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Sample records for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis

  1. Transcriptional Analysis of the Bordetella Alcaligin Siderophore Biosynthesis Operon

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Young; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    1998-01-01

    The alc gene cluster of Bordetella pertussis includes three genes, alcA, alcB, and alcC, which are involved in alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis in response to iron starvation. The production of AlcA, AlcB, and AlcC in Bordetella cells and the transcriptional organization of alcA, alcB, and alcC were investigated by using a set of three alc′-′lacZ gene fusion constructs that were contiguous with the known promoter upstream of alcA and extended to fusion junctions within each alc cistron. All three alc′-′lacZ fusions exhibited iron-repressible reporter gene expression which was abolished by deletion of the 105-bp alcA promoter-operator region. In an immunoblot analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for β-galactosidase, the AlcA-LacZ, AlcB-LacZ, and AlcC-LacZ hybrid proteins were detected in Bordetella cells grown under iron-depleted conditions. A B. pertussis mutant in which the 105-bp alcA promoter-operator region was deleted by allelic exchange was unable to produce detectable levels of siderophore. Hybridization analysis using gene-specific probes showed that alc-specific transcript levels in the mutant were negligible compared with those of the wild-type parent. These results confirm that alcA, alcB, and alcC are cotranscribed from an iron-regulated control region immediately upstream of alcA. Transcript analysis using hybridization probes representing regions downstream of alcC demonstrated that alc transcription extends approximately 3.6 kb further downstream from the alcC coding region, suggesting the cotranscription of additional, uncharacterized alcaligin system genes. PMID:9473039

  2. Identification and Characterization of alcR, a Gene Encoding an AraC-Like Regulator of Alcaligin Siderophore Biosynthesis and Transport in Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Fiona C.; Kang, Ho Young; Brickman, Timothy J.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    1998-01-01

    A Bordetella bronchiseptica iron transport mutant was isolated following an enrichment procedure based on streptonigrin resistance. The mutant displayed a growth defect on iron-restricted medium containing ferric alcaligin as the sole iron source. In addition to the apparent inability to acquire iron from the siderophore, the mutant failed to produce alcaligin as well as two known iron-regulated proteins, one of which is the AlcC alcaligin biosynthesis protein. A 1.6-kb KpnI-PstI Bordetella pertussis DNA fragment mapping downstream of the alcaligin biosynthesis genes alcABC restored both siderophore biosynthesis and expression of the iron-regulated proteins to the mutant. Nucleotide sequencing of this complementing 1.6-kb region identified an open reading frame predicted to encode a protein with strong similarity to members of the AraC family of transcriptional regulators, for which we propose the gene designation alcR. Primer extension analysis localized an iron-regulated transcription initiation site upstream of the alcR open reading frame and adjacent to sequences homologous to the consensus Fur repressor binding site. The AlcR protein was produced by using an Escherichia coli expression system and visualized in electrophoretic gels. In-frame alcR deletion mutants of B. pertussis and B. bronchiseptica were constructed, and the defined mutants exhibited the alcR mutant phenotype, characterized by the inability to produce and transport alcaligin and express the two iron-repressed proteins. The cloned alcR gene provided in trans restored these siderophore system activities to the mutants. Together, these results indicate that AlcR is involved in the regulation of Bordetella alcaligin biosynthesis and transport genes and is required for their full expression. PMID:9473040

  3. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  4. Analysis of the alcABC operon encoding alcaligin biosynthesis enzymes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1997-07-18

    We previously cloned a B. bronchiseptica (Bb) genomic DNA fragment that complements a Bb alcaligin biosynthesis mutant, and reported the identification of a gene, alcA, with predicted protein sequence similarity to siderophore biosynthesis enzymes from other organisms. In the present study we show that further nt sequencing of this region revealed two open reading frames (ORFs) 3' to alcA that encode putative proteins AlcB and AlcC, with significant sequence similarity to the aerobactin biosynthesis enzymes IucB and IucC, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the three ORFs are encoded on a single transcript, and that this operon is repressed at the transcriptional level by Fe. Primer extension analysis placed the transcriptional start point (tsp) 35 nt from the 5' end of the Fur consensus sequence and 188 nt from the putative start of translation of AlcA.

