm to 1567 nm are achieved. We realize the tunable output of wavelength by adjusting the 980 nm pump power and the Brillouin pump wavelength. Stability of the multiwavelength fiber laser is also observed.

  5. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2000-01-01

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  6. Demonstration of miniaturized 20mW CW 280nm and 266nm solid-state UV laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landru, Nicolas; Georges, Thierry; Beaurepaire, Julien; Le Guen, Bruno; Le Bail, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Visible 561 nm and 532 nm laser emissions from 14-mm long DPSS monolithic cavities are frequency converted to deep UV 280 nm and 266 nm in 16-mm long monolithic external cavities. Wavelength conversion is fully insensitive to mechanical vibrations and the whole UV laser sources fit in a miniaturized housing. More than 20 mW deep UV laser emission is demonstrated with high power stability, low noise and good beam quality. Aging tests are in progress but long lifetimes are expected thanks to the cavity design. Protein detection and deep UV resonant Raman spectroscopy are applications that could benefit from these laser sources.

  7. Evaluation of dental pulp repair using low level laser therapy (688 nm and 785 nm) morphologic study in capuchin monkeys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretel, H.; Oliveira, J. A.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Ramalho, L. T. O.

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) 688 nm and 785 nm accelerate dentin barrier formation and repair process after traumatic pulp exposure. The sample consisted of 45 premolars of capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) with pulp exposure Class V cavities. All premolars were treated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2), divided in groups of 15 teeth each, and analyzed on 7th, 25th, and 60th day. Group GI - only Ca(OH)2, GII - laser 688 nm, and GIII - laser 785 nm. Laser beam was used in single and punctual dose with the parameters: continuous, 688 nm and 785 nm wavelength, tip's area of 0.00785 cm2, power 50 mW, application time 20 s, dose 255 J/cm2, energy 2 J. Teeth were capped with Ca(OH)2, Ca(OH)2 cement and restored with amalgam. All groups presented pulp repair. On 25th day the thickness of the formed dentin barrier was different between the groups GI and GII (p < 0.05) and between groups GI and GIII (p < 0.01). On 60th day there was difference between GI and GIII (p < 0.01). It may be concluded that, LLLT 688 nm and 785 nm accelerated dentin barrier formation and consequently pulp repair process, with best results using infrared laser 785 nm.

  8. 1319 nm and 1356 nm dual-wavelength operation of diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Wang, Zhi-chao; Zhang, Shen-jin; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Feng-feng; Yuan, Lei; He, Miao; Li, Jia-jia; Zhang, Xiao-wen; Zong, Nan; Wang, Zhi-min; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-jun; Cui, Da-fu; Xu, Zu-yan

    2016-05-01

    We report the first demonstration on a diode-side-pumped quasi continuous wave (QCW) dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser operating at 1319 nm and 1356 nm. The resonator adopts symmetrical L-shaped flat-flat structure working in a thermally near unstable cavity. By precise coating on the cavity mirrors, the simultaneous oscillation at 1319 nm and 1356 nm is delivered. A maximum dual-wavelength output power of 9.4 W is obtained. The beam quality factor M2 is measured to be 1.9.

  9. High-power 850-870-nm pulsed lasers based on heterostructures with narrow and wide waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Ladugin, M A; Koval', Yu P; Marmalyuk, Aleksandr A; Petrovskii, V A; Bagaev, T A; Andreev, A Yu; Padalitsa, A A; Simakov, V A

    2013-05-31

    The power and spectral characteristics of pulsed laser diode arrays operating in the spectral range of 850-870 nm and based on heterostructures of two different types (with narrow and wide waveguides) are studied. It is found that the power-current characteristics of the laser arrays of both types are linear within the pump current range of 10-50 A and that the steepness of these characteristics decreases at currents exceeding 80 A. The decrease in the slope efficiency is more noticeable for laser arrays based on heterostructures with wide waveguides. (semiconductor lasers. physics and technology)

  10. Next-generation 193-nm laser for sub-100-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffey, Thomas P.; Blumenstock, Gerry M.; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Pan, Xiaojiang; Newman, Peter C.; Glatzel, Holger; Watson, Tom A.; Erxmeyer, J.; Kuschnereit, Ralf; Weigl, Bernhard

    2001-09-01

    The next generation 193 nm (ArF) laser has been designed and developed for high-volume production lithography. The NanoLithTM 7000, offering 20 Watts average output power at 4 kHz repetition rates is designed to support the highest exposure tool scan speeds for maximum productivity and wafer throughput. Fundamental design changes made to the laser core technologies are described. These advancements in core technology support the delivery of highly line-narrowed light with

  11. Applications of the 308-nm excimer laser in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A.; Kemeny, L.

    2006-05-01

    Excimer lasers contain a mixture of a noble inert gas and a halogen, which form excited dimers only in the activated state. High-energy current is used to produce these dimers, which have a very short lifetime, and after their fast dissociation they release the excitation energy through ultraviolet photons. The application of these lasers proved to be successful in medicine, including the field of ophthalmology, cardiology, angiology, dentistry, orthopaedics, and, in recent years, dermatology. For medical purposes, the 193-nm argon fluoride, the 248-nm krypton fluoride, the 351-nm xenon fluoride, and the 308-nm xenon chloride lasers are used. Recently, the 308-nm xenon chloride laser has gained much attention as a very effective treatment modality in dermatological disorders. It was successfully utilized in psoriasis; later, it proved to be useful in handling other lightsensitive skin disorders and even in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review summarizes the possible applications of this promising tool in dermatology.

  12. Densification Kinetics and Structural Evolution During Microwave and Pressureless Sintering of 15 nm Titanium Nitride Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zgalat-Lozynskyy, Ostap; Ragulya, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    Microwave sintering (MWS) of commercially available 15-nm-size nanocrystalline TiN powder was studied. Densification kinetics and grain growth mechanisms of nano-TiN were evaluated using non-isothermal heating up to 1500 °C with variable heating rates. A true nanocrystalline ceramic with ~80-nm-size grains and 94.5 % theoretical density was obtained via MWS consolidation at 1400 °C. At higher temperatures, however, an uncontrolled grain growth and a formation of bimodal microstructure were noticed. A temperature dependence of grain growth suggested grain boundary sliding as a primary mechanism of densification below 1100-1200 °C. An activation energy of nano-TiN densification under MWS varied from 26 ± 3 kJ/mol at the initial stage of sintering (900-1200 °C) to 162 ± 22 kJ/mol at higher temperatures. In addition, a relationship coupling microstructural characteristics (grain size, grain boundary) with mechanical properties of titanium nitride ceramics obtained via both microwave and pressureless sintering techniques was discussed.

  13. 1064 nm laser emission of highly doped Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet under 885 nm diode laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupei, V.; Pavel, N.; Taira, T.

    2002-06-01

    Highly efficient 1064 nm continuous-wave laser emission under 885 nm diode pumping in concentrated Nd: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) crystals (up to 3.5 at. % Nd) and ceramics (up to 3.8 at. % Nd) is reported. A highly doped (2.4 at. %) Nd:YAG laser, passively Q switched by a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber, is demonstrated.

  14. Wavelength dependence on the forensic analysis of glass by nanosecond 266 nm and 1064 nm laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahoon, Erica M.; Almirall, Jose R.

    2010-05-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy can be used for the chemical characterization of glass to provide evidence of an association between a fragment found at a crime scene to a source of glass of known origin. Two different laser irradiances, 266 nm and 1064 nm, were used to conduct qualitative and quantitative analysis of glass standards. Single-pulse and double-pulse configurations and lens-to-sample-distance settings were optimized to yield the best laser-glass coupling. Laser energy and acquisition timing delays were also optimized to result in the highest signal-to-noise ratio corresponding to the highest precision and accuracy. The crater morphology was examined and the mass removed was calculated for both the 266 nm and 1064 nm irradiations. The analytical figures of merit suggest that the 266 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths are capable of good performance for the forensic chemical characterization of glass. The results presented here suggest that the 266 nm laser produces a better laser-glass matrix coupling, resulting in a better stoichiometric representation of the glass sample. The 266 nm irradiance is therefore recommended for the forensic analysis and comparison of glass samples.

  15. Simulations of groundwater flow, transport, and age in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for a study of transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heywood, Charles E.

    2013-01-01

    Vulnerability to contamination from manmade and natural sources can be characterized by the groundwater-age distribution measured in a supply well and the associated implications for the source depths of the withdrawn water. Coupled groundwater flow and transport models were developed to simulate the transport of the geochemical age-tracers carbon-14, tritium, and three chlorofluorocarbon species to public-supply wells in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A separate, regional-scale simulation of transport of carbon-14 that used the flow-field computed by a previously documented regional groundwater flow model was calibrated and used to specify the initial concentrations of carbon-14 in the local-scale transport model. Observations of the concentrations of each of the five chemical species, in addition to water-level observations and measurements of intra-borehole flow within a public-supply well, were used to calibrate parameters of the local-scale groundwater flow and transport models. The calibrated groundwater flow model simulates the mixing of “young” groundwater, which entered the groundwater flow system after 1950 as recharge at the water table, with older resident groundwater that is more likely associated with natural contaminants. Complexity of the aquifer system in the zone of transport between the water table and public-supply well screens was simulated with a geostatistically generated stratigraphic realization based upon observed lithologic transitions at borehole control locations. Because effective porosity was simulated as spatially uniform, the simulated age tracers are more efficiently transported through the portions of the simulated aquifer with relatively higher simulated hydraulic conductivity. Non-pumping groundwater wells with long screens that connect aquifer intervals having different hydraulic heads can provide alternate pathways for contaminant transport that are faster than the advective transport through the aquifer material. Simulation of

  16. Rock magnetic characteristics of faulted sediments with magnetic anomalies: A case study from the Albuquerque Basin, Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. R.; Grauch, V. J.

    2009-12-01

    High-resolution airborne surveys in the Rio Grande rift have documented abundant short-wavelength, low-amplitude magnetic anomalies generated at faults within basin sediments. We present a rock magnetic study bearing on the source of a10-20-nT linear anomaly over the San Ysidro normal fault, which is well exposed in outcrop in the northern part of the Albuquerque Basin. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) values (SI vol) from 310 sites distributed through a 1200-m-thick composite section of rift-filling sediments of Santa Fe Group and pre-rift sedimentary rocks juxtaposed by the San Ysidro fault have lognormal distributions with well-defined means. These averages generally increase up section through eight map units: from 1.7E-4 to 2.2E-4 in the pre-rift Cretaceous and Eocene rocks, from 9.9E-4 to 1.2E-3 in three units of the Miocene Zia and Cerro Conejo Formations of the Santa Fe Group, and from 1.5E-3 to 3.5E-3 in three units of the Miocene-Pliocene Arroyo Ojito and Ceja Formations of the Santa Fe Group. Remanent magnetization is not important; Koenigsberger ratios are less than 0.3 for Santa Fe Group samples. Rock magnetic parameters (e.g., ARM/MS and S ratios) and petrography indicate that detrital magnetite content and its variable oxidation to maghemite and hematite are the predominant controls of magnetic property variations within the Santa Fe Group sediments. Magnetite is present in rounded detrital grains (including both homogeneous and subdivided types) and as fine inclusions in volcanic rock fragments. Santa Fe Group sediments with highest magnetic susceptibility have greatest magnetic-grain size as indicated by lowest ARM/MS ratios. Magnetic susceptibility increases progressively with sediment grain size to pebbly sand within the fluvial Arroyo Ojito Formation. In contrast, MS reaches highest values in fine to medium sands in eolian Zia Formation. Partial oxidation of detrital magnetite and resultant lower MS is spatially associated with calcite cementation

  17. EUV reticle inspection with a 193nm reticle inspector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, William; Inderhees, Gregg; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lee, Isaac; Lim, Phillip

    2013-06-01

    The prevailing industry opinion is that EUV Lithography (EUVL) will enter High Volume Manufacturing (HVM) in the 2015 - 2017 timeframe at the 16nm HP node. Every year the industry assesses the key risk factors for introducing EUVL into HVM - blank and reticle defects are among the top items. To reduce EUV blank and reticle defect levels, high sensitivity inspection is needed. To address this EUV inspection need, KLA-Tencor first developed EUV blank inspection and EUV reticle inspection capability for their 193nm wavelength reticle inspection system - the Teron 610 Series (2010). This system has become the industry standard for 22nm / 3xhp optical reticle HVM along with 14nm / 2xhp optical pilot production; it is further widely used for EUV blank and reticle inspection in R and D. To prepare for the upcoming 10nm / 1xhp generation, KLA-Tencor has developed the Teron 630 Series reticle inspection system which includes many technical advances; these advances can be applied to both EUV and optical reticles. The advanced capabilities are described in this paper with application to EUV die-to-database and die-to-die inspection for currently available 14nm / 2xhp generation EUV reticles. As 10nm / 1xhp generation optical and EUV reticles become available later in 2013, the system will be tested to identify areas for further improvement with the goal to be ready for pilot lines in early 2015.

  18. All-fibre ytterbium laser tunable within 45 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullina, S R; Babin, S A; Vlasov, A A; Kablukov, S I; Shelemba, I S; Kurkov, A S

    2007-12-31

    A tunable ytterbium-doped fibre laser is fabricated. The laser is tuned by using a tunable fibre Bragg grating (FBG) as a selecting intracavity element. The laser is tunable within 45 nm (from 1063 to 1108 nm) and emits {approx}6 W in the line of width {approx}0.15 nm, the output power and linewidth being virtually invariable within the tuning range. The method is proposed for synchronous tuning the highly reflecting and output FBGs, and a tunable ytterbium all-fibre laser is built. (lasers)

  19. Spectropolarimetry of Atomic and Molecular Lines near 4135 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Matthew James; Uitenbroek, Han; Clark, Alan; Coulter, Roy; Goode, Phil; Cao, Wenda

    2016-10-01

    New spatially scanned spectropolarimetry sunspot observations are made of photospheric atomic and molecular absorption lines near 4135 nm. The relative splittings among several atomic lines are measured and shown to agree with values calculated with configuration interaction and intermediate coupling. Large splitting is seen in a line identified with Fe i at 4137 nm, showing multiple Stokes V components and an unusual linear polarization. This line will be a sensitive probe of quiet-Sun magnetic fields, with a magnetic sensitivity of 2.5 times higher than that of the well-known 1565 nm Fe i line.

  20. Spectropolarimetry of Atomic and Molecular Lines near 4135 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Matthew James; Uitenbroek, Han; Clark, Alan; Coulter, Roy; Goode, Phil; Cao, Wenda

    2016-09-01

    New spatially scanned spectropolarimetry sunspot observations are made of photospheric atomic and molecular absorption lines near 4135 nm. The relative splittings among several atomic lines are measured and shown to agree with values calculated with configuration interaction and intermediate coupling. Large splitting is seen in a line identified with Fe uc(i) at 4137 nm, showing multiple Stokes V components and an unusual linear polarization. This line will be a sensitive probe of quiet-Sun magnetic fields, with a magnetic sensitivity of 2.5 times higher than that of the well-known 1565 nm Fe uc(i) line.

  1. 80 nm tunable DBR-free semiconductor disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z.; Albrecht, A. R.; Cederberg, J. G.; Sheik-Bahae, M.

    2016-07-01

    We report a widely tunable optically pumped distributed Bragg reflector (DBR)-free semiconductor disk laser with 6 W continuous wave output power near 1055 nm when using a 2% output coupler. Using only high reflecting mirrors, the lasing wavelength is centered at 1034 nm and can be tuned up to a record 80 nm by using a birefringent filter. We attribute such wide tunability to the unique broad effective gain bandwidth of DBR-free semiconductor disk lasers achieved by eliminating the active mirror geometry.

  2. Efficient laser operation of Nd3+:Lu2O3 at various wavelengths between 917 nm and 1463 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brunn, P.; Heuer, A. M.; Fornasiero, L.; Huber, G.; Kränkel, C.

    2016-08-01

    Even though the first Nd3+-doped sesquioxide lasers have been realized more than 50 years ago, up to now no reports on efficient laser operation of Nd3+:doped sesquioxides can be found. In this work, we review the favorable spectroscopic properties of the sesquioxide Nd3+:Lu2O3 in terms of ground state absorption, stimulated emission, and excited state absorption cross sections as well as the upper level lifetime. Making use of these properties, we achieved efficient laser performance on eight different laser transitions in the wavelength range between 917 nm and 1463 nm under Ti:sapphire laser pumping using state-of-the-art HEM-grown Nd3+:Lu2O3 crystals with good optical quality. At the strongest transition around 1076 nm we determined a slope efficiency of 69%, which represents the highest efficiency ever obtained for a Nd3+-doped sesquioxide. Furthermore, we could generate watt level output powers and high slope efficiencies for seven other transitions. Lasers at 917 nm, 1053 nm, 1108 nm and 1463 nm were realized for the first time and the latter represents one of the longest laser wavelengths obtained on the 4F3/2  →  4I13/2 transition in Nd3+-doped materials.

  3. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  4. 980 nm narrow linewidth Yb-doped phosphate fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Yao, Yifei; Hu, Haowei; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Zhang, Guangju

    2014-12-01

    A narrow-linewidth ytterbium (Yb)-doped phosphate fiber laser based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) operating around 980 nm is reported. Two different kinds of cavity are applied to obtain the 980 nm narrow-linewidth output. One kind of the cavity consists of a 0.35 nm broadband lindwidth high-reflection FBG and the Yb-doped phosphate fiber end with 0° angle, which generates a maximum output power of 25 mW. The other kind of resonator is composed of a single mode Yb-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of FBGs. Over 10.7 mW stable continuous wave are obtained with two longitudinal modes at 980 nm. We have given a detailed analysis and discussion for the results.

  5. Absolute measurement of F2-laser power at 157 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, Stefan; Brandt, Friedhelm; Kremling, Hans-Albert; Gottwald, Alexander; Hoehl, Arne; Richter, Mathias

    2006-05-10

    We report a comparison of laser power measurements at the F2-laser wavelength oaf nm made at two facilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute. At the PTB laboratory at the electron storage ring BESSY II in Berlin, the scale for laser power was directly traced to a cryogenic radiometer operating at 157 nm, whereas at the PTB laser radiometry facility in Braunschweig the calibration of transfer detectors was performed with a newly developed standard for laser power at 157 nm, which is traceable in several steps to a cryogenic radiometer operating at 633 nm. The comparison was performed under vacuum conditions with laser pulse energies of?10 {mu}J, however with different average powers because different primary standard radiometers were used. The relative deviation for the responsivity of the transfer detector was 4.8% and thus within the combined standard uncertainty.

  6. Immersion and 32nm lithography: now and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masaomi; McCallum, Martin

    2007-12-01

    The amazing growth of the semiconductor industry over the past decades has been supported, and in many cases driven, by miniaturization of devices. Behind this has been one strong backbone - lithography. In the 1970's, devices had geometries of several micrometers, but now we are about to enter 45nm device pre-production and shortly after move it into volume-production. Immersion lithography, although having a short development time, is already in production and will become the primary technology driver. What we need to do now is identify the solutions for 32nm lithography. There are several candidates for 32nm lithography, such as EUVL, High Index Immersion and Double Patterning / Double Exposure. Other more esoteric technologies such as nanoimprint and maskless lithography have also been mentioned. In this paper, the present status of Immersion lithography will be reviewed and each of the 32nm candidates are reviewed.

  7. Determination of complex index of immersion liquids at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehle, Jean-Louis; Piel, Jean-Philippe; Campillo-Carreto, Jose

    2006-03-01

    The next nodes in immersion lithography will require the scanners to use the 193 nm ArF* laser line with a very large numerical aperture and a liquid between the optics and the resist. (1) Immersion lithography at 193 nm requests very specific parameters for the fluid. The first generation is using the deionized Water (DIW) very pure and not recycled, but when a new optical material for the last lens will be available with a refractive index (RI) larger than 1.85, a higher refractive index fluid could be used, enabling second and maybe third generation of immersion lithography at 193 nm. So the 45 and maybe the 32 nm nodes could be covered with this high Index fluids (HIF).

  8. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  9. Low-k/copper integration scheme suitable for ULSI manufacturing from 90nm to 45nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogami, T.; Lane, S.; Fukasawa, M.; Ida, K.; Angyal, M.; Chanda, K.; Chen, F.; Christiansen, C.; Cohen, S.; Cullinan, M.; Dziobkowski, C.; Fitzsimmons, J.; Flaitz, P.; Grill, A.; Gill, J.; Inoue, K.; Klymko, N.; Kumar, K.; Labelle, C.; Lane, M.; Li, B.; Liniger, E.; Madon, A.; Malone, K.; Martin, J.; McGahay, V.; McLaughlin, P.; Melville, I.; Minami, M.; Molis, S.; Nguyen, S.; Penny, C.; Restaino, D.; Sakamoto, A.; Sankar, M.; Sherwood, M.; Simonyi, E.; Shimooka, Y.; Tai, L.; Widodo, J.; Wildman, H.; Ono, M.; McHerron, D.; Nye, H.; Davis, C.; Sankaran, S.; Edelstein, D.; Ivers, T.

    2005-11-01

    This paper discusses low-k/copper integration schemes which has been in production in the 90 nm node, have been developed in the 65 nm node, and should be taken in the 45 nm node. While our baseline 65 nm BEOL process has been developed by extension and simple shrinkage of our PECVD SiCOH integration which has been in production in the 90 nm node with our SiCOH film having k=3.0, the 65 nm SiCOH integration has two other options to go to extend to lower capacitance. One is to add porosity to become ultra low-k (ULK). The other is to stay with low-k SiCOH, which is modified to have a "lower-k". The effective k- value attained with the lower-k (k=2.8) SiCOH processed in the "Direct CMP" scheme is very close to that with an ULK (k=2.5) SiCOH film built with the "Hard Mask Retention" scheme. This paper first describes consideration of these two damascene schemes, whose comparison leads to the conclusion that the lower-k SiCOH integration can have more advantages in terms of process simplicity and extendibility of our 90 nm scheme under certain assumptions. Then describing the k=2.8 SiCOH film development and its successful integration, damascene schemes for 45nm nodes are discussed based on our learning from development of the lower-k 65nm scheme. Capability of modern dry etchers to define the finer patterns, non-uniformity of CMP, and susceptibility to plasma and mechanical strength and adhesion of ULK are discussed as factors to hamper the applicability of ULK.

  10. High efficiency 1341 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser in-band pumped at 912 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. Y.; Zhang, Y. C.

    2012-03-01

    A high-efficiency 1341 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser in-band pumped at 912 nm is demonstrated for the first time. Using an all-solid-state Nd:GdVO4 laser operating at 912 nm as pump source, 542 mW output was obtained with 1.14 W absorbed pump power. The slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 56.6%, and the fluctuation of the output power was better than 2.6% in the given 30 min. The beam quality factor M 2 is 1.15.

