Science.gov

Sample records for alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis recovered from cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Wellinghausen, Nele; Wirths, Beate; Poppert, Sven

    2006-09-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is frequently isolated from the respiratory secretions of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, but identification with biochemical tests is unreliable. We describe fluorescence in situ hybridization assays for the rapid identification of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Alcaligenes faecalis. Both assays showed high sensitivities and high specificities with a collection of 155 nonfermenters from CF patients. PMID:16954289

  2. Combined nickel-cobalt-cadmium resistance encoded by the ncc locus of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans 31A.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, T; Schlegel, H G

    1994-01-01

    The nickel-cobalt-cadmium resistance genes carried by plasmid pTOM9 of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans 31A are located on a 14.5-kb BamHI fragment. By random Tn5 insertion mutagenesis, the fragment was shown to contain two distinct nickel resistance loci, ncc and nre. The ncc locus causes a high-level combined nickel, cobalt, and cadmium resistance in strain AE104, which is a cured derivative of the metal-resistant bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34. ncc is not expressed in Escherichia coli. The nre locus causes low-level nickel resistance in both Alcaligenes and E. coli strains. The nucleotide sequence of the ncc locus revealed seven open reading frames designated nccYXHCBAN. The corresponding predicted proteins share strong similarities with proteins encoded by the metal resistance loci cnr (cnrYXHCBA) and czc (czcRCBAD) of A. eutrophus CH34. When different DNA fragments carrying ncc genes were heterologously expressed under the control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter, five protein bands representing NccA (116 kDa), NccB (40 kDa), NccC (46 kDa), NccN (23.5 kDa), and NccX (16.5 kDa) were detected. Images PMID:7961470

  3. Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis subsp. nov., a bacterium accumulating poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate from acetone-butanol bioprocess residues.

    PubMed

    Schroll, G; Busse, H J; Parrer, G; Rölleke, S; Lubitz, W; Denner, E B

    2001-04-01

    The authors have previously isolated a solvent tolerant bacterium, strain G(T), (T = type strain) capable to convert acetone-butanol bioprocess residues into poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate. Strain G(T) was initially identified as Alcaligenes spp by standard bacteriological tests. In this study the taxonomic position of the bacterium was investigated in detail. The 165 rDNA sequence analysis, the G + C content of DNA (56 mol%) and the presence of ubiquinone Q-8 confirmed strain G(T) as a representative of the genus Alcaligenes. In the polyamine pattern of the bacterium putrescine and cadaverine were detected, but only trace amounts of 2-hydroxyputrescine. The extremely low content of 2-hydroxyputrescine is remarkable, since this unique diamine is a common marker for beta-proteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA demonstrated that Alcaligenes sp. G(T) is most closely related to the species Alcaligenes faecalis (99.6% sequence similarity to A. faecalis HR4 and 98.7% sequence similarity to A. faecalis [ATCC 8750T = DSM 30030T]. On the basis of DNA-DNA relatedness (56% similarity), the unique polyamine pattern, the physiological and biochemical differences strain G(T) could be distinguished from the species A. faecalis. Therefore, a new subspecies for the species Alcaligenes faecalis is proposed; Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis subsp. nov. PMID:11403397

  4. Draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. faecalis NCIB 8687 (CCUG 2071).

    PubMed

    Phung, Le T; Trimble, William L; Meyer, Folker; Gilbert, Jack A; Silver, Simon

    2012-09-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. faecalis NCIB 8687, the betaproteobacterium from which arsenite oxidase had its structure solved and the first "arsenate gene island" identified, provided a draft genome of 3.9 Mb in 186 contigs (with the largest 15 comprising 90% of the total) for this opportunistic pathogen species. PMID:22933773

  5. Efficacy of polysaccharide from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 administration as protection against γ-radiation in female rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Amal I; Ghoneim, Mona A M; Mahmoud, Manal G; Asker, Mohsen M S; Mohamed, Saher S

    2016-03-01

    Damage to normal tissues is a consequence of both therapeutic and accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. A water-soluble heteropolysaccharide called AXEPS, composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose and glucouronic acid in a molar ratio of nearly 1.0:1.6:0.4:2.3, respectively, was isolated from culture medium of strain Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 by ethanol precipitation followed by freeze-drying. Chemical analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and chromatographic studies revealed that the molecular weight was 1.6 × 10(4) g mol(-1). This study was designed to investigate the radioprotective and biological effects of AXEPS in alleviating the toxicity of ionizing radiation in female albino rats. A total of 32 female albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for four weeks. The second group was administered AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for four weeks. Animals in the third group were exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy) and remained for 2 weeks without treatment. The fourth group received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for two weeks before being exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy), then 24 h post γ-rays, they received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) in a treatment continuing till the end of the experiment (15 days after the whole-body γ-irradiation). Oral administration of AXEPS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed the oxidative stress effects of radiation, as evidenced by the decrease in DNA damage in the bone marrow. Assessment of apoptosis and cell proliferation markers revealed that caspase-3 significantly increased in the irradiated group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the hematological constituents of peripheral blood, the chemotactic index and CD8+ T cells were observed in animals in the irradiation-only group, whereas an increase in the lymphocyte index was observed in animals in that group. In contrast, AXEPS treatment prevented these alterations. From our results, we conclude that

  6. Efficacy of polysaccharide from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 administration as protection against γ-radiation in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Amal I.; Ghoneim, Mona A. M.; Mahmoud, Manal G.; Asker, Mohsen M. S.; Mohamed, Saher S.

    2016-01-01

    Damage to normal tissues is a consequence of both therapeutic and accidental exposures to ionizing radiation. A water-soluble heteropolysaccharide called AXEPS, composed of glucose, galactose, rhamnose and glucouronic acid in a molar ratio of nearly 1.0:1.6:0.4:2.3, respectively, was isolated from culture medium of strain Alcaligenes xylosoxidans MSA3 by ethanol precipitation followed by freeze-drying. Chemical analysis, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and chromatographic studies revealed that the molecular weight was 1.6 × 104 g mol−1. This study was designed to investigate the radioprotective and biological effects of AXEPS in alleviating the toxicity of ionizing radiation in female albino rats. A total of 32 female albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for four weeks. The second group was administered AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for four weeks. Animals in the third group were exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy) and remained for 2 weeks without treatment. The fourth group received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) orally by gavage for two weeks before being exposed to whole-body γ-rays (5 Gy), then 24 h post γ-rays, they received AXEPS (100 mg/kg) in a treatment continuing till the end of the experiment (15 days after the whole–body γ-irradiation). Oral administration of AXEPS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed the oxidative stress effects of radiation, as evidenced by the decrease in DNA damage in the bone marrow. Assessment of apoptosis and cell proliferation markers revealed that caspase-3 significantly increased in the irradiated group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the hematological constituents of peripheral blood, the chemotactic index and CD8+ T cells were observed in animals in the irradiation-only group, whereas an increase in the lymphocyte index was observed in animals in that group. In contrast, AXEPS treatment prevented these alterations. From our results, we conclude that

  7. Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus subsp. nov. a phenol-degrading, denitrifying bacterium isolated from a graywater bioprocessor.

    PubMed

    Rehfuss, Marc; Urban, James

    2005-07-01

    A Gram (-) coccobacillary bacterium, J(T), was isolated from a graywater bioprocessor. 16S rRNA and biochemical analysis has revealed strain J(T) closely resembles Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 8750T and A. faecalis subsp. parafaecalis DSM 13975T, but is a distinct, previously uncharacterized isolate. Strain J(T), along with the type strain of A. faecalis and its previously described subspecies share the ability to aerobically degrade phenol. The degradation rates of phenol for strain J(T) and reference phenol degrading bacteria were determined by photometrically measuring the change in optical density when grown on 0.1% phenol as the sole carbon source, followed by addition of Gibb's reagent to measure depletion of substrate. The phenol degradation rates of strain J(T) was found to exceed that of the phenol hydroxylase group III bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, with isolate J(T) exhibiting a doubling time of 4.5 h. The presence of the large subunit of the multicomponent phenol hydroxylase gene in strain J(T) was confirmed by PCR. The presence of the nirK nitrite reductase gene as demonstrated by PCR as well as results obtained from nitrite media indicated denitrification at least to N2O. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, fatty acid analysis and results from DNA DNA hybridization, we propose assigning a novel subspecies of Alcaligenes faecalis, to be named Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. phenolicus with the type strain J(T) (= DSM 16503) (= NRRL B-41076). PMID:16094869

  8. Production, purification, and characterization of D-aminoacylase from Alcaligenes xylosoxydans subsp. xylosoxydans A-6.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, M; Sakai, K; Miyamoto, Y; Wakayama, M

    1993-07-01

    The best inducers for D-aminoacylase from Alcaligenes xylosoxydans subsp. xylosoxydans A-6 (Alcaligenes A-6) were a poor substrate, N-acetyl-gamma-methyl-D-leucine, and an inhibitor, N-acetyl-D-alloisoleucine. The enzyme has been homogeneously purified. The molecular weight of the native enzyme was estimated to be 58,000 by gel filtration. A subunit molecular weight of 52,000 was measured by SDS-PAGE, indicating that the native protein is a monomer. The isoelectric point was 5.2. The enzyme was specific to the D-isomer and hydrolyzed N-acetyl derivatives of D-leucine, D-phenylalanine, D-norleucine, D-methionine, and D-valine, and also N-formyl, N-butyryl, and N-propionyl derivatives of D-leucine. The Km for N-acetyl-D-leucine was 9.8 mM. The optimum pH and temperature were 7.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The stabilities of pH and temperature were 8.1 and 40 degrees C. D-Aminoacylases from three species of the genus Alcaligenes differ in inducer and substrate specificities, but are similar with respect to molecular weight and N-terminal amino acid sequence. PMID:7763986

  9. The Crystal Structure of D-Threonine Aldolase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Provides Insight into a Metal Ion Assisted PLP-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Michael K.; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Steinkellner, Georg; Riegler-Berket, Lina; Mink, Daniel; van Assema, Friso; Schürmann, Martin; Gruber, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Threonine aldolases catalyze the pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent cleavage of threonine into glycine and acetaldehyde and play a major role in the degradation of this amino acid. In nature, L- as well as D-specific enzymes have been identified, but the exact physiological function of D-threonine aldolases (DTAs) is still largely unknown. Both types of enantio-complementary enzymes have a considerable potential in biocatalysis for the stereospecific synthesis of various β-hydroxy amino acids, which are valuable building blocks for the production of pharmaceuticals. While several structures of L-threonine aldolases (LTAs) have already been determined, no structure of a DTA is available to date. Here, we report on the determination of the crystal structure of the DTA from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (AxDTA) at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results underline the close relationship of DTAs and alanine racemases and allow the identification of a metal binding site close to the PLP-cofactor in the active site of the enzyme which is consistent with the previous observation that divalent cations are essential for DTA activity. Modeling of AxDTA substrate complexes provides a rationale for this metal dependence and indicates that binding of the β-hydroxy group of the substrate to the metal ion very likely activates this group and facilitates its deprotonation by His193. An equivalent involvement of a metal ion has been implicated in the mechanism of a serine dehydratase, which harbors a metal ion binding site in the vicinity of the PLP cofactor at the same position as in DTA. The structure of AxDTA is completely different to available structures of LTAs. The enantio-complementarity of DTAs and LTAs can be explained by an approximate mirror symmetry of crucial active site residues relative to the PLP-cofactor. PMID:25884707

  10. Prevalence of Achromobacter xylosoxidans in pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in different regions of Europe.

    PubMed

    Adam, Patrick; Czapiewski, Piotr; Colak, Seba; Kosmidis, Perikles; Tousseyn, Thomas; Sagaert, Xavier; Boudova, Ludmila; Okoń, Krzysztof; Morresi-Hauf, Alicia; Agostinelli, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Du, Ming-Qing; Fend, Falko

    2014-03-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) comprises 7-8% of B-cell lymphomas and commonly originates from a background of long-standing chronic inflammation. An association with distinct bacteria species has been confirmed for several anatomical sites of MALT lymphoma. For pulmonary MALT lymphoma, however, a clear link with an infectious agent or autoimmune disorder has not yet been reported. Using a 16S rRNA gene-based approach, we have recently identified Achromobacter (Alcaligenes) xylosoxidans in eight of nine cases of pulmonary MALT lymphoma. A. xylosoxidans is a gram-negative betaproteobacterium with low virulence, but high resistance to antibiotic treatment. To further examine a potential association with A. xylosoxidans, 124 cases of pulmonary MALT lymphoma and 82 control tissues from six European countries were analysed using a specific nested PCR. Although prevalence rates for A. xylosoxidans varied significantly from country to country, they were consistently higher for MALT lymphoma as compared to controls. Overall, 57/124 (46%) pulmonary MALT lymphomas and 15/82 (18%) control tissues were positive for A. xylosoxidans (P = 0·004). Whether the significant association of A. xylosoxidans with pulmonary MALT lymphoma demonstrated in our study points to a potential causal role in the pathogenesis of this lymphoma will require further studies. PMID:24372375

  11. Characterization of an Indole-3-Acetamide Hydrolase from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis and Its Application in Efficient Preparation of Both Enantiomers of Chiral Building Block 2,3-Dihydro-1,4-Benzodioxin-2-Carboxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pradeep; Kaur, Suneet; Sharma, Amar Nath; Jolly, Ravinder S

    2016-01-01

    Both the enantiomers of 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid are valuable chiral synthons for enantiospecific synthesis of therapeutic agents such as (S)-doxazosin mesylate, WB 4101, MKC 242, 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzodioxin, and N-[2,4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide. Pharmaceutical applications require these enantiomers in optically pure form. However, currently available methods suffer from one drawback or other, such as low efficiency, uncommon and not so easily accessible chiral resolving agent and less than optimal enantiomeric purity. Our interest in finding a biocatalyst for efficient production of enantiomerically pure 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid lead us to discover an amidase activity from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis, which was able to kinetically resolve 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxyamide with E value of >200. Thus, at about 50% conversion, (R)-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid was produced in >99% e.e. The remaining amide had (S)-configuration and 99% e.e. The amide and acid were easily separated by aqueous (alkaline)-organic two phase extraction method. The same amidase was able to catalyse, albeit at much lower rate the hydrolysis of (S)-amide to (S)-acid without loss of e.e. The amidase activity was identified as indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (IaaH). IaaH is known to catalyse conversion of indole-3-acetamide (IAM) to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is phytohormone of auxin class and is widespread among plants and bacteria that inhabit plant rhizosphere. IaaH exhibited high activity for 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which was about 65% compared to its natural substrate, indole-3-acetamide. The natural substrate for IaaH indole-3-acetamide shared, at least in part a similar bicyclic structure with 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which may account for high activity of enzyme towards this un-natural substrate. To the best of

  12. Characterization of an Indole-3-Acetamide Hydrolase from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis and Its Application in Efficient Preparation of Both Enantiomers of Chiral Building Block 2,3-Dihydro-1,4-Benzodioxin-2-Carboxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pradeep; Kaur, Suneet; Sharma, Amar Nath; Jolly, Ravinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Both the enantiomers of 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid are valuable chiral synthons for enantiospecific synthesis of therapeutic agents such as (S)-doxazosin mesylate, WB 4101, MKC 242, 2,3-dihydro-2-hydroxymethyl-1,4-benzodioxin, and N-[2,4-oxo-1,3-thiazolidin-3-yl]-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide. Pharmaceutical applications require these enantiomers in optically pure form. However, currently available methods suffer from one drawback or other, such as low efficiency, uncommon and not so easily accessible chiral resolving agent and less than optimal enantiomeric purity. Our interest in finding a biocatalyst for efficient production of enantiomerically pure 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid lead us to discover an amidase activity from Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. parafaecalis, which was able to kinetically resolve 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxyamide with E value of >200. Thus, at about 50% conversion, (R)-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxylic acid was produced in >99% e.e. The remaining amide had (S)-configuration and 99% e.e. The amide and acid were easily separated by aqueous (alkaline)-organic two phase extraction method. The same amidase was able to catalyse, albeit at much lower rate the hydrolysis of (S)-amide to (S)-acid without loss of e.e. The amidase activity was identified as indole-3-acetamide hydrolase (IaaH). IaaH is known to catalyse conversion of indole-3-acetamide (IAM) to indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which is phytohormone of auxin class and is widespread among plants and bacteria that inhabit plant rhizosphere. IaaH exhibited high activity for 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which was about 65% compared to its natural substrate, indole-3-acetamide. The natural substrate for IaaH indole-3-acetamide shared, at least in part a similar bicyclic structure with 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-carboxamide, which may account for high activity of enzyme towards this un-natural substrate. To the best of

  13. Cerebral ventriculitis associated with Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, S; Yasunaga, Y; Honzumi, K; Okamura, H; Kumata, R; Endo, S

    1978-01-01

    Six patients in the neurosurgical ward of Fukushima Medical College Hospital suffering from ventriculitis due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection had undergone craniotomy or cranial trepanation before the infection. The strains of A. xylosoxidans isolated from the patients were resistant to streptomycin, ampicillin, cephaloridine, gentamicin, and colistin. They were also resistant to chlorhexidine digluconate (Hibitane) in a concentration of 2%. When a study of the chlorhexidine used in the hospital was carried out four strains of A. xylosoxidans were isolated from 20 containers of chlorhexidine solution in the surgical ward but not from those in the operating theatre. Images Figure PMID:632360

  14. Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis after contact lens usage.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hyun; Song, Nang Hee; Koh, Jae Woong

    2012-02-01

    To report on Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis in two healthy patients who had worn contact lenses foran extended period of time. A 36-year-old female and a 21-year-old female visited our hospital with ocular pain and blurred vision. Both patients had a history of wearing soft contact lenses for over fve years with occasional overnight wear. At the initial presentation, a slit lamp examination revealed corneal stromal infiltrations and epithelial defects with peripheral neovascularization in both patients. Microbiological examinations were performed from samples of corneal scrapings, contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution. The culture resulting from the samples taken from the contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution were all positive for Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Confrming that the direct cause of the keratitis was the contact lenses, the frst patient was prescribed ceftazidime and amikacin drops sensitive to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The second patient was treated with 0.3% gatifoxacin and fortifed tobramycin drops. After treatment, the corneal epithelial defects were completely healed, and subepithelial corneal opacity was observed. Two cases of Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis were reported in healthy young females who wore soft contact lenses. Achromobacter xylosoxidans should be considered a rare but potentially harmful pathogen for lens-induced keratitis in healthy hosts. PMID:22323886

  15. Nosocomial colonization and infection by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed Central

    Reverdy, M E; Freney, J; Fleurette, J; Coulet, M; Surgot, M; Marmet, D; Ploton, C

    1984-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans, a bacterial species named in 1971, is often isolated from aqueous environments, but little has been reported about its pathogenicity in humans, its epidemiological pattern, and its susceptibility to antibiotics and antiseptics. We were faced with an epidemic caused by this microorganism for 18 months in an intensive care unit. Two patients had fatal infections and 37 others were colonized. The source was the deionized water of the hemodialysis system. The 46 isolates were identified by comparison with the reference strain A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061. The characteristic cellular fatty acids of this species were demonstrated by gas-liquid chromatography. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of 27 antibiotics were determined. The isolates were susceptible to only two: moxalactam at 4 micrograms/ml and ceftazidime at 8 micrograms/ml. The minimal bactericidal concentrations of one disinfectant and three antiseptics were: sodium hypochloride, 109 micrograms/ml; chlorhexidine digluconate in ethanol solution, 15 to 125 micrograms/ml; polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine, 750 micrograms/ml; and iodine ethanol, 312 to 625 micrograms/ml. PMID:6699141

  16. Alcaligenes faecalis rhinotracheitis in Manitoba turkeys.

    PubMed

    Boycott, B R; Wyman, H R; Wong, F C

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of alcaligenes rhinotracheitis occurred on one premises housing five turkey flocks totaling 25,000 poults. Prominent findings were severe respiratory difficulty resulting from excess mucus in the nasopharynx, lachrimation, and tracheal collapse. Sinus and tracheal cultures consistently yielded Alcaligenes faecalis. An adenovirus was isolated and four flocks became positive for CELO virus by agar-gel-precipitin (AGP) tests. Mortality by flocks ranged from 4% to 48%. Treatment was unsuccessful and appeared to increase the mortality rate. The course of the disease was about 6 weeks, and recovered turkeys were marketed 1 week later than the usual date. PMID:6525132

  17. Endophthalmitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans following Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victor M.; Emanuelli, Andres; Flynn, Harry W.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Miller, Darlene; Kao, Andrew A.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Alfonso, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a cause of both acute-onset and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Methods A non-comparative, consecutive case series of patients with culture-proven A. xylosoxidans endophthalmitis between 1970 and 2012. Cataract surgery and intraocular lens placement were performed in all patients prior to endophthalmitis. Positive cultures were obtained from the vitreous, capsular bag, and/or the removed intraocular lens. Results The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in 4 patients with positive cultures. Two endophthalmitis patients had a preliminary culture report of Pseudomonas species. In addition to receiving intravitreal antibiotics, all patients underwent capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal at the time of pars plana vitrectomy. Visual acuity at last follow up was 20/40 or better in 2 of 4 (50%) but the remaining 2 patients were 20/200 or worse. Conclusion A. xylosoxidans may be a cause of acute, recurrent, and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Complete capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal can be considered in recurrent and recalcitrant patients. PMID:24150240

  18. Differentiation of Alcaligenes-like bacteria of avian origin and comparison with Alcaligenes spp. reference strains.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, H A; Riddle, G D

    1984-04-01

    Although standard biochemical tests used for the identification of Alcaligenes spp. revealed only minor differences, the oxidative low-peptone technique clearly differentiated between Alcaligenes-like bacteria of avian origin and Alcaligenes spp. reference strains. Based on their colonial morphology, biochemical profiles, and hemagglutination, the Alcaligenes-like bacteria of avian origin were further divided into two subgroups, C1-T1 and C2-T2. Colonies of subgroup C1-T1 were nondescript, round, raised, glistening, translucent, greyish, and about 2 mm in diameter. Colonies of subgroup C2-T2 were off-white, flat, dry and wrinkled, generally round, and resembled tiny lily pads. Biochemical profiles by the oxidative low-peptone method showed the C1-T1 subgroup alkalinizing only three substrates (citrate, acetate, and succinate), whereas the C2-T2 subgroup alkalinized eight substrates (citrate, acetate, butyrate, itaconate, malonate, saccharate, succinate, and M-tartrate). Subgroup C1-T1 agglutinated human, chicken, and turkey erythrocytes, whereas subgroup C2-T2 did not. The recognition of these two subgroups within the Alcaligenes-like bacteria of avian origin is important, since it may explain the differences seen in pathogenicity among isolates. PMID:6715517

  19. Genomic Insights into Intrinsic and Acquired Drug Resistance Mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium. PMID:25487802

  20. Degradation of indole by Alcaligenes spec.

    PubMed

    Claus, G; Kutzner, H J

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes spec. strain In 3 was isolated from an enrichment culture with indole inoculated with activated sludge. The organism was able to grow with indole as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. During growth with this substrate indigo and anthranilate accumulated in the culture broth. By measurement of the oxidation of intermediates (O(2)-uptake) and determination of the activity of enzymes responsible for ring cleavage the following pathway for indole degradation could be established: indole → indoxyl → isatin → anthranilate → gentisate → maleyl pyruvate → fumaryl pyruvate → fumarate + pyruvate. - Alcaligenes spec. strain In 3 was also able to grow with various aromatic compounds; these were degraded by ortho- or meta-cleavage or via the gentisinic acid pathway. PMID:23194589

  1. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Firmida, M.C.; Pereira, R.H.V.; Silva, E.A.S.R.; Marques, E.A.; Lopes, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans

  2. Denitrification by Alcaligenes eutrophus is plasmid dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Römermann, D; Friedrich, B

    1985-01-01

    Curing of the hydrogenase-specifying megaplasmid pHG indigenous to strains of the facultative lithoautotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus was correlated with a loss of denitrifying ability (Nitd). The retransfer of plasmid pHG1 reconstituted the Nitd phenotype. Plasmid-free mutants were still capable of converting some nitrate to nitrite, but they did not metabolize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. PMID:3886640

  3. Bilateral Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Linke, Stephan J; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Katz, Toam

    2010-06-01

    A 31-year-old man was referred to us 2 months after bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). On presentation, the corrected distance visual acuity was hand motion in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye. Slitlamp examination showed a diffuse central stromal infiltrate, flap melting, and hypopyon in the right eye and marked interface opacities with crystal-like edges in the left eye. Flap lift and irrigation were performed. Because of the progressive keratitis, penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was done in both eyes. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from both corneal buttons, and therapy was changed to chloramphenicol prednisolone eyedrops 8 times a day and intravenous meropenem 500 mg 3 times a day according to sensitivity testing. Two months after surgery, both transplants remained clear. PMID:20494781

  4. Cloning, overexpression, and characterization of a novel thermostable penicillin G acylase from Achromobacter xylosoxidans: probing the molecular basis for its high thermostability.

    PubMed

    Cai, Gang; Zhu, Songcheng; Yang, Sheng; Zhao, Guoping; Jiang, Weihong

    2004-05-01

    The gene encoding a novel penicillin G acylase (PGA), designated pgaW, was cloned from Achromobacter xylosoxidans and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The pgaW gene contains an open reading frame of 2586 nucleotides. The deduced protein sequence encoded by pgaW has about 50% amino acid identity to several well-characterized PGAs, including those of Providencia rettgeri, Kluyvera cryocrescens, and Escherichia coli. Biochemical studies showed that the optimal temperature for this novel PGA (PGA650) activity is greater than 60 degrees C and its half-life of inactivation at 55 degrees C is four times longer than that of another previously reported thermostable PGA from Alcaligenes faecalis (R. M. D. Verhaert, A. M. Riemens, J. V. R. Laan, J. V. Duin, and W. J. Quax, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:3412-3418, 1997). To our knowledge, this is the most thermostable PGA ever characterized. To explore the molecular basis of the higher thermostability of PGA650, homology structural modeling and amino acid composition analyses were performed. The results suggested that the increased number of buried ion pair networks, lower N and Q contents, excessive arginine residues, and remarkably high content of proline residues in the structure of PGA650 could contribute to its high thermostability. The unique characteristic of higher thermostability of this novel PGA provides some advantages for its potential application in industry. PMID:15128530

  5. Sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase yields acetyl phosphate: purification from Alcaligenes defragrans and gene clusters in taurine degradation.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Jürgen; Denger, Karin; Cook, Alasdair M

    2003-01-15

    The facultatively anaerobic bacterium Alcaligenes defragrans NKNTAU was found to oxidize taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonate) with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Taurine was transaminated to 2-sulphoacetaldehyde. This was not converted into sulphite and acetate by a "sulphoacetaldehyde sulpho-lyase" (EC 4.4.1.12), but into sulphite and acetyl phosphate, which was identified by three methods. The enzyme, which required the addition of phosphate, thiamin diphosphate and Mg(2+) ions for activity, was renamed sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase (Xsc; EC 2.3.1.-). Inducible Xsc was expressed at high levels, and a three-step 11-fold purification yielded an essentially homogeneous soluble protein, which was a homotetramer in its native form; the molecular mass of the subunit was found to be between about 63 kDa (SDS/PAGE) and 65.3 kDa (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS). The N-terminal and two internal amino acid sequences were determined, and PCR primers were generated. The xsc gene was amplified and sequenced; the derived molecular mass of the processed protein was 65.0 kDa. The downstream gene presumably encoded the inducible phosphate acetyltransferase (Pta) found in crude extracts. The desulphonative enzymes ("EC 4.4.1.12") from Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIMB 10751 and Desulfonispora thiosulfatigenes GKNTAU were shown to be Xscs. We detected at least three subclasses of xsc in Proteobacteria and in Gram-positive bacteria, and they comprised a distinct group within the acetohydroxyacid synthase supergene family. Genome sequencing data revealed xsc genes in Burkholderia fungorum (80% sequence identity) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (61%) with closely linked pta genes. Different patterns of regulation for the transport and dissimilation of taurine were hypothesized for S. meliloti and B. fungorum. PMID:12358600

  6. Sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase yields acetyl phosphate: purification from Alcaligenes defragrans and gene clusters in taurine degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Jürgen; Denger, Karin; Cook, Alasdair M

    2003-01-01

    The facultatively anaerobic bacterium Alcaligenes defragrans NKNTAU was found to oxidize taurine (2-aminoethanesulphonate) with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. Taurine was transaminated to 2-sulphoacetaldehyde. This was not converted into sulphite and acetate by a "sulphoacetaldehyde sulpho-lyase" (EC 4.4.1.12), but into sulphite and acetyl phosphate, which was identified by three methods. The enzyme, which required the addition of phosphate, thiamin diphosphate and Mg(2+) ions for activity, was renamed sulphoacetaldehyde acetyltransferase (Xsc; EC 2.3.1.-). Inducible Xsc was expressed at high levels, and a three-step 11-fold purification yielded an essentially homogeneous soluble protein, which was a homotetramer in its native form; the molecular mass of the subunit was found to be between about 63 kDa (SDS/PAGE) and 65.3 kDa (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS). The N-terminal and two internal amino acid sequences were determined, and PCR primers were generated. The xsc gene was amplified and sequenced; the derived molecular mass of the processed protein was 65.0 kDa. The downstream gene presumably encoded the inducible phosphate acetyltransferase (Pta) found in crude extracts. The desulphonative enzymes ("EC 4.4.1.12") from Achromobacter xylosoxidans NCIMB 10751 and Desulfonispora thiosulfatigenes GKNTAU were shown to be Xscs. We detected at least three subclasses of xsc in Proteobacteria and in Gram-positive bacteria, and they comprised a distinct group within the acetohydroxyacid synthase supergene family. Genome sequencing data revealed xsc genes in Burkholderia fungorum (80% sequence identity) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (61%) with closely linked pta genes. Different patterns of regulation for the transport and dissimilation of taurine were hypothesized for S. meliloti and B. fungorum. PMID:12358600

  7. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. CASE REPORT We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. CONCLUSIONS As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  8. Achromobacter Xylosoxidans Bloodstream Infection in Elderly Patient with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Kausalya; Ahmed, Nishat H; Baruah, Frincy K; Grover, Rajesh K

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidansis a nonfermentative Gram-negative organism, known to cause opportunistic infection in humans. We report a case of septicemia in a 76-year-old male patient with underlying hepatocellular carcinoma due to A. xylosoxidans, which showed a different antimicrobial susceptibility pattern from what is usually reported. From aerobic blood culture of the patient, A. xylosoxidans was isolated which was found to be sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefoperazone-sulbactam, meropenem, minocycline, tigecycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The patient recovered with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment, which was given empirically to the patient. The present case highlights the possible role of amoxicillin-clavulanic acid for treatment of bloodstream infection with A. xylosoxidans. PMID:26417165

  9. Sepsis Caused by Achromobacter Xylosoxidans in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis and Severe Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stobbelaar, Kim; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Lequesne, Monique; De Dooy, Jozef; Ho, Erwin; Vlieghe, Erika; Ieven, Margaretha; Verhulst, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 10 Final Diagnosis: Sepsis Symptoms: Fever • hypotension • not tollerating enteral feeds • respiratory deterioration Medication: — Clinical Procedure: IV antibiotics • lungtransplantion Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can be responsible for various severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It has been found in immunocompromised patients and patients with several other underlying conditions, but the clinical role of this microorganism in cystic fibrosis is unclear. Case Report: We describe a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 10-year-old child with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease. Conclusions: As the prevalence of A. xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients is rising and patient-to-patient transmission is highly probable, further studies are warranted to determine its role and to document the appropriate treatment strategy for eradication and long-term treatment of this organism. PMID:27498677

  10. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-03-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. PMID:2835003

  11. Size of diffusion pore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, J; Nakae, T

    1988-01-01

    The diffusion pore of the outer membrane of Alcaligenes faecalis was shown to be substantially smaller than the Escherichia coli porin pore. In experiments with intact cells, pentoses and hexoses penetrated into the NaCl-expanded periplasm, whereas saccharides of Mr greater than 342 did not. Cells treated with 0.5 M saccharides of Mr greater than 342 weighed 33 to 38% less than cells treated with isotonic solution, suggesting that these saccharides do not permeate through the outer membrane. The diffusion rates of various solutes through the liposome membranes reconstituted from the Mr-43,000 outer membrane protein showed the following characteristics. (i) The relative diffusion rates of pentoses, hexoses, and methylhexoses appeared to be about 1.0, 0.6, and negligibly small, respectively. (ii) The diffusion rate of glucose appeared to be about 1/10th that with the E. coli B porin. (iii) The diffusion rate of gluconic acid was five to seven times higher than that of glucose. (iv) The diffusion rates of beta-lactam antibiotics appeared to be 40 to less than 10% of those with the E. coli B porin. Images PMID:2835003

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Broad-Spectrum Xenobiotic Degrader Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidansADAF13, isolated from farmland soil, possesses a large number of putative degradation genes and pathways that break down a wide variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, and other high-impact xenobiotics. These properties make this strain an excellent candidate for further development as a broad-spectrum bioremediation agent. PMID:27081123

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Broad-Spectrum Xenobiotic Degrader Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13

    PubMed Central

    Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans ADAF13, isolated from farmland soil, possesses a large number of putative degradation genes and pathways that break down a wide variety of aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, endocrine disruptors, and other high-impact xenobiotics. These properties make this strain an excellent candidate for further development as a broad-spectrum bioremediation agent. PMID:27081123

  14. Shared Genotypes of Achromobacter xylosoxidans Strains Isolated from Patients at a Cystic Fibrosis Rehabilitation Center

    PubMed Central

    Van daele, Sabine; Verhelst, Rita; Claeys, Geert; Verschraegen, Gerda; Franckx, Hilde; Van Simaey, Leen; de Ganck, Catharine; De Baets, Frans; Vaneechoutte, Mario

    2005-01-01

    During a study examining transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa among 76 cystic fibrosis patients in a rehabilitation center, where patients stay in close contact during prolonged periods, several clusters of patients carrying genotypically identical P. aeruginosa, as well as two clusters of 4 and 10 patients, respectively, colonized with genotypically identical Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains, were discovered. PMID:15956444

  15. Bile acid transformations by Alcaligenes recti.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, I; Mahato, S B

    1993-02-01

    Metabolism of cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, and deoxycholic acid by the grown cells of the bacterium Alcaligenes recti suspended in water was studied. Each isolated metabolite was characterized by the application of various spectroscopic methods. Cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, and deoxycholic acid yielded methylated derivatives 3 alpha-methoxy-7 alpha, 12 alpha-dihydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid, 3 alpha-methoxy-7 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid, 3 alpha-methoxy-7 beta-hydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid, and 3 alpha-methoxy-12 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta-cholanoic acid, respectively. In addition, cholic acid furnished 7 alpha, 12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-oxochol-4-en-24-oic acid; chenodeoxycholic acid gave 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxo-5 beta-cholanoic acid and 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-oxochol-4-en-24-oic acid while ursodeoxycholic acid yielded 7 beta-hydroxy-3-oxochol-4-en-24-oic acid and 3-oxochola-4,6-dien-24-oic acid. The formation of various metabolites showed that two competitive enzymic reactions, i.e., selective methylation of the 3 alpha-hydroxy group and dehydrogenation in the A/B rings, were operative. The methylation process was found to be enzymic involving an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyl transferase, and this reaction appeared to be inhibitory to the process of degradation of the ring system. In the other reaction sequence, degradation of the ring system was initiated by dehydrogenation of the 3 alpha-hydroxy group. A 7 beta-dehydratase activity producing the delta 6 double bond was also noticeable in the metabolism of ursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:8484188

  16. Effect of humidity on infection of turkeys with Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Slavik, M F; Skeeles, J K; Beasley, J N; Harris, G C; Roblee, P; Hellwig, D

    1981-01-01

    Turkeys maintained at 75% to 80% relative humidity were more adversely affected by Alcaligenes faecalis infection than turkeys maintained at 20 to 35% relative humidity. Alcaligenes faecalis was reisolated earlier and more often from turkeys maintained at the higher humidity. Clinically, the turkeys maintained at high humidity exhibited both sinusitis and conjunctivitis earlier than the turkeys at low humidity. In both groups, antibody titers as determined by a microagglutination test developed by 2 weeks postinoculation and started to decline after the third week, lymphocytosis was demonstrated at 1 week postinoculation, and a lymphopenia developed at 5 weeks postinoculation. PMID:7337613

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 Complies with Important Pathogenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hansen, Martin Asser; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Hansen, Lars; Riber, Leise; Cockburn, April; Kolpen, Mette; Rønne Hansen, Christine; Ridderberg, Winnie; Eickhardt, Steffen; Hansen, Marlene; Kerpedjiev, Peter; Alhede, Morten; Qvortrup, Klaus; Burmølle, Mette; Moser, Claus; Kühl, Michael; Ciofu, Oana; Givskov, Michael; Sørensen, Søren J.; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an environmental opportunistic pathogen, which infects an increasing number of immunocompromised patients. In this study we combined genomic analysis of a clinical isolated A. xylosoxidans strain with phenotypic investigations of its important pathogenic features. We present a complete assembly of the genome of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996, an isolate from a cystic fibrosis patient obtained in 1996. The genome of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 contains approximately 7 million base pairs with 6390 potential protein-coding sequences. We identified several features that render it an opportunistic human pathogen, We found genes involved in anaerobic growth and the pgaABCD operon encoding the biofilm adhesin poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamin. Furthermore, the genome contains a range of antibiotic resistance genes coding efflux pump systems and antibiotic modifying enzymes. In vitro studies of A. xylosoxidans NH44784-1996 confirmed the genomic evidence for its ability to form biofilms, anaerobic growth via denitrification, and resistance to a broad range of antibiotics. Our investigation enables further studies of the functionality of important identified genes contributing to the pathogenicity of A. xylosoxidans and thereby improves our understanding and ability to treat this emerging pathogen. PMID:23894309

  18. Characterization of Alcaligenes faecalis strain AD15 indicating biocontrol activity against plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shin-ichiro; Adachi, Yoshitomi; Asakura, Shuichi; Kohyama, Erina

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial strain possessing both bacteriostatic and fungistatic activity (biocontrol activity) against pathogens of cyclamen (Cyclamen sp.) was isolated from the soil in Gifu Prefecture, Japan, and characterized with respect to its taxonomic and biocontrol properties. The sequence of its 16S rRNA gene, morphology, biochemistry, and fatty acid composition demonstrated that it is a strain most closely related to Alcaligenes faecalis subsp. faecalis LMG 1229(T). The isolate was named A. faecalis strain AD15. A. faecalis AD15 produced hydroxylamine at maximum yields of 33.3±1.7 mg/L after 16 h cultivation in LB medium and 19.0±0.44 mg/L after 19 h cultivation in synthetic medium. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentrations of hydroxylamine against the cyclamen pathogens Pantoea agglomerans and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were 4.20±0.98 and 16.5±0.67 mg/L. These results indicated that the biocontrol activity of strain AD15 might be attributed to hydroxylamine, a metabolite in the culture medium, and it had the potential for biopesticide application. PMID:23759862

  19. Partial characterization of the hemagglutinin of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D G; Rose, L P; Brogden, K A; Rimler, R B

    1984-01-01

    The hemagglutinin of Alcaligenes faecalis was partially characterized. Hemagglutination (HA) was blocked by enzymes inactivating proteins, by heat, and by antisera but not by sugar-blocking substances. Pili were not determined to be a factor in HA activity. There was no connection between virulence and HA activity. PMID:6148928

  20. POSSIBLE USE OF 'ALCALIGENES PARADOXUS' AS A BIOLOGICAL MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tritium (3H2)-oxidizing soil isolate was identified as Alcaligenes paradoxus, a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. This organism belongs to a group of facultative autotrophs referred to as the 'hydrogen bacteria' due to their unique ability to utilize hydrogen as a sole sourc...

  1. Evaluation of the 4-hour RapID NF Plus method for identification of 345 gram-negative nonfermentative rods.

    PubMed

    Kitch, T T; Jacobs, M R; Appelbaum, P C

    1992-05-01

    The ability of the RapID NF Plus system (Innovative Diagnostic Systems, Inc., Atlanta, Ga.) to identify 345 nonfermentative gram-negative rods was evaluated. Kits were inoculated with no. 1 McFarland suspensions, and reactions were interpreted after a 4-h incubation at 35 degrees C. Overall, the method correctly identified 311 strains (90.1%) without additional tests and 21 strains (6.1%) with additional tests, and 13 strains (3.8%) were misidentified. Five of 13 misidentified strains were Alcaligenes faecalis-Alcaligenes odorans misidentified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans; however, all strains were xylose negative but nitrate positive and could have been A. faecalis group I-Alcaligenes piechaudii. The system does not differentiate between Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and all Acinetobacter species are identified as Acetinobacter calcoaceticus. Additionally, no subspecies differentiation is made between A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans and A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. All strains of the former Flavobacterium group IIb are identified as Flavobacterium indologenes-Flavobacterium gleum, and no species identification of the genus Methylobacterium is attempted. The system is easy to set up and interpret and provides an accurate commercial nonautomated method for same-day identification of gram-negative nonfermenters. PMID:1583129

  2. Characterization of a novel Achromobacter xylosoxidans specific siphoviruse: phiAxp-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Erna; Zhao, Jiangtao; Ma, Yanyan; Wei, Xiao; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have recently been considered as an alternative biocontrol tool because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Herein, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (phiAxp-1) from a water sample of the Bohai sea of China that specifically infects A. xylosoxidans. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage phiAxp-1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. We sequenced the genome of phiAxp-1, which comprises 45,045 bp with 64 open reading frames. Most of the proteins encoded by phiAxp-1 have no similarity to sequences in the public databases. Twenty-one proteins with assigned functions share weak homology with those of other dsDNA bacteriophages infecting diverse hosts, such as Burkholderia phage KL1, Pseudomonas phage 73, Pseudomonas phage vB_Pae-Kakheti25, Pseudomonas phage vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26, Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and Achromobacter phage JWX. The genome can be divided into different clusters for the head and tail structure, DNA replication and mazG. The sequence and genomic organization of bacteriophage phiAxp-1 are clearly distinct from other known Siphoviridae phages; therefore, we propose that it is a member of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family. Furthermore, one-step growth curve and stability studies of the phage were performed, and the specific receptor of phiAxp-1 was identified as the lipopolysaccharide of A. xylosoxidans. PMID:26908262

  3. Characterization of a novel Achromobacter xylosoxidans specific siphoviruse: phiAxp-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Erna; Zhao, Jiangtao; Ma, Yanyan; Wei, Xiao; Li, Huan; Lin, Weishi; Wang, Xuesong; Li, Chao; Shen, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ruixiang; Jiang, Aimin; Yang, Huiying; Yuan, Jing; Zhao, Xiangna

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have recently been considered as an alternative biocontrol tool because of the widespread occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Herein, we isolated a virulent bacteriophage (phiAxp-1) from a water sample of the Bohai sea of China that specifically infects A. xylosoxidans. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that phage phiAxp-1 belongs to the Siphoviridae. We sequenced the genome of phiAxp-1, which comprises 45,045 bp with 64 open reading frames. Most of the proteins encoded by phiAxp-1 have no similarity to sequences in the public databases. Twenty-one proteins with assigned functions share weak homology with those of other dsDNA bacteriophages infecting diverse hosts, such as Burkholderia phage KL1, Pseudomonas phage 73, Pseudomonas phage vB_Pae-Kakheti25, Pseudomonas phage vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26, Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and Achromobacter phage JWX. The genome can be divided into different clusters for the head and tail structure, DNA replication and mazG. The sequence and genomic organization of bacteriophage phiAxp-1 are clearly distinct from other known Siphoviridae phages; therefore, we propose that it is a member of a novel genus of the Siphoviridae family. Furthermore, one-step growth curve and stability studies of the phage were performed, and the specific receptor of phiAxp-1 was identified as the lipopolysaccharide of A. xylosoxidans. PMID:26908262

  4. Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a new microorganism strain colonizing high-density polyethylene as a key step to its biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Chyc, Marek; Ryszka, Przemysław; Latowski, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    This study presents results of research on isolation new bacteria strain Achromobacter xylosoxidans able to effect on the structure of high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymer resistant to degradation in environment. New strain of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 was isolated from the soil and identified by analysis of the 16S ribosome subunit coding sequences. The substance to be degraded was HDPE in the form of thin foil films. The foil samples were analyzed with Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) as well as scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results revealed degradation of chemical structure of HDPE. About 9 % loss of weight was also detected as a result of A. xylosoxidans PE-1 effect on HDPE foil. On the basis of comparative spectral analysis of the raw material before the bacteria treatment and the spectrum from a spectra database, it was assumed that the HDPE was the only source of carbon and energy for the microorganisms. No fillers or other additives used in the plastic processing were observed in HDPE before experiments. This is the first communication showing that A. xylosoxidans is able to modify chemical structure of HDPE, what was observed both on FTIR, in mass reduction of HDPE and SEM analysis. We also observed quite good growth of the bacteria also when the HDPE was the sole carbon source in the medium. These results prove that A. xylosoxidans is an organism worth applying in future HDPE biodegradation studies. PMID:27072033

  5. Biodegradation of phenol at high initial concentration by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Wen, Jianping; Bai, Jing; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Zongding

    2007-08-17

    Strain Alcaligenes faecalis was isolated and identified as a member of the genus Alcaligenes by using BIOLOG and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. The phenol biodegradation tests showed that the phenol-degrading potential of A. faecalis related greatly to the different physiological phases of inoculum. The maximum phenol degradation occurred at the late phase of the exponential growth stages, where 1600 mg L(-1) phenol was completely degraded within 76 h. A. faecalis secreted and accumulated a vast quantity of phenol hydroxylase in this physiological phase, which ensured that the cells could quickly utilize phenol as a sole carbon and energy source. In addition, the kinetic behavior of A. faecalis in batch cultures was also investigated over a wide range of initial phenol concentrations (0-1600 mg L(-1)) by using Haldane model. It was clear that the Haldane kinetic model adequately described the dynamic behavior of the phenol biodegradation by the strain of A. faecalis. PMID:17597295

  6. Metabolic energy from arsenite oxidation in Alcaligenes faecalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. L.; Love, M.; Zeider, B. K.

    2003-05-01

    The aerobic soil bacterium, Alcaligenes faecalis, survives in cultures containing greater than 10 g/L of aqueous arsenic. Toleration of arsenite occurs by the enzymatic oxidation of arsenite (As^III), to the less toxic arsenate (As^V). In defined media, the bacterium grows faster in the presence of arsenite than in its absence. This suggests that the bacterium uses the redox potential of arsenite oxidation as metabolic energy. The oxidation occurs via periplasmic arsenite oxidase, azurin, and cytochrome c [11] which presumably pass electron equivalents through an electron transport chain involving cytochrome c oxidase aud oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. The associated proton translocation would allow synthesis of ATP and provide a useful means of harnessing the redox potential of arsenite oxidation. Arsenite and arsenate assays of the media during bacterial growth indicate that arsenite is depleted during the exponential growth phase and occurs concomitantly with the expression of arsenite oxidase. These results suggest that arsenite is detoxified to arsenate during bacterial growth and are inconsistent with previous reported interpretations of growth data. Alcaligenes faecalis is dependent on organic carbon sources and is therefore not chemolithoautotrophic. The relationship between succinate and arsenite utilisation provides evidence for the use of arsenite as a supplemental energy source. Because Alcaligenes faecalis not only tolerates, but thrives, in very high concentrations of arsenic has important implications in bioremediation of environments contaminated by aqueous arsenic.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan; Manickam, Natesan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  9. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Italian Cystic fibrosis center: genome variability, biofilm production, antibiotic resistance, and motility in isolated strains

    PubMed Central

    Trancassini, Maria; Iebba, Valerio; Citerà, Nicoletta; Tuccio, Vanessa; Magni, Annarita; Varesi, Paola; De Biase, Riccardo V.; Totino, Valentina; Santangelo, Floriana; Gagliardi, Antonella; Schippa, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have chronic airway infection and frequent exposure to antibiotics, which often leads to the emergence of resistant organisms. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a new emergent pathogen in CF spectrum. From 2005 to 2010 we had an outbreak in A. xylosoxidans prevalence in our CF center, thus, the present study was aimed at deeply investigating virulence traits of A. xylosoxidans strains isolated from infected CF patients. To this purpose, we assessed A. xylosoxidans genome variability by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), biofilm production, antibiotic resistances, and motility. All A. xylosoxidans strains resulted to be biofilm producers, and were resistant to antibiotics usually employed in CF treatment. Hodge Test showed the ability to produce carbapenemase in some strains. Strains who were resistant to β-lactamics antibiotics, showed the specific band related to metal β-lactamase (blaIMP-1), and some of them showed to possess the integron1. Around 81% of A. xylosoxidans strains were motile. Multivariate analysis showed that RAPD profiles were able to predict Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1%) and biofilm classes. A significant prevalence of strong biofilm producers strains was found in CF patients with severely impaired lung functions (FEV1% class 1). The outbreak we had in our center (prevalence from 8.9 to 16%) could be explained by an enhanced adaptation of A. xylosoxidans in the nosocomial environment, despite of aggressive antibiotic regimens that CF patients usually undergo. PMID:24772108

  10. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  11. A Case of Septic Shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans in an Immunocompetent Female Patient after Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy for a Ureteral Stone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hyuk; Lee, So Yon; Park, In Young; Park, So Yeon; Lee, Jin Seo; Kang, Goeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Eom, Joong Sik

    2016-03-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans can cause various types of infections, but its infection in humans is rare. A. xylosoxidans has been reported as a rare etiological agent of infections including primary bacteremia, catheter-related bloodstream infection, endocarditis, otitis, and pneumonia, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. We encountered a case of septic shock caused by A. xylosoxidans in a 52-year-old, immunocompetent woman with no underlying disease, who received extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy to remove a left upper ureteral stone. She was treated with antibiotics to which the organism was susceptible but died as a result of septic shock. PMID:27104016

  12. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014.