  5. Identification of AlcR, an AraC-Type Regulator of Alcaligin Siderophore Synthesis in Bordetella bronchiseptica and Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Pradel, Elizabeth; Guiso, Nicole; Locht, Camille

    1998-01-01

    A Fur titration assay was used to isolate DNA fragments bearing putative Fur binding sites (FBS) from a partial Bordetella bronchiseptica genomic DNA library. A recombinant plasmid bearing a 3.5-kb DNA insert was further studied. Successive deletions in the cloned fragment enabled us to map a putative FBS at about 2 kb from one end. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of an FBS upstream from a new gene encoding an AraC-type transcriptional regulator. The deduced protein displays similarity to PchR, an activator of pyochelin siderophore and ferripyochelin receptor synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Homologous genes in Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis were PCR amplified, and sequence comparisons indicated a very high conservation in the three species. The B. pertussis and B. bronchiseptica chromosomal genes were inactivated by allelic exchange. Under low-iron growth conditions, the mutants did not secrete the alcaligin siderophore and lacked AlcC, an alcaligin biosynthetic enzyme. Alcaligin production was restored after transformation with a plasmid bearing the wild-type gene. On the basis of its role in regulation of alcaligin biosynthesis, the new gene was designated alcR. Additional sequence determination showed that alcR is located about 2 kb downstream from the alcABC operon and is transcribed in the same orientation. Two tightly linked open reading frames, alcD and alcE, were identified between alcC and alcR. AlcE is a putative iron-sulfur protein; AlcD shows no homology with the proteins in the database. The production of major virulence factors and colonization in the mouse respiratory infection model are AlcR independent. PMID:9473041

  6. Genetics and Assembly Line Enzymology of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, Jorge H.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2002-01-01

    The regulatory logic of siderophore biosynthetic genes in bacteria involves the universal repressor Fur, which acts together with iron as a negative regulator. However in other bacteria, in addition to the Fur-mediated mechanism of regulation, there is a concurrent positive regulation of iron transport and siderophore biosynthetic genes that occurs under conditions of iron deprivation. Despite these regulatory differences the mechanisms of siderophore biosynthesis follow the same fundamental enzymatic logic, which involves a series of elongating acyl-S-enzyme intermediates on multimodular protein assembly lines: nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). A substantial variety of siderophore structures are produced from similar NRPS assembly lines, and variation can come in the choice of the phenolic acid selected as the N-cap, the tailoring of amino acid residues during chain elongation, the mode of chain termination, and the nature of the capturing nucleophile of the siderophore acyl chain being released. Of course the specific parts that get assembled in a given bacterium may reflect a combination of the inventory of biosynthetic and tailoring gene clusters available. This modular assembly logic can account for all known siderophores. The ability to mix and match domains within modules and to swap modules themselves is likely to be an ongoing process in combinatorial biosynthesis. NRPS evolution will try out new combinations of chain initiation, elongation and tailoring, and termination steps, possibly by genetic exchange with other microorganisms and/or within the same bacterium, to create new variants of iron-chelating siderophores that can fit a particular niche for the producer bacterium. PMID:12040125

  7. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in C olletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize

    PubMed Central

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen C olletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N 5-monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. PMID:24674132

  8. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in Colletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize.

    PubMed

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-04-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N(5) -monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system.

  9. Cellular organization of siderophore biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Evidence for siderosomes.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Véronique; Guillon, Laurent; Cunrath, Olivier; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2015-07-01

    Pyoverdine I (PVDI) and pyochelin (PCH) are the two major siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to import iron. The biochemistry of the biosynthesis of these two siderophores has been described in detail in the literature over recent years. PVDI assembly requires the coordinated action of seven cytoplasmic enzymes and is followed by a periplasmic maturation before secretion of the siderophore into the extracellular medium by the efflux system PvdRT-OpmQ. PCH biosynthesis also involves seven cytoplasmic enzymes but no periplasmic maturation. Recent findings indicate that the cytoplasmic enzymes involved in each of these two siderophore biosynthesis pathways can form siderophore-specific multi-enzymatic complexes called siderosomes associated with the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane. This organization may optimize the transfer of the siderophore precursors between the various participating enzymes and avoid the diffusion of siderophore precursors, able to chelate metals, throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we describe these recently published findings and discuss the existence of these siderosomes in P. aeruginosa.

  10. Inhibition of the Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Siderophore A (SidA) Blocks Siderophore Biosynthesis and Aspergillus fumigatus Growth.