  11. Revisit pattern collapse for 14nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kenji; Higgins, Craig; Raghunathan, Ananthan; Hartley, John G.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Kato, Hirokazu; Petrillo, Karen; Colburn, Matthew E.; Schefske, Jeffrey; Wood, Obert; Wallow, Thomas I.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we have analyzed new data sets of pattern collapse obtained from 300 mm wafers which were coated with a process-of-record (POR) EUV resist and exposed by an EUV Alpha-Demo tool (ADT) and a Vistec VB300 e-beam exposure tool. In order to minimize any processing effects on pattern collapse, the same POR EUV track process was applied to both exposures. A key metric of our analysis is the critical aspect ratio of collapse (CARC)1. We found that CARC of POR EUV resist decreases monotonically with spacing, in the range of ~1.8-2.2 at ~32-54 nm space (60-80 nm pitch) for EUV, and ~1.5-2.1 at ~16-50 nm space (~46-80 nm pitch) for e-beam. We also estimated an apparent Young's modulus of POR EUV resist by fitting a collapse model2 to the CARC data. The resulting modulus ~0.30 GPa was much smaller than the modulus of typical polymer glasses (~1.0-5.0 GPa). Our findings suggest that due to a significant decrease of resist mechanical properties and a sharp increase in capillary force, it will be challenging to maintain aspect ratios above 2.0 for sub-30 nm resist spacing (sub-60 nm pitches). For patterning at these dimensions, alternate processes and materials will become increasingly necessary, e.g. surfactant-based rinse solutions3 and other approaches.

  12. Defect inspection of imprinted 32 nm half pitch patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; McMackin, Ian; Perez, Joseph; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2008-10-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  13. Electron beam inspection methods for imprint lithography at 32 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Resnick, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography redefines nanoimprinting. This novel technique involves the field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by jetting technology onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid which then quickly flows into the relief patterns in the mask by capillary action. Following this filling step, the resist is crosslinked under UV radiation, and then the mask is removed leaving a patterned solid on the substrate. Compatibility with existing CMOS processes requires a mask infrastructure in which resolution, inspection and repair are all addressed. The purpose of this paper is to understand the limitations of inspection at half pitches of 32 nm and below. A 32 nm programmed defect mask was fabricated. Patterns included in the mask consisted of an SRAM Metal 1 cell, dense lines, and dense arrays of pillars. Programmed defect sizes started at 4 nm and increased to 48 nm in increments of 4 nm. Defects in both the mask and imprinted wafers were characterized scanning electron microscopy and the measured defect areas were calculated. These defects were then inspected using a KLA-T eS35 electron beam wafer inspection system. Defect sizes as small as 12 nm were detected, and detection limits were found to be a function of defect type.

  14. Magneto-optical trap for metastable helium at 389 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Koelemeij, J.C.J.; Stas, R.J.W.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2003-05-01

    We have constructed a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for metastable triplet helium atoms utilizing the 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}3 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 389 nm as the trapping and cooling transition. The far-red-detuned MOT (detuning {delta}=-41 MHz) typically contains few times 10{sup 7} atoms at a relatively high ({approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) density, which is a consequence of the large momentum transfer per photon at 389 nm and a small two-body loss rate coefficient (2x10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}/s<{beta}<1.0x10{sup -9} cm{sup 3}/s). The two-body loss rate is more than five times smaller than in a MOT on the commonly used 2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}{yields}2 {sup 3}P{sub 2} line at 1083 nm. Furthermore, laser cooling at 389 nm results in temperatures somewhat lower than those achieved using 1083 nm. The 389-nm MOT exhibits small losses due to two-photon ionization, which have been investigated as well.

  15. Alternatives to chemical amplification for 193nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylav, Burak; Zhao, Meng; Yin, Ran; Xie, Peng; Scholz, Chris; Smith, Bruce; Smith, Thomas; Zimmerman, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Research has been conducted to develop alternatives to chemically amplified 193 nm photoresist materials that will be able to achieve the requirements associated with sub-32 nm device technology. New as well as older photoresist design concepts for non-chemically amplified 193 nm photoresists that have the potential to enable improvements in line edge roughness while maintaining adequate sensitivity, base solubility, and dry etch resistance for high volume manufacturing are being explored. The particular platforms that have been explored in this work include dissolution inhibitor photoresist systems, chain scissioning polymers, and photoresist systems based on polymers incorporating formyloxyphenyl functional groups. In studies of two-component acidic polymer/dissolution inhibitor systems, it was found that compositions using ortho-nitrobenzyl cholate (NBC) as the dissolution inhibitor and poly norbornene hexafluoro alcohol (PNBHFA) as the base resin are capable of printing 90 nm dense line/space patterns upon exposure to a 193 nm laser. Studies of chain scission enhancement in methylmethacrylate copolymers showed that incorporating small amounts of absorptive a-cleavage monomers significantly enhanced sensitivity with an acceptable increase in absorbance at 193 nm. Specifically, it was found that adding 3 mol% of α-methyl styrene (α-MS) reduced the dose to clear of PMMA-based resist from 1400 mJ/cm2 to 420 mJ/cm2. Preliminary data are also presented on a direct photoreactive design concept based on the photo-Fries reaction of formyloxyphenyl functional groups in acrylic copolymers.

  16. Application of atomic force microscope to 65-nm node photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Itou, Yasutoshi; Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Matsuyama, Katsuhiro; Dawson, Dean J.

    2004-08-01

    The technology node of semiconductor device production is progressing to 65nm generation. For the 65nm photomasks, the target specifications of defect size and repair accuracy are 52nm and 7nm, respectively. Especially, real defects on photomasks are not only simple two-dimensional patterns but also three-dimensional shapes such as phase shift defects and contamination, thus we need to recognize defect shapes accurately. Additionally, AAPSM's Cr patterns overhang, and we have to measure defects on three-dimensional shapes. To evaluate them, we use an AFM metrology system, Dimension X3D (Veeco), having both precise CD measurement repeatability (2nm) and high resolution for defects. In this report, we show the performance of the AFM metrology system. First, we evaluated CD metrology performance, CD repeatbility about four type photomasks: NEGA-BIM, POSI-BIM, KrF-HT and ArF-HT, and all masks met specifications. Next, we evaluated defect pattern shapes and AAPSM and CPL mask patterns. Consequently, we have confirmed that the AFM metrology system has high performance for 65nm photomasks.

  17. Highly efficient continuous-wave 912 nm Nd:GdVO4 laser emission under direct 880 nm pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Y. F.; Zhang, X. H.; Xia, J.; Zhang, A. F.; Yin, X. D.; Bao, L.

    2009-11-01

    The quasi-three-level 912 nm continuous-wave laser emission under direct diode laser pumping at 880 nm into emitting level 4F3/2 of Nd:GdVO4 have been demonstrated. An end-pumped Nd:GdVO4 crystal yielded 8.1 W of output power for 13.9 W of absorbed pump power. The slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power was 0.679. To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of such a laser system. Comparative results obtained for the pump with diode laser at 808 nm, into the highly-absorbing 4F5/2 level, are given in order to prove the advantages of the 880 nm wavelength pumping.

  18. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range.

  19. The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 161 The Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps in the 691nm to 5804nm region Database (Web, free access)   This atlas presents observations of the infra-red (IR) spectrum of a low current Th-Ar hollow cathode lamp with the 2-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at NIST. These observations establish more than 2400 lines that are suitable for use as wavelength standards in the range 691 nm to 5804 nm. The observations were made in collaboration with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in order to provide calibration reference data for new high-resolution Echelle spectrographs, such as the Cryogenic High-Resolution IR Echelle Spectrograph ([CRIRES]), ESO's new IR spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope in Chile.

  20. High-efficiency high-brightness diode lasers at 1470 nm/1550 nm for medical and defense applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallup, Kendra; Ungar, Jeff; Vaissie, Laurent; Lammert, Rob; Hu, Wentao

    2012-03-01

    Diode lasers in the 1400 nm to 1600 nm regime are used in a variety of applications including pumping Er:YAG lasers, range finding, materials processing, aesthetic medical treatments and surgery. In addition to the compact size, efficiency, and low cost advantages of traditional diode lasers, high power semiconductor lasers in the eye-safe regime are becoming widely used in an effort to minimize the unintended impact of potentially hazardous scattered optical radiation from the laser source, the optical delivery system, or the target itself. In this article we describe the performance of high efficiency high brightness InP laser bars at 1470nm and 1550nm developed at QPC Lasers for applications ranging from surgery to rangefinding.

  1. 750 nm 1.5 W frequency-doubled semiconductor disk laser with a 44 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 750 nm by intracavity frequency doubling a wafer-fused semiconductor disk laser diode-pumped at 980 nm. An optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% was achieved using a bismuth borate crystal. The wavelength of the doubled emission could be tuned from 720 to 764 nm with an intracavity birefringent plate. The beam quality parameter M2 of the laser output was measured to be below 1.5 at all pump powers. The laser is a promising tool for biomedical applications that can take advantage of the large penetration depth of light in tissue in the 700-800 nm spectral range. PMID:26421536

  2. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  3. Generation of Thermospheric OI 845 nm Emission by Bowen Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.; Sharpee, B. D.; Cosby, P. C.; Slanger, T. G.

    2006-12-01

    777 and 845 nm emissions from the 3p-3s multiplets of atomic oxygen are commonly observed at non-auroral latitudes in the terrestrial nightglow. By studying the relative strengths of these emissions we can learn something about the mechanisms that produce them and what they can teach us about the atmosphere. Recently [1] we have used intensity-calibrated sky spectra from the Keck telescopes to investigate the relative strengths of a wide range of O-atom Rydberg lines and have confirmed that electron-ion radiative recombination is a primary source of excitation for both the triplet and quintet systems. Following the intensity of the 777 and 845 nm lines during the night, we find that for most of the night the quintet 777 nm line is consistently stronger than the triplet 845 nm line, with a nearly constant intensity ratio I(777)/I(845) near 2.3, although both intensities fall rapidly as the night progresses. However, late in the night the 845 nm intensity levels off, while the 777 nm intensity continues to fall, and the I(777)/I(845) ratio plunges by a factor of 5-10. We interpret these observations as indicating that the O-atom quintet states are still being excited by the same mechanism as earlier in the night, i.e. radiative recombination, but some triplet states are also being excited by an additional mechanism. Such a mechanism has been proposed before [2-6] but not previously observed directly in the terrestrial nightglow. The oxygen triplet 3d-2p transition at 102.576 nm is in close coincidence with the solar hydrogen Lyman-β line at 102.572 nm. Radiative transport in the hydrogen geocorona will deliver Lyman-β intensity into the Earth's shadow and will produce triplet O(3d 3D) high in the atmosphere, even prior to direct solar illumination. The result is observable in a radiative cascade sequence 3d-3p(1129 nm) → 3p- 3s(845 nm) → 3s-2p(130 nm). A similar effect is observed in the H-α emission, which is also excited by Lyman-β absorption. This process

  4. Measurements of Photoabsorpton Cross Sections and their Temperature Dependence for CO2 in the 170nm to 200nm Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Yoshino, K.

    2001-11-01

    All the photochemical models for the predominately CO2 Martian atmosphere ar e very sensitive to the amount of CO2 and to the values and spectral details of the absorpton cross sections of CO2 in the region 170nm-200nm. Earlier we had measured and published absolute cross sections of CO2 in the region 118.0 nm-175.5 nm at 295K and 195K. We have recently extended these measurements from 170 nm to 200 nm at 300K and 1 95K. The new measurements have been carried out at high resolution with our 6.65 -m normal incidence , photoelectric spectrometer. To measure the weak photoabsorption of the CO2 bands in the wavelength region 170 --200 nm, we required a high column density of the gas. We obtained this by using a multi pass technique, a White cell. The White cell was designed to have a distance of 1.50 m between two main mirrors, and was set for four, double pas ses making a path length of 12.0 m. CO2 gas was frozen in a stainless cylinder immersed in liquid nitrogen, and t he frozen product (dryice) was pumped by the diffusion pump for purification. The CO2 was warmed up slowly and kept in the cylinder at high pressure. The CO2 pressure used in the White cell was varied from 1 to 1000 Torr depend ing on the wavelength region, and was measured with a a capacitance manometer (M KS Baratron, 10 Torr and 1000 Torr). We divided the spectral region into twenty sections of about 1.5 nm extent. At each scan range, another scan was obtained from the emission spectrum of the fourth positive bands of CO for wavelength calibration. We acknowledge funding from NASA, grant NAGS-7859 to Harvard College Observatory.

  5. Imaging performance and challenges of 10nm and 7nm logic nodes with 0.33 NA EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Setten, Eelco; Schiffelers, Guido; Psara, Eleni; Oorschot, Dorothe; Davydova, Natalia; Finders, Jo; Depre, Laurent; Farys, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The NXE:3300B is ASML's third generation EUV system and has an NA of 0.33 and is positioned at a resolution of 22nm, which can be extended down to 18nm and below with off-axis illumination at full transmission. Multiple systems have been qualified and installed at customers. The NXE:3300B succeeds the NXE:3100 system (NA of 0.25), which has allowed customers to gain valuable EUV experience. It is expected that EUV will be adopted first for critical Logic layers at 10nm and 7nm nodes, such as Metal-1, to avoid the complexity of triple patterning schemes using ArF immersion. In this paper we will evaluate the imaging performance of (sub-)10nm node Logic M1 on the NXE:3300B EUV scanner. We will show the line-end performance of tip-to-tip and tip-to-space test features for various pitches and illumination settings and the performance enhancement obtained by means of a 1st round of OPC. We will also show the magnitude of local variations. The Logic M1 cell is evaluated at various critical features to identify hot spots. A 2nd round OPC model was calibrated of which we will show the model accuracy and ability to predict hot spots in the Logic M1 cell. The calibrated OPC model is used to predict the expected performance at 7nm node Logic using off-axis illumination at 16nm minimum half pitch. Initial results of L/S exposed on the NXE:3300B at 7nm node resolutions will be shown. An outlook is given to future 0.33 NA systems on the ASML roadmap with enhanced illuminator capabilities to further improve performance and process window.

  6. A self-Q-switched all-fiber erbium laser at 1530 nm using an auxiliary 1570-nm erbium laser.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzong-Yow; Fang, Yen-Cheng

    2009-11-23

    We demonstrate a self-Q-switched, all-fiber, tunable, erbium laser at 1530 nm with high pulse repetition rates of 0.9-10 kHz. Through the use of an auxiliary 10-mW, 1570 nm laser that shortened the relaxation time of erbium, sequentially Q-switched pulses with pulse energies between 4 and 6 microJ and pulse widths of 40 ns were steadily achieved. A peak pulse power of 165 W was obtained.

  7. Considerations for fine hole patterning for the 7nm node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaegashi, Hidetami; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shohei; Yamato, Masatoshi; Koike, Kyohei

    2016-03-01

    One of the practical candidates to produce 7nm node logic devices is to use the multiple patterning with 193-immersion exposure. For the multiple patterning, it is important to evaluate the relation between the number of mask layer and the minimum pitch systematically to judge the device manufacturability. Although the number of the time of patterning, namely LE(Litho-Etch) ^ x-time, and overlay steps have to be reduced, there are some challenges in miniaturization of hole size below 20nm. Various process fluctuations on contact hole have a direct impact on device performance. According to the technical trend, 12nm diameter hole on 30nm-pitch hole will be needed on 7nm node. Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUV) and Directed self-assembly (DSA) are attracting considerable attention to obtain small feature size pattern, however, 193-immersion still has the potential to extend optical lithography cost-effectively for sub-7nm node. The objective of this work is to study the process variation challenges and resolution in post-processing for the CD-bias control to meet sub-20nm diameter contact hole. Another pattern modulation is also demonstrated during post-processing step for hole shrink. With the realization that pattern fidelity and pattern placement management will limit scaling long before devices and interconnects fail to perform intrinsically, the talk will also outline how circle edge roughness (CER) and Local-CD uniformity can correct efficiency. On the other hand, 1D Gridded-Design-Rules layout (1D layout) has simple rectangular shapes. Also, we have demonstrated CD-bias modification on short trench pattern to cut grating line for its fabrication.

  8. High-brightness 800nm fiber-coupled laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Yuri; Levy, Moshe; Rappaport, Noam; Tessler, Renana; Peleg, Ophir; Shamay, Moshe; Yanson, Dan; Klumel, Genadi; Dahan, Nir; Baskin, Ilya; Shkedi, Lior

    2014-03-01

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. Single emitters offer reliable multi-watt output power from a 100 m lateral emission aperture. By their combination and fiber coupling, pump powers up to 100 W can be achieved from a low-NA fiber pigtail. Whilst in the 9xx nm spectral range the single emitter technology is very mature with <10W output per chip, at 800nm the reliable output power from a single emitter is limited to 4 W - 5 W. Consequently, commercially available fiber coupled modules only deliver 5W - 15W at around 800nm, almost an order of magnitude down from the 9xx range pumps. To bridge this gap, we report our advancement in the brightness and reliability of 800nm single emitters. By optimizing the wafer structure, laser cavity and facet passivation process we have demonstrated QCW device operation up to 19W limited by catastrophic optical damage to the 100 μm aperture. In CW operation, the devices reach 14 W output followed by a reversible thermal rollover and a complete device shutdown at high currents, with the performance fully rebounded after cooling. We also report the beam properties of our 800nm single emitters and provide a comparative analysis with the 9xx nm single emitter family. Pump modules integrating several of these emitters with a 105 μm / 0.15 NA delivery fiber reach 35W in CW at 808 nm. We discuss the key opto-mechanical parameters that will enable further brightness scaling of multi-emitter pump modules.

  9. Analysis of Cervical Supernatant Samples Luminescence Using 355 nm Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Stanikunas, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2010-05-01

    The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine. Laser induced autofluorescence spectra in cervical smear content were fitted to predict the cervical epithelium diagnosis as a lab off "optical biopsy" method. Liquid PAP supernatant sediment dried on Quartz plate spectroscopy was performed by 355 nm Nd YAG microlaser STA-1 (Standa, Ltd). For comparison a liquid supernatant spectroscopy was formed by laboratory "Perkin Elmer LS 50B spetrometer at 290, 300, 310 nm excitations. Analysis of spectrum was performed by approximation using the multi-peaks program with Lorentz functions for the liquid samples and with Gaussian functions for the dry samples. Ratio of spectral components area to the area under whole experimental curve (SPP) was calculated. The spectral components were compared by averages of SPP using Mann-Whitney U-test in histology groups. Results. Differentiation of Normal and HSIL/CIN2+ cases in whole supernatant could be performed by stationary laboratory lamp spectroscopy at excitation 290 nm and emission >379 nm with accuracy AUC 0,69, Sens 0,72, Spec 0,65. Differentiation Normal versus HSIL/CIN2+ groups in dried enriched supernatant could be performed by 355 nm microlaser excitation at emission 405-424 nm with accuracy (AUC 0,96, Sens 0,91, Spec 1.00). Diagnostic algorithm could be created for all histology groups differentiation under 355 nm excitation. Microlaser induced "optical biopsy "looks promising method for cervical screening at the point of care.

  10. Electro-optically Q-switched dual-wavelength Nd:YLF laser emitting at 1047 nm and 1053 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Men, Shaojie; Liu, Zhaojun; Cong, Zhenhua; Li, Yongfu; Zhang, Xingyu

    2015-05-01

    A flash-lamp pumped electro-optically Q-switched dual-wavelength Nd:YLF laser is demonstrated. Two Nd:YLF crystals placed in two cavities are employed to generate orthogonally polarized 1047 nm and 1053 nm radiations, respectively. The two cavities are jointed together by a polarizer and share the same electro-optical Q-switch. Two narrow-band pass filters are used to block unexpected oscillations at the hold-off state of the electro-optical Q-switch. In this case, electro-optical Q-switching is able to operate successfully. With pulse synchronization realized, the maximum output energy of 66.2 mJ and 83.9 mJ are obtained for 1047 nm and 1053 nm lasers, respectively. Correspondingly, the minimum pulse width is both 17 ns for 1047 nm and 1053 nm lasers. Sum frequency generation is realized. This demonstrates the potential of this laser in difference-frequency generations to obtain terahertz wave.

  11. All-fiber wavelength-tunable Tm/Ho-codoped laser between 1727 nm and 2030 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guanghui; Zhang, Bin; Yin, Ke; Yang, Weiqiang; Hou, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Lasers in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region are attracting significant interest due to a variety of applications such as atmospheric lidar sensing and medical treatment, which require laser sources matching the absorption lines of various molecules in the 2 μm wavelength region. We demonstrate an all-fiber Tm/Ho-codoped laser operating in the 2 μm wavelength region with a wide wavelength tuning range of more than 300 nm. The Tm/Ho-codoped fiber laser (THFL) was built in a ring cavity configuration with a fiberized grating-based tunable filter to select the operating wavelength. The tunable wavelength range of the THFL was from 1727 nm to 2030 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the widest tuning range that has been reported for an all-fiber rare-earth-doped laser to date. Efficient short wavelength operation was also achieved. The output power of the THFL was further scaled up from 1810 nm to 2010 nm by using a stage of Tm/Ho-codoped fiber amplifier (THFA), which exhibited the maximum slope efficiency of 42.6% with output power of 408 mW at 1910 nm.

  12. Optical coherence tomography based imaging of dental demineralisation and cavity restoration in 840 nm and 1310 nm wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damodaran, Vani; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a study of in-house built optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with a wavelength of 840 nm for imaging of dental caries, progress in demineralisation and cavity restoration is presented. The caries when imaged with the 840 nm OCT system showed minute demineralisation in the order of 5 μm. The OCT system was also proposed to study the growth of lesion and this was demonstrated by artificially inducing caries with a demineralisation solution of pH 4.8. The progress of carious lesion to a depth of about 50-60 μm after 60 hours of demineralisation was clearly observed with the 840 nm OCT system. The tooth samples were subjected to accelerated demineralisation condition at pH of approximately 2.3 to study the adverse effects and the onset of cavity formation was clearly observed. The restoration of cavity was also studied by employing different restorative materials (filled and unfilled). In the case of restoration without filler material (unfilled), the restoration boundaries were clearly observed. Overall, results were comparable with that of the widely used 1310 nm OCT system. In the case of restoration with filler material, the 1310 nm OCT imaging displayed better imaging capacity due to lower scattering than 840 nm imaging.

  13. A 1.5-W frequency doubled semiconductor disk laser tunable over 40 nm at around 745 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Esa J.; Lyytikäinen, Jari; Ranta, Sanna; Rantamäki, Antti; Saarela, Antti; Sirbu, Alexei; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Kapon, Eli; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a semiconductor disk laser emitting 1.5 W of output power at the wavelength of 745 nm via intracavity frequency doubling. The high power level and the < 40 nm tuning range make the laser a promising tool for medical treatments that rely on photosensitizing agents and biomarkers in the transmission window of tissue between 700 and 800 nm. The InP-based gain structure of the laser was wafer-fused with a GaAs-based bottom mirror and thermally managed with an intracavity diamond heat spreader. The structure was pumped with commercial low-cost 980 nm laser diode modules. Laser emission at 1490 nm was frequency-doubled with a bismuth borate crystal that was cut for type I critical phase matching. At the maximum output power, we achieved an optical-to-optical efficiency of 8.3% with beam quality parameter M2 below 1.5. The laser wavelength could be tuned with an intracavity birefringent plate from 720 to 764 nm.