    PubMed

    Haviari, Skerdi; Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13-October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case-control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation. PMID:27434277

  13. Specific and sensitive detection of Alcaligenes species from an agricultural environment.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo; Niwa, Masumi; Nishimura, Norihiro

    2013-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay to specifically detect and quantify the genus Alcaligenes in samples from the agricultural environment, such as vegetables and farming soils, was developed. The minimum detection sensitivity was 106 fg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from two cells of Alcaligenes faecalis. To evaluate the detection limit of A. faecalis, serially diluted genomic DNA from this organism was mixed with DNA extracted from soil and vegetables and then a standard curve was constructed. It was found that Alcaligenes species are present in the plant phytosphere at levels 10(2)-10(4) times lower than those in soil. The approach presented here will be useful for tracking or quantifying species of the genus Alcaligenes in the agricultural environment. PMID:23489084

  14. Purification and characterization of exopolysaccharide bioflocculant produced by heavy metal resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Sanjukta; Bisht, Varsha; Batta, Neha; Pathak, Mihirjyoti; Devi, Arundhuti; Lal, Banwari

    2016-02-10

    Optimization of process parameters enhanced bioflocculating activity of 'Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain TERI L1' from 75% to 83.3% in absence of heavy metals, which decreased to 73% in presence of multi-metals. 'TERI L1' could adsorb 90% of multi-metals when grown in presence of 1250 mg L(-1) Zn, 2 mg L(-1) Cd, 30 mg L(-1) Pb, 200 mg L(-1) Ni and 90 mg L(-1) Cu and could adsorb 1100 mg L(-1) of Pb when grown in presence of 1500 ppm lead nitrate. The bioflocculant was purified and characterized. Bioflocculant yield was 5 g L(-1). Fourier transform infrared spectrum indicated presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl, amino groups, typical of glycoprotein. Spectroscopic analysis of bioflocculant by nuclear magnetic resonance revealed that it is a glycoprotein. LC-MS analysis confirmed the bioflocculant as a carbohydrate hetero polymer. Bioflocculant was composed of 75% total sugar with 72.9% neutral sugar and 11.5% protein. Scanning Electron Micrography revealed effective flocculation of kaolin clay by purified exopolysaccharide bioflocculant. PMID:26686149

  15. Outbreak of Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Ochrobactrum anthropi Infections after Prostate Biopsies, France, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Cassier, Pierre; Dananché, Cédric; Hulin, Monique; Dauwalder, Olivier; Rouvière, Olivier; Bertrand, Xavier; Perraud, Michel; Bénet, Thomas; Vanhems, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of healthcare-associated prostatitis involving rare environmental pathogens in immunocompetent patients undergoing transrectal prostate biopsies at Hôpital Édouard Herriot (Lyon, France) during August 13–October 10, 2014. Despite a fluoroquinolone-based prophylaxis, 5 patients were infected with Achromobacter xylosoxidans and 3 with Ochrobactrum anthropi, which has not been reported as pathogenic in nonimmunocompromised persons. All patients recovered fully. Analysis of the outbreak included case investigation, case–control study, biopsy procedure review, microbiologic testing of environmental and clinical samples, and retrospective review of hospital records for 4 years before the outbreak. The cases resulted from asepsis errors during preparation of materials for the biopsies. A low-level outbreak involving environmental bacteria was likely present for years, masked by antimicrobial drug prophylaxis and a low number of cases. Healthcare personnel should promptly report unusual pathogens in immunocompetent patients to infection control units, and guidelines should explicitly mention asepsis during materials preparation. PMID:27434277

  16. Elucidation of fluoranthene degradative characteristics in a newly isolated Achromobacter xylosoxidans DN002.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Ling; Lu, Wei; Wan, Li-Li; Luo, Na

    2015-02-01

    Strain DN002 isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil was identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans based on morphological and biochemical properties and 16S rRNA phylogeny, and investigated for its potential to utilize numerous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as fluoranthene and pyrene as sole carbon and energy resource. Biodegradation studies showed that 500 mg(·)l(-1)fluranthene was degraded to 35.6 ± 0.3 mg(·)l(-1) by DN002 after 14 days incubation. During fluoranthene biodegradation, catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23O) activity was augmented 1.5 times more than catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12O), which indicated that C23O played a major role in fluoranthene degradation by DN002. Protein profiles were examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and two-dimensional electrophoresis then analyzed by mass spectrometry induced by fluoranthene; a molecular mass range of 18 ∼ 66 kDa proteins were found upregulated compared with the uninduced control sample, including multiple isoenzymes of β-oxidation and dehydrogenases as well as dioxygenases. Besides, some new proteins, i.e., dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase and aldehyde dehydrogenase family proteins and isocitrate lyase were also synthesized. PMID:25381650

  17. Biochemical and genetic analyses of acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Fründ, C; Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1989-01-01

    In genetic studies on the catabolism of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, we used Tn5::mob-induced mutants which were impaired in the utilization of acetoin as the sole carbon source for growth. The transposon-harboring EcoRI restriction fragments from 17 acetoin-negative and slow-growing mutants (class 2a) and from six pleiotropic mutants of A. eutorphus, which were acetoin-negative and did not grow chemolithoautotrophically (class 2b), were cloned from pHC79 gene banks. The insertions of Tn5 were mapped on four different chromosomal EcoRI restriction fragments (A, C, D, and E) in class 2a mutants. The native DNA fragments were cloned from a lambda L47 or from a cosmid gene bank. Evidence is provided that fragments A (21 kilobase pairs [kb]) and C (7.7 kb) are closely linked in the genome; the insertions of Tn5 covered a region of approximately 5 kb. Physiological experiments revealed that this region encodes for acetoin:dichlorophenol-indophenol oxidoreductase, a fast-migrating protein, and probably for one additional protein that is as yet unknown. In mutants which were not completely impaired in growth on acetoin but which grew much slower and after a prolonged lag phase, fragments D (7.2 kb) and E (8.1 kb) were inactivated by insertion of Tn5::mob. No structural gene could be assigned to the D or E fragments. In class 2b mutants, insertions of Tn5 were mapped on fragment B (11.3 kb). This fragment complemented pleiotropic hno mutants in trans; these mutants were impaired in the formation of a rpoN-like protein. The expression of the gene cluster on fragments A and C seemed to be rpoN dependent. PMID:2556366

  18. Degradation of dexamethasone by acclimated strain of Pseudomonas Alcaligenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lili; Yang, Zhibang; Yang, Qian; Tu, Zeng; Ma, Lianju; Shi, Zhongquan; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the use of microbial remediation technology for degradation of dexamethasone in polluted water. A strain of Pseudomonas Alcaligenes with the ability of dexamethasone degradation was isolated from hospital polluted water. This strain was further acclimated into a bacterial strain that could highly degrade dexamethasone. Domesticated bacterial proteins were separated by osmotic shock method and were analyzed using SDS-PAGE. Enzyme activity of dexamethasone degradation was detected by high performance liquid chromatography. Protein bands with different molecular weight were found in all regions of the bacteria and a band with molecular weight of about 100 kDa was most obvious. In intracellular and periplasmic liquid, there was a band with molecular weight of about 41 kDa. Enzyme activity mainly existed in intracellular liquid. The 41 kDa protease was purified using ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-52 ion exchange column and Sephadex G-100 column. Dexamethasone and dexamethasone sodium phosphate degrading rates of the purified enzyme were 36% and 95%, respectively. The 100 kDa protein had a 19% coverage rate to TonB receptor dependent protein, with 11 peptides matching. The 41 kDa protein had a 56% coverage rate to isovaleryl coenzyme A dehydrogenase, with 5 peptides matching. The 41 kDa protein had good degradation between the temperature of 25-40°C and PH value of 6.5-8.5. The enzyme kinetics equation was Ct = C0 e-0.1769t, in accordance with the first-order kinetic equation. This study laid the foundation for further preparation of bioremediation agents for clearance of dexamethasone pollution in water. PMID:26379892

  19. Metabolism of Cyclohexane Carboxylic Acid by Alcaligenes Strain W1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, David G.; Trudgill, Peter W.

    1978-01-01

    Thirty-three microorganisms capable of growth with cyclohexane carboxylate as the sole source of carbon were isolated from mud, water, and soil samples from the Aberystwyth area. Preliminary screening and whole-cell oxidation studies suggested that, with one exception, all of the strains metabolized the growth substrate by beta-oxidation of the coenzyme A ester. This single distinctive strain, able to oxidize rapidly trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate, 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate, p-hydroxybenzoate, and protocatechuate when grown with cyclohexane carboxylate, was classified as a strain of Alcaligenes and given the number W1. Enzymes capable of converting cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate were induced by growth with the alicyclic acid and included the first unambiguous specimen of a cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase. Because it is a very fragile protein, attempts to stabilize the cyclohexane carboxylate hydroxylase so that a purification procedure could be developed have consistently failed. In limited studies with crude cell extracts, we found that hydroxylation occurred at the 4 position, probably yielding the trans isomer of 4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate. Simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidation, coupled with an assessment of reactant stoichiometry, showed the enzyme to be a mixed-function oxygenase. Mass spectral analysis enabled the conversion of cyclohexane carboxylate to p-hydroxybenzoate by cell extracts to be established unequivocally, and all of our data were consistent with the pathway: cyclohexane carboxylate → trans-4-hydroxycyclohexane carboxylate → 4-ketocyclohexane carboxylate → p-hydroxybenzoate. The further metabolism of p-hydroxybenzoate proceeded by meta fission and by the oxidative branch of the 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconic semialde-hyde-cleaving pathway. PMID:207665

  20. Beta-lactamase-free penicillin amidase from Alcaligenes sp.: isolation strategy, strain characteristics, and enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Pal, A; Samanta, T B

    1999-11-01

    Isolation and characterization of a beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6)-free, penicillin amidase (penicillin amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1. 11)-producing organism is reported. The test strain was isolated by an enrichment technique with a substrate other than penicillins. The isolated strain belongs to the genus Alcaligenes. Phenylacetic acid was found to be the inducer of penicillin amidase. The amidase has a broad substrate spectrum. It is very active against penicillin G and semisynthetic cephalosporins, whereas penicillin V and semisynthetic penicillins acted moderately as a substrate. Immobilized cells of Alcaligenes sp. were shown to act as a reversible enzyme. PMID:10489431

  1. Antigenic determinants of the membrane-bound hydrogenase in Alcaligenes eutrophus are exposed toward the periplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Eismann, K; Mlejnek, K; Zipprich, D; Hoppert, M; Gerberding, H; Mayer, F

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopic immunogold labeling experiments were performed with ultrathin sections of plasmolyzed cells of Alcaligenes eutrophus and "whole-mount" samples of spheroplasts and protoplasts. They demonstrated that antigenic determinants of the membrane-bound hydrogenase are exposed, at the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane, to the periplasm. PMID:7592402

  2. A Newly Sequenced Alcaligenes faecalis Strain: Implications for Novel Temporal Symbiotic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Lozano-Aguirre Beltrán, Luis Fernando; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Quiroz-Castañeda, Rosa Estela; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02, a bacterium that is able to colonize nematodes in a temporary fashion and kill insects for their own benefit. The availability of the genome should enable us to explain these phenotypes. PMID:25540337

  3. The characterisation of Bordetella/Alcaligenes-like organisms and their effects on turkey poults and chicks.

    PubMed

    Varley, J

    1986-01-01

    Eight isolates of the Bordetella or Alcaligenes-like organisms associated with turkey rhino-tracheitis were examined. Five of these isolates had been recovered from the United Kingdom and three were foreign isolates. Four of the UK isolates came from flocks with mild respiratory disease. The fifth isolate came from birds with no respiratory signs and this appears to be the first report of the recovery of Bordetella/Alcaligenes from apparently normal turkeys. The field isolates and type strains Alcaligenes faecalis NCTC 415 and Bordetella bronchiseptica NCTC 452 were characterised by biochemical tests, but these did not include any electrophoresis or nucleic acid studies. Cluster analysis using the group average method and the similarly coefficient of Sokal and Sneath indicated that all the strains were distinct from Alcaligenes faecalis but were quite closely related to Bordetella bronchiseptica. Each field isolate was used to infect separate groups of day-old turkey poults and chicks, and each group contained birds which were experimentally infected and others which were in-contact. Observations were made over a 32-day period. In turkey poults, some of the isolates induced severe respiratory disease and mortality, and others very little or none. The UK isolates were less pathogenic than the foreign isolates. It was not possible to correlate the pathogenicity of the isolates for turkey poults with their biochemical characteristics. Chicks infected with two of the eight isolates showed slight respiratory signs, but there was no significant mortality. PMID:18766500

  4. Unusual causes of peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient: Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An 87 -year-old female who was undergoing peritoneal dialysis presented with peritonitis caused by Alcaligenes faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans in consecutive years. With the following report we discuss the importance of these unusual microorganisms in peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:21477370

  5. Isolation and characterization of the pesticide-degrading plasmid pJP1 from Alcaligenes paradoxus.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, P R; Appleton, J; Pemberton, J M

    1978-01-01

    A strain of Alcaligenes paradoxus, unable to degrade phenoxyacetic acid, was shown to degrade two synthetic derivatives of this molecule, the herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid. The ability to degrade these pesticides is encoded by a 58-megadalton conjugal plasmid, pJP1. PMID:690076

  6. Antibody Response to Achromobacter xylosoxidans during HIV Infection Is Associated with Lower CD4 Levels and Increased Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Purnajo, Intan; Richman, Douglas D.; Smith, Davey M.; Gianella, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation during HIV infection is associated with worse disease outcomes and progression. Many mechanisms have been indicted, including HIV itself, coinfections, and gut microbial translocation. Concerning microbial translocation, we hypothesized that adaptive immune responses to a specific bacterial species known to be present in gut-associated lymphoid tissue are higher among HIV-infected individuals than among HIV-uninfected controls and are associated with T cell activation and lower CD4 T cell counts. By characterizing the IgG response to Achromobacter xylosoxidans, we found that HIV-infected participants who were immunoresponsive (n = 48) had significantly lower CD4 percentages (P = 0.01), greater CD4 activation (percentages of RA− CD38+) (P = 0.03), and higher soluble CD14 (P = 0.01). HIV-positive individuals had higher anti-A. xylosoxidans IgG titers than HIV-uninfected individuals (P = 0.04). The results suggest an abnormal adaptive immune activation to gut microflora during HIV infection. PMID:24173027

  7. Selection and application of endophytic bacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain F3B for improving phytoremediation of phenolic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Mathew, Dony Chacko; Hsiao, Shu-Chuan; Shih, Chun-Hao; Chien, Mei-Fang; Chiang, Hsing-Mei; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2012-06-15

    While phytoremediation has been considered as an in situ bioprocess to remediate environmental contaminants, the application of functional endophytic bacteria within plants remains a potential strategy that could enhance the plants' efficiency in phytoremediation. In this study, 219 endophytes were isolated from plants that are predominantly located in a constructed wetland, including reed (Phragmites australis) and water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica). Twenty-five strains of the isolated endophytes utilize aromatic compounds as sole carbon source; Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain F3B was chosen for the in planta studies using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that those endophytic isolates of A. xylosoxidans formed a cluster within its species, and a specific real-time PCR detection method was developed for confirming the stability of the isolates in plants. In the presence of either catechol or phenol, inoculation of A. thaliana with F3B could extend into the root lengths and fresh weights to promote pollutants removal rates. These results demonstrate the potential of the endophytic F3B strain for helping plants to tolerate stress from aromatic compounds and to improve phytoremediation of phenolic pollutants. PMID:22497718

  8. IMP-1 encoded by a novel Tn402-like class 1 integron in clinical Achromobacter xylosoxidans, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhong; Fang, Haihong; Wang, Li; Sun, Fengjun; Wang, Yong; Yin, Zhe; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain A22732 is isolated from a pneumonia patient in China and produces carbapenemases OXA-114e and IMP-1, which are encoded by chromosome and plasmid, respectively, and confer resistance to multiple ß-lactam antibiotics including carbapenems. The blaIMP-1 gene together with aacA7 and orfE is captured by a novel Tn402-like class 1 integron in a conjugative IncP-1ß plasmid. In addition to the intrinsic integron promoter PcW, there is still a blaIMP-1 gene cassette-specific promoter. This is the first report of carbapenemase-encoding IncP-1ß plasmid in clinical bacterial isolate. PMID:25428613

  9. Characterization of protease from Alcaligens faecalis and its antibacterial activity on fish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, N; Kumar, Arun; Saravanakumar, A; Vijaylakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T

    2011-11-01

    Alcaligens faecalis AU01 isolated from seafood industry effluent produced an alkaline protease. The optimum culture conditions for growth as well as enzyme production were 37 degrees C and pH 8. The partially purified protease had specific activity of 9.66 with 17.77% recovery with the molecular weight of 33 kDa and it was active between 30-70 degrees C and optimum being at 55 degrees C and pH 9. The enzyme retains more than 85% activity at 70 degrees C and 78% even at pH 10. The enzyme inhibited the growth of fish pathogens such as Flavobacterium sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio harveyi, Proteus sp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. From the present study it can be concluded that Alcaligens faecalis AU01 has the potential for aquaculture as probiotic agent and other several applications. PMID:22471216

  10. Characterization of pbt genes conferring increased Pb2+ and Cd2+ tolerance upon Achromobacter xylosoxidans A8.

    PubMed

    Hložková, Kateřina; Suman, Jáchym; Strnad, Hynek; Ruml, Tomas; Paces, Vaclav; Kotrba, Pavel

    2013-12-01

    The cluster of pbtTFYRABC genes is carried by plasmid pA81. Its elimination from Achromobacter xylosoxidans A8 resulted in increased sensitivity towards Pb(2+) and Cd(2+). Predicted pbtTRABC products share strong similarities with Pb(2+) uptake transporter PbrT, transcriptional regulator PbrR, metal efflux P1-ATPases PbrA and CadA, undecaprenyl pyrophosphatase PbrB and its signal peptidase PbrC from Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34. Expression of pbtABC or pbtA in a metal-sensitive Escherichia coli GG48 rendered the strain Pb(2+)-, Cd(2+)- and Zn(2+)-tolerant and caused decreased accumulation of the metal ions. Accumulation of Pb(2+), but not of Cd(2+) or Zn(2+), was promoted in E. coli expressing pbtT. Additional genes of the pbt cluster are pbtF and pbtY, which encode the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF)-like transporter and a putative fatty acid hydroxylase of unknown function, respectively. Expression of pbtF did not confer increased metal tolerance upon E. coli GG48, although the protein showed measurable Pb(2+)-efflux activity. Unlike the pbtT promoter, promoters of pbtABC, pbtF and pbtY contain features characteristic of promoters controlled by metal-responsive transcriptional regulators of the MerR family. Upregulation of pbtABC, pbtF and pbtY upon Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) exposure was confirmed in wild-type Achromobacter xylosoxidans A8. Gel shift assays proved binding of purified PbtR to the respective promoters. PMID:24125695

  11. Lipase Expression in Pseudomonas alcaligenes Is Under the Control of a Two-Component Regulatory System▿

    PubMed Central

    Krzeslak, Joanna; Gerritse, Gijs; van Merkerk, Ronald; Cool, Robbert H.; Quax, Wim J.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary observations in a large-scale fermentation process suggested that the lipase expression of Pseudomonas alcaligenes can be switched on by the addition of certain medium components, such as soybean oil. In an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of induction of lipase expression, we have set up a search method for genes controlling lipase expression by use of a cosmid library containing fragments of P. alcaligenes genomic DNA. A screen for lipase hyperproduction resulted in the selection of multiple transformants, of which the best-producing strains comprised cosmids that shared an overlapping genomic fragment. Within this fragment, two previously unidentified genes were found and named lipQ and lipR. Their encoded proteins belong to the NtrBC family of regulators that regulate gene expression via binding to a specific upstream activator sequence (UAS). Such an NtrC-like UAS was identified in a previous study in the P. alcaligenes lipase promoter, strongly suggesting that LipR acts as a positive regulator of lipase expression. The regulating role could be confirmed by down-regulated lipase expression in a strain with an inactivated lipR gene and a threefold increase in lipase yield in a large-scale fermentation when expressing the lipQR operon from the multicopy plasmid pLAFR3. Finally, cell extracts of a LipR-overexpressing strain caused a retardation of the lipase promoter fragment in a band shift assay. Our results indicate that lipase expression in Pseudomonas alcaligenes is under the control of the LipQR two-component system. PMID:18192420

  12. Arsenic Methylation and Volatilization by Arsenite S-Adenosylmethionine Methyltransferase in Pseudomonas alcaligenes NBRC14159

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Tingting; Tang, Zhu; Shen, Qirong; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (As) is highly toxic and ubiquitous in the environment. Inorganic As can be transformed by microbial methylation, which constitutes an important part of the As biogeochemical cycle. In this study, we investigated As biotransformation by Pseudomonas alcaligenes NBRC14159. P. alcaligenes was able to methylate arsenite [As(III)] rapidly to dimethylarsenate and small amounts of trimethylarsenic oxide. An arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase, PaArsM, was identified and functionally characterized. PaArsM shares low similarities with other reported ArsM enzymes (<55%). When P. alcaligenes arsM gene (PaarsM) was disrupted, the mutant lost As methylation ability and became more sensitive to As(III). PaarsM was expressed in the absence of As(III) and the expression was further enhanced by As(III) exposure. Heterologous expression of PaarsM in an As-hypersensitive strain of Escherichia coli conferred As(III) resistance. Purified PaArsM protein methylated As(III) to dimethylarsenate as the main product in the medium and also produced dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine gases. We propose that PaArsM plays a role in As methylation and detoxification of As(III) and could be exploited in bioremediation of As-contaminated environments. PMID:25681184

  13. Isolation of Indole Utilizing Bacteria Arthrobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. From Livestock Waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Eonmi; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Younghoon; Lee, Jintae

    2016-06-01

    Indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signaling molecule widespread in different environmental compartment. Although multifaceted roles of indole in different biological systems have been established, little information is available on the microbial utilization of indole in the context of combating odor emissions from different types of waste. The present study was aimed at identifying novel bacteria capable of utilizing indole as the sole carbon and energy source. From the selective enrichment of swine waste and cattle feces, we identified Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter and Alcaligenes. Bacteria belonging to the genus Alcaligenes showed higher rates of indole utilization than Arthrobacter. Indole at 1.0 mM for growth was completely utilized by Alcaligenes sp. in 16 h. Both strains produced two intermediates, anthranilic acid and isatin, during aerobic indole metabolism. These isolates were also able to grow on several indole derivatives. Interestingly, an adaptive response in terms of a decrease in cell size was observed in both strains in the presence of indole. The present study will help to explain the degradation of indole by different bacteria and also the pathways through which it is catabolized. Furthermore, these novel bacterial isolates could be potentially useful for the in situ attenuation of odorant indole and its derivatives emitted from different types of livestock waste. PMID:27570307

  14. Development of a PCR-based method for monitoring the status of Alcaligenes species in the agricultural environment.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyo; Niwa, Masumi; Nishimura, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the status of the genus Alcaligenes in the agricultural environment, we developed a PCR method for detection of these species from vegetables and farming soil. The selected PCR primers amplified a 107-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene in a specific PCR assay with a detection limit of 1.06 pg of pure culture DNA, corresponding to DNA extracted from approximately 23 cells of Alcaligenes faecalis. Meanwhile, PCR primers generated a detectable amount of the amplicon from 2.2×10(2) CFU/ml cell suspensions from the soil. Analysis of vegetable phylloepiphytic and farming soil microbes showed that bacterial species belonging to the genus Alcaligenes were present in the range from 0.9×10(0) CFU per gram (or cm(2)) (Japanese radish: Raphanus sativus var. longipinnatus) to more than 1.1×10(4) CFU/g (broccoli flowers: Brassica oleracea var. italic), while 2.4×10(2) to 4.4×10(3) CFU/g were detected from all soil samples. These results indicated that Alcaligenes species are present in the phytosphere at levels 10-1000 times lower than those in soil. Our approach may be useful for tracking or quantifying species of the genus Alcaligenes in the agricultural environment. PMID:24670615

  15. Septic arthritis caused by a gram-negative bacterium representing a new species related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes complex.

    PubMed

    Kronvall, G; Hanson, H S; von Stedingk, L V; Törnqvist, E; Falsen, E

    2000-03-01

    A knee-joint exudate culture yielded on two occasions a gram-negative bacterium. Regular methods for speciation did not provide an identification. The infection was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. The unknown isolate, CCUG 36768, was subjected to further investigation, including 16S rDNA sequencing, protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis, and various biochemical tests, in order to produce a species identification. The 1469 bp-long 16S rDNA sequence did not reveal identity with any known species sequence. CCUG 36768 clustered in a group of species, including Alcaligenes defragrans, Denitrobacter permanens, Taylorella equigenitalis, Alcaligenes faecalis, and four strains of Alcaligenes species without a specific species name. Bordetella species also showed a high degree of similarity with CCUG 36768. Protein profiling, cellular fatty acid analysis and computer-assisted analysis of biochemical profiles indicated similarity with Bordetella-Alcaligenes species, often close to B. holmesii and B. avium. API 20 NE indicated the profile of Moraxella species of poor identity. It is concluded that CCUG 36768 represents a new bacterial species of pathogenic potential in humans. It is related to the Bordetella-Alcaligenes group. Powerful new methods for speciation are available and it is recommended that unknown isolates from normally sterile sites be submitted for further analysis. Several isolates are required for the definition of new species. PMID:10752687

  16. Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis subsp. nov., isolated from vegetable matrices.

    PubMed

    Bringel, Françoise; Castioni, Anna; Olukoya, Daniel K; Felis, Giovanna E; Torriani, Sandra; Dellaglio, Franco

    2005-07-01

    Fourteen strains isolated from vegetable sources and identified as belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum presented an atypical pattern of amplification with a species-specific multiplex-PCR assay. Phylogenetic analysis of two protein-encoding genes, recA (encoding the recombinase A protein) and cpn60 (encoding the GroEL chaperonin), as well as phenotypic and genomic traits revealed a homogeneous group of very closely related strains for which subspecies status is proposed, with the name Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. argentoratensis. The type strain is DKO 22(T) (=CIP 108320(T)=DSM 16365(T)). PMID:16014493

  17. Dissecting the taxonomic heterogeneity within Propionibacterium acnes: proposal for Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Dekio, Itaru; Culak, Renata; Misra, Raju; Gaulton, Tom; Fang, Min; Sakamoto, Mitsuo; Ohkuma, Moriya; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Rajendram, Dunstan; Gharbia, Saheer E; Shah, Haroun N

    2015-12-01

    Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. are described. These emanate from the three known phylotypes of P. acnes, designated types I, II and III. Electron microscopy confirmed the filamentous cell shape of type III, showing a striking difference from types I/II, which were short rods. Biochemical tests indicated that, in types I/II, either the pyruvate, l-pyrrolidonyl arylamidase or d-ribose 2 test was positive, whereas all of these were negative among type III strains. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) spectra, which profile mainly their ribosomal proteins, were different between these two groups. Surface-enhanced laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS) spectra of all phylotypes revealed a specific protein biomarker that was overexpressed in type III strains compared with types I/II only when grown aerobically. Reference strains had high whole-genome similarity between types I (>91 %) and II (>75 %), but a considerably lower level of 72 % similarity with type III. recA and gyrB sequence dendrograms confirmed the distant relatedness of type III, indicating the presence of two distinct centres of variation within the species P. acnes. On the other hand, cellular fatty acid profiles and 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness (>99.3 %) circumscribed the species. Thus, we propose two subspecies, Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes subsp. nov. for types I/II and Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum subsp. nov. for type III. The type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. acnes is NCTC 737T ( = ATCC 6919T = JCM 6425T = DSM 1897T = CCUG 1794T), while the type strain of Propionibacterium acnes subsp. elongatum is K124T ( = NCTC 13655T = JCM 18919T). PMID:26432704

  18. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  19. Growth kinetics of Pseudomonas alcaligenes C-0 relative to inoculation and 3-chlorobenzoate metabolism in soil.

    PubMed

    Focht, D D; Shelton, D

    1987-08-01

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes C-0 was isolated from activated sewage sludge by enrichment with 3-chlorobenzoate (3CB) as the sole carbon source. The carbon balance from [14C]3CB in pure culture could be accounted for in substrate, biomass, and CO2 from all sampling periods and inoculum densities (0.012, 0.092, 0.20, and 0.92 micrograms of dry cells X ml-1), and inorganic chloride was produced stoichiometrically. Monod parameters as determined in culture were compared with the kinetics of 3CB metabolism in soil with decreasing inoculum densities (1.9 X 10(-1), 1.9 X 10(-3), and 1.9 X 10(-5) micrograms of cells X g-1). 3CB was refractile to attack in soil by indigenous microflora, but it was completely metabolized upon inoculation with P. alcaligenes C-0. The saturation constant KS was much higher in soil than in culture, but the yield coefficient Y and the growth rate constant were the same in both systems: mu max = 0.32 h-1; Y = 34 micrograms cells X mumol-1; KS = 0.18 mM in culture and 6.0 mM in soil solution (1.1 mumol X g-1 of soil). The parameter estimates obtained from the highest inoculum density could be used for the lower inoculum densities with reasonable agreement between predicted and observed 3CB concentrations in soil, although the residual sum of squares was progressively higher. Since the growth rate of P. alcaligenes C-0 in soil was comparable to its growth rate in culture, inoculation should be a viable strategy for biodegradation of 3CB in soil if indigenous microflora are unable to exploit this metabolic niche. PMID:3662518

  20. The complete genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02, a novel potential bionematocide.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shouyong; Zheng, Jinshui; Lin, Jian; Geng, Ce; Zhu, Lei; Guan, Ziyu; Zheng, Ziqiang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-20

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) can infect almost all crops, and result in huge economic losses in agriculture. There is no effective and environmentally safe means available to control RKNs. Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02 isolated from free living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans cadavers shows toxicity against RKN Meloidogyne incognita, that makes this strain to be a good bionematicide candidate for controlling of RKNs. Here, we firstly report the complete genome of A. faecalis ZD02 and describe its features. Additionally, we found two potential virulence factors in this genome, which play important roles for the nematocidal activity of A. faecalis ZD02. PMID:26656226

  1. Nitrous oxide production by Alcaligenes faecalis under transient and dynamic aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, S.; Grobben, N.G.; Robertson, L.A.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Kuenen, J.G.

    1996-07-01

    Nitrous oxide production contributes to both greenhouse effect and ozone depletion in the stratosphere. A significant part of the global N2O emission can be attributed to microbial processes, especially nitrification and denitrification, used in biological wastewater treatment systems. This study looks at the efficiency of denitrification and the enzymes involved, with the emphasis on N2O production during the transient phase from aerobic to anaerobic conditions and vice versa. The effect of repetitive changing aerobic-anaerobic conditions on N2O was also studied. Alcaligenes faecalis was used as the model denitrofing organism. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Negative findings concerning Alcaligenes faecalis as an etiologic agent in acute respiratory disease of turkeys.

    PubMed

    Singer, N; Weisman, Y; Aronovici, A

    1981-01-01

    An acute respiratory disease of turkeys in Israel was first reported in November 1978. Alcaligenes faecalis was isolated from sick turkeys and from chickens not affected by the disease. Plate agglutination tests with A. faecalis antigen of 1,067 turkey and 494 chicken serum samples gave variable results: healthy turkeys gave positive reactions and sick turkeys sometimes gave negative ones. All isolated strains were highly sensitive in vitro drug sensitivity tests, but chemotherapy failed in the field. Pathogenicity trials with A. faecalis, given alone or in combination with Yucaipa virus to 8-day-old turkey poults, failed to reproduce the disease. PMID:7259671

  3. Physiology and molecular genetics of poly(beta-hydroxy-alkanoic acid) synthesis in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Steinbüchel, A; Schlegel, H G

    1991-03-01

    The Alcaligenes eutrophus genes for beta-ketothiolase, NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase and poly(beta-hydroxybutyric acid) synthase (PHB synthase) which comprise the three-step PHB-biosynthetic pathway, were cloned. Molecular studies revealed that these genes are organized in a single operon. The A. eutrophus PHB-biosynthetic genes are readily expressed in other bacteria, and DNA fragments harbouring the operon can be used as a cartridge to confer to other bacteria the ability to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA. The biochemical and physiological capabilities of A. eutrophus for the synthesis of a wide variety of polyhydroxyalkanoates are discussed. PMID:2046547

  4. Aerobic degradation of bisphenol A by Achromobacter xylosoxidans strain B-16 isolated from compost leachate of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chang; Zeng, Guangming; Yuan, Li; Yu, Jian; Li, Jianbing; Huang, Guohe; Xi, Beidou; Liu, Hongliang

    2007-05-01

    A novel bacterium designated strain B-16 was isolated from the compost leachate of the municipal solid waste (MSW) in a laboratory reactor. This strain was identified as a gram-negative bacterium, Achromobacter xylosoxidans that could grow on bisphenol A (BPA, a representative endocrine disruptor) as a sole carbon source under aerobic condition. BPA-degrading characteristics of strain B-16 were investigated in liquid cultures. The results show that BPA degradation was influenced by several factors (e.g. inoculum size, substrate concentration, temperature and pH, etc). The half-lives, optimum temperature and pH were found to be 0.58-3.1d, 35 degrees C and 7.0, respectively. BPA-degrading activity and cell growth were inhibited at high substrate concentration. Metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process were identified as p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and p-hydroquinone, respectively. Metabolic pathway of BPA degradation was proposed in this study. PMID:17291567

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Numerous Novel Phages Targeting Diverse Strains of the Ubiquitous and Opportunistic Pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Johannes; Dreiseikelmann, Brigitte; Rohde, Christine; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The clinical relevance of nosocomially acquired infections caused by multi-resistant Achromobacter strains is rapidly increasing. Here, a diverse set of 61 Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains was characterized by MultiLocus Sequence Typing and Phenotype MicroArray technology. The strains were further analyzed in regard to their susceptibility to 35 antibiotics and to 34 different and newly isolated bacteriophages from the environment. A large proportion of strains were resistant against numerous antibiotics such as cephalosporines, aminoglycosides and quinolones, whereas piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin, mezlocillin and imipenem were still inhibitory. We also present the first expanded study on bacteriophages of the genus Achromobacter that has been so far a blank slate with respect to phage research. The phages were isolated mainly from several waste water treatment plants in Germany. Morphological analysis of all of these phages by electron microscopy revealed a broad diversity with different members of the order Caudovirales, including the families Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae. A broad spectrum of different host ranges could be determined for several phages that lysed up to 24 different and in part highly antibiotic resistant strains. Molecular characterisation by DNA restriction analysis revealed that all phages contain linear double-stranded DNA. Their restriction patterns display distinct differences underlining their broad diversity. PMID:24466294

  6. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  7. Proton translocation during denitrification by a nitrifying--denitrifying Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Castignetti, D; Hollocher, T C

    1983-04-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifying Alcaligenes sp. from soil was grown as a denitrifier on nitrate and subjected to oxidant pulse experiments to ascertain the apparent efficiencies of proton translocations during O2 and nitrogen-oxide respirations. With endogenous substrate as the reducing agent the leads to H+/2e- ratios, extrapolated to zero amount of oxidant per pulse, were 9.4, 3.7, 4.3 and 3.5 for O2, nitrate, nitrite and N2O, respectively. The value for O2 and those for the N-oxides are, respectively, somewhat larger and smaller than corresponding values for Paracoccus denitrificans. None of the three permeant ions employed with the Alcaligenes sp. (valinomycin-K+, thiocyanate and triphenylmethylphosphonium) was ideal for all purposes. Thiocyanate provided highest ratios for O2 but abolished the oxidant pulse response for nitrate and N2O. Valinomycin was slow to penetrate to the cytoplasmic membrane and relatively high concentrations were required for optimal performance. Triphenylmethylphosphonium enhanced passive proton permeability and diminished proton translocation at concentrations required to realize the maximal oxidant pulse response. PMID:6311094

  8. Degradation of h-acid by free and immobilized cells of Alcaligenes latus

    PubMed Central

    Usha, M.S.; Sanjay, M.K.; Gaddad, S.M.; Shivannavar, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Alcaligenes latus, isolated from industrial effluent, was able to grow in mineral salts medium with 50 ppm (0.15 mM) of H-acid as a sole source of carbon. Immobilization of Alcaligenes latus in Ca-alginate and polyurethane foam resulted in cells embedded in the matrices. When free cells and immobilized cells were used for biodegradation studies at concentration ranging from 100 ppm (0.3 mM) to 500 ppm (1.15 mM) degradation rate was enhanced with immobilized cells. Cells immobilized in polyurethane foam showed 100% degradation up to 350 ppm (1.05 mM) and 57% degradation at 500 ppm (1.5 mM). Degradation rate of Ca-alginate immobilized cells was less as compared to that of polyurethane foam immobilized cells. With Ca-alginate immobilized cells 100% degradation was recorded up to 200 ppm (0.6 mM) of H-acid and only 33% degradation was recorded at 500 ppm (1.5 mM) of H-acid. Spectral analysis of the products after H-acid utilization showed that the spent medium did not contain any aromatic compounds indicating H-acid degradation by A. latus. PMID:24031573

  9. Studies of the polysaccharide fraction from the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas alcaligenes

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, James A.; Gray, George W.; Wilkinson, Stephen G.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain BR 1/2 were extended to the polysaccharide moiety. The crude polysaccharide, obtained by mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide, was fractionated by gel filtration. The major fraction was the phosphorylated polysaccharide, for which the approximate proportions of residues were; glucose (2), rhamnose (0.7), heptose (2–3), galactosamine (1), alanine (1), 3-deoxy-2-octulonic acid (1), phosphorus (5–6). The heptose was l-glycero-d-manno-heptose. The minor fractions from gel filtration contained free 3-deoxy-2-octulonic acid, Pi and PPi. The purified polysaccharide was studied by periodate oxidation, methylation analysis, partial hydrolysis, and dephosphorylation. All the rhamnose and part of the glucose and heptose occur as non-reducing terminal residues. Other glucose residues are 3-substituted, and most heptose residues are esterified with condensed phosphate residues, possibly in the C-4 position. Free heptose and a heptosylglucose were isolated from a partial hydrolysate of the polysaccharide. The location of galactosamine in the polysaccharide was not established, but either the C-3 or C-4 position appears to be substituted and a linkage to alanine was indicated. In its composition, the polysaccharide from Ps. alcaligenes resembles core polysaccharides from other pseudomonads: no possible side-chain polysaccharide was detected. PMID:4369226

  10. The Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis NBIB-017 Contains Genes with Potentially High Activities against Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Daye; Wu, Jinping; Yu, Cui; Zhou, Ronghua; Liu, Cuijun; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jingwu; Cheng, Meng; Guo, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalisNBIB-017, a Gram-negative bacterium, was isolated from soil in China. Here, we provide the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, which possesses a high number of genes encoding antibacterial factors, including proteins and small molecular peptides. PMID:27056227

  11. The Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis NBIB-017 Contains Genes with Potentially High Activities against Erwinia carotovora

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Daye; Wu, Jinping; Yu, Cui; Zhou, Ronghua; Liu, Cuijun; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jingwu; Cheng, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis NBIB-017, a Gram-negative bacterium, was isolated from soil in China. Here, we provide the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, which possesses a high number of genes encoding antibacterial factors, including proteins and small molecular peptides. PMID:27056227

  12. SEQUENCE SIMILARITIES IN THE GENES ENCODING POLY- CHLORINATED BIPHENYL DEGRADATION BY PSEUDOMONAS STRAIN LB400 AND ALCALIGENES EUTROPHUS H850

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-DNA hybridization was used to compare the Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) degradation with those from seven other PCB-degrading strains. Significant hybridization was detected to the genome of Alcaligenes eutrophus H850, a strain similar to L...

  13. N2O and N2 production during heterotrophic nitrification by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; He, Yi Liang; Guo, Jin Song

    2012-07-01

    A heterotrophic nitrifier, strain NR, was isolated from a membrane bioreactor. Strain NR was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis by Auto-Microbic system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. A. faecalis strain NR shows a capability of heterotrophic nitrification and N(2)O and N(2) production as well under the aerobic condition. Further tests demonstrated that neither nitrite nor nitrate could be denitrified aerobically by strain NR. However, when hydroxylamine was used as the sole nitrogen source, nitrogenous gases were detected. With an enzyme assay, a 0.063 U activity of hydroxylamine oxidase was observed, while nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase were undetectable. Thus, nitrogenous gas was speculated to be produced via hydroxylamine. Therefore, two different metabolic pathways might exist in A. faecalis NR. One is heterotrophic nitrification by oxidizing ammonium to nitrite and nitrate. The other is oxidizing ammonium to nitrogenous gas directly via hydroxylamine. PMID:22534373

  14. Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl)-enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production in an estuarine Alcaligenes faecalis strain.

    PubMed

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada; Dubey, S K; Naik, Milind Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) has been used extensively as an antifouling agent in ship paints, which results in the contamination of aquatic sites. These contaminated sites serve as enrichment areas for TBTCl-resistant bacterial strains. One TBTCl-resistant bacterial strain was isolated from the sediments of Zuari estuary, Goa, India, which is a major hub of various ship-building activities. Based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this bacterial strain was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis and designated as strain SD5. It could degrade ≥3 mM TBTCl by using it as a sole carbon source and transform it into the less toxic dibutyltin chloride, which was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Interestingly, this bacterial strain also showed enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production when cells were exposed to toxic levels of TBTCl, suggesting their involvement in conferring resistance to this antifouling biocide as well as degradative capability respectively. PMID:25612551

  15. Effect of nitrogen source on curdlan production by Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 31749.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Longfa

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of nitrogen source on curdlan production by Alcaligenes faecalis ATCC 31749. Curdlan production fell when excess nitrogen source was present, while biomass accumulation increased as the level of nitrogen source raised. Curdlan production and biomass accumulation were greater with urea compared with those with other nitrogen sources. The highest production of curdlan and biomass accumulation by A. faecalis ATCC 31749 was 28.16 g L(-1) and 9.58 g L(-1), respectively, with urea, whereas those with NH(4)Cl were 15.17 g L(-1) and 6.25 g L(-1), respectively. The optimum fermentation time for curdlan production was also affected by the nitrogen source in the medium. PMID:23085490

  16. Alcaligenes faecalis: an unusual cause of skin and soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Tena, Daniel; Fernández, Cristina; Lago, María R

    2015-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) due to Alcaligenes faecalis is very rare and has never been studied. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of this infection. We conducted a retrospective review of 5 cases that occurred at our institution over a period of 6 years. All patients had underlying diseases, and infection was secondary to vascular disease or recent surgery in 4 of them. The most common clinical presentations were vascular ulcer infection and surgical site infection. The clinical outcome was uniformly good after treatment, except in 1 patient. In conclusion, A. faecalis should be considered a potential pathogen of SSTI, particularly in patients with vascular diseases or after surgery. The history of contact with water or aqueous solutions should be investigated in all cases. The clinical outcome is usually good, but treatment can be difficult in some cases due to the high level of resistance to commonly used antibiotics. PMID:25420652

  17. Purification and properties of inducible penicillin beta-lactamase isolated from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Sato, K; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1985-04-01

    An inducible penicillin beta-lactamase was purified from a strain of Alcaligenes faecalis resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was 29,000 based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its isoelectric point was 5.9. The enzyme more rapidly hydrolyzed penicillins, such as penicillin G, ampicillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, and cloxacillin, than it hydrolyzed cephalosporins. For the hydrolysis of penicillin G, the optimal pH was 5.5, and the optimal temperature was 35 degrees C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodine, Cu2+, Hg2+, and EDTA but was not inhibited by clavulanic acid and sulbactam. PMID:3873902

  18. Strain of alcaligenes latus bacteria used for the decomposition of polychlorinated biphenyls

    DOEpatents

    Dyadischev, Nikolai Romanovich; Zharikov, Gennady Alekseevich; Kapranov, Vladimir Vladimirovich

    2001-09-11

    Alcaligenes latus bacterial strain TXD-13 VKPM B 75-05 is capable of degrading polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The strain may be employed to detoxicate environment media and PCB-containing industrial waste. To produce biomass, the strain is incubated on media which contain carbon sources, nitrogen sources and mineral salts. The strain is cultivated by a subsurface method up to a titer from 6.0.multidot.10.sup.8 to 2.0.times.10.sup.9 cells per cu cm. The produced biomass is used for degrading PCBs in concentrations from 10.sup.7 to 10.sup.8 cells per cu cm. The strain ensures from 35 to 50% reduction in PCB content in soil and water.

  19. Benzoate degradation via the ortho pathway in Alcaligenes eutrophus is perturbed by succinate.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Uribelarrea, J L; Aragao, G M; Lindley, N D

    1997-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-plus-succinate mixtures, substrates were simultaneously metabolized, leading to a higher specific growth rate (mu = 0.56 h-1) than when a single substrate was used (mu = 0.51 h-1 for benzoate alone and 0.44 h-1 for succinate alone), without adversely affecting the growth yield (0.57 Cmol/Cmol). Flux distribution analysis revealed that succinate dehydrogenase most probably controls the rate of total succinate consumption (the maximum flux being 9.7 mmol.g-1.h-1). It is postulated that the relative consumption rate of each substrate is in part related to modified levels of gene expression but to a large extent is dependent upon the presence of succinate, end product of the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Indeed, the in vitro beta-ketoadipate-succinyl coenzyme A transferase activity was seen to be inhibited by succinate, a coproduct of the reaction. PMID:9212423

  20. Degradation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) by poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase from Alcaligenes faecalis T1.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Y; Fukui, T; Saito, T; Okamoto, Y; Narikawa, T; Koide, K; Tomita, K; Takemasa, T; Masamune, S

    1986-01-15

    The extracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase purified from Alcaligenes faecalis T1 has two disulfide bonds, one of which appears to be necessary for the full enzyme activity. This depolymerase hydrolyzed not only hydrophobic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) but also water-soluble trimer and larger oligomers of D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, regardless of their solubilities in water. Kinetic analyses with oligomers of various sizes indicated that the substrate cleaving site of the enzyme consisted of four subsites with individual affinities for monomer units of the substrate. Analyses of the hydrolytic products of oligomers, which had labeled D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate at the hydroxy terminus, showed that the enzyme cleaved only the second ester linkage from the hydroxy terminus of the trimer and tetramer, and acted as an endo-type hydrolase toward the pentamer and higher oligomers. The enzyme appeared to have a hydrophobic site which interacted with poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) and determined the affinity of the enzyme toward the hydrophobic substrate. PMID:3942778

  1. Potential application of Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4 in mitigating ammonia emissions from dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Neerackal, George M; Ndegwa, Pius M; Joo, Hung-Soo; Wang, Xiang; Frear, Craig S; Harrison, Joseph H; Beutel, Marc W

    2016-04-01

    This research examined the potential mitigation of NH3 emissions from dairy manure via an enhanced aerobic bio-treatment with bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4. The studies were conducted in aerated batch reactors using air and pure oxygen. Aeration with air and oxygen removed approximately 40% and 100% total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), respectively. Intermittent oxygenation (every 2 or 4 h) reduced oxygen consumption by 95%, while attaining nearly identical TAN removal to continuous aeration. The results revealed that adequate oxygen supply and supplementing dairy wastewater with carbon are essential for this bioprocess. Based on the nitrogen mass balance, only 4% of TAN was released as NH3 gas, while the majority was retained in either the microbial biomass (58%) or converted to nitrogen gas (36%). The mass balance results reveal high potential for environmentally friendly bio-treatment of dairy wastewater using A. faecalis strain No. 4 with respect to NH3 emissions. PMID:26845217

  2. Production optimization of cyanophycinase ChpEal from Pseudomonas alcaligenes DIP1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes DIP1 produces an extracellular cyanophycinase (CphEal). The corresponding gene (cphEal) was identified from subclones of a genomic DNA gene library by heterologously expressing the functionally active enzyme in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the gene (1260 base pairs) was determined indicating a theoretical mass of 43.6 kDa (mature CphEal) plus a leader peptide of 2,6 kDa which corresponds well to the apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa as revealed by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme exhibited a high sequence identity of 91% with the extracellular cyanophycinase from P. anguilliseptica strain BI and carried an N-terminal Sec secretion signal peptide. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of cphE revealed a putative catalytic triad consisting of the serine motif GXSXG plus a histidine and a glutamate residue, suggesting a catalytic mechanism similar to serine-type proteases. The cyanophycinase (CphEal) was heterologously produced in two different E. coli strains (Top10 and BL21(DE3)) from two plasmid vectors (pBBR1MCS-4 and pET-23a(+)). The signal peptide of CphEal was cleaved in E. coli, suggesting active export of the protein at least to the periplasm. Substantial enzyme activity was also present in the culture supernatants. The extracellular cyanophycinase activities in E. coli were higher than activities in the wild type P. alcaligenes DIP1 in complex LB medium. Highest extracellular enzyme production was achieved with E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing CphEal from pBBR1MCS-4. Using M9 minimal medium was less effective, but the relatively low cost of mineral salt media makes these results important for the industrial-scale production of dipeptides from cyanophycin. PMID:22060187

  3. Leucobacter musarum subsp. musarum sp. nov., subsp. nov., Leucobacter musarum subsp. japonicus subsp. nov., and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov., three nematopathogenic bacteria isolated from Caenorhabditis, with an emended description of Leucobacter celer

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Three Gram-stain-positive, irregular-rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore-forming bacteria were isolated from nematodes collected from Santa Antao, Cabo Verde (CBX151T, CBX152T) and Kakegawa, Japan (CBX130T). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strains CBX130T, CBX151T and CBX152T were shown to belong to the genus Leucobacter. This affiliation was supported by chemotaxonomic data (2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell wall; major respiratory quinones MK-10 and MK-11; major polar lipids phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; major fatty acids anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0). Strains CBX130T and CBX152T were found to share salient characteristics. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical analysis, strain CBX152T represents a novel species of the genus Leucobacter, for which the name Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) is proposed. Two subspecies of Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. are proposed: Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. musarum subsp. nov. (type strain CBX152T = DSM 27160T = CIP 110721T) and Leucobacter musarum sp. nov. subsp. japonicus subsp. nov. (type strain CBX130T = DSM 27158T = CIP 110719T). The third novel strain, CBX151T, showed genetic similarities with Leucobacter celer NAL101T indicating that these strains belong to the same species. Based on morphological, physiological, chemotaxonomic and biochemical differences it is proposed to split the species Leucobacter celer into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter celer subsp. celer subsp. nov. (type strain NAL101T = KACC 14220T = JCM 16465T) and Leucobacter celer subsp. astrifaciens subsp. nov. (type strain CBX151T = DSM 27159T = CIP 110720T), and to emend the description of Leucobacter celer Shin et al. 2011. PMID:26275616

  4. A heavy-metal tolerant novel bacterium, Alcaligenes pakistanensis sp. nov., isolated from industrial effluent in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Saira; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Iida, Toshiya; Lee, Yong-Jae; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Fujiwara, Toru; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2015-10-01

    Two strains, NCCP-650(T) and NCCP-667, were isolated from industrial effluent and their taxonomic positions were investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The strains were found to be Gram-stain negative, strictly aerobic, motile short rods, which are tolerant to heavy-metals (Cr(+2), As(+2), Pb(+2) and Cu(+2)). Cells were observed to grow at a temperature range of 10-37 °C (optimal 25-33 °C), pH range of 5.5-10.0 (optimal 6.5-7.5) and can tolerate 0-7 % NaCl (w/v) (optimum 0-1 %) in tryptic soya agar medium. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and two housekeeping genes, gyrB and nirK, of the isolated strains revealed that both strains belong to the Betaproteobacteria showing highest sequence similarities with members of the genus Alcaligenes. The chemotaxonomic data [major quinones as Q-8; predominant cellular fatty acids as summed features 3 (C16 :1 ω7c/iso-C15 :0 2OH) and C16:0 followed by Summed features 2 (iso-C16 :1 I/C14 :0 3OH), C17:0 Cyclo and C18:1 ω7c; major polar lipids as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one unidentified aminolipid] also supported the affiliation of the isolated strains with the genus Alcaligenes. DNA-DNA hybridizations between the two strains and with closely related type strains of species of the genus Alcaligenes confirmed that both isolates belong to a single novel species within the genus Alcaligenes. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses, physiological, biochemical characteristics and DNA-DNA hybridization, the isolated strains can be differentiated from established Alcaligenes species and thus represent a novel species, for which the name Alcaligenes pakistanensis sp. nov. is proposed with the type strain NCCP-650(T) (=LMG 28368(T) = KCTC42083(T) = JCM 30216(T)). PMID:26238381

  5. Nutritional features of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis.

    PubMed

    Varel, V H; Bryant, M P

    1974-08-01

    Studies of three reference strains of Bacteroides fragilis subsp. fragilis showed that they grow well in a minimal defined medium containing glucose, hemin, vitamin B(12), minerals, bicarbonate-carbon dioxide buffer, NH(4)Cl, and sulfide. The vitamin B(12) requirement of 0.1 ng/ml was replaced with 7.5 mug of methionine. Cysteine or sulfide was an excellent source of sulfur, thioglycolate was a poor source, and thiosulfate, methionine, beta-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, sulfate, or sulfite did not serve as sole sources of sulfur. Neither single amino acids, nitrate, urea, nor a complex mixture of L-amino acids or peptides effectively replaced ammonia as the nitrogen source. Comparative studies with a few strains of other subspecies of B. fragilis including B. fragilis subsp. vulgatus, B. fragilis subsp. thetaiotaomicron, and B. fragilis subsp. distasonis indicate that they exhibit similar growth responses in the minimal medium. A single strain of B. fragilis subsp. ovatus required other materials. The results indicate the great biosynthetic ability of these organisms and suggest that, in their ecological niche within the large intestine, many nutrients such as amino acids are in very low supply, whereas materials such as ammonia, heme, and vitamin B(12), or related compounds, must be available during much of the time. PMID:4853401

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis Strain LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii Strain LMG 15993

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Emma; Chapman, Mary H.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies, C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis isolate LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii isolate LMG 15993. PMID:27417840

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis Strain LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii Strain LMG 15993.