    PubMed

    Martín Del Campo, Julia S; Vogelaar, Nancy; Tolani, Karishma; Kizjakina, Karina; Harich, Kim; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-11-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the most common causative agent of fatal invasive mycoses. The flavin-dependent monooxygenase siderophore A (SidA) catalyzes the oxygen and NADPH dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine (l-Orn) to N(5)-l-hydroxyornithine in the biosynthetic pathway of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Deletion of the gene that codes for SidA has shown that it is essential in establishing infection in mice models. Here, a fluorescence polarization high-throughput assay was used to screen a 2320 compound library for inhibitors of SidA. Celastrol, a natural quinone methide, was identified as a noncompetitive inhibitor of SidA with a MIC value of 2 μM. Docking experiments suggest that celastrol binds across the NADPH and l-Orn pocket. Celastrol prevents A. fumigatus growth in blood agar. The addition of purified ferric-siderophore abolished the inhibitory effect of celastrol. Thus, celastrol inhibits A. fumigatus growth by blocking siderophore biosynthesis through SidA inhibiton.

  11. Siderophore Biosynthesis Governs the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by Coordinately Modulating the Differential Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; He, Yan; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections impose substantial health burdens on women worldwide. Urinary tract infections often incur a high risk of recurrence and antibiotic resistance, and uropathogenic E. coli accounts for approximately 80% of clinically acquired cases. The diagnosis of, treatment of, and drug development for urinary tract infections remain substantial challenges due to the complex pathogenesis of this condition. The clinically isolated UPEC 83972 strain was found to produce four siderophores: yersiniabactin, aerobactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The biosyntheses of some of these siderophores implies that the virulence of UPEC is mediated via the targeting of primary metabolism. However, the differential modulatory roles of siderophore biosyntheses on the differential metabolomes of UPEC and non-UPEC strains remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate how the differential metabolomes can be used to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC strains and to determine the associated regulatory roles of siderophore biosynthesis. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the identified differential metabolomes strongly differentiated UPEC from non-UPEC strains. Furthermore, we performed metabolome assays of mutants with different patterns of siderophore deletions; the data revealed that the mutations of all four siderophores exerted a stronger modulatory role on the differential metabolomes of the UPEC and non-UPEC strains relative to the mutation of any single siderophore and that this modulatory role primarily involved amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation in the carbon fixation pathway, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Surprisingly, the modulatory roles were strongly dependent on the type and number of mutated siderophores. Taken together, these results demonstrated that siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the differential metabolomes and thus may indicate novel targets for virulence-based diagnosis

  12. Mixing and matching siderophore clusters: structure and biosynthesis of serratiochelins from Serratia sp. V4.

    PubMed

    Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Cleto, Sara; Carr, Gavin; Vlamakis, Hera; João Vieira, Maria; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2012-08-22

    Interrogation of the evolutionary history underlying the remarkable structures and biological activities of natural products has been complicated by not knowing the functions they have evolved to fulfill. Siderophores-soluble, low molecular weight compounds-have an easily understood and measured function: acquiring iron from the environment. Bacteria engage in a fierce competition to acquire iron, which rewards the production of siderophores that bind iron tightly and cannot be used or pirated by competitors. The structures and biosyntheses of "odd" siderophores can reveal the evolutionary strategy that led to their creation. We report a new Serratia strain that produces serratiochelin and an analog of serratiochelin. A genetic approach located the serratiochelin gene cluster, and targeted mutations in several genes implicated in serratiochelin biosynthesis were generated. Bioinformatic analyses and mutagenesis results demonstrate that genes from two well-known siderophore clusters, the Escherichia coli enterobactin cluster and the Vibrio cholera vibriobactin cluster, were shuffled to produce a new siderophore biosynthetic pathway. These results highlight how modular siderophore gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in siderophores.

  13. Mixing and Matching Siderophore Clusters: Structure and Biosynthesis of Serratiochelins from Serratia sp. V4

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Interrogation of the evolutionary history underlying the remarkable structures and biological activities of natural products has been complicated by not knowing the functions they have evolved to fulfill. Siderophores—soluble, low molecular weight compounds—have an easily understood and measured function: acquiring iron from the environment. Bacteria engage in a fierce competition to acquire iron, which rewards the production of siderophores that bind iron tightly and cannot be used or pirated by competitors. The structures and biosyntheses of “odd” siderophores can reveal the evolutionary strategy that led to their creation. We report a new Serratia strain that produces serratiochelin and an analog of serratiochelin. A genetic approach located the serratiochelin gene cluster, and targeted mutations in several genes implicated in serratiochelin biosynthesis were generated. Bioinformatic analyses and mutagenesis results demonstrate that genes from two well-known siderophore clusters, the Escherichia coli enterobactin cluster and the Vibrio cholera vibriobactin cluster, were shuffled to produce a new siderophore biosynthetic pathway. These results highlight how modular siderophore gene clusters can be mixed and matched during evolution to generate structural diversity in siderophores. PMID:22830960