  14. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  15. Noticeability of Colours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Leslie

    1972-01-01

    Results of 7200 responses recorded from 180 children indicate that there is a tendency for stimuli which are pigmented in the orange-red arc of the spectrum to have a high noticeability factor. (Author)

  16. Observation of Quiet Limb in He I 1083.0 nm, H Paschen alpha1281.8 nm and H Brackett gamma 2166.1 nm lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we shall present the results of an observational study of the quiet solar limb in the near infrared lines using the New IR Array Camera (NAC) and the vertical spectrograph at the focal plane of McMath-Pierce telescope. The NAC, at the exit port of the spectrograph, was used to record the limb spectrum in HeI 1083.0 nm, Hydrogen Paschen 1281.8 nm and Brackett 2165.5 nm wavelength regions. The NAC is a 1024x1024 InSb Alladin III Detector operating over 1-5 micron range with high density sampling at 0.018 arc second/pixel. The all-reflective optical train minimizes number of surfaces and eliminates ghosts leading to low scatter, ghost-free optics. The close-cycle cryogenic provides a stable cooling environment over six hour period with an accuracy of 0.01K leading to low dark current. The low read out noise combined with low scattered light and dark current makes NAC an ideal detector for making high quality infrared spectral observations of solar limb. The limb spectrums were obtained by placing the spectrograph slit perpendicular to the limb at an interval of 10 degrees around the solar disk. We shall report the intensity profile, line-of-sight velocity and line width distribution around the sun derived from the spectra along the slit.

  17. Hydrogeology, water chemistry, and transport processes in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2007-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Crilley, Dianna M.; Christenson, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey began a series of groundwater studies in 2001 in representative aquifers across the Nation in order to increase understanding of the factors that affect transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells. One of 10 regional-scale TANC studies was conducted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) in New Mexico, where a more detailed local-scale study subsequently investigated the hydrogeology, water chemistry, and factors affecting the transport of contaminants in the zone of contribution of one 363-meter (m) deep public-supply well in Albuquerque. During 2007 through 2009, samples were collected for the local-scale study from 22 monitoring wells and 3 public-supply (supply) wells for analysis of major and trace elements, arsenic speciation, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved gases, stable isotopes, and tracers of young and old water. To study groundwater chemistry and ages at various depths within the aquifer, the monitoring wells were divided into three categories: (1) each shallow well was screened across the water table or had a screen midpoint within 18.3 m of the water level in the well; (2) each intermediate well had a screen midpoint between about 27.1 and 79.6 m below the water level in the well; and (3) each deep well had a screen midpoint about 185 m or more below the water level in the well. The 24-square-kilometer study area surrounding the "studied supply well" (SSW), one of the three supply wells, consists of primarily urban land within the MRGB, a deep alluvial basin with an aquifer composed of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated deposits of sand, gravel, silt, and clay. Conditions generally are unconfined, but are semiconfined at depth. Groundwater withdrawals for public supply have substantially changed the primary direction of flow from northeast to southwest under predevelopment

  18. [In vitro antimycobacterial activity of a new quinolone, NM394].

    PubMed

    Tomioka, H; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1993-08-01

    We evaluated the in vitro antimicrobial activity of NM394 and ofloxacin (OFLX) against representative pathogenic mycobacteria by the agar dilution method, using 7H11 agar medium. NM394 showed appreciable antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MIC90 = 0.78 micrograms/ml), M. kansasii (MIC90 = 6.25 micrograms/ml), M. marinum (MIC90 = 3.13 micrograms/ml) and M. fortuitum (MIC90 = 3.13 micrograms/ml), whereas the agent was not active against M. scrofulaceum (MIC90 = > 100 micrograms/ml), M. avium (MIC90 = 50 micrograms/ml), M. intracellulare (MIC90 = > 100 micrograms/ml), M. chelonae subsp. abscessus (MIC90 = > 100 micrograms/ml) and M. chelonae subsp. chelonae (MIC90 = 25 micrograms/ml). The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the agent against M. fortuitum was a little more active than that of OFLX, whereas the activity of NM394 against the other mycobacteria was slightly inferior to that of OFLX. The antimycobacterial activity of NM394 against M. tuberculosis H37Rv (MIC:NM394 = 0.78 micrograms/ml, OFLX = 0.78 micrograms/ml) phagocytosed in murine peritoneal macrophages was less active than that of OFLX, when the macrophages were cultured in RPMI-1640 medium containing 1 microgram/ml or 10 micrograms/ml of these agents for up to 5 days. PMID:8397311

  19. Taking the X Architecture to the 65-nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Robin C.; Smayling, Michael C.; Arora, Narain; Nagata, Toshiyuki; Duane, Michael P.; Shah, Santosh; Keston, Harris J.; Oemardani, Shiany

    2004-05-01

    The X Architecture is a new way of orienting the interconnect on an integrated circuit using diagonal pathways, as well as the traditional right-angle, or Manhattan, configuration. By enabling designs with significantly less wire and fewer vias, the X Architecture can provide substantial improvements in chip performance, power consumption and cost. Members of the X Initiative semiconductor supply chain consortium have demonstrated the production worthiness of the X Architecture at the 130-nm and 90-nm process technology nodes. This paper presents an assessment of the manufacturing readiness of the X Architecture for the 65-nm technology node. The extent to which current production capabilities in mask writing, lithography, wafer processing, inspection and metrology can be used is discussed using the results from a 65-nm test chip. The project was a collaborative effort amongst a number of companies in the IC fabrication supply chain. Applied Materials fabricated the 65-nm X Architecture test chip at its Maydan Technology Center and leveraged the technology of other X Initiative members. Cadence Design Systems provided the test structure design and chip validation tools, Dai Nippon Printing produced the masks and Canon"s imaging system was employed for the photolithography.

  20. Coronal Diagnostics from Narrowband Images Around 30.4 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andretta, V.; Telloni, D.; Del Zanna, G.

    2012-07-01

    Images taken in the band centered at 30.4 nm are routinely used to map the radiance of the He ii Ly α line on the solar disk. That line is one of the strongest, if not the strongest, line in the EUV observed in the solar spectrum, and one of the few lines in that wavelength range providing information on the upper chromosphere or lower transition region. However, when observing the off-limb corona, the contribution from the nearby Si xi 30.3 nm line can become significant. In this work we aim at estimating the relative contribution of those two lines in the solar corona around the minimum of solar activity. We combine measurements from CDS taken in August 2008 with temperature and density profiles from semiempirical models of the corona to compute the radiances of the two lines, and of other representative coronal lines ( e.g. Mg x 62.5 nm, Si xii 52.1 nm). Considering both diagnosed quantities from line ratios (temperatures and densities) and line radiances in absolute units, we obtain a good overall match between observations and models. We find that the Si xi line dominates the He ii line from just above the limb up to ≈ 2 R ⊙ in streamers, while its contribution to narrowband imaging in the 30.4 nm band is expected to become smaller, even negligible in the corona beyond ≈ 2 - 3 R ⊙, the precise value being strongly dependent on the coronal temperature profile.

  1. Comparison of modeled NmE with NmE measured by the Boulder ionosonde near the spring equinox.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anatoli; Pavlova, Nadezhda

    We present a comparison of the E-layer peak electron number densities, NmE, measured by the Boulder ionosonde during geomagnetically quiet conditions on 10 April 1996 at low solar activity, 2 April 1993 and 9 April 1978 during moderate solar activity conditions, and 10 April 1991 at high solar activity with numerical theoretical model calculations of NmE. Based on this comparison, the modified EUVAC model solar flux is necessary to increase by a factor of 2 at moderate and high solar activity in the wavelength range of 3.2-7.0 nm. If O (+) ( (4) S), O (+) ( (2) D), O (+) ( (2) P), and N (+) ions are not calculated, the value of NmE is decreased up to a factor of 1.12 at solar minimum and up to a factor of 1.23 for the moderate and high solar activity conditions. The production of N _{2} (+) ions by photoelectron-impact ionization of N _{2} increases the value of NmE up to a factor of 1.18 at low solar activity and up to a factor of 1.33 for the moderate and high solar activity levels. The increase in NmE due to the production of O _{2} (+) ions by photoelectron-impact ionization of O _{2} does not exceed 4 percent. A difference between the calculated electron, T _{e}, and neutral, T _{n}, temperatures is less than 1, 4, 20, 70, and 145 K at 105, 110, 120, 130, and 140 km altitude, respectively. Changes in NmE caused by this difference between T _{e} and T _{n} are negligible.

  2. Novel fluoro copolymers for 157-nm photoresists: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohle, Christoph; Hien, Stefan; Eschbaumer, Christian; Rottstegge, Joerg; Sebald, Michael

    2002-07-01

    Several fluoro-substituted polymers consisting of acid cleavable methacryoic or cinnamic acid tert.-butyl ester compounds copolymerized with maleic acid anhydride derivatives were synthesized by radical copolymerization. Vacuum ultraviolet transmission measurements of the samples reveal absorbances down to 5micrometers -1 despite of the strongly absorbing anhydride moiety which serves as silylation anchor for the application of the Chemical Amplification of Resist Lines (CARL) process, one of the promising approaches for sub-90nm pattern fabrication. Some of the samples exhibit resolutions down to 110nm dense at 157nm exposure using an alternating phase shift mask. The feasibility of the CARL principle including the silylation reaction after development has been demonstrated with selected fluorinated polymer samples.

  3. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. PMID:19687946

  4. Guaranteed discovery of the NmSuGra model

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, Csaba; Carter, Daniel

    2008-11-23

    We analyze the discovery potential of the next-to-minimal supergravity motivated model: NmSuGra. This model is an extension of mSuGra by a gauge singlet, and contains only one additional parameter: {lambda}, the Higgs-singlet-Higgs coupling. NmSuGra solves the {mu}-problem and reduces the fine tuning of mSuGra. After identifying parameter space regions preferred by present experimental data, we show that these regions of NmSuGra are amenable to detection by the combination of the Large Hadron Collider and an upgraded Cryogenic Dark Matter Search. This conclusion holds strictly provided that the more than three sigma discrepancy in the difference of the experimental and the standard theoretical values of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon prevails in the future.

  5. High Power 938nm Cladding Pumped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Beach, R; Brobshoff, A; Liao, Z; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Taylor, L; Hackenberg, W; Bonaccini, D

    2002-12-26

    We have developed a Nd:doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier, which operates at 938nm with greater than 2W of output power. The core co-dopants were specifically chosen to enhance emission at 938nm. The fiber was liquid nitrogen cooled in order to achieve four-level laser operation on a laser transition that is normally three level at room temperature, thus permitting efficient cladding pumping of the amplifier. Wavelength selective attenuation was induced by bending the fiber around a mandrel, which permitted near complete suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm. We are presently seeking to scale the output of this laser to 10W. We will discuss the fiber and laser design issues involved in scaling the laser to the 10W power level and present our most recent results.

  6. New 223-nm excimer laser surgical system for photorefractive keratectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaev, Sergei N.; Razhev, Alexander M.; Zhupikov, Andrey A.

    1999-02-01

    The using of KrCl (223 nm) excimer laser in ophthalmic devices for Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) and phototherapeutic Keratectomy (PTK) is offered. The structure and functions of a new surgical UV ophthalmic laser systems Medilex using ArF (193 nm) or KrCl (223 nm) excimer laser for corneal surgery are presented. The systems Medilex with the new optical delivery system is used for photoablative reprofiling of the cornea to correct refraction errors (myopia, hyperopia and astigmatism) and to treat a corneal pathologies. The use of the 223 nanometer laser is proposed to have advantages over the 193 nanometer laser. The results of application of the ophthalmic excimer laser systems Medilex for treatment of myopia are presented.

  7. Developmental Function of Nm23/awd - A Mediator of Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nallamothu, Gouthami; Dammai, Vincent; Hsu, Tien

    2009-01-01

    The metastasis suppressor gene Nm23 is highly conserved from yeast to human, implicating a critical developmental function. Studies in cultured mammalian cells have identified several potential functions, but many have not been directly verified in vivo. Here we summarize the studies on the Drosophila homologue of the Nm23 gene, named abnormal wing discs (awd), which shares 78% amino acid identity with the human Nm23-H1 and H2 isoforms. These studies confirmed that awd gene encodes a nucleoside diphosphate kinase, and provided strong evidence of a role for awd in regulating cell differentiation and motility via regulation of growth factor receptor signaling. The latter function is mainly mediated by control of endocytosis. This review provides a historical account of the discovery and subsequent analyses of the awd gene. We will also discuss the possible molecular function of the Awd protein that underlies the endocytic function. PMID:19373545

  8. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability.

  9. 11nm logic lithography with OPC-lite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smayling, Michael C.; Tsujita, Koichiro; Yaegashi, Hidetami; Axelrad, Valery; Nakayama, Ryo; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa

    2014-03-01

    CMOS logic at the 22nm node and below is being done with a highly regular layout style using Gridded Design Rules (GDR). Smaller nodes have been demonstrated using a "lines and cuts" approach with good pattern fidelity and process margin, with extendibility to ~7nm.[1] In previous studies, Design-Source-Mask Optimization (DSMO) has been demonstrated to be effective down to the 12nm node.[2,3,4,5,6] The transition from single- to double- and in some cases triple- patterning was evaluated for different layout styles, with highly regular layouts delaying the need for multiple-patterning compared to complex layouts. To address mask complexity and cost, OPC for the "cut" patterns was studied and relatively simple OPC was found to provide good quality metrics such as MEEF and DOF.[3,7,8] This is significant since mask data volumes of >500GB per layer are projected for pixelated masks created by complex OPC or inverse lithography; writing times for such masks are nearly prohibitive. In our present work, we extend the scaling using SMO with "OPC Lite" beyond 12nm. The focus is on the contact pattern since a "hole" pattern is similar to a "cut" pattern so a similar technique should be useful. The test block is a reasonably complex logic function with ~100k gates of combinatorial logic and flip-flops, scaled from previous studies. The contact pattern is a relatively dense layer since it connects two underlying layers - active and gate - to one overlying layer - metal-1. Several design iterations were required to get suitable layouts while maintaining circuit functionality. Experimental demonstration of the contact pattern using OPC-Lite will be presented. Wafer results have been obtained at a metal-1 half-pitch of 18nm, corresponding to the 11nm CMOS node. Additional results for other layers - FINs, local interconnect, and metal-1 - will also be discussed.

  10. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  11. Full-field imprinting of sub-40 nm patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL (R)) is a unique patterning method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay to enable multilevel device fabrication. A photocurable low viscosity resist is dispensed dropwise to match the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling patterning with a uniform residual layer thickness across a field and across multiple wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-50 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of imprint masks (templates). For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x imprint masks with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub-32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the imprint mask and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  12. Determination of transition probability for the 655-nm Tl line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabourniotis, D.; Couris, S.; Damelincourt, J. J.

    Studies of high-pressure Hg-Tl I a.c. (50 Hz) arc plasmas have been used to verify the validity of Boltzmann statistics at the moment of maximum electron density (5 ms) by applying LTE criteria. For a known plasma temperature, the transition probability of the optically-thin 655-nm line of Tl was derived from emission measurements by using the self-reversed 535-nm line of Tl as reference [A655 = (3.74±0.37)×106s-1].

  13. On the 630 nm red-line pulsating aurora: Red-line Emission Geospace Observatory observations and model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Jackel, B.; Spanswick, E.; Gillies, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present observations of red-line (630 nm) pulsating auroras using the camera system of Red-line Emission Geospace Observatory (REGO), during a geomagnetic storm interval. We also develop a time-dependent model to simulate the 630 nm auroral pulsations in response to modulated precipitation inputs and compare the model outputs with REGO observations. Key results are as follows. (1) Notwithstanding the long radiative timescale of the 630 nm emission, red-line auroras can still be modulated by pulsating electron precipitations and feature noticeable oscillations, which constitute the red-line pulsating auroral phenomena. (2) In a majority of cases, the oscillation magnitude of red-line pulsating auroras is substantially smaller than that of the concurrent pulsating auroras seen on Thermal Emission Imaging System whitelight images (generally dominated by 557.7 nm green-line emissions). Under certain circumstances, e.g., when the characteristic energy of the precipitation is very high, some of the pulsating auroras may not show discernible imprints on red line. (3) The altitude range contributing most to the red-line pulsating aurora is systematically lower than that of the steady-state red-line aurora, since the slower O(1D) loss rate at higher altitudes tends to suppress the oscillation range of the 630 nm emission rate. (4) We find that some pulsating auroral patches are characterized by enhanced red-to-green color ratio during their on time, hinting that the percentage increase of the red-line auroral component exceeds that of the green-line auroral component for those patches. We suggest that those special patches might possibly be associated with lower energy (<1 keV) electron precipitations.

  14. Extension of 193 nm dry lithography to 45-nm half-pitch node: double exposure and double processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Abani M.; Li, Jianliang; Hiserote, Jay A.; Melvin, Lawrence S., III

    2006-10-01

    Immersion lithography and multiple exposure techniques are the most promising methods to extend lithography manufacturing to the 45nm node. Although immersion lithography has attracted much attention recently as a promising optical lithography extension, it will not solve all the problems at the 45-nm node. The 'dry' option, (i.e. double exposure/etch) which can be realized with standard processing practice, will extend 193-nm lithography to the end of the current industry roadmap. Double exposure/etch lithography is expensive in terms of cost, throughput time, and overlay registration accuracy. However, it is less challenging compared to other possible alternatives and has the ability to break through the κ I barrier (0.25). This process, in combination with attenuated PSM (att-PSM) mask, is a good imaging solution that can reach, and most likely go beyond, the 45-nm node. Mask making requirements in a double exposure scheme will be reduced significantly. This can be appreciated by the fact that the separation of tightly-pitched mask into two less demanding pitch patterns will reduce the stringent specifications for each mask. In this study, modeling of double exposure lithography (DEL) with att-PSM masks to target 45-nm node is described. In addition, mask separation and implementation issues of optical proximity corrections (OPC) to improve process window are studied. To understand the impact of OPC on the process window, Fourier analysis of the masks has been carried out as well.

  15. Isolation of Enterococcus faecium NM113, Enterococcus faecium NM213 and Lactobacillus casei NM512 as novel probiotics with immunomodulatory properties.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Nahla M; Heine, Holger; Abdou, Sania M; Shenana, Mohamed E; Zakaria, Mohamed K; El-Diwany, Ahmed

    2014-10-01

    Probiotics, defined as living bacteria that are beneficial for human health, mainly function through their immunomodulatory abilities. Hence, these microorganisms have proven successful for treating diseases resulting from immune deregulation. The aim of this study was to find novel candidates to improve on and complement current probiotic treatment strategies. Of 60 lactic acid bacterial strains that were isolated from fecal samples of healthy, full-term, breast-fed infants, three were chosen because of their ability to activate human immune cells. These candidates were then tested with regard to immunomodulatory properties, antimicrobial effects on pathogens, required pharmacological properties and their safety profiles. To identify the immunomodulatory structures of the selected isolates, activation of specific innate immune receptors was studied. The three candidates for probiotic treatment were assigned Enterococcus faecium NM113, Enterococcus faecium NM213 and Lactobacillus casei NM512. Compared with the established allergy-protective strain Lactococcus lactis G121, these isolates induced release of similar amounts of IL-12, a potent inducer of T helper 1 cells. In addition, all three neonatal isolates had antimicrobial activity against pathogens. Analysis of pharmacological suitability showed high tolerance of low pH, bile salts and pancreatic enzymes. In terms of safe application in humans, the isolates were sensitive to three antibiotics (chloramphenicol, tetracycline and erythromycin). In addition, the Enterococcus isolates were free from the four major virulence genes (cylA, agg, efaAfs and ccf). Moreover, the isolates strongly activated Toll-like receptor 2, which suggests lipopeptides as their active immunomodulatory structure. Thus, three novel bacterial strains with great potential as probiotic candidates and promising immunomodulatory properties have here been identified and characterized.

  16. Hydrogeology, water chemistry, and transport processes in the zone of contribution of a public-supply well in Albuquerque, New Mexico, 2007-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Jurgens, Bryant C.; Crilley, Dianna M.; Christenson, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey began a series of groundwater studies in 2001 in representative aquifers across the Nation in order to increase understanding of the factors that affect transport of anthropogenic and natural contaminants (TANC) to public-supply wells. One of 10 regional-scale TANC studies was conducted in the Middle Rio Grande Basin (MRGB) in New Mexico, where a more detailed local-scale study subsequently investigated the hydrogeology, water chemistry, and factors affecting the transport of contaminants in the zone of contribution of one 363-meter (m) deep public-supply well in Albuquerque. During 2007 through 2009, samples were collected for the local-scale study from 22 monitoring wells and 3 public-supply (supply) wells for analysis of major and trace elements, arsenic speciation, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), dissolved gases, stable isotopes, and tracers of young and old water. To study groundwater chemistry and ages at various depths within the aquifer, the monitoring wells were divided into three categories: (1) each shallow well was screened across the water table or had a screen midpoint within 18.3 m of the water level in the well; (2) each intermediate well had a screen midpoint between about 27.1 and 79.6 m below the water level in the well; and (3) each deep well had a screen midpoint about 185 m or more below the water level in the well. The 24-square-kilometer study area surrounding the "studied supply well" (SSW), one of the three supply wells, consists of primarily urban land within the MRGB, a deep alluvial basin with an aquifer composed of unconsolidated to moderately consolidated deposits of sand, gravel, silt, and clay. Conditions generally are unconfined, but are semiconfined at depth. Groundwater withdrawals for public supply have substantially changed the primary direction of flow from northeast to southwest under predevelopment

  17. Characterization of single 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle attachments on AFM tips for single sub-4-nm object pickup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Tang, Song-Nien; Yuan, Chi-Tsu; Tang, Jau; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the attachment of a 1.8-nm Au nanoparticle (Au-NP) to the tip of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe through the application of a current-limited bias voltage. The resulting probe is capable of picking up individual objects at the sub-4-nm scale. We also discuss the mechanisms involved in the attachment of the Au-NP to the very apex of an AFM probe tip. The Au-NP-modified AFM tips were used to pick up individual 4-nm quantum dots (QDs) using a chemically functionalized method. Single QD blinking was reduced considerably on the Au-NP-modified AFM tip. The resulting AFM tips present an excellent platform for the manipulation of single protein molecules in the study of single protein-protein interactions.

  18. Periodic nanostructures on titanium dioxide film produced using femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 nm and 775 nm.

    PubMed

    Shinonaga, Togo; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Miyaji, Godai

    2014-06-16

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) film is an important biomaterial used to improve the biocompatibility of titanium (Ti). We have used a film coating method with an aerosol beam and femtosecond laser irradiation to form periodic structures on biomaterials for control of the cell spreading. The control of cell spreading on biomaterials is important for the development of advanced biomaterials. In this study, nanostructures with periods of 130 and 230 nm were formed on a film using a femtosecond laser with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm, respectively. The nanostructure period on the film was 30% of the laser wavelengths. Periods produced with wavelengths of 388 and 775 nm were calculated using a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) model and the experimental results for both wavelengths were in the range of the calculated periods, which suggests that the mechanism for the formation of the periodic nanostructures on the film with a femtosecond laser was due to the excitation of SPPs.

  19. Imaging challenges in 20nm and 14nm logic nodes: hot spots performance in Metal1 layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoshkov, V.; Rio, D.; Liu, H.; Gillijns, W.; Wang, J.; Wong, P.; Van Den Heuvel, D.; Wiaux, V.; Nikolsky, P.; Finders, J.