    PubMed

    Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Chapman, Mary H

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies, C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of C. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis isolate LMG 9260 and C. hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii isolate LMG 15993. PMID:27417840

  8. Characterization of the novel dimethyl sulfide-degrading bacterium Alcaligenes sp. SY1 and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiming; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) has become a burgeoning field, with a growing focus on the reduction of VOSCs. The reduction of VOSCs encompasses both organic emission control and odor control. Herein, Alcaligenes sp. SY1 was isolated from active sludge and found to utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as a growth substrate in a mineral salt medium. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was applied to optimize the incubation conditions. The following conditions for optimal degradation were identified: temperature 27.03°C; pH 7.80; inoculum salinity 0.84%; and initial DMS concentration 1585.39 μM. Under these conditions, approximately 99% of the DMS was degraded within 30 h of incubation. Two metabolic compounds were detected and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS): dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The DMS degradation kinetics for different concentrations were evaluated using the Haldane-Andrews model and the pseudo first-order model. The maximum specific growth rate and degradation rate of Alcaligenes sp. SY1 were 0.17 h(-1) and 0.63 gs gx(-1)h(-1). A possible degradation pathway is proposed, and the results suggest that Alcaligenes sp. SY1 has the potential to control odor emissions under aerobic conditions. PMID:26623933

  9. Structure of the 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P.; Hopper, D. J.; Rigby, S. E. J.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-09-01

    The first X-ray structure of a 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP at a resolution of 2.2 Å is reported. This structure establishes that the enzyme adopts the cupin-fold, forming compact dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. Each monomer possesses a catalytic ferrous iron that is coordinated by three histidines (76, 78 and 114) and an additional ligand which has been putatively assigned as a carbonate, although formate and acetate are possibilities. The enzyme 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in

  10. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  11. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus in homosexual males.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, H R; McIntyre, L

    1983-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus was isolated from the stools of two homosexual males. One was asymptomatic at the time of isolation. The other presented with diarrhea. Both isolates were initially grown at 42 degrees C. This organism should be included among the list of organisms that are found in homosexual males. PMID:6630480

  12. Construction of a plant-microbe phytoremediation system: combination of vetiver grass with a functional endophytic bacterium, Achromobacter xylosoxidans F3B, for aromatic pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ying-Ning; Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2013-10-01

    The endophytic bacterial strain Achromobacter xylosoxidans F3B, which was able to utilize aromatic compounds as a sole carbon source, was inoculated into vetiver grass in this study. A real-time PCR detection method has been developed for confirming the stability of F3B in plants and DGGE profiles were conducted for examining the diversity of endophytes during the remediation process. These results showed that the endophytic bacteria strain F3B could maintain a stable population in plant roots without largely interfering with the diversity of native endophytes. Furthermore, the strain F3B could protect plants against toluene stress and maintain chlorophyll content of leaves, and a 30% reduction of evapotranspiration through vetiver leaves was observed. Our results demonstrate the potential to improve phytoremediation of aromatic pollutants by inoculating functional endophytic bacterial strains. PMID:23591084

  13. Evidence for novel mechanisms of polychlorinated biphenyl metabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus H850

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, D.L.; Haberl, M.L.; May, R.J.; Brennan, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies indicated that Alcaligenes eutrophus H850 attacks a different spectrum of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners than do most PCB-degrading bacteria and that novel mechanisms of PCB degradation might be involved. To delineate this, the authors have investigated the differences in congener selectivity and metabolite production between H850 and Corynebacterium sp. strain MB1, an organism that apparently degrades PCBs via a 2,3-dioxygenase. H850 exhibited a superior ability to degrade congeners via attack on 2-, 2,4-, 2,5-, or 2,4,5-chlorophenyl rings in PCBs but an inferior ability to degrade congeners via attack on a 4-chlorophenyl ring. Reactivity preferences were also reflected in the products formed from unsymmetrical PCBs; thus, MB1 attacked the 2,3-chlorophenyl ring of 2,3,2',5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl to yield 2,5-dichlorobenzoic acid, while H850 attacked the 2,5-chlorophenyl ring to yield 2,3-dichlorobenzoic acid and a novel metabolite, 2',3'-dichloroacetophenone. Furthermore, H850 oxidized 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexachlorobiphenyl, a congener with no adjacent unsubstituted carbons, to 2',4',5'-trichloroacetophenone. The atypical congener selectivity pattern and novel metabolites produced suggest that A. eutrophus H850 may degrade certain PCB congeners by a new route beginning with attack by some enzyme other than the usual 2,3-dioxygenase.

  14. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  15. Enzymatic properties of immobilized Alcaligenes faecalis cells with cell-associated beta-glucosidase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatly, M.A.; Phillips, C.R.

    1984-06-01

    Enzymatic properties of Alcaligenes faecalis cells immobilized in polyacrylamide were characterized and compared with those reported for the extracted enzyme, and with those measured for free cells. Many of the properties reflected those of the extracted enzyme rather than those measured in the free whole cells prior to immobilization, suggesting cell disruption during immobilization. These properties included the pH activity profile, a slightly broader pH stability profile, and the activation energy. Electron micrographs showed evidence of cell debris among the polymer matrix. The immobilized cells were not viable, and did not consume glucose. Thermal stability was less after immobilization with a half-line of 16 h at 45 degrees C, and 3.5 h at 50 degrees C. The immobilized preparation was more stable when stored lyophilized rather than in buffer, losing 23 and 52% activity, respectively, after six months. The enzyme was irreversibly inhibited by both acetate and citrate buffers. If the immobilized enzyme is to be used in conjunction with cellulases from Trichoderma reesei for cellulase saccharification, the optimal conditions would be pH 5.5 and 45 degrees C in a buffer containing no carboxylic acid groups.

  16. Efficient enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin by mutant Alcaligenes faecalis penicillin G acylase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Senwen; Su, Erzheng; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Shengli; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-04-10

    Semi-synthetic β-lactam antibiotics (SSBAs) are one of the most important antibiotic families in the world market. Their enzymatic synthesis can be catalyzed by penicillin G acylases (PGAs). In this study, to improve enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin, site-saturating mutagenesis was performed on three conserved amino acid residues: βF24, αR146, and αF147 of thermo-stable penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis (Af PGA). Four mutants βF24G, βF24A, βF24S, and βF24P were recovered by screening the mutant bank. Kinetic analysis of them showed up to 800-fold increased kcat/Km value for activated acyl donor D-phenylglycine methyl ester (D-PGME). When βF24G was used for ampicillin synthesis under kinetic control at industrially relevant conditions, 95% of nucleophile 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) was converted to ampicillin in aqueous medium at room temperature while 12% process time is needed to reach maximum product accumulation at 25% enzyme concentration compared with the wild-type Af PGA. Consequently, process productivity of enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin catalyzed by Af PGA was improved by more than 130 times, which indicated an enzyme viable for efficient SSBAs synthesis. PMID:25681630

  17. Colonization of Alcaligenes faecalis strain JBW4 in natural soils and its detoxification of endosulfan.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingfen; Zhu, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Lusheng; Xie, Hui; Wei, Kai; Yan, Tongxiang; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Fenghua; Sun, Fengxia

    2014-02-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain JBW4, a strain of bacteria that is capable of degrading endosulfan, was inoculated into sterilized and natural soils spiked with endosulfan. JBW4 degraded 75.8 and 87.0 % of α-endosulfan and 58.5 and 69.5 % of β-endosulfan in sterilized and natural soils, respectively, after 77 days. Endosulfan ether and endosulfan lactone were the major metabolites that were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This result suggested that A. faecalis strain JBW4 degrades endosulfan using a non-oxidative pathway in soils. The ability of strain JBW4 to colonize endosulfan-contaminated soils was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. This result suggested that strain JBW4 competed with the original inhabitants in the soil to establish a balance and successfully colonize the soils. In addition, the detoxification of endosulfan by strain JBW4 was evaluated using single-cell gel electrophoresis and by determining the soil microbial biomass carbon and enzymatic activities. The results showed that the genotoxicity and ecotoxicity of endosulfan in soil were reduced after degradation. The natural degradation of endosulfan in soil is inadequate; therefore, JBW4 shows potential for the bioremediation of industrial soils that are contaminated with endosulfan residues. PMID:23812277

  18. Biodegradation of nicosulfuron by a novel Alcaligenes faecalis strain ZWS11.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weisong; Wang, Chen; Xu, Li; Zhao, Chunqing; Liang, Hongwu; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-09-01

    A bacterial strain ZWS11 was isolated from sulfonylurea herbicide-contaminated farmland soil and identified as a potential nicosulfuron-degrading bacterium. Based on morphological and physicochemical characterization of the bacterium and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence, strain ZWS11 was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis. The effects of the initial concentration of nicosulfuron, inoculation volume, and medium pH on degradation of nicosulfuron were investigated. Strain ZWS11 could degrade 80.56% of the initial nicosulfuron supplemented at 500.0mg/L under the conditions of pH7.0, 180r/min and 30°C after incubation for 6days. Strain ZWS11 was also capable of degrading rimsulfuron, tribenuron-methyl and thifensulfuron-methyl. Four metabolites from biodegradation of nicosulfuron were identified, which were 2-aminosulfonyl-N, N-dimethylnicotinamide (M1), 4, 6-dihydroxypyrimidine (M2), 2-amino-4, 6-dimethoxypyrimidine (M3) and 2-(1-(4,6-dimethoxy-pyrimidin-2-yl)-ureido)-N,N-dimethyl-nicotinamide (M4). Among the metabolites detected, M2 was reported for the first time. Possible biodegradation pathways of nicosulfuron by strain ZWS11 were proposed. The degradation proceeded mainly via cleavage of the sulfonylurea bridge, O-dealkylation, and contraction of the sulfonylurea bridge by elimination of a sulfur dioxide group. The results provide valuable information for degradation of nicosulfuron in contaminated environments. PMID:26354704

  19. Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02, a Novel Nematicidal Bacterium with an Extracellular Serine Protease Virulence Factor.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shouyong; Lin, Jian; Zheng, Jinshui; Wang, Shaoying; Zhou, Hongying; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs) are the world's most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), and they can infect almost all crops. At present, harmful chemical nematicides are applied to control RKNs. Using microbial nematicides has been proposed as a better management strategy than chemical control. In this study, we describe a novel nematicidal bacterium named Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02. A. faecalis ZD02 was isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans cadavers and has nematostatic and nematicidal activity, as confirmed by C. elegans growth assay and life span assay. In addition, A. faecalis ZD02 fermentation broth showed toxicity against C. elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. To identify the nematicidal virulence factor, the genome of strain ZD02 was sequenced. By comparing all of the predicted proteins of strain ZD02 to reported nematicidal virulence factors, we determined that an extracellular serine protease (Esp) has potential to be a nematicidal virulence factor, which was confirmed by bioassay on C. elegans and M. incognita. Using C. elegans as the target model, we found that both A. faecalis ZD02 and the virulence factor Esp can damage the intestines of C. elegans. The discovery that A. faecalis ZD02 has nematicidal activity provides a novel bacterial resource for the control of RKNs. PMID:26826227

  20. Crystallization and X-ray structure analysis of a thermostable penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Nishant Kumar; Kumar, R Suresh; Ignatova, Zoya; Prabhune, Asmita; Pundle, Archana; Dodson, Eleanor; Suresh, C G

    2012-03-01

    The enzyme penicillin G acylase (EC 3.5.1.11) catalyzes amide-bond cleavage in benzylpenicillin (penicillin G) to yield 6-aminopenicillanic acid, an intermediate chemical used in the production of semisynthetic penicillins. A thermostable penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis (AfPGA) has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method in two different space groups: C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 72.9, b = 86.0, c = 260.2 , and P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.6, c = 298.8 . Data were collected at 293 and the structure was determined using the molecular-replacement method. Like other penicillin acylases, AfPGA belongs to the N-terminal nucleophilic hydrolase superfamily, has undergone post-translational processing and has a serine as the N-terminal residue of the β-chain. A disulfide bridge has been identified in the structure that was not found in the other two known penicillin G cylase structures. The presence of the disulfide bridge is perceived to be one factor that confers higher stability to this enzyme. PMID:22442220

  1. Kinetic characteristics and modelling of growth and substrate removal by Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhao, Bin; An, Qiang; Wang, Xia; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2016-04-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain NR has the capability of simultaneous ammonium and organic carbon removal under sole aerobic conditions. The growth and substrate removal characteristics of A. faecalis strain NR were studied and appropriate kinetic models were developed. The maximum substrate removal rate of NH4 (+)-N and TOC were determined as 2.27 mg NH4 (+)-N/L/h and 30.00 mg TOC/L/h, respectively with initial NH4 (+)-N = 80 mg/L and TOC = 800 mg/L. Single-substrate models and double-substrate models based on Monod, Contois, Moser and Teissier were employed to describe the bioprocess kinetic coefficients. As a result, two double-substrate models, Teissier-Contois and Contois-Contois, were considered to be appropriate to model growth kinetics with both NH4 (+)-N and TOC as limiting substrates. The kinetic constants of maximum growth rate (μ max) and half-saturation constant (K S and B S) were obtained by solving multiple equations with regression. This work can be used to further understand and predict the performance of heterotrophic nitrifiers, and thus provides specific guidance of these functional strains in practical wastewater treatment process. PMID:26796583

  2. Influence of Ammonium Salts and Cane Molasses on Growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus and Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, M.; Beaulieu, Y.; Melinard, J.; Pandian, S.; Goulet, J.

    1995-01-01

    The production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Alcaligenes eutrophus DSM 545 was studied in a synthetic medium with 3% glucose at pH 7.0 supplemented with several ammonium substrates and cane molasses. Growth was measured by dry cell weight, and the PHB content was measured by gas chromatography. The effects of ammonium sources such as sulfate, nitrate, phosphate, and chloride salts and those of different ammonium sulfate concentrations were evaluated. The best growth and PHB production were obtained with ammonium sulfate; however, NH(inf4)(sup+) concentrations between 0.5 and 1.5 g/liter showed no significant difference. Ammonium sulfate was therefore used as the sole source of NH(inf4)(sup+) for experiments with cane molasses as the growth activator. Optimal growth and PHB production were obtained with 0.3% molasses. However, the yields of biomass (39 to 48%) and PHB (17 to 26%) varied significantly among the different ammonium substrates and cane molasses concentrations. PMID:16534900

  3. Reversible and irreversible effects of nitric oxide on the soluble hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1988-01-01

    The effects of NO on the H2-oxidizing and diaphorase activities of the soluble hydrogenase from Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 were investigated. With fully activated enzyme, NO (8-150 nM in solution) inhibited H2 oxidation in a time- and NO-concentration-dependent process. Neither H2 nor NAD+ appeared to protect the enzyme against the inhibition. Loss of activity in the absence of an electron acceptor was about 10 times slower than under turnover conditions. The inhibition was partially reversible; approx. 50% of full activity was recoverable after removal of the NO. Recovery was slower in the absence of an electron acceptor than in the presence of H2 plus an electron acceptor. The diaphorase activity of the unactivated hydrogenase was not affected by NO concentrations of up to 200 microM in solution. Exposure of the unactivated hydrogenase to NO irreversibly inhibited the ability of the enzyme to be fully activated for H2-oxidizing activity. The enzyme also lost its ability to respond to H2 during activation in the presence of NADH. The results are interpreted in terms of a complex inhibition that displays elements of (1) a reversible slow-binding inhibition of H2-oxidizing activity, (2) an irreversible effect on H2-oxidizing activity and (30 an irreversible inhibition of a regulatory component of the enzyme. Possible sites of action for NO are discussed. PMID:3052436

  4. Extensive degradation of aroclors and environmentally transformed polychlorinated biphenyls by Alcaligenes eutrophus H850

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, D.L.; Wagner, R.E.; Brennan, M.J.; Haberl, M.L.; Brown, J.F. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized a strain of Alcaligenes eutrophus, designated H850, that rapidly degrades a broad and unusual spectrum of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) including many tetra- and pentachlorobiphenyls and several hexachlorobiphenyls. This strains, which was isolated from PCB-containing dredge spoils by enrichment on biphenyl, grows well on biphenyl and 2-chlorobiphenyl but poorly on 3- and 4-chlorobiphenyl. Capillary gas-chromatographic analysis showed that biphenyl-grown resting cells of H850 degraded the components of 38 of the 41 largest peaks of Aroclor 1242 and 15 of the 44 largest peaks of Aroclor 1254, resulting in an overall reduction of PCBs by 81% for Aroclor 1242 (10 ppm) and 35% for the Aroclor 1254 (10 ppm) in 2 days. Furthermore, H850 metabolized the predominantly ortho-substituted PCB congeners that the resulted from the environmental transformation of the more highly chlorinated congeners of Aroclor 1242 by the upper Hudson River anaerobic meta-, and para-dechlorination agent system. The congener selectivity patterns indicate that a two-step process consisting of anaerobic dechlorination followed by oxidation by H850 can effectively degrade all to congeners in Aroclor 1242 and possibly all those in Aroclor 1254.

  5. Wheat Bran Enhances the Cytotoxicity of Immobilized Alcaligenes aquatilis F8 against Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengfei; Lin, Hui; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Ximing; Zhang, Qichun; Zhao, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Algicidal bacteria offer a promising option for killing cyanobacteria. Therefore, a new Alcaligenes aquatilis strain F8 was isolated to control Microcystis aeruginosa in this study. The algicidal activity of strain F8 was dependent on the cell density of M. aeruginosa, and the maximal algicidal rate of the free bacterium reached 88.45% within 72 h. With a view to its application to the control of M. aeruginosa in the natural environment, strain F8 was immobilized in sodium alginate beads, but immobilization of the strain decreased its algicidal rate compared to that of the free bacterium. However, addition of wheat bran to the sodium alginate matrix used to immobilize strain F8 not only eliminated the adverse effects of immobilization on the bacteria but also resulted in an 8.83% higher algicidal rate of the immobilized than free bacteria. Exclusion and recovery methods were used to identify key ingredients of wheat bran and gain insight into the mechanism underlying the observed enhancement of algicidal activity. This analysis indicated that certain factors in wheat bran, including vitamins B1, B2, B9, and E were responsible for promoting bacterial growth and thereby improving the algicidal rate of immobilized strain F8. Our findings indicate that wheat bran is able to improve the algicidal efficiency of A. aquatilis strain F8 for killing M. aeruginosa and is a good source of not only carbon and nitrogen but also vitamins for bacteria. PMID:26295573

  6. Effect of phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency on heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Reutz, I; Schobert, P; Bowien, B

    1982-01-01

    Mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus were isolated on the basis of their inability to grow on succinate as the sole source of carbon and energy. The mutants also failed to grow on other gluconeogenic substrates, including pyruvate, acetate, and citrate. Simultaneously, they had lost their capability for autotrophic growth. The mutants grew, but slower than the wild type, on fructose or gluconate. Growth retardation on gluconate was more pronounced. The mutants lacked phosphoglycerate mutase activity, and spontaneous revertants of normal growth phenotype had regained the activity. The physiological characteristics of the mutants indicate the role of phosphoglycerate mutase in heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism of A. eutrophus. Although the enzyme is necessary for gluconeogenesis during heterotrophic growth on three- or four-carbon substrates, its glycolytic function is not essential for the catabolism of fructose or gluconate via the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The enzyme is required during autotrophic growth as a catalyst in the biosynthetic route leading from glycerate 3-phosphate to pyruvate. It is suggested that the mutants accomplish the complete degradation of fructose and gluconate mutase lesion. The catabolically produced triose phosphates are converted to fructose 6-phosphate which is rechanneled into the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. This carbon recycling mechanism operates less effectively in mutant cells growing on gluconate. PMID:6282814

  7. Fluoride, hydrogen, and formate activate ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase formation in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Im, D S; Friedrich, C G

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus formed ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPCase; EC 4.1.1.39) when grown on fructose. Addition of sodium fluoride (NaF) to fructose minimal medium resulted in a slightly decreased growth rate and a rapid fivefold increase in RuBPCase specific activity. With citrate, a glucogenic carbon source, RuBPCase was also formed, However, addition of NaF to cells growing on citrate resulted in a 50% decrease in RuBPCase specific activity. Among the enzymes of fructose catabolism, NaF (10 mM) inhibited enolase in vitro by 98% and gluconate 6-phosphate dehydratase by 87%. Inhibition of the dehydratase by NaF was insignificant in vivo, as determined with a mutant defective in phosphoglycerate mutase activity. Growth of this mutant on fructose was not inhibited by NaF, and only a minor increase in RuBPCase activity was observed. From these results, we concluded that the product of the enolase reaction, phosphoenolpyruvate, played a role in RuBPCase formation. Addition of H2 or formate to the wild type growing on fructose or citrate did not affect the growth rate but resulted in rapid formation of RuBPCase activity. Mutants impaired in H2 metabolism formed RuBPCase at a low rate during growth on fructose plus H2 but at a high rate on formate. Apparently, additional reductant from H2 or formate metabolism induced RuBPCase formation in A. eutrophus. PMID:6841316

  8. Improved welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from pretreated cane molasses.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongxia; Liu, Min; Yu, Pingru; Zhang, Shaozhi; Suo, Yukai; Luo, Ping; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jufang

    2015-09-20

    Welan gum production by Alcaligenes sp. ATCC31555 from cane molasses was studied in batch fermentation to reduce production costs and enhance gum production. The pretreatment of cane molasses, agitation speed and the addition of supplements were investigated to optimize the process. Sulfuric acid hydrolysis was found to be the optimal pretreatment, resulting in a maximum gum concentration of 33.5 g/L, which is 50.0% higher than those obtained from the molasses' mother liquor. Agitation at 600 rpm at 30°C and addition of 10% n-dodecane following fermentation for 36 h increased the maximum gum production up to 41.0 ± 1.41 g/L, which is 49.1% higher than the greatest welan gum concentration in the literature so far. The welan gum product showed an acceptable molecular weight, similar rheological properties and better thermal stability to that obtained from glucose. These results indicate that cane molasses may be a suitable and inexpensive substrate for cost-effective industrial-scale welan gum production. PMID:26050885

  9. Disparate Host Immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antigens in Calves Inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii, and M. bovis

    PubMed Central

    Waters, W. R.; Bannantine, J. P.; Palmer, M. V.

    2013-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and a criticism of the current tests that are used for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recombinant proteins were evaluated for antigenic specificity compared to a whole-cell sonicate preparation (MPS). Measures of cell-mediated immunity to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were compared in calves inoculated with live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium (M. avium), Mycobacterium kansasii, or Mycobacterium bovis. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses to MPS were observed in all calves that were exposed to mycobacteria compared to control calves at 4 months postinfection. Pooled recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins also elicited nonspecific IFN-γ responses in inoculated calves, with the exception of calves infected with M. bovis. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins failed to elicit antigen-specific responses for the majority of immune measures; however, the expression of CD25 and CD26 was upregulated on CD4, CD8, gamma/delta (γδ) T, and B cells for the calves that were inoculated with either M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. avium after antigen stimulation of the cells. Stimulation with MPS also resulted in the increased expression of CD26 on CD45RO+ CD25+ T cells from calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium. Although recombinant proteins failed to elicit specific responses for the calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the differences in immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens were dependent upon mycobacterial exposure. The results demonstrated a close alignment in immune responses between calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and those inoculated with M. avium that were somewhat disparate from the responses in calves infected with M. bovis, suggesting

  10. The first closed genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus venerealis biovar intermedius is a variant of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, the causative agent of Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis. In contrast to Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis which is restricted to the genital tract of cattle, Campylobacter fetus subsp. vener...

  11. Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov., occurring in human clinical material.

    PubMed

    Švec, Pavel; De Bel, Annelies; Sedláček, Ivo; Petráš, Petr; Gelbíčová, Tereza; Černohlávková, Jitka; Mašlanˇová, Ivana; Cnockaert, Margo; Varbanovová, Ivana; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vandamme, Peter; Pantuček, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Seven coagulase-negative, oxidase-negative and novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci assigned tentatively as Staphylococcus petrasii were investigated in this study in order to elucidate their taxonomic position. All strains were initially shown to form a genetically homogeneous group separated from remaining species of the genus Staphylococcus by using a repetitive sequence-based PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)5 primer. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, gap and tuf sequences showed that the group is closely related to Staphylococcus petrasii but separated from the three hitherto known subspecies, S. petrasii subsp. petrasii, S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus and S. petrasii subsp. jettensis. Further investigation using automated ribotyping, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, fatty acid methyl ester analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biotyping confirmed that the analysed group represents a novel subspecies within S. petrasii, for which the name Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRL/St 12/356(T) ( = CCM 8529(T) = LMG 28327(T)). PMID:25829332

  12. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1.

    PubMed

    Bottacini, Francesca; Dal Bello, Fabio; Turroni, Francesca; Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Foroni, Elena; Viappiani, Alice; Strati, Francesco; Mora, Diego; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BLC1 is a probiotic bacterium that is widely exploited by food industries as the active ingredient of various functional foods. Here we report the complete genome sequence of B. animalis subsp. lactis BLC1, which is expected to provide insights into the biology of this health-promoting microorganism and improve our understanding of its phylogenetic relatedness with other members of the B. animalis subsp. lactis taxon. PMID:22038957

  13. Antibacterial Activity of Alkyl Gallates against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Silva, I. C.; Regasini, L. O.; Petrônio, M. S.; Silva, D. H. S.; Bolzani, V. S.; Belasque, J.; Sacramento, L. V. S.

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is the causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, a serious disease that affects all the cultivars of citrus in subtropical citrus-producing areas worldwide. There is no curative treatment for citrus canker; thus, the eradication of infected plants constitutes the only effective control of the spread of X. citri subsp. citri. Since the eradication program in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is under threat, there is a clear risk of X. citri subsp. citri becoming endemic in the main orange-producing area in the world. Here we evaluated the potential use of alkyl gallates to prevent X. citri subsp. citri growth. These esters displayed a potent anti-X. citri subsp. citri activity similar to that of kanamycin (positive control), as evaluated by the resazurin microtiter assay (REMA). The treatment of X. citri subsp. citri cells with these compounds induced altered cell morphology, and investigations of the possible intracellular targets using X. citri subsp. citri strains labeled for the septum and centromere pointed to a common target involved in chromosome segregation and cell division. Finally, the artificial inoculation of citrus with X. citri subsp. citri cells pretreated with alkyl gallates showed that the bacterium loses the ability to colonize its host, which indicates the potential of these esters to protect citrus plants against X. citri subsp. citri infection. PMID:23104804

  14. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Enhanced Alcaligenes faecalis Denitrification Rate with Electrodes as the Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Cuiping; Ding, Hongrui; Wang, Changqiu

    2015-01-01

    The utilization by Alcaligenes faecalis of electrodes as the electron donor for denitrification was investigated in this study. The denitrification rate of A. faecalis with a poised potential was greatly enhanced compared with that of the controls without poised potentials. For nitrate reduction, although A. faecalis could not reduce nitrate, at three poised potentials of +0.06, −0.06, and −0.15 V (versus normal hydrogen electrode [NHE]), the nitrate was partially reduced with −0.15- and −0.06-V potentials at rates of 17.3 and 28.5 mg/liter/day, respectively. The percentages of reduction for −0.15 and −0.06 V were 52.4 and 30.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, for nitrite reduction, the poised potentials greatly enhanced the nitrite reduction. The nitrite reduction rates for three poised potentials (−0.06, −0.15, and −0.30 V) were 1.98, 4.37, and 3.91 mg/liter/h, respectively. When the potentials were cut off, the nitrite reduction rate was maintained for 1.5 h (from 2.3 to 2.25 mg/liter/h) and then greatly decreased, and the reduction rate (0.38 mg/liter/h) was about 1/6 compared with the rate (2.3 mg/liter/h) when potential was on. Then the potentials resumed, but the reduction rate did not resume and was only 2 times higher than the rate when the potential was off. PMID:26048940

  16. Enhanced Alcaligenes faecalis Denitrification Rate with Electrodes as the Electron Donor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Cuiping; Ding, Hongrui; Li, Yan; Wang, Changqiu; Lu, Anhuai

    2015-08-15

    The utilization by Alcaligenes faecalis of electrodes as the electron donor for denitrification was investigated in this study. The denitrification rate of A. faecalis with a poised potential was greatly enhanced compared with that of the controls without poised potentials. For nitrate reduction, although A. faecalis could not reduce nitrate, at three poised potentials of +0.06, -0.06, and -0.15 V (versus normal hydrogen electrode [NHE]), the nitrate was partially reduced with -0.15- and -0.06-V potentials at rates of 17.3 and 28.5 mg/liter/day, respectively. The percentages of reduction for -0.15 and -0.06 V were 52.4 and 30.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, for nitrite reduction, the poised potentials greatly enhanced the nitrite reduction. The nitrite reduction rates for three poised potentials (-0.06, -0.15, and -0.30 V) were 1.98, 4.37, and 3.91 mg/liter/h, respectively. When the potentials were cut off, the nitrite reduction rate was maintained for 1.5 h (from 2.3 to 2.25 mg/liter/h) and then greatly decreased, and the reduction rate (0.38 mg/liter/h) was about 1/6 compared with the rate (2.3 mg/liter/h) when potential was on. Then the potentials resumed, but the reduction rate did not resume and was only 2 times higher than the rate when the potential was off. PMID:26048940

  17. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  18. Immunostimulatory activities of a decapeptide derived from Alcaligenes faecalis FY-3 to crucian carp.

    PubMed

    Wang, G-X; Li, F-Y; Cui, J; Wang, Y; Liu, Y-T; Han, J; Lei, Y

    2011-07-01

    A strain was isolated from a soil sample collected from Weihe river in Shaanxi province (108°03'E 34°14'N), which was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis by 16S rRNA analysis. A compound M showing potent immune activity was isolated from secondary metabolites of the strain through bioassay-guided isolation techniques. The structure of the compound M was elucidated using FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra and identified as cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5 which was first time reported as a natural product. We evaluated the immune effects of the cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5 on the basis of serum lysozyme activity, bacterial agglutination titre assay, superoxide anion production and phagocytic activity assay, and they were found to be significantly increased by cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5. The effects of cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5 on immune-related gene expression were further investigated. The outcomes of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) proved that the transcribing level of interleukin 6β (IL-6β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase 1β (iNOS-1β) mRNA in the blood leucocytes have been augmented by cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5. The challenge experiment showed that crucian carp injected the cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5 had significantly (P < 0.05) lower cumulative mortality (13.0%) compared with the control (45.4%) after infection with live Aeromonas hydrophila. These results suggested that cyclo-(L-Pro-Gly)5 is a possible immunostimulant and may strengthen the immune response and protect the heath status of crucian carp against A. hydrophila. PMID:21332568

  19. Development and use of amicroagglutination test to detect antibodies to Alcaligenes faecalis in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, D J; Saif, Y M

    1980-01-01

    A neotetrazolium-chloride-stained Alcaligenes faecalis antigen was developed for use in the microagglutination (MA) test. The test was used to detect serum antibodies in naturally and experimentally infected turkeys. The highest titer observed in naturally infected birds was 1:320. In one commercial flock, antibodies were detected at 12 and 15 weeks after the initial disease outbreak. Four experiments were conducted to study the serologic responses of turkeys to A. faecalis. Antibodies were first detected at 2 weeks postexposure (PE) in poults that were exposed to the organism at 1 week of age. Peak antibody titers were detected at 3 weeks PE; isolations of the organism then declined. No antibodies were detected at 7 weeks PE in these birds. Birds infected at 5 weeks of age via various routes developed maximum antibody titers 2 weeks PE. Birds inoculated subcutaneously had the highest titers, whereas those inoculated intramuscularly had the lowest titers. Antibodies were still detected at 56 days PE in some birds. Hens vaccinated with an inactivated A. faecalis bacterin developed antibody titers. Titers not higher than 1:40 were detected at hatching in progeny of these hens. However, these poults were not protected from disease after challenge. There was some evidence that birds exposed to live or inactivated A. faecalis develop some protection against challenge. Antigens were prepared using 4 Ohio A. faecalis isolates (A, B, C, and D) and 1 North Carolina isolate for use in the MA test. The results indicated that the 5 isolates were antigenically similar. Antigens prepared using isolate B reacted best in the MA test. PMID:7447837

  20. Structural-based mutational analysis of d-aminoacylase from Alcaligenes faecalis DA1

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Sheng; Lai, Wen-Lin; Chang, Wei-Wei; Liaw, Shwu-Huey; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2002-01-01

    d-Aminoacylase is an attractive candidate for commercial production of d-amino acids through its catalysis in the zinc-assistant hydrolysis of N-acyl-d-amino acids. We report here the cloning, expression, and structural-based mutation of the d-aminoacylase from Alcaligenes faecalis DA1. A 1,007-bp PCR product amplified with degenerate primers, was used to isolate a 4-kb genomic fragment, encoding a 484-residue d-aminoacylase. The enzyme amino-terminal segment shared significant homology within a variety of enzymes including urease. The structural fold was predicted by 3D-PSSM to be similar to urease and dihydroorotase, which have grouped into a novel α/β-barrel amidohydrolase superfamily with a virtually indistinguishable binuclear metal centers containing six ligands, four histidines, one aspartate, and one carboxylated lysine. Three histidines, His-67, His-69, and His-250, putative metal ligands in d-aminoacylase, have been mutated previously, the remaining histidine (His-220) and aspartate (Asp-366) Asp-65, and four cysteines were then characterized. Substitution of Asp-65, Cys-96, His-220, and Asp-366 with alanine abolished the enzyme activity. The H220A mutant bound approximately half the normal complement of zinc ion as did H250N. However, the C96A mutant showed little zinc-binding ability, revealing that Cys-96 may replace the carboxylated lysine to serve as a bridging ligand. According to the urease structure, the conserved amino-terminal segment including Asp-65 may be responsible for structural stabilization. PMID:12381838

  1. Structure of the 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P.; Hopper, D. J.; Rigby, S. E. J.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in the predominantly hydrophobic active-site pocket where it undergoes peroxide radical-mediated heterolysis. PMID:25195757

  2. Influence of different chemical treatments on transport of Alcaligenes paradoxus in porous media.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, M J; Logan, B E

    1995-01-01

    Seven chemicals, three buffers, and a salt solution known to affect bacterial attachment were tested to quantify their abilities to enhance the penetration of Alcaligenes paradoxus in porous media. Chemical treatments included Tween 20 (a nonionic surfactant that affects hydrophobic interactions), sodium dodecyl sulfate (an anionic surfactant), EDTA (a cell membrane permeabilizer that removes outer membrane lipopolysaccharides), sodium PPi (a surface charge modifier), sodium periodate (an oxidizer that cleaves surface polysaccharides), lysozyme (an enzyme that cleaves cell wall components), and proteinase K (a nonspecific protease that cleaves peptide bonds). Buffers included MOPS [3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonic acid], Tris, phosphate, and an unbuffered solution containing only NaCl. Transport characteristics in the porous media were compared by using a sticking coefficient, alpha, defined as the rate at which particles stick to a grain of medium divided by the rate at which they strike the grain. Tween 20 reduced alpha by 2.5 orders of magnitude, to alpha = 0.0016, and was the most effective chemical treatment for decreasing bacterial attachment to glass beads in buffered solutions. Similar reductions in alpha were achieved in unbuffered solutions by reducing the solution ionic strength to 0.01 mM. EDTA, protease, and other treatments designed to alter cell structures did not reduce alpha by more than an order of magnitude. The number of bacteria retained by the porous media was decreased by treatments that made A. paradoxus more hydrophobic and less electrostatically charged, although alpha was poorly correlated with electrophoretic mobility and hydrophobicity index measurements at lower alpha values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7646012

  3. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat; Usup, Gires

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  4. Identification of a novel gene, aut, involved in autotrophic growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Freter, A; Bowien, B

    1994-01-01

    The aerobic facultative chemoautotroph Alcaligenes eutrophus was found to possess a novel gene, designated aut, required for both lithoautotrophic (hydrogen plus carbon dioxide) and organoautotrophic (formate) growth (Aut+ phenotype). Insertional mutagenesis by transposon Tn5-Mob localized the gene on a chromosomal 13-kbp EcoRI fragment. Physiological characterization of various Aut- mutants revealed pleiotropic effects caused by the transposon insertion. Heterotrophic growth of the mutants on substrates catabolized via the glycolytic pathway was slower than that of the parent strains, and the colony morphology of the mutants was altered when grown on nutrient agar. The heterotrophic derepression of the cbb operons encoding Calvin cycle enzymes was abolished, although their expression was still inducible in the presence of formate. Apparently, the mutation did not affect the cbb genes directly but impaired the autotrophic growth in a more general manner. The conjugally transferred wild-type EcoRI fragment allowed phenotypic in trans complementation of the mutants. Further subcloning and sequencing identified a single open reading frame (aut) of 495 bp that was sufficient for complementation. The monocistronic aut gene was constitutively transcribed into a 0.65-kb mRNA. However, its expression appeared to be low. Heterologous expression of aut was achieved in Escherichia coli, resulting in overproduction of an 18-kDa protein. Database searches yielded weak partial sequence similarities of the deduced Aut protein sequence to some cytidylyltransferases, but no indication for the exact function of the aut gene was obtained. Hybridizing DNA sequences that might be similar to the aut gene were detected by Southern hybridization in the genome of two other autotrophic bacteria. Images PMID:8071217

  5. The cbb operons of the facultative chemoautotroph Alcaligenes eutrophus encode phosphoglycolate phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Schäferjohann, J; Yoo, J G; Kusian, B; Bowien, B

    1993-01-01

    The two highly homologous cbb operons of Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 that are located on the chromosome and on megaplasmid pHG1 contain genes encoding several enzymes of the Calvin carbon reduction cycle. Sequence analysis of a region from the promoter-distal part revealed two open reading frames, designated cbbT and cbbZ, at equivalent positions within the operons. Comparisons with known sequences suggested cbbT to encode transketolase (TK; EC 2.2.1.1) as an additional enzyme of the cycle. No significant overall sequence similarities were observed for cbbZ. Although both regions exhibited very high nucleotide identities, 93% (cbbZ) and 96% (cbbT), only the chromosomally encoded genes were heterologously expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli. The molecular masses of the observed gene products, CbbT (74 kDa) and CbbZ (24 kDa), correlated well with the values calculated on the basis of the sequence information. TK activities were strongly elevated in E. coli clones expressing cbbT, confirming the identity of the gene. Strains of E. coli harboring the chromosomal cbbZ gene showed high levels of activity of 2-phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGP; EC 3.1.3.18), a key enzyme of glycolate metabolism in autotrophic organisms that is not present in wild-type E. coli. Derepression of the cbb operons during autotrophic growth resulted in considerably increased levels of TK activity and the appearance of PGP activity in A. eutrophus, although the pHG1-encoded cbbZ gene was apparently not expressed. To our knowledge, this study represents the first cloning and sequencing of a PGP gene from any organism. Images PMID:8226680

  6. Classification of Alcaligenes faecalis-like isolates from the environment and human clinical samples as Ralstonia gilardii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Coenye, T; Falsen, E; Vancanneyt, M; Hoste, B; Govan, J R; Kersters, K; Vandamme, P

    1999-04-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study that included DNA-DNA hybridizations, DNA base ratio determinations, 16S rDNA sequence analysis, whole-cell protein and fatty acid analyses, AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) fingerprinting and an extensive biochemical characterization was performed on 10 strains provisionally identified as Alcaligenes faecalis-like bacteria. The six environmental and four human isolates belonged to the genus Ralstonia and were assigned to a new species for which the name Ralstonia gilardii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMG 5886T. PMID:10319461

  7. Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ranae subsp. nov., isolated from septicaemic farmed frogs in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Huys, Geert; Pearson, Marianne; Kämpfer, Peter; Denys, Rik; Cnockaert, Margo; Inglis, Valerie; Swings, Jean

    2003-05-01

    A group of seven sucrose-negative Aeromonas strains (referred to as group Au) isolated from the internal organs of septicaemic farmed frogs (Rana rugulosa) in Thailand was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study including fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (FAFLP) and ERIC-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rDNA sequencing, microplate DNA-DNA hybridizations and extensive phenotypic characterization. Comparison of FAFLP and ERIC-PCR fingerprints indicated that the group Au isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas hydrophila DNA hybridization group (HG) 1 in which they represent a genotypic subgroup closely affiliated to A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila and subsp. dhakensis. One representative of the Au group exhibited > or = 99.0% 16S rDNA sequence similarity with the type strains of the two A. hydrophila subspecies. DNA-DNA hybridization with type and reference strains of all known Aeromonas taxa revealed that the Au group represented a homogeneous taxon that exhibited the highest relatedness with members of the two A. hydrophila subspecies, ranging from 75 to 93%. Phenotypic characterization on the basis of 152 features further revealed that the Au group isolates differed from A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila or subsp. dhakensis in a total of 13 biochemical properties. Of these, assimilation of L-glycine and isobutyrate as sole carbon source, acid production from salicin and D-sucrose, and aesculin hydrolysis were of diagnostic value. From the results of this study, it can be concluded that the Aeromonas frog isolates of the Au group represent a new subspecies of A. hydrophila, for which the name Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. ranae subsp. nov. is proposed. Its type strain is Au-1D12(T) (=LMG 19707(T) = CCUG 46211(T)). PMID:12807217

  8. Reclassification of Paenibacillus larvae subsp. pulvifaciens and Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae as Paenibacillus larvae without subspecies differentiation.

    PubMed

    Genersch, Elke; Forsgren, Eva; Pentikäinen, Jaana; Ashiralieva, Ainura; Rauch, Sandra; Kilwinski, Jochen; Fries, Ingemar

    2006-03-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study of the two subspecies of Paenibacillus larvae, Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae and Paenibacillus larvae subsp. pulvifaciens, supported the reclassification of the subspecies into one species, Paenibacillus larvae, without subspecies separation. Our conclusions are based on the analysis of six reference strains of P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens and three reference strains and 44 field isolates of P. larvae. subsp. larvae. The latter originated from brood or honey of clinically diseased honey bee colonies or from honey of both clinically diseased and asymptomatic colonies from Sweden, Finland and Germany. Colony and spore morphology, as well as the metabolism of mannitol and salicin, did not allow a clear identification of the two subspecies and SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins did not support the subspecies differentiation. For genomic fingerprinting, repetitive element-PCR fingerprinting using ERIC primers and PFGE of bacterial DNA were performed. The latter method is a high-resolution DNA fingerprinting method proven to be superior to most other methods for biochemical and molecular typing and has not previously been used to characterize P. larvae. ERIC-PCR identified four different genotypes, while PFGE revealed two main clusters. One cluster included most of the P. larvae subsp. larvae field isolates, as well as all P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens reference strains. The other cluster comprised the pigmented variants of P. larvae subsp. larvae. 16S rRNA gene sequences were determined for some strains. Finally, exposure bioassays demonstrated that reference strains of P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens were pathogenic for honey bee larvae, producing symptoms similar to reference strains of P. larvae subsp. larvae. In comparison with the type strain for P. larvae subsp. larvae, ATCC 9545T, the P. larvae subsp. pulvifaciens strains tested were even more virulent, since they showed a shorter LT100. An emended description of the species is given

  9. Optimization of biodemulsifier production from Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1 and its application in breaking crude oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Huang, Xiang-Feng; Lu, Li-Jun; Xu, Jing-Cheng; Wen, Yue; Yang, Dian-Hai; Zhou, Qi

    2010-11-15

    A biodemulsifier-producing strain of Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1, isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil of the Karamay Oilfield, exhibited excellent demulsifying ability. The application of this biodemulsifier significantly improved the quality of separated water compared with the chemical demulsifier, polyether, which clearly indicates that it has potential applications in the crude oil extraction industry. To optimize its biosynthesis, the impacts of carbon sources, nitrogen sources and pH were studied in detail. Paraffin, a hydrophobic carbon source, favored the synthesis of this cell wall associated biodemulsifier. The nitrogen source ammonium citrate stimulated the production and demulsifying performance of the biodemulsifier. An alkaline environment (pH 9.5) of the initial culture medium favored the strain's growth and improved its demulsifying ability. The results showed paraffin, ammonium citrate and pH had significant effects on the production of the biodemulsifier. These three variables were further investigated using a response surface methodology based on a central composite design to optimize the biodemulsifier yield. The optimal yield conditions were found at a paraffin concentration of 4.01%, an ammonium citrate concentration of 8.08 g/L and a pH of 9.35. Under optimal conditions, the biodemulsifier yield from Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1 was increased to 3.42 g/L. PMID:20702035

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    PubMed Central

    Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M. abscessus complex genomics. PMID:27284156

  11. Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue displays pathogenic properties different from those of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Wicher, K; Wicher, V; Abbruscato, F; Baughn, R E

    2000-06-01

    The present study described the susceptibility of C4D guinea pigs to cutaneous infection with Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue Haiti B strain. The general manifestations of the disease in adults and neonates differ, to a certain degree, from those induced by T. pallidum subsp. pallidum Nichols strain. Noticeable differences between the infections were reflected in the character of the skin lesions, their onset and persistence, and the kinetics of the humoral response. The incidence and dissemination of cutaneous yaws lesions in very young guinea pigs were remarkably different from the low frequency observed in a similar age group of syphilis infection, 100 versus 17%, respectively. Moreover, as opposed to T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue does not cross the placenta. Offspring born to yaws-infected mothers did not produce immunoglobulin M antibodies and their organs, examined by PCR and rabbit infectivity test (RIT), were all negative. Examination of a large number of tissues and organs in adult, neonate, and maternal yaws by PCR and RIT clearly demonstrated that, unlike syphilis, there was a low incidence and short persistence of the yaws pathogen in internal organs. These findings stress the dermotropic rather than the organotropic character of yaws and provide further evidence of distinctive biological and pathological differences between yaws and venereal syphilis. PMID:10816466

  12. Exogenous cofactors for the improvement of bioremoval and biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole by Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Bi; Zhou, Jiao; Xu, Qiu-Man; Cheng, Jing-Sheng; Luo, Yu-Lu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-09-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX), an extensively prescribed or administered antibiotic pharmaceutical product, is usually detected in aquatic environments, because of its incomplete metabolism and elimination. This study investigated the effects of exogenous cofactors on the bioremoval and biotransformation of SMX by Alcaligenes faecalis. High concentration (100mg·L(-1)) of exogenous vitamin C (VC), vitamin B6 (VB6) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) enhanced SMX bioremoval, while the additions of vitamin B2 (VB2) and vitamin B12 (VB12) did not significantly alter the SMX removal efficiency. Globally, cellular growth of A. faecalis and SMX removal both initially increased and then gradually decreased, indicating that SMX bioremoval is likely dependent on the primary biomass activity of A. faecalis. The decreases in the SMX removal efficiency indicated that some metabolites of SMX might be transformed into parent compound at the last stage of incubation. Two transformation products of SMX, N-hydroxy sulfamethoxazole (HO-SMX) and N4-acetyl sulfamethoxazole (Ac-SMX), were identified by a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled with mass spectrometer. High concentrations of VC, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, 7.1mg·L(-1)), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+), 6.6mg·L(-1)), and low concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, 0.1 and 10mg·L(-1)) and VB2 (1mg·L(-1)) remarkably increased the formation of HO-SMX, while VB12 showed opposite effects on HO-SMX formation. In addition, low concentrations of GSH and NADH enhanced Ac-SMX formation by the addition of A. faecalis, whereas cofactors (VC, VB2, VB12, NAD(+), and GSSG) had no obvious impact on the formation of Ac-SMX compared with the controls. The levels of Ac-SMX were stable when biomass of A. faecalis gradually decreased, indicating the direct effect of biomass on the formation of Ac-SMX by A. faecalis. In sum, these results help us understand the roles played by exogenous cofactors in

  13. Complete genome sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strain LMG9260 and Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strain LMG15993

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies: subsps. hyointestinalis and lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of the subsp. h...

  14. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    PubMed

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  15. Alahopcin, a new dipeptide antibiotic produced by Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Higashide, E; Horii, S; Ono, H; Mizokami, N; Yamazaki, T; Shibata, M; Yoneda, M

    1985-03-01

    An actinomycete strain No. B-52653 was found to produce an antibiotic selectively active against the in vitro antibiotic resistant mutant of Staphylococcus aureus. Based on taxonomic studies, the name Streptomyces albulus subsp. ochragerus subsp. nov. is proposed for the strain. The microorganism produced two kinds of antibiotics; one identical with gougerotin, the other an amphoteric water soluble dipeptide containing L-alanine. The latter has the molecular formula C9H15N3O6 and is named alahopcin. It has a broad antibacterial spectrum and a synergistic effect with some other antibiotics against some antibiotic resistant staphylococci. Alahopcin has a low toxicity and was effective against experimental infections in mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:3839222

  16. Cell surface characteristics of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei, Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, C; Bouley, C; Cayuela, C; Bouttier, S; Bourlioux, P; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    1997-01-01

    Hydrophilic and electrostatic cell surface properties of eight Lactobacillus strains were characterized by using the microbial adhesion to solvents method and microelectrophoresis, respectively. All strains appeared relatively hydrophilic. The strong microbial adhesion to chloroform, an acidic solvent, in comparison with microbial adhesion to hexadecane, an apolar n-alkane, demonstrated the particularity of lactobacilli to have an important electron donor and basic character and consequently their potential ability to generate Lewis acid-base interactions with a support. Regardless of their electrophoretic mobility (EM), strains were in general slightly negatively charged at alkaline pH. A pH-dependent behavior concerning cell surface charges was observed. The EM decreased progressively with more acidic pHs for the L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains until the isoelectric point (IEP), i.e., the pH value for which the EM is zero. On the other hand, the EM for the L. rhamnosus strains was stable from pH 8 to pH 3 to 4, at which point there was a shift near the IEP. Both L. casei subsp. casei and L. paracasei subsp. paracasei strains were characterized by an IEP of around 4, whereas L. rhamnosus strains possessed a markedly lower IEP of 2. The present study showed that the cell surface physicochemical properties of lactobacilli seem to be, at least in part and under certain experimental conditions, particular to the bacterial species. Such differences detected between species are likely to be accompanied by some particular changes in cell wall chemical composition. PMID:9143109

  17. Fatal pneumonia due to Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora.

    PubMed Central

    Bollet, C; Grimont, P; Gainnier, M; Geissler, A; Sainty, J M; De Micco, P

    1993-01-01

    Serratia proteamaculans subsp. quinovora was isolated from several samples (blood cultures, tracheal aspirates, pleural effusion) from a patient with pneumonia. This is the first clinical isolate and the first documented human infection caused by this organism. PMID:8432835

  18. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  19. Description of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae sp. nov., isolated from human infections, with two subspecies, Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov., and demonstration that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella variicola.