  14. The long-overlooked enzymology of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent pathway for virulence-conferring siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Oves-Costales, Daniel; Kadi, Nadia; Challis, Gregory L

    2009-11-21

    Siderophores are high-affinity ferric iron chelators biosynthesised and excreted by most microorganisms that play an important role in iron acquisition. Siderophore-mediated scavenging of ferric iron from hosts contributes significantly to the virulence of pathogenic microbes. As a consequence siderophore biosynthesis is an attractive target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Two main pathways for siderophore biosynthesis exist in microbes. One pathway involves nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) multienzymes while the other is NRPS-independent. The enzymology of NRPS-mediated siderophore biosynthesis has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In contrast, the enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore (NIS) biosynthesis was overlooked for almost thirty years since the first genetic characterisation of the NIS biosynthetic pathway to aerobactin. However, the past three years have witnessed an explosion of interest in the enzymology of NIS synthetases, the key enzymes in the assembly of siderophores via the NIS pathway. The biochemical characterisation of ten purified recombinant synthetases has been reported since 2007, along with the first structural characterisation of a synthetase by X-ray crystallography in 2009. In this feature article we summarise the recent progress that has been made in understanding the long-overlooked enzymology of NRPS-independent siderophore biosynthesis, highlight important remaining questions, and suggest likely directions for future research.

  15. AmcA—a putative mitochondrial ornithine transporter supporting fungal siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schafferer, Lukas; Beckmann, Nicola; Binder, Ulrike; Brosch, Gerald; Haas, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient required for a wide range of cellular processes. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus employs low-molecular mass iron-specific chelators, termed siderophores, for uptake, storage and intracellular iron distribution, which play a crucial role in the pathogenicity of this fungus. Siderophore biosynthesis (SB) depends on coordination with the supply of its precursor ornithine, produced mitochondrially from glutamate or cytosolically via hydrolysis of arginine. In this study, we demonstrate a role of the putative mitochondrial transporter AmcA (AFUA_8G02760) in SB of A. fumigatus. Consistent with a role in cellular ornithine handling, AmcA-deficiency resulted in decreased cellular ornithine and arginine contents as well as decreased siderophore production on medium containing glutamine as the sole nitrogen source. In support, arginine and ornithine as nitrogen sources did not impact SB due to cytosolic ornithine availability. As revealed by Northern blot analysis, transcript levels of siderophore biosynthetic genes were unresponsive to the cellular ornithine level. In contrast to siderophore production, AmcA deficiency did only mildly decrease the cellular polyamine content, demonstrating cellular prioritization of ornithine use. Nevertheless, AmcA-deficiency increased the susceptibility of A. fumigatus to the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor eflornithine, most likely due to the decreased ornithine pool. AmcA-deficiency decreased the growth rate particularly on ornithine as the sole nitrogen source during iron starvation and sufficiency, indicating an additional role in the metabolism and fitness of A. fumigatus, possibly in mitochondrial ornithine import. In the Galleria mellonella infection model, AmcA-deficiency did not affect virulence of A. fumigatus, most likely due to the residual siderophore production and arginine availability in this host niche. PMID:25904899

  16. SidL, an Aspergillus fumigatus Transacetylase Involved in Biosynthesis of the Siderophores Ferricrocin and Hydroxyferricrocin ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Blatzer, Michael; Schrettl, Markus; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert H.; Pfaller, Kristian; Haas, Hubertus

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus produces four types of siderophores, low-molecular-mass iron chelators: it excretes fusarinine C (FsC) and triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC) for iron uptake and accumulates ferricrocin (FC) for hyphal and hydroxyferricrocin (HFC) for conidial iron distribution and storage. Siderophore biosynthesis has recently been shown to be crucial for fungal virulence. Here we identified a new component of the fungal siderophore biosynthetic machinery: AFUA_1G04450, termed SidL. SidL is conserved only in siderophore-producing ascomycetes and shows similarity to transacylases involved in bacterial siderophore biosynthesis and the N5-hydroxyornithine:anhydromevalonyl coenzyme A-N5-transacylase SidF, which is essential for TAFC biosynthesis. Inactivation of SidL in A. fumigatus decreased FC biosynthesis during iron starvation and completely blocked FC biosynthesis during iron-replete growth. In agreement with these findings, SidL deficiency blocked conidial accumulation of FC-derived HFC under iron-replete conditions, which delayed germination and decreased the size of conidia and their resistance to oxidative stress. Remarkably, the sidL gene is not clustered with other siderophore-biosynthetic genes, and its expression is not affected by iron availability. Tagging of SidL with enhanced green fluorescent protein suggested a cytosolic localization of the FC-biosynthetic machinery. Taken together, these data suggest that SidL is a constitutively active N5-hydroxyornithine-acetylase required for FC biosynthesis, in particular under iron-replete conditions. Moreover, this study revealed the unexpected complexity of siderophore biosynthesis, indicating the existence of an additional, iron-repressed N5-hydroxyornithine-acetylase. PMID:21622789