    2013-10-01

    The 20nm Metal1 layer, based on ARM standard cells, has a 2D design with minimum pitch of 64nm. This 2D design requires a Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch (LELE) double patterning. The whole design is divided in 2 splits: Me1A and Me1B. But solution of splitting conflicts needs stitching at some locations, what requires good Critical Dimension (CD) and overlay control to provide reliable contact between 2 stitched line ends. ASML Immersion NXT tools are aimed at 20 and 14nm logic production nodes. Focus control requirements become tighter, as existing 20nm production logic layouts, based on ARM, have about 50-60nm focus latitude and tight CD Uniformity (CDU) specifications, especially for line ends. IMEC inspected 20nm production Metal1 ARM standard cells with a Negative Tone Development (NTD) process using the Process Window Qualification-like technique experimentally and by Brion Tachyon LMC by simulations. Stronger defects were found thru process variations. A calibrated Tachyon model proved a good overall predictability capability for this process. Selected defects are likely to be transferred to hard mask during etch. Further, CDU inspection was performed for these critical features. Hot spots showed worse CD uniformity than specifications. Intra-field CDU contribution is significant in overall CDU budget, where reticle has major impact due to high MEEF of hot spots. Tip-to-Tip and tip-to-line hot spots have high MEEF and its variation over the field. Best focus variation range was determined by best focus offsets between hot spots and its variation within the field.

  20. High average power, narrow band 248 nm alexandrite laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuper, J.W.; Chin, T.C.; Papanestor, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    A compact line-narrowed 248 nm solid state laser source operating at 15 mJ {at} 100 Hz PRF was demonstrated. Constraints due to thermal loading of components were addressed. Tradeoffs between pulse energy and repetition rate were investigated. A method for overcoming thermal dephasing in the THG material was achieved by scanning a slab shaped crystal.

  1. 77 FR 62481 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Crownpoint, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Crownpoint, NM AGENCY: Federal Communications....415 and 1.420. List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. Federal Communications... preamble, the Federal Communications Commission proposes to amend 47 CFR Part 73 as follows: PART...

  2. Gain measurements at 5 nm in nickel-like ytterbium

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.J.; Bourgade, J.L.; Combis, P.; Keane, C.J.; Louis-Jacquet, M.; Matthews, D.L.; Naccache, D.; Stone, G.; Thiell, G.; Whelan, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    Soft x-ray gain has been demonstrated at 5.03 nm within a laser produced plasma of Ni-like ytterbium. Experiments will also be described with higher Z Ni-like ions which can produce even shorter wavelength x-ray laser transition. 3 refs.

  3. Corneal injury from 1318-nm single laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, William P.; Ketzenberger, Bryan K.; Burton, Margaret B.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Threshold, median effective dose, and the mechanism of laser-tissue interaction are not well defined at the 1318-nm wavelength for human corneal exposures. The goals of this research effort are to identify at-risk groups, characterize the lesions imposed, and establish the ED50 for single pulse 1318-nm laser exposures on the cornea. A Neodymium: Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser was used to deliver 1318-nm wavelength pulses to the corneas of ten female Dutch Belted rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Single pulses of 0.5-ms duration and radiant beam energy ranging from 116 to 2250 joules/per square centimeter (J/cm2) were used. Exposure sites were clinically evaluated acutely, one hour and twenty-four hours post-exposure for the presence of a lesion. Results from the twenty-four hour evaluation were used to determine the ED50. Grossly, the lesions appeared as small, circular, well-demarcated, white, opaque lesions. Histologically, the lesions appeared as conical shaped coagulative necrosis with the base of the lesion at the epithelial surface of the cornea and extending to the apex at the endothelial border of the cornea. The ED50 for 1318-nm exposures to the rabbit cornea was determined to be 383 J/cm2 for a 0.1-mm spot size as measured at 1/e2.

  4. Pushing EUV lithography development beyond 22-nm half pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; Montogomery, Warren; Wallow, Tom

    2009-06-30

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) have and continue to play a dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists and masks. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) MET. Here we investigate the possibilities and limitations of using the 0.3-NA MET for sub-22-nm half-pitch development. We consider mask resolution limitations and present a method unique to the centrally obscured MET allowing these mask limitations to be overcome. We also explore projection optics resolution limits and describe various illumination schemes allowing resolution enhancement. At 0.3-NA, the 0.5 k1 factor resolution limit is 22.5 nm meaning that conventional illumination is of limited utility for sub-22-nm development. In general resolution enhancing illumination encompasses increased coherence. We study the effect of this increased coherence on line-edge roughness, which along with resolution is another crucial factor in sub-22-nm resist development.

  5. Surface Photometry of the Southern Milky Way at 170 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Koczet, P.

    As part of the D2-Space-Shuttle-Mission in 1993, the GAUSS-Camera has obtained photographic images of the Milky Way in various passbands in the Ultraviolet. Each film covers an area of the sky of about 140^\\circ. Six images were obtained at 170 nm, but only three of them could be used. The calibration has been done using the catalogued intensities of stars and transforming them into surface brightnesses. Then the stars on the images have been filtered out and the Shuttle-Glow has been eliminated. The images finally have been transformed into maps of the Milky Way in galactic coordinates l, b. These maps cover the Milky Way between the Galactic Center and Vela (360^\\circ <= l <= 270^\\circ, - -25^\\circ <= b <= 35^\\circ) and include dark clouds, reflection nebulae and bright open clusters. They are a perfect tool to investigate the distribution of these objects and therefore the global structure of the Milky Way. The image of the Milky Way at 170 nm is heavily dominated by interstellar extinction, leading to high intensity gradients all over the galactic plane. The images at 217 nm and 280 nm, also obtained by the GAUSS-Camera, and previous photometries taken in U, B, V and R have been used for comparison.

  6. 77 FR 63409 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00029

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4079-DR), dated 08/24/2012. Incident: Flooding. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW MEXICO, dated 08/24/2012, is hereby amended to...

  7. 76 FR 2431 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00016

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00016 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1... Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-1936-DR), dated 09/13/2010. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of NEW MEXICO, dated 09/13/2010, is hereby amended...

  8. 78 FR 73581 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00035

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00035 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4152-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms... disaster declaration for Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 10/29/2013,...

  9. 76 FR 81553 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00024

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4047-DR), dated 11/23/2011. Incident: Flooding. Incident... Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 11/23/2011, is hereby amended to...

  10. 77 FR 47907 - New Mexico Disaster #NM-00025

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster NM-00025 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of NEW MEXICO...'s declaration for the State of New Mexico, dated 07/09/2012 is hereby amended to establish...

  11. 78 FR 72141 - New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00037

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION New Mexico Disaster Number NM-00037 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment... Assistance Only for the State of New Mexico (FEMA-4148-DR), dated 09/30/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and... Private Non-Profit organizations in the State of New Mexico, dated 09/30/2013, is hereby amended...

  12. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W.

    2013-02-20

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  13. 850-nm oxide VCSEL development at Hewlett-Packard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongyu; Dudley, James J.; Lim, Sui F.; Lei, Chun; Liang, Bing; Tashima, M.; Hodge, Lee A.; Zhang, Xuemei; Herniman, John; Herrick, Robert W.

    1999-04-01

    Oxide confined VCSELs are being developed at Hewlett-Packard for the next-generation low cost fiber optics communication applications. Compared to the existing 850 nm implant confined VCSELs, the oxide VCSELs have lower operating voltages, higher slope efficiencies, and better modal bandwidth characteristics. Preliminary data on epitaxy and oxidation control uniformity, device performance, and reliability will be discussed.

  14. Novel main-chain-fluorinated polymers for 157-nm photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Koh, Meiten; Ishikawa, Takuji; Kodani, T.; Araki, Takayuki; Aoyama, Hirokazu; Yamashita, Tsuneo; Yamazaki, Tamio; Furukawa, Takamitsu; Itani, Toshiro

    2003-06-01

    Main-chain-fluorinated base-resins, including tetrafluoroethylene and norbornene derivatives, were synthesized and their fundamental properties, such as transparency at 157 nm and solubility in a standard alkaline developer, were characterized. A high transparency, i.e., absorbance of less then 0.5 μm-1, was achieved by optimizing the polymerization conditions with a variety of counter monomers. It was found that the polymerization conditions could also control the dissolution rates of the fluoropolymers and increased the dissolution rate of unprotected fluoropolymers by about three orders of magnitude, which was sufficient for the alkaline developability. Positive-working resists based on fluororesins were developed and showed good transparency of less than 1 μm-1 at 157 nm, and good solubility in a standard alkaline solution of 0.26-N tetramethylammonium (without any swelling behavior). And an acceptable etching rate as resistant as ArF resists was obtained and 65-nm dense lines could be delineated by the exposure at 157-nm wavelength.

  15. On the photochemistry of IONO2: absorption cross section (240-370 nm) and photolysis product yields at 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D M; Ashworth, S H; Plane, J M C

    2007-11-01

    The absolute absorption cross section of IONO(2) was measured by the pulsed photolysis at 193 nm of a NO(2)/CF(3)I mixture, followed by time-resolved Fourier transform spectroscopy in the near-UV. The resulting cross section at a temperature of 296 K over the wavelength range from 240 to 370 nm is given by log(10)(sigma(IONO(2))/cm(2) molecule(-1)) = 170.4 - 3.773 lambda + 2.965 x 10(-2)lambda(2)- 1.139 x 10(-4)lambda(3) + 2.144 x 10(-7)lambda(4)- 1.587 x 10(-10)lambda(5), where lambda is in nm; the cross section, with 2sigma uncertainty, ranges from (6.5 +/- 1.9) x 10(-18) cm(2) at 240 nm to (5 +/- 3) x 10(-19) cm(2) at 350 nm, and is significantly lower than a previous measurement [J. C. Mössinger, D. M. Rowley and R. A. Cox, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 2002, 2, 227]. The photolysis quantum yields for IO and NO(3) production at 248 nm were measured using laser induced fluorescence of IO at 445 nm, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy of NO(3) at 662 nm, yielding phi(IO)

  16. Resist materials for 157-nm microlithography: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Raymond J.; Tran, Hoang V.; Trinque, Brian C.; Chiba, Takashi; Yamada, Shintaro; Sanders, Daniel; Connor, Eric F.; Grubbs, Robert H.; Klopp, John M.; Frechet, Jean M. J.; Thomas, Brian H.; Shafer, Gregory J.; DesMarteau, Darryl D.; Conley, Will; Willson, C. Grant

    2001-08-01

    Fluorocarbon polymers and siloxane-based polymers have been identified as promising resist candidates for 157 nm material design because of their relatively high transparency at this wavelength. This paper reports our recent progress toward developing 157 nm resist materials based on the first of these two polymer systems. In addition to the 2-hydroxyhexafluoropropyl group, (alpha) -trifluoromethyl carboxylic acids have been identified as surprisingly transparent acidic functional groups. Polymers based on these groups have been prepared and preliminary imaging studies at 157 nm are described. 2-Trifluoromethyl-bicyclo[2,2,1] heptane-2-carboxylic acid methyl ester derived from methyl 2-(trifluoromethyl)acrylate was also prepared and gas-phase VUV measurements showed substantially improved transparency over norbornane. This appears to be a general characteristic of norbornane-bearing geminal electron-withdrawing substituents on the 2 carbon bridge. Unfortunately, neither the NiII nor PdII catalysts polymerize these transparent norbornene monomers by vinyl addition. However, several new approaches to incorporating these transparent monomers into functional polymers have been investigated. The first involved the synthesis of tricyclononene (TCN) monomers that move the bulky electron withdrawing groups further away from the site of addition. The hydrogenated geminally substituted TCN monomer still has far better transparency at 157 nm than norbornane. The second approach involved copolymerizing the norbornene monomers with carbon monoxide. The third approach involved free-radical polymerization of norbornene monomers with tetrafluoroethylene and/or other electron-deficient comonomers. All these approaches provided new materials with encouraging absorbance at 157 nm. The lithographic performance of some of these polymers is discussed.

  17. 77 FR 2096 - Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-13

    ... on the date of publication of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Federal Register (FR) Notice... scoping process in the Federal Register on July 15, 2010 (75 FR 41242). The NRC staff accepted comments... Isotopes Fluorine Extraction Process and Depleted Uranium Deconversion Plant in Lea County, NM AGENCY:...

  18. Direct writing of 150 nm gratings and squares on ZnO crystal in water by using 800 nm femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jukun; Jia, Tianqing; Zhou, Kan; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Zhang, Hongxin; Jia, Xin; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-12-29

    We present a controllable fabrication of nanogratings and nanosquares on the surface of ZnO crystal in water based on femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). The formation of nanogrooves depends on both laser fluence and writing speed. A single groove with width less than 40 nm and double grooves with distance of 150 nm have been produced by manipulating 800 nm femtosecond laser fluence. Nanogratings with period of 150 nm, 300 nm and 1000 nm, and nanosquares with dimensions of 150 × 150 nm2 were fabricated by using this direct femtosecond laser writing technique.

  19. Effect of light-emitting diode (ʎ 627 nm and 945 nm ʎ) treatment on first intention healing: immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kerppers, Ivo Ilvan; de Lima, Carlos José; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-01-01

    Collagen I is not only responsible for maintaining the integrity of most tissues due to its mechanical properties, but also for its active participation in the functionality of tissues because of its interaction with cells present in the extracellular matrix. The synthesis of collagen begins with tissue injury and remains until the end of the healing process. The use of non-coherent light for healing processes is still understudied. This procedure stands out as a biostimulation method for tissue repair, which increases local circulation, cell proliferation, and collagen synthesis. This study sought to quantify collagen I in the healing process after the treatment of wounds with the light-emitting diode (LED) treatment. The histologic analysis with tissue samples stained with picrosirius red showed a statistical difference between the positive controls, LED 627 and LED 945 nm groups; the group treated with LED 627 nm showed a predominance of mature collagen. The immunohistochemical analysis showed a statistically significant high concentration of collagen I in the LED 945 nm group. The irradiation of wounds with the higher wavelength (945 nm) used in the study produced the best activity of collagen I formation in experimental model.

  20. Cryogenic Lifetime Studies of 130 nm and 65 nm CMOS Technologies for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, James R.; Deptuch, G. W.; Wu, Guoying; Gui, Ping

    2015-06-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility intends to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. Research is under way to place the electronics inside the cryostat. For reasons of efficiency and economics, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This, then, requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130 nm and 65 nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. Our results show that both technologies achieve the lifetimes required by the experiment. Minimal design changes are necessary in the case of the 130 nm process and no changes whatsoever are necessary for the 65 nm process.

  1. Pattern generation requirements for mask making beyond 130 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Gesley, Mark A.; Maldonado, Juan R.

    1998-06-01

    It is commonly accepted in the semiconductor industry that optical lithography will be the most cost-effective solution for 150 nm and 130 nm device generations. Some selected layers at the 130 nm device generation may be produced using electron-beam direct-write or x-ray during the development phase. However, for the production phase, it is expected that 193 nm optical lithography with reticle enhancement techniques such as optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase shift masks (PSM) will be the technology of choice. What about post 193 nm. The range of solutions is more diverse and a clear winner has not yet emerged. The topic, however, is becoming more visible and has taken a prominent place in technical conferences in the past year. The five leading potential alternatives to optical lithography are proximity x-ray, e-beam projection (EBP), extended UV (EUV), ion projection lithography (IPL), and e-beam direct write. The search for the right answer will most likely continue for a few years, and possibly more than one alternative will emerge as an effective solution at and below 100 nm. All of the alternatives, with the exception of e-beam direct write, have one thing in common, the mask. Except for proximity x- ray, all solutions at present envision a 4x reduction of the mask-to-wafer image plane. Instead of chrome-coated quartz, a silicon wafer substrate is used. Aside from patterning, mask fabrication varies depending on the lithography absorbing substrate, and EUV requires a reflective multilayer stack. Most key lithography requirements needed to pattern the imaging layer are common to all of the candidates, at least for the reduction methods. For x-ray lithography, the requirements are significantly more stringent but at a smaller field. This paper will consolidate the requirements of the various types of masks from a pattern generation point of view and will focus on the pattern generation tool requirements to meet those mask requirements. In addition, it

  2. Final report on the torque key komparison CCM.T-K1.2 measurand torque: 0 N.m, 500 N.m, 1000 N.m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röske, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the CIPM subsequent bilateral comparison CCM.T-K1.2 was to link another participant, namely the National Institute of Metrology (Thailand), in short NIMT, to the CCM.T-K1 torque key comparison. The measuring capabilities up to 1000 N.m of dead-weight torque standard machines with supported lever were investigated. The pilot laboratory was the same in both comparisons—it was the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB, Braunschweig, Germany). The same two very stable torque transducers with well-known properties were used as travelling standards. The measurements at the participating laboratory were carried out between November 2007 and February 2008. According to the technical protocol, torque steps of 500 N.m and 1000 N.m had to be measured both in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. Corrections had to be applied to the results reported by the participants taking into account the use of different amplifiers, the creep (due to different loading times of the machines) and the environmental conditions in the laboratories (temperature and relative humidity of the ambient air). The results of the pilot laboratory in this bilateral comparison are in very good agreement with the same results obtained in the CCM.T-K1 comparison. For each of the transducers, the two torque steps and both senses of direction of the torque vector, the key comparison reference value of the CCM.T-K1 was taken, and the results of participant NIMT were calculated with respect to these values. The agreement between the results is very good. The smallest expanded (k = 2) relative uncertainty of the machine stated by the participant is 1 × 10-4. The results of the comparison support this uncertainty statement. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by CCM, according

  3. Performance of Thin Borosilicate Glass Sheets at 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P K; Hahn, D; Soules, T; Norton, M; Dixit, S; Donohue, G; Folta, J; Hollingsworth, W; Mainschein-Cline, M

    2004-11-11

    Previously, we reported preliminary results for commercial thin borosilicate glass sheets evaluated for use as a frequently-replaced optic to separate the radiation and contamination produced by the inertial confinement fusion experiments in the National Ignition Facility target chamber from the expensive precision laser optics which focus and shape the 351-nm laser beam. The goal is identification of low cost substrates that can deliver acceptable beam energy and focal spots to the target. The two parameters that dominate the transmitted beam quality are the transmitted wave front error and 351-nm absorption. Commercial materials and fabrication processes have now been identified which meet the beam energy and focus requirements for all of the missions planned for the National Ignition Facility. We present the first data for use of such an optic on the National Ignition Facility laser.

  4. Enhanced performance of the iodine monofluoride (491 nm) laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, J. Gary; Kane, Karen Y.

    1990-09-01

    The impact of substituting HI for CF3I as the iodine donor in the discharge-pumped iodine monofluoride (IF) laser at 491 nm has been investigated. More than an order of magnitude improvement in output pulse energy has been observed and is attributed to more efficient production of low-lying (nu-prime less than 5) vibrational levels of the IF (D-prime) ion pair state. Preliminary evidence indicates that vibrational excitation of HI (X 1Sigma+) assists in the relaxation of the D-prime state population. The increased net small-signal gain of D-prime - A-prime (n-prime = 0 - nu-double prime) transitions in HI-containing gas mixtures has the effect of intensifying the 491 nm (0, 15) bandhead relative to the lower gain transitions.

  5. Enhanced performance of the iodine monofluoride (491 nm) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Knae, K.Y.; Eden, J.G. )

    1990-09-01

    The impact of substituting HI for CF{sub 3}I as the iodine donor in the discharge-pumped iodine monofluoride (IF) laser at 491 nm ha been investigated. More than an order of magnitude improvement in output pulse energy has been observed, which is attributed to more efficient production of low-lying ({ital v}{prime} {lt} 5) vibrational levels of the IF ({ital D}{prime}) ion pair state. Preliminary evidence indicates that vibrational excitation of HI ({ital X}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) assists in the relaxation of the {ital D}{prime} state population. The increased net small signal gain of {ital D}{prime} {r arrow} {ital A}{prime}({ital v}{prime} = 0 {r arrow} {ital v}{double prime}) transitions in HI-containing gas mixtures has the effect of intensifying the 491 nm (0,15) bandhead relative to the lower gain transitions.

  6. Resist reflow process for arbitrary 32 nm node pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Min; An, Ilsin; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2008-03-01

    In order to shrink down the contact hole which is usually much larger than other patterns, the resist reflow process (RRP) has been widely used. Various types, shapes, and pitches of contact hole arrays are made by RRP, but RRP was limited to be used only for contact hole patterns. The same RRP method is expanded to 32 nm node arbitrary and complex patterns including dense line and space patterns. There might be simple 1-dimensional patterns, but 2-dimensional proximity conflict patterns are difficult to make in general. Specially, the data split with proximity correction needs a lot of attention for double patterning. 32 nm node arbitrary patterns can be easily made by using RRP without complex data split.

  7. Resist Reflow Process for 32 nm Node Arbitrary Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon-Min; An, Ilsin; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2009-04-01

    In order to decrease the size of contact holes, which is usually much larger than other patterns, the resist reflow process (RRP) has been widely used. Various types, shapes, and pitches of contact hole arrays are generated by RRP, but the use of RRP was limited to only contact hole patterns. The use of the same RRP method is expanded to 32 nm node arbitrary and complex patterns including dense line and space patterns. There might be simple one-dimensional patterns, but two-dimensional proximity conflict patterns are difficult to generate in general. In particular, the data split with proximity correction requires much attention for double patterning. 32 nm node arbitrary patterns could be generated using RRP without complex data splits when high-index fluid immersion lithography [numerical aperture (NA) 1.55] is used.

  8. Performance of Thin Borosilicate Glass Sheets at 351-nm

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, P K; Staggs, M; Carr, W; Dixit, S; Sell, W; Milam, D

    2001-11-01

    Commercial thin borosilicate glass sheets have been evaluated for use as a single-shot optic ''debris shield'' to separate the radiation and contamination produced by the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiment from the expensive precision laser optics which focus and shape the 351-nm laser beam which irradiates the target. The goal of this work is identification of low cost materials that can deliver acceptable beam energy and focal spots to the target. The two parameters that dominate the transmitted beam quality are the transmitted wave front error and bulk absorption. This paper focuses on the latter. To date, the materials with the lowest linear 351-nm absorption have also generally demonstrated the lowest non-linear absorption. Commercial materials have been identified which approach the beam energy and focus requirements for many ICF missions.

  9. Optical responses of a metal with sub-nm gaps

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Tae Yun; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2016-01-01

    If the size of a metallic structure is reduced to be comparable to or even smaller than the typical quantum-mechanical lengths such as the Fermi wavelength or Thomas-Fermi wavelength, the electronic structure and optical responses are modulated by quantum effects. Here, we calculate the optical responses of a metal with sub-nm gaps using the eigenstates obtained from an effective-mass quantum theory. According to our simulation, the dielectric responses can be significantly modified by tuning the inter-gap distances. Remarkably, sub-nm gaps occupying a 0.3% volumetric fraction can elongate the penetration depth by an order of magnitude in the terahertz regime. We find that the detailed dependences of electron-photon interaction matrix elements on the involved electronic wavefunctions play an important role in the optical responses. The results draw our attention to these recently fabricated systems. PMID:26964884

  10. Thermospheric O I 844.6-nm emission in twilight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahsoun-Hamade, F.; Wiens, R. H.; Shepherd, G. G.; Richards, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    The thermospheric O I 844.6-nm column emission rate was measured over Toronto, a midlatitude station, in the autumn of 1991 using an imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer. Twilight decay curves were measured on four clear evenings when the solar zenith angle was between 95 degs and 104 degs, giving corresponding column emission rates between 874 R and 130 R at 20 degs elevation angle in the azimuth of the Sun. The expected decay curves were calculated from the field line interhemisperic plasma model assuming only photoelectron impact excitation as the production mechanism with a cross section appropriate to an optically thin atmosphere. The agreement was good when the solar and geomagnetic activity levels were low to moderate, but the emission rate was overestimated during high activity periods. The comparison indicates that the photoelectron impact mechanism with a thin-atmosphere cross section is sufficient to explain the twilight decay of the thermospheric O I 844.6-nm emission.