    PubMed

    Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2014-09-01

    Strains previously classified as members of Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogroups KpI, KpII-A, KpII-B and KpIII were characterized by 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analysis based on rpoB, fusA, gapA, gyrA and leuS genes, average nucleotide identity and biochemical characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that KpI and KpIII corresponded to K. pneumoniae and Klebsiella variicola, respectively, whereas KpII-A and KpII-B formed two well-demarcated sequence clusters distinct from other members of the genus Klebsiella. Average nucleotide identity between KpII-A and KpII-B was 96.4 %, whereas values lower than 94 % were obtained for both groups when compared with K. pneumoniae and K. variicola. Biochemical properties differentiated KpII-A, KpII-B, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola, with acid production from adonitol and l-sorbose and ability to use 3-phenylproprionate, 5-keto-d-gluconate and tricarballylic acid as sole carbon sources being particularly useful. Based on their genetic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the names Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. for strains of KpII-A and KpII-B, respectively. The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae sp. nov. and of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 01A030(T) ( = SB11(T) = CIP 110771(T) = DSM 28211(T)). The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 07A044(T) ( = SB30(T) = CIP 110770(T) = DSM 28212(T)). Both strains were isolated from human blood cultures. This work also showed that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of K. variicola. PMID:24958762

  20. Molecular fingerprinting of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica derby isolated from tropical seafood in South India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Surendran, P K; Thampuran, Nirmala

    2008-09-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains isolated from different seafood were genotyped by PCR-ribotyping and ERIC-PCR assays. This study has ascertained the genetic relatedness among serovars prevalent in tropical seafood. PCR-ribotyping exhibited genetic variation in both Salmonella serovars, and ribotype profile (II) was most predominant, which was observed in 10/18 of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and 7/17 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Cluster analysis of ERIC-PCR for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium strains exhibited nine different banding patterns and four strains showed >95% genetic homology within the cluster pairs. ERIC-PCR produced more genetic variations in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium; nevertheless, both methods were found to be comparable for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby isolates. Discrimination index of PCR-ribotyping for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium isolates was obtained at 0.674 and index value 0.714 was observed for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby strains. Molecular fingerprinting investigation highlighted the hypothesis of diverse routes of Salmonella contamination in seafood as multiple clones of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Typhimurium and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Derby were detected in same or different seafood throughout the study period. PMID:18480975

  1. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Potable-Water Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lehtola, Markku J.; Torvinen, Eila; Miettinen, Ilkka T.; Keevil, C. William

    2006-01-01

    Here, we present for the first time a high-affinity peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotide sequence for detecting Mycobacterium avium bacteria, including the opportunistically pathogenic subspecies M. avium subsp. avium, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and M. avium subsp. silvaticum, by the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. There is evidence that M. avium subsp. avium especially is able to survive and grow in drinking-water biofilms and possibly transmit via drinking water. The designed PNA probe (MAV148) specificity was tested with several bacterial species, including other mycobacteria and mycolic acid-containing bacteria. From the range of bacterial strains tested, only M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains were hybridized. The PNA FISH method was applied successfully to detect M. avium subsp. avium spiked in water samples and biofilm established within a Propella biofilm reactor fed with potable water from a distribution supply. PMID:16391126

  2. Neonatal mortality in puppies due to bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae.

    PubMed

    Vela, Ana I; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F

    2006-02-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  3. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  4. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    PubMed

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. PMID:26507830

  5. Disparate host immunity to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in calves inoculated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, M. avium subsp. avium, M. kansasii and M. bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-reactivity of mycobacterial antigens in immune-based diagnostic assays has been a major concern and criticism of current tests for the detection of paratuberculosis. In the present study, host immune responses to antigen preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), consis...

  6. Potential Transmission Pathways of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Dumke, Jessika; Hinse, Dennis; Vollmer, Tanja; Schulz, Jochen; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus), a member of group D streptococci, is an inhabitant of the animal and human gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, it is a facultative pathogen which causes e.g. endocarditis, septicemia and mastitis. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus may be transmitted either directly or indirectly between animals and humans. However, the transmission routes are an unsolved issue. In this study, we present systematic analyses of an S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolate of an infective endocarditis patient in relation to isolates of his laying hen flock. Isolates from pooled droppings of laying hens, pooled dust samples and human blood culture were characterized by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and DNA fingerprinting. MLST revealed the same allelic profile of isolates from the human blood culture and from the droppings of laying hens. In addition, these isolates showed clonal identity regarding a similar DNA fingerprinting pattern. For the first time, we received a hint that transmission of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus between poultry and humans may occur. This raises the question about the zoonotic potential of isolates from poultry and should be considered in future studies. PMID:25978355

  7. Simultaneous detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii based on microsphere immunoreaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Jinfeng; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-04-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis (Cmn) and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pss) are two plant pathogens that can cause tremendous agricultural economic losses. This novel method based on microsphere immunoreaction was developed for the simultaneous detection of Cmn and Pss in maize. This multiplex method was constructed based on microsphere immunodetection with fluorescent labels such as quantum dots (QDs) and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) for the detection of Cmn and Pss. Captured QDs and R-PE serve as signal reporters for fluorescent readout. The principle of this method is based on a sandwich immunoreaction. Cmn and Pss captured by the microspheres were detected using flow cytometry. The limit of detection of this method was 10 times lower than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and its analysis time (1 h) was much shorter compared with ELISA (6-8 h). The method, which has been proven to be an effective approach to multiplex detection of plant bacteria (Cmn and Pss as models), not only increased the varieties but also improved the sensitivity. The microsphere immunoreaction provides a universal method for the multiplex determination of microbes because of its high sensitivity, specificity, and speed. In the future, the method will be more fully validated in vivo to detect diversiform bacteria. PMID:23169888

  8. Sugar Utilization and Acid Production by Free and Entrapped Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in a Whey Permeate Medium

    PubMed Central

    Audet, Pascal; Paquin, Celine; Lacroix, Christophe

    1989-01-01

    Cells of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis entrapped in k-carrageenan-locust bean gum gel performed similarly to free cells in the conversion of lactose to lactic acid. Bead diameter influenced the fermentation rate. Cells entrapped in smaller beads (0.5 to 1.0 mm) showed higher release rates, higher lactose, glucose, and formic acid utilization, higher galactose accumulation, and higher lactic acid production than did cells entrapped in larger beads (1.0 to 2.0 mm). Values for smaller beads were comparable with those for free cells. Immobilization affected the fermentation rate of lactic acid bacteria, especially Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Entrapped cells of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus demonstrated a lower lactic acid production than did free cells in batch fermentation. The kinetics of the production of formic and pyruvic acids by L. lactis subsp. lactis and S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus are presented. PMID:16347822

  9. Identification of a new Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02 and assessment of its toxicity and pathogenicity to insects.

    PubMed

    Quiroz-Castañeda, Rosa Estela; Mendoza-Mejía, Ared; Obregón-Barboza, Verónica; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Martínez-Garduño, Felipe; Guillén-Solís, Gabriel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Federico; Peña-Chora, Guadalupe; Ortíz-Hernández, Laura; Gaytán-Colín, Paul; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a bacterium from Galleria mellonella larva and its identification using genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis. This bacterium was named Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02. Microscopic analyses revealed that the bacteria are located in the esophagus and intestine of the nematodes Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, and H. bacteriophora. Using G. mellonella larvae as a model, when the larvae were injected with 24,000 CFU in their hemocoel, more than 96% mortality was achieved after 24 h. Additionally, toxicity assays determined that 1 μg of supernatant extract from A. faecalis MOR02 killed more than 70% G. mellonella larvae 96 h after injection. A correlation of experimental data with sequence genome analyses was also performed. We discovered genes that encode proteins and enzymes that are related to pathogenicity, toxicity, and host/environment interactions that may be responsible for the observed phenotypic characteristics. Our data demonstrates that the bacteria are able to use different strategies to colonize nematodes and kill insects to their own benefit. However, there remains an extensive group of unidentified microorganisms that could be participating in the infection process. Additionally, a nematode-bacterium association could be established probably as a strategy of dispersion and colonization. PMID:25667924

  10. Purification and characterization of chitinase from Alcaligenes faecalis AU02 by utilizing marine wastes and its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Neelamegam; Veeramuthu Rajeswari, Mayavan; Vijayalakshmi, Shanmugam; Balasubramanian, Thangavel

    2011-12-01

    Marine waste is an abundant renewable source for the recovery of several value added metabolites with potential industrial applications. This study describes the production of chitinase on marine waste, with the subsequent use of the same marine waste for the extraction of antioxidants. A chitinase-producing bacterium isolated from seafood effluent was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis AU02. Optimal chitinase production was obtained in culture conditions of 37°C for 72 h in 100 ml medium containing 1% shrimp and crab shell powder (1:1) (w/v), 0.1% K(2)HPO(4), and 0.05% MgSO(4)·7H(2)O. The molecular weight of chitinase was determined by SDS-PAGE to be 36 kDa. The optimum pH, temperature, pH stability, and thermal stability of chitinase were about 8, 37°C, 5-12, and 40-80°C, respectively. The antioxidant activity of A. faecalis AU02 culture supernatant was determined through scavenging ability on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) as 84%, and the antioxidant compound was characterized by TLC and its FT-IR spectrum. The present study proposed that marine wastes can be utilized to generate a high-value-added product and that pharmacological studies can extend its use to the field of medicine. PMID:22131949

  11. Optimization of nitrilase production from Alcaligenes faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3): effect of inducers on substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Nageshwar, Y V D; Sheelu, Gurrala; Shambhu, Rekha Rao; Muluka, Hemalatha; Mehdi, Nooreen; Malik, M Shaheer; Kamal, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Microbial nitrilases are biocatalysts of interest and the enzyme produced using various inducers exhibits altered substrate specificity, which is of great interest in bioprocess development. The aim of the present study is to investigate the nitrilase-producing Alcaligenes faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) for its ability to transform various nitriles in the presence of different inducers after optimization of various parameters for maximum enzyme production and activity. The production of A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) nitrilase was optimum with glucose (1.0%), acrylonitrile (0.1%) at pH 7.0. The nitrilase activity of A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) was optimum at 35 °C, pH 8.0 and the enzyme was stable up to 6 h at 50 °C. The nitrilase enzyme produced using different inducers was investigated for substrate specificity. The enzyme hydrolyzed aliphatic, heterocyclic and aromatic nitriles with different substitutions. Acrylonitrile was the most preferred substrate (~40 U) as well as inducer. Benzonitrile was hydrolyzed with almost twofold higher relative activity than acrylonitrile when it was used as an inducer. The versatile nitrilase-producing A. faecalis MTCC 10757 (IICT-A3) exhibits efficient conversion of both aliphatic and aromatic nitriles. The aromatic nitriles, which show not much or no affinity towards nitrilase from A. faecalis, are hydrolyzed effectively with this nitrilase-producing organism. Studies are in progress to exploit this organism for synthesis of industrially important compounds. PMID:21188422

  12. Heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of high-strength ammonium in anaerobically digested sludge by Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yoichi

    2014-06-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis strain No. 4 which is capable of heterogeneous nitrification and aerobic denitrification, was used to remove high-strength ammonium (approximately 1 g NH4(+)-N/l) from digested sludge, the product of an anaerobic digestion reactor, in which methane was produced from excess municipal sewage sludge. Repeated batch operations were conducted at 20°C and 30°C for 550 h, using a jar fermentor. The removal ratios of high-strength ammonium reached 90-100% within 24 h, and the average ammonium removal rate was 2.9 kg-N/m(3)/day, more than 200 times higher than that in conventional nitrification-denitrification processes. During these operations, the cell density was maintained at 10(8)-10(9) cells of A. faecalis strain No. 4/ml. At 3% NaCl in the digested sludge, strain No. 4 exhibited an ammonium removal rate of 3 kg-N/m(3)/day. PMID:24411668

  13. Application of waste frying oils in the biosynthesis of biodemulsifier by a demulsifying strain Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Peng, Kaiming; Huang, Xiangfeng; Lu, Lijun; Cheng, Hang; Yang, Dianhai; Zhou, Qi; Deng, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of biodemulsifiers has become a new research aspect. Using waste frying oils (WFOs) as carbon source to synthesize biodemulsifiers has a potential prospect to decrease production cost and to improve the application of biodemulsifiers in the oilfield. In this study, a demulsifying strain, Alcaligenes sp. S-XJ-1, was investigated to synthesize a biodemulsifier using waste frying oils as carbon source. It was found that the increase of initial pH of culture medium could increase the biodemulsifier yield but decrease the demulsification ratio compared to that using paraffin as carbon source. In addition, a biodemulsifier produced by waste frying oils and paraffin as mixed carbon source had a lower demulsification capability compared with that produced by paraffin or waste frying oil as sole carbon source. Fed-batch fermentation of biodemulsifier using waste frying oils as supplementary carbon source was found to be a suitable method. Mechanism of waste frying oils utilization was studied by using tripalmitin, olein and tristearin as sole carbon sources to synthesize biodemulsifier. The results showed saturated long-chain fatty acid was difficult for S-XJ-1 to utilize but could effectively enhance the demulsification ability of the produced biodemulsifier. Moreover, FT-IR result showed that the demulsification capability of biodemulsifiers was associated with the content of C=O group and nitrogen element. PMID:22066226

  14. Identification of a New Alcaligenes faecalis Strain MOR02 and Assessment of Its Toxicity and Pathogenicity to Insects

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Mejía, Ared; Obregón-Barboza, Verónica; Martínez-Ocampo, Fernando; Hernández-Mendoza, Armando; Martínez-Garduño, Felipe; Guillén-Solís, Gabriel; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Federico; Peña-Chora, Guadalupe; Ortíz-Hernández, Laura; Gaytán-Colín, Paul; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    We report the isolation of a bacterium from Galleria mellonella larva and its identification using genome sequencing and phylogenomic analysis. This bacterium was named Alcaligenes faecalis strain MOR02. Microscopic analyses revealed that the bacteria are located in the esophagus and intestine of the nematodes Steinernema feltiae, S. carpocapsae, and H. bacteriophora. Using G. mellonella larvae as a model, when the larvae were injected with 24,000 CFU in their hemocoel, more than 96% mortality was achieved after 24 h. Additionally, toxicity assays determined that 1 μg of supernatant extract from A. faecalis MOR02 killed more than 70% G. mellonella larvae 96 h after injection. A correlation of experimental data with sequence genome analyses was also performed. We discovered genes that encode proteins and enzymes that are related to pathogenicity, toxicity, and host/environment interactions that may be responsible for the observed phenotypic characteristics. Our data demonstrates that the bacteria are able to use different strategies to colonize nematodes and kill insects to their own benefit. However, there remains an extensive group of unidentified microorganisms that could be participating in the infection process. Additionally, a nematode-bacterium association could be established probably as a strategy of dispersion and colonization. PMID:25667924

  15. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid mediated anti-oomycete activity of the endophytic Alcaligenes sp. EIL-2 against Phytophthora meadii.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Amith; Philip, Shaji; Jacob, Manoj Kurian; Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackel; Jacob, C Kuruvilla; Kochupurackal, Jayachandran

    2015-01-01

    The oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora meadii, causes various diseases in Hevea brasiliensis at different stages of its life cycle. The study reports the structural characterization of the active principle from the culture filtrate of Alcaligenes sp. EIL-2 (GenBank ID: HQ641257) offering antagonistic activity against P. meadii. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis showed the similarity of the compound with phenazine derivatives. The specific representations of FT-IR spectrum such as 3200 cm(-1) (OH stretching, NH stretching and presence of aromatic ring), 1737 cm(-1) (carboxylic acid), 2200-2400 cm(-1) (conjugated dienes) and 1467 cm(-1), and 1422 cm(-1) (CN bonds) were an indicative of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). The structure of the compound was further confirmed by (1)H NMR/(13)C NMR spectroscopy, DEPT experiments, and two-dimensional NMR spectral studies, including (1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC as PCA with the molecular formula of C₁₃H₈N₂O₂. P. meadii was sensitive to purified PCA extract from the endophyte and a concentration of 5 μg/ml completely inhibited the mycelia growth. PCA also showed zoosporicidal activity against P. meadii zoospores. This is the first study of this kind where PCA from an endophyte of H. brasiliensis is being confirmed to carry antagonistic activity against P. meadii. PMID:24985092

  16. Efficient cascade synthesis of ampicillin from penicillin G potassium salt using wild and mutant penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Senwen; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Su, Erzheng; Wei, Dongzhi

    2016-02-10

    To avoid isolation and purification of the intermediate 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), a two-enzyme two-step cascade synthesis of ampicillin from penicillin G was established. In purely aqueous medium, penicillin G hydrolysis and ampicillin synthesis were catalyzed by immobilized wild-type and mutagenized penicillin G acylases from Alcaligenes faecalis (Af PGA), respectively (Fig. 1). The βF24 G mutant Af PGA (the 24th Phenylalanine of the β-subunit was replaced by Glycine) was employed for its superior performance in enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin. By optimizing the reaction conditions, including enzyme loading, temperature, initial pH and D-PGME/6-APA ratio, the conversion of the second step of ampicillin synthesis reached approximately 90% in 240 min and less than 1.7 mole D-PGME were required to produce 1 mole ampicillin. Overall, in a 285 min continuous two-step procedure, an ampicillin yield of 87% was achieved, demonstrating the possibility of improving the cascade synthesis of ampicillin by mutagenized PGA, providing an economically efficient and environmentally benign procedure for semi-synthetic penicillins antibiotics synthesis. PMID:26732414

  17. Enantioselective acylation of β-phenylalanine acid and its derivatives catalyzed by penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Dengchao; Ji, Lilian; Wang, Xinfeng; Wei, Dongzhi

    2013-01-01

    This study developed a simple, efficient method for producing racemic β-phenylalanine acid (BPA) and its derivatives via the enantioselective acylation catalyzed by the penicillin G acylase from Alcaligenes faecalis (Af-PGA). When the reaction was run at 25°C and pH 10 in an aqueous medium containing phenylacetamide and BPA in a molar ratio of 2:1, 8 U/mL enzyme and 0.1 M BPA, the maximum BPA conversion efficiency at 40 min only reached 36.1%, which, however, increased to 42.9% as the pH value and the molar ratio of phenylacetamide to BPA were elevated to 11 and 3:1, respectively. Under the relatively optimum reaction conditions, the maximum conversion efficiencies of BPA derivatives all reached about 50% in a relatively short reaction time (45-90 min). The enantiomeric excess value of product (ee(p)) and enantiomeric excess value of substrate (ee(s)) were all above 98% and 95%, respectively. These results suggest that the method established in this study is practical, effective, and environmentally benign and may be applied to industrial production of enantiomerically pure BPA and its derivatives. PMID:23302108

  18. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) generated by Alcaligenes latus using lactose and whey after acid protein precipitation process.

    PubMed

    Berwig, Karina Hammel; Baldasso, Camila; Dettmer, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Whey after acid protein precipitation was used as substrate for PHB production in orbital shaker using Alcaligenes latus. Statistical analysis determined the most appropriate hydroxide for pH neutralization of whey after protein precipitation among NH4OH, KOH and NaOH 10%w/v. The results were compared to those of commercial lactose. A scale-up test in a 4L bioreactor was done at 35°C, 750rpm, 7L/min air flow, and 6.5 pH. The PHB was characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. NH4OH provided the best results for productivity (p), 0.11g/L.h, and for polymer yield, (YP/S), 1.08g/g. The bioreactor experiment resulted in lower p and YP/S. PHB showed maximum degradation temperature (291°C), melting temperature (169°C), and chemical properties similar to those of standard PHB. The use of whey as a substrate for PHB production did not affect significantly the final product quality. PMID:27347795

  19. Evaluation of screening methods for demulsifying bacteria and characterization of lipopeptide bio-demulsifier produced by Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Jia; Lu, Li-Jun; Wen, Yue; Xu, Jing-Cheng; Yang, Dian-Hai; Zhou, Qi

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, surface tension measurement, oil-spreading test and blood-plate hemolysis test were attempted in the screening of demulsifying bacteria. After the comparison to the screening results obtained in demulsification test, 50 mN/m of surface tension of culture was proposed as a preliminary screening standard for potential demulsifying bacteria. For the identification of efficient demulsifying strains, surface tension level was set at 40 mN/m. The detected strains were further verified in demulsification test. Compared to using demulsification test alone as screening method, the proposed screening protocol would be more efficient. From the screening, a highly efficient demulsifying stain, S-XJ-1, was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil and identified as Alcaligenes sp. by 16S rRNA gene and physiological test. It achieved 96.5% and 49.8% of emulsion breaking ratio in W/O and O/W kerosene emulsion within 24h, respectively, and also showed 95% of water separation ratio in oilfield petroleum emulsion within 2h. The bio-demulsifier was found to be cell-wall combined. After soxhlet extraction and purification through silicon-gel column, the bio-demulsifier was then identified as lipopeptide biosurfactant by TLC and FT-IR. PMID:18799309

  20. [Evaluation of occurrence of Alcaligenes faecalis in clinical samples of patients of the university hospital in Bydgoszcz].

    PubMed

    Jachna-Sawicka, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Alcaligenes faecalis is an aerobic Gram-negative, non-fermentative rod. It's saprophyte of water and soil. It may be recovered from wet places of hospital environment. It is considered as an opportunistic pathogen. The aim of this review was evaluation of occurrence in clinical samples and susceptibility to antibiotics of 72 A. faecalis strains isolated in years 2003-2008. Over 30% of strains were isolated from patients in surgical ward, 19.6% from patients in outpatient clinic and almost 14% from patients in Department of Dermatology. 70.8% of strains were isolated from purulent material samples, whereas from urine--16.7% of strains. Nearly 88% out of examined strains were grown in mixed culture together with one (26.4%), two (32.0%), three (23.6%) or four (5.6%) microorganisms. All out of strains were sensitive to piperacyline, piperacyline/tazobactam and carbapenems. Sensitivity to aztreonam was observed at 22.2% of strains and to co-trimoxazole at 57.1% of strains. PMID:19517818

  1. Genetic Diversity and Horizontal Transfer of Genes Involved in Oxidation of Reduced Phosphorus Compounds by Alcaligenes faecalis WM2072

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Marlena M.; Metcalf, William W.

    2005-01-01

    Enrichment was performed to isolate organisms that could utilize reduced phosphorus compounds as their sole phosphorus sources. One isolate that grew well with either hypophosphite or phosphite was identified by 16S rRNA gene analysis as a strain of Alcaligenes faecalis. The genes required for oxidation of hypophosphite and phosphite by this organism were identified by using transposon mutagenesis and include homologs of the ptxD and htxA genes of Pseudomonas stutzeri WM88, which encode an NAD-dependent phosphite dehydrogenase (PtxD) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent hypophosphite dioxygenase (HtxA). This organism also has the htxB, htxC, and htxD genes that comprise an ABC-type transporter, presumably for hypophosphite and phosphite transport. The role of these genes in reduced phosphorus metabolism was confirmed by analyzing the growth of mutants in which these genes were deleted. Sequencing data showed that htxA, htxB, htxC, and htxD are virtually identical to their homologs in P. stutzeri at the DNA level, indicating that horizontal gene transfer occurred. However, A. faecalis ptxD is very different from its P. stutzeri homolog and represents a new ptxD lineage. Therefore, this gene has ancient evolutionary roots in bacteria. These data suggest that there is strong evolutionary selection for the ability of microorganisms to oxidize hypophosphite and phosphite. PMID:15640200

  2. Recombination of a 3-chlorobenzoate catabolic plasmid from Alcaligenes eutrophus NH9 mediated by direct repeat elements.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Miyashita, K

    1995-11-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus NH9 was isolated from soil. This strain can utilize 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB) as a sole source of carbon and energy. Most of the 3-CB-negative segregants had lost one of the plasmids present in the parent strain. The genes for catabolism of 3-CB were located within a 9.2-kb SacI fragment of this plasmid (pENH91). The genes were found to hybridize with genes for components of the modified ortho cleavage pathway from Pseudomonas putida. In one of the 3-CB-negative segregants, the plasmid had undergone the deletion of a segment with a size of about 12.5 kb that covered the catabolic genes. The deletion event seemed to be the result of reciprocal recombination between two highly homologous sequences with sizes of 2.5 kb that were present as a direct repeat at the two ends of the region that included the catabolic genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis of homologous fragments revealed a structure that resembled an insertion sequence and relatedness to IS21. During repeated subculturing of NH9 on liquid media with 3-CB, the culture was taken over by a derivative strain (designated NH9A) in which the degradative plasmid carried a duplicate copy of the 12.5-kb region that contained the catabolic genes. The duplication of these genes seemed again to have been mediated by recombination between the direct repeat sequences. PMID:8526487

  3. Construction and use of a gene bank of Alcaligenes eutrophus in the analysis of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, K; Wilke-Douglas, M

    1984-01-01

    A gene bank of the DNA from the hydrogen bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus ATCC 17707 was constructed in the broad host range cosmid vector pVK102 and established in Escherichia coli. A triparental replica plating procedure was developed to allow rapid screening of large numbers of isolated E. coli gene bank clones for complementation of A. eutrophus mutants. This procedure was used to identify hybrid cosmids that complemented CO2 fixation-negative (Cfx-), H2 uptake-negative (Hup-), and auxotrophic A. eutrophus mutants. The average insert DNA size in these hybrid cosmids was 22 kilobases. Nine hybrid cosmids that complemented ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-negative (RuBPCase-) mutants were characterized. They fell into two distinct groups with respect to their restriction patterns. Complementing subclones from the two groups contained no common restriction fragments, but hybridization experiments indicated a high degree of sequence homology. Restriction fragments corresponding to one of the subclones were absent in total DNA from a cured strain that had lost plasmid pAE7, indigenous to the wild type. It is concluded that functional CO2 fixation genes in the A. eutrophus ATCC 17707 chromosome are reiterated on plasmid pAE7. Images PMID:6090401

  4. Mechanisms involved in quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Nuno T; Assunção, Patrícia; Poveda, José B; Tavío, María M

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri is a causative agent of contagious agalactia in goats. In this study, M. mycoides subsp. capri mutants were selected for resistance to fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin) by serial passes in broth with increasing concentrations of antibiotic. Mutations conferring cross-resistance to the three fluoroquinolones were found in the quinolone resistance determining regions of the four genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Different mutations in the DNA gyrase GyrA subunit suggest a different mechanism of inhibition between norfloxacin and the other tested fluoroquinolones. The presence of an adenosine triphosphate-dependent efflux system was suggested through the use of the inhibitor orthovanadate. PMID:25951987

  5. An isobutyronitrile-induced bienzymatic system of Alcaligenes sp. MTCC 10674 and its application in the synthesis of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S K; Mehta, P K; Bhatia, R K; Bhalla, T C

    2013-05-01

    Alcaligenes sp. MTCC 10674 was isolated as acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing bacterium from soil of orchid gardens of Himachal Pradesh. Acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing activity of this organism comprised nitrile hydratase and amidase activities. It exhibited higher substrate specificity towards aliphatic hydroxynitrile (acetone cyanohydrin) in comparison to arylaliphatic hydroxynitrile. Isobutyronitrile (40 mM) acted as a carbon source as well as inducer for growth of Alcaligenes sp. MTCC 10674 and expression of acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing activity. Optimization of culture condition using response surface methodology increased acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing activity by 1.3-fold, while inducer mediation approach increased the activity by 1.2-fold. The half life of this enzyme was 25 h at 15 °C. V max and K m value for acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing enzyme was 0.71 μmol mg(-1) min(-1) and 14.3 mM, when acetone cyanohydrin was used as substrate. Acetone cyanohydrin hydrolyzing enzyme encountered product inhibition and IC50 and K i value were calculated to be 28 and 10.2 mM, respectively, when product α-hydroxyisobutyric acid was added in the reaction. Under optimized reaction conditions at 40 ml fed batch scale, 3 mg dcw ml (-) resting cells of Alcaligenes sp. MTCC 10674 fully converted 0.33 M acetone cyanohydrin into α-hydroxyisobutyric acid (1.02 g) in 6 h 40 min. The characterization of acetone cyanohydrins hydrolyzing activity revealed that it comprises bienzymatic nitrile hydrolyzing system, i.e. nitrile hydratase and amidase for the production of α-hydroxyisobutyric acid from acetone cyanohydrin and maximum 70 % yield is being reported for the first time. PMID:22945851

  6. Hidden Gems in the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    If 4,350 genes annotated in the M. avium subsp paratuberculosis strain K-10 genome wasn’t already enough to study, more genes have recently been uncovered, hidden deep within this genome sequence. Genomic and proteomic studies, both published and unpublished, have revealed a handful of new genes mi...

  7. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  8. Toxic shock syndrome related to Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Mohamed; Vialette, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    We describe a documented streptococcal toxic shock syndrome linked to horse-to-man transmission of Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus. The patient was treated successfully with respiratory and haemodynamic support in conjunction with antibiotic treatment associated with polyvalent human immunoglobulin and high-volume venovenous haemofiltration. PMID:24014562

  9. Substructure within Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Isolates from Australian Wildlife▿

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Sandra K.; Bull, C. Michael; Gordon, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing of 56 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica strains isolated from Australian wildlife hosts was performed. The results of population assignment algorithms revealed that the 56 strains could be subdivided into two distinct clades. Strains belonging to the two clades were further distinguished phenotypically, genotypically, and with respect to host distribution. PMID:21378038

  10. Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius strain ST1464 genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    Elbir, Haitham; Robert, Catherine; Nguyen, Ti Thien; Gimenez, Grégory; El Sanousi, Sulieman M.; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is responsible for Morel's disease in animals and a cause of abscess in humans. It is characterized by a microaerophilic growth, contrary to the other strains of S. aureus. The 2,604,446-bp genome (32.7% GC content) of S. anaerobius ST1464 comprises one chromosome and no plasmids. The chromosome contains 2,660 open reading frames (ORFs), 49 tRNAs and three complete rRNAs, forming one complete operon. The size of ORFs ranges between 100 to 4,600 bp except for two ORFs of 6,417 and 7,173 bp encoding segregation ATPase and non-ribosomal peptide synthase, respectively. The chromosome harbors Staphylococcus phage 2638A genome and incomplete Staphylococcus phage genome PT1028, but no detectable CRISPRS. The antibiotic resistance gene for tetracycline was found although Staphylococcus aureus subsp. anaerobius is susceptible to tetracycline in-vitro. Intact oxygen detoxification genes encode superoxide dismutase and cytochrome quinol oxidase whereas the catalase gene is impaired by a stop codon. Based on the genome, in-silico multilocus sequence typing indicates that S. aureus subsp. anaerobius emerged as a clone separated from all other S. aureus strains, illustrating host-adaptation linked to missing functions. Availability of S. aureus subsp. anaerobius genome could prompt the development of post-genomic tools for its rapid discrimination from S. aureus. PMID:24501641

  11. Recurrent Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Bacteremia in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joshua R.; Leber, Amy; Velineni, Sridhar; Timoney, John F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of an infant with recurrent bacteremia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, likely transmitted from mother to infant. Our case highlights the importance of an epidemiological history and molecular diagnostics in ascertaining insights into transmission, pathogenesis, and optimal management. PMID:26179301

  12. Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jin; Feng, Jia; Xie, Shulian; Wang, Feipeng; Xu, Qiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff) Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1∶25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3) had the highest (P<0.05) antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%), esters (5.24%), acids (4.87%) and alcohols (2.21%). Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum. PMID:24714388

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale is a naturally attenuated subtype that has been used as a vaccine for a century. We sequenced the genome of this organism and compared it to those of virulent senso stricto A. marginale strains. The comparison markedly narrows the number of outer membrane protein ...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus NBRC 16556.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Hisayuki; Ichikawa, Natsuko; Oguchi, Akio; Hamada, Moriyuki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain NBRC 16556, deposited as Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. hygroscopicus into the NBRC culture collection. An average nucleotide identity analysis confirmed that the taxonomic identification is correct. The genome sequence will serve as a valuable reference for genome mining to search new secondary metabolites. PMID:27198007

  15. Description and history of Syringa oblata subsp. oblata 'Frank Meyer'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An accession of Syringa oblata subsp. oblata (PI 23031) collected in China by Frank Meyer in 1908was given the name ‘Frank Meyer’ by Father Fiala in 1988. To be established according to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants, a new cultivar name must be accompanied by a descrip...

  16. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  17. Expression of the Escherichia coli pfkA gene in Alcaligenes eutrophus and in other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Steinbüchel, A

    1986-04-01

    The Escherichia coli pfkA gene has been cloned in the non-self-transmissible vector pVK101 from hybrid plasmids obtained from the Clarke and Carbon clone bank, resulting in the plasmids pAS300 and pAS100; the latter plasmid also encoded the E. coli tpi gene. These plasmids were transferred by conjugation to mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus which are unable to grow on fructose and gluconate due to lack of 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase activity. These transconjugants recovered the ability to grow on fructose and harbored pAS100 or pAS300. After growth on fructose, the transconjugants contained phosphofructokinase at specific activities between 0.73 and 1.83 U/mg of protein, indicating that the E. coli pfkA gene is readily expressed in A. eutrophus and that the utilization of fructose occurs via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway instead of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. In contrast, transconjugants of the wild type of A. eutrophus, which are potentially able to catabolize fructose via both pathways, grew at a decreased rate on fructose and during growth on fructose did not stably maintain pAS100 or pAS300. Indications for a glycolytic futile cycling of fructose 6-phosphate and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate are discussed. Plasmid pA 100 was also transferred to 14 different species of gram-negative bacteria. The pfkA gene was expressed in most of these species. In addition, most transconjugants of these strains and of A. eutrophus exhibited higher specific activities of triosephosphate isomerase than did the corresponding parent strains. PMID:2937774

  18. The effect of combined and separate infection by Alcaligenes faecalis and paramyxovirus (Yucaipa) on the surface morphology of the trachea in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Yegana, Y; Weismen, Y; Herz, A; Schapira, R; Hod, I

    1985-10-01

    Sixty-seven 1-day-old turkey poults were inoculated in the infra orbital sinus with 3 x 10(8) Alcaligenes faecalis bacteria and/or by 10(5.8)EID 50/ ml of Yucaipa virus. Twenty-five similar birds served as controls. Identification of the agents inoculated was made during the development of disease by means of isolation and serological tests. During the development of the disease, the surface morphology of the trachea in the affected animals revealed cellular oedema associated with a mucus coating of the cilia. PMID:18766948

  19. Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Pérez, Tania; Balcázar, José Luis; Peix, Alvaro; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; de Blas, Ignacio; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol

    2011-08-01

    The species Lactococcus lactis currently includes three subspecies; L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, isolated from milk sources, and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, isolated from the leafhopper Hordnia circellata. In this study, three strains, designated L105(T), I3 and L101, were isolated from the intestinal mucus of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These strains were closely related to members of the species Lactococcus lactis. Strain L105(T) showed 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of the type strains L. lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 604(T) and L. lactis subsp. hordniae NCDO 2181(T) and showed 99.9 % similarity to the type strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris NCDO 607(T). Analysis of two housekeeping genes, rpoB and recA, confirmed the close relationship between the novel strains and L. lactis subsp. cremoris with similarities of 99.3 and 99.7 %, respectively. The three strains could, however, be differentiated from their closest relatives on the basis of several phenotypic characteristics, as was the case for L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. hordniae, which were also closely related on the basis of 16S rRNA, rpoB and recA gene sequence similarities. The strains isolated in this study represent a new subspecies, for which the name Lactococcus lactis subsp. tructae subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is L105(T) ( = LMG 24662(T)  = DSM 21502(T)). PMID:20833888

  20. Analysis of labdane-type diterpenes from Cistus creticus (subsp. creticus and subsp. eriocephalus), by GC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Anastasaki, T; Demetzos, C; Perdetzoglou, D; Gazouli, M; Loukis, A; Harvala, C

    1999-12-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis of labdane-type diterpenes of the hexane extracts and of the essential oils of the leaves, fruits and resin "Ladano", of Cistus creticus subsp. creticus and Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus, have been carried out by GC and GC-MS analysis using two capillary chromatographic columns, i.e., HP-5MS and CP-Wax. The methanolic extract of the fruits of C. creticus subsp. creticus was examined and seven labdane diterpenes were isolated and identified by spectroscopic methods. Data on the investigation of labdane diterpenes by GC and GC-MS is limited and most of them have never been analysed by this method. The results obtained by this analysis could be useful for identifying them in crude plant extracts. Manoyl oxides were studied further for the percentage content of their isomers. The hexane extracts of the two subspecies as well as the manoyl oxide isomers isolated from the methanolic extract of the fruits of C. creticus subsp. creticus, were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Global numerical differences of these C. creticus subspecies, based on labdane diterpenes content in the hexane extracts as well as in the essential oils, were established by statistical methods. Phenotypic differences are discussed. PMID:10630116

  1. Insecticidal toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae: gene cloning and characterization and comparison with B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki CryIA(c) toxins.

    PubMed Central

    Von Tersch, M A; Robbins, H L; Jany, C S; Johnson, T B

    1991-01-01

    Genes encoding insecticidal crystal proteins were cloned from three strains of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kenyae and two strains of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. Characterization of the B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae toxin genes showed that they are most closely related to cryIA(c) from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The cloned genes were introduced into Bacillus host strains, and the spectra of insecticidal activities of each Cry protein were determined for six pest lepidopteran insects. CryIA(c) proteins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae are as active as CryIA(c) proteins from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki against Trichoplusia ni, Lymantria dispar, Heliothis zea, and H. virescens but are significantly less active against Plutella xylostella and, in some cases, Ostrinia nubilalis. The sequence of a cryIA(c) gene from B. thuringiensis subsp. kenyae was determined (GenBank M35524) and compared with that of cryIA(c) from B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The two genes are more than 99% identical and show seven amino acid differences among the predicted sequences of 1,177 amino acids. Images PMID:2014985

  2. In vitro activities of quinolones, beta-lactams, tobramycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole against nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Fass, R J; Barnishan, J; Solomon, M C; Ayers, L W

    1996-06-01

    From 1991 to 1995, 8,975 nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli were isolated from patients at The Ohio State University Medical Center: 71% Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 14% Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, 7.6% Acinetobacter baumannii, and < 2% each of 25 other species. The MICs of trovafloxacin (CP-99,219), ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, ampicillin-sulbactam, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ceftazidime, cefoperazone, ceftriaxone, imipenem, tobramycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) were determined for 308 isolates, representing 13 species, by a standardized broth microdilution method. The activities of all drugs were species dependent. The fluoroquinolones had inconsistent activity against most species, although several relatively uncommon nonfermenters were consistently susceptible or resistant. Trovafloxacin was considerably more active than ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against S. maltophilia, A. baumannii, and several less common species. Among the beta-lactams, relative activities varied considerably; overall, imipenem had the broadest spectrum of activity but was inactive against S. maltophilia and Burkholderia cepacia isolates. Tobramycin and TMP-SMZ had stereotypic spectra of activity. Tobramycin was active against most species except S. maltophilia, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans, Burkholderia spp., and Weeksella virosa. TMP-SMZ was active against most species except P. aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens-putida. A review of laboratory records indicated few changes in susceptibility patterns from 1991 to 1995; the only clear trend was toward increasing P. aeruginosa resistance to all classes of drugs. PMID:8726011

  3. Uptake of benzoic acid and chloro-substituted benzoic acids by alcaligenes denitrificans BRI 3010 and BRI 6011

    SciTech Connect

    Miguez, C.B.; Ingram, J.M.; MacLeod, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The mechanism of uptake of benzoic and 2,4-dichlorobenzoic acid (2,4-DCBA) by Alcaligenes denitrificans BRI 3010 and BRI 6011 and Pseudomonas sp. strain B13, three organisms capable of degrading isomers of chlorinated benzoic acids, was investigated. In all three organisms, uptake of benzoic acid was inducible. For benzoic acid uptake into BRI 3010, monophasic saturation kinetics with apparent K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of 1.4 {mu}M and 3.2 nmol/min/mg of cell dry weight, respectively, were obtained. For BRI 6011, biphasic saturation kinetics were observed, suggesting presence of two uptake systems for benzoic acid with distinct K{sub m} (0.72 and 5.3 {mu}M) and V{sub max} (3.3 and 4.6 nmol/min/mg of cell dry weight) values. BRI 3010 and BRI 6011 accumulated benzoic acid against a concentration gradient by a factor of 8 and 10, respectively. A wide range of structural analogs, at 50-fold excess concentrations, inhibited benzoic acid uptake by BRI 3010 and BRI 6011, whereas with B13, only 3-chlorobenzoic acid was an effective inhibitor. For BRI 3010 and BRI 6011, the inhibition by the structural analogs was not of a competitive nature. Uptake of benzoic acid by BRI 3010 and BRI 6011 was inhibited by KCN, by the protonophore 3,5,3`, 4`-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS), and, for BRI 6011, by anaerobiosis unless nitrate was present, thus indicating that energy was required for the uptake process. Uptake of 2,4-DCBA by BRI 6011 was constitutive and saturation uptake kinetics were not observed. Uptake of 2,4-DCBA by BRI 6011 was inhibited by KCN, TCS, and anaerobiosis even if nitrate was present, but the compound was not accumulated intracellularly against a concentration gradient. Uptake of 2,4-DCBA by BRI 6011 appears to occur by passive diffusion into the cell down its concentration gradient, which is maintained by the intracellular metabolism of the compound. This process could play an important role in the degradation of xenobiotic compounds by microorganisms.

  4. Metabolic pathway for biosynthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) from 4-hydroxybutyrate by Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Valentin, H E; Zwingmann, G; Schönebaum, A; Steinbüchel, A

    1995-01-15

    Various aerobic Gram-negative bacteria have been examined for their ability to use 4-hydroxybutyrate and 1,4-butanediol as carbon source for growth. Alcaligenes eutrophus strains H16, HF39, PHB-4 and Pseudomonas denitrificans 'Morris' were not able to grow with 1,4-butanediol or 4-hydroxybutyrate. From A. eutrophus HF39 spontaneous primary mutants (e.g. SK4040) were isolated which grew on 4-hydroxybutyrate with doubling times of approximately 3 h. Tn5::mob mutagenesis of mutant SK4040 led to the isolation of two phenotypically different classes of secondary mutants which were affected in the utilization of 4-hydroxybutyrate. Mutants exhibiting the phenotype 4-hydroxybutyrate-negative did not grow with 4-hydroxybutyrate, and mutants exhibiting the phenotype 4-hydroxybutyrate-leaky grew at a significantly lower rate with 4-hydroxybutyrate. Hybridization experiments led to the identification of a 10-kbp genomic EcoRI fragment of A. eutrophus SK4040, which was altered in mutants with the phenotype 4-hydroxybutyrate-negative, and of two 1-kbp and 4.5-kbp genomic EcoRI fragments, which were altered in mutants with the phenotype 4-hydroxybutyrate-leaky. This 10-kbp EcoRI fragment was cloned from A. eutrophus SK4040, and conjugative transfer of a pVDZ'2 hybrid plasmid to A. eutrophus H16 conferred the ability to grow with 4-hydroxybutyrate to the wild type. DNA-sequence analysis of this fragment, enzymic analysis of the wild type and of mutants of A. eutrophus as well as of recombinant strains of Escherichia coli led to the identification of a structural gene encoding for a 4-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase which was affected by transposon mutagenesis in five of six available 4-hydroxybutyrate-negative mutants. Enzymic studies also provided evidence for the presence of an active succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase in 4-hydroxybutyrate-grown cells. This indicated that degradation of 4-hydroxybutyrate occurs via succinate semialdehyde and succinate and that the latter is

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of the acetyl coenzyme A synthetase gene (acoE) of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Priefert, H; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    The gene locus acoE, which is involved in the utilization of acetoin in Alcaligenes eutrophus, was identified as the structural gene of an acetyl coenzyme A synthetase (acetate:coenzyme A ligase [AMP forming]; EC 6.2.1.1). This gene was localized on a 3.8-kbp SmaI-EcoRI subfragment of an 8.1-kbp EcoRI restriction fragment (fragment E) that was cloned recently (C. Fründ, H. Priefert, A. Steinbüchel, and H. G. Schlegel, J. Bacteriol. 171:6539-6548, 1989). The 1,983 bp acoE gene encoded a protein with a relative molecular weight of 72,519, and it was preceded by a putative Shine-Dalgarno sequence. A comparison analysis of the amino acid sequence deduced from acoE revealed a high degree of homology to primary structures of acetyl coenzyme A synthetases from other sources (amounting to up to 50.5% identical amino acids). Tn5 insertions in two transposon-induced mutants of A. eutrophus, that were impaired in the catabolism of acetoin were mapped 481 and 1,159 bp downstream from the translational start codon of acoE. The expression of acoE in Escherichia coli led to the formation of an acyl coenzyme A synthetase that accepted acetate as the preferred substrate (100% relative activity) but also reacted with propionate (46%) and hydroxypropionate (87%); fatty acids consisting of four or more carbon atoms were not accepted. In addition, evidence for the presence of a second acyl coenzyme A synthetase was obtained; this enzyme exhibited a different substrate specificity. The latter enzyme is obviously required for the activation of propionate, e.g., during the formation of the storage compound poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid-co-3-hydroxyvaleric acid) when propionate is provided as the sole carbon source. An analysis of mutants provided evidence that the expression of the uptake protein for propionate depends on the presence of alternate sigma factor sigma 54. Images PMID:1356967

  6. Draft Genome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Nottingham Isolated from Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Ayers, Sherry; Melka, David C.; Curry, Phillip E.; Payne, Justin S.; Laasri, Anna; Wang, Charles; Hammack, Thomas S.; Brown, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) designed to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, targeting the sdf gene, generated positive results for S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (CFSAN033950) and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Nottingham (CFSAN006803) isolated from food samples. Both strains show pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns distinct from those of S. Enteritidis. Here, we report the genome sequences of these two strains. PMID:27445384

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Fusobacterium necrophorum subsp. funduliforme Bovine Liver Abscess Isolate B35

    PubMed Central

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Foecking, Mark F.; Nagaraja, Tiruvoor G.

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that causes foot rot and liver abscesses in cattle. F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum and the less virulent organism F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme are recognized. We present here a draft genome sequence of the bovine liver abscess isolate F. necrophorum subsp. funduliforme strain B35, which affords a genomic perspective of virulence and bovine adaptation. PMID:24786958

  8. Construction of targeted insertion mutations in Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jirong; Zogaj, Xhavit; Barker, Jeffrey R; Klose, Karl E

    2007-10-01

    Francisella tularensis is one of the most deadly bacterial agents, yet most of the genetic determinants of pathogenesis are still unknown. We have developed an efficient targeted mutagenesis strategy in the model organism F. tularensis subsp. novicida by utilizing universal priming of optimized antibiotic resistance cassettes and splicing by overlap extension (SOE). This process enables fast and efficient construction of targeted insertion mutations in F. tularensis subsp. novicida that have characteristics of nonpolar mutations; optimized targeted mutagenesis strategies will promote the study of this mysterious bacterium and facilitate vaccine development against tularemia. Moreover the general strategy of gene disruption by PCR-based antibiotic resistance cassette insertion is broadly applicable to many bacterial species. PMID:18019340

  9. Colonization patterns of an mCherry-tagged Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense strain in potato plants.

    PubMed

    Kubheka, Gugulethu C; Coutinho, Teresa A; Moleleki, Ntsane; Moleleki, Lucy N

    2013-12-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense is a newly identified member of the potato soft rot enterobacteriaceae. The pathogenesis of this pathogen is still poorly understood. In this study, an mCherry-P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense-tagged strain was generated to study P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense-potato plant interactions. Prior to use, the tagged strain was evaluated for in vitro growth, plasmid stability, and virulence on potato tubers and shown to be similar to the wild type. Four potato cultivars were evaluated for stem-based resistance against P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy and in vitro viable cell counts showed that P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense is able to penetrate roots of a susceptible potato cultivar as early as 12 h postinoculation and migrate upward into aerial stem parts. Due to the phenotypic differences observed between tolerant and susceptible cultivars, a comparison of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense colonization patterns in these cultivars was undertaken. In the susceptible cultivar, P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense cells colonized the xylem tissue, forming "biofilm-like" aggregates that led to occlusion of some of the vessels. In contrast, in the tolerant cultivar, P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense appeared as free-swimming planktonic cells with no specific tissue localization. This suggests that there are resistance mechanisms in the tolerant cultivar that limit aggregation of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense in planta and, hence, the lack of symptom development in this cultivar. PMID:23758294

  10. Characterization of Tetragenococcus strains from sugar thick juice reveals a novel species, Tetragenococcus osmophilus sp. nov., and divides Tetragenococcus halophilus into two subspecies, T. halophilus subsp. halophilus subsp. nov. and T. halophilus subsp. flandriensis subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Justé, A; Van Trappen, S; Verreth, C; Cleenwerck, I; De Vos, P; Lievens, B; Willems, K A

    2012-01-01

    Most bacteria recovered so far from sugar thick juice during storage represent strains of the species Tetragenococcus halophilus. Recently, several Gram-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming cocci with other physiological and genetic traits were isolated from sugar thick juice samples from different origins. In this study, representative isolates were investigated using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity between these isolates and their closest relative, Tetragenococcus muriaticus, was 97.4%. The level of DNA-DNA relatedness between isolate T1(T), representing the newly found Tetragenococcus isolates, and T. muriaticus was 57%. Isolate T1(T) had a DNA G+C content of 36.7 mol%. Phylogenetic data and genomic and phenotypic features demonstrated that the isolates represent a novel species, for which the name Tetragenococcus osmophilus sp. nov. is proposed with T1(T) as the type strain (=LMG 26041(T) =DSM 23765(T)). Additionally, T. halophilus isolates from high-salt and high-sugar environments showed clear differences in several physiological and genetic characteristics like RAPD fingerprints and 16S rRNA gene sequences. DNA-DNA hybridizations, however, showed 79 to 80% relatedness between osmophilic and halophilic T. halophilus isolates, demonstrating that the different strains belong to the same species. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic differences observed, as well as the different origins of the strains and the industrial relevance of thick juice degradation, two subspecies of T. halophilus are described in this manuscript: T. halophilus subsp. halophilus subsp. nov. for the strains isolated from salt media and T. halophilus subsp. flandriensis subsp. nov. for the strains isolated from sugar-rich environments, which were first isolated in Flanders, Belgium. The type strains for the subspecies are IAM 1676(T) (=LMG 11490(T) =DSM 20339(T)) and T5(T) (=LMG 26042(T) =DSM 23766(T)), respectively. PMID:21357458

  11. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Group A.I, United States

    PubMed Central

    Birdsell, Dawn N.; Johansson, Anders; Öhrman, Caroline; Kaufman, Emily; Molins, Claudia; Pearson, Talima; Gyuranecz, Miklós; Naumann, Amber; Vogler, Amy J.; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Larsson, Pär; Forsman, Mats; Sjödin, Andreas; Gillece, John D.; Schupp, James; Petersen, Jeannine M.; Keim, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We used whole-genome analysis and subsequent characterization of geographically diverse strains using new genetic signatures to identify distinct subgroups within Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I: A.I.3, A.I.8, and A.I.12. These subgroups exhibit complex phylogeographic patterns within North America. The widest distribution was observed for A.I.12, which suggests an adaptive advantage. PMID:24755401

  12. PEDIOCIN PRODUCTION IN MILK BY PEDIOCOCCUS ACIDILACTICI IN CO-CULTURE WITH STREPTOCOCCUS THERMOPHILUS AND LACTOBACILLUS DELBRUECKII SUBSP. BULGARICUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of pediocin in milk by Pediococcus acidilactici was evaluated in co-culture with the dairy fermentation cultures Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The cultures were tested singly or in different combinations...

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the 2,4′-dihydroxyaceto­phenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    PubMed Central

    Beaven, G.; Bowyer, A.; Erskine, P.; Wood, S. P.; McCoy, A.; Coates, L.; Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Hopper, D. J.; Kaderbhai, M. A.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (or DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits each containing nonhaem iron and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. By the use of limited chymotrypsinolysis, the DAD enzyme from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP has been crystallized in a form that diffracts synchrotron radiation to a resolution of 2.2 Å. PMID:24915102

  14. Heterotrophic nitrification by Alcaligenes faecalis: NO sub 2 sup minus , NO sub 3 sup minus , N sub 2 O, and NO production in exponentially growing cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Papen, H.; von Berg, R.; Hinkel, I.; Thoene, B.; Rennenberg, H. )

    1989-08-01

    Heterotrophic nitrification by Alcaligenes faecalis DSM 30030 was not restricted to media containing organic forms of nitrogen. In both peptone-meat extract and defined media with ammonium and citrate as the sole nitrogen and carbon sources, respectively, NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO, and N{sub 2}O were produced under aerobic growth conditions. Heterotrophic nitrification was not attributable to old or dying cell populations. Production of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NO, and N{sub 2}O was detectable shortly after cultures started growth and proceeded exponentially during the logarithmic growth phase. NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} production rates were higher for cultures inoculated in media with pH values below 7 than for those in media at alkaline pH. Neither assimilatory nor dissimilatory nitrate or nitrite reductase activities were detectable in aerobic cultures.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorobenzoate to 4-chlorobenzoate and hydrolytic dehalogenation of 4-chloro-, 4-bromo-, and 4-iodobenzoate by Alcaligenes denitrificans NTB-1.