  17. Structure and biosynthesis of fimsbactins A-F, siderophores from Acinetobacter baumannii and Acinetobacter baylyi.

    PubMed

    Proschak, Anna; Lubuta, Patrice; Grün, Peter; Löhr, Frank; Wilharm, Gottfried; De Berardinis, Veronique; Bode, Helge B

    2013-03-18

    Novel chatechol/hydroxamate siderophores (named "fimsbactins") were identified in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 and Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. The major compound, fimsbactin A, was isolated from low-iron cultures of A. baylyi ADP1, and its chemical structure was elucidated by mass spectrometry, and detailed (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR spectroscopy. From inverse feeding experiments following HPLC-MS analysis, the structures of five additional derivatives were elucidated. The gene cluster encoding the fimsbactin synthetase (fbs) was identified in both genomes, and mutants in fbs genes in A. baylyi were analyzed, thus allowing prediction of the fimsbactin biosynthesis pathway.

  18. Cloning of a Vibrio cholerae vibriobactin gene cluster: identification of genes required for early steps in siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wyckoff, E E; Stoebner, J A; Reed, K E; Payne, S M

    1997-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae secretes the catechol siderophore vibriobactin in response to iron limitation. Vibriobactin is structurally similar to enterobactin, the siderophore produced by Escherichia coli, and both organisms produce 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) as an intermediate in siderophore biosynthesis. To isolate and characterize V. cholerae genes involved in vibriobactin biosynthesis, we constructed a genomic cosmid bank of V. cholerae DNA and isolated clones that complemented mutations in E. coli enterobactin biosynthesis genes. V. cholerae homologs of entA, entB, entC, entD, and entE were identified on overlapping cosmid clones. Our data indicate that the vibriobactin genes are clustered, like the E. coli enterobactin genes, but the organization of the genes within these clusters is different. In this paper, we present the organization and sequences of genes involved in the synthesis and activation of DHBA. In addition, a V. cholerae strain with a chromosomal mutation in vibA was constructed by marker exchange. This strain was unable to produce vibriobactin or DHBA, confirming that in V. cholerae VibA catalyzes an early step in vibriobactin biosynthesis. PMID:9371453

  19. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis. PMID:26963250

  20. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis.

  1. An anti-Aspergillus protein from Escherichia coli DH5α: putative inhibitor of siderophore biosynthesis in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Balhara, Meenakshi; Ruhil, Sonam; Kumar, Manish; Dhankhar, Sandeep; Chhillar, A K

    2014-03-01

    An antifungal protein designated as anti-Aspergillus protein (AAP), produced by Escherichia coli DH5α, was purified and characterised. It exhibited a molecular weight of 60 kDa on Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and depicted 99% purity on ultra performance liquid chromatography. The purified protein manifested antimycotic potential against pathogenic isolates of Aspergillus spp., depicting a minimum inhibitory concentration in the range 15.62-31.25 μg ml(-1) and 5.0-10.0 μg per disc, using microbroth dilution, spore germination inhibition and disc diffusion assays respectively. In vitro toxicity tests demonstrated that it showed no toxicity against human erythrocytes at doses up to 1000 μg ml(-1) . Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-Time-of-flight analysis of trypsin-digested peptides of purified protein and subsequent Mascot search revealed that several peptides of AAP have identity with bacterial siderophore biosynthetic protein, i.e. non-ribosomal peptide synthetase enzyme, involved in critical step of fungal siderophore biosynthesis. Siderophore-based inhibition was further corroborated by Chrome azurol S assay. Hence, the antagonistic effect might be the result of impediment in siderophore-mediated iron uptake and transport process which may cause critical consequences on Aspergillus growth and virulence.