  11. Effect of 655-nm diode laser on dog sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Corral-Baqués, M I; Rigau, T; Rivera, M; Rodríguez, J E; Rigau, J

    2005-01-01

    Sperm motility depends on energy consumption. Low-level laser irradiation increases adenosin triphosphate (ATP) production and energy supply to the cell. The aim of this study is to analyse whether the irradiation affects the parameters that characterise dog sperm motility. Fresh dog sperm samples were divided into four groups and irradiated with a 655-nm continuous-wave diode laser with varying doses: 0 (control), 4, 6 and 10 J/cm(2). At 0, 15 and 45 min following irradiation, pictures were taken of all the groups in order to study motility with computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA). Functional tests were also performed. Average path velocity (VAP), linear coefficient (Lin) and beat cross frequency (BCF) were statistically and significantly different when compared to the control. The functional tests also showed a significant difference. At these parameters, the 655-nm continuous-wave diode laser improves the speed and linear coefficient of the sperm.

  12. Single, composite, and ceramic Nd:YAG 946-nm lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Rui-Jun; Yang, Guang; Zheng-Ping, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Single, composite crystal and ceramic continuous wave (CW) 946-nm Nd:YAG lasers are demonstrated, respectively. The ceramic laser behaves better than the crystal laser. With 5-mm long ceramic, a CW output power of 1.46 W is generated with an optical conversion efficiency of 13.9%, while the slope efficiency is 17.9%. The optimal ceramic length for a 946-nm laser is also calculated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405171), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ014), and the Science and Technology Program of the Shandong Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. J13LJ05).

  13. 32 nm logic patterning options with immersion lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, K.; Burns, S.; Halle, S.; Zhuang, L.; Colburn, M.; Allen, S.; Babcock, C.; Baum, Z.; Burkhardt, M.; Dai, V.; Dunn, D.; Geiss, E.; Haffner, H.; Han, G.; Lawson, P.; Mansfield, S.; Meiring, J.; Morgenfeld, B.; Tabery, C.; Zou, Y.; Sarma, C.; Tsou, L.; Yan, W.; Zhuang, H.; Gil, D.; Medeiros, D.

    2008-03-01

    The semiconductor industry faces a lithographic scaling limit as the industry completes the transition to 1.35 NA immersion lithography. Both high-index immersion lithography and EUV lithography are facing technical challenges and commercial timing issues. Consequently, the industry has focused on enabling double patterning technology (DPT) as a means to circumvent the limitations of Rayleigh scaling. Here, the IBM development alliance demonstrate a series of double patterning solutions that enable scaling of logic constructs by decoupling the pattern spatially through mask design or temporally through innovative processes. These techniques have been successfully employed for early 32nm node development using 45nm generation tooling. Four different double patterning techniques were implemented. The first process illustrates local RET optimization through the use of a split reticle design. In this approach, a layout is decomposed into a series of regions with similar imaging properties and the illumination conditions for each are independently optimized. These regions are then printed separately into the same resist film in a multiple exposure process. The result is a singly developed pattern that could not be printed with a single illumination-mask combination. The second approach addresses 2D imaging with particular focus on both line-end dimension and linewidth control [1]. A double exposure-double etch (DE2) approach is used in conjunction with a pitch-filling sacrificial feature strategy. The third double exposure process, optimized for via patterns also utilizes DE2. In this method, a design is split between two separate masks such that the minimum pitch between any two vias is larger than the minimum metal pitch. This allows for final structures with vias at pitches beyond the capability of a single exposure. In the fourth method,, dark field double dipole lithography (DDL) has been successfully applied to BEOL metal structures and has been shown to be

  14. Hard x-ray Zernike microscopy reaches 30 nm resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Chen, T.; Yi, J.; Chu, Y.; Lee, W.-K.; Wang, C.; Kempson, I.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30?nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  15. Hard x-ray Zernike Microscopy Reaches 30 nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.T.; Chu, Y.; Chen, T-Y.; Yi, J.; Lee, W-K.; Wang, C-L.; Kempson, I. M.; Hwu, Y.; Gajdosik, V.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-03-30

    Since its invention in 1930, Zernike phase contrast has been a pillar in optical microscopy and more recently in x-ray microscopy, in particular for low-absorption-contrast biological specimens. We experimentally demonstrate that hard-x-ray Zernike microscopy now reaches a lateral resolution below 30 nm while strongly enhancing the contrast, thus opening many new research opportunities in biomedicine and materials science.

  16. The polarization properties of Fe II 614.9 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    The anomalous Zeeman splitting of the Fe II line at 614.9 nm results in four unusual properties of the polarization signature of this line in the presence of magnetic fields: the absence of linear polarization, no magnetooptical effect, the independence of intensity at line center from the inclination of the field, and a depolarizing self-absorption. The origin of these properties is illustrated in terms of the transfer of line radiation in an idealized solar atmosphere.

  17. Portable field spectrometer for reflectance measurements 340-2500 nm.

    PubMed

    Myrabø, H K; Lillesaeter, O; Høimyr, T

    1982-08-01

    A portable field spectrometer designed for measuring the spectral reflectance signatures of terrain objects is described. The instrument employs a chopping technique rendering possible the simultaneous measurement of irradiance from sun and sky on one hand and radiance from the scene on the other. This enhances the applicability of the instrument during variable irradiance conditions caused by drifting clouds. The instrument operates over the 340-2500-nm spectral region. Examples of measuring results are given.

  18. Step and flash imprint lithography for sub-100-nm patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Matthew; Grot, Annette; Amistoso, Marie N.; Choi, Byung J.; Bailey, Todd C.; Ekerdt, John G.; Sreenivasan, S. V.; Hollenhorst, James; Willson, C. Grant

    2000-07-01

    Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL) is an alternative to photolithography that efficiently generates high aspect-ratio, sub-micron patterns in resist materials. Other imprint lithography techniques based on physical deformation of a polymer to generate surface relief structures have produced features in PMMA as small as 10 nm, but it is very difficult to imprint large depressed features or to imprint a thick films of resist with high aspect-ratio features by these techniques. SFIL overcomes these difficulties by exploiting the selectivity and anisotropy of reactive ion etch (RIE). First, a thick organic 'transfer' layer (0.3 micrometer to 1.1 micrometer) is spin coated to planarize the wafer surface. A low viscosity, liquid organosilicon photopolymer precursor is then applied to the substrate and a quartz template applied at 2 psi. Once the master is in contact with the organosilicon solution, a crosslinking photopolymerization is initiated via backside illumination with broadband UV light. When the layer is cured the template is removed. This process relies on being able to imprint the photopolymer while leaving the minimal residual material in the depressed areas. Any excess material is etched away using a CHF3/He/O2 RIE. The exposed transfer layer is then etched with O2 RIE. The silicon incorporated in the photopolymer allows amplification of the low aspect ratio relief structure in the silylated resist into a high aspect ratio feature in the transfer layer. The aspect ratio is limited only by the mechanical stability of the transfer layer material and the O2 RIE selectivity and anisotropy. This method has produced 60 nm features with 6:1 aspect ratios. This lithography process was also used to fabricate alternating arrays of 100 nm Ti lines on a 200 nm pitch that function as efficient micropolarizers. Several types of optical devices including gratings, polarizers, and sub-wavelength structures can be easily patterned by SFIL.

  19. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  20. Absolute measurements of nonlinear absorption near LIDT at 193 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev; Welsch, Eberhard; Apel, Oliver

    2001-04-01

    Previous investigations indicate that oxide coatings exhibit non-linear absorption phenomena below 200 nm. Hereby, absorption data of Al2O3 thin film coatings has been determined absolutely by laser calorimetry (LCA) at 193 nm in the low fluence regime. As an alternative, on the basis of the pulsed surface thermal lens technique (STL), photothermal measurements allow to determine the absorption relatively at fluence levels both in the subdamage fluence range far from the damage onset and close to the LIDT. By combining the two measurement techniques, the absolute determination of linear as well as multiphoton absorption can be achieved also in the vicinity of the laser damage fluences. This is of crucial interest because the initiation of damage onset can be observed immediately. Absolute absorption data of Al2O3 coatings at different laser fluences stating of some mJoule/cm2 will be presented for the wavelength 193 nm. Thus, the correlation between the increase of absorption and the onset of breakdown can be illustrated impressively. The evaluation and discussion of the experimental results are focused on the degree of non-linearity of the investigated absorption behavior of oxide single layers initiating the optical breakdown of UV oxide coatings.

  1. 450 nm diode laser: A new help in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the performance of 450 nm diode laser in oral surgery procedures. METHODS The case described consisted of the removal of a lower lip fibroma through a blue diode laser (λ = 450 nm). RESULTS The efficacy of this device, even at very low power (1W, CW), allows us to obtain very high intra and postoperative comfort for the patient, even with just topical anaesthesia and without needing suture. The healing process was completed in one week and, during the follow-up, the patient did not report any problems, pain or discomfort even without the consumption of any kind of drugs, such as painkillers and antibiotics. The histological examination performed by the pathologist showed a large area of fibrous connective tissue with some portions of epithelium-connective detachments and a regular incision with very scanty areas of carbonization. CONCLUSION The 450 nm diode laser proved of being very efficient in the oral soft tissue surgical procedures, with no side effects for the patients.

  2. Brain lesion induced by 1319nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaifu; Chen, Hongxia; Wang, Jiarui; Chen, Peng; Ma, Ping; Qian, Huanwen

    2010-11-01

    The laser-tissue interaction has not been well defined at the 1319 nm wavelength for brain exposure. The goal of this research effort was to identify the behavioral and histological changes of brain lesion induced by 1319 nm laser. The experiment was performed on China Kunming mice. Unilateral brain lesions were created with a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser (1319nm). The brain lesions were identified through behavioral observation and histological haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining method. The behavior change was observed for a radiant exposure range of 97~773 J/cm2. The histology of the recovery process was identified for radiant exposure of 580 J/cm2. Subjects were sacrificed 1 hour, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 months, 7 months and 13 months after laser irradiation. Results showed that after laser exposure, behavioral deficits, including kyphosis, tail entasia, or whole body paralysis could be noted right after the animals recovered from anesthesia while gradually disappeared within several days and never recurred again. Histologically, the laser lesion showed a typical architecture dependent on the interval following laser treatment. The central zone of coagulation necrosis is not apparent right after exposure but becomes obvious within several days. The nerotic tissue though may persist for a long time, will finally be completely resorbed. No carbonization granules formed under our exposure condition.

  3. Photoelectron Emission Studies in CsBr at 257 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, Juan R.; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Yun; Pianetta, Piero A.; Pease, Fabian W.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-28

    CsBr/Cr photocathodes were found [1,2] to meet the requirements of a multi-electron beam lithography system operating with a light energy of 4.8 eV (257nm). The fact that photoemission was observed with a light energy below the reported 7.3 eV band gap for CsBr was not understood. This paper presents experimental results on the presence of intra-band gap absorption sites (IBAS) in CsBr thin film photo electron emitters, and presents a model based on IBAS to explain the observed photoelectron emission behavior at energies below band gap. A fluorescence band centered at 330 nm with a FWHM of about 0.34 eV was observed in CsBr/Cr samples under 257 nm laser illumination which can be attributed to IBAS and agrees well with previously obtained synchrotron photoelectron spectra[1] from the valence band of CsBr films.

  4. 450 nm diode laser: A new help in oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Merigo, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe the performance of 450 nm diode laser in oral surgery procedures. METHODS The case described consisted of the removal of a lower lip fibroma through a blue diode laser (λ = 450 nm). RESULTS The efficacy of this device, even at very low power (1W, CW), allows us to obtain very high intra and postoperative comfort for the patient, even with just topical anaesthesia and without needing suture. The healing process was completed in one week and, during the follow-up, the patient did not report any problems, pain or discomfort even without the consumption of any kind of drugs, such as painkillers and antibiotics. The histological examination performed by the pathologist showed a large area of fibrous connective tissue with some portions of epithelium-connective detachments and a regular incision with very scanty areas of carbonization. CONCLUSION The 450 nm diode laser proved of being very efficient in the oral soft tissue surgical procedures, with no side effects for the patients. PMID:27672639

  5. Advances in 193 nm excimer lasers for mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph; Esser, Hans-Gerd; Bonati, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Ongoing progress in mass analysis applications such as laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry of solid samples and ultraviolet photoionization mediated sequencing of peptides and proteins is to a large extent driven by ultrashort wavelength excimer lasers at 193 nm. This paper will introduce the latest improvements achieved in the development of compact high repetition rate excimer lasers and elaborate on the impact on mass spectrometry instrumentation. Various performance and lifetime measurements obtained in a long-term endurance test over the course of 18 months will be shown and discussed in view of the laser source requirements of different mass spectrometry tasks. These sampling type applications are served by excimer lasers delivering pulsed 193 nm output of several mJ as well as fast repetition rates which are already approaching one Kilohertz. In order to open up the pathway from the laboratory to broader market industrial use, sufficient component lifetimes and long-term stable performance behavior have to be ensured. The obtained long-term results which will be presented are based on diverse 193 nm excimer laser tube improvements aiming at e.g. optimizing the gas flow dynamics and have extended the operational life the laser tube for the first time over several billion pulses even under high duty-cycle conditions.

  6. Synthesis of novel fluoropolymers for 157-nm photoresists by cyclopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Shun-ichi; Kaneko, Isamu; Takebe, Yoko; Okada, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yasuhide; Shida, Naomi; Ishikawa, Seiichi; Toriumi, Minoru; Itani, Toshiro

    2002-07-01

    Novel fluoropolymers having partially fluorinated monocyclic (5-membered and 6-membered ring) structure have been synthesized with radical cyclo-polymerization, which have C- F bond in the polymer main chain and also possess fluorocontaining acidic alcohol group. These polymers have excellent transparency lower than 1.0 μm-1 at 157nm wave length. The number-average molecular weight (Mn) of the polymers is 4000 to 20000, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is 130 to 155 °C and the decomposition temperature (Td) is about 400 °C. Copolymerization reaction with the other monomers (ex. fluoroolefins,(meth)acrylates and vinyl esters) were also examined. The introduction of protecting group (ex. methoxylmethly, and t-butoxycarbonyl group) to alcohol units of the polymer can be applied before or after polymerization reaction. We also evaluated fundamental resist performances. These have excellent transparency of 0.5 to 1.5 μm-1, good solubility in the standard alkaline solution (0.26N N-tetramethylammonium hydroxide aqueous solution) and relatively high sensitivities below than 10mJ/cm2. The imaging results of the above fluoropolymer based positive- working resists are presented. Under 100-nm line and space pattern are delineated in 200-nm thick film by using the phase shift mask.

  7. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-02-28

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  8. Scanning photorefractive keratectomy at 213 nm: PMMA ablations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Fabrice; Rol, Pascal O.; Wosnitza, Martin; Maine, Patrick; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: In scanning photorefractive keratectomy, the corneal surface is reshaped by laser ablation with a scanning beam for the correction of myopia or astigmatism. A precise knowledge of the volume of corneal tissue removed by each laser pulse is necessary to be able to develop accurate ablation algorithms for scanning photorefractive keratectomy. The purpose of this study was to measure the ablation per pulse created on PMMA surfaces with a Q-switched frequency-quintupled Nd:YAG laser emitting at 213 nm. Methods: A frequency-quintupled Nd:YAG laser emitting at 213 nm with a pulse duration of 5 ns and a pulse energy of 1.2 to 1.5 mJ was used. The laser beam was focused on the surface of PMMA blocks and ablation craters were produced with 10, 50 and 100 pulses. The shape of the ablation craters was measured with an optical profilometer and compared with the beam profile measured with a laser beam diagnostic system. Results: The beam intensity distribution in the near-field consisted of two quasi-Gaussian peaks. The ablation craters contained two peaks. Assuming a Gaussian intensity distribution, the ablation per pulse in PMMA at 213 nm can be modeled by a parabolic function. Conclusions: Optical profilometry can be used to accurately measure the ablation per pulse and evaluate the homogeneity of the beam.

  9. Auditory nerve impulses induced by 980 nm laser.

    PubMed

    Guan, Tian; Zhu, Kai; Chen, Fei; He, Yonghong; Wang, Jian; Wu, Mocun; Nie, Guohui

    2015-08-01

    The discovery that a pulsed laser could trigger an auditory neural response inspired ongoing research on cochlear implants activated by optical stimulus rather than by electrical current. However, most studies to date have used visible light (532 nm) or long-wavelength near-infrared (>1840  nm ) and involved making a hole in the cochlea. This paper investigates the effect of optical parameters on the optically evoked compound action potentials (oCAPs) from the guinea pig cochlea, using a pulsed semiconductor near-infrared laser (980 nm) without making a hole in the cochlea. Synchronous trigger laser pulses were used to stimulate the cochlea, before and after deafening, upon varying the pulse duration (30–1000  μs ) and an amount of radiant energy (0–53.2  mJ/cm 2 ). oCAPs were successfully recorded after deafening. The amplitude of the oCAPs increased as the infrared radiant energy was increased at a fixed 50  μs pulse duration, and decreased with a longer pulse duration at a fixed 37.1  mJ/cm 2 radiant energy. The latency of the oCAPs shortened with increasing radiant energy at a fixed pulse duration. With a higher stimulation rate, the amplitude of the oCAPs’ amplitude decreased. PMID:26295178

  10. Characterization of 32nm node BEOL grating structures using scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangooie, Shahin; Sendelbach, Matthew; Angyal, Matthew; Archie, Charles; Vaid, Alok; Matthew, Itty; Herrera, Pedro

    2008-03-01

    Implementations of scatterometry in the back end of the line (BEOL) of the devices requires design of advanced measurement targets with attention to CMP ground rule constraints as well as model simplicity details. In this paper we outline basic design rules for scatterometry back end targets by stacking and staggering measurement pads to reduce metal pattern density in the horizontal plane of the device and to avoid progressive dishing problems along the vertical direction. Furthermore, important characteristics of the copper shapes in terms of their opaqueness and uniformity are discussed. It is shown that the M1 copper thicknesses larger than 100 nm are more than sufficient for accurate back end scatterometry implementations eliminating the need for modeling of contributions from the buried layers. AFM and ellipsometry line scans also show that the copper pads are sufficiently uniform with a sweet spot area of around 20 μm. Hence, accurate scatterometry can be done with negligible edge and/or dishing contributions if the measurement spot is placed any where within the sweet spot area. Reference metrology utilizing CD-SEM and CD-AFM techniques prove accuracy of the optical solutions for the develop inspect and final inspect grating structures. The total measurement uncertainty (TMU) values for the process of record line width are of the order of 0.77 nm and 0.35 nm at the develop inspect and final inspect levels, respectively.

  11. 12 CFR 717.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and...; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt-out notice. (1) In general. A notice must be clear... C of this part. (b) Coordinated and consolidated notices. A notice required by this subpart may...

  12. 12 CFR 717.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and...; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt-out notice. (1) In general. A notice must be clear... C of this part. (b) Coordinated and consolidated notices. A notice required by this subpart may...

  13. 12 CFR 334.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and...-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt-out notice. (1) In general. A...) Model notices. Model notices are provided in Appendix C of this part. (b) Coordinated and...

  14. 75 FR 70916 - Surplus Properties; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... Department of the Army Surplus Properties; Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice... Defense components. This Notice amends the Notice published in the Federal Register (71 FR 26081) on May 8, 2007. DATES: Effective immediately, by adding the following surplus property notice. FOR...

  15. Inline detection of Chrome degradation on binary 193nm photomasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufaye, Félix; Sippel, Astrid; Wylie, Mark; García-Berríos, Edgardo; Crawford, Charles; Hess, Carl; Sartelli, Luca; Pogliani, Carlo; Miyashita, Hiroyuki; Gough, Stuart; Sundermann, Frank; Brochard, Christophe

    2013-09-01

    193nm binary photomasks are still used in the semiconductor industry for the lithography of some critical layers for the nodes 90nm and 65nm, with high volumes and over long periods. However, these 193nm binary photomasks can be impacted by a phenomenon of chrome oxidation leading to critical dimensions uniformity (CDU) degradation with a pronounced radial signature. If not detected early enough, this CDU degradation may cause defectivity issues and lower yield on wafers. Fortunately, a standard cleaning and repellicle service at the mask shop has been demonstrated as efficient to remove the grown materials and get the photomask CD back on target.Some detection methods have been already described in literature, such as wafer CD intrafield monitoring (ACLV), giving reliable results but also consuming additional SEM time with less precision than direct photomask measurement. In this paper, we propose another approach, by monitoring the CDU directly on the photomask, concurrently with defect inspection for regular requalification to production for wafer fabs. For this study, we focused on a Metal layer in a 90nm technology node. Wafers have been exposed with production conditions and then measured by SEM-CD. Afterwards, this photomask has been measured with a SEM-CD in mask shop and also inspected on a KLA-Tencor X5.2 inspection system, with pixels 125 and 90nm, to evaluate the Intensity based Critical Dimension Uniformity (iCDU) option. iCDU was firstly developed to provide feed-forward CDU maps for scanner intrafield corrections, from arrayed dense structures on memory photomasks. Due to layout complexity and differing feature types, CDU monitoring on logic photomasks used to pose unique challenges.The selection of suitable feature types for CDU monitoring on logic photomasks is no longer an issue, since the transmitted intensity map gives all the needed information, as shown in this paper. In this study, the photomask was heavily degraded after more than 18,000 300

  16. Relativistic Calculation of Transition Probabilities for 557.7 nm and 297.2 nm Emission Lines in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantler, C. T.; Nguyen, T. V. B.; Lowe, J. A.; Grant, I. P.

    2013-05-01

    The 557.7 nm green line and the 297.2 nm ultraviolet line in oxygen have been studied extensively due to their importance in astrophysics and atmospheric science. Despite the enormous effort devoted to these two prominent transition lines over 30 years, and in fact going back to 1934, the ratio of their transition probabilities remains a subject of major discrepancies amongst various theoretical calculations for many decades. Moreover, theoretical results are inconsistent with available laboratory results, as well as recent spacecraft measurements of Earth's airglow. This work presents new relativistic theoretical calculations of the transition probabilities of these two photoemission lines from neutral oxygen using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. Our calculations were performed in both length and velocity gauges in order to check for accuracy and consistency, with agreement to 8%. Whilst remaining a challenging computation, these results directly bear upon interpretations of plasma processes and ionization regimes in the universe.

  17. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCPR K1-a: Spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolliams, Emma R.; Fox, Nigel P.; Cox, Maurice G.; Harris, Peter M.; Harrison, Neil J.