    PubMed Central

    van den Tweel, W J; Kok, J B; de Bont, J A

    1987-01-01

    Alcaligenes denitrificans NTB-1, previously isolated on 4-chlorobenzoate, also utilized 4-bromo-, 4-iodo-, and 2,4-dichlorobenzoate but not 4-fluorobenzoate as a sole carbon and energy source. During growth, stoichiometric amounts of halide were released. Experiments with whole cells and cell extracts revealed that 4-bromo- and 4-iodobenzoate were metabolized like 4-chlorobenzoate, involving an initial hydrolytic dehalogenation yielding 4-hydroxybenzoate, which in turn was hydroxylated to 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate. The initial step in the metabolism of 2,4-dichlorobenzoate was catalyzed by a novel type of reaction for aerobic organisms, involving inducible reductive dechlorination to 4-chlorobenzoate. Under conditions of low and controlled oxygen concentrations, A. denitrificans NTB-1 converted all 4-halobenzoates and 2,4-dichlorobenzoate almost quantitatively to 4-hydroxybenzoate. PMID:3579283

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M; Tisa, Louis S

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, an Entomopathogenic Bacterium Isolated from Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Ghazal, Shimaa; Oshone, Rediet; Simpson, Stephen; Morris, Krystalynne; Abebe-Akele, Feseha; Thomas, W. Kelley; Khalil, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88 is an entomopathogenic bacterium that forms a symbiotic association with Heterorhabditis nematodes. We report here a 5.27-Mbp draft genome sequence for P. luminescens subsp. laumondii HP88, with a G+C content of 42.4% and containing 4,243 candidate protein-coding genes. PMID:26988056

  18. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers Against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne’s disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced fr...

  19. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strain YF11

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhui; Song, Lifu; Feng, Wenjing; Pei, Guangsheng; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Zhichao; Sun, Jibin

    2013-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain YF11 is a food preservative bacterium with a high capacity to produce nisin. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis YF11 (2,527,433 bp with a G+C content of 34.81%). PMID:23929487

  1. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhe; Geng, Jianing; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Haiying; Yi, Li; Lei, Meng; Lu, Cheng-ping; Fan, Hong-jie; Hu, Songnian

    2011-10-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is an opportunistic pathogen. It has caused a very large economic loss in the swine industry of China and has become a threat to human health. We announce the complete genome sequence of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246, which provides opportunities to understand its pathogenesis mechanism and genetic basis. PMID:21914890

  2. First isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp Paratuberculosis from commercial pasteurized milk in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Paolicchi, Fernando; Cirone, Karina; Morsella, Claudia; Gioffré, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis was isolated from two out of seventy samples (2.86 %) of pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized milk. The isolates were positives to IS900 PCR and showed a C17 RFLP pattern, the most prevalent in Argentina. The present study is the first report of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis culture from pasteurized milk in Argentina. PMID:24031925

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Virulent Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Isolate Causing Soft Rot of Cucumber.

    PubMed

    Onkendi, Edward M; Ramesh, Aadi Moolam; Kwenda, Stanford; Naidoo, Sanushka; Moleleki, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense causes soft rot and blackleg diseases on potatoes, ornamentals, and other crops of economic importance. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a highly virulent P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense strain, PcbHPI01, isolated from a cucumber in South Africa. PMID:26744374

  4. Proposal for designation of F38-type caprine mycoplasmas as Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae subsp. nov. and consequent obligatory relegation of strains currently classified as M. capricolum (Tully, Barile, Edward, Theodore, and Ernø 1974) to an additional new subspecies, M. capricolum subsp. capricolum subsp. nov.

    PubMed

    Leach, R H; Ernø, H; MacOwan, K J

    1993-07-01

    A subspecies relationship with the existing species Mycoplasma capricolum is appropriate for the F38 group of mycoplasmas, the causative agent of classical contagious caprine pleuropneumonia. We believe that this classification is justified on the basis of the close DNA-DNA relationship recently reported for isolates belonging to the two groups and the other known serological and biological similarities and differences of these organisms. Strain F38T (T = type strain) and taxonomically indistinguishable strains are therefore proposed as members of a new subspecies of M. capricolum, M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. Strain F38 (= NCTC 10192) is the type strain of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae subsp. nov. As a consequence of this subdivision of the species M. capricolum, strains previously classified as M. capricolum are now necessarily relegated to subspecies status, as M. capricolum subsp. capricolum subsp. nov. Strain California kid (= ATCC 27343 = NCTC 10154) is the type strain of M. capricolum, as well as of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum. A taxonomic description of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae and a brief amended description of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum are presented. PMID:8347517

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides Strain J18, Isolated from Kimchi

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Young; Lee, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Se Hee

    2012-01-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides is one of the most predominant lactic acid bacterial groups during kimchi fermentation. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides J18, which was isolated from kimchi. The genome of the strain consists of a 1,896,561-bp chromosome and five plasmids. PMID:22247530

  6. Genome Sequence of an Epidemic Isolate of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Rebecca M; Reynolds, Paul R; Farias-Hesson, Eveline; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii, collectively called BRA100, were associated with outbreaks of postsurgical skin infections across various regions of Brazil from 2003 to 2009. We announce the draft genome sequence of a newly sequenced BRA100 strain, M. abscessus subsp. bolletii CRM-0020, isolated from a patient in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:23950125

  7. Biosystematic studies on Enicostema axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal subsp. Axillare (Gentianaceae) in peninsular India.

    PubMed

    Shahina, P M; Nampy, Santhosh

    2014-05-01

    The pantropical genus Enicostema (Gentianaceae) has three species and two sub species world over, namely, E. verticillatum (L.) Engl. (America), E. elizabethae Veldkamp (Madagascar) and E. axillare having 3 subsp. viz., subsp. axillare (Lam.) A. Raynal (India), subsp. latilobum (N.E. Br.) A. Raynal (East Africa) and subsp. littorale (Blume) A. Raynal (Indonesia). The present study aims to delimit the Indian taxa based on field and herbarium studies. Comparative morphology is studied using live as well as consulting wide range of specimens housed at various herbaria. The anatomy of leaf, stem, and root is studied using free hand sections and from epidermal peelings. The seed and pollen morphology are studied under SEM. Information on anatomy, palynology and seed micromorphology of E. axillare subsp. axillare is provided for the first time. PMID:26031003

  8. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    PubMed

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  9. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J.; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). PMID:26988049

  10. Assessing the Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Composting of Livestock Carcasses

    PubMed Central

    Tkachuk, Victoria L.; Krause, Denis O.; McAllister, Tim A.; Buckley, Katherine E.; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  11. Assessing the inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during composting of livestock carcasses.

    PubMed

    Tkachuk, Victoria L; Krause, Denis O; McAllister, Tim A; Buckley, Katherine E; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve; Ominski, Kim H

    2013-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  12. Subspeciation of Bifidobacterium longum by multilocus approaches and amplified fragment length polymorphism: Description of B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov., isolated from the faeces of piglets.

    PubMed

    Yanokura, Emiko; Oki, Kaihei; Makino, Hiroshi; Modesto, Monica; Pot, Bruno; Mattarelli, Paola; Biavati, Bruno; Watanabe, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    The species Bifidobacterium longum is currently divided into three subspecies, B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis. This classification was based on an assessment of accumulated information on the species' phenotypic and genotypic features. The three subspecies of B. longum were investigated using genotypic identification [amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)]. By using the AFLP and the MLSA methods, we allocated 25 strains of B. longum into three major clusters corresponding to the three subspecies; the cluster comprising the strains of B. longum subsp. suis was further divided into two subclusters differentiable by the ability to produce urease. By using the MLST method, the 25 strains of B. longum were divided into eight groups: four major groups corresponding to the results obtained by AFLP and MLSA, plus four minor disparate groups. The results of AFLP, MLSA and MLST analyses were consistent and revealed a novel subspeciation of B. longum, which comprised three known subspecies and a novel subspecies of urease-negative B. longum, for which the name B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Su 851(T)=DSM 28597(T)=JCM 19995(T). PMID:26007614

  13. Biological activity of harpin produced by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Majerczak, D R; Pike, S; Hoyos, M E; Novacky, A; Coplin, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii causes Stewart's wilt of sweet corn. A hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (Hrp) secretion system is needed to produce water-soaking and wilting symptoms in corn and to cause a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. Sequencing of the hrp cluster revealed a putative harpin gene, hrpN. The product of this gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and shown to elicit the HR in tobacco and systemic resistance in radishes. The protein was designated HrpN(Pnss). Like other harpins, it was heat stable and protease sensitive, although it was three- to fourfold less active biologically than Erwinia amylovora harpin. We used antibodies to purified HrpN(Pnss) to verify that hrpN mutants could not produce harpin. This protein was secreted into the culture supernatant and was produced by strains of P. stewartii subsp. indologenes. In order to determine the importance of HrpN(Pnss) in pathogenesis on sweet corn, three hrpN::Tn5 mutants were compared with the wild-type strain with 50% effective dose, disease severity, response time, and growth rate in planta as parameters. In all tests, HrpN(Pnss) was not required for infection, growth, or virulence in corn or endophytic growth in related grasses. PMID:11605962

  14. Glycosylation of DsbA in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rebecca M; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Tessier, Luc; Kilmury, Sara L N; Ding, Wen; Harmer, Nicholas; Michell, Stephen L; Oyston, Petra C F; Titball, Richard W; Prior, Joann L

    2011-10-01

    In Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, DsbA has been shown to be an essential virulence factor and has been observed to migrate to multiple protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels. In this work, we show that the protein is modified with a 1,156-Da glycan moiety in O-linkage. The results of mass spectrometry studies suggest that the glycan is a hexasaccharide, comprised of N-acetylhexosamines, hexoses, and an unknown monosaccharide. Disruption of two genes within the FTT0789-FTT0800 putative polysaccharide locus, including a galE homologue (FTT0791) and a putative glycosyltransferase (FTT0798), resulted in loss of glycan modification of DsbA. The F. tularensis subsp. tularensis ΔFTT0798 and ΔFTT0791::Cm mutants remained virulent in the murine model of subcutaneous tularemia. This indicates that glycosylation of DsbA does not play a major role in virulence under these conditions. This is the first report of the detailed characterization of the DsbA glycan and putative role of the FTT0789-FTT0800 gene cluster in glycan biosynthesis. PMID:21803994

  15. Intestinal colonization of neonatal animals by Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Field, L H; Underwood, J L; Pope, L M; Berry, L J

    1981-01-01

    Neonatal mice (2.3 to 2.8 g) were inoculated intragastrically with different human isolates of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. At weekly intervals thereafter, mice were sacrificed and dilution plate counts were performed on segments of the gastrointestinal tract. Mice were uniformly colonized by some strains for 2 weeks, whereas other strains were being cleared at that time. One strain (BO216) persisted in some mice for 3 weeks. The greatest number of organisms (10(7)) was recovered from the cecum and large intestine. The small intestine had from 10(2) to 10(5) colony-forming units. Colonization of the stomach was not found consistently. One strain killed 13% of the infected mice. Deaths occurred between 1 and 5 days postinfection. Two other strains killed a smaller percentage of challenged animals, and two additional strains killed none. Retarded weight gain was noticed in some, but not all, of the infected mice. The intestines of neonatal rats and rabbits were colonized much the same as those of mice, whereas hamsters were resistant to colonization. Preweanling mice, up to about 6.5 to 7.0 g, could be colonized with C. fetus subsp. jejuni after intragastric challenge, but weanling mice of larger weight (9.8 g) and young adult mice (18.3 g) could not. Scanning electron photomicrographs of the lower ileum showed campylobacters in and below the dried mucous gel that lines the intestines. The use of this model for additional studies is discussed. Images PMID:7287188

  16. Strong genetic differentiation between North American and European populations of Phytophthora alni subsp. uniformis.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Jaime; Adams, Gerard C; Halkett, Fabien; Catal, Mursel; Husson, Claude; Nagy, Zoltán Á; Hansen, Everett M; Marçais, Benoît; Frey, Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Alder decline caused by Phytophthora alni has been one of the most important diseases of natural ecosystems in Europe during the last 20 years. The emergence of P. alni subsp. alni -the pathogen responsible for the epidemic-is linked to an interspecific hybridization event between two parental species: P. alni subsp. multiformis and P. alni subsp. uniformis. One of the parental species, P. alni subsp. uniformis, has been isolated in several European countries and, recently, in North America. The objective of this work was to assess the level of genetic diversity, the population genetic structure, and the putative reproduction mode and mating system of P. alni subsp. uniformis. Five new polymorphic microsatellite markers were used to contrast both geographical populations. The study comprised 71 isolates of P. alni subsp. uniformis collected from eight European countries and 10 locations in North America. Our results revealed strong differences between continental populations (Fst = 0.88; Rst = 0.74), with no evidence for gene flow. European isolates showed extremely low genetic diversity compared with the North American collection. Selfing appears to be the predominant mating system in both continental collections. The results suggest that the European P. alni subsp. uniformis population is most likely alien and derives from the introduction of a few individuals, whereas the North American population probably is an indigenous population. PMID:23095465

  17. Nested PCR for ultrasensitive detection of the potato ring rot bacterium, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I M; Bartoszyk, I M; Gundersen, D E; Mogen, B; Davis, R E

    1997-01-01

    Oligonucleotide primers derived from sequences of the 16S rRNA gene (CMR16F1, CMR16R1, CMR16F2, and CMR16R2) and insertion element IS1121 of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (CMSIF1, CMSIR1, CMSIF2, and CMISR2) were used in nested PCR to detect the potato ring rot bacterium C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. Nested PCR with primer pair CMSIF1-CMSIR1 followed by primer pair CMSIF2-CMSIR2 specifically detected C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, while nested PCR with CMR16F1-CMR16R1 followed by CMR16F2-CMR16R2 detected C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and the other C. michiganensis subspecies. In the latter case, C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus can be differentiated from the other subspecies by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses of the nested PCR products (16S rDNA sequences). The nested PCR assays developed in this work allow ultrasensitive detection of very low titers of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus which may be present in symptomiess potato plants or tubers and which cannot be readily detected by direct PCR (single PCR amplification). RFLP analysis of PCR products provides for an unambiguous confirmation of the identify of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. PMID:9212412

  18. Role of Blossoms in Watermelon Seed Infestation by Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli.

    PubMed

    Walcott, R R; Gitaitis, R D; Castro, A C

    2003-05-01

    ABSTRACT The role of watermelon blossom inoculation in seed infestation by Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli was investigated. Approximately 98% (84/87) of fruit developed from blossoms inoculated with 1 x 10(7) or 1 x 10(9) CFU of A. avenae subsp. citrulli per blossom were asymptomatic. Using immunomagnetic separation and the polymerase chain reaction, A. avenae subsp. citrulli was detected in 44% of the seed lots assayed, despite the lack of fruit symptoms. Furthermore, viable colonies were recovered from 31% of the seed lots. Of these lots, 27% also yielded seedlings expressing bacterial fruit blotch symptoms when planted under conditions of 30 degrees C and 90% relative humidity. A. avenae subsp. citrulli was detected and recovered from the pulp of 33 and 19%, respectively, of symptomless fruit whose blossoms were inoculated with A. avenae subsp. citrulli. The ability to penetrate watermelon flowers was not unique to A. avenae subsp. citrulli, because blossoms inoculated with Pantoea ananatis also resulted in infested seed and pulp. The data indicate that watermelon blossoms are a potential site of ingress for fruit and seed infestation by A. avenae subsp. citrulli. PMID:18942974

  19. Profiling Bovine Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection by Using Protein Arrays▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Paustian, Michael L.; Waters, W. Ray; Stabel, Judith R.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Li, Lingling; Kapur, Vivek

    2008-01-01

    With the genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis determined, technologies are now being developed for construction of protein arrays to detect the presence of antibodies against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in host serum. The power of this approach is that it enables a direct comparison of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins to each other in relation to their immunostimulatory capabilities. In this study, 93 recombinant proteins, produced in Escherichia coli, were arrayed and spotted onto nitrocellulose. These proteins include unknown hypothetical proteins and cell surface proteins as well as proteins encoded by large sequence polymorphisms present uniquely in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Also included were previously reported or known M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens to serve as a frame of reference. Sera from healthy control cattle (n = 3) and cattle infected with either M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium bovis were exposed to the array to identify nonspecific or cross-reactive epitopes. These data demonstrated a degree of cross-reactivity with the M. avium subsp. avium proteins that was higher than the degree of cross-reactivity with the more distantly related M. bovis proteins. Finally, sera from naturally infected cattle (n = 3) as well as cattle experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (n = 3) were used to probe the array to identify antigens in the context of Johne's disease. Three membrane proteins were the most strongly detected in all serum samples, and they included an invasion protein, an ABC peptide transport permease, and a putative GTPase protein. This powerful combination of genomic information, molecular tools, and immunological assays has enabled the identification of previously unknown antigens of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:18039835

  20. A proposal to unify two subspecies of Staphylococcus equorum: Staphylococcus equorum subsp. equorum and Staphylococcus equorum subsp. linens.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Do-Won; Kim, Hye-Rim; Han, Seulhwa; Jeon, Che Ok; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Twelve isolates from jeotgal, a Korean high-salt-fermented seafood, identified as Staphylococcus equorum were compared by phenotypic and genotypic methods to determine their precise taxonomic identities at the subspecies level. Four strains and three strains had complete 16S rRNA gene sequence matches with S. equorum subsp. equorum DSM 20674(T) and S. equorum subsp. linens DSM 15097(T), respectively. Five strains showed 99.9 % identity with the sequences of both type strains. In our DNA-DNA hybridization analyses among two type strains and two isolates, the similarities were over 72 % and were higher than the similarities presented at the subspecies proposal. Physiological characteristics such as sugar utilization, β-galactosidase activity, novobiocin resistance and salt tolerance, which were adopted for subspecies separation, could not be applied to assign the isolates to a taxonomic unit. Antibiotic susceptibility, hemolytic activity, biofilm formation and protein profiles did not present markers to divide the isolates into either of the subspecies. Multilocus sequence typing of the sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and five housekeeping genes did not produce any coherent relationship among the isolates and type strains. Repetitive element-PCR fingerprinting using ERIC (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus) primers classified 12 isolates to three genotypes, and the genotypes of both type strains coincided with two isolates expressing different characteristics. Based on these phenotypic and genotypic analyses results, we propose to unify the present two subspecies of S. equorum into one species, S. equorum. PMID:24057981

  1. Seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in urban and rural dogs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Bekir; Taylan Ozkan, Aysegul; Kilic, Selcuk; Akca, Atilla; Koenhemsi, Lora; Pasa, Serdar; Yildiz, Kader; Mamak, Nuri; Guzel, Murat

    2010-11-01

    The seroprevalence of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii was investigated in stray urban dogs and shepherd and farm guard dogs from rural areas sampled from 10 provinces of Turkey. Sera from 855 dogs were examined for the presence of anti-B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii antibodies by indirect fluorescent antibody test. Overall, 56 (6.6%) of the 855 dogs examined, including 16 (3%) of the 522 stray dogs and 40 (12%) of the 333 rural dogs, were seropositive. This is the first report on prevalence of antibodies to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in dogs in Turkey. PMID:20574140

  2. High quality draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01

    PubMed Central

    Hu, XinJun; Li, Ang; Lv, LongXian; Yuan, Chunhui; Guo, Lihua; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Qian, GuiRong; Zheng, BeiWen; Guo, Jing; Li, LanJuan

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii belongs to the family Staphylococcaceae in the order Bacillales, class Bacilli and phylum Firmicutes. The increasing relevance of S. cohnii to human health prompted us to determine the genomic sequence of Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01, a multidrug-resistant isolate from a hospital in China. Here we describe the features of S. cohnii subsp. cohnii strain hu-01, together with the genome sequence and its annotation. This is the first genome sequence of the species Staphylococcus cohnii. PMID:25197460

  3. Comparative Genomic Hybridizations Reveal Genetic Regions within the Mycobacterium avium Complex That Are Divergent from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates†

    PubMed Central

    Paustian, Michael L.; Kapur, Vivek; Bannantine, John P.

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is genetically similar to other members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), some of which are nonpathogenic and widespread in the environment. We have utilized an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis whole-genome microarray representing over 95% of the predicted coding sequences to examine the genetic conservation among 10 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, two isolates each of Mycobacterium avium subsp. silvaticum and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and a single isolate each of both Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium smegmatis. Genomic DNA from each isolate was competitively hybridized with DNA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis K10, and open reading frames (ORFs) were classified as present, divergent, or intermediate. None of the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates had ORFs classified as divergent. The two M. avium subsp. avium isolates had 210 and 135 divergent ORFs, while the two M. avium subsp. silvaticum isolates examined had 77 and 103 divergent ORFs. Similarly, 130 divergent ORFs were identified in M. intracellulare. A set of 97 ORFs were classified as divergent or intermediate in all of the nonparatuberculosis MAC isolates tested. Many of these ORFs are clustered together on the genome in regions with relatively low average GC content compared with the entire genome and contain mobile genetic elements. One of these regions of sequence divergence contained genes homologous to a mammalian cell entry (mce) operon. Our results indicate that closely related MAC mycobacteria can be distinguished from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by multiple clusters of divergent ORFs. PMID:15774884

  4. Integrative Cloning, Expression, and Stability of the cryIA(c) Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a Recombinant Strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis

    PubMed Central

    Lampel, Jay S.; Canter, Gayle L.; Dimock, Michael B.; Kelly, Jeffrey L.; Anderson, James J.; Uratani, Brenda B.; Foulke, James S.; Turner, John T.

    1994-01-01

    A bacterial endophyte was engineered for insecticidal activity against the European corn borer. The cryIA(c) gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was introduced into the chromosome of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis by using an integrative plasmid vector. The integration vectors pCG740 and pCG741 included the replicon pGEM5Zf(+), which is maintained in Escherichia coli but not in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; tetM as a marker for selection in C. xyli subsp. cynodontis; and a chromosomal fragment of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis to allow for homologous recombination between the vector and the bacterial chromosome. Insertion of vector DNA into the chromosome was demonstrated by DNA hybridization. Recombinant strains MDR1.583 and MDR1.586 containing the cryIA(c) gene were shown to produce the 133,000-kDa protoxin and several smaller immunoreactive proteins. Both strains were equally toxic to insect larvae in bioassays. Significant insecticidal activity was demonstrated in planta. The cryIA(c) gene and the tetM gene introduced into strain MDR1.586 were shown to be deleted from some cells, thereby giving rise to a noninsecticidal segregant population. In DNA hybridization experiments and insect bioassays, these segregants were indistinguishable from the wild-type strain. Overall, these results demonstrate the plausibility of genetically engineered bacterial endophytes for insect control. Images PMID:16349179

  5. The in vitro effect of six antimicrobials against Mycoplasma putrefaciens, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides LC and Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum isolated from sheep and goats in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Momani, W; Nicholas, R A J; Janakat, S; Abu-Basha, E; Ayling, R D

    2006-01-01

    Respiratory disease in sheep and goats is a major problem in Jordan and is often associated with Mycoplasma species. Without effective vaccines, control is mainly by chemotherapy, but the uncontrolled use of antimicrobials has led to concerns about the potential development of antimicrobial resistance. The in vitro effect of chloramphenicol, florfenicol, enrofloxacin, tylosin, erythromycin and oxytetracycline was determined against 32 isolates of Mycoplasma species-M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC (6), M. capricolum subsp. capricolum (8) and M. putrefaciens (18), all isolated from either nasal swabs or milk, from sheep and goats in different regions of Jordan. The antimicrobial susceptibility showed some Mycoplasma species-specific differences, with M. capricolum subsp. capricolum being more susceptible to tylosin and erythromycin. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were the least effective for all three Mycoplasma species. No trends or significant differences in antimicrobial susceptibilities were observed between sheep and goat isolates, between milk or nasal swab isolates, or between isolates from different regions of Jordan. Some isolates of M. capricolum subsp. capricolum and M. putrefaciens showed higher MIC levels with oxytetracycline, as did two isolates of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides LC with tylosin, possibly indicating signs of development of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17405622

  6. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  7. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum type strain 03-427T

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum has been isolated from reptiles and humans. This Campylobacter subspecies is genetically distinct from other C. fetus subspecies. Here we present the first whole genome sequence for this C. fetus subspecies....

  8. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii produces an endoglucanase that is required for full virulence in sweet corn.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Burbank, Lindsey; Roper, M Caroline

    2012-04-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a xylem-dwelling bacterium, is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt and blight of sweet corn. The goal of this study was to characterize the only gene in the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii genome predicted to encode an endoglucanase (EGase); this gene was designated engY. Culture supernatants from P. stewartii subsp. stewartii and Escherichia coli expressing recombinant EngY protein possessed both EGase and xylanase activities. Deletion of engY abolished EGase and xylanase activity, demonstrating that EngY appears to be the major EGase or xylanase produced by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Most importantly, our results show that EngY contributes to movement in the xylem and disease severity during the wilting phase of Stewart's wilt but is not required for water-soaked lesion formation. PMID:22122328

  9. Comparative genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis reveals a strict monophyletic bifidobacterial taxon.

    PubMed

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Ventura, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  10. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433

    PubMed Central

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A.; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A.; Gregoracci, Gustavo B.; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  11. Exploring the Genome of Cheese Starter Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433.

    PubMed

    Tschoeke, Diogo Antonio; Moreira, Ana Paula B; Chimetto Tonon, Luciane A; de Mesquita, Milene Miranda A; Gregoracci, Gustavo B; Gomez-Gil, Bruno; Valle, Rogério; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present the draft genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis CECT 4433, a cheese fermentation starter strain. The genome provides further insight into the genomic plasticity, biocomplexity (including gene strain specifics), and evolution of these genera. PMID:25395632

  12. Experimental Paratuberculosis in Calves following Inoculation with a Rabbit Isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Beard, P. M.; Stevenson, K.; Pirie, A.; Rudge, K.; Buxton, D.; Rhind, S. M.; Sinclair, M. C.; Wildblood, L. A.; Jones, D. G.; Sharp, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The role of wildlife species in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis has been the subject of increased research efforts following the discovery of natural paratuberculosis in free-living rabbits from farms in east Scotland. This paper describes the experimental inoculation of young calves with an isolate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from a free-living rabbit. After a 6-month incubation period, all eight calves inoculated with the rabbit isolate had developed histopathological and/or microbiological evidence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Similar results were obtained from a group of calves infected with a bovine isolate of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The virulence of the rabbit isolate for calves demonstrated in this study suggests that rabbits are capable of passing paratuberculosis to domestic ruminants and that wildlife reservoirs of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis should therefore be considered when formulating control plans for the disease. PMID:11526132

  13. Neisseria elongata subsp elongata infective endocarditis following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Joanne May; Fife, Amanda; Baghai, Max; Dworakowski, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old Argentinian woman presented with a 3-week history of fever, night sweats, myalgia and lethargy following a work trip to Uganda where she ran a marathon. Malarial screens were negative but C reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and neutrophil count were raised and she was anaemic. A new pansystolic murmur was heard over the mitral valve and the transthoracic echocardiogram showed a large vegetation (>1 cm) with at least moderate mitral regurgitation. Blood cultures grew Neisseria elongata, subsp elongata treated initially with ceftriaxone then oral ciprofloxacin to complete 4 weeks of treatment. CT scan revealed a wedge-shaped area of low attenuation in the spleen in keeping with a splenic infarct. Seven days postadmission, the patient underwent a successful mitral valve repair. Recovery was complicated by a likely embolic infarct in the right frontal lobe, but the patient was discharged 12 days postoperative with no neurological sequelae. PMID:26655669

  14. Efficient production of nonactin by Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yulian; Zheng, Shaolun

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the production of the cyclic macrotetrolide nonactin from the fermentation culture of Streptomyces griseus subsp. griseus. Nonactin is a member of a family of naturally occurring cyclic ionophores known as the macrotetrolide antibiotics. Our fermentation procedure of Streptomyces griseus was performed at 30 °C and 200 rev·min(-1) for 5 days on a rotary shaker. Diaion HP-20 and Amberlite XAD-16 were added to the fermentation medium. Isolated yield of nonactin was up to 80 mg·L(-1) using our methodology. Nonactin is commonly known as an ammonium ionophore and also exhibits antibacterial, antiviral, and antitumor activities. It is also widely used for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes and sensors. Chemical synthesis of nonactin has been achieved by some groups; however, overall yields are very low, making efficient biosynthesis an attractive means of production. PMID:27405846

  15. Volatile Components Emitted from the Liverwort Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kazutoshi; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Kawakami, Yukihiko; Ochiai, Nozomi; Yabe, Shigeki; Nakagawa, Tomomi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2016-02-01

    The volatile components from the thalloid liverwort, Marchantia paleacea subsp. diptera were investigated by HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. The monocyclic monoterpene aldehyde, perillaldehyde was identified for the first time as the major component and its content was about 50% of the volatiles, along with β-pinene, limonene, β-caryophyllene, α-selinene and β-selinene as minor volatiles. Using MD (Multi-dimensional) GC-MS analysis equipped with a chiral column as the second column, the chirality was determined of both perillaldehyde and limonene, which was considered as the precursor of perillaldehyde. Both compounds were (S)-(-)-enantiomers (over 99.0 %) and (R)-enantiomers (less than 0.5 %). This is the first report of the existence of perillaldehyde in liverworts. PMID:27032216

  16. Bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins from white salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius subsp. porrifolius).

    PubMed

    Zidorn, Christian; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Pschorr, Susanne; Salvenmoser, Daniela; Ongania, Karl-Hans; Ellmerer, Ernst P; Börner, Andreas; Stuppner, Hermann

    2005-07-01

    A phytochemical investigation of three accessions of Tragopogon porrifolius L. subsp. porrifolius (Asteraceae, Lactuceae) yielded three new bibenzyl derivatives, 5,4'-dihydroxy-3-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, 2-carboxyl-3,4'-dihydroxy-5-beta-d-xylopyranosyloxybibenzyl, tragopogonic acid (2'carboxyl-3',5',4''-trihydroxyphenylethanone) and three dihydroisocoumarin derivatives, including the new natural product 6-O-methylscorzocreticoside I. One of the isolated bibenzyl derivatives is considered to be a precursor to the biosynthesis of dihydroisocoumarins. Structures of new compounds were established by HR mass spectrometry, extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Moreover, radical scavenging activities of the polyphenolic compounds were measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay; two of the bibenzyls showed moderate and two of the dihydroisocoumarins showed weak radical scavenging activities. The chemosystematic impact of bibenzyls and dihydroisocoumarins is discussed briefly. PMID:15964041

  17. Carbon sources of natural cyanamide in Vicia villosa subsp. varia.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Tsunashi; Kasahara, Ryohei; Abe, Shun; Hirota, Mitsuru; Sugano, Mami; Yamaya, Hiroko; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu

    2010-10-01

    The ¹³C labels of [¹³C]carbon dioxide and D-[¹³C₆]glucose were incorporated into cyanamide (NH₂CN) when they were administered to Vicia villosa subsp. varia shoots. In contrast, the administration of sodium [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate did not affect the relative area of the [M + 1]+ ion of cyanamide in the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. [2,3-¹³C₂]pyruvate was incorporated into organic acids that are part of the citric acid cycle, such as succinate and fumarate, confirming that the shoots absorbed and metabolised it. These observations demonstrated that the carbon atom of cyanamide is derived from any of the carbohydrates that are present upstream of pyruvate in the metabolic pathway. PMID:20954091

  18. Novel fermentation media for production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    PubMed

    Poopathi, Subbiah; Kumar, K Anup

    2003-08-01

    The production of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (deBarjac) (Bti) as a biopesticide is not cost-effective using existing fermentation technology. In this study, we explored the use of several less expensive alternative culture media (potato, common sugar, and Bengal gram) for the growth and production of Bti. Growth was obtained in all tested media and was comparable to that obtained in conventional medium (Luria-Bertani). Toxicity assays showed that the toxin produced from the novel growth media were effective in killing larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Anopheles stephensi, and Aedes aegypti and toxicity was comparable to that produced from Luria-Bertani medium. These observations suggest that potato can be used as a cheap source of culture medium for the production of Bti toxin in mosquito control programs. PMID:14503573

  19. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  20. Seed-associated subspecies of the genus Clavibacter are clearly distinguishable from Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; Alvarez, Anne M

    2015-03-01

    The genus Clavibacter contains one recognized species, Clavibacter michiganensis. Clavibacter michiganensis is subdivided into subspecies based on host specificity and bacteriological characteristics, with Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis causing bacterial canker of tomato. Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is often spread through contaminated seed leading to outbreaks of bacterial canker in tomato production areas worldwide. The frequent occurrence of non-pathogenic Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis-like bacteria (CMB) is a concern for seed producers because Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is a quarantine organism and detection of a non-pathogenic variant may result in destruction of an otherwise healthy seed lot. A thorough biological and genetic characterization of these seed-associated CMB strains was performed using standard biochemical tests, cell wall analyses, metabolic profiling using Biolog, and single-gene and multilocus sequence analyses. Combined, these tests revealed two distinct populations of seed-associated members of the genus Clavibacter that differed from each other, as well as from all other described subspecies of Clavibacter michiganensis. DNA-DNA hybridization values are 70 % or higher, justifying placement into the single recognized species, C. michiganensis, but other analyses justify separate subspecies designations. Additionally, strains belonging to the genus Clavibacter isolated from pepper also represent a distinct population and warrant separate subspecies designation. On the basis of these data we propose subspecies designations for separate non-pathogenic subpopulations of Clavibacter michiganensis: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. californiensis subsp. nov. and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. chilensis subsp. nov. for seed-associated strains represented by C55(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2691(T) = CFBP 8216(T)) and ZUM3936(T) ( = ATCC BAA-2690(T) = CFBP 8217(T

  1. Acetate utilization is inhibited by benzoate in Alcaligenes eutrophus: evidence for transcriptional control of the expression of acoE coding for acetyl coenzyme A synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ampe, F; Lindley, N D

    1995-01-01

    During batch growth of Alcaligenes eutrophus on benzoate-acetate mixtures, benzoate was the preferred substrate, with acetate consumption being delayed until the rate of benzoate consumption had diminished. This effect was attributed to a transcriptional control of the synthesis of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) synthetase, an enzyme necessary for the entry of acetate into the central metabolic pathways, rather than to a biochemical modulation of the activity of this enzyme. Analysis of a 2.4-kb mRNA transcript hybridizing with the A. eutrophus acoE gene confirmed this repression effect. In a benzoate-limited chemostat culture, derepression was observed, with no increase in the level of expression following an acetate pulse. Benzoate itself was not the signal triggering the repression of acetyl-CoA synthetase. This role was played by catechol, which transiently accumulated in the medium when high specific rates of benzoate consumption were reached. The lack of rapid inactivation of the functional acetyl-CoA synthetase after synthesis has been stopped enables A. eutrophus to retain the capacity to metabolize acetate for prolonged periods while conserving minimal protein expenditure. PMID:7592330

  2. Effect of bacterial inoculation of strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alcaligenes feacalis and Bacillus subtilis on germination, growth and heavy metal (Cd, Cr, and Ni) uptake of Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Ndeddy Aka, Robinson Junior; Babalola, Olubukola Oluranti

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial inoculation may influence Brassica juncea growth and heavy metal (Ni, Cr, and Cd) accumulation. Three metal tolerant bacterial isolates (BCr3, BCd33, and BNi11) recovered from mine tailings, identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa KP717554, Alcaligenes feacalis KP717561, and Bacillus subtilis KP717559 were used. The isolates exhibited multiple plant growth beneficial characteristics including the production of indole-3-acetic acid, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, insoluble phosphate solubilization together with the potential to protect plants against fungal pathogens. Bacterial inoculation improved seeds germination of B. juncea plant in the presence of 0.1 mM Cr, Cd, and Ni, as compared to the control treatment. Compared with control treatment, soil inoculation with bacterial isolates significantly increased the amount of soluble heavy metals in soil by 51% (Cr), 50% (Cd), and 44% (Ni) respectively. Pot experiment of B. juncea grown in soil spiked with 100 mg kg(-1) of NiCl2, 100 mg kg(-1) of CdCl2, and 150 mg kg(-1) of K2Cr2O7, revealed that inoculation with metal tolerant bacteria not only protected plants against the toxic effects of heavy metals, but also increased growth and metal accumulation of plants significantly. These findings suggest that such metal tolerant, plant growth promoting bacteria are valuable tools which could be used to develop bio-inoculants for enhancing the efficiency of phytoextraction. PMID:26503637

  3. Catechol dioxygenases from Escherichia coli (MhpB) and Alcaligenes eutrophus (MpcI): sequence analysis and biochemical properties of a third family of extradiol dioxygenases.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, E L; Kawamukai, M; Sanvoisin, J; Braven, H; Bugg, T D

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Escherichia coli mhpB gene, encoding 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase, was determined by sequencing of a 3.1-kb fragment of DNA from Kohara phage 139. The inferred amino acid sequence showed 58% sequence identity with the sequence of an extradiol dioxygenase, MpcI, from Alcaligenes eutrophus and 10 to 20% sequence identity with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas paucimobilis, with 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate 2,3-dioxygenase from E. coli, and with human 3-hydroxyanthranilate dioxygenase. Sequence similarity between the N- and C-terminal halves of this new family of dioxygenases was detected, with conserved histidine residues in the N-terminal domain. A model is proposed to account for the relationship between this family of enzymes and other extradiol dioxygenases. The A. eutrophus MpcI enzyme was expressed in E. coli, purified, and characterized as a protein with a subunit size of 33.8 kDa. Purified MhpB and MpcI showed similar substrate specificities for a range of 3-substituted catechols, and evidence for essential histidine and cysteine residues in both enzymes was obtained. PMID:8752345

  4. CzcR and CzcD, gene products affecting regulation of resistance to cobalt, zinc, and cadmium (czc system) in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed

    Nies, D H

    1992-12-01

    The czcR gene, one of the two control genes responsible for induction of resistance to Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ (czc system) in the Alcaligenes eutrophus plasmid pMOL30, was cloned and characterized. The 1,376-bp sequence upstream of the czcCBAD structural genes encodes a 41.4-kDa protein, the czcR gene product, transcribed in the opposite direction of that of the czcCBAD genes. The putative CzcR polypeptide (355 amino acid residues) contains 11 cysteine and 14 histidine residues which might form metal cation-binding sites. A czcC::lacZ reporter gene translational fusion was constructed, inserted into plasmid pMOL30 in A. eutrophus, and expressed under the control of CzcR. Zn2+, Co2+, and Cd2+, as well as Ni2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, and Mn2+ and even Al3+, served as inducers of beta-galactosidase activity. Besides the CzcR protein, the membrane-bound CzcD protein was essential for induction of czc. The CzcR and CzcD proteins display no sequence similarity to two-component regulatory systems of a sensor and a response activator type; however, CzcD has 34% identity with the ZRC-1 protein, which mediates zinc resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (A. Kamizomo, M. Nishizawa, Y. Teranishi, K. Murata, and A. Kimura, Mol. Gen. Genet. 219:161-167, 1989). PMID:1459958

  5. Pork Meat as a Potential Source of Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kritas, Spyridon; Govaris, Alexander; Burriel, Angeliki R.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae was isolated from 13 of 123 slaughtered pigs in central Greece. The samples cultured were feces, ileum tissue, mesenteric lymph nodes, and gallbladder swabs. A total of 74 isolates from 492 samples were identified as Salmonella spp. by use of standard laboratory culture media and two commercial micromethods and by use of a polyvalent slide agglutination test for the detection of O and H antigens. Among them were 19 (25.68%) suspected to be S. enterica subsp. arizonae according to analysis with standard laboratory culture media. Of those, 14 were identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae by the API 20E (bioMérieux, France) and the Microgen GnA+B-ID (Microgen Bioproducts, Ltd., United Kingdom) identification systems. All the isolates were tested for resistance to 23 antimicrobials. Strains identified as S. enterica subsp. arizonae were resistant to 17 (70.8%) antibiotics. The highest proportions of resistance were observed for sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (71.4%), tetracycline (71.4%), ampicillin (64.3%), and amoxicillin (57.1%). Two isolates were resistant to aztreonam (7.1%) and tigecycline (7.1%), used only for the treatment of humans. Thus, pork meat may play a role in the transmission of antibiotic-resistant S. enterica subsp. arizonae to human consumers. This is the first report of S. enterica subsp. arizonae isolation from pigs. PMID:24335956

  6. Detection of Goss's Wilt Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis in Maize by Loop-Mediated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; de Silva, Asoka; Heuchelin, Scott A; Chaky, Jennifer L; Alvarez, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The Goss's wilt pathogen, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, can cause considerable losses in maize (Zea mays) production. Diagnosis of Goss's wilt currently is based on symptomology and identification of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, following isolation on a semiselective medium and/or serological testing. In an effort to provide a more efficient identification method, a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) assay was developed to detect the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP)-type C4-dicarboxylate transport system large permease component and tested using strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, all other C. michiganensis subspecies and several genera of nontarget bacteria. Only strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis reacted positively with the LAMP assay. The LAMP assay was then used to identify bacterial isolates from diseased maize. 16S rDNA and dnaA sequence analyses were used to confirm the identity of the maize isolates and validate assay specificity. The Cmm ImmunoStrip assay was included as a presumptive identification test of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis at the species level. The Cmn-LAMP assay was further tested using symptomatic leaf tissue. The Cmn-LAMP assay was run in a hand-held real-time monitoring device (SMART-DART) and performed equally to in-lab quantitative polymerase chain reaction equipment. The Cmn-LAMP assay accurately identified C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and has potential as a field test. The targeted sequence also has potential application in other molecular detection platforms. PMID:26595113

  7. Tomato fruit and seed colonization by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis through external and internal routes.

    PubMed

    Tancos, Matthew A; Chalupowicz, Laura; Barash, Isaac; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Smart, Christine D

    2013-11-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, causal agent of bacterial wilt and canker of tomato, is an economically devastating pathogen that inflicts considerable damage throughout all major tomato-producing regions. Annual outbreaks continue to occur in New York, where C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis spreads via infected transplants, trellising stakes, tools, and/or soil. Globally, new outbreaks can be accompanied by the introduction of contaminated seed stock; however, the route of seed infection, especially the role of fruit lesions, remains undefined. In order to investigate the modes of seed infection, New York C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis field strains were stably transformed with a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). A constitutively eGFP-expressing virulent C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate, GCMM-22, was used to demonstrate that C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis could not only access seeds systemically through the xylem but also externally through tomato fruit lesions, which harbored high intra- and intercellular populations. Active movement and expansion of bacteria into the fruit mesocarp and nearby xylem vessels followed, once the fruits began to ripen. These results highlight the ability of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis to invade tomato fruits and seeds through multiple entry routes. PMID:24014525

  8. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization. PMID:16177367

  9. Decreased Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to Mosquito Larvae after Contact with Leaf Litter

    PubMed Central

    Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

  10. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    PubMed

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-01

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (p<0.05). The interaction of nisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. PMID:26310130

  11. Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov., a pigmented bacterium isolated from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and emended description of L. chromiireducens.

    PubMed

    Muir, Rachel E; Tan, Man-Wah

    2007-12-01

    A yellow-pigmented, Gram-positive, aerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, irregular rod-shaped bacterium (strain TAN 31504(T)) was isolated from the bacteriophagous nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, DNA G+C content of 69.5 mol%, 2,4-diaminobutyric acid in the cell-wall peptidoglycan, major menaquinone MK-11, abundance of anteiso- and iso-fatty acids, polar lipids diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol and a number of shared biochemical characteristics, strain TAN 31504(T) was placed in the genus Leucobacter. DNA-DNA hybridization comparisons demonstrated a 91 % DNA-DNA relatedness between strain TAN 31504(T) and Leucobacter chromiireducens LMG 22506(T) indicating that these two strains belong to the same species, when the recommended threshold value of 70 % DNA-DNA relatedness for the definition of a bacterial species by the ad hoc committee on reconciliation of approaches to bacterial systematics is considered. Based on distinct differences in morphology, physiology, chemotaxonomic markers and various biochemical characteristics, it is proposed to split the species L. chromiireducens into two novel subspecies, Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. chromiireducens subsp. nov. (type strain L-1(T)=CIP 108389(T)=LMG 22506(T)) and Leucobacter chromiireducens subsp. solipictus subsp. nov. (type strain TAN 31504(T)=DSM 18340(T)=ATCC BAA-1336(T)). PMID:18048723

  12. Quick detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli by PCR and necleotide sequence analysis of PCR amplicons from Chinese Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quick polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for the detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx), the bacterial causal agent of ratoon stunting disease (RSD) of sugarcane, in crude juice samples from stalks. After removal of abiotic impurities and large molecular weight microorgani...

  13. Stability of the delta-endotoxin gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in a recombinant strain of Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, J T; Lampel, J S; Stearman, R S; Sundin, G W; Gunyuzlu, P; Anderson, J J

    1991-01-01

    Deletion of chromosomally inserted gene sequences from Clavibacter xyli subsp. cynodontis, a xylem-inhabiting endophyte, was studied in vitro and in planta. We found that nonreplicating plasmid pCG610, which conferred resistance to kanamycin and tetracycline and contained segments of C. xyli subsp. cynodontis genomic DNA, integrated into a homologous sequence in the bacterial chromosome. In addition, pCG610 contains two copies of the gene encoding the CryIA(c) insecticidal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HD73. Using drug resistance phenotypes and specific DNA probes, we found that the loss of all three genes arose both in vitro under nonselective conditions and in planta. The resulting segregants are probably formed by recombination between the repeated DNA sequences flanking pCG610 that resulted from the integration event into the chromosome. Eventually, segregants predominated in the bacterial population. The loss of the integrated plasmid from C. xyli subsp. cynodontis revealed a possible approach for decreasing the environmental consequences of recombinant bacteria for agricultural use. Images PMID:1664710

  14. Compositions of essential oils and trichomes of Teucrium chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ayla; Demirci, Betül; Başer, K Hüsnü C

    2009-01-01

    Teucrium chamaedrys L. is a member of the Lamiaceae family and is represented in the Flora of Turkey by six subspecies. The aerial organs of T. chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil. bears numerous eglandular and glandular trichomes. Eglandular trichomes are simple, long-multicellular with cuticular micropapillae, and glandular hairs are of peltate and capitate types. The peltate hairs consist of a basal cell, a short unicellular stalk, and multicellular secretory head, and the capitate ones possess 1-2 stalk cells and one glandular head cell. The aerial parts were subjected to microdistillation for the isolation of volatiles. The analysis was simultaneously performed by using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components were characterized as beta-caryophyllene (18%), nonacosane (12%), germacrene D (11%), caryophyllene oxide (7%), and alpha-pinene (7%) for subsp. trapezunticum, and caryophyllene oxide (23%), alpha-pinene (11%), and caryophyllenol II (5%) for subsp. syspirense. PMID:19180459

  15. Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

  16. Metabolism of acrylate to {beta}-hydroxypropionate and its role in dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase induction by a salt marsh sediment bacterium, Alcaligenes faecalis M3A

    SciTech Connect

    Ansede, J.H.; Pellechia, P.J.; Yoch, D.C.

    1999-11-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is degraded to dimethylsulfide (DMS) and acrylate by the enzyme DMSP lyase. DMS or acrylate can serve as a carbon source for both free-living and endophytic bacteria in the marine environment. In this study, the authors report on the mechanism of DMSP-acrylate metabolism by Alcaligenes faecalis M3A. Suspensions of citrate-grown cells expressed a low level of DMSP lyase activity that could be induced to much higher levels in the presence of DMSP, acrylate, and its metabolic product, {beta}-hydroxypropionate. DMSP was degraded outside the cell, resulting in an extracellular accumulation of acrylate, which in suspensions of citrate-grown cells was then metabolized at a low endogenous rate. The inducible nature of acrylate metabolism was evidenced by both an increase in the rate of its degradation over time and the ability of acrylate-grown cells to metabolize this molecule at about an eight times higher rate than citrate-grown cells. Therefore, acrylate induces both its production (from DMSP) and its degradation by an acrylase enzyme. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance analyses were used to identify the products resulting from [1-{sup 13}C]acrylate metabolism. The results indicated that A.faecalis first metabolized acrylate to {beta}-hydroxypropionate outside the cell, which was followed by its intracellular accumulation and subsequent induction of DMSP lyase activity. In summary, the mechanism of DMSP degradation to acrylate and the subsequent degradation of acrylate to {beta}-hydroxypropionate in the aerobic {beta}-Proteobacterium A.faecalis has been described.

  17. Induction of immune-related gene expression in Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney cells by secondary metabolites from immunostimulatory Alcaligenes faecalis FY-3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z-F; Liu, G-L; Zhou, Z; Wang, G-X; Xia, L; Liu, J-L

    2012-08-01

    This study was undertaken to isolate active secondary metabolites from immunostimulatory Alcaligenes faecalis FY-3 and evaluate their activities using grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella kidney (CIK) cells. By applying chromatography techniques and successive recrystallization, three purified metabolites were obtained and identified by spectral data (mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance) as: (1) phenylacetic acid, (2) p-hydroxyphenylacetylamide and (3) cyclo-(Gly-(L)-Pro). CIK cells were stimulated by different concentrations (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of the isolated compounds, and expression of MyD88, IL-1β, TNF-α, type I-IFN and IL-8 genes at different time points (2, 8 and 24 h) post-stimulation was quantified by real-time PCR. The known immunostimulatory agent lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was used as a positive control. To analyse whether these compounds are toxic to the cells, the methyl tetrazolium assay was employed to measure changes in cell viability. The obtained results revealed that transcribing level of MyD88, an important adaptor molecule in toll-like receptor signalling pathway, was augmented remarkably by all the three isolated compounds and LPS as early as 2-h exposure. These compounds also induced gene expression of cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α and type I-IFN. Under the experimental conditions, none of the test compounds is toxic to the CIK cells. These findings demonstrate that the immunostimulatory properties of the three metabolites [phenylacetic acid, p-hydroxyphenylacetylamide and cyclo-(Gly-(L)-Pro)] from A. faecalis FY-3 in CIK cells and highlight the potential of using these metabolites as immunostimulants in fish aquaculture. PMID:22606987

  18. Improvement of Alcaligenes faecalis nitrilase by gene site saturation mutagenesis and its application in stereospecific biosynthesis of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Xin-Hong; Xue, Ya-Ping; Xu, Ming; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2014-05-21

    Nitrilases have recently received considerable attention as the biocatalysts for stereospecific production of carboxylic acids. To improve the activity, the nitrilase from Alcaligenes faecalis was selected for further modification by the gene site saturation mutagenesis method (GSSM), based on homology modeling and previous reports about mutations. After mutagenesis, the positive mutants were selected using a convenient two-step high-throughput screening method based on product formation and pH indicator combined with the HPLC method. After three rounds of GSSM, Mut3 (Gln196Ser/Ala284Ile) with the highest activity and ability of tolerance to the substrate was selected. As compared to the wild-type A. faecalis nitrilase, Mut3 showed 154% higher specific activity. Mut3 could retain 91.6% of its residual activity after incubation at pH 6.5 for 6 h. In a fed-batch reaction with 800 mM mandelonitrile as the substrate, the cumulative production of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid after 7.5 h of conversion reached 693 mM with an enantiomeric excess of 99%, and the space-time productivity of Mut3 was 21.50-fold higher than that of wild-type nitrilase. The Km, Vmax, and k(cat) of wild-type and Mut3 for mandelonitrile were 20.64 mM, 33.74 μmol mg(-1) min(-1), 24.45 s(-1), and 9.24 mM, 47.68 μmol mg(-1) min(-1), and 34.55 s(-1), respectively. A homology modeling and molecular docking study showed that the diameter of the catalytic tunnel of Mut3 became longer and that the tunnel volume was smaller. These structural changes are proposed to improve the hydrolytic activity and pH stability of Mut3. Mut3 has the potential for industrial applications in the upscale production of (R)-(-)-mandelic acid. PMID:24766313

  19. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers. [Pseudomonas fluorescens; Serratia marcescens; Alcaligenes faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, I.C.; Levine, J.S.