  2. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women’s bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the “interactive metabolome”, which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI. PMID:27076285

  3. Baulamycins A and B, Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Identified as Inhibitors of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M.; Chlipala, George E.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Scaglione, Jamie B.; Hanna, Philip C.; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 µM and 19 µM against SbnE and 180 µM and 200 µM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus, B. anthracis, E. coli and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents PMID:24401083

  4. Baulamycins A and B, broad-spectrum antibiotics identified as inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M; Chlipala, George E; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A; Nusca, Tyler D; Scaglione, Jamie B; Hanna, Philip C; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H

    2014-01-29

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 μM and 19 μM against SbnE and 180 μM and 200 μM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus , B. anthracis , E. coli , and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents.

  5. Identification of an additional ferric-siderophore uptake gene clustered with receptor, biosynthesis, and fur-like regulatory genes in fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, D J; Morris, J; O'Gara, F

    1990-01-01

    Five cosmid clones with insert sizes averaging 22.6 kilobases (kb) were isolated after complementation of 22 Tn5-induced Sid- mutants of Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. One of these plasmids (pMS639) was also shown to encode ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation functions. The receptor gene was located on this plasmid since introduction of the plasmid into three wild-type fluorescent pseudomonads enabled them to utilize the ferric-siderophore from strain M114. The presence of an extra iron-regulated protein in the outer membrane profile of one of these strains was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ferric-siderophore dissociation gene was attributed to pMS639 since it complemented the ferric-siderophore uptake mutation in strain M114FR2. This mutant was not defective in the outer membrane receptor for ferric-siderophore but apparently accumulated ferric-siderophore internally. Since ferric-citrate alleviated the iron stress of the mutant, there was no defect in iron metabolism subsequent to release of iron from the ferric-siderophore complex. Consequently, this mutant was defective in ferric-siderophore dissociation. A fur-like regulatory gene also present on pMS639 was subcloned to a 7.0-kb BglII insert of pCUP5 and was located approximately 7.3 kb from the receptor region. These results established that the 27.2-kb insert of pMS639 encoded at least two siderophore biosynthesis genes, ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation genes, and a fur-like regulatory gene from the biocontrol fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. Images PMID:2143887

  6. Coordinated Regulation of Species-Specific Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation and Siderophore Biosynthesis Pathways in Agrobacterium fabrum

    PubMed Central

    Baude, Jessica; Vial, Ludovic; Villard, Camille; Campillo, Tony; Lavire, Céline; Nesme, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rhizosphere-inhabiting species Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to degrade hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs), especially ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid, via the novel A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway. Gene expression profiles of A. fabrum strain C58 were investigated in the presence of HCAs, using a C58 whole-genome oligoarray. Both ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid caused variations in the expression of more than 10% of the C58 genes. Genes of the A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway, together with the genes involved in iron acquisition, were among the most highly induced in the presence of HCAs. Two operons coding for the biosynthesis of a particular siderophore, as well as genes of the A. fabrum HCA degradation pathway, have been described as being specific to the species. We demonstrate here their coordinated expression, emphasizing the interdependence between the iron concentration in the growth medium and the rate at which ferulic acid is degraded by cells. The coordinated expression of these functions may be advantageous in HCA-rich but iron-starved environments in which microorganisms have to compete for both iron and carbon sources, such as in plant roots. The present results confirm that there is cooperation between the A. fabrum-specific genes, defining a particular ecological niche. IMPORTANCE We previously identified seven genomic regions in Agrobacterium fabrum that were specifically present in all of the members of this species only. Here we demonstrated that two of these regions, encoding the hydroxycinnamic acid degradation pathway and the iron acquisition pathway, were regulated in a coordinated manner. The coexpression of these functions may be advantageous in hydroxycinnamic acid-rich but iron-starved environments in which microorganisms have to compete for both iron and carbon sources, such as in plant roots. These data support the view that bacterial genomic species

  7. A new salicylate synthase AmS is identified for siderophores biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T).

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Dai, Shengwang; Shen, Jinzhao; Ren, Biao; Huang, Pei; Wang, Qiushui; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Buchang; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-07-01