    2006-01-01

    The CCPR K1-a key comparison of spectral irradiance (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) was carried out to meet the requirements of the Mutual Recognition Arrangement by 13 participating national metrology institutes (NMIs). Because of the fragile nature of the tungsten halogen lamps used as comparison artefacts, the comparison was arranged as a star comparison with three lamps per participant. NPL (United Kingdom) piloted the comparison and, by measuring all lamps, provided a link between participants' measurements. The other participants were BNM-INM (France), CENAM (Mexico), CSIRO (Australia), HUT (Finland), IFA-CSIC (Spain), MSL-IRL (New Zealand), NIM (China), NIST (United States of America), NMIJ (Japan), NRC (Canada), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russian Federation). Before the analysis was completed and the results known, the pilot discussed with each participant which lamp measurements should be included as representative of their comparison. As a consequence of this check, at least one measurement was excluded from one third of the lamps because of changes due to transportations. The comparison thus highlighted the difficulty regarding the availability of suitable transfer standards for the dissemination of spectral irradiance. The use of multiple lamps and multiple measurements ensured sufficient redundancy that all participants were adequately represented. In addition, during this pre-draft A phase all participants had the opportunity to review the uncertainty budgets and methods of all other participants. This new process helped to ensure that all submitted results and their associated uncertainties were evaluated in a consistent manner. The comparison was analysed using a model-based method which regarded each lamp as having a stable spectral irradiance and the measurements made by an NMI as systematically influenced by a factor that applies to all that NMI's measurements. The aim of the analysis was to estimate the systematic factor for each NMI. Across the

  18. Successful use of 1064 Nm Nd:YAG in conjunction with 2790 Nm YSGG ablative laser for traumatic scarring.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, Rajiv I; Perez, Maritza I

    2014-01-01

    Patients with traumatic scarring often seek both aesthetic and functional improvement and can be a challenge to treat; however, advances in laser and light technologies have helped to treat many of these patients with rather minimally invasive approaches. A nineteen year old girl with Fitzpatrick skin type III skin presented for the evaluation of extensive traumatic scarring involving her right cheek, right chin, and right oral commissure that she sustained after a motor vehicle accident. We report the successful use of the 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser in conjunction with the ablative 2790 nm YSGG laser for the treatment of traumatic scarring in this patient. Our patient noted a notable improvement in the appearance of her traumatic scarring in addition to decrease in contracture of the right oral commissure. The treatment regimen described provides an effective option for clinicians to utilize when treating traumatic scarring and skin textural changes.

  19. Megahertz FDML laser with up to 143nm sweep range for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 1050nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Jan Philip; Klein, Thomas; Eibl, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Tom; Wieser, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert

    2016-03-01

    We present a new design of a Fourier Domain Mode Locked laser (FDML laser), which provides a new record in sweep range at ~1μm center wavelength: At the fundamental sweep rate of 2x417 kHz we reach 143nm bandwidth and 120nm with 4x buffering at 1.67MHz sweep rate. The latter configuration of our system is characterized: The FWHM of the point spread function (PSF) of a mirror is 5.6μm (in tissue). Human in vivo retinal imaging is performed with the MHz laser showing more details in vascular structures. Here we could measure an axial resolution of 6.0μm by determining the FWHM of specular reflex in the image. Additionally, challenges related to such a high sweep bandwidth such as water absorption are investigated.

  20. A nanosecond regenerative Ti:Sapphire amplifier for the simultaneous generation of 940 nm and of 320 nm pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talluto, Vincenzo; Blochowicz, Thomas; Walther, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Narrowband cw radiation at 940 and 960 nm is used to seed a Nd:YAG-pumped regenerative Ti:Sapphire amplifier. A Pockels cell traps a slice of the seed radiation inside the amplifier cavity, generating two synchronized pulses and releasing them after amplification. The total pulse energy is as high as 9 mJ at a pulse duration of 6.5 ns and a Fourier-transform-limited bandwidth. The timing jitter between the two pulses at the two wavelengths is less than ±300 ps. The relative pulse energy can be controlled by the relative seed laser power. Up to 1 mJ pulse energy at 320 nm was achieved by third-harmonic generation.

  1. Squeezing visible light waves into a 3-nm-thick and 55-nm-long plasmon cavity.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kurokawa, Yoichi

    2006-03-10

    We demonstrate controlled squeezing of visible light waves into nanometer-sized optical cavities. The light is perpendicularly confined in a few-nanometer-thick SiO2 film sandwiched between Au claddings in the form of surface plasmon polaritons and exhibits Fabry-Perot resonances in a longitudinal direction. As the thickness of the dielectric core is reduced, the plasmon wavelength becomes shorter; then a smaller cavity is realized. A dispersion relation down to a surface plasmon wavelength of 51 nm for a red light, which is less than 8% of the free-space wavelength, was experimentally observed. Any obvious breakdowns of the macroscopic electromagnetics based on continuous dielectric media were not disclosed for 3-nm-thick cores.

  2. Comparison of the photothermal effects of 808nm gold nanorod and indocyanine green solutions using an 805nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Zhou, Feifan; West, Connor; Silk, Kegan; Doughty, Austin; Bahavar, Cody F.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive laser immunotherapy (NLIT) is a treatment method for metastatic cancer which combines noninvasive laser irradiation with immunologically modified nanostructures to ablate a primary tumor and induce a systemic anti-tumor response. To further expand the development of NLIT, two different photosensitizing agents were compared: gold nanorods (GNR) with an optical absorption peak of 808 nm and indocyanine green (ICG) with an optical absorption peak of ~800 nm. Various concentrations of GNR and ICG solutions were irradiated at different power densities using an 805 nm diode laser, and the temperature of the solutions was monitored during irradiation using a thermal camera. For comparison, dye balls made up of a 1:1 volume ratio of gel solution to GNR or ICG solution were placed in phantom gels and were then irradiated using the 805 nm diode laser to imitate the effect of laser irradiation on in vivo tumors. Non-invasive laser irradiation of GNR solution for 2 minutes resulted in a maximum increase in temperature by 31.8 °C. Additionally, similar irradiation of GNR solution dye ball within phantom gel for 10 minutes resulted in a maximum temperature increase of 8.2 °C. Comparatively, non-invasive laser irradiation of ICG solution for 2 minutes resulted in a maximum increase in temperature by 28.0 °C. Similar irradiation of ICG solution dye ball within phantom gel for 10 minutes yielded a maximum temperature increase of only 3.4 °C. Qualitatively, these studies showed that GNR solutions are more effective photosensitizing agents than ICG solution.

  3. Improved CD control for 45-40 nm CMOS logic patterning: anticipation for 32-28 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gratiet, Bertrand; Sundermann, Frank; Massin, Jean; Decaux, Marianne; Thivolle, Nicolas; Baron, Fabrice; Ostrovsky, Alain; Monget, Cedric; Chapon, Jean Damien; Blancquaert, Yoann; Dabertrand, Karen; Thevenon, Lionel; Bry, Benedicte; Cluet, Nicolas; Borot, Bertrand; Bingert, Raphael; Devoivre, Thierry; Gourard, Pascal; Babaud, Laurène; Buttgereit, Ute; Birkner, Robert; Joyner, Mark; Graitzer, Erez; Cohen, Avi

    2010-03-01

    Since 2008, we have been presenting some papers regarding CMOS 45nm logic gate patterning activity to reduce CD dispersion. After a global CD budget evaluation at SPIE08, we have been focusing on Intrafield CD corrections using Dose MapperTM. The story continues and since then we have pursued our intrafield characterisation and focus on ways to get Dose MapperTM dose recipe created before the first silicon is coming. In fact 40nm technology is already more demanding and we must be ready with integrated solutions for 32/28nm node. Global CD budget can be divided in Lot to Lot, Wafer to Wafer, Intra wafer and Intra field component. We won't talk here about run to run solutions which are put in place for Lot to Lot and Wafer to Wafer. We will emphasize on the intrafield / intrawafer process corrections and outline process compensation control and strategy. A lot of papers regarding intrafield CD compensation are available in the litterature but they do not necesserally fit logic manufacturing needs or possibilities. We need to put similar solutions in place which are comprehensive and flexible. How can we correct upfront an Etch chamber CD profile combined with a mask and scanner CD signature? How can we get intrafield map from random logic devices? This is what we will develop in this paper.

  4. 2 nm continuously tunable 488nm micro-integrated diode-laser-based SHG light source for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braune, M.; Maiwald, M.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy in the visible spectral range is of great interest due to resonant Raman effects. Nevertheless, fluorescence and ambient light can mask the weak Raman lines. Shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy is a demonstrated tool to overcome this drawback. To apply this method, a light source with two alternating wavelengths is necessary. The spectral distance between these two wavelengths has to be adapted to the width of the Raman signal. According to the sample under investigation the width of the Raman signal could be in the range of 3 cm-1 - 12 cm-1. In this work, a micro-integrated light source emitting at 488 nm with a continuous wavelength tuning range up to 2 nm (83 cm-1) is presented. The pump source, a DFB laser emitting at 976 nm, and a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) ridge waveguide crystal is used for the second harmonic generation (SHG). Both components are mounted on a μ-Peltier-element for temperature control. Here, a common wavelength tuning of the pump wavelength and the acceptance bandwidth of the SHG crystal via temperature is achieved. With the results the light source is suitable for portable Raman and SERDS experiments with a flexible spectral distance between both excitation wavelengths for SERDS with respect to the sample under investigation.

  5. Generation of Coherent 19- and 38-nm Radiation at a Free-Electron Laser Directly Seeded at 38 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, S.; Azima, A.; Bajt, S.; Bödewadt, J.; Curbis, F.; Dachraoui, H.; Delsim-Hashemi, H.; Drescher, M.; Düsterer, S.; Faatz, B.; Felber, M.; Feldhaus, J.; Hass, E.; Hipp, U.; Honkavaara, K.; Ischebeck, R.; Khan, S.; Laarmann, T.; Lechner, C.; Maltezopoulos, Th.; Miltchev, V.; Mittenzwey, M.; Rehders, M.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Rossbach, J.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Schroedter, L.; Schulz, M.; Schulz, S.; Tarkeshian, R.; Tischer, M.; Wacker, V.; Wieland, M.

    2013-09-01

    Initiating the gain process in a free-electron laser (FEL) from an external highly coherent source of radiation is a promising way to improve the pulse properties such as temporal coherence and synchronization performance in time-resolved pump-probe experiments at FEL facilities, but this so-called “seeding” suffers from the lack of adequate sources at short wavelengths. We report on the first successful seeding at a wavelength as short as 38.2 nm, resulting in GW-level, coherent FEL radiation pulses at this wavelength as well as significant second harmonic emission at 19.1 nm. The external seed pulses are about 1 order of magnitude shorter compared to previous experiments allowing an ultimate time resolution for the investigation of dynamic processes enabling breakthroughs in ultrafast science with FELs. The seeding pulse is the 21st harmonic of an 800-nm, 15-fs (rms) laser pulse generated in an argon medium. Methods for finding the overlap of seed pulses with electron bunches in spatial, longitudinal, and spectral dimensions are discussed and results are presented. The experiment was conducted at FLASH, the FEL user facility at DESY in Hamburg, Germany.

  6. Mechanistic comparison of pulse laser induced phase separation of particulates from cellulose paper at 213 nm and 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, S.; Forster, M.; Bushuk, S.; Kouzmouk, A.; Tatur, H.; Batishche, S.; Kautek, W.

    2013-02-01

    The laser-induced phase separation of charcoal particles on additive-free cotton linters cellulose paper was investigated by electron and optical microscopy, colorimetry, and diffuse reflectance FT-IR. The fibre bundles were vaporised in depth of several 10 μm above destruction fluence thresholds using visible 532 nm radiation. This is in contrast to mid-ultraviolet 213 nm radiation, where only the top fibre bundles were modified and partially evaporated. The colorimetric lightness results generally represented the cleaning status, whereas the colorimetric yellowing data represented irreversible chemical and/or photochemical changes. Charcoal-contaminated paper treated with visible and mid-ultraviolet radiation exhibited yellowing, whereas uncontaminated did not. This suggests that the electron-rich plasma generated by the evaporation of the particles heats the adjacent substrate and also excludes oxygen. Mid-ultraviolet, in contrast to visible radiation, shows particle removal always accompanied by paper destruction. IR spectroscopy results suggest cross-linking by ether bonds near the destruction threshold, but do not prove the formation of oxidation products and double bonds as the basis of the yellowing. A "cleaning window" between the cleaning threshold (0.1 J/cm2) and the paper destruction threshold (2.9 J/cm2) with a pulse number of 2 is provided by visible 532 nm laser treatment.

  7. Writing time estimation of EB mask writer EBM-9000 for hp16nm/logic11nm node generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamikubo, Takashi; Takekoshi, Hidekazu; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Yamada, Hirokazu; Hattori, Kiyoshi

    2014-10-01

    The scaling of semiconductor devices is slowing down because of the difficulty in establishing their functionality at the nano-size level and also because of the limitations in fabrications, mainly the delay of EUV lithography. While multigate devices (FinFET) are currently the main driver for scalability, other types of devices, such as 3D devices, are being realized to relax the scaling of the node. In lithography, double or multiple patterning using ArF immersion scanners is still a realistic solution offered for the hp16nm node fabrication. Other lithography candidates are those called NGL (Next Generation Lithography), such as DSA (Directed-Self-Assembling) or nanoimprint. In such situations, shot count for mask making by electron beam writers will not increase. Except for some layers, it is not increasing as previously predicted. On the other hand, there is another aspect that increases writing time. The exposure dose for mask writing is getting higher to meet tighter specifications of CD uniformity, in other words, reduce LER. To satisfy these requirements, a new electron beam mask writer, EBM-9000, has been developed for hp16nm/logic11nm generation. Electron optical system, which has the immersion lens system, was evolved from EBM-8000 to achieve higher current density of 800A/cm2. In this paper, recent shot count and dose trend are discussed. Also, writing time is estimated for the requirements in EBM-9000.

  8. 75 FR 27005 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  10. 77 FR 39518 - Notice of Information Collection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  11. Transcanalicular laser dacryocystorhinostomy using low energy 810 nm diode laser

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjiv K.; Kumar, Ajai; Agarwal, Swati; Pandey, Paritosh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic scarring may be a cause of failure after transcanalicular laser dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery. This hypertrophic scarring results from tissue charring and excessive coagulation, which may be caused by the high laser energy. We have evaluated the use of low energy settings to prevent hypertrophic scarring, for a successful outcome. Aims: To perform and evaluate transcanalicular laser DCR using low energy 810 nm diode laser. Design: Interventional, non-comparative, case series. Materials and Methods: Patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction and chronic dacryocystitis, who needed DCR, and were fit for surgery under local anesthesia, were recruited to undergo transcanalicular laser DCR using a 810 nm diode laser. The outcome was measured by the patency of the lacrimal passage, as indicated by the relief in the symptoms and the patency on syringing at the last follow-up. The surgical time and surgical complications were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis. Results: The study included 94 patients. The average age was 30.1 years (range 15 - 69 years). Seventy (74.4%) patients were female. Eight patients had failed external DCR. Per-operative patency of the passage was obtained in all the patients. Average surgical time was seven minutes (5 – 18 minutes). At the end of the study period of one year, a successful outcome was seen in 85 patients (90.5%). There were eight patients of previous failed DCR surgeries, and six of them achieved a cure at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Transcanalicular Laser DCR can be safely performed using a low power 810 nm diode laser. The surgery is elegant, minimally invasive, allows fast rehabilitation, and has an excellent success rate. PMID:23439888

  12. 28nm node process optimization: a lithography centric view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltmann, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Many experts claim that the 28nm technology node will be the most cost effective technology node forever. This results from primarily from the cost of manufacturing due to the fact that 28nm is the last true Single Patterning (SP) node. It is also affected by the dramatic increase of design costs and the limited shrink factor of the next following nodes. Thus, it is assumed that this technology still will be alive still for many years. To be cost competitive, high yields are mandatory. Meanwhile, leading edge foundries have optimized the yield of the 28nm node to such a level that that it is nearly exclusively defined by random defectivity. However, it was a long way to go to come to that level. In my talk I will concentrate on the contribution of lithography to this yield learning curve. I will choose a critical metal patterning application. I will show what was needed to optimize the process window to a level beyond the usual OPC model work that was common on previous nodes. Reducing the process (in particular focus) variability is a complementary need. It will be shown which improvements were needed in tooling, process control and design-mask-wafer interaction to remove all systematic yield detractors. Over the last couple of years new scanner platforms were introduced that were targeted for both better productivity and better parametric performance. But this was not a clear run-path. It needed some extra affords of the tool suppliers together with the Fab to bring the tool variability down to the necessary level. Another important topic to reduce variability is the interaction of wafer none-planarity and lithography optimization. Having an accurate knowledge of within die topography is essential for optimum patterning. By completing both the variability reduction work and the process window enhancement work we were able to transfer the original marginal process budget to a robust positive budget and thus ensuring high yield and low costs.

  13. EUV mask blank: defect detection at 100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hue, Jean; Quesnel, Etienne; Pelle, Catherine; Muffato, Viviane; Carini, G.; Favier, Sylvie; Besson, Pascal

    2003-06-01

    The characteristics of a defect counting tool, COMNET< based on scattering light measurement, is presented. This prototype supports the development of defect-free EUV blanks. Thanks to new improvements, it becomes possible to detect PSL particles having a diameter as low as 100 nm, with a video CCD camera, on silicon substrates or on EUV blanks. To reach this sensitivity, one of the enhancements consists in a laser irradiation close to 65°. The present configuration and the use of a CCD camera, with a variable exposure time, should lead to the detection of 80 nm PSL particles deposited on silicon substrate. This extrapolation is based on experimental results and on a simple model. To detect 100 nm particle and smaller particles, it is essential to reduce the level of stray light and to increase the signal to noise ratio. In our application, the stray light essentially comes from three sources: the noise induced by the roughness of the sample, the Rayleigh scattering of the atmosphere, and the stray light in the room. The restrictions induced by these phenomena are described in some detail. All the improvements are not only available for the characterization of silicon substrates but also for transparent blank substrates and for EUV mask blanks. The additional noise induced by the tranparent substrate is analyzed. The defects, whatever the compoent sizes and the component shapes can be detected. A cross characterization achieved with a commercial tool on silicon substate is reported. Counting measurements performed on EUV blanks are shown. Furthermore, a more explicit definition of added defects is proposed.

  14. 635nm diode laser biostimulation on cutaneous wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmaz, Hakan; Gülsoy, Murat; Ülgen, Yekta

    2014-05-01

    Biostimulation is still a controversial subject in wound healing studies. The effect of laser depends of not only laser parameters applied but also the physiological state of the target tissue. The aim of this project is to investigate the biostimulation effects of 635nm laser irradiation on the healing processes of cutaneous wounds by means of morphological and histological examinations. 3-4 months old male Wistar Albino rats weighing 330 to 350 gr were used throughout this study. Low-level laser therapy was applied through local irradiation of red light on open skin excision wounds of 5mm in diameter prepared via punch biopsy. Each animal had three identical wounds on their right dorsal part, at which two of them were irradiated with continuous diode laser of 635nm in wavelength, 30mW of power output and two different energy densities of 1 J/cm2 and 3 J/cm2. The third wound was kept as control group and had no irradiation. In order to find out the biostimulation consequences during each step of wound healing, which are inflammation, proliferation and remodeling, wound tissues removed at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 following the laser irradiation are morphologically examined and than prepared for histological examination. Fragments of skin including the margin and neighboring healthy tissue were embedded in paraffin and 6 to 9 um thick sections cut are stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histological examinations show that 635nm laser irradiation accelerated the healing process of cutaneous wounds while considering the changes of tissue morphology, inflammatory reaction, proliferation of newly formed fibroblasts and formation and deposition of collagen fibers. The data obtained gives rise to examine the effects of two distinct power densities of low-level laser irradiation and compare both with the non-treatment groups at different stages of healing process.

  15. Quasi-cw tissue transillumination at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernini, Umberto; Ramaglia, Antonio; Russo, Paolo

    1997-08-01

    An extended series of transillumination experiments has been performed in vitro on animal samples (bovine muscle, up to 30- mm-thick; chicken wing and quail femur, 12-mm-thick) and in vivo on the human hand (thickness, about 20 mm), using a pulsed light source (7 ns, about 10-4 J/pulse, 10 Hz rep rate) from a collimated (1.2 m) Nd:YAG laser beam (1064 nm). A PIN photodiode connected to a digital oscilloscope was used to measure the maximum intensity of the beam pulse transmitted through the sample (i.e., no temporal discrimination of the output signal was attempted) while it was scanned across the source/detector assembly. One dimensional scans were performed on bovine muscle samples in which thin metallic test objects were embedded, in order to study the spatial resolution of the technique (for bovine muscle at 1064 nm, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reported to be about 1 cm-1 and 3 cm-1, respectively). The measured spatial resolution was as good as 3.6 mm in 30 mm of tissue thickness. In the two-dimensional scans of the chicken and quail sample, fat and bone tissues can be easily seen with good resolution, whereas imaging of the middle finger of a human hand shows cartilaginoid and bone tissue with 1 - 2 mm resolution. Hence, this simple collimated quasi-cw technique gives significantly better results for tissue imaging than pure cw transillumination. Use of (pulsed) light above 1000 nm and a high energy content per pulse are supposed to explain the positive experimental findings.

  16. nm structures produced by direct laser writing.

    PubMed

    Pavel, E; Jinga, S; Andronescu, E; Vasile, B S; Rotiu, E; Ionescu, L; Mazilu, C

    2011-01-14

    Here we present a new approach to overcome the optical diffraction limit by using novel materials. In the paper, we report experimental results obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and optical absorption spectroscopy, for a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramic containing rare-earth ions such as samarium (Sm). Using a home built dynamic tester, with a low power laser, we recorded nanostructures having 5 nm line widths. In the line structure, measurements reveal the presence of silver nanocrystals with few nanometre sizes. HRTEM shows that there is a random orientation of the nanocrystals. A writing mechanism with three steps is proposed.

  17. Low-resistivity 10 nm diameter magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Maqableh, Mazin M; Huang, Xiaobo; Sung, Sang-Yeob; Reddy, K Sai Madhukar; Norby, Gregory; Victora, R H; Stadler, Bethanie J H

    2012-08-01

    Resistivities of 5.4 μΩ·cm were measured in 10-nm-diameter metallic wires. Low resistance is important for interconnections of the future to prevent heating, electromigration, high power consumption, and long RC time constants. To demonstrate application of these wires, Co/Cu/Co magnetic sensors were synthesized with 20-30 Ω and 19% magnetoresistance. Compared to conventional lithographically produced magnetic tunnel junction sensors, these structures offer facile fabrication and over 2 orders of magnitude lower resistances due to smooth sidewalls from in situ templated chemical growth.