    1986-05-01

    The authors investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO/sub 2/) on the production of NO and N/sub 2/O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO/sub 2/ in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N/sub 2/O production was inversely proportional to pO/sub 2/. Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N/sub 2/O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N/sub 2/O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of No and N/sub 2/O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N/sub 2/O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sprayed with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N/sub 2/O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites necessary for denitrification by either denitrifiers or nitrifiers.

  20. Analysis, cloning, and high-level expression of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate monooxygenase gene tfdA of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134.

    PubMed Central

    Streber, W R; Timmis, K N; Zenk, M H

    1987-01-01

    Plasmid pJP4 of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 contains all genes for the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Five of these genes, tfdB, tfdC, tfdD, tfdE, and tfdF, have recently been localized and cloned (R. H. Don, A. J. Weightman, H.-J. Knackmuss, and K. N. Timmis, J. Bacteriol. 161:85-90, 1985). Gene tfdA, which codes for the 2,4-D monooxygenase, has now been found by mutagenesis with transposon Tn5. A 3-kilobase fragment of pJP4 cloned in a broad-host-range vector could complement the 2,4-D-negative phenotype of two mutants which lacked 2,4-D monooxygenase activity. The cloned tfdA gene was also transferred to A. eutrophus JMP222, which is a cured derivative of JMP134. The recombinant strain could utilize phenoxyacetic acid as a sole source of carbon and energy. Pseudomonas sp. strain B13, containing the cloned tfdA, was able to degrade phenoxyacetic acid and 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid. Gene tfdA was subcloned and analyzed by deletions. Expression of 2,4-D monooxygenase in Escherichia coli containing a 1.4-kilobase subfragment was demonstrated by radioisotopic enzyme assay, and a protein of 32,000-dalton molecular mass was detected by labeling experiments. A 2-kilobase subfragment containing tfdA has been sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 861 bases which was identified as the coding region of tfdA by insertion mutagenesis. Images PMID:3036764

  1. Antibacterial and toxicological evaluation of beta-lactams synthesized by immobilized beta-lactamase-free penicillin amidase produced by Alcaligenes sp.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Jiaur R; Majee, Sutapa B; Das, Shuvendu; Samanta, Timir B

    2007-12-01

    Search for anti-beta-lactamase and synthesis of newer penicillin were suggested to overcome resistance to penicillin in chemotherapy. It was found that clavulanic acid, an ant-beta-lactamase was ineffective due to its structural modification by bacteria. Thus, there is a need for the synthesis of newer pencillins. Retro-synthesis was inspired by the success of forward reaction i.e.conversion of penicillin G to 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) by biological process. In the present study a better enzymatic method of synthesis of newer pencillin by a beta-lactamase-free penicillin amidase produced by Alcaligenes sp. is attempted. Antibacterial and toxicological evaluation of the enzymatically synthesized beta-lactams are reported. Condensation of 6-APA with acyl donor was found to be effective when the reaction is run in dimethyl formamide (DMF 50% v/v) in acetate buffer (25 mM pH 5.0) at 37 degrees C. Periplasm entrapped in calcium alginate exihibited the highest yield (approximately 34%) in synthesis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the synthetic products against Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella typhi varied between 20-80 microg/ml. Some of the products exhibited antibacterial activity against enteric pathogens. It was interesting to note that product A was potent like penicillin G. LD50 value of three products (product A, B and C) was more than 12 mg/kg. Furthermore, these synthetic beta-lactams did not exihibit any adverse effect on house keeping enzymes viz., serum glutamate oxalacetate-trans-aminase, serum glutamate pyruvate -trans-aminase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase of the test animals. The hematological profile (RBC and WBC) of the test animals also remained unaffected. PMID:18254214

  2. Fate of Enterobacter cloacae JP120 and Alcaligenes eutrophus AEO106(pRO101) in soil during water stress: effects on culturability and viability.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, J C; Jacobsen, C S

    1993-05-01

    A sandy loam soil near field capacity moisture content (psi = -0.050 MPa) or air dried (psi = -300 MPa) was inoculated with about 3 x 10(7) CFU of Enterobacter cloacae JP120 and Alcaligenes eutrophus AEO106(pRO101) per g and incubated in 40-g portions at 17 degrees C in closed or open Erlenmeyer flasks. In the field-moist soil, selective plating, direct viable counts, and DNA hybridization showed only minor changes in the numbers of E. cloacae and A. eutrophus cells with time (14 days), and the results obtained with the three detection methods generally agreed. In the air-dried soil, the majority of both bacteria were found as intact DNA-carrying cells that were neither culturable nor viable by the methods employed in this study. The numbers of culturable E. cloacae and A. eutrophus cells dropped to 10(5) and 10(2) CFU/g, respectively, 2 h after inoculation. Direct viable counts showed that only about 1% of the cells detected by immunofluorescence microscopy were viable, but a fraction of viable nonculturable cells of both bacteria was present. A. eutrophus did not tolerate desiccation as well as E. cloacae. Only a minor fraction of the two test organisms regained their culturability or viability after rewetting of the air-dried soil; the number of total heterotrophic culturable bacteria, however, increased more than 10-fold and reached 73% of the level found in the field-moist soil at day 14. PMID:8517752

  3. Growth kinetics, nutrient uptake, and expression of the Alcaligenes eutrophus poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis pathway in transgenic maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Hahn, J J; Eschenlauer, A C; Narrol, M H; Somers, D A; Srienc, F

    1997-01-01

    Transgenic suspension cultures of Black Mexican Sweet maize (Zea mays L.) expressing the Alcaligenes eutrophus genes encoding enzymes of the pathway for biosynthesis of the biodegradable polymer poly(beta-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were established as a tool for investigating metabolic regulation of the PHB pathway in plant cells. Cultures were grown in a 2 L modified mammalian cell bioreactor and in shake flasks. Biomass doubling times for transgenic bioreactor cultures (3.42 +/- 0.76 days) were significantly higher than those for untransformed cultures (2.01 +/- 0.33 days). Transgenic expression of the bacterial enzymes beta-ketothiolase (0.140 units/mg protein) and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (0.636 units/mg protein) was detected by enzyme assays and immunoblots. However, over the first 2 years of cultivation, reductase activity decreased to 0.120 units/mg proteins. Furthermore, the PHB synthase gene, although initially present, was not detectable after 1.5 years of cultivation in suspension culture. These facts suggest that transgenic expression of PHB pathway genes in plant cells may not be stable. A hydroxybutyrate derivative was detected via gas chromatography even after 4 years of cultivation. Although the method used to prepare samples for gas chromatography cannot directly distinguish among PHB polymer, hydroxybutyryl-CoA (HB-CoA), and hydroxybutyric acid, solvent washing experiments indicated that most or all of the signal was non-polymeric, presumably H-CoA. The synthesis of HB-CoA appeared to be linked to substrate growth limitation, with HB-CoA accumulation increasing dramatically and cell growth ceasing upon depletion of ammonium. This suggests that the PHB synthesis pathway in plants is subject to regulatory mechanisms similar to those in prokaryotic cells. PMID:9265773

  4. Quantification of the Sensitivity of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica to Low pH and High Organic Acids using Propidium Monoazide and Quantitative PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map) and Salmonella enterica subsp enterica (S. enterica) are two pathogens that are a concern to food and animal safety due to their ability to withstand harsh conditions encountered in the natural environment and within the host during pathogenesis. Acid...

  5. Enhancement of Nisin Production by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Dussault, Dominic; Vu, Khanh Dang; Lacroix, Monique

    2016-09-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp lactis BSA (L. lactis BSA) was isolated from a commercial fermented product (BSA Food Ingredients, Montreal, Canada) containing mixed bacteria that are used as starter for food fermentation. In order to increase the bacteriocin production by L. lactis BSA, different fermentation conditions were conducted. They included different volumetric combinations of two culture media (the Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS) broth and skim milk), agitation level (0 and 100 rpm) and concentration of commercial nisin (0, 0.15, and 0.30 µg/ml) added into culture media as stimulant agent for nisin production. During fermentation, samples were collected and used for antibacterial evaluation against Lactobacillus sakei using agar diffusion assay. Results showed that medium containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk gave better antibacterial activity as compared to other medium formulations. Agitation (100 rpm) did not improve nisin production by L. lactis BSA. Adding 0.15 µg/ml of nisin into the medium-containing 50 % MRS broth and 50 % skim milk caused the highest nisin activity of 18,820 AU/ml as compared to other medium formulations. This activity was 4 and ~3 times higher than medium containing 100 % MRS broth without added nisin (~4700 AU/ml) and 100 % MRS broth with 0.15 µg/ml of added nisin (~6650 AU/ml), respectively. PMID:27147536

  6. [Reactivating factor of Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei: isolation and characterization].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Rogozhin, E A; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Nikolaev, I V; Turova, T P

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that a producer strain of reactivating factor (RF) is identical to a typical strain of Luteococcus japonicus DSM 10546 from the Propionibacteriaceae family according to the physiological and biochemical properties and the sequencing of 16S rRNA fragments. A number of phenotypical differences from the model strain allowed the producer strain to be considered a subspecies of Luteococcus japonicus, and it was named Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei. At cultivation of the producer, RF is secreted into the medium and plays the role of a signaling molecule. RF antioxidant activities towards various organic radicals may be a possible mechanism of its protective and reactivating effects. Metabolites secreted by the L. casei producer strain into the culture medium were separated by a combination of liquid chromatographies. Four components possessing biological activities were found. The most active one was studied by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, which revealed that it is a polypeptide. Primary identification of some amino acid residues was performed. Sugar residues were found in the structure. PMID:25842902

  7. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Wajima, Takeaki; Morozumi, Miyuki; Hanada, Shigeo; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Chiba, Naoko; Iwata, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We collected β-hemolytic streptococci (1,611 isolates) from patients with invasive streptococcal infections in Japan during April 2010–March 2013. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) was most common (n = 693); 99% of patients with SDSE infections were elderly (mean age 75 years, SD ±15 years). We aimed to clarify molecular and epidemiologic characteristics of SDSE isolates and features of patient infections. Bacteremia with no identified focus of origin and cellulitis were the most prevalent manifestations; otherwise, clinical manifestations resembled those of S. pyogenes infections. Clinical manifestations also differed by patient’s age. SDSE isolates were classified into 34 emm types; stG6792 was most prevalent (27.1%), followed by stG485 and stG245. Mortality rates did not differ according to emm types. Multilocus sequence typing identified 46 sequence types and 12 novel types. Types possessing macrolide- and quinolone-resistance genes were 18.4% and 2.6%, respectively; none showed β-lactam resistance. Among aging populations, invasive SDSE infections are an increasing risk. PMID:26760778

  8. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

  9. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  10. [Phenolic acid derivatives from Bauhinia glauca subsp. pernervosa].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao-Li; Wu, Zeng-Bao; Zheng, Zhi-Hui; Lu, Xin-Hua; Liang, Hong; Cheng, Wei; Zhang, Qing-Ying; Zhao, Yu-Ying

    2011-08-01

    To study the chemical constituents of Bauhinia glauca subsp. pernervosa, eleven phenolic acids were isolated from a 95% ethanol extract by using a combination of various chromatographic techniques including column chromatography over silica gel, ODS, MCI, Sephadex LH-20, and semi-preparative HPLC. By spectroscopic techniques including 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 2D NMR, and HR-ESI-MS, these compounds were identified as isopropyl O-beta-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (1), ethyl O-beta-(6'-O-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (2), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-(6'-O-galloyl)-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (3), 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), gallic acid (5), methyl gallate (6), ethyl gallate (7), protocatechuic acid (8), 3, 5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (9), erigeside C (10) and glucosyringic acid (11). Among them, compound 1 is a new polyhydroxyl compound; compounds 2, 10, and 11 were isolated from the genus Bauhinia for the first time, and the other compounds were isolated from the plant for the first time. Compounds 6 and 8 showed significant protein tyrosine phosphatase1B (PTP1B) inhibitory activity in vitro with the IC50 values of 72.3 and 54.1 micromol x L(-1), respectively. PMID:22007520

  11. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Tae; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-07-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  12. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  13. Characterization of N-deoxyribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Masaki, Takeharu; Chohnan, Shigeru

    2007-10-01

    A nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase-homologous gene was detected by homological search in the genomic DNA of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. The gene yejD is composed of 477 nucleotides encoding 159 amino acids with only 25% identity, which is low in comparison to the amino acid sequences of the N-deoxyribosyltransferases from other lactic acid bacteria, i.e. Lactobacillus leichmannii and Lactobacillus helveticus. The residues responsible for catalytic and substrate-binding sites in known enzymes are conserved at Gln49, Asp73, Asp93 (or Asp95), and Glu101, respectively. The recombinant YejD expressed in Escherichia coli shows a 2-deoxyribosyl transfer activity to and from both bases of purine and pyrimidine, showing that YejD should be categorized as a class II N-deoxyribosyltransferase. Interestingly, the base-exchange activity as well as the heat stability of YejD was enhanced by the presence of monovalent cations such as K(+), NH(4)(+), and Rb(+), indicating that the Lactococcus enzyme is a K(+)-activated Type II enzyme. However, divalent cations including Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) significantly inhibit the activity. Whether or not the yejD gene product actually participates in the nucleoside salvage pathway of Lc. lactis remains unclear, but the lactic acid bacterium possesses the gene coding for the nucleoside N-deoxyribosyltransferase activated by K(+) on its genome. PMID:17881307

  14. Description of a novel adhesin of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  15. Description of a Novel Adhesin of Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Mariana Noelia; Echeverria-Valencia, Gabriela; Romasanta, Pablo; Mon, María Laura; Fernandez, Marisa; Malchiodi, Emilio; Romano, María Isabel; Gioffré, Andrea Karina; Santangelo, María de la Paz

    2014-01-01

    The binding and ingestion of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) by host cells are fibronectin (FN) dependent. In several species of mycobacteria, a specific family of proteins allows the attachment and internalization of these bacteria by epithelial cells through interaction with FN. Thus, the identification of adhesion molecules is essential to understand the pathogenesis of MAP. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize FN binding cell wall proteins of MAP. We searched for conserved adhesins within a large panel of surface immunogenic proteins of MAP and investigated a possible interaction with FN. For this purpose, a cell wall protein fraction was obtained and resolved by 2D electrophoresis. The immunoreactive spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and a homology search was performed. We selected elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as candidate for further studies. We demonstrated the FN-binding capability of EF-Tu using a ligand blot assay and also confirmed the interaction with FN in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The dissociation constant of EF-Tu was determined by surface plasmon resonance and displayed values within the μM range. These data support the hypothesis that this protein could be involved in the interaction of MAP with epithelial cells through FN binding. PMID:25136616

  16. Novel Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius variants harboring lactose metabolism genes homologous to Streptococcus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Jans, Christoph; Gerber, Andrea; Bugnard, Joséphine; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-08-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius belongs to the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) commonly associated with human and animal infections. We elucidated the lactose metabolism of S. infantarius subsp. infantarius predominant in African fermented milk products. S. infantarius subsp. infantarius isolates (n = 192) were identified in 88% of spontaneously fermented camel milk suusac samples (n = 24) from Kenya and Somalia at log₁₀ 8.2-8.5 CFU mL⁻¹. African S. infantarius isolates excreted stoichiometric amounts of galactose when grown on lactose, exhibiting a metabolism similar to Streptococcus thermophilus and distinct from their type strain. African S. infantarius subsp. infantarius CJ18 harbors a regular gal operon with 99.7-100% sequence identity to S. infantarius subsp. infantarius ATCC BAA-102(T) and a gal-lac operon with 91.7-97.6% sequence identity to S. thermophilus, absent in all sequenced SBSEC strains analyzed. The expression and functionality of lacZ was demonstrated in a β-galactosidase assay. The gal-lac operon was identified in 100% of investigated S. infantarius isolates (n = 46) from suusac samples and confirmed in Malian fermented cow milk isolates. The African S. infantarius variant potentially evolved through horizontal gene transfer of an S. thermophilus-homologous lactose pathway. Safety assessments are needed to identify any putative health risks of this novel S. infantarius variant. PMID:22475940

  17. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.

    PubMed

    Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (ΦXacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection. PMID:25180689

  18. THE ABILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS TO ENTER BOVINE EPITHELIAL CELLS IS INFLUENCED BY PREEXPOSURE TO A HYPEROSMOLAR ENVIRONMENT AND INTRACELLULAR PASSAGE IN BOVINE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the cause of Johne’s disease in cattle and other ruminants. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection of the bovine host is not well understood; however, it is assumed that crossing the bovine intestinal mucosa is important in order for M. avium subsp...

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Siyuan; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis Strain DSM46306, a Gram-Positive Bacterial Pathogen of Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Zerillo, Marcelo Marques; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Kitajima, João Paulo

    2013-01-01

    We announce the complete genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis, a vascular pathogen of Bermuda grass. The species also comprises Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, a sugarcane pathogen. Since these two subspecies have genome sequences available, a comparative analysis will contribute to our understanding of the differences in their biology and host specificity. PMID:24201198

  1. Xylella fastidiosa Isolates from Both subsp. multiplex and fastidiosa Cause Disease on Southern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) Under Greenhouse Conditions.

    PubMed

    Oliver, J E; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2015-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited gram-negative plant pathogen that affects numerous crop species, including grape, citrus, peach, pecan, and almond. Recently, X. fastidiosa has also been found to be the cause of bacterial leaf scorch on blueberry in the southeastern United States. Thus far, all X. fastidiosa isolates obtained from infected blueberry have been classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; however, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates are also present in the southeastern United States and commonly cause Pierce's disease of grapevines. In this study, seven southeastern U.S. isolates of X. fastidiosa, including three X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates from grape, one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolate from elderberry, and three X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry, were used to infect the southern highbush blueberry 'Rebel'. Following inoculation, all isolates colonized blueberry, and isolates from both X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa caused symptoms, including characteristic stem yellowing and leaf scorch symptoms as well as dieback of the stem tips. Two X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry caused more severe symptoms than the other isolates examined, and infection with these two isolates also had a significant impact on host mineral nutrient content in sap and leaves. These findings have potential implications for understanding X. fastidiosa host adaptation and expansion and the development of emerging diseases caused by this bacterium. PMID:25738552

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto Strain CGMCC 2108, a High Producer of Poly-γ-Glutamic Acid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Siyuan; Meng, Yonghong; Su, Anping; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the 4.1-Mb draft genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108, a high producer of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA). This sequence will provide further help for the biosynthesis of γ-PGA and will greatly facilitate research efforts in metabolic engineering of B. subtilis subsp. natto strain CGMCC 2108. PMID:27231363

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Strain S31A1, Isolated from Equine Infectious Endometritis.

    PubMed

    da Piedade, Isabelle; Skive, Bolette; Christensen, Henrik; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus S31A1, a strain isolated from equine infectious endometritis in Denmark. Comparative analyses of this genome were done with four published reference genomes: S. zooepidemicus strains MGCS10565, ATCC 35246, and H70 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047. PMID:24009118

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus Strain S31A1, Isolated from Equine Infectious Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Skive, Bolette; Christensen, Henrik; Bojesen, Anders Miki

    2013-01-01

    We present the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus S31A1, a strain isolated from equine infectious endometritis in Denmark. Comparative analyses of this genome were done with four published reference genomes: S. zooepidemicus strains MGCS10565, ATCC 35246, and H70 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047. PMID:24009118

  5. Complete Genome Sequences of Virulent Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Strains F38 and ILRI181

    PubMed Central

    Liljander, Anne; Schieck, Elise; Gluecks, Ilona; Frey, Joachim; Jores, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a severe epidemic affecting mainly domestic Caprinae species but also affects wild Caprinae species. M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae belongs to the “Mycoplasma mycoides cluster.” The disease features prominently in East Africa, in particular Kenya, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. CCPP also endangers wildlife and thus affects not only basic nutritional resources of large populations but also expensively built-up game resorts in affected countries. Here, we report the complete sequences of two M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains: the type strain F38 and strain ILRI181 isolated druing a recent outbreak in Kenya. Both genomes have a G+C content of 24% with sizes of 1,016,760 bp and 1,017,183 bp for strains F38 and ILRI181, respectively. PMID:25323717

  6. Comparative Phenotypic and Molecular Genetic Profiling of Wild Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Strains of the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris Genotypes, Isolated from Starter-Free Cheeses Made of Raw Milk▿

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Elena; Alegría, Ángel; Delgado, Susana; Martín, M. Cruz; Mayo, Baltasar

    2011-01-01

    Twenty Lactococcus lactis strains with an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype isolated from five traditional cheeses made of raw milk with no added starters belonging to the L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotypes (lactis and cremoris genotypes, respectively; 10 strains each) were subjected to a series of phenotypic and genetic typing methods, with the aims of determining their phylogenetic relationships and suitability as starters. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis of intact genomes digested with SalI and SmaI proved that all strains were different except for three isolates of the cremoris genotype, which showed identical PFGE profiles. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis using internal sequences of seven loci (namely, atpA, rpoA, pheS, pepN, bcaT, pepX, and 16S rRNA gene) revealed considerable intergenotype nucleotide polymorphism, although deduced amino acid changes were scarce. Analysis of the MLST data for the present strains and others from other dairy and nondairy sources showed that all of them clustered into the cremoris or lactis genotype group, by using both independent and combined gene sequences. These two groups of strains also showed distinctive carbohydrate fermentation and enzyme activity profiles, with the strains in the cremoris group showing broader profiles. However, the profiles of resistance/susceptibility to 16 antibiotics were very similar, showing no atypical resistance, except for tetracycline resistance in three identical cremoris genotype isolates. The numbers and concentrations of volatile compounds produced in milk by the strains belonging to these two groups were clearly different, with the cremoris genotype strains producing higher concentrations of more branched-chain, derived compounds. Together, the present results support the idea that the lactis and cremoris genotypes of phenotypic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis actually represent true subspecies. Some strains of the two subspecies

  7. Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductases C and D Are Major Antigens Constitutively Expressed by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid; Reitan, Liv J.; Holstad, Gudmund; Wiker, Harald G.

    2000-01-01

    Antigens characteristic for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis were identified by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and by absorbing out cross-reactive antigens by using a polyclonal and polyvalent Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium antiserum. Two antigens were present in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and not detected in Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. They were identified as antigens 17 and 20 in a CIE reference system for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens. Purified antigen 20 was identified as alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C (AhpC) while the N-terminal part of purified antigen 17 showed 80% homology with alkyl hydroperoxide reductase D (AhpD) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. AhpC had a nonreduced mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to a molecular mass of 45 kDa and is probably a homodimer linked with disulfide bridges in its native form. AhpD had a mobility corresponding to 19 kDa. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against AhpC and AhpD reacted with 9 strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but not with 20 other mycobacterial strains except for a Mycobacterium gordonae strain, against which a weak cross-reactive band was produced. Goats experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had strong gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses toward both AhpC and AhpD, and they also had antibodies against AhpC. The ability of AhpC and AhpD to induce IFN-γ production shows that these proteins potentially could be used in future vaccines or in diagnostic assays. These results further show that AhpC and AhpD are immunologically important proteins which are constitutively and highly expressed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis without the bacteria being submitted to oxidative stress and that the specificities of antigens can be a matter of different levels of protein expression in various species as well as distinct structural differences. PMID:10639449

  8. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies and Aptamers against Major Antigens of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Radosevich, Thomas J.; Stabel, Judith R.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Kapur, Vivek; Paustian, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Specific antibodies, available in unlimited quantities, have not been produced against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the bacterium that causes Johne's disease (JD). To fill this gap in JD research, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were produced from BALB/c mice immunized with a whole-cell extract of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. A total of 10 hybridomas producing MAbs to proteins ranging from 25 to 85 kDa were obtained. All MAbs showed some degree of cross-reactivity when they were analyzed against a panel of whole-cell protein lysates comprising seven different mycobacterial species. The MAbs were characterized by several methods, which included isotype analysis, specificity analysis, epitope analysis, reactivity in immunoblot assays, and electron microscopy. The identities of the antigens that bound to two selected MAbs were determined by screening an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis lambda phage expression library. This approach revealed that MAb 9G10 detects MAP1643 (isocitrate lyase) and that MAb 11G4 detects MAP3840 (a 70-kDa heat shock protein), two proteins present in high relative abundance in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The epitopes for MAb 11G4 were mapped to the N-terminal half of MAP3840, whereas MAb 9G10 bound to the C-terminal half of MAP1643. Aptamers, nucleic acids that bind to specific protein sequences, against the hypothetical protein encoded by MAP0105c were also generated and tested for their binding to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis as well as other mycobacteria. These detection reagents may be beneficial in many JD research applications. PMID:17344350

  9. Characterization of Free Exopolysaccharides Secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Tardy, Florence; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS), also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical β(1−>6)-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan) and associated with an

  10. Characterization of the Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida type IV pilus.

    PubMed

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Chakraborty, Subhra; Liu, Jirong; Thanassi, David G; Klose, Karl E

    2008-07-01

    Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularaemia. Type IV pili (Tfp) genes are present in the genomes of all F. tularensis subspecies. We show that the wild-type F. tularensis subsp. novicida expresses pilus fibres on its surface, and mutations in the Tfp genes pilF and pilT disrupt pilus biogenesis. Mutations in other Tfp genes (pilQ and pilG) do not eliminate pilus expression. A mutation in pilE4 eliminates pilus expression, whereas mutations in the other pilin subunits pilE1-3 and pilE5 do not, suggesting that pilE4 is the major pilus structural subunit. The virulence regulator MglA is required for pilus expression, and it regulates the transcription of a putative Tfp glycosylation gene (FTN0431). However, MglA does not regulate transcription of pilF, pilT or pilE4, and a strain lacking FTN0431 still expresses pili; thus, it is unclear how MglA regulates pilus expression. Only pilF was also required for protein secretion, while pilE4 and pilT were not, indicating that there is very little overlap of the protein secretion/Tfp functions of the pil genes. The protein secretion component pilE1 was more important for in vitro intramacrophage growth and mouse virulence than the Tfp component pilE4. Our results provide the first genetic characterization of the novel Tfp system of F. tularensis. PMID:18599841

  11. Reproductive biology of the andromonoecious Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Kouonon, Leonie C.; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Zoro Bi, Arsene I.; Bertin, Pierre; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Dje, Yao

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Cucumis melo subsp. agrestis (Cucurbitaceae) is cultivated in many African regions for its edible kernels used as a soup thickener. The plant, an annual, andromonoecious, trailing-vine species, is of high social, cultural and economic value for local communities. In order to improve the yield of this crop, the first step and our aim were to elucidate its breeding system. Methods Eight experimental pollination treatments were performed during three growing seasons to assess spontaneous selfing, self-compatibility and effects of pollen source (hermaphroditic vs. male flowers). Pollination success was determined by pollen tube growth and reproductive success was assessed by fruit, seed and seedling numbers and characteristics. The pollinator guild was surveyed and the pollination distance determined both by direct observations and by indirect fluorescent dye dispersal. Key Results The species is probably pollinated by several Hymenoptera, principally by Hypotrigona para. Pollinator flight distances varied from 25 to 69 cm. No evidence for apomixis or spontaneous self-pollination in the absence of insect visitors was found. The self-fertility index (SFI = 0) indicated a total dependence on pollinators for reproductive success. The effects of hand pollination on fruit set, seed number and seedling fitness differed among years. Pollen tube growth and reproductive success did not differ between self- and cross-pollinations. Accordingly, a high self-compatibility index for the fruit set (SCI = 1·00) and the seed number (SCI = 0·98) and a low inbreeding depression at all developmental stages (cumulative δ = 0·126) suggest a high selfing ability. Finally, pollen origin had no effect on fruit and seed sets. Conclusions This andromonoecious species has the potential for a mixed mating system with high dependence on insect-mediated pollination. The selfing rate through geitonogamy should be important. PMID:19671577

  12. Molecular Subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal▿

    PubMed Central

    Castro, R.; Prieto, E.; Águas, M. J.; Manata, M. J.; Botas, J.; Martins Pereira, F.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken. PMID:19494073

  13. Isofuranodiene is the main volatile constituent of Smyrnium perfoliatum L. subsp. perfoliatum growing in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Papa, Fabrizio; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Cianfaglione, Kevin; Maggi, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    The essential oil hydrodistilled from the aerial parts of Smyrnium perfoliatum subsp. perfoliatum growing in central Italy was analysed by GC-MS. The main peak in the gas chromatogram was given by the furanosesquiterpene curzerene which is the Cope rearrangement product of isofuranodiene formed into injector and column during the gas chromatographic run. A truthful quantification of these compounds was achieved by HPLC-DAD analysis which showed that isofuranodiene is the main volatile component (180.0 mg/g eo) of S. perfoliatum subsp. perfoliatum, while curzerene occurs in small amounts (18.1 mg/g eo). PMID:26134598

  14. Selection of trichloroethene (TCE) degrading bacteria that resist inactivation by TCE.

    PubMed

    Ewers, J; Freier-Schröder, D; Knackmuss, H J

    1990-01-01

    Two isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) utilizing bacteria, Alcaligenes denitrificans ssp. xylosoxidans JE 75 and Rhodococcus erythropolis JE 77, were identified as highly efficient cooxidizers of TCE, cis- and trans-dichloroethene, 1,1-dichloroethene and vinyl-chloride. Isoprene grown cells eliminate chloride from TCE in stoichiometric amounts and tolerate high concentrations of TCE. PMID:2244792

  15. Antioxidant Activity of the Essential Oils of Different Parts of Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. excelsa and J. excelsa M. Bieb. subsp. polycarpos (K. Koch) Takhtajan (Cupressaceae).

    PubMed

    Emami, Sayyed Ahmad; Abedindo, Bibi Fatemeh; Hassanzadeh-Khayyat, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The essential oils of branchlets and fruits of Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa and Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos were examined for their antioxidant activity. The compositions of the essential oils were studied by GC and GC-MS. To evaluation the antioxidants activity of the volatile oils, pure components and positive controls at different concentrations, thin-layer chromatography (TLC) screening methods, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, deoxyribose degradation test and modified deoxyribose degradation test were employed. The results of the present study demonstrate some antioxidant activity for the tested essential oils obtained from various parts of both plants. It indicates that the use of these essential oils, in very low concentrations, may be useful as a natural preservative. However before any final conclusion, it is suggested that the antioxidant activity of these oils should also be evaluated by using lipid solvent system methods. PMID:24250416

  16. Peyer's Patch-Deficient Mice Demonstrate That Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Translocates across the Mucosal Barrier via both M Cells and Enterocytes but Has Inefficient Dissemination ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez, Luiz E.; Petrofsky, Mary; Sommer, Sandra; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the agent of Johne's disease, infects ruminant hosts by translocation through the intestinal mucosa. A number of studies have suggested that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with M cells in the Peyer's patches of the small intestine. The invasion of the intestinal mucosa by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, a pathogen known to interact with intestinal cells, was compared. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was capable of invading the mucosa, but it was significantly less efficient at dissemination than M. avium subsp. hominissuis. B-cell knockout (KO) mice, which lack Peyer's patches, were used to demonstrate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis enters the intestinal mucosa through enterocytes in the absence of M cells. In addition, the results indicated that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis had equal abilities to cross the mucosa in both Peyer's patch and non-Peyer's patch segments of normal mice. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was also shown to interact with epithelial cells by an α5β1 integrin-independent pathway. Upon translocation, dendritic cells ingest M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but this process does not lead to efficient dissemination of the infection. In summary, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis interacts with the intestinal mucosa by crossing both Peyer's patches and non-Peyer's patch areas but does not translocate or disseminate efficiently. PMID:20498259

  17. Contribution of permeability and sensitivity to inhibition of DNA synthesis in determining susceptibilities of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Alcaligenes faecalis to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Bedard, J; Chamberland, S; Wong, S; Schollaardt, T; Bryan, L E

    1989-09-01

    To examine the correlation between bacterial cell susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and the magnitude of uptake and cell target sensitivity, the relative contribution of ciprofloxacin accumulation in intact cells and its ability to inhibit DNA synthesis were investigated among strains of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Alcaligenes faecalis. Uptake studies of [14C]ciprofloxacin demonstrated diffusion kinetics for P. aeruginosa and E. coli. Ciprofloxacin was more readily removed from E. coli J53 and A. faecalis ATCC 19018 by washing than from P. aeruginosa PAO503. These results indicate that the process of cell accumulation is different for P. aeruginosa in that the drug is firmly bound at an extracellular site. Whatever the washing conditions, A. faecalis accumulated less drug than either of the other two bacteria. Magnesium chloride (10 mM) caused a substantial decrease of ciprofloxacin accumulated and an increase in the MIC, depending upon the nature of the medium. The addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone caused a variable increase in drug accumulated, depending on the medium and the bacterial strain. The concentration of ciprofloxacin required to obtain 50% inhibition (ID50) of DNA synthesis for P. aeruginosa PAO503 and A. faecalis ATCC 19018 did not correlate with their corresponding MICs but did for E. coli J53. Treatment with EDTA decreased the ID50 of ciprofloxacin for P. aeruginosa PAO503 and its gyrA derivative by 5- and 2-fold, respectively, and decreased the ID50 for E. coli JB5R, a strain with a known decrease in OmpF, by 1.4-fold but did not decrease the ID50 for the normally susceptible E. coli J53. The ID(50) for P. aeruginosa obtained after EDTA treatment or in ether-permeabilized cells was higher than that obtained for the other two strains. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone prevented killing by low ciprofloxacin concentrtaions, but sodium azide did not. The latter compound did not enhance killing

  18. Molecular weight-dependent degradation of D-lactate-containing polyesters by polyhydroxyalkanoate depolymerases from Variovorax sp. C34 and Alcaligenes faecalis T1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tabata, Yuta; Kadoya, Ryosuke; Ooi, Toshihiko; Abe, Hideki; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2015-11-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate depolymerase derived from Variovorax sp. C34 (PhaZVs) was identified as the first enzyme that is capable of degrading isotactic P[67 mol% (R)-lactate(LA)-co-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate(3HB)] [P(D-LA-co-D-3HB)]. This study aimed at analyzing the monomer sequence specificity of PhaZVs for hydrolyzing P(LA-co-3HB) in comparison with a P(3HB) depolymerase from Alcaligenes faecalis T1 (PhaZAf) that did not degrade the same copolymer. Degradation of P(LA-co-3HB) by action of PhaZVs generated dimers, 3HB-3HB, 3HB-LA, LA-3HB, and LA-LA, and the monomers, suggesting that PhaZVs cleaved the linkages between LA and 3HB units and between LA units. To provide a direct evidence for the hydrolysis of these sequences, the synthetic methyl trimers, 3HB-3HB-3HB, LA-LA-3HB, LA-3HB-LA, and 3HB-LA-LA, were treated with the PhaZs. Unexpectedly, not only PhaZVs but also PhaZAf hydrolyzed all of these substrates, namely PhaZAf also cleaved LA-LA linkage. Considering the fact that both PhaZs did not degrade P[(R)-LA] (PDLA) homopolymer, the cleavage capability of LA-LA linkage by PhaZs was supposed to depend on the length of the LA-clustering region in the polymer chain. To test this hypothesis, PDLA oligomers (6 to 40 mer) were subjected to the PhaZ assay, revealing that there was an inverse relationship between molecular weight of the substrates and their hydrolysis efficiency. Moreover, PhaZVs exhibited the degrading activity toward significantly longer PDLA oligomers compared to PhaZAf. Therefore, the cleaving capability of PhaZs used here toward the D-LA-based polymers containing the LA-clustering region was strongly associated with the substrate length, rather than the monomer sequence specificity of the enzyme. PMID:26109003

  19. Measurement of Growth at Very Low Rates ((mu) >= 0), an Approach To Study the Energy Requirement for the Survival of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP 134

    PubMed Central

    Muller, R. H.; Babel, W.

    1996-01-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP 134 was grown in a recycling-mode fermenter with 100% biomass retention on 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), phenol, and fructose. The growth pattern obtained given a constant supply of substrates exhibited three phases of linear growth on all three substrates. The transition from phase 1 to phase 2, considered to correspond to the onset of stringent (growth) control as indicated by a significant increase in guanosine 5(prm1)-bisphosphate 3(prm1)-bisphosphate (ppGpp), took place at 0.016 h(sup-1) with 2,4-D and at about 0.02 h(sup-1) with phenol and fructose. In the final phase, phase 4, which was achieved after the growth rate on the respective substrates fell below 0.003 to 0.001 h(sup-1), a constant level of biomass was obtained irrespective of further feeding of substrate at the same rate. The yield coefficients decreased by 70 to 80% from phase 1 to phase 3 and were 0 in phase 4. The stationary substrate concentrations s(infmin) in phase 4, calculated from the kinetic constants of the strain, were 1.23, 0.34, and 0.23 (mu)M for 2,4-D, phenol, and fructose, respectively. These figures characterize the minimum stationary substrate concentrations required in a dynamic system to keep A. eutrophus alive. This is caused by a substrate flux which enables growth at a rate >=0 due to the provision of energy to an extent at least satisfying maintenance requirements. According to the constant feed rates of the substrates and the final and stable biomass concentrations, this maintenance energy amounts to 14.4, 4.0, and 2.4 (mu)mol of ATP (middot) mg of dry mass(sup-1) h(sup-1) for 2,4-D, phenol, and fructose, respectively, after correction for the fraction of living cells. The increased energy expenditure in the case of 2,4-D is discussed with respect to uncoupling. PMID:16535205

  20. [Frequency of clinical isolation of glucose non-fermentative gram-negative rods and their susceptibilities to antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Koguchi, M; Tanaka, S; Fukayama, S; Ishihara, R; Deguchi, K; Oda, S; Nakane, Y; Fukumoto, T

    1995-09-01

    A comparison was made for frequencies of isolation o glucose non-fermentative Gram-negative rods ((G)NF-GNR) from clinical specimens during a period from July, 1986 to June, 1987 (the first period) and that from January, 1994 to December, 1994 (the second period). Also, minimum inhibitory concentrations of principal drugs were determined against these isolates. The obtained results are summarized as follows: 1. Thirty four (34) species of (G)NF-GNR were found from 35,200 clinical specimens in the two periods. Numbers of strains of (G)NF-GNR obtained were 4,575 during the first period and 4,704 during the second period, thus no significant difference existed in numbers of strains isolated in the two periods. 2. Among the 34 species to which the 4,704 strains were classified into, Pseudomonas aeruginosa comprised 68.4%, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia 6.9%, Acinetobacter baumannii 5.6%, Burkholderia cepacia 3.1%, Acinetobacter Iwoffii 2.6%, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans 2.4%, Flavobacterium indologenes 1.7%, Pseudomonas putida 1.1%, Acinetobacter junii 1.1% and Moraxella subgenus Moraxella lacunata 0.9%. When these frequencies of isolation were compared with those in the first period, it was found that B. cepacia decreased significantly (P < 0.01) and that S. maltophilia increased significantly (P < 0.001). 3. MIC determinations revealed multiple drug resistance strains in many different species of bacteria. Minocycline, however, were active against many such strains, and ofloxacin was found to have strong antibacterial activity against some strains. PMID:7474336

  1. Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov., and reclassification of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440T as later synonym of Pseudomonas oleovorans ATCC 8062 T.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Spröer, Cathrin; Beck, Brian; Bagley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Isolate RS1(T) isolated from used metalworking fluid was found to be a Gram-negative, motile, and non-spore forming rod. Based on phylogenetic analyses with 16S rRNA, isolate RS1(T) was placed into the mendocina sublineage of Pseudomonas. The major whole cell fatty acids were C(18:1)omega7c (32.6%), C(16:0) (25.5%), and C(15:0) ISO 2OH/C(16:1)omega7c (14.4%). The sequence similarities of isolate RS1(T) based on gyrB and rpoD genes were 98.9 and 98.0% with Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes, and 98.5 and 98.1% with Pseudomonas oleovorans, respectively. The ribotyping pattern showed a 0.60 similarity with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 0.63 with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC17440(T). The DNA G + C content of isolate RS1(T) was 62.2 mol.%. The DNA-DNA relatedness was 73.0% with P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) and 79.1% with P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T). On the basis of morphological, biochemical, and molecular studies, isolate RS1(T) is considered to represent a new subspecies of P. oleovorans. Furthermore, based on the DNA-DNA relatedness (>70%), chemotaxonomic, and molecular profile, P. pseudoalcaligenes ATCC 17440(T) and P. oleovorans ATCC 8062(T) should be united under the same name; according to the rules of priority, P. oleovorans, the first described species, is the earlier synonym and P. pseudoalcaligenes is the later synonym. As a consequence, the division of the species P. oleovorans into two novel subspecies is proposed: P. oleovorans subsp. oleovorans subsp. nov. (type strain ATCC 8062(T) = DSM 1045(T) = NCIB 6576(T)), P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis subsp. nov. (type strain RS1(T) = ATCC BAA-1494(T) = DSM 21016(T)). PMID:19936829

  2. Bioprocessing of some agro-industrial residues for endoglucanase production by the new subsp.; Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Abdelwahed, Nayera A.M.; Saber, Wesam I.A.; Mohamed, Asem A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of low cost agro-industrial residues for the production of industrial enzymes is one of the ways to reduce significantly production costs. Cellulase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil and decayed agricultural wastes. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-J, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties, together with 16S rDNA sequence. It is proposed that strain NEAE-J should be included in the species Streptomyces albogriseolus as a representative of a novel sub-species, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J and sequencing product was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number JN229412. This organism was tested for its ability to produce endoglucanase and release reducing sugars from agro-industrial residues as substrates. Sugarcane bagasse was the most suitable substrate for endoglucanase production. Effects of process variables, namely incubation time, temperature, initial pH and nitrogen source on production of endoglucanase by submerged fermentation using Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus have been studied. Accordingly optimum conditions have been determined. Incubation temperature of 30 °C after 6 days, pH of 6.5, 1% sugarcane bagasse as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source were found to be the optimum for endoglucanase production. Optimization of the process parameters resulted in about 2.6 fold increase in the endoglucanase activity. Therefore, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus coud be potential microorganism for the intended application. PMID:25242966

  3. Morphological, chemical and genetic differentiation of two subspecies of Cistus creticus L. (C. creticus subsp. eriocephalus and C. creticus subsp. corsicus).

    PubMed

    Paolini, Julien; Falchi, Alessandra; Quilichini, Yann; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Cian, Marie-Cecile De; Varesi, Laurent; Costa, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Cistus creticus L., an aromatic species from the Mediterranean area, contains various diterpenes bearing the labdane skeleton. The production of essential oil from this species has potential economic value, but so far, it has not been optimized. In order to contribute to a better knowledge of this species and to its differentiation, the morphological characters, volatile chemical composition and genetic data of two subspecies (C. creticus subsp. eriocephalus and C. creticus subsp. corsicus) were investigated. The leaf trichomes were studied using scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of Corsican essential oil (C. creticus subsp. corsicus) has been reported using GC, GC/MS and 13C NMR; the main constituents were oxygenated labdane diterpenes (33.9%) such as 13-epi-manoyl oxide (18.5%). Using plant material (54 samples) collected from 18 geographically distinct areas of the islands of Corsica and Sardinia, the basis of variation in the headspace solid-phase microextraction volatile fraction and an inter-simple sequence repeat genetic analysis were also examined. It was shown that the two subspecies of C. creticus differed in morphology, essential oil production, volatile fraction composition and genetic data. PMID:19660770

  4. Isolation and Identification of novel toxins from a new mosquitocidal isolate from Malaysia, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan.

    PubMed

    Kawalek, M D; Benjamin, S; Lee, H L; Gill, S S

    1995-08-01

    A new mosquitocidal Bacillus thuringiensis subsp., jegathesan, has recently been isolated from Malaysia. Parasporal crystal inclusions were purified from this strain and bioassayed against fourth-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Aedes aegypti, Aedes togoi, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles maculatus, and Mansonia uniformis. The 50% lethal concentration of crystal inclusions for each species was 0.34, 8.08, 0.34, 17.59, 3.91, and 120 ng/ml, respectively. These values show that parasporal inclusions from this new subspecies have mosquitocidal toxicity comparable to that of inclusions isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. Solubilized and chymotrypsin-activated parasporal inclusions possessed low-level hemolytic activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the crystals were composed of polypeptides of 77, 74, 72, 68, 55, 38, 35, 27, and 23 kDa. Analysis by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with polyclonal antisera raised against toxins purified from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis reveals that proteins in parasporal inclusions of subsp. jegathesan are distinct, because little cross-reactivity was shown. Analysis of the plasmid content of B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan indicates that the genes for toxin production may be located on 105- to 120-kb plasmids. Cry- clones that have been cured of these plasmids are nontoxic. Southern blot analysis of plasmid and chromosomal DNA from subsp. jegathesan showed little or low homology to the genes coding for CryIVA, CryIVB, and CryIVD from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. PMID:7487029

  5. Foliar application of biofilm formation-inhibiting compounds enhances control of citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyun; Wang, Nian

    2014-02-01

    Citrus canker caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri is an economically important disease of citrus worldwide. Biofilm formation plays an important role in early infection of X. citri subsp. citri on host leaves. In this study, we assessed the hypothesis that small molecules inhibiting biofilm formation reduce X. citri subsp. citri infection and enhance the control of citrus canker disease. D-leucine and 3-indolylacetonitrile (IAN) were found to prevent biofilm formation by X. citri subsp. citri on different abiotic surfaces and host leaves at a concentration lower than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis indicated that IAN repressed expression of chemotaxis/motility-related genes in X. citri subsp. citri. In laboratory experiments, planktonic and biofilm cells of X. citri subsp. citri treated with D-leucine and IAN, either alone or in combination, were more susceptible to copper (CuSO4) than those untreated. In greenhouse assays, D-leucine and IAN applied alone or combined with copper reduced both the number of canker lesions and bacterial populations of X. citri subsp. citri on citrus host leaves. This study provides the basis for the use of foliar-applied biofilm inhibitors for the control of citrus canker alone or combined with copper-based bactericides. PMID:23901828

  6. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses. PMID:26483406

  7. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  8. Divergent immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection correlate with kinome responses at the site of intestinal infection.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  9. An improved assay for detection of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli in watermelon and melon seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), the causal agent of a watermelon seedling blight and fruit blotch (WFB), has emerged as a serious seedborne pathogen of watermelon, melons, pumpkin, and citron. Although attempts have been made to develop a simple routine laboratory seed assay to detect the...

  10. Genome Sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris Strain T26, Isolated from Mesophilic Undefined Cheese Starter

    PubMed Central

    Kot, W. P.; Hansen, L. H.; Sørensen, S. J.; Broadbent, J. R.; Vogensen, F. K.; Ardö, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Leuconostoc is the main group of heterofermentative bacteria found in mesophilic dairy starters. They grow in close symbiosis with the Lactococcus population and are able to degrade citrate. Here we present a draft genome sequence of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris strain T26. PMID:24903867

  11. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine monocyte-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease is a significant problem in many North American cattle herds. The efficacy of currently available vaccines is questionable. There is a need to develop efficacious vaccines and strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAPTB) that could serve as potential candidates for ...

  12. Phylogenomic analysis shows that Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum is a later heterotypic synonym of Bacillus methylotrophicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rhizosphere isolated bacteria belonging to the Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum and Bacillus methylotrophicus clades are an important group of strains that are used as plant growth promoters and antagonists of plant pathogens. These properties have made these strains the focus of comm...

  13. Comparison of nine PCR primer sets designed to detect Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's bacterial wilt of maize, is a major quarantine pest in maize seed. Verifying freedom from P. stewartii remains a significant hurdle in exporting corn seed from the U.S. Several PCR primer sets have been developed and suggested as bein...

  14. Primary transcriptomes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis reveal proprietary pathways in tissue and macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis persistently infect intestines and mesenteric lymph nodes leading to a prolonged subclinical disease. We investigated the intracellular lifestyle of MAP in the intestines and lymph nodes to understand the MAP pathways that function to govern th...

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana strains isolated from agricultural sources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report draft genomes of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana strain CVM42234 isolated from chick feed in 2012 and Salmonella Cubana strain 76814 isolated from swine in 2004. The genome sizes are 4,975,046 and 4,936,251 base pairs, respectively....

  16. Bioaccessible Antioxidants in Milk Fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175–358%) was observed during digestion. PMID:25802836

  17. Unraveling the Host Response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: One Thread at a Time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Improved tools for the measurement of immunologic responses in ruminant species, par...

  18. Exploring the strain-specific attachment of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum on food contact surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Aulia, Yosi Ayu; Van der Linden, Inge; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Devlieghere, Frank

    2015-04-16

    The psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum has emerged as one of the most prevalent specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) of packaged, cold-stored food products in Northern Europe. The whole genome sequencing of the type strain L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum LMG 18811(T) revealed genes encoding for proteins related to adhesion. In the present study the attachment of six food and environmental isolates was monitored on stainless steel (SS) and glass surfaces incubated (7 °C for 5-9 days) in two food simulating substrates (i.e. sweet bell pepper juice and boiled eggs in brine). The selection encompassed unique genotypes, isolated from different food products or sampling sites as well as slime-forming biotypes. The evaluation of the attached cells was performed with the bead vortexing method and a viability staining assay coupled with epifluorescence microscopy. On SS surfaces the slime-formers showed the lowest attachment (3.3-4.5 logCFU/cm(2)), while strain L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum ab2, which was isolated from an acetic acid bath in a vegetable salad company, reached significantly higher populations of attached cells exceeding 7 logCFU/cm(2). Strain ab2 formed dense cell aggregations on SS after 9 days of incubation in sweet bell pepper juice. The attachment ability of L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum on surfaces documented in the present study extends our knowledge and understanding of the spoilage potential and intra-subspecies diversity of this microbe. PMID:25625910

  19. Optimization of hexadecylpyridinium chloride decontamination for culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cows in advanced stages of Johne’s disease shed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into both their milk and feces, allowing for transmission of the bacteria between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of MAP from milk and colos...

  20. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ratoon stunt, caused by the xylem-limited coryneform bacterium Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx), is prevalent in most sugarcane-planting countries. Because the disease does not cause characteristic external symptoms, a laboratory-based technique is needed for accurate diagnosis. Based on loop-mediat...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59.

    PubMed

    Ladero, Victor; Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain-isolated from a traditional cheese-produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  2. A comparison of the bioassay test and culture to detect Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri [Xcc]) can cause yield loss of susceptible citrus and result in trade restrictions of fresh fruit. For both regulatory purposes and epidemiological studies, accurate detection and quantification of viable inoculum is critical. Two accepted meth...

  3. New Tricks from an Old Cow: Infective Endocarditis Caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Jordal, Stina; Glambek, Marte; Oppegaard, Oddvar

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae, a major cause of bovine mastitis and previously thought to be an animal-restricted pathogen. The patient reported no direct contact with animals, and the clinical course was severe and complicated. PMID:25472489

  4. Predisposition of citrus foliage to infection with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is a serious disease of susceptible citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing areas of the world. The effect of leaf preconditioning as a route for entry of the bacteria is poorly characterized. A series of experiments were designed to i...

  5. Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in endemically infected dairy herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is thought to be the primary source of infection for dairy cattle. The exact link between fecal shedding of MAP by individual cows and environmental contamination levels at the herd level was explored with a cross-se...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Putrescine-Producing Strain Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59

    PubMed Central

    Ladero, Victor; del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernandez, María; Mayo, Baltasar; Martín, M. Cruz

    2015-01-01

    We report here the 2,576,542-bp genome annotated draft assembly sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1AA59. This strain—isolated from a traditional cheese—produces putrescine, one of the most frequently biogenic amines found in dairy products. PMID:26089428

  7. Evaluation of several seed treatments for eradication of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli from watermelon seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), the causal agent of bacterial fruit blotch of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), is a serious seedborne pathogen. To determine the effectiveness of several seed treatments for eradication of Aac from seed, healthy triploid watermelon seedlots were spiked with n...