    Siderophores are important for the growth of bacteria or the applications in treatment of iron overload-associated diseases due to the iron-chelating property. Salicylate synthase played a key role in the biosynthesis of some NRPS-derived siderophores by the providing of an iron coordination moiety as the initial building block. A new salicylate synthase, namely AmS, was identified in the biosynthesis pathway of siderophore amychelin in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T), since it shunt chorismate, an integrant precursor, from primary to secondary metabolite flow. The amino acid sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that AmS grouped into a new cluster. In vitro assays of AmS revealed its wide temperature tolerance ranged from 0 to 40 °C and narrow pH tolerant ranged from 7.0 to 9.0. AmS was resistant to organic solvents and non-ionic detergents. Moreover, AmS converted chorismate to salicylate with K m of 129.05 μM, k cat of 2.20 min(-1) at optimal conditions, indicating its low substrate specificity and comparable velocity to reported counterparts (Irp9 and MbtI). These properties of AmS may improve the iron-seizing ability of A. methanolica to compete with its neighbors growing in natural environments. Most importantly, serine and cysteine residues were found to be important for the catalytic activity of AmS. This study presented AmS as a new cluster of salicylate synthase and the reaction mechanism and potential applications of salicylate synthase were highlighted as well.

  8. Biosynthesis of amphi-enterobactin siderophores by Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116: identification of a bifunctional nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domain.

    PubMed

    Zane, Hannah K; Naka, Hiroaki; Rosconi, Federico; Sandy, Moriah; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-16

    The genome of Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116 contains a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster (aebA-F) resembling that for enterobactin, yet enterobactin is not produced. A gene predicted to encode a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (FACL), similar to enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of acyl peptides, resides 15 kb away from the putative enterobactin-like biosynthetic gene cluster (aebG). The proximity of this FACL gene to the enterobactin-like synthetase suggested that V. harveyi may produce amphiphilic enterobactin-like siderophores. Extraction of the bacterial cell pellet of V. harveyi led to the isolation and structure determination of a suite of eight amphi-enterobactin siderophores composed of the cyclic lactone of tris-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-L-serine and acyl-L-serine. The FACL knockout mutant, ΔaebG V. harveyi, and the NRPS knockout mutant, ΔaebF V. harveyi, do not produce amphi-enterobactins. The amphi-enterobactin biosynthetic machinery was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating the condensation domain of AebF has unique activity, catalyzing two distinct condensation reactions.

  9. Isolation and characterization of Bacillus subtilis genes involved in siderophore biosynthesis: relationship between B. subtilis sfpo and Escherichia coli entD genes.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, T H; Tuckman, M; Ellestad, S; Osburne, M S

    1993-01-01

    In response to iron deprivation, Bacillus subtilis secretes a catecholic siderophore, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl glycine, which is similar to the precursor of the Escherichia coli siderophore enterobactin. We isolated two sets of B. subtilis DNA sequences that complemented the mutations of several E. coli siderophore-deficient (ent) mutants with defective enterobactin biosynthesis enzymes. One set contained DNA sequences that complemented only an entD mutation. The second set contained DNA sequences that complemented various combinations of entB, entE, entC, and entA mutations. The two sets of DNA sequences did not appear to overlap. AB. subtilis mutant containing an insertion in the region of the entD homolog grew much more poorly in low-iron medium and with markedly different kinetics. These data indicate that (i) at least five of the siderophore biosynthesis genes of B. subtilis can function in E. coli, (ii) the genetic organization of these siderophore genes in B. subtilis is similar to that in E. coli, and (iii) the B. subtilis entD homolog is required for efficient growth in low-iron medium. The nucleotide sequence of the B. subtilis DNA contained in plasmid pENTA22, a clone expressing the B. subtilis entD homolog, revealed the presence of at least two genes. One gene was identified as sfpo, a previously reported gene involved in the production of surfactin in B. subtilis and which is highly homologous to the E. coli entD gene. We present evidence that the E. coli entD and B. subtilis sfpo genes are interchangeable and that their products are members of a new family of proteins which function in the secretion of peptide molecules. Images PMID:8407792

  10. Structure and Biosynthesis of Amychelin, an Unusual Mixed-Ligand Siderophore from Amycolatopsis sp. AA4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria generate a large number of structurally diverse small molecules with potential therapeutic value. Genomic analyses of this productive group of bacteria show that their genetic potential to manufacture small molecules exceeds their observed ability by roughly an order of magnitude, and this revelation has prompted a number of studies to identify members of the unknown majority. As a potential window into this cryptic secondary metabolome, pairwise assays for developmental interactions within a set of 20 sequenced actinomycetes were carried out. These assays revealed that Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, a so-called “rare” actinomycete, produces a novel siderophore, amychelin, which alters the developmental processes of several neighboring streptomycetes. Using this phenotype as an assay, we isolated amychelin and solved its structure by NMR and MS methods coupled with an X-ray crystallographic analysis of its Fe-complex. The iron binding affinity of amychelin was determined using EDTA competition assays, and a biosynthetic cluster was identified and annotated to provide a tentative biosynthetic scheme for amychelin. PMID:21699219

  11. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  12. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J; Owen, Jeremy G; Craig, Jeffrey W; Brady, Sean F

    2013-01-18

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein, we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts.