  18. Propagation study of 850nm/58 GHz hybrid municipal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilfert, Otakar; Kvicera, Vaclav; Kolka, Zdenek; Grabner, Martin; Fiser, Ondrej

    2010-08-01

    The paper deals with the results of a propagation study on a fixed hybrid Free Space Optical (FSO) and Radio Frequency (RF) system operating in 850 nm / 58 GHz bands. Propagation models for the availability assessment of both FSO and RF links were examined against a comprehensive database of meteorological attenuation events. The influences of individual hydrometeors were analyzed and the availability performances of the simulated FSO/MMW hybrid link were evaluated. The study pointed out that visibility and rainfall measurements can be only used for the raw assessment of availability performance due to the concurrent occurrence of different attenuation effect.

  19. Ocular safety limits for 1030nm femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2013-03-01

    Application of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has added unprecedented precision and reproducibility but ocular safety limits for the procedure are not well-quantified. We present an analysis of safety during laser cataract surgery considering scanned patterns, reduced blood perfusion, and light scattering on residual bubbles formed during laser cutting. Experimental results for continuous-wave 1030 nm irradiation of the retina in rabbits are used to calibrate damage threshold temperatures and perfusion rate for our computational model of ocular heating. Using conservative estimates for each safety factor, we compute the limits of the laser settings for cataract surgery that optimize procedure speed within the limits of retinal safety.

  20. EUV lithography optics for sub-9nm resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneer, Bernhard; Migura, Sascha; Kaiser, Winfried; Neumann, Jens Timo; van Schoot, Jan

    2015-03-01

    EUV lithography for resolution below 9 nm requires the numerical aperture of the projection optics to be significantly larger than 0.45. A configuration of 4x magnification, full field size and 6'' reticle is not feasible anymore. The increased chief ray angle and higher NA at reticle lead to non-acceptable shadowing effects, which can only be controlled by increasing the magnification, hence reducing the system productivity. We demonstrate that the best compromise in imaging, productivity and field split is a so-called anamorphic magnification and a half field of 26 x 16.5 mm². We discuss the optical solutions for anamorphic high-NA lithography.

  1. YSGG 2790-nm superficial ablative and fractional ablative laser treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin C; Schachter, G Daniel

    2011-05-01

    The 2790-nm wavelength YSGG laser was introduced for aesthetic purposes under the trade name Pearl by Cutera in 2007. In clinical use, the Pearl superficial resurfacing laser has proved effective and well tolerated for the correction of superficial brown epidermal dyschromia and superficial fine lines and scars, and the Pearl Fractional laser produces excellent improvement in both dyschromia and improvement of deeper lines and moderately deep acne scarring. The two laser treatments can be combined in a single treatment session on different parts of the face or on the entire face, depending on patient needs and priorities. PMID:21763987

  2. Spectroscopy of Pluto at six longitudes, 380-930 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lorenzi, Vania; Grundy, Will M.; Licandro, Javier; Binzel, Richard P.

    2014-11-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution ~450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical pathlength through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 µm) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical pathlength through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 µm. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto’s spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto’s surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  3. Spectroscopy of Pluto, 380-930 Nm at Six Longitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Lorenzi, V.; Grundy, William; Licandro, J.; Binzel, R. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained spectra of the Pluto-Charon pair (unresolved) in the wavelength range 380-930 nm with resolution approx..450 at six roughly equally spaced longitudes. The data were taken in May and June, 2014, with the 4.2-m Isaac Newton Telescope at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory in the Canary Islands, using the ACAM (auxiliary-port camera) in spectrometer mode, and using two solar analog stars. The new spectra clearly show absorption bands of solid CH4 at 620, 728, and 850-910 nm, which were known from earlier work. The 620-nm CH4 band is intrinsically very weak, and its appearance indicates a long optical path-length through the ice. This is especially true if it arises from CH4 dissolved in N2 ice. Earlier work (Owen et al. Science 261, 745, 1993) on the near-infrared spectrum of Pluto (1-2.5 microns) has shown that the CH4 bands are shifted to shorter wavelengths because the CH4 occurs as a solute in beta-phase crystalline N2. The optical path-length through the N2 crystals must be on the order of several cm to produce the N2 band observed at 2.15 microns. The new spectra exhibit a pronounced red slope across the entire wavelength range; the slope is variable with longitude, and differs in a small but significant way from that measured at comparable longitudes by Grundy & Fink (Icarus 124, 329, 1996) in their 15-year study of Pluto's spectrum (500-1000 nm). The new spectra will provide an independent means for calibrating the color filter bands on the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) (Reuter et al. Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129, 2008) on the New Horizons spacecraft, which will encounter the Pluto-Charon system in mid-2015. They will also form the basis of modeling the spectrum of Pluto at different longitudes to help establish the nature of the non-ice component(s) of Pluto's surface. It is presumed that the non-ice component is the source of the yellow-red coloration of Pluto, which is known to be variable across the surface.

  4. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  5. 75 FR 55347 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Land Near Aztec in San Juan County, NM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... applicable provisions of Section 203 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA... other local government or nonprofit organization. The land is adjacent to commercially developed...

  6. 75 FR 30389 - City of Santa Fe, NM; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... electronically via the Internet in lieu of paper; see 18 CFR 385.2001(a)(1)(iii) and the instructions on the... Service (FWS) and New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) . The FWS concurred with the...

  7. Efficient 750-nm LED-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Yan; Su, Cheng-Kuo; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chiu, Yu-Chung; Huang, Yen-Chieh

    2016-05-30

    We report an Nd:YAG laser pumped by light emission diodes (LEDs) at 750 nm. With 1% output coupling from a linear cavity containing a 2-cm long Nd:YAG crystal, the laser generated 37.5 μJ pulse energy at 1064 nm with M2 = 1.1 when pumped by 2.73-mJ LED energy in a 1-ms pulse at a 10 Hz rate. The measured optical and slope efficiencies for this linear-cavity laser are 1.36, and 9%, respectively. With 1 and 5% output couplings from a Z-cavity containing the same laser crystal, the lasers generated 346 and 288 μJ pulse energy with an optical efficiency of 3.4 and 2.8% and slope efficiency of 6.6 and 14%, respectively, for the same 1-ms pump pulse repeating at a 10 Hz rate. At the highest output from the Z-cavity, the measured M2 for the beam is 3.6. PMID:27410125

  8. Solid sampling with 193-nm excimer laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmdahl, Ralph

    2007-02-01

    Reproducible and sensitive elemental analysis of solid samples is a crucial task in areas of geology (e.g. microanalysis of fluid inclusions), material sciences, industrial quality control as well as in environmental, forensic and biological studies. To date the most versatile detection method is mass-spectroscopic multi-element analysis. In order to obtain reproducible results, this requires transferring the solid sample into the gas-phase while preserving the sample's stoichiometric composition. Laser ablation in combination with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is a proven powerful technique to meet the requirements for reliable solid sample analysis. The sample is laser ablated in an air-tight cell and the aerosol is carried by an inert gas to a micro-wave induced plasma where its constituents are atomized and ionized prior to mass analysis. The 193 nm excimer laser ablation, in particular, provides athermal sample ablation with very precise lateral ablation and controlled depth profiling. The high photon energy and beam homogeneity of the 193 nm excimer laser system avoids elemental fractionation and permits clean ablation of even transmissive solid materials such as carbonates, fluorites and pure quartz.

  9. 1125-nm quantum dot laser for tonsil thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has the potential to provide a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy. Clinical implementation requires that the lymphoid tissue of tonsils is heated homogeneously to produce an amount of primary thermal injury that corresponds to gradual postoperative tonsil shrinkage, with minimal risk of damage to underlying critical blood vessels. Optical constants are derived for tonsils from tissue components and used to calculate the depth of 1/e of irradiance. The 1125 nm wavelength is shown to correspond to both deep penetration and minimal absorption by blood. A probe for tonsil thermal therapy that comprises two opposing light emitting, temperature controlled surfaces is described. For ex vivo characterization of tonsil heating, a prototype 1125 nm diode laser is used in an experimental apparatus that splits the laser output into two components, and delivers the radiation to sapphire contact window surfaces of two temperature controlled cells arranged to irradiate human tonsil specimens from opposing directions. Temperatures are measured with thermocouple microprobes at located points within the tissue during and after irradiation. Primary thermal damage corresponding to the recorded thermal histories are calculated from Arrhenius parameters for human tonsils. Results indicate homogeneous heating to temperatures corresponding to the threshold of thermal injury and above can be achieved in advantageously short irradiation times.

  10. 650 nm Laser stimulated dating from Side Antique Theatre, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, M.; Meriç, N.

    2014-03-01

    Samples were taken from the archeological excavation site, which was at the backs of the Side Antique Theatre. Samples were taken from under the base rock in this area. Polymineral fine grains were examined to determine the ages of the sediments. Samples gathered from the Side Antique Theatre were investigated through using the SAR method. Firstly, one part of the samples were evaluated by using conventional IRSL reading head model of (ELSEC-9010) which is infrared (880±80 nm) stimulation source with Schott BG39 filter. The IRSL age dating with feldspar minerals, gives a number of overestimated or underestimated age values as a result. A new reading head was proposed with the following configuration attachments for overestimation of equivalent dose rates. Measurements were done with this newly designed red laser stimulating reading head which works with Elsec 9010 OSL age dating system. SAR measurements were performed by (650±10 nm) red laser light source with two Schott BG3 filters. With usage of the new designed reading head; closer results were obtained in comparision with the Antique Theatre's expected age range. Fading rates were taken into consideration and these corrections were also handled for true age results.

  11. Advanced metrology for the 14 nm node double patterning lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carau, D.; Bouyssou, R.; Dezauzier, C.; Besacier, M.; Gourgon, C.

    2014-05-01

    In microelectronics the two crucial parameters for the lithography step are the critical dimension, which is the width of the smallest printable pattern, and the misalignment error of the reticle, called overlay. For the 14 nm node, the limit of scanner resolution can be overcome by the double patterning technique, which requires a maximum overlay error between the two reticles of 3 nm [1]. The current approach in the measurements of critical dimension and overlay is to treat them separately, but it has become much more complex in the double patterning context, since they are no longer independent. In this paper, a strategy of a common measurement is developed. The aim of the strategy is to measure simultaneously overlay and critical dimension in the metal level double patterning grating before the second etch process. The scatterometry technique is well known for critical dimension measurement. This study demonstrates that the overlay between the two gratings can also be deduced. Thanks to this original scatterometry-based method, it becomes possible to provide information on the lithography step quality before the second etch process; therefore the lithography can be reworked if it is necessary.

  12. 980-nm diode laser application in electroneurophysiology: a LEP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelsoy, Murat; Durak, Kadir; Kurt, Adnan; Karamursel, Sacit; Cilesiz, Inci F.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of the 980 nm diode laser for LEP (Laser Evoked Potentials) studies. Human subjects were exposed to laser stimulation. After the pain thresholds of the subjects were determined with respect to laser power level, 1.5 times the threshold value was applied and laser evoked potentials were recorded using standard EEG techniques. LEPs were obtained due to right hand stimulation. Latency and amplitude values of LEPs were found in accordance with those reported in the literature. Statistical evaluation showed differences in the LEPs at C3 and C4 locations as a function of the sex of the subjects. The power levels used in the present study was three times less than the levels applied for Nd: YAG laser in the literature. The evoked potential parameters measured were in consistence with the data reported by earlier researchers. Moreover, it was found that, LEPs due to 980 nm wavelength irradiation can be recorded by applying less energy when compared to Nd:YAG laser. This result indicated the potential of diode laser for LEP studies.

  13. Fabrication of 70nm split ring resonators by nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Graham J.; Khokhar, Ali Z.; Johnson, Nigel P.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the fabrication of 70 nm wide, high resolution rectangular U-shaped split ring resonators (SRRs) using nanoimprint lithography (NIL). The fabrication method for the nanoimprint stamp does not require dry etching. The stamp is used to pattern SRRs in a thin PMMA layer followed by metal deposition and lift-off. Nanoimprinting in this way allows high resolution patterns with a minimum feature size of 20 nm. This fabrication technique yields a much higher throughput than conventional e-beam lithography and each stamp can be used numerous times to imprint patterns. Reflectance measurements of fabricated aluminium SRRs on silicon substrates show a so-called an LC resonance peak in the visible spectrum under transverse electric polarisation. Fabricating the SRRs by NIL rather than electron beam lithography allows them to be scaled to smaller dimensions without any significant loss in resolution, partly because pattern expansion caused by backscattered electrons and the proximity effect are not present with NIL. This in turn helps to shift the magnetic response to short wavelengths while still retaining a distinct LC peak.

  14. 946 nm Diode Pumped Laser Produces 100mJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative approach to obtaining high energy at 946 nm has yielded 101 mJ of laser energy with an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 24.5%. A single gain module resonator was evaluated, yielding a maximum output energy of 50 mJ. In order to obtain higher energy a second gain module was incorporated into the resonator. This innovative approach produced un-surprised output energy of 101 mJ. This is of utmost importance since it demonstrates that the laser output energy scales directly with the number of gain modules. Therefore, higher energies can be realized by simply increasing the number of gain modules within the laser oscillator. The laser resonator incorporates two gain modules into a folded "M-shaped" resonator, allowing a quadruple pass gain within each rod. Each of these modules consists of a diode (stack of 30 microlensed 100 Watt diode array bars, each with its own fiber lens) end-pumping a Nd:YAG laser rod. The diode output is collected by a lens duct, which focuses the energy into a 2 mm diameter flat to flat octagonal pump area of the laser crystal. Special coatings have been developed to mitigate energy storage problems, including parasitic lasing and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), and encourage the resonator to operate at the lower gain transition at 946 nm.

  15. Holistic overlay control for multi-patterning process layers at the 10nm and 7nm nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstappen, Leon; Mos, Evert; Wardenier, Peter; Megens, Henry; Schmitt-Weaver, Emil; Bhattacharyya, Kaustuve; Adam, Omer; Grzela, Grzegorz; van Heijst, Joost; Willems, Lotte; Wildenberg, Jochem; Ignatova, Velislava; Chen, Albert; Elich, Frank; Rajasekharan, Bijoy; Vergaij-Huizer, Lydia; Lewis, Brian; Kea, Marc; Mulkens, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Multi-patterning lithography at the 10-nm and 7-nm nodes is driving the allowed overlay error down to extreme low values. Advanced high order overlay correction schemes are needed to control the process variability. Additionally the increase of the number of split layers results in an exponential increase of metrology complexity of the total overlay and alignment tree. At the same time, the process stack includes more hard-mask steps and becomes more and more complex, with as consequence that the setup and verification of the overlay metrology recipe becomes more critical. All of the above require a holistic approach that addresses total overlay optimization from process design to process setup and control in volume manufacturing. In this paper we will present the holistic overlay control flow designed for 10-nm and 7-nm nodes and illustrate the achievable ultimate overlay performance for a logic and DRAM use case. As figure 1 illustrates we will explain the details of the steps in the holistic flow. Overlay accuracy is the driver for target design and metrology tool optimization like wavelength and polarization. We will show that it is essential to include processing effects like etching and CMP which can result in a physical asymmetry of the bottom grating of diffraction based overlay targets. We will introduce a new method to create a reference overlay map, based on metrology data using multiple wavelengths and polarization settings. A similar approach is developed for the wafer alignment step. The overlay fingerprint correction using linear or high order correction per exposure (CPE) has a large amount of parameters. It is critical to balance the metrology noise with the ultimate correction model and the related metrology sampling scheme. Similar approach is needed for the wafer align step. Both for overlay control as well as alignment we have developed methods which include efficient use of metrology time, available for an in the litho-cluster integrated

  16. Efficient generation of 1096 nm and 1572 nm by simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering and optical parametric oscillation in one KTiOPO4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. T.; He, J. L.; Liu, S. D.; Yang, J. F.; Zhang, B. T.; Liu, F. Q.

    2011-04-01

    The simultaneous stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and optical parametric oscillation (OPO) for the 1064 nm radiation were realized in one KTP crystal for the first time. At an incident diode laser power of 8.6 W, the maximum average output powers at 1096 nm and 1572 nm were 1.1 W and 0.36 W, respectively. The conversion efficiency to Stokes with respect to the incident diode power was as high as 12.8%. The corresponding minimum pulse widths at 1096 nm and 1572 nm were 2.8 and 1.1 ns, respectively.

  17. CCPR-S1 Supplementary comparison for spectral radiance in the range of 220 nm to 2500 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlevnoy, Boris; Sapritsky, Victor; Rougie, Bernard; Gibson, Charles; Yoon, Howard; Gaertner, Arnold; Taubert, Dieter; Hartmann, Juergen

    2009-08-01

    In 1997, the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR) initiated a supplementary comparison of spectral radiance in the wavelength range from 220 nm to 2500 nm (CCPR-S1) using tungsten strip-filament lamps as transfer standards. Five national metrology institutes (NMIs) took part in the comparison: BNM/INM (France), NIST (USA), NRC (Canada), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russia), with VNIIOFI as the pilot laboratory. Each NMI provided the transfer lamps that were used to transfer their measurements to the pilot laboratory. The intercomparison sequence began with the participant measurements, then the pilot measurements, followed by a second set of measurements by the participant laboratory. The measurements were carried out from 1998 to 2002, with the final report completed in 2008. This paper presents the descriptions of measurement facilities and uncertainties of the participants, as well as the comparison results that were analysed in accordance with the Guidelines for CCPR Comparisons Report Preparation, and a re-evaluation of the results taking into account the instability of some of the transfer lamps. Excluding a few wavelengths, all participants agree with each other within ±1.5%. The disagreement decreases to approximately ±1.0% when the anomalous data are excluded from the analysis.

  18. Isotope shift study in two visible lines: 500.6 nm and 520.3 nm of Pb I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowicz, T. J.

    2005-06-01

    The isotope shift (IS) in two visible lines of neutral lead involving transitions 6s2 6p7s 1P1-6s2 6p2 1S0 (λ5OO.6 nm) and 6s2 6p8s 3P1-6s2 6p2 1S0 (λ520.3nm) have been measured using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The isotope shifts between even isotopic pairs were found to be: v208-v206=73.3+/-0.9 mK and v208-v204=121.4+/-1.1 mK for 6p7s configuration and v208-v206=70.1+/-0.6 mK and v208-v204=135.7+/-0.8 mK for 6p8s configuration. The displacements of the centers of gravity of isotope 207 with respect to isotope 208 were determined to be v208-v207 CG=46.4+/-1.2 mK and v208-v207 CG=44.9+/-1.1 mK for 6p7s and 6p8s configurations, respectively.

  19. Final report on EUROMET PR-K2.b: Comparison on spectral responsivity (300 nm to 1000 nm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Joaquin; Pons, Alicia; Blattner, Peter; Dubard, Jimmy; Bastie, Jean; Litwiniuk, Lukasz; Pietrzykowski, Jerzy; Smid, Marek; Mihai, Sim; Bos, Daniel; Gran, Jarle; Bazkir, Ozcan; Fäldt, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains the results of the regional comparison EUROMET PR-K2.b (registered in the KCDB under the identifier EURAMET.PR-K2.b). Ten laboratories took part in it, including the pilot. In general the results are consistent, with a few exceptions as explained in the report. The comparison gives international linkage in spectral responsivity from 300 nm to 1000 nm to seven European laboratories: Bundesamt für Metrologie und Akkreditierung (METAS), Norwegian Metrology and Accreditation Service (Justervesenet), Central Office of Measures (GUM), National Institute of Metrology (INM-Romania), Optics Laboratory of TUBITAK-UME (UME), Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) and Swedish National Testing and Research Institute (SP). Three laboratories provided the link to CCPR-K2.b: Bureau National de Metrologie (BNM-INM/CNAM), Instituto de Optica 'Daza de Valdés' (IO-CSIC, acting as pilot) and NMi Van Swinden Laboratorium BV (NMi-VSL). Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCPR, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  20. Total dose responses and reliability issues of 65 nm NMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhao, Yu; Qiwen, Zheng; Jiangwei, Cui; Hang, Zhou; Xuefeng, Yu; Qi, Guo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, total dose responses and reliability issues of MOSFETs fabricated by 65 nm CMOS technology were examined. “Radiation-induced narrow channel effect” is observed in a narrow channel device. Similar to total dose responses of NMOSFETs, narrow channel NMOSFEs have larger hot-carrier-induced degradation than wide channel devices. Step Time-Dependent Dielectric Breakdown (TDDB) stresses are applied, and narrow channel devices have higher breakdown voltage than wide channel devices, which agree with “weakest link” theory of TDDB. Experimental results show that linear current, transconductance, saturated drain current and subthreshold swing are superposed degenerated by total dose irradiation and reliability issues, which may result in different lifetime from that considering total dose irradiation reliability issues separately. Project supported by “Light of West China” Program of CAS (No. XBBS201219).

  1. Megasonic cleaning: possible solutions for 22nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Hrishi; Singh, Sherjang; Baugh, James; Mann, Raunak; Dietze, Uwe; Dress, Peter

    2011-11-01

    Megasonic energy transfer to the photomask surface is indirectly controlled by process parameters that provide an effective handle to physical force distribution on the photomask surface. A better understanding of the influence of these parameters on the physical force distribution and their effect on pattern damage of fragile mask features can help optimize megasonic energy transfer as well as assist in extending this cleaning technology beyond the 22nm node. In this paper we have specifically studied the effect of higher megasonic frequencies (3 & 4MHz) and media gasification on pattern damage; the effect of cleaning chemistry, media volume flow rate, process time, and nozzle distance to the mask surface during the dispense is also discussed. Megasonic energy characterization is performed by measuring the acoustic energy as well as cavitation created by megasonic energy through sonoluminescence measurements.

  2. Fluorescence microscopy with 6 nm resolution on DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Raab, Mario; Schmied, Jürgen J; Jusuk, Ija; Forthmann, Carsten; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-08-25

    Resolution of emerging superresolution microscopy is commonly characterized by the width of a point-spread-function or by the localization accuracy of single molecules. In contrast, resolution is defined as the ability to separate two objects. Recently, DNA origamis have been proven as valuable scaffold for self-assembled nanorulers in superresolution microscopy. Here, we use DNA origami nanorulers to overcome the discrepancy of localizing single objects and separating two objects by resolving two docking sites at distances of 18, 12, and 6 nm by using the superresolution technique DNA PAINT(point accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography). For the smallest distances, we reveal the influence of localization noise on the yield of resolvable structures that we rationalize by Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:24895173

  3. Wind Measurements with a 355 nm Molecular Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.

    2000-01-01

    A Doppler lidar system based on the molecular double edge technique is described. The system is mounted in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar operates with a tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm, a 45cm aperture telescope and a matching azimuth-over-elevation scanner to allow full sky access. Validated atmospheric wind profiles have been measured from 1.8 km to 35 km with a 178 m vertical resolution. The range dependent rms deviation of the horizontal wind speed is 0.4 - 6 m/s. The results of wind speed and direction are in good agreement with balloon sonde wind measurements made simultaneously at the same location.

  4. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    SciTech Connect

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  5. Fluorescence microscopy with 6 nm resolution on DNA origami.