  8. Multilocus sequence typing reveals two evolutionary lineages of the watermelon pathogen, Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), the causal agent of bacterial blight and fruit blotch of watermelon and other cucurbits, has caused great damage to the watermelon and melon industry in China and the USA. Understanding the origin of this emerging disease is important for controlling outbrea...

  9. Predisposition of citrus foliage to infection with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker (caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xcc) is a serious disease of susceptible citrus in Florida and other citrus-growing areas of the world. The specific effects of predisposing factors for bacterial penetration of leaves are poorly characterized. Experiments were designed to inv...

  10. First identification of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis causing mortality in Mexican tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Cesar; Mancera, Gerardo; Enríquez, Ricardo; Vargas, Augusto; Martínez, Simón; Fajardo, Raúl; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Navarrete, María José; Romero, Alex

    2016-08-01

    Francisellosis, an emerging disease in tilapia Oreochromis spp., is caused by the facultative, intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis, which is present in various countries where tilapia farming is commercially important. We confirmed the presence of francisellosis in Mexican tilapia cultures in association with an outbreak during the second semester of 2012. Broodstock fish presented a mortality rate of approximately 40%, and disease was characterized by histologically classified granulomas, or whitish nodules, in different organs, mainly the spleen and kidney. Through DNA obtained from infected tissue and pure cultures in a cysteine heart medium supplemented with hemoglobin, F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis was initially confirmed through the amplification and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes demonstrated close similarity with previously reported F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis sequences obtained from infected tilapia from various countries. The identification of this subspecies as the causative agent of the outbreak was confirmed using the iglC gene as a target sequence, which showed 99.5% identity to 2 F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis strains (Ethime-1 and Toba04). These findings represent the first documented occurrence of francisellosis in Mexican tilapia cultures, which highlights the importance of establishing preventative measures to minimize the spread of this disease within the Mexican aquaculture industry. PMID:27503916

  11. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and rep...

  12. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) in agricultural environments. The goal of this stu...

  13. INGESTION AND ADSORPTION OF 'BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS' SUBSP. 'ISRAELENSIS' BY 'GAMMARUS LACUSTRIS' IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several groups of Gammarus lacustris adults were exposed to solutions containing 0.5 and 5.0 mg of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis per liter for 1- or 24-hour periods by using traditional static bioassay exposure procedures. The experiments verified that traditional exp...

  14. Resistance of sweet orange Pera (Citrus sinensis) genotypes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri under field conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus canker control is based on protection measures and eradication of plants infected with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Although these measures show satisfactory results, the use of resistant genotypes is an important alternative for citrus canker control. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  15. Effect of Watering Trough Chlorination on Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The continued global increase in the number of cases of Johne’s disease suggests that more information is needed to understand the mechanisms by which the causative agent Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is spread among livestock on the farm site. Livestock watering troughs are freq...

  16. Liver Abscess Caused by Infection with Community-Acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Breurec, Sebastien; Melot, Benedicte; Hoen, Bruno; Passet, Virginie; Schepers, Kinda; Bastian, Sylvaine

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of pyogenic liver abscess caused by community-acquired Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae. The infecting isolate had 2 prominent features of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains: the capsular polysaccharide synthesis region for K1 serotype and the integrative and conjugative element ICEKp1, which encodes the virulence factors yersiniabactin, salmochelin, and RmpA. PMID:26890371

  17. Immunlogic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting, and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site react...

  18. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain Stag’s Leap

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag’s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce’s disease....

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; King, Jordon C. K.; Molini, Barbara J.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum Sea81-4 Strain.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L; King, Jordon C K; Molini, Barbara J; Lukehart, Sheila A; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Using the rabbit model of syphilis, the Sea81-4 strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum has been found to be more likely than other strains to invade the central nervous system (CNS). To identify possible explanations for this important phenotype at the genomic level, we sequenced the Sea81-4 strain genome. PMID:24744342

  1. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  2. The Transport of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through Saturated Aquifer Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric infection causing diarrhea and wasting in cattle, sheep, and other ruminants. Because Johne’s disease is spread by the ingestion of M. paratuberculosis, a good understanding...

  3. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica.

    PubMed

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses. PMID:26904002

  4. Molecular markers to determine ecological fate of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacillus thuringiensis (“Bt”) is a ubiquitous soil bacterium with entomopathogenic properties. One strain, Bt subsp. kurstaki (“Btk”), is highly toxic to lepidopteran larvae and used in many commercial products for biological pest control. We designed a set of DNA markers that successfully identifi...

  5. The genome sequence of the gram-positive sugarcane pathogen Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B; Camargo, Luis E A; Van Sluys, Marie A; Kitajima, João P; Truffi, Daniela; do Amaral, Alexandre M; Harakava, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Wood, Derek; de Oliveira, Mariana C; Miyaki, Cristina; Takita, Marco A; da Silva, Ana C R; Furlan, Luis R; Carraro, Dirce M; Camarotte, Giovana; Almeida, Nalvo F; Carrer, Helaine; Coutinho, Luiz L; El-Dorry, Hamza A; Ferro, Maria I T; Gagliardi, Paulo R; Giglioti, Eder; Goldman, Maria H S; Goldman, Gustavo H; Kimura, Edna T; Ferro, Emer S; Kuramae, Eiko E; Lemos, Eliana G M; Lemos, Manoel V F; Mauro, Sonia M Z; Machado, Marcos A; Marino, Celso L; Menck, Carlos F; Nunes, Luiz R; Oliveira, Regina C; Pereira, Gonsalo G; Siqueira, Walter; de Souza, Alessandra A; Tsai, Siu M; Zanca, A S; Simpson, Andrew J G; Brumbley, Stevens M; Setúbal, João C

    2004-08-01

    The genome sequence of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, which causes ratoon stunting disease and affects sugarcane worldwide, was determined. The single circular chromosome of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli CTCB07 was 2.6 Mb in length with a GC content of 68% and 2,044 predicted open reading frames. The analysis also revealed 307 predicted pseudogenes, which is more than any bacterial plant pathogen sequenced to date. Many of these pseudogenes, if functional, would likely be involved in the degradation of plant heteropolysaccharides, uptake of free sugars, and synthesis of amino acids. Although L. xyli subsp. xyli has only been identified colonizing the xylem vessels of sugarcane, the numbers of predicted regulatory genes and sugar transporters are similar to those in free-living organisms. Some of the predicted pathogenicity genes appear to have been acquired by lateral transfer and include genes for cellulase, pectinase, wilt-inducing protein, lysozyme, and desaturase. The presence of the latter may contribute to stunting, since it is likely involved in the synthesis of abscisic acid, a hormone that arrests growth. Our findings are consistent with the nutritionally fastidious behavior exhibited by L. xyli subsp. xyli and suggest an ongoing adaptation to the restricted ecological niche it inhabits. PMID:15305603

  6. Bioaccessible antioxidants in milk fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum strains.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175-358%) was observed during digestion. PMID:25802836

  7. Immunologic responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois protein cocktail vaccines in a mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteritis characterized by severe diarrhea, wasting and a decline in milk production caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculois (MAP). The vaccine currently on the market has some limitations including a severe injection site reactio...

  8. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  9. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the infection process to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is tantamount to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for the control of this disease in the field. The current study compared the effectiveness of oral and intraperitoneal methods of experimental in...

  10. Cytokine Secretion in Periparturient dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's disease, cause by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), has a devastating impact on the dairy industry. Cows typically are infected as neonates, and stressors, such as parturition, may induce the transition from the subclinical to a more clinical stage of disease. The objective ...

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a Longitudinal Study of Three Dairy Herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether cows that were low shedders of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) were passive shedding animals or whether they were truly infected with MAP. We also evaluated whether these MAP-infected animals could have been infected as adults by ...

  12. Intraspecific variability of the essential oil of Calamintha nepeta subsp. nepeta from Southern Italy (Apulia).

    PubMed

    Negro, C; Notarnicola, S; De Bellis, L; Miceli, A

    2013-03-01

    The essential oil of 46 spontaneous plants of Calamintha nepeta (L.) Savi subsp. nepeta growing wild in Sud, Italy (Salento, Apulia), were investigated by GC/MS. Fifty-seven components were identified in the oil representing over the 98% of the total oil composition. Four chemotypes were identified: piperitone oxide, piperitenone oxide, piperitone-menthone and pulegone. PMID:22646908

  13. Osteopontin Expression in Periparturient Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Periods of immunosuppression, typically seen at parturition, may contribute to the transition from the subclinical, or asymptomatic, to the clinical stage of inf...

  14. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis as an Agent of Blood Culture-Negative Endocarditis in a Human

    PubMed Central

    Fenollar, Florence; Sire, Stéphane; Raoult, Didier

    2005-01-01

    We report the case of a patient hospitalized with endocarditis. The etiological diagnosis of Bartonella was suggested by detection of high titers of antibodies by immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Two different nested PCRs performed on sera identified Bartonella vinsonii subsp. arupensis by sequencing. PMID:15695714

  15. Antigenic Profiles of Recombinant Proteins from Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in Sheep with Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to improve the ELISA test to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis have been explored over several years. Previously, selected recombinant proteins of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis were found to be immunogenic in cattle with Johne’s disease. In the present study, antibo...

  16. Evaluation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric infection that affects ruminants. Eradication of Map from infected farms has been difficult and is likely due to long-term survival of the organism in the environment. The application of Ma...

  17. VERTEBRATE TOXICOLOGY OF THE SOLUBILIZED PROTEINS OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review summarizes the studies done with the mammalian toxic Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) 28 kDa cytA protein. The data is relevant to hazard identification studies with bacterial pesticides. The data shows that cytA produces lethal physiological changes in...

  18. EFFECT OF REMOVAL OF THE CYTOLYTIC FACTOR OF 'BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS' SUBSP. 'ISRAELENSIS' ON MOSQUITO TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solubilized crystal protein of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was fractionated by affinity chromotography using a monoclonal antibody directed against the crystal's 28 kDa peptide. The 28 kDa peptide ws found to be relatively nontoxic to mosquito larvae although it doe...

  19. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS SUBSP. ISRAELENSIS AND FATHEAD MINNOWS, PIMEPHALES PROMELAS RAFINESQUE, UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions between Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, were studied in laboratory exposures to two commercial formulations, Vectobac-G and Mosquito Attack. ortality among fatheads exposed to 2.0 x 10 6 to 6.5 x 10 6 CFU/ml with bo...

  20. Parturition and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: A Potential Interface for the Pathogenesis of Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds and cost the industry $250 million annually. One major period of stress for dairy cows is the periparturient period, and field observations suggest ...

  1. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  2. From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts...

  3. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against a Major Membrane Protein of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis 35-kDa major membrane protein (MMP) encoded by MAP2121c has been shown to play a role in invasion of epithelial cells and is an important membrane antigen recognized by cattle with Johne’s disease. In this study, purified recombinant MMP was used to p...

  4. The Aeromonas salmonicida Lipopolysaccharide Core from Different Subspecies: The Unusual subsp. pectinolytica

    PubMed Central

    Merino, Susana; Tomás, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Initial hydridization tests using Aeromonas salmonicida typical and atypical strains showed the possibility of different lipopolysaccharide (LPS) outer cores among these strains. By chemical structural analysis, LPS-core SDS-PAGE gel migration, and functional and comparative genomics we demonstrated that typical A. salmonicida (subsp. salmonicida) strains and atypical subsp. masoucida and probably smithia strains showed the same LPS outer core. A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes strains show a similar LPS outer core but lack one of the most external residues (a galactose linked α1-6 to heptose), not affecting the O-antigen LPS linkage. A. salmonicida subsp. pectinolytica strains show a rather changed LPS outer core, which is identical to the LPS outer core from the majority of the A. hydrophila strains studied by genomic analyses. The LPS inner core in all tested A. salmonicida strains, typical and atypical, is well-conserved. Furthermore, the LPS inner core seems to be conserved in all the Aeromonas (psychrophilic or mesophilic) strains studied by genomic analyses. PMID:26904002

  5. Complete Genome Sequence and Methylome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Cerro, a Frequent Dairy Cow Serovar

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Bradd J.; Pirone, Cary; Muruvanda, Tim; Brown, Eric; Allard, Marc; Karns, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cerro is an infrequent pathogen of humans and other mammals but is frequently isolated from the hindgut of asymptomatic cattle in the United States. To further understand the genomic determinants of S. Cerro specificity for the bovine hindgut, the genome of isolate CFSAN001588 was fully sequenced and deposited in the GenBank database. PMID:26823571

  6. Comparison of fecal DNA extraction kits for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnostics of paratuberculosis, however, PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in fecal material is widely used today, having demonstrated great sensitivity and specificity. To insure the most efficient and r...

  7. Functional Characterization of Iron Dependent Regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we investigated an iron dependent regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). IdeR is a transcriptional factor that plays a global iron regulatory role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with a 19-bp recognition sequence. IdeR recognition sites within MAP ge...

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Ouakam Isolated from Ground Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Marasini, Daya; Abo-Shama, Usama H.

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we announce the first whole-genome sequencing of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Ouakam strain GNT-01, isolated from ground turkey retail meat. The strain has a chromosome of 5,088,451 bp long, with a G+C content of 52.3%, and a plasmid of 109,715 bp. PMID:26798110

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Mishmarhaemek Isolated from Bovine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ashley; Lambert, Dominic; Koziol, Adam G.; Seyer, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Mishmarhaemek is a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium implicated in human clinical disease. Here, we report a 4.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of a nalidixic acid-resistant isolate of S. serovar Mishmarhaemek. PMID:26472847

  10. Demodicosis in Chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra subsp. rupicapra) in the Italian Alps, 2013-14.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Claudia; Formenti, Nicoletta; Trogu, Tiziana; Lanfranchi, Paolo; Papini, Roberto A; Poli, Alessandro

    2016-04-28

    We report demodicosis in five alpine chamois ( Rupicapra rupicapra subsp. rupicapra) from the Italian Alps that showed moderate crusts on the head and dorsal aspect of the trunk. We detected intramural folliculitis, moderate dermatitis, and T-lymphocytes and macrophages associated with Demodex spp. in follicles and sebaceous glands. PMID:26981687

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae Strain ATCC 700603

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Alysha G.; Ganesamoorthy, Devika; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae strain ATCC 700603, formerly known as K. pneumoniae K6, is known for producing extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes that can hydrolyze oxyimino-β-lactams, resulting in resistance to these drugs. We herein report the complete genome of strain ATCC 700603 and show that the ESBL genes are plasmid-encoded. PMID:27231369

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the Emerging Bivalve Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus

    PubMed Central

    Spinard, Edward J.; Dubert, Javier; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus is a bivalve pathogen isolated during episodes of mortality affecting larval cultures in different shellfish hatcheries. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of the type strain PP-638 and describe potential virulence factors, which may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity. PMID:27469949

  13. Inhibition of protein glycation by essential oils of branchlets and fruits of Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica.

    PubMed

    Asgary, S; Naderi, G A; Shams Ardekani, M R; Sahebkar, A; Airin, A; Aslani, S; Kasher, T; Emami, S A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and protein glycation play pivotal roles in the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-glycation properties of essential oils obtained from different parts of Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica. The branchlets of male tree (BMT) and branchlets of female (BFT) tree, and fruits of J. communis subsp. hemisphaerica were extracted using steam distillation method. The oils were phytochemically analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Anti-glycation properties were evaluated using hemoglobin and insulin glycation assays. Overall, 18 volatile components were identified in the J. communis subsp. hemisphaerica oils, amounting to 82.1%, 100.0% and 96.4% of the BMT, BFT and fruit oils, respectively. Promising inhibitory activity was observed from all concentrations of the tested oils in the hemoglobin and insulin glycation assays. The inhibitory activities peaked to 89.9% (BFT oil; 200 μg mL(-1)) and 81.0% (BFT oil; 600 μg mL(-1)) in the hemoglobin and insulin glycation assays, respectively. The evidence from this study suggests that essential oils obtained from the fruits and branchlets of J. communis subsp. hemisphaerica possess anti-glycation properties. These activities may find implication for the prevention and treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:25657787

  14. Conditioned food aversion for control of poisoning by Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conditioned food aversion is a technique that can be used to train livestock to avoid ingestion of poisonous plants. This study tested the efficacy and durability of conditioned food aversion to eliminate goat’s consumption of Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa. We used 14 young Moxotó goats, which wer...

  15. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, a Strain Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Gazzola, Simona; Fontana, Cecilia; Bassi, Daniela; Cocconcelli, Pier-Sandro; von Wright, Atte

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Mast36, isolated from bovine mastitis, is reported here. This strain was shown to be able to grow in milk and still possess genes of vegetable origin. The genome also contains a cluster of genes associated with pathogenicity. PMID:25999570

  16. Red stripe caused by Acidovirax avenae subsp. avenae in Louisiana sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red stripe of sugarcane caused by Acidovirax avenae subsp. avenae is considered to be of minor importance because, most often when found, only the mild leaf stripe symptom is observed. In 2010, both leaf stripe and the more severe top rot symptom were observed in commercial sugarcane fields in Louis...

  17. Complete genome sequence of salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Strain RM6836

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson (S. Thompson) strain RM6836 was isolated from lettuce in 2002. We report the complete sequence and annotation of the genome of S. Thompson strain RM6836. This is the first reported complete genome sequence for S. Thompson and will provide a point ...

  18. Development of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ratoon stunt, caused by the xylem-limited coryneform bacterium Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx), is prevalent in most sugarcane-producing countries. Because the disease does not cause characteristic external symptoms, a laboratory-based technique is needed for accurate diagnosis. We developed a diag...

  19. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric infection that affects ruminants. Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little rese...

  20. Identification of a tomatinase in the tomato-pathogenic actinomycete Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382.

    PubMed

    Kaup, Olaf; Gräfen, Ines; Zellermann, Eva-Maria; Eichenlaub, Rudolf; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz

    2005-10-01

    The insertion site of a transposon mutant of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB382 was cloned and found to be located in the gene tomA encoding a member of the glycosyl hydrolase family 10. The intact gene was obtained from a cosmid library of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. The deduced protein TomA (543 amino acids, 58 kDa) contains a predicted signal peptide and two domains, the N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal fibronectin III-like domain. The closest well-characterized relatives of TomA were tomatinases from fungi involved in the detoxification of the tomato saponin alpha-tomatine which acts as a growth inhibitor. Growth inhibition of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis by alpha-tomatine was stronger in the tomA mutants than in the wild type. Tomatinase activity assayed by deglycosylation of alpha-tomatine to tomatidine was demonstrated in concentrated culture supernatants of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. No activity was found with the tomA mutants. However, neither the transposon mutant nor a second mutant constructed by gene disruption was affected in virulence on the tomato cv. Moneymaker. PMID:16255248

  1. Surface Proteome of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” during the Early Stages of Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael; Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is a robust and pervasive environmental bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in humans. The bacterium overcomes the host immune response and is capable of surviving and replicating within host macrophages. Little is known about the bacterial mechanisms that facilitate these processes, but it can be expected that surface-exposed proteins play an important role. In this study, the selective biotinylation of surface-exposed proteins, streptavidin affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface-exposed proteome of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. This analysis detected more than 100 proteins exposed at the bacterial surface of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Comparisons of surface-exposed proteins between conditions simulating early infection identified several groups of proteins whose presence on the bacterial surface was either constitutive or appeared to be unique to specific culture conditions. This proteomic profile facilitates an improved understanding of M. avium subsp. hominissuis and how it establishes infection. Additionally, surface-exposed proteins are excellent targets for the host adaptive immune system, and their identification can inform the development of novel treatments, diagnostic tools, and vaccines for mycobacterial disease. PMID:22392927

  2. Immunogenicity of Proteome-Determined Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Proteins in Sheep with Paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Valerie; Bannantine, John P.; Denham, Susan; Smith, Stuart; Garcia-Sanchez, Alfredo; Sales, Jill; Paustian, Michael L.; Mclean, Kevin; Stevenson, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis, a chronic granulomatous enteritis. Detecting animals with paratuberculosis infections is difficult because the currently available tools have low sensitivity and lack specificity; these tools are prone to generating spurious positive test results caused by exposure to environmental M. avium complex organisms. To generate candidate antigens for incorporation into a specific test for paratuberculosis, subspecies-specific proteins were determined by proteomic comparison of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium. Analysis was aimed at revealing proteins only expressed (or predominant) in the protein profile of M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolved approximately 1,000 protein spots from each subspecies. Proteome analysis identified protein spots whose expression profile appeared markedly increased in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 32 were identified by analysis of their tryptic peptide profile by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis. Thirty of these proteins were cloned, and their recombinant proteins were expressed. Ovine paratuberculosis sera were used to assess their immunoreactivity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, and dot blot analysis. Seventeen proteins were detected in at least one of the immunoassays, and eleven proteins were detected by ELISA with an optical density in excess of the cutoff of 0.1 in four of six sera tested. The immunoreactivity of these proteins indicates their potential as unique diagnostic antigens for the development of a specific serological detection of paratuberculosis. PMID:18845834

  3. Identification of Immune Parameters To Differentiate Disease States among Sheep Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Sonia; O'Brien, Rory; Hughes, Alan D.; Griffin, J. Frank T.

    2010-01-01

    Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants, is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Three distinct forms have been observed in sheep: paucibacillary disease (PB), multibacillary disease (MB), and asymptomatic infection (AS). In this study, immune parameters for animals naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and identified postmortem as having PB, MB, or AS were compared to provide a further understanding of the immunological reactivity contributing to or resulting from these different disease states in sheep. PB was associated with strong ex vivo M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen-stimulated gamma interferon responses, pronounced increases in CD25+ T-cell frequencies in circulation, antibody production, and a B-cell population that expanded significantly upon ex vivo antigenic stimulation. The MB group featured the highest antibody levels and a lack of cellular immune responsiveness to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. The AS group expressed an immunological phenotype intermediate between that for noninfected control animals and that for the PB group. The relationship between immune responses and disease severity within the PB group was investigated more closely; significant positive correlations were observed between disease severity and both the CD8+ population in the circulating blood and the expression of interleukin-4 mRNA in antigen-stimulated blood samples ex vivo. Together, these data point toward distinct immune profiles in sheep that correspond to different Johne's disease states, which can be determined from circulating blood and/or from localized intestinal tract tissue samples. PMID:19923568

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa Strain Stag’s Leap

    PubMed Central

    Wu, F.; Zheng, Z.; Deng, X.; Burbank, L. P.; Stenger, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag’s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce’s disease resistance and a phenotypic assessment of knockout mutants to determine gene function. PMID:27103713

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. utilis LTH 7013, Isolated from South Tyrolean Ham

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Anne; Huptas, Christopher; Wenning, Mareike; Weiss, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus is used as a starter culture in meat fermentation, where it contributes to color formation and produces aromatic compounds. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an S. carnosus subsp. utilis strain, LTH 7013, isolated from South Tyrolean ham, with potential application as a starter culture. PMID:25977432

  6. Fortunella margarita Transcriptional Reprogramming Triggered by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Citrus canker disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) has become endemic in areas where high temperature, rain, humidity, and windy conditions provide a favourable environment for the dissemination of the bacterium. Xcc is pathogenic on many commercial citrus varieties but appears to elicit an incompatible reaction on the citrus relative Fortunella margarita Swing (kumquat), in the form of a very distinct delayed necrotic response. We have developed subtractive libraries enriched in sequences expressed in kumquat leaves during both early and late stages of the disease. The isolated differentially expressed transcripts were subsequently sequenced. Our results demonstrate how the use of microarray expression profiling can help assign roles to previously uncharacterized genes and elucidate plant pathogenesis-response related mechanisms. This can be considered to be a case study in a citrus relative where high throughput technologies were utilized to understand defence mechanisms in Fortunella and citrus at the molecular level. Results cDNAs from sequenced kumquat libraries (ESTs) made from subtracted RNA populations, healthy vs. infected, were used to make this microarray. Of 2054 selected genes on a customized array, 317 were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in Xcc challenged kumquat plants compared to mock-inoculated ones. This study identified components of the incompatible interaction such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and programmed cell death (PCD). Common defence mechanisms and a number of resistance genes were also identified. In addition, there were a considerable number of differentially regulated genes that had no homologues in the databases. This could be an indication of either a specialized set of genes employed by kumquat in response to canker disease or new defence mechanisms in citrus. Conclusion Functional categorization of kumquat Xcc-responsive genes revealed an enhanced defence

  7. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from free-ranging birds and mammals on livestock premises.

    PubMed

    Corn, Joseph L; Manning, Elizabeth J B; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R

    2005-11-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants ("7,5") appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock. PMID:16269731

  8. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Kenta; NISHIYAMA, Keita; MIYAJIMA, Hiroki; OSAWA, Ro; YAMAMOTO, Yuji; MUKAI, Takao

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10−8 M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  9. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Free-Ranging Birds and Mammals on Livestock Premises

    PubMed Central

    Corn, Joseph L.; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Fischer, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Surveys for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging mammals and birds were conducted on nine dairy and beef cattle farms in Wisconsin and Georgia. Specimens were collected from 774 animals representing 25 mammalian and 22 avian species. Specimens of ileum, liver, intestinal lymph nodes, and feces were harvested from the larger mammals; a liver specimen and the gastrointestinal tract were harvested from birds and small mammals. Cultures were performed by using radiometric culture and acid-fast isolates were identified by 16S/IS900/IS1311 PCR and mycobactin dependency characteristics. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was cultured from tissues and feces from 39 samples from 30 animals representing nine mammalian and three avian species. The prevalence of infected wild animals by premises ranged from 2.7 to 8.3% in Wisconsin and from 0 to 6.0% in Georgia. Shedding was documented in seven (0.9%) animals: three raccoons, two armadillos, one opossum, and one feral cat. The use of two highly polymorphic short sequence repeat loci for analysis of 29 of the 39 strains identified 10 alleles. One allelic pattern broadly shared in domestic ruminants (“7,5”) appeared in approximately one-third of the wildlife M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates studied. Given the few cases of shedding by free-ranging animals compared to the volume of contaminated manure produced by infected domestic ruminant livestock, contamination of the farm environment by infected wildlife was negligible. Wildlife may, however, have epidemiological significance for farms where M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recently has been eliminated or on farms free of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis but located in the geographic vicinity of farms with infected livestock. PMID:16269731

  10. Adhesion properties of a putative polymorphic fimbrial subunit protein from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenta; Nishiyama, Keita; Miyajima, Hiroki; Osawa, Ro; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we found that the open reading frame bl0675 in the genome of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum isolated from human feces encoded a novel putative fimbrial protein, was highly polymorphic, and had five variants (A, B, C, D, and E types). The aim of this study was to evaluate the affinity of these variants to porcine colonic mucins (PCMs). Protein-binding properties were examined using the recombinant BL0675 protein containing a C-terminal 6 × His tag (His-BL0675). Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that the His-BL0675 A type had strong affinity to PCMs (KD = 9.82 × 10(-8) M), whereas the B, C, D, and E types exhibited little or no binding. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, His-BL0675 A type binding was reduced by addition of mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting that the binding occurs via carbohydrate chains of PCMs. The localization of BL0675 to the B. longum subsp. longum cell surface was confirmed by western blot analysis using A type polyclonal antibodies. Bacterial adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum to PCMs was also blocked by A type-specific antibodies; however, its adhesion properties were strain specific. Our results suggest that the BL0675 variants significantly contribute to the adhesion of B. longum subsp. longum strains. The expression and the adhesive properties of this protein are affected by genetic polymorphisms and are specific for B. longum subsp. longum strains. However, further studies are required on the properties of binding of these putative fimbrial proteins to the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26858927

  11. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility

    PubMed Central

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A.; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E.; Loparev, Vladimir N.; Raphael, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides T1/44, a Vaccine Strain against Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Gourgues, Géraldine; Barré, Aurélien; Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Weber, Johann; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Barbe, Valérie; Schieck, Elise; Jores, Joerg; Vashee, Sanjay; Blanchard, Alain; Lartigue, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides is the etiologic agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia. We report here the complete genome sequence of the strain T1/44, which is widely used as a live vaccine in Africa. PMID:27081135

  13. Evaluation of Control Points in Youngstock and Adult Dairy Cow Management to Control Transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete a series of prospective controlled on-farm trials to critically evaluate the efficacy and cost-benefit of commonly recommended management practices for reducing the transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in youngstock in infected herds....

  14. Three Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei Associated with Colonization of a Health Care Facility.

    PubMed

    Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Morrison, Shatavia S; Sammons, Scott; Rowe, Lori A; Sheth, Mili; Frace, Michael; Lucas, Claressa E; Loparev, Vladimir N; Raphael, Brian H; Winchell, Jonas M

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Legionella pneumophila subsp. pascullei strains (including both serogroup 1 and 5 strains) that were found in the same health care facility in 1982 and 2012. PMID:27151801

  15. Faecal bacterial composition in dairy cows shedding Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in faeces in comparison with nonshedding cows.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Videnska, Petra; Sedlar, Karel; Bartejsova, Iva; Kralova, Alena; Slana, Iva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in the faecal microbiota of dairy cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in comparison with noninfected cows from the same herds. Faecal samples from cows in 4 herds were tested for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by real-time PCR, and faecal bacterial populations were analysed by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The most notable differences between shedding and nonshedding cows were an increase in the genus Psychrobacter and a decrease in the genera Oscillospira, Ruminococcus, and Bifidobacterium in cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study is the first to report the faecal microbial composition in dairy cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:27127920

  16. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  17. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serotype Saintpaul Strain S-70, Isolated from an Aquatic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Acosta, Mitzi; Medrano-Félix, Andrés; Jiménez, Maribel; Gómez-Gil, Bruno; León-Félix, Josefina; Amarillas, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella is a pathogen of worldwide importance, causing disease in a vast range of hosts, including humans. We report the genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Saintpaul strain S-70, isolated from an aquatic environment. PMID:24336367

  19. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  20. In vitro antiseptic susceptibility of clinical isolates from nosocomial infections.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, M; Okuzumi, K; Yoneyama, A; Kunisada, T; Araake, M; Ogawa, H; Kimura, S

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility of a large number of strains to various antiseptics, we elaborated a simple, qualitative broth turbidity method in which we could quickly judge the efficacy visually. For this method, we prepared a modified neutralizer broth, consisting of trypticase soy broth containing 15% Tween 80, 1% soybean lecithin and 0.5% sodium thiosulfate. The susceptibilities of Serratia marcescens No. 26 to 4 antiseptics obtained from the turbidity method showed a good agreement with those obtained from the colony-counting method; the 4 antiseptics tested were povidone-iodine (PVP-I), chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG), benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and alkyldiaminoethylglycine hydrochloride (AEG). Both PVP-I and BAC had complete efficacy in 0.5 min against all isolates tested [100 isolates of S. marcescens, 103 of Klebsiella pneumoniae, 99 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 19 of Alcaligenes faecalis and 30 of A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxydans (A. xylosoxydans)]. In contrast, the effectiveness of CHG was weak compared with PVP-I, BAC and AEG. Strong resistance against AEG was noted even after 3-min exposure in 1 isolate each of A. faecalis and A. xylosoxydans. It is concluded that the turbidity test is a simple and accurate method to evaluate susceptibility to various antiseptics and that it is suitable for a screening of a large number of strains. Among the 4 antiseptics tested, PVP-I and BAC showed a consistently high activity against all isolates, confirming PVP-I and BAC to be clinically useful antiseptics. PMID:12011516

  1. A Genomic Island Defines Subspecies-Specific Virulence Features of the Host-Adapted Pathogen Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Kienesberger, Sabine; Schober, Caroline; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Gülly, Christian; Zechner, Rudolf; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Campylobacter fetus comprises two subspecies, C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis. Although these taxa are highly related on the genome level, they are adapted to distinct hosts and tissues. C. fetus subsp. fetus infects a diversity of hosts, including humans, and colonizes the gastrointestinal tract. In contrast, C. fetus subsp. venerealis is largely restricted to the bovine genital tract, causing epidemic abortion in these animals. In light of their close genetic relatedness, the specific niche preferences make the C. fetus subspecies an ideal model system to investigate the molecular basis of host adaptation. In this study, a subtractive-hybridization approach was applied to the genomes of the subspecies to identify different genes potentially underlying this specificity. The comparison revealed a genomic island uniquely present in C. fetus subsp. venerealis that harbors several genes indicative of horizontal transfer and that encodes the core components necessary for bacterial type IV secretion. Macromolecular transporters of this type deliver effector molecules to host cells, thereby contributing to virulence in various pathogens. Mutational inactivation of the putative secretion system confirmed its involvement in the pathogenicity of C. fetus subsp. venerealis. PMID:19897645

  2. Virulence and Immunity Orchestrated by the Global Gene Regulator sigL in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Pallab; Steinberg, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease in ruminants, a chronic enteric disease responsible for severe economic losses in the dairy industry. Global gene regulators, including sigma factors are important in regulating mycobacterial virulence. However, the biological significance of such regulators in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis rremains elusive. To better decipher the role of sigma factors in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenesis, we targeted a key sigma factor gene, sigL, activated in mycobacterium-infected macrophages. We interrogated an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ΔsigL mutant against a selected list of stressors that mimic the host microenvironments. Our data showed that sigL was important in maintaining bacterial survival under such stress conditions. Survival levels further reflected the inability of the ΔsigL mutant to persist inside the macrophage microenvironments. Additionally, mouse infection studies suggested a substantial role for sigL in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis virulence, as indicated by the significant attenuation of the ΔsigL-deficient mutant compared to the parental strain. More importantly, when the sigL mutant was tested for its vaccine potential, protective immunity was generated in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. Overall, our study highlights critical role of sigL in the pathogenesis and immunity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, a potential role that could be shared by similar proteins in other intracellular pathogens. PMID:24799632

  3. Evaluation and histological examination of a Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis small animal infection model.

    PubMed

    Koya, A; de Wet, S C; Turner, S; Cawdell-Smith, J; Venus, B; Greer, R M; Lew-Tabor, A E; Boe-Hansen, G B

    2015-04-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC), caused by Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, is associated with production losses in cattle worldwide. This study aimed to develop a reliable BGC guinea pig model to facilitate future studies of pathogenicity, abortion mechanisms and vaccine efficacy. Seven groups of five pregnant guinea pigs (1 control per group) were inoculated with one of three strains via intra-peritoneal (IP) or intra-vaginal routes. Samples were examined using culture, PCR and histology. Abortions ranged from 0% to 100% and re-isolation of causative bacteria from sampled sites varied with strain, dose of bacteria and time to abortion. Histology indicated metritis and placentitis, suggesting that the bacteria induce inflammation, placental detachment and subsequent abortion. Variation of virulence between strains was observed and determined by culture and abortion rates. IP administration of C. fetus subsp. venerealis to pregnant guinea pigs is a promising small animal model for the investigation of BGC abortion. PMID:25599935

  4. Intestinal colonization and competitive exclusion of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni in young chicks.

    PubMed

    Soerjadi, A S; Snoeyenbos, G H; Weinack, O M

    1982-01-01

    Colonization of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni was investigated in monoxenic and holoxenic chicks. In monoxenic chicks, major colonization was found in the crop and ceca, with populations in the ceca consistently reaching 10(9) colony-forming-units/ml of cecal contents over the 28-day test period. Bacteremia was found in most chicks, but no significant gross pathological lesions were detected. In holoxenic chicks, major colonization occurred only in the ceca, and no evidence of bacteremia was detected. Colonization by native gut microflora sharply reduced subsequent colonization by C. fetus subsp. jejuni. The protective mechanism is perhaps the same as that protective against paratyphoid salmonellae and pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli. PMID:7150145

  5. Comparison of selective media for primary isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, C M; Mitchell, S W; Potter, M E; Kaufmann, A F

    1981-01-01

    Three selective media, Skirrow, Butzler, and a modification of Butzler medium, were compared for the primary isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni. This organism was isolated from 87 of 347 specimens (72 from 240 dogs rectal swabs and 15 from 107 cats rectal swabs). The positive rate for dogs (30%) was twice as high as that for cats (14%). Skirrow and Butzler media were comparable in their isolation of C. fetus subsp. jejuni. A significantly higher rate of positive results was obtained with modified Butzler medium. The best combination of two media was that of modified Butzler and Skirrow media, which detected 98% of the isolates obtained. The percentage of Campylobacter-positive specimens was increased by 9% by holding primary isolation plates 72 h. Images PMID:7204549

  6. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: Characterization of the bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Danielle N.; Todorov, Svetoslav D.; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T.; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  7. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality. PMID:25763065

  8. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis PtpA Is an Endogenous Tyrosine Phosphatase Secreted during Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Horacio; Sun, Jim; Hmama, Zakaria; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive gene expression in prokaryotes is mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. These regulatory proteins mediate phosphorylation of histidine or aspartate in two-component systems and serine/threonine or tyrosine in eukaryotic and eukaryote-like protein kinase systems. The genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease, does not possess a defined tyrosine kinase. Nevertheless, it encodes for protein tyrosine phosphatases. Here, we report that Map1985, is a functional low-molecular tyrosine phosphatase that is secreted intracellularly upon macrophage infection. This finding suggests that Map1985 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by dephosphorylating essential macrophage signaling and/or adaptor molecules. PMID:16982836

  9. Immunological and Molecular Characterization of Susceptibility in Relationship to Bacterial Strain Differences in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus)

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, R.; Mackintosh, C. G.; Bakker, D.; Kopecna, M.; Pavlik, I.; Griffin, J. F. T.

    2006-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) infection, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, represents a major disease problem in farmed ruminants. Although JD has been well characterized in cattle and sheep, little is known of the infection dynamics or immunological response in deer. In this study, typing of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from intestinal lymphatic tissues from 74 JD-infected animals showed that clinical isolates of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from New Zealand farmed red deer were exclusively of the bovine strain genotype. The susceptibility of deer to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was further investigated by experimental oral-route infection studies using defined isolates of virulent bovine and ovine M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains. Oral inoculation with high (109 CFU/animal) or medium (107 CFU/animal) doses of the bovine strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis established 100% infection rates, compared to 69% infection following inoculation with a medium dose of the ovine strain. The high susceptibility of deer to the bovine strain of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was confirmed by a 50% infection rate following experimental inoculation with a low dose of bacteria (103 CFU/animal). This study is the first to report experimental M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in red deer, and it outlines the strong infectivity of bovine-strain M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates for cervines. PMID:16714585

  10. Avian wildlife reservoir of Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni, Yersinia spp., and Salmonella spp. in Norway.

    PubMed

    Kapperud, G; Rosef, O

    1983-02-01

    Cloacal swabs from 540 wild-living birds were cultured for Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni, Yersinia spp., and Salmonella spp. The carrier rates detected were as follows: C. fetus subsp. jejuni, 28.4%; Yersinia spp., 1.2%; and Salmonella spp., 0.8%. All birds were apparently healthy when captured. C. fetus subsp. jejuni was isolated from 11 of the 40 bird species examined. Among birds inhabiting the city of Oslo, the highest isolation rate was found in crows (Corvus corone cornix) (89.8%), followed by gulls (Larus spp.) (50.0%) and domestic pigeons (Columba livia domesticus) (4.2%). The gulls and crows scavenge on refuse dumps. High carrier rates were also detected among the following birds from nonurban, coastal areas: puffin (Fratercula arctica) (51.3%), common tern (Sterna hirundo) (5.6%), common gull (Larus canus) (18.9%), black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) (13.2%), and herring gull (Larus argentatus) (4.2%). The list of species harboring C. fetus subsp. jejuni also includes the Ural owl (Strix uralensis), goldeneye (Bucephala clangula), and reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus). The following five Yersinia strains were isolated: Y. kristensenii (two strains), Y. intermedia (two strains), and "Yersinia X2" (one strain). Four strains belonging to the genus Salmonella were isolated from three different species of gulls. These isolates were identified as S. typhimurium, S. indiana, and S. djugu. The results indicate that campylobacters are a normal component of the intestinal flora in several bird species, whereas Salmonella and Yersinia carriers are more sporadic. PMID:6338824

  11. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F.; Weibel, Douglas B.; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 103 and 5 × 104 cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus sciuri subsp. sciuri Strain Z8, Isolated from Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinjun; Zheng, Beiwen; Jiang, Haiyin; Kang, Yi; Cao, Qing; Ning, Huibin

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus sciuri subsp. sciuri strain Z8 was isolated from a skin wound infection of a patient with infective endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, the genome sequence of the species S. sciuri has not been previously studied. The complete genome sequence of strain Z8 includes a genome of 2,620,868 bp (32.43% GC content) without any plasmids. PMID:26205872

  13. Prophage lysin Ply30 protects mice from Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus infections.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fang; Li, Dezhi; Wang, Haojin; Ma, Zhe; Lu, Chengping; Dai, Jianjun

    2015-11-01

    Streptococcus suis and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus are capable of infecting humans and various animals, causing significant problems for the worldwide swine industry. As antibiotic resistance has increased, lysosomal enzymes encoded by phages have shown potential for use against pathogenic bacteria. In this study, a novel bacteriophage lysin, Ply30, encoded by the S. suis prophage phi30c, was recombinantly expressed and purified. Ply30 showed high bacteriolysis activity on S. suis and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus in vitro. The ratio of the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) with treatment versus the OD600 with no treatment for most tested S. suis and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains decreased from 1 to <0.3 and <0.5, respectively, within 1 h. The results of plate viability assays showed that treated bacteria suffered a 1- to 2-log decrease in CFU within 1 h. The optimal concentration of Ply30 was 50 μg/ml, and the optimal pH was 7. Moreover, Ply30 maintained high activity over a wide pH range (pH 6 to 10). The MICs of Ply30 against Streptococcus strains ranged from 16 to 512 μg/ml. In vivo, a 2-mg dose of Ply30 protected 90% (9/10 mice) of mice from infection with S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus and 80% (8/10 mice) of mice from infection with S. suis. Seven days after lysin Ply30 treatment, bacterial loads were significantly decreased in all tested organs and blood compared with those at 1 h postinfection without Ply30 treatment. Ply30 showed in vitro and in vivo antimicrobial efficiency and protected mice against two kinds of bacterial infections, indicating that Ply30 may be an effective therapeutic against streptococci. PMID:26253669

  14. Novel Phytases from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum ATCC 27919 and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697

    PubMed Central

    Tamayo-Ramos, Juan Antonio; Sanz-Penella, Juan Mario; Yebra, María J.

    2012-01-01

    Two novel phytases have been characterized from Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. The enzymes belong to a new subclass within the histidine acid phytases, are highly specific for the hydrolysis of phytate, and render myo-inositol triphosphate as the final hydrolysis product. They represent the first phytases characterized from this group of probiotic microorganisms, opening the possibilities for their use in the processing of high-phytate-content foods. PMID:22582052

  15. Physical map of the genome of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols).

    PubMed Central

    Walker, E M; Howell, J K; You, Y; Hoffmaster, A R; Heath, J D; Weinstock, G M; Norris, S J

    1995-01-01

    A physical map of the chromosome of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols), the causative agent of syphilis, was constructed from restriction fragments produced by NotI, SfiI, and SrfI. These rare-cutting restriction endonucleases cleaved the T. pallidum genome into 16, 8, and 15 fragments, respectively. Summation of the physical lengths of the fragments indicates that the chromosome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum is approximately 1,030 to 1,080 kbp in size. The physical map was constructed by hybridizing a variety of probes to Southern blots of single and double digests of T. pallidum genomic DNA separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis. Probes included cosmid clones constructed from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum genomic DNA, restriction fragments excised from gels, and selected genes. Physical mapping confirmed that the chromosome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum is circular, as the SfiI and SrfI maps formed complete circles. A total of 13 genes, including those encoding five membrane lipoproteins (tpn47, tpn41, tpn29-35, tpn17, and tpn15), a putative outer membrane porin (tpn50), the flagellar sheath and hook proteins (flaA and flgE), the cytoplasmic filament protein (cfpA), 16S rRNA (rrnA), a major sigma factor (rpoD), and a homolog of cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (cysS), have been localized in the physical map as a first step toward studying the genetic organization of this noncultivable pathogen. PMID:7896703

  16. Establishment of a functional genomics platform for Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli.

    PubMed

    Brumbley, Stevens M; Petrasovits, Lars A; Murphy, Rachel M; Nagel, Roland J; Candy, Judith M; Hermann, Scott R

    2004-02-01

    Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli, the causal agent of ratoon stunting disease in sugarcane, is a xylem-limited, nutritionally fastidious, slow growing, gram-positive coryneform bacterium. Because of the difficulties in growing this bacterium in pure culture, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis. Currently, the genome sequence of L. xyli subsp. xyli is being completed by the Agronomical and Environmental Genomes group from the Organization for Nucleotide Sequencing and Analysis in Brazil. To complement this work, we produced 712 Lxx::Tn4431 transposon mutants and sequenced flanking regions from 383 of these, using a rapid polymerase chain reaction-based approach. Tn4431 insertions appeared to be widespread throughout the L. xyli subsp. xyli genome; however, there were regions that had significantly higher concentrations of insertions. The Tn4431 mutant library was screened for individuals unable to colonize sugarcane, and one noncolonizing mutant was found. The mutant contained a transposon insertion disrupting two open reading frames (ORF), one of which had homology to an integral membrane protein from Mycobacterium leprae. Sequencing of the surrounding regions revealed two operons, pro and cyd, both of which are believed to play roles in disease. Complementation studies were carried out using the noncolonizing Lxx::Tn4431 mutant. The noncolonizing mutant was transformed with a cosmid containing 40 kbp of wild-type sequence, which included the two ORF disrupted in the mutant, and several transformants were subsequently able to colonize sugarcane. However, analysis of each of these transformants, before and after colonization, suggests that they have all undergone various recombinant events, obscuring the roles of these ORF in L. xyli subsp. xyli pathogenesis. PMID:14964531

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex Strain Griffin-1 from Quercus rubra in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianchi; Huang, Hong; Chang, Chung-Jan; Stenger, Drake C

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain Griffin-1, isolated from a red oak tree (Quercus rubra) in Georgia, is reported here. The bacterium has a genome size of 2,387,314 bp, with a G+C content of 51.7%. The Griffin-1 strain genome contains 2,903 predicted open reading frames and 50 RNA genes. PMID:24115539

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Genetically Distinct Human Isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis

    PubMed Central

    Evers, Caitlin; Patel, Khushali; Petrosyan, Varduhi; Morrison, Clay; Varghese, Viju; Chu, Randy A.; Baig, Aymen; Thompson, Erika J.; Chase, Michael; Hu, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    β-Hemolytic group C and group G streptococci (GCS-GGS; Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis) emerged as human pathogens in the late 1970s. We report here the draft genome sequences of four genetically distinct human strains of GCS-GGS isolated between the 1960s and 1980s. Comparative analysis of these genomes may provide a deeper understanding of GCS-GGS genome and virulence evolution. PMID:26430051

  19. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent). PMID:15811411

  20. Hare-to-human transmission of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, Germany.

    PubMed

    Otto, Peter; Kohlmann, Rebekka; Müller, Wolfgang; Julich, Sandra; Geis, Gabriele; Gatermann, Sören G; Peters, Martin; Wolf, Peter Johannes; Karlsson, Edvin; Forsman, Mats; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Tomaso, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    In November 2012, a group of 7 persons who participated in a hare hunt in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, acquired tularemia. Two F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates were cultivated from human and hare biopsy material. Both isolates belonged to the FTN002-00 genetic subclade (derived for single nucleotide polymorphisms B.10 and B.18), thus indicating likely hare-to-human transmission. PMID:25531286

  1. Field-Applicable Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Liljander, Anne; Yu, Mingyan; O'Brien, Elizabeth; Heller, Martin; Nepper, Julia F; Weibel, Douglas B; Gluecks, Ilona; Younan, Mario; Frey, Joachim; Falquet, Laurent; Jores, Joerg

    2015-09-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is a highly contagious disease caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae that affects goats in Africa and Asia. Current available methods for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma infection, including cultivation, serological assays, and PCR, are time-consuming and require fully equipped stationary laboratories, which make them incompatible with testing in the resource-poor settings that are most relevant to this disease. We report a rapid, specific, and sensitive assay employing isothermal DNA amplification using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) for the detection of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae. We developed the assay using a specific target sequence in M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, as found in the genome sequence of the field strain ILRI181 and the type strain F38 and that was further evidenced in 10 field strains from different geographical regions. Detection limits corresponding to 5 × 10(3) and 5 × 10(4) cells/ml were obtained using genomic DNA and bacterial culture from M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strain ILRI181, while no amplification was obtained from 71 related Mycoplasma isolates or from the Acholeplasma or the Pasteurella isolates, demonstrating a high degree of specificity. The assay produces a fluorescent signal within 15 to 20 min and worked well using pleural fluid obtained directly from CCPP-positive animals without prior DNA extraction. We demonstrate that the diagnosis of CCPP can be achieved, with a short sample preparation time and a simple read-out device that can be powered by a car battery, in <45 min in a simulated field setting. PMID:26085615

  2. Cytotoxic and antibacterial labdane-type diterpenes from the aerial parts of Cistus incanus subsp. creticus.

    PubMed

    Chinou, I; Demetzos, C; Harvala, C; Roussakis, C; Verbist, J F

    1994-02-01

    Seven labdane-type diterpenoids were isolated from the leaves of Cistus incanus subsp. creticus; their structures were established by spectroscopic means. All compounds were tested in vitro for their cytotoxicity against three cell line systems: KB, P-388; and NSCLC-N6. Their antibacterial and antifungal activities were tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosae, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Torulopsis glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans as well. PMID:8134413

  3. Geography of Genetic Structure in Barley Wild Relative Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Patrick; Reilley, Ann; Engels, Johannes M. M.; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Börner, Andreas; Pillen, Klaus; Richards, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Informed collecting, conservation, monitoring and utilization of genetic diversity requires knowledge of the distribution and structure of the variation occurring in a species. Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) Thell., a primary wild relative of barley, is an important source of genetic diversity for barley improvement and co-occurs with the domesticate within the center of origin. We studied the current distribution of genetic diversity and population structure in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan and investigated whether it is correlated with either spatial or climatic variation inferred from publically available climate layers commonly used in conservation and ecogeographical studies. The genetic structure of 32 populations collected in 2012 was analyzed with 37 SSRs. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified. Populations were characterized by admixture and high allelic richness, and genetic diversity was concentrated in the northern part of the study area. Genetic structure, spatial location and climate were not correlated. This may point out a limitation in using large scale climatic data layers to predict genetic diversity, especially as it is applied to regional genetic resources collections in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum. PMID:27513459

  4. Identification of gene expression profile during fertilization in Brassica campestris subsp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Jiang, Jianxia; Qiu, Lin; Miao, Ying; Yao, Lina; Cao, Jiashu

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization is controlled by a complex gene regulatory network. To study the fertilization mechanism, we determined time courses of the four developmental stages of fertilization in Chinese cabbage pak-choi (Brassica campestris subsp. chinensis) by cytological observation. We then used the Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray to characterize the gene expression profiles of pollinated and unpollinated pistils in B. campestris subsp. chinensis. The result showed 44 up-regulated genes and 33 down-regulated genes in pollinated pistils compared with unpollinated pistils. Gene ontology analysis identified 20% of the up-regulated genes as belonging to the category of cell wall metabolism. We compared the up-regulated genes in pollinated pistils with previously identified pollen development related genes. Ten genes were found to be in common, which were termed as continuously expressed genes, in the two processes in the present article. Their expression patterns during pollen development and fertilization processes were then verified by RT-PCR. One of the continuously expressed genes, the homologous gene of At3g01270 in B. campestris subsp. chinensis, was confirmed as specifically expressed in microspores and pollinated pistils by using in situ hybridization. The potential biological functions of the other continuously expressed genes were also discussed. PMID:23379337

  5. Phobalysin, a Small β-Pore-Forming Toxin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Amable J; von Hoven, Gisela; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Füser, Sabine; Boller, Klaus; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R; Husmann, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, an important pathogen of marine animals, may also cause septicemia or hyperaggressive necrotizing fasciitis in humans. We previously showed that hemolysin genes are critical for virulence of this organism in mice and fish. In the present study, we characterized the hlyA gene product, a putative small β-pore-forming toxin, and termed it phobalysin P (PhlyP), for "photobacterial lysin encoded on a plasmid." PhlyP formed stable oligomers and small membrane pores, causing efflux of K(+), with no significant leakage of lactate dehydrogenase but entry of vital dyes. The latter feature distinguished PhlyP from the related Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Attack by PhlyP provoked a loss of cellular ATP, attenuated translation, and caused profound morphological changes in epithelial cells. In coculture experiments with epithelial cells, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae led to rapid hemolysin-dependent membrane permeabilization. Unexpectedly, hemolysins also promoted the association of P. damselae subsp. damselae with epithelial cells. The collective observations of this study suggest that membrane-damaging toxins commonly enhance bacterial adherence. PMID:26303391

  6. Isolation and characterization of chromosomal promoters of Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Slos, P; Bourquin, J C; Lemoine, Y; Mercenier, A

    1991-01-01

    A promoter probe vector, pTG244, was constructed with the aim of isolating transcription initiation signals from Streptococcus thermophilus (Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus). pTG244 is based on the Escherichia coli-streptococcus shuttle vector pTG222, into which the promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene of Bacillus pumilus (cat-86) was cloned. Random Sau3A fragments from the S. thermophilus A054 chromosomal DNA were cloned upstream of the cat-86 gene by using E. coli as the host. The pool of recombinant plasmids were introduced into S. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in order to search for promoter activity in these hosts. For S. thermophilus, it was necessary to first select erythromycin-resistant transformants and then to screen for chloramphenicol resistance among these. Direct selection of chloramphenicol-resistant clones was, however, possible in L. lactis subsp. lactis. Six fragments exhibiting promoter activity were characterized in S. thermophilus by measuring the levels of cat-86 transcription and/or chloramphenicol acetyltransferase specific activity. Three of the promoter-carrying fragments were sequenced. The 5' ends of their corresponding mRNAs were determined by S1 mapping and shown to correspond to a purine residue in all cases. Upstream from these potential transcription start points, sequences homologous to the E. coli sigma 70 and the Bacillus subtilis vegetative sigma 43 (or sigma A) consensus promoters were identified. Images PMID:1854195

  7. Phobalysin, a Small β-Pore-Forming Toxin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; von Hoven, Gisela; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Füser, Sabine; Boller, Klaus; Lemos, Manuel L.; Osorio, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, an important pathogen of marine animals, may also cause septicemia or hyperaggressive necrotizing fasciitis in humans. We previously showed that hemolysin genes are critical for virulence of this organism in mice and fish. In the present study, we characterized the hlyA gene product, a putative small β-pore-forming toxin, and termed it phobalysin P (PhlyP), for “photobacterial lysin encoded on a plasmid.” PhlyP formed stable oligomers and small membrane pores, causing efflux of K+, with no significant leakage of lactate dehydrogenase but entry of vital dyes. The latter feature distinguished PhlyP from the related Vibrio cholerae cytolysin. Attack by PhlyP provoked a loss of cellular ATP, attenuated translation, and caused profound morphological changes in epithelial cells. In coculture experiments with epithelial cells, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae led to rapid hemolysin-dependent membrane permeabilization. Unexpectedly, hemolysins also promoted the association of P. damselae subsp. damselae with epithelial cells. The collective observations of this study suggest that membrane-damaging toxins commonly enhance bacterial adherence. PMID:26303391

  8. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  9. New Type of Antimicrobial Protein Produced by the Plant Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanliang; Ma, Ping; Holtsmark, Ingrid; Skaugen, Morten; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2013-01-01

    It has previously been shown that the tomato pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis secretes a 14-kDa protein, C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis AMP-I (CmmAMP-I), that inhibits growth of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the causal agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. Using sequences obtained from tryptic fragments, we have identified the gene encoding CmmAMP-I and we have recombinantly produced the protein with an N-terminal intein tag. The gene sequence showed that CmmAMP-I contains a typical N-terminal signal peptide for Sec-dependent secretion. The recombinant protein was highly active, with 50% growth inhibition (IC50) of approximately 10 pmol, but was not toxic to potato leaves or tubers. CmmAMP-I does not resemble any known protein and thus represents a completely new type of bacteriocin. Due to its high antimicrobial activity and its very narrow inhibitory spectrum, CmmAMP-1 may be of interest in combating potato ring rot disease. PMID:23851100

  10. Survival and Dormancy of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Richard J.; Marshall, D. Jeff; Nicholls, Paul J.; Marsh, Ian B.; Reddacliff, Leslie A.