    PubMed

    Raab, Mario; Schmied, Jürgen J; Jusuk, Ija; Forthmann, Carsten; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-08-25

    Resolution of emerging superresolution microscopy is commonly characterized by the width of a point-spread-function or by the localization accuracy of single molecules. In contrast, resolution is defined as the ability to separate two objects. Recently, DNA origamis have been proven as valuable scaffold for self-assembled nanorulers in superresolution microscopy. Here, we use DNA origami nanorulers to overcome the discrepancy of localizing single objects and separating two objects by resolving two docking sites at distances of 18, 12, and 6 nm by using the superresolution technique DNA PAINT(point accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography). For the smallest distances, we reveal the influence of localization noise on the yield of resolvable structures that we rationalize by Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. NM-Scale Anatomy of an Entire Stardust Carrot Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Messenger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Comet Wild-2 samples collected by NASA s Stardust mission are extremely complex, heterogeneous, and have experienced wide ranges of alteration during the capture process. There are two major types of track morphologies: "carrot" and "bulbous," that reflect different structural/compositional properties of the impactors. Carrot type tracks are typically produced by compact or single mineral grains which survive essentially intact as a single large terminal particle. Bulbous tracks are likely produced by fine-grained or organic-rich impactors [1]. Owing to their challenging nature and especially high value of Stardust samples, we have invested considerable effort in developing both sample preparation and analytical techniques tailored for Stardust sample analyses. Our report focuses on our systematic disassembly and coordinated analysis of Stardust carrot track #112 from the mm to nm-scale.

  7. Multilayer reticles: advantages and challenges for 28nm chip making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotzel, Arthur; Seltmann, Rolf; Busch, Jens; Cotte, Eric

    2011-03-01

    Chip manufacturing with multilayer reticles offers the possibility to reduce reticle cost at the expense of scanner throughput, and is therefore an attractive option for small-volume production and test chips. Since 2010, GLOBALFOUNDRIES Fab 1 uses this option for the 28nm IP shuttles and test chips offered to their customers for development and advance testing of their products. This paper discusses the advantages and challenges of this approach and the practical experience gained during implementation. One issue that must be considered is the influence of the small image field and the asymmetric reticle illumination on the lithographic key parameters, namely layer to layer overlay. Theoretical considerations and experimental data concerning the effects of lens distortion, lens heating, and reticle heating on overlay performance are presented, and concepts to address the specific challenges of multilayer reticles for high-end chip production are discussed.

  8. Broadband terahertz generation and detection at 10 nm scale.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Huang, Mengchen; Ryu, Sangwoo; Bark, Chung Wung; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    2013-06-12

    Terahertz (0.1-30 THz) radiation reveals a wealth of information that is relevant for material, biological, and medical sciences with applications that span chemical sensing, high-speed electronics, and coherent control of semiconductor quantum bits. To date, there have been no methods capable of controlling terahertz (THz) radiation at molecular scales. Here we report both generation and detection of broadband terahertz field from 10 nm scale oxide nanojunctions. Frequency components of ultrafast optical radiation are mixed at these nanojunctions, producing broadband THz emission. These same devices detect THz electric fields with comparable spatial resolution. This unprecedented control, on a scale of 4 orders of magnitude smaller than the diffraction limit, creates a pathway toward THz-bandwidth spectroscopy and control of individual nanoparticles and molecules.

  9. Search for solar neutrons using NM-64 equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinic, N. J.; Reguerin, A.; Palenque, E.; Taquichiri, M. A.; Wada, M.; Inoue, A.; Takahashi, K.

    1985-01-01

    Two years (1980 to 1982) neutron monitor data from the Chacaltaya (geographic coordinates: N16.32 deg W68. 15 deg; cutoff rigidity: 13.1 GV; altitude: 5,300 m a.s.l.) station has been scanned; the sampling time of the 12NM-64 neutron monitor is 5 min. The nucleonic component increases have been correlated with 66 hard X-, gamma rays satellite data from solar origin, as reported by several groups. Typical neutron monitor time profiles of the events are presented. Chree-analysis was performed discriminating the events according to its solar coordinates. Ground data from solar limb locii are more enhanced at the time of the onset than other geometrically visible flares. Chree histograms of neutron monitor output profiles are also presented from geometrically invisible events from the Chacaltaya station.

  10. Photolithography reaches 6 nm half-pitch using EUV light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Daniel; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    EUV interference lithography records the interference pattern of two diffracted, coherent light beams, where the pattern resolution is half the diffraction grating resolution. The fabrication of diffraction grating masks by e-beam lithography is restricted by the electron proximity effect and pattern transfer limitations into diffraction efficient materials. By patterning HSQ lines at a relaxed pitch to avoid the electron proximity effect, depositing conformal iridium via atomic layer deposition, followed by ion milling the top and bottom iridium and HSQ removal, we fabricated iridium diffraction gratings at double the line spacing of the original HSQ lines. 6 nm half-pitch patterns were achieved using these masks marking a new record resolution in photolithography.

  11. Fabrication of sub-15 nm aluminum wires by controlled etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan-Wall, T.; Hughes, H. J.; Hartman, N.; McQueen, T. M.; Marković, N.

    2014-04-01

    We describe a method for the fabrication of uniform aluminum nanowires with diameters below 15 nm. Electron beam lithography is used to define narrow wires, which are then etched using a sodium bicarbonate solution, while their resistance is simultaneously measured in-situ. The etching process can be stopped when the desired resistance is reached, and can be restarted at a later time. The resulting nanowires show a superconducting transition as a function of temperature and magnetic field that is consistent with their smaller diameter. The width of the transition is similar to that of the lithographically defined wires, indicating that the etching process is uniform and that the wires are undamaged. This technique allows for precise control over the normal state resistance and can be used to create a variety of aluminum nanodevices.

  12. Lasing at 300 nm and below: Optical challenges and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Garzella, D.; Couprie, M.E. |; Billardon, M.

    1995-12-31

    The FEL experiment in the visible and near UV on the Super ACO storage ring has given, since 1989, important informations on the SRFEL dynamics and, furthermore, a very good beam stability has been achieved. In addition, the operation at 350 nm with this good stability and a long beam lifetime allowed us to perform the first user experiment in biology and to start with a campaign for using the laser as photons source for experiments in other domains, coupling FEL light and the Synchrotron Radiation. For this, FEL starts to be very competitive with respect to the other conventional laser sources, provided that it could oscillate further in the UV, say at 300 nm and below. So, the real challenge is now given by the lasing at shorter wavelengths and, for this, by the optical technology existing nowadays. Since 1992 the efforts have been concentrating to look for every kind of solution allowing us to overcome the problem of having a very low gain. From an optical point of view, in the range of wavelengths explored, there is a lack of transparents dielectric materials for substrates and coatings. Substrates are required at the same time to be relatively not absorbing (a few tens 10{sup -6}), to have a very good surface quality (RMS roughness below 10 {Angstrom}) because of scattering losses dramatically increasing in this spectral range and, due to the thermal load of the undulator emission, to have adequate thermal characteristics. In order to fulfill all these requirements, a good characterisation and modelisation of the substrates is needed, especially to correlate thermal loading and mechanical deformations from one hand, and roughness and scattering losses from the other hand. Coatings must be not absorbing too and, above all, the most amorphous as possible (this could be obtained with IBS deposition technique), in order to insure a good reproduction of the substrate roughness at the interfaces and on the top layer and an higher resistance to the XUV photons load.

  13. 5 W frequency stabilized 976 nm tapered diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Patrick; Gilly, Jürgen; Moritz, Stefan; Ostendorf, Ralf; Kelemen, Márc T.

    2008-02-01

    More and more applications, like tunable frequency doubling of diode lasers for blue-green outputs, non linear spectroscopy, or pump laser sources for fiber lasers necessitate diffraction-limited tunable narrow linewidths and high output powers in the multiwatt regime. For these applications, tapered lasers based on a tapered amplifier with gain-guided design can be used in an external cavity set up to guarantee both - frequency stabilization and tunability. We have realized frequency stabilized high-power ridge-waveguide tapered diode lasers with more than 4W of cw output power. These low modal gain, single quantum well InGaAs/AlGaAs devices emitting between 920nm and 1064nm were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Tapered single emitters consist of an index-guided ridge section and a gain-guided taper section with an overall length of 3.5mm. The taper angle was 6°. With a high-reflectivity coating on the rear facet and an antireflection coating on the front facet more than 10W of output power have been demonstrated. To optimize the beam quality at higher output power the two different sections have been operated by different operation currents. For this purpose the tapered diodes have been mounted p-side down on structured submounts. For wavelength tunability and frequency stabilization the tapered diodes, provided with AR coatings on both facets, have been used in external cavity setup in Littrow configuration. The influence of the different operation currents on the electrooptical and beam characteristics has been carefully investigated in detail. Within this operation mode a nearly diffraction limited behavior up to 5W has been established.

  14. Design and study of resist materials for 157-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Shintaro; Cho, Sungseo; Zampini, Anthony

    2003-06-01

    We investigated the structure-property relationships of several polymer platforms containing hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and tertiary alkyl ester functionalities in order to identify and develop fluorine-containing polymers suitable for 157nm lithography. We observed that the aqueous base solubility of homopolymers containing HFIP was highly dependent on the monomer structure, number of HFIP group per monomer unit, substituent on the alcohol and the polymer architecture. Copolymers of tert-butyl acrylate (TBA), tert-butyl 2-fluoroacrylate (TBFA) and tert-butyl 2-trifluoromethylacrylate (TBTFMA) with styrene hexafluoroisopropanol (STYHFIP) or norborene hexafluoro-isopropanol (NBHFIP) were also investigated to determine the effect of substitution at the acrylate α-position. Under the same ration of STYHFIP, the transparency of the co-polymers improved in the or der of CF3>F>H while the dry etch stability decreased in the order of CF3>F>H. When exposed to 157 nm radiation, photoresists of P(STYHFIP-TBA), P(STYHFIP-TBFA) and P(STYHFIP-TBTFMA) showed an increase in E0 ni the order of H

  15. New Absorption Spectra of CH_2 Near 780 NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Ju; Wang, Zhong; Sears, Trevor J.

    2009-06-01

    The near infrared and visible spectrum (tilde{b}^1B_1 - tilde{a}^1A_1) of singlet CH_2 has been the subject of much study. However, the region between the red end of the visible part of the spectrum and about 800 nm has not been recorded since the pioneering work of Herzberg and Johns. We have remeasured the absorption spectrum between approximately 769 and 806 nm at near shot-noise-limited sensitivity and Doppler-limited resolution using a frequency-modulated extended cavity diode laser source. Rotational branches in 7 vibronic bands involving K_a = 0-4 have been assigned using known ground state combination differences. Most of them have not previously been observed and some reassignments of the Herzberg and Johns analysis have been made. Comparison with the most complete available calculated ro-vibronic energy level structure helped considerably in making the assignments, and the observed vibronic levels are assigned to levels of both tilde{a} and tilde{b} electronic character. The calculated energy levels show moderate, up to 10 cm^{-1}, apparently random, differences from the observed levels The new data will certainly help to refine the singlet potential and also provide additional avenues for future kinetics and dynamics studies of the radical. G. Herzberg and J. W. C. Johns Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A, 295, 107 (1966) J. -P. Gu, G. Hirsch, R J Buenker, M. Brumm, G. Osmann, P. R. Bunker and P. Jensen J. Molec. Struc., 517-8, 247 (2000) Acknowledgments: Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Ju Xin acknowledges support from the Faculty and Student Teams program of the Educational Programs Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  16. Gigashot optical degradation in silica optics at 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Ly, Sonny; Laurence, Ted A; Shen, Nan; Hollingsworth, Bill; Norton, Mary; Bude, Jeff D

    2015-02-23

    As applications of lasers demand higher average powers, higher repetition rates, and longer operation times, optics will need to perform well under unprecedented conditions. We investigate the optical degradation of fused silica surfaces at 351 nm for up to 10(9) pulses with pulse fluences up to 12 J/cm(2). The central result is that the transmission loss from defect generation is a function of the pulse intensity, I(p), and total integrated fluence, φ(T), and is influenced by oxygen partial pressure. In 10(-6) Torr vacuum, at low I(p), a transmission loss is observed that increases monotonically as a function of number of pulses. As the pulse intensity increases above 13 MW/cm(2), the observed transmission losses decrease, and are not measureable for 130 MW/cm(2). A physical model which supports the experimental data is presented to describe the suppression of transmission loss at high pulse intensity. Similar phenomena are observed in anti-reflective sol-gel coated optics. Absorption, not scattering, is the primary mechanism leading to transmission loss. In 2.5 Torr air, no transmission loss was detected under any pulse intensity used. We find that the absorption layer that leads to transmission loss is less than 1 nm in thickness, and results from a laser-activated chemical process involving photo-reduction of silica within a few monolayers of the surface. The competition between photo-reduction and photo-oxidation explains the measured data: transmission loss is reduced when either the light intensity or the O(2) concentration is high. We expect processes similar to these to occur in other optical materials for high average power applications.

  17. Scatterometry measurement precision and accuracy below 70 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sendelbach, Matthew; Archie, Charles N.

    2003-05-01

    Scatterometry is a contender for various measurement applications where structure widths and heights can be significantly smaller than 70 nm within one or two ITRS generations. For example, feedforward process control in the post-lithography transistor gate formation is being actively pursued by a number of RIE tool manufacturers. Several commercial forms of scatterometry are available or under development which promise to provide satisfactory performance in this regime. Scatterometry, as commercially practiced today, involves analyzing the zeroth order reflected light from a grating of lines. Normal incidence spectroscopic reflectometry, 2-theta fixed-wavelength ellipsometry, and spectroscopic ellipsometry are among the optical techniques, while library based spectra matching and realtime regression are among the analysis techniques. All these commercial forms will find accurate and precise measurement a challenge when the material constituting the critical structure approaches a very small volume. Equally challenging is executing an evaluation methodology that first determines the true properties (critical dimensions and materials) of semiconductor wafer artifacts and then compares measurement performance of several scatterometers. How well do scatterometers track process induced changes in bottom CD and sidewall profile? This paper introduces a general 3D metrology assessment methodology and reports upon work involving sub-70 nm structures and several scatterometers. The methodology combines results from multiple metrologies (CD-SEM, CD-AFM, TEM, and XSEM) to form a Reference Measurement System (RMS). The methodology determines how well the scatterometry measurement tracks critical structure changes even in the presence of other noncritical changes that take place at the same time; these are key components of accuracy. Because the assessment rewards scatterometers that measure with good precision (reproducibility) and good accuracy, the most precise

  18. Standoff detection of biological agents using laser induced fluorescence—a comparison of 294 nm and 355 nm excitation wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Farsund, Øystein; Rustad, Gunnar; Skogan, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Standoff detection measuring the fluorescence spectra of seven different biological agents excited by 294 nm as well as 355 nm wavelength laser pulses has been undertaken. The biological warfare agent simulants were released in a semi-closed aerosol chamber at 210 m standoff distance and excited by light at either of the two wavelengths using the same instrument. Significant differences in several of the agents’ fluorescence response were seen at the two wavelengths. The anthrax simulants’ fluorescence responses were almost an order of magnitude stronger at the shorter wavelength excitation. However, most importantly, the fluorescence spectra were significantly more dissimilar at 294 nm than at 355 nm excitation with ~7 nm spectral resolution. This indicates that classification of the substances should be possible with a lower error rate for standoff detection using 294 nm rather than 355 nm excitation wavelength, or even better, utilizing both. PMID:23162732

  19. Standoff detection of biological agents using laser induced fluorescence-a comparison of 294 nm and 355 nm excitation wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Farsund, Oystein; Rustad, Gunnar; Skogan, Gunnar

    2012-11-01

    Standoff detection measuring the fluorescence spectra of seven different biological agents excited by 294 nm as well as 355 nm wavelength laser pulses has been undertaken. The biological warfare agent simulants were released in a semi-closed aerosol chamber at 210 m standoff distance and excited by light at either of the two wavelengths using the same instrument. Significant differences in several of the agents' fluorescence response were seen at the two wavelengths. The anthrax simulants' fluorescence responses were almost an order of magnitude stronger at the shorter wavelength excitation. However, most importantly, the fluorescence spectra were significantly more dissimilar at 294 nm than at 355 nm excitation with ~7 nm spectral resolution. This indicates that classification of the substances should be possible with a lower error rate for standoff detection using 294 nm rather than 355 nm excitation wavelength, or even better, utilizing both. PMID:23162732

  20. 22 nm node wafer inspection using diffraction phase microscopy and image post-processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Popescu, Gabriel; Goddard, Lynford L.

    2013-04-01

    We applied epi-illumination diffraction phase microscopy to measure the amplitude and phase of the scattered field from a SEMATECH 22 nm node intentional defect array (IDA) wafer. We used several imaging processing techniques to remove the wafer's underlying structure and reduce both the spatial and temporal noise and eliminate the system calibration error to produce stretched panoramic amplitude and phase images. From the stretched images, we detected defects down to 20 nm × 160 nm for a parallel bridge, 20 nm × 100 nm for perpendicular bridge, and 35 nm × 70 nm for an isolated dot.

  1. Nanobumps on silicon created with polystyrene spheres and 248 or 308 nm laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Piparia, Reema; Rothe, Erhard W.; Baird, R. J.

    2006-11-27

    Huang et al. [Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 161911 (2005)] formed arrays of nanobumps on a silicon substrate. They applied a 248 nm laser pulse to a surface monolayer of 1-{mu}m-diameter polystyrene spheres. The authors first replicated their experiment with 248 nm light. But when 308 nm pulses were applied instead, the nanobumps had a different shape and composition. At 248 nm, much of the laser light is absorbed in the polystyrene, which serves to quickly distort, melt, and ablate the sphere. At 308 nm, very little light is absorbed. The nanobumps from 248 nm radiation are organic polymers, while those formed with 308 nm pulses are silicon based.

  2. 47 CFR 51.331 - Notice of network changes: Timing of notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of network changes: Timing of notice. 51... Notice of network changes: Timing of notice. (a) An incumbent LEC shall give public notice of planned... procure from another entity, any product the design of which affects or relies on a new or changed...

  3. 47 CFR 51.325 - Notice of network changes: Public notice requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of network changes: Public notice... § 51.325 Notice of network changes: Public notice requirement. (a) An incumbent local exchange carrier (“LEC”) must provide public notice regarding any network change that: (1) Will affect a...

  4. 47 CFR 51.327 - Notice of network changes: Content of notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notice of network changes: Content of notice. 51.327 Section 51.327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER... Notice of network changes: Content of notice. (a) Public notice of planned network changes must, at...

  5. 12 CFR 222.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and... Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt-out notice—(1) In...) Model notices. Model notices are provided in appendix C of this part. (b) Coordinated and...

  6. 12 CFR 222.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and... Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt-out notice—(1) In...) Model notices. Model notices are provided in appendix C of this part. (b) Coordinated and...

  7. 16 CFR 680.23 - Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and... REPORTING ACT AFFILIATE MARKETING § 680.23 Contents of opt-out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices... chapter. (b) Coordinated and consolidated notices. A notice required by this part may be coordinated...

  8. 17 CFR 248.123 - Contents of opt out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; consolidated and equivalent notices. 248.123 Section 248.123 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Marketing § 248.123 Contents of opt out notice; consolidated and equivalent notices. (a) Contents of opt out...) Coordinated and consolidated notices. A notice required by this subpart may be coordinated and...

  9. 47 CFR 51.327 - Notice of network changes: Content of notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of network changes: Content of notice. 51.327 Section 51.327 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER... Notice of network changes: Content of notice. (a) Public notice of planned network changes must, at...

  10. 47 CFR 51.331 - Notice of network changes: Timing of notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of network changes: Timing of notice. 51... Notice of network changes: Timing of notice. (a) An incumbent LEC shall give public notice of planned... procure from another entity, any product the design of which affects or relies on a new or changed...

  11. 75 FR 79334 - Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ARCTIC RESEARCH COMMISSION Meeting Notice Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Arctic Research Commission will hold its 95th meeting... concerning Arctic research activities. The focus of the meeting will be reports and updates on programs...

  12. Teacher Noticing: Enlightening or Blinding?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiner, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    This paper comments on the theoretical formulations and usage of the construct of teacher noticing in a selection of the papers in this special issue of "ZDM Mathematics Education." The analysis of how the notion of teacher noticing is used in the papers suggests that it draws attention to several interdependencies involved that have not…

  13. Students' Mathematical Noticing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobato, Joanne; Hohensee, Charles; Rhodehamel, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Even in simple mathematical situations, there is an array of different mathematical features that students can attend to or notice. What students notice mathematically has consequences for their subsequent reasoning. By adapting work from both cognitive science and applied linguistics anthropology, we present a focusing framework, which treats…

  14. 68 FR 23162 - Meeting Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-04-30

    ... LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE Meeting Notice AGENCY: National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, (NCLIS). ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The U.S. National Commission on Libraries and..., Director of Operations, U.S. National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, 1110 Vermont...

  15. 75 FR 10811 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment to the Roswell Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan Amendment to the Roswell... prepare an amendment to the Roswell Resource Management Plan (RMP) with an associated Environmental... BLM Web site at: http://www.blm.gov/nm/st/en.html . In order to be included in the Draft RMP...

  16. 75 FR 55349 - Notice of Realty Action: Modified Competitive Sealed Bid Sale of Public Lands in Rio Arriba...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... in Rio Arriba County, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action... Manager, Farmington Field Office, 1235 La Plata Highway, Suite A, Farmington, New Mexico 87401. FOR... described contains 160 acres, more or less, in Rio Arriba County. The sale is in conformance with the...

  17. 77 FR 11155 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement on the Pojoaque Basin Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Pojoaque Basin Regional Water System will divert, treat, and distribute potable water to the Pueblo and non... Water System to treat and distribute the water to residents of the Pojoaque Basin. The Settlement... Regional Water System, Santa Fe County, NM AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation, Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  18. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover

  19. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas : shallow ground-water quality and land use in the Albuquerque area, central New Mexico, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, Scott K.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water and the relations between land use and the quality of that shallow ground water in an urban area in and adjacent to Albuquerque, New Mexico. Water samples were collected from 24 shallow wells. Samples were analyzed for selected common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, volatile organic compounds, and pesticides. The study area, which is in the Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico, was limited to the Rio Grande flood plain; depth to water in this area generally is less than 25 feet. The amount and composition of recharge to the shallow ground-water system are important factors that affect shallow ground-water composition in this area. Important sources of recharge that affect shallow ground-water quality in the area include infiltration of surface water, which is used in agricultural land-use areas to irrigate crops, and infiltration of septic-system effluent in residential areas. Agricultural land use represents about 28 percent of the area, and residential land use represents about 35 percent of the total study area. In most of the study area, agricultural land use is interspersed with residential land use and neither is the dominant land use in the area. Land use in the study area historically has been changing from agricultural to urban. The composition of shallow ground water in the study area varies considerably. The dissolved solids concentration in shallow ground water in the study area ranges from 272 to 1,650 milligrams per liter, although the relative percentages of selected cations and anions do not vary substantially. Calcium generally is the dominant cation and bicarbonate generally is the dominant anion. Concentrations of nutrients generally were less than 1 milligram per liter. The concentration of many trace elements in shallow ground water was below or slightly above 1 microgram per liter and there was little variation in the concentrations. Barium, iron, manganese

  20. 75 FR 9083 - Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Inquiry Commission Notice of Open Meeting; Notice #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 38 / Friday, February 26, 2010 / Notices#0;#0; ] FINANCIAL CRISIS INQUIRY COMMISSION Notice of Open Meeting SUMMARY: The... Participation The meeting is open to the public. The Chairman of the Commission will lead the forum for...