    2004-01-01

    The survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was studied by culture of fecal material sampled at intervals for up to 117 weeks from soil and grass in pasture plots and boxes. Survival for up to 55 weeks was observed in a dry fully shaded environment, with much shorter survival times in unshaded locations. Moisture and application of lime to soil did not affect survival. UV radiation was an unlikely factor, but infrared wavelengths leading to diurnal temperature flux may be the significant detrimental component that is correlated with lack of shade. The organism survived for up to 24 weeks on grass that germinated through infected fecal material applied to the soil surface in completely shaded boxes and for up to 9 weeks on grass in 70% shade. The observed patterns of recovery in three of four experiments and changes in viable counts were indicative of dormancy, a hitherto unreported property of this taxon. A dps-like genetic element and relA, which are involved in dormancy responses in other mycobacteria, are present in the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome sequence, providing indirect evidence for the existence of physiological mechanisms enabling dormancy. However, survival of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the environment is finite, consistent with its taxonomic description as an obligate parasite of animals. PMID:15128561

  11. Enhancement of Exopolysaccharide Production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772 with a Simplified Defined Medium.

    PubMed

    Grobben, G J; Chin-Joe, I; Kitzen, V A; Boels, I C; Boer, F; Sikkema, J; Smith, M R; de Bont, J A

    1998-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the medium requirements for growth and production of exopolysaccharides by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772. The strain was grown in batch cultures on a chemically defined medium, and the technique of single omission of medium components was applied to determine the nutritional requirements. The omission of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, or glycine affected growth only slightly, and the omission of glutamine, asparagine, or threonine resulted in a stronger reduction of the growth. All the other amino acids were essential. Multiple omissions of amino acids caused an almost complete loss of growth. L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus required only riboflavin, calcium pantothenate, and nicotinic acid as individual vitamins. Surprisingly, when only these vitamins were present in the medium and other vitamins were not, less growth was observed than in the complete medium but the amount of exopolysaccharide produced was significantly greater. These observations were studied in more detail with a simplified defined medium in which L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus was able to grow and produce exopolysaccharides. Although the final optical density in the simplified medium was lower, the production of exopolysaccharides was about twofold higher than in the complete medium. PMID:16349540

  12. Geography of Genetic Structure in Barley Wild Relative Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Imke; Reeves, Patrick; Reilley, Ann; Engels, Johannes M M; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Börner, Andreas; Pillen, Klaus; Richards, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Informed collecting, conservation, monitoring and utilization of genetic diversity requires knowledge of the distribution and structure of the variation occurring in a species. Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) Thell., a primary wild relative of barley, is an important source of genetic diversity for barley improvement and co-occurs with the domesticate within the center of origin. We studied the current distribution of genetic diversity and population structure in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan and investigated whether it is correlated with either spatial or climatic variation inferred from publically available climate layers commonly used in conservation and ecogeographical studies. The genetic structure of 32 populations collected in 2012 was analyzed with 37 SSRs. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified. Populations were characterized by admixture and high allelic richness, and genetic diversity was concentrated in the northern part of the study area. Genetic structure, spatial location and climate were not correlated. This may point out a limitation in using large scale climatic data layers to predict genetic diversity, especially as it is applied to regional genetic resources collections in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum. PMID:27513459

  13. Ingestion and Adsorption of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis by Gammarus lacustris in the Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brazner, John C.; Anderson, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Several groups of Gammarus lacustris adults were exposed to solutions containing 0.5 and 5.0 mg of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis per liter for 1- or 24-h periods by using traditional static bioassay exposure procedures. During a postexposure holding period, fecal pellets were removed and plated on tryptic soy agar to determine B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spore content. The experiments verified that traditional exposure procedures assure ingestion of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores and provided a mean dose estimate of 1,948 spores ingested per test animal with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 891 to 4,296 (1-h exposure, 5.0 mg/liter). It was also found that dose level is highly dependent upon both exposure duration and concentration and that relatively short exposures can result in a relatively long-term retention of spores postexposure (≥30 days). Body burden experiments established that large numbers of spores adsorb to the bodies of test animals during exposure and may in part explain the long-term retention of spores in the test system postexposure. These results imply that in field applications of microbial control agents, toxicologically unaffected but exposed organisms might transport the agent to untreated sites, expanding the effective treatment area and the number of organisms exposed. PMID:16347242

  14. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongling; Zhuo, Tao; Fan, Xiaojing; Zou, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri. PMID:26950296

  15. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida haem receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Naka, H; Hirono, I; Aoki, T

    2005-02-01

    A haem receptor gene from Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida (formerly known as Pasteurella piscicida) has been cloned, sequenced and analysed for its function. The gene, designated as pph, has an open reading frame consisting of 2154 bp, a predicted 718 amino acid residues and exists as a single copy. It is homologous with the haem receptors of Vibrio anguillarum hupA, V. cholerae hutA, V. mimicus mhuA and V. vulnificus hupA at 32.7, 32.7, 45.6 and 30.9%, respectively, and is highly conserved, consisting of a Phe-Arg-Ala-Pro sequence (FRAP), an iron transport related molecule (TonB) and a Asn-Pron-Asn-Leu sequence (NPNL), binding motifs associated with haem receptors. As a single gene knockout mutant P. damselae subsp. piscicida was able to bind haem in the absence of pph, suggesting that other receptors may be involved in its iron transport system. This study shows that the P. damselae subsp. piscicida pph belongs to the haem receptor family, is conserved and that its iron-binding system may involve more than one receptor. PMID:15705153

  16. Variants of a genomic island in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida link isolates with their geographical origins.

    PubMed

    Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Vincent, Antony T; Trudel, Mélanie V; Brochu, Francis; Boyle, Brian; Tanaka, Katherine H; Attéré, Sabrina A; Jubinville, Éric; Loch, Thomas P; Winters, Andrew D; Faisal, Mohamed; Frenette, Michel; Derome, Nicolas; Charette, Steve J

    2015-01-30

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a fish pathogen. Analysis of its genomic characteristics is required to determine the worldwide distribution of the various populations of this bacterium. Genomic alignments between the 01-B526 pathogenic strain and the A449 reference strain have revealed a 51-kb chromosomal insertion in 01-B526. This insertion (AsaGEI1a) has been identified as a new genomic island (GEI) bearing prophage genes. PCR assays were used to detect this GEI in a collection of 139 A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates. Three forms of this GEI (AsaGEI1a, AsaGEI1b, AsaGEI2a) are now known based on this analysis and the sequencing of the genomes of seven additional isolates. A new prophage (prophage 3) associated with AsaGEI2a was also discovered. Each GEI appeared to be strongly associated with a specific geographic region. AsaGEI1a and AsaGEI2a were exclusively found in North American isolates, except for one European isolate bearing AsaGEI2a. The majority of the isolates bearing AsaGEI1b or no GEI were from Europe. Prophage 3 has also a particular geographic distribution and was found only in North American isolates. We demonstrated that A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida possesses unsuspected elements of genomic heterogeneity that could be used as indicators to determine the geographic origins of isolates of this bacterium. PMID:25480167

  17. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  18. Lymphoproliferative and Gamma Interferon Responses to Stress-Regulated Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ratna B.; Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; de Silva, Kumudika; Bannantine, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease in ruminants is a chronic infection of the intestines caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. An important strategy to control disease is early detection, and a potentially efficient method for early detection is measurement of cell-mediated immune responses developed by the host in response to exposure or infection. One method is to measure lymphoproliferation and cytokine release from the host cells when exposed to the organism or parts of the organism. In this study, 10 recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins known to be upregulated under in vitro stress conditions were evaluated by examining their ability to evoke memory as a result of exposure by vaccination or oral challenge with live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Out of 10 proteins, MAP2698c was found to induce higher cell-mediated immune responses in vaccinated and challenged sheep in comparison to healthy controls. The findings suggest that not all stress-regulated proteins have the diagnostic potential to detect cell-mediated immune responses in ovine paratuberculosis. PMID:24695774

  19. Mannosylated Lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis Alters the Inflammatory Response by Bovine Macrophages and Suppresses Killing of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Avium Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Cleverson; Davis, William C.; Eckstein, Torsten M.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Weiss, Douglas J.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the mechanisms through which pathogenic mycobacteria interfere with macrophage activation and phagosome maturation have shown that engagement of specific membrane receptors with bacterial ligands is the initiating event. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (Man-LAM) has been identified as one of the ligands that modulates macrophage function. We evaluated the effects of Man-LAM derived from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) on bovine macrophages. Man-LAM induced a rapid and prolonged expression of IL-10 message as well as transient expression of TNF-α. Preincubation with Man-LAM for up to 16 h did not suppress expression of IL-12 in response to interferon-γ. Evaluation of the effect of Man-LAM on phagosome acidification, phagosome maturation, and killing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) showed that preincubation of macrophages with Man-LAM before addition of MAA inhibited phagosome acidification, phagolysosome fusion, and reduced killing. Analysis of signaling pathways provided indirect evidence that inhibition of killing was associated with activation of the MAPK-p38 signaling pathway but not the pathway involved in regulation of expression of IL-10. These results support the hypothesis that MAP Man-LAM is one of the virulence factors facilitating survival of MAP in macrophages. PMID:24098744

  20. Co-culturing of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei with a Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii mutant to make high cell density for increased lactate productivity from cassava bagasse hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    John, Rojan Pappy; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2011-03-01

    To increase the productivity of lactic acid, a co-culture of lactobacilli was made by mixing 1:1 ratio of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei and a fast growing L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii mutant. The culture was embedded on to polyurethane foam (PUF) cubes as a biofilm and used for fermentation. In order to prevent the cell leakage, the PUF cubes were further entrapped in calcium cross-linked alginate. The maximum lactic acid production using a high cell density free culture was >38 g l(-1) from ~40 g l(-1) of reducing sugar within 12 h of fermentation. Using PUF biofilms, the same yield of lactic acid attained after 24 h. When the cubes were further coated with alginate it took 36 h for the maximum yield. Even though, the productivity is slightly lesser with the alginate coating, cell leakage was decreased and cubes were reused without much decrease in production in repeated batches. Using a conventional control inoculum (3%, w/v), it took 120 h to yield same amount of lactic acid. PMID:20972788

  1. Morphological leaf variability in natural populations of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica along climatic gradient: new features to update Pistacia atlantica subsp. atlantica key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Zerey-Belaskri, Asma; Benhassaini, Hachemi

    2016-04-01

    The effect of bioclimate range on the variation in Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica leaf morphology was studied on 16 sites in Northwest Algeria. The study examined biometrically mature leaves totaling 3520 compound leaves. Fifteen characters (10 quantitative and 5 qualitative) were assessed on each leaf. For each quantitative character, the nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine relative magnitude of variation at each level of the nested hierarchy. The correlation between the climatic parameters and the leaf morphology was examined. The statistical analysis applied on the quantitative leaf characters showed highly significant variation at the within-site level and between-site variation. The correlation coefficient ( r) showed also an important correlation between climatic parameters and leaf morphology. The results of this study exhibited several values reported for the first time on the species, such as the length and the width of the leaf (reaching up to 24.5 cm/21.9 cm), the number of leaflets (up to 18 leaflets/leaf), and the petiole length of the terminal leaflet (reaching up to 3.4 cm). The original findings of this study are used to update the P. atlantica subsp. atlantica identification key.

  2. Morphological leaf variability in natural populations of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica along climatic gradient: new features to update Pistacia atlantica subsp. atlantica key.

    PubMed

    El Zerey-Belaskri, Asma; Benhassaini, Hachemi

    2016-04-01

    The effect of bioclimate range on the variation in Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica leaf morphology was studied on 16 sites in Northwest Algeria. The study examined biometrically mature leaves totaling 3520 compound leaves. Fifteen characters (10 quantitative and 5 qualitative) were assessed on each leaf. For each quantitative character, the nested analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine relative magnitude of variation at each level of the nested hierarchy. The correlation between the climatic parameters and the leaf morphology was examined. The statistical analysis applied on the quantitative leaf characters showed highly significant variation at the within-site level and between-site variation. The correlation coefficient (r) showed also an important correlation between climatic parameters and leaf morphology. The results of this study exhibited several values reported for the first time on the species, such as the length and the width of the leaf (reaching up to 24.5 cm/21.9 cm), the number of leaflets (up to 18 leaflets/leaf), and the petiole length of the terminal leaflet (reaching up to 3.4 cm). The original findings of this study are used to update the P. atlantica subsp. atlantica identification key. PMID:26522787

  3. Stable transformation of the gram-positive phytopathogenic bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus with several cloning vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Laine, M J; Nakhei, H; Dreier, J; Lehtilä, K; Meletzus, D; Eichenlaub, R; Metzler, M C

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe transformation of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus, the potato ring rot bacterium, with plasmid vectors. Three of the plasmids used, pDM100, pDM302, and pDM306, contain the origin of replication from pCM1, a native plasmid of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. We constructed two new cloning vectors, pHN205 and pHN216, by using the origin of replication of pCM2, another native plasmid of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. Plasmids pDM302, pHN205, and pHN216 were stably maintained without antibiotic selection in various strains of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus. We observed that for a single plasmid, different strains of C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus showed significantly different transformation efficiencies. We also found unexplained strain-to-strain differences in stability with various plasmid constructions containing different arrangements of antibiotic resistance genes and origins of replication. We examined the effect of a number of factors on transformation efficiency. The best transformation efficiencies were obtained when C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus cells were grown on DM agar plates, harvested during the early exponential growth phase, and used fresh (without freezing) for electroporation. The maximal transformation efficiency obtained was 4.6 x 10(4) CFU/microgram of pHN216 plasmid DNA. To demonstrate the utility of this transformation system, we cloned a beta-1,4-endoglucanase-encoding gene from C. michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus into pHN216. When this construction, pHN216:C8, was electroporated into competent cells of a cellulase-deficient mutant, it restored cellulase production to almost wild-type levels. PMID:8633849

  4. Reclassification of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820 as Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev., designation of ATCC 334 as the neotype of L. casei subsp. casei, and rejection of the name Lactobacillus paracasei.

    PubMed

    Dicks, L M; Du Plessis, E M; Dellaglio, F; Lauer, E

    1996-01-01

    The type strain of Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei (ATCC 393) exhibits low levels of DNA homology with other strains of L. casei subsp. casei (8 to 46%) and strains of Lactobacillus paracasei (30 to 50%), but exhibits a level of DNA similarity of 80% with Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 15820, the original type strain of "Lactobacterium zeae" Kuznetsov 1959. Strains ATCC 393T (T = type strain) and ATCC 15820T are members of one protein profile cluster that is separate from the other Lactobacillus spp. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR profile of strain ATCC 393T is also different from the profiles obtained for the other species. L. casei ATCC 334T is genetically closely related to L. casei subsp. casei strains (71 to 97%) and L. paracasei strains (71 to 91%), is a member of the same protein profile cluster as these organisms, and shares several DNA amplicons with L. paracasei strains. On the basis of these results, we propose that L. casei subsp. casei ATCC 393T and L. rhamnosus ATCC 15820 should be reclassified as members of Lactobacillus zeae nom. rev. (type strain, ATCC 15820), that strain ATCC 334 should be designated the neotype strain of L. casei subsp. casei, and that the name L. paracasei should be rejected. PMID:8573516

  5. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T). PMID:26763962

  6. Novel Feature of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Highlighted by Characterization of the Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Lefrancois, Louise H.; Bodier, Christelle C.; Cochard, Thierry; Canepa, Sylvie; Raze, Dominique; Lanotte, Philippe; Sevilla, Iker A.; Stevenson, Karen; Behr, Marcel A.; Locht, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis comprises two genotypically defined groups, known as the cattle (C) and sheep (S) groups. Recent studies have reported phenotypic differences between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis groups C and S, including growth rates, infectivity for macrophages, and iron metabolism. In this study, we investigated the genotypes and biological properties of the virulence factor heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) for both groups. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, HBHA is a major adhesin involved in mycobacterium-host interactions and extrapulmonary dissemination of infection. To investigate HBHA in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, we studied hbhA polymorphisms by fragment analysis using the GeneMapper technology across a large collection of isolates genotyped by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-IS900) analyses. Furthermore, we analyzed the structure-function relationships of recombinant HBHA proteins of types C and S by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses. In silico analysis revealed two forms of HBHA, corresponding to the prototype genomes for the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This observation was confirmed using GeneMapper on 85 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, including 67 strains of type C and 18 strains of type S. We found that HBHAs from all type C strains contain a short C-terminal domain, while those of type S present a long C-terminal domain, similar to that produced by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The purification of recombinant HBHA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis of both types by heparin-Sepharose chromatography highlighted a correlation between their affinities for heparin and the lengths of their C-terminal domains, which was confirmed by SPR analysis. Thus, types C and S of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis may be

  7. Prevalence and Acquisition of the Genes for Zoocin A and Zoocin A Resistance in Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Anna-Lee D.; Simmonds, Robin S.; Gargis, Amy S.; Sloan, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Zoocin A is a streptococcolytic enzyme produced by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus strain 4881. The zoocin A gene (zooA) and the gene specifying resistance to zoocin A (zif) are adjacent on the chromosome and are divergently transcribed. Twenty-four S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains were analyzed to determine the genetic difference between three previously characterized as zoocin A producers (strains 4881, 9g and 9h) and the twenty-one non-producers. LT-PCR and Southern hybridization studies revealed that none of the non-producer strains possessed zooA or zif. RAPD and PFGE showed that the 24 strains were a genetically diverse population with 8 RAPD profiles. S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains 9g and 9h appeared genetically identical to each other, but quite different from 4881. Sequences derived from 4881 and 9g showed that zooA and zif were integrated into the chromosome adjacent to the gene flaR. A comparison of these sequences with the genome sequences of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus strains H70 and MGCS10565 and S. equi subsp. equi strain 4047 suggests that flaR flanks a region of genome plasticity in this species. PMID:19357799

  8. Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and Comparison of Serological Methods for Its Sensitive Detection on Potato Tubers.

    PubMed

    Gorris, M T; Alarcon, B; Lopez, M M; Cambra, M

    1994-06-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica have been produced. One, called 4G4, reacted with high specificity for serogroup I of E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, the most common serogroup on potato tubers in different serological assays. Eighty-six strains belonging to different E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica serogroups were assayed. Some strains of serogroup XXII also reacted positively. No cross-reactions were observed against other species of plant pathogenic bacteria or 162 saprophytic bacteria from potato tubers. Only one strain of E. chrysanthemi from potato cross-reacted. A comparison of several serological techniques to detect E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica on potato tubers was performed with MAb 4G4 or polyclonal antibodies. The organism was extracted directly from potato peels of artificially inoculated tubers by soaking or selective enrichment under anaerobiosis in a medium with polypectate. MAb 4G4 was able to detect specifically 240 E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica cells per ml by indirect immunofluorescence and immunofluorescence colony staining and after soaking by ELISA-DAS (double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) after enrichment. The same amount of cells was detected by using immunolectrotransfer with polyclonal antibodies, and E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. carotovora were distinguished by the latter technique. ELISA-DAS using MAb 4G4 with an enrichment step also efficiently detected E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica in naturally infected tubers and plants. PMID:16349293

  9. Nineteen Whole-Genome Assemblies of Yersinia pestis subsp. microtus, Including Representatives of Biovars caucasica, talassica, hissarica, altaica, xilingolensis, and ulegeica.

    PubMed

    Kislichkina, Angelina A; Bogun, Aleksandr G; Kadnikova, Lidiya A; Maiskaya, Nadezhda V; Platonov, Mikhail E; Anisimov, Nikolai V; Galkina, Elena V; Dentovskaya, Svetlana V; Anisimov, Andrey P

    2015-01-01

    The etiologic agent of plague, Yersinia pestis, includes two subspecies, of which Y. pestis subsp. microtus contains the strains that cause only occasional diseases in humans that are not accompanied by human-to-human transmission. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of 19 Y. pestis strains (across 6 biovars of Y. pestis subsp. microtus). PMID:26634751

  10. Modulation of Cytokine Gene Expression and Secretion During the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modulation of cytokine gene expression and secretion during the periparturient period in dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Technical abstract Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more t...

  11. Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in Lactose-Grown Chemostat Cocultures

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J. H.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Pronk, Jack T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Bron, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations. PMID:23872557

  12. Activation of the classical and alternative pathways of complement by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and Treponema vincentii.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T J

    1987-09-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro studies have indicated that complement plays an important role in the syphilitic immune responses. Few quantitative data are available concerning activation of the classical pathway by Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, and no information is available on treponemal activation of the alternative pathway. Activation of both pathways was compared by using T. pallidum subsp. pallidum and the nonpathogen T. vincentii. With rabbit and human sources of complement, both organisms rapidly activated the classical pathway, as shown by hemolysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C4a. With human sources of complement, both organisms also activated the alternative pathway, as shown by hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes and by the generation of soluble C3a in the presence of magnesium ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). During incubation, organisms remained actively mobile and did not lyse, indicating that activation was a function of complement reactivity with the intact outer treponemal surface. In addition, freshly harvested T. pallidum subsp. pallidum immediately activated both pathways of complement; preincubation of organisms did not enhance complement reactivity. T. vincentii was a more potent activator of this pathway. T. pallidum subsp. pallidum contained almost four times as much surface sialic acid as T. vincentii did. When sialic acid was enzymatically removed from T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, enhanced activation of the alternative pathway was detected. It is proposed that T. pallidum subsp. pallidum retards complement-mediated damage by the alternative pathway through surface-associated sialic acid. This may be an important virulence determinant that enables these organisms to readily disseminate through the bloodstream to infect other tissues. PMID:3305362

  13. Persistence and Decontamination of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii Spores on Corroded Iron in a Model Drinking Water System▿

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Jeffrey G.; Rice, Eugene W.; Bishop, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    Persistence of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores on corroded iron coupons in drinking water was studied using a biofilm annular reactor. Spores were inoculated at 106 CFU/ml in the dechlorinated reactor bulk water. The dechlorination allowed for observation of the effects of hydraulic shear and biofilm sloughing on persistence. Approximately 50% of the spores initially adhered to the corroded iron surface were not detected after 1 month. Addition of a stable 10 mg/liter free chlorine residual after 1 month led to a 2-log10 reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii, but levels on the coupons quickly stabilized thereafter. Increasing the free chlorine concentration to 25 or 70 mg/liter had no additional effect on inactivation. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores injected in the presence of a typical distribution system chlorine residual (∼0.75 mg/liter) resulted in a steady reduction of adhered B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii over 1 month, but levels on the coupons eventually stabilized. Adding elevated chlorine levels (10, 25, and 70 mg/liter) after 1 month had no effect on the rate of inactivation. Decontamination with elevated free chlorine levels immediately after spore injection resulted in a 3-log10 reduction within 2 weeks, but the rate of inactivation leveled off afterward. This indicates that free chlorine did not reach portions of the corroded iron surface where B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores had adhered. B. atrophaeus subsp. globigii spores are capable of persisting for an extended time in the presence of high levels of free chlorine. PMID:17308186

  14. Salmonella enterica Suppresses Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Population and Soft Rot Progression by Acidifying the Microaerophilic Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Grace; Charkowski, Amy O.; Barak, Jeri D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although enteric human pathogens are usually studied in the context of their animal hosts, a significant portion of their life cycle occurs on plants. Plant disease alters the phyllosphere, leading to enhanced growth of human pathogens; however, the impact of human pathogens on phytopathogen biology and plant health is largely unknown. To characterize the interaction between human pathogens and phytobacterial pathogens in the phyllosphere, we examined the interactions between Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Salmonella enterica or Escherichia coli O157:H7 with regard to bacterial populations, soft rot progression, and changes in local pH. The presence of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum enhanced the growth of both S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 on leaves. However, in a microaerophilic environment, S. enterica reduced P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum populations and soft rot progression by moderating local environmental pH. Reduced soft rot was not due to S. enterica proteolytic activity. Limitations on P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum growth, disease progression, and pH elevation were not observed on leaves coinoculated with E. coli O157:H7 or when leaves were coinoculated with S. enterica in an aerobic environment. S. enterica also severely undermined the relationship between the phytobacterial population and disease progression of a P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum budB mutant defective in the 2,3-butanediol pathway for acid neutralization. Our results show that S. enterica and E. coli O157:H7 interact differently with the enteric phytobacterial pathogen P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. S. enterica inhibition of soft rot progression may conceal a rapidly growing human pathogen population. Whereas soft rotted produce can alert consumers to the possibility of food-borne pathogens, healthy-looking produce may entice consumption of contaminated vegetables. PMID:23404399

  15. A negative regulator mediates quorum-sensing control of exopolysaccharide production in Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    von Bodman, S B; Majerczak, D R; Coplin, D L

    1998-06-23

    Classical quorum-sensing (autoinduction) regulation, as exemplified by the lux system of Vibrio fischeri, requires N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals to stimulate cognate transcriptional activators for the cell density-dependent expression of specific target gene systems. For Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, a bacterial pathogen of sweet corn and maize, the extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) stewartan is a major virulence factor, and its production is controlled by quorum sensing in a population density-dependent manner. Two genes, esaI and esaR, encode essential regulatory proteins for quorum sensing. EsaI is the AHL signal synthase, and EsaR is the cognate gene regulator. esaI, DeltaesaR, and DeltaesaI-esaR mutations were constructed to establish the regulatory role of EsaR. We report here that strains containing an esaR mutation produce high levels of EPS independently of cell density and in the absence of the AHL signal. Our data indicate that quorum-sensing regulation in P. s. subsp. stewartii, in contrast to most other described systems, uses EsaR to repress EPS synthesis at low cell density, and that derepression requires micromolar amounts of AHL. In addition, derepressed esaR strains, which synthesize EPS constitutively at low cell densities, were significantly less virulent than the wild-type parent. This finding suggests that quorum sensing in P. s. subsp. stewartii may be a mechanism to delay the expression of EPS during the early stages of infection so that it does not interfere with other mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:9636211

  16. Phytochemical Composition and Antinociceptive Activity of Bauhinia glauca subsp. hupehana in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinlong; Zhao, Qizhi; Wei, Lei; Yang, Yu; Xu, Rui; Yu, Nengjiang; Zhao, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    In traditional medicine, Bauhinia glauca subsp. hupehana has long been used as an analgesic agent in China. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the ethanol extract of the aerial parts of B. glauca subsp. hupehana (BHE) in rats and its chemical fingerprint. The antinociceptive activity of BHE was assessed in mice using chemically and heat–induced pain models, such as the acetic acid–induced writhing, hot plate, tail–flick and glutamate tests. Naltrexone hydrochloride, a non–selective opioid receptor antagonist, was utilized to determine the involvement of the opioid system. In addition to this, the involvements of the cGMP and ATP–sensitive K+ channel pathways were also detected using methylene blue and glibenclamide. The oral administration of BHE (at doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) produced significant and dose–related inhibitions in both the chemically and heat–induced pain models. Interestingly, in the abdominal constriction test, when the dose of BHE was increased to 800 mg/kg (p.o., n = 10), the inhibition rate was 100%. The antinociceptive mechanism may involve the cGMP pathway and ATP sensitive K+ channel pathway. The central antinociceptive effect was not antagonized by naltrexone. One phenolic acid, one lignin and five flavonoids were isolated from BHE. The antinociceptive activity of BHE was most likely due to the presence of the flavonoids. The acute toxicity results showed that BHE was safe at a high dose (2 g/kg, p.o.). The current investigation demonstrates that B. glauca subsp. hupehana is a potential candidate for the development of novel, non–opioid, analgesic phytomedicines. PMID:25658740

  17. Phylogeography and seed dispersal in islands: the case of Rumex bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis (Polygonaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Talavera, María; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Arista, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Rumex bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis is an endemic taxon to Macaronesia with diaspore polymorphism. The origin and colonizing route of this taxon in Macaronesia was studied using molecular data and information on diaspore types. Methods Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was used in 260 plants from 22 populations of R. bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis, four from the Madeiran archipelago and 18 from the Canary archipelago. Diaspore production was analysed in 9–50 plants from each population used for AFLP analysis. One hundred and one plants from the Madeiran archipelago and 375 plants from the Canary Islands were studied. For each plant the type of diaspore produced was recorded. Key Results Overall populations had low genetic diversity but they showed a geographical pattern of genetic diversity that was higher in the older eastern islands than in the younger western ones. Two types of dispersible diaspores were found: in the eastern Canary islands (Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and Gran Canaria), plants produced exclusively long-dispersible diaspores, whereas in the western Canary islands (Tenerife, La Gomera, El Hierro) and the Madeiran archipelago plants produced exclusively short-dispersible diaspores. Genetically, the studied populations fell into four main island groups: Lanzarote–Fuerteventura, Gran Canaria, Tenerife–El Hierro and La Gomera–Madeira archipelago. Conclusions A Moroccan origin of R. bucephalophorus subsp. canariensis is hypothesized with a colonization route from the eastern to the western islands. In addition, at least one gene flow event from La Gomera to the Madeiran archipelago has taken place. During the colonization process the type of dispersible diaspore changed so that dispersability decreased in populations of the westernmost islands. PMID:23267005

  18. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. Methods The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Quercetin, Tannic acid and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the stem bark extracts of this plant were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) methods. Results The quantity of the phenolic compounds, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins detected differ significantly in the various extracts. The phenolics were significantly higher than the flavonoids and proanthocyanidin contents in all the extracts investigated. The ferric reducing ability and the radical scavenging activities of the extracts were very high and dose-dependent. The ethanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by the acetone extract while the aqueous extract was the least active. Reacting with ABTS, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were (0.0429 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for aqueous, (0.0317 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for acetone and (0.0306 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for ethanol extracts while they inhibited DPPH radical with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.0646 ± 0.02 mg/ml (aqueous), 0.0482 ± 0.02 mg/ml (acetone) and 0.0422 ± 0.03 mg/ml (ethanol). Conclusions A correlation between the antioxidant activity and the total phenolic contents of the extracts indicated that phenolic compounds were the dominant contributors to the antioxidant activity of the plant. This study, therefore, demonstrated that Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata has strong antioxidant

  19. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    PubMed Central

    Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at −18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

  20. Early Immune Markers Associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stabel, J. R.; Robbe-Austerman, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Groups for experimental infection included control (noninfected), oral (infected orally with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10), oral/DXM (pretreatment with dexamethasone before oral inoculation), intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, and oral/M (oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from a cow with clinical disease) groups. One of the earliest markers to emerge was antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Only i.p. inoculated calves had detectable antigen-specific IFN-γ responses at 7 days, with responses of the other infection groups becoming detectable at 90 and 120 days. All infection groups maintained robust IFN-γ responses for the remainder of the study. At 1 month, calves in the oral and oral/M groups had higher antigen-stimulated interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels than calves in the other treatment groups, but IL-10 secretion declined by 12 months for all calves. T-cell activation markers such as CD25, CD26, CD45RO, and CD5 were significantly upregulated in infected calves compared to noninfected controls. Oral inoculation of calves resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation at 9 and 12 months, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) secretion at 6 and 12 months. These results demonstrate that infection of naïve calves with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis invoked early immunologic responses characterized by robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses and induction of CD25 and CD45RO expression on T-cell subsets. These were followed by antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, iNOS secretion, and expression of CD26 and CD5bright markers in the latter part of the 12-month study. PMID:21228140

  1. Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni as a cause of gastroenteritis in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Ringertz, S; Rockhill, R C; Ringertz, O; Sutomo, A

    1980-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni was isolated from the feces of 15 out of 144 (10%) children (0 to 9 years old) and 4 out of 251 (2%) adults with gastroenteritis and was found together with another enteric pathogen in 2 of the children and in all 4 adults. It was isolated from 2 out of 7 (28%) children and 3 out of 160 (2%) adults with suspected typhoid fever. The bacterium was recovered from 3 out of 4 orphanage children with diarrhea and from 1 without symptoms and was isolated from only 1 child in a control group of 221 persons. PMID:7419706

  2. Genome Sequence of the Ethanol-Producing Zymomonas mobilis subsp. mobilis Lectotype Strain ATCC 10988 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Katherine M.; Kouvelis, Vassili N.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Brettin, Thomas S.; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Balakireva, Mariya; Han, Cliff S.; Savvakis, Giannis; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Typas, Milton A.

    2011-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis ATCC 10988 is the type strain of the Z. mobilis subsp. mobilis taxon, members of which are some of the most rigorous ethanol-producing bacteria. Isolated from Agave cactus fermentations in Mexico, ATCC 10988 is one of the first Z. mobilis strains to be described and studied. Its robustness in sucrose-substrate fermentations, physiological characteristics, large number of plasmids, and overall genomic plasticity render this strain important to the study of the species. Here we report the finishing and annotation of the ATCC 10988 chromosomal and plasmid genome. PMID:21725006

  3. A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaichik, E.A.; Pesnyakevich, A.G.

    1995-08-01

    A circular genetic map of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica 3-2 was constructed on the basis of the R471a plasmid and Tn5 and Tn9 using Hfr-like donors. Forty-six genes, including phytopathogenicity genes, were located on the basis of interrupted mating experiment results and analysis of coinheritance of markers on a map of 183 min in length. The similarity and differences of chromosomal genetic maps of Erwinia genus bacteria are discussed. 23 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Current perspectives on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Johne's disease, and Crohn's disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Over, Ken; Crandall, Philip G; O'Bryan, Corliss A; Ricke, Steven C

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes the disease of cattle, Johne's. The economic impact of this disease includes early culling of infected cattle, reduced milk yield, and weight loss of cattle sold for slaughter. There is a possible link between MAP and Crohn's disease, a human inflammatory bowel disease. MAP is also a potential human food borne pathogen because it survives current pasteurization treatments. We review the current knowledge of MAP, Johne's disease and Crohn's disease and note directions for future work with this organism including rapid and economical detection, effective management plans and preventative measures. PMID:21254832

  5. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Wang, Jieping; Yin, Wen; Shao, Xiaohu; Zheng, Huajun; Li, Mingshun; Zhao, Youwen; Sun, Ming; Wang, Shengyue; Yu, Ziniu

    2011-07-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis has been widely used as an agricultural biopesticide for a long time. As a producing strain, B. thuringiensis subsp. chinensis strain CT-43 is highly toxic to lepidopterous and dipterous insects. It can form various parasporal crystals consisting of Cry1Aa3, Cry1Ba1, Cry1Ia14, Cry2Aa9, and Cry2Ab1. During fermentation, it simultaneously generates vegetative insecticidal protein Vip3Aa10 and the insecticidal nucleotide analogue thuringiensin. Here, we report the finished, annotated genome sequence of B. thuringiensis strain CT-43. PMID:21551307

  6. Large-scale outbreak of infection with Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. abscessus after penicillin injection.

    PubMed

    Zhibang, Yang; BiXia, Zhang; Qishan, Lu; Lihao, Chen; Xiangquan, Liu; Huaping, Li

    2002-07-01

    An outbreak of infection with Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. abscessus after the injection of penicillin in 86 patients attending a factory hospital is reported. The bacterium was isolated both from lids and from the soil where the drug was stored. Molecular analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell proteins and plasmids revealed a pattern identical to that of the strains isolated from the wounds. The source of the infections was soil contamination of the vial lids and was caused by improper use and sterilization of penicillin vials. PMID:12089291

  7. Genetic IS901 RFLP diversity among Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from four pheasant flocks.

    PubMed

    Moravkova, Monika; Lamka, Jiri; Slany, Michal; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    IS901 RFLP analysis of 36 Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA) isolates from 15 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) and two goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) from four pheasant farms was performed. Using this method, six different IS901 RFLP types (E, F, G, M, Q, and V) were identified. The distribution of IS901 RFLP profiles was tightly linked to individual flocks. Matching IS901 RFLP profiles observed in the present study indicate MAA transmission between pheasants and goshawks in the same locality. In two flocks, different pheasants within a flock as well as in various organs of five individual pheasants were found to have two distinct IS901 RFLP profiles. PMID:23388436

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain

    PubMed Central

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S.; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a Citrate-Fermenting Strain.

    PubMed

    Zuljan, Federico; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Esteban, Luis; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis CRL264, a natural strain isolated from artisanal cheese from northwest Argentina. L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis is one of the most important microorganisms used as starter culture around the world. The CRL264 strain constitutes a model microorganism in the studies on the generation of aroma compounds (diacetyl, acetoin, and 2,3-butanediol) by lactic acid bacteria. Our genome analysis shows similar genetic organization to other available genomes of L. lactis bv. diacetylactis strains. PMID:26847906

  10. High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  11. Effects of carbon source and growth rate on cell wall composition of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger.

    PubMed Central

    Kruyssen, F J; de Boer, W R; Wouters, J T

    1980-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether factors other than the availability of phosphorus were involved in the regulation of synthesis of teichoic and teichuronic acids in Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger WM. First, the nature of the carbon source was varied while the dilution rate was maintained at about 0.3 h-1. Irrespective of whether the carbon source was glucose, glycerol, galactose, or malate, teichoic acid was the main anionic wall polymer whenever phosphorus was present in excess of the growth requirement, and teichuronic acid predominated in the walls of phosphate-limited cells. The effect of growth rate was studied by varying the dilution rate. However, only under phosphate limitation did the wall composition change with the growth rate: walls prepared from cells grown at dilution rates above 0.5 h-1 contained teichoic as well as teichuronic acid, despite the culture still being phosphate limited. The wall content of the cells did not vary with the nature of the growth limitation, but a correlation was observed between the growth rate and wall content. No indications were obtained that the composition of the peptidoglycan of B. subtilis subsp. niger WM was phenotypically variable. PMID:6774960

  12. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M.; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  13. Cloning and characterization of the nicotianamine synthase gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    PubMed

    Huang, B L; Cheng, C; Zhang, G Y; Su, J J; Zhi, Y; Xu, S S; Cai, D T; Zhang, X K; Huang, B Q

    2015-01-01

    Nicotianamine (NA) is a ubiquitous metabolite in plants that bind heavy metals, is crucial for metal homeostasis, and is also an important metal chelator that facilitates long-distance metal transport and sequestration. NA synthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme nicotianamine synthase (NAS). Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is highly tolerant to Ni, Pb, and Zn. In this study, a gene encoding EvNAS was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvNAS cDNA sequence contained a 111-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 155-bp 3'-UTR, and a 966-bp open reading frame encoding 322-amino acid residues. The EvNAS genomic sequence contained no introns, which is similar to previously reported NAS genes. The deduced translation of EvNAS contained a well-conserved NAS domain (1-279 amino acids) and an LIKI-CGEAEG box identical to some Brassica NAS and to the LIRL-box in most plant NAS, which is essential for DNA binding. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that EvNAS was most closely related to Brassica rapa NAS3 within the Cruciferae, followed by Thlaspi NAS1, Camelina NAS3, and Arabidopsis NAS3. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvNAS expression was greatest in the leaves, followed by the flower buds and hypocotyls. EvNAS was moderately expressed in the roots. PMID:26782459

  14. Transcriptomic profile of aguR deletion mutant of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Beatriz; Linares, Daniel M; Redruello, Begoña; Martin, Maria Cruz; Fernandez, Maria; de Jong, Anne; Kuipers, Oscar P; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 (formerly GE2-14) is a dairy strain that catabolizes agmatine (a decarboxylated derivative of arginine) into the biogenic amine putrescine by the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway [1]. The AGDI cluster of L. lactis is composed by five genes aguR, aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC. The last four genes are responsible for the deamination of agmatine to putrescine and are co-transcribed as a single policistronic mRNA forming the catabolic operon aguBDAC[1]. aguR encodes a transmembrane protein that functions as a one-component signal transduction system that senses the agmatine concentration of the medium and accordingly regulates the transcription of aguBDAC[2], which is also transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose, but not by other sugars such as lactose and galactose [1], [3]. Here we report the transcriptional profiling of the aguR gene deletion mutant (L. lactis subsp. cremoris CECT 8666 ∆aguR) [2] compared to the wild type strain, both grown in M17 medium with galactose as carbon source and supplemented with agmatine. The transcriptional profiling data of AguR-regulated genes were deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession no. GSE59514. PMID:26697381

  15. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 under submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, S-Y; Lü, F-X; Lu, Z-X; Bie, X-M; Jiao, Y; Sun, L-J; Yu, B

    2008-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has several well-known physiological functions and has been applied to the production of many drugs and functional foods. The technology of GABA production via submerged fermentation by Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2 was investigated in this paper. It indicated that the GABA production was related to the biochemical characteristics of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) of S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus Y2. After 24 h of fermentation at 37 degrees C, which is the suitable culture conditions for GAD-production, then the culture condition were adjusted to the optimal temperature (40 degrees C) and pH (4.5) for the GAD reaction activity in biotransformation of cells and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (0.02 mmol/l) were added to the broth at the 48 h, the GABA production was increased up to 1.76-fold, reaching 7984.75 +/- 293.33 mg/l. The strain shows great potential use as a starter for GABA-containing yoghurt, cheese and other functional fermented food productions. PMID:17514494

  16. Cross-amplification of Vicia sativa subsp. sativa microsatellites across 22 other Vicia species.

    PubMed

    Raveendar, Sebastin; Lee, Gi-An; Jeon, Young-Ah; Lee, Yun Jeong; Lee, Jung-Ro; Cho, Gyu-Taek; Cho, Joon-Hyeong; Park, Jong-Hyun; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The temperate and herbaceous genus Vicia L. is a member of the legume tribe Fabeae of the subfamily Papilionoideae. The genus Vicia comprises 166 annual or perennial species distributed mainly in Europe, Asia, and North America, but also extending to the temperate regions of South America and tropical Africa. The use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for Vicia species has not been investigated as extensively as for other crop species. In this study, we assessed the potential for cross-species amplification of cDNA microsatellite markers developed from common vetch (Vicia sativa subsp. sativa). For cross-species amplification of the SSRs, amplification was carried out with genomic DNA isolated from two to eight accessions of 22 different Vicia species. For individual species or subspecies, the transferability rates ranged from 33% for V. ervilia to 82% for V. sativa subsp. nigra with an average rate of 52.0%. Because the rate of successful SSR marker amplification generally correlates with genetic distance, these SSR markers are potentially useful for analyzing genetic relationships between or within Vicia species. PMID:25608853

  17. Production of a Thermostable and Alkaline Chitinase by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki Strain HBK-51

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Secil Berna; Güvenmez, Hatice Korkmaz; Denizci, Aziz Akin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the isolation and identification of chitinase-producing Bacillus from chitin-containing wastes, production of a thermostable and alkaline chitinasese, and enzyme characterization. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HBK-51 was isolated from soil and was identified. Chitinase was obtained from supernatant of B. thuringiensis HBK-51 strain and showed its optimum activity at 110°C and at pH 9.0. Following 3 hours of incubation period, the enzyme showed a high level of activity at 110°C (96% remaining activity) and between pH 9.0 and 12.0 (98% remaining activity). Considering these characteristics, the enzyme was described as hyperthermophile-thermostable and highly alkaline. Two bands of the enzyme weighing 50 and 125 kDa were obtained following 12% SDS-PAGE analyses. Among the metal ions and chemicals used, Ni2+ (32%), K+ (44%), and Cu2+ (56%) increased the enzyme activity while EDTA (7%), SDS (7%), Hg2+ (11%), and ethyl-acetimidate (20%) decreased the activity of the enzyme. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki HBK-51 is an important strain which can be used in several biotechnological applications as a chitinase producer. PMID:23304523

  18. The generalist Inga subnuda subsp. luschnathiana (Fabaceae): negative effect of floral visitors on reproductive success?

    PubMed

    Avila, R; Pinheiro, M; Sazima, M

    2015-05-01

    Inga species are characterised by generalist or mixed pollination system. However, this feature does not enhance reproductive rates in species with very low fruit set under natural conditions. Some ecological and genetic factors are associated with this feature, and to test the effect of massive visits on pollination success in Inga subnuda subsp. luschnathiana, we studied the efficacy of polyads deposited on stigmas of flowers isolated from visitors and polyads exposed to visitors. The proportion of polyads fixed in stigmas decreased after exposure to visitors (24 h) in comparison to stigmas isolated from visitors (hummingbirds, bees, wasps, hawkmoths and bats), and fruit set was very low. Furthermore, nectar production, sugar composition and other floral biology traits were evaluated. Increased nectar production, sugar availability and sucrose dominance during the night indicates adaptation to nocturnal visitors and supports their role as main pollinators; although the brush-flower morphology, time of anthesis, nectar dynamics and chemical composition also allow daytime visitors. Thus the species is an important resource for a diverse group of floral visitors. We conclude that excess visits (diurnal and nocturnal) are responsible for the decrease in fixed polyads in stigmas of I. subnuda subsp. luschnathiana flowers, thus contributing, with others factors, to its low fruit set. Therefore, the generalist pollination system does not result in reproductive advantages because the low fruit set in natural conditions could be the result of a negative effect of visitors/pollinators. PMID:25488371

  19. treA Codifies for a Trehalase with Involvement in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Alexandrino, André Vessoni; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is a severe disease of citrus. Xcc presents broad spectrum of citrus hosts including economically important species whereas X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii-type C (XauC) causes a milder disease and only infects Citrus aurantifolia. Trehalase catalyzes hydrolysis of the disaccharide trehalose, a sugar that has been reported to be related to Xcc pathogenicity. We expressed the recombinant gene product and assessed Xcc trehalase structural and kinetics data. The recombinant protein presented 42.7% of secondary structures in α-helix and 13% in β-sheets, no quaternary structure in solution, and Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 0.077 mM and Vmax 55.308 μMol glucose.min-1.mg protein-1 for trehalose. A Xcc mutant strain (XccΔtreA) was produced by gene deletion from Xcc genome. Enzymatic activity of trehalase was determined in Xcc, XauC and XccΔtreA cellular lysates, showing the highest values for XauC in in vitro infective condition and no activity for XccΔtreA. Finally, leaves of Citrus aurantifolia infected with XccΔtreA showed much more drenching and necrosis than those infected by wild type Xcc. We concluded that trehalase contributes to alleviate bacterial virulence and that inability for trehalose hydrolysis may promote higher Xcc infectivity. PMID:27611974

  20. Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae–bacteriophage combination from the caecal effluent of a healthy woman

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Turton, Jane F.; Mahony, Jennifer; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Hudspith, Barry; Gibson, Glenn R.; McCartney, Anne L.

    2015-01-01

    A sample of caecal effluent was obtained from a female patient who had undergone a routine colonoscopic examination. Bacteria were isolated anaerobically from the sample, and screened against the remaining filtered caecal effluent in an attempt to isolate bacteriophages (phages). A lytic phage, named KLPN1, was isolated on a strain identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae (capsular type K2, rmpA+). This Siphoviridae phage presents a rosette-like tail tip and exhibits depolymerase activity, as demonstrated by the formation of plaque-surrounding haloes that increased in size over the course of incubation. When screened against a panel of clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae, phage KLPN1 was shown to infect and lyse capsular type K2 strains, though it did not exhibit depolymerase activity on such hosts. The genome of KLPN1 was determined to be 49,037 bp (50.53 %GC) in length, encompassing 73 predicted ORFs, of which 23 represented genes associated with structure, host recognition, packaging, DNA replication and cell lysis. On the basis of sequence analyses, phages KLPN1 (GenBank: KR262148) and 1513 (a member of the family Siphoviridae, GenBank: KP658157) were found to be two new members of the genus “Kp36likevirus.” PMID:26246963