  13. Selective enrichment of environmental DNA libraries for genes encoding nonribosomal peptides and polyketides by phosphopantetheine transferase-dependent complementation of siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Banik, Jacob J.; Owen, Jeremy G.; Craig, Jeffrey W.; Brady, Sean F.

    2012-01-01

    The cloning of DNA directly from environmental samples provides a means to functionally access biosynthetic gene clusters present in the genomes of the large fraction of bacteria that remains recalcitrant to growth in the laboratory. Herein we demonstrate a method by which complementation of phosphopantetheine transferase deletion mutants can be used to restore siderophore biosynthesis and to therefore selectively enrich eDNA libraries for nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) and polyketide synthase (PKS) gene sequences to unprecedented levels. The common use of NRPS/PKS-derived siderophores across bacterial taxa makes this method generalizable and should allow for the facile selective enrichment of NRPS/PKS-containing biosynthetic gene clusters from large environmental DNA libraries using a wide variety of phylogenetically diverse bacterial hosts. PMID:23072412

  14. Bordetella pertussis FbpA binds both unchelated iron and iron siderophore complexes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Weerasinghe, Aruna J; Parker Siburt, Claire J; Kreulen, R Timothy; Armstrong, Sandra K; Brickman, Timothy J; Lambert, Lisa A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2014-06-24

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough. This pathogenic bacterium can obtain the essential nutrient iron using its native alcaligin siderophore and by utilizing xeno-siderophores such as desferrioxamine B, ferrichrome, and enterobactin. Previous genome-wide expression profiling identified an iron repressible B. pertussis gene encoding a periplasmic protein (FbpABp). A previously reported crystal structure shows significant similarity between FbpABp and previously characterized bacterial iron binding proteins, and established its iron-binding ability. Bordetella growth studies determined that FbpABp was required for utilization of not only unchelated iron, but also utilization of iron bound to both native and xeno-siderophores. In this in vitro solution study, we quantified the binding of unchelated ferric iron to FbpABp in the presence of various anions and importantly, we demonstrated that FbpABp binds all the ferric siderophores tested (native and xeno) with μM affinity. In silico modeling augmented solution data. FbpABp was incapable of iron removal from ferric xeno-siderophores in vitro. However, when FbpABp was reacted with native ferric-alcaligin, it elicited a pronounced change in the iron coordination environment, which may signify an early step in FbpABp-mediated iron removal from the native siderophore. To our knowledge, this is the first time the periplasmic component of an iron uptake system has been shown to bind iron directly as Fe(3+) and indirectly as a ferric siderophore complex.

  15. Bordetella pertussis FbpA Binds Both Unchelated Iron and Iron Siderophore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough. This pathogenic bacterium can obtain the essential nutrient iron using its native alcaligin siderophore and by utilizing xeno-siderophores such as desferrioxamine B, ferrichrome, and enterobactin. Previous genome-wide expression profiling identified an iron repressible B. pertussis gene encoding a periplasmic protein (FbpABp). A previously reported crystal structure shows significant similarity between FbpABp and previously characterized bacterial iron binding proteins, and established its iron-binding ability. Bordetella growth studies determined that FbpABp was required for utilization of not only unchelated iron, but also utilization of iron bound to both native and xeno-siderophores. In this in vitro solution study, we quantified the binding of unchelated ferric iron to FbpABp in the presence of various anions and importantly, we demonstrated that FbpABp binds all the ferric siderophores tested (native and xeno) with μM affinity. In silico modeling augmented solution data. FbpABp was incapable of iron removal from ferric xeno-siderophores in vitro. However, when FbpABp was reacted with native ferric-alcaligin, it elicited a pronounced change in the iron coordination environment, which may signify an early step in FbpABp-mediated iron removal from the native siderophore. To our knowledge, this is the first time the periplasmic component of an iron uptake system has been shown to bind iron directly as Fe3+ and indirectly as a ferric siderophore complex. PMID:24873326

  16. The Structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the First Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Siderophore Mycobactin, Reveals It To Be a Salicylate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2006-01-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 Å, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis. PMID:16923875

  17. The structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin, reveals it to be a salicylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2006-09-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 A, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis.

  18. Total Biosynthesis and Diverse Applications of the Nonribosomal Peptide-Polyketide Siderophore Yersiniabactin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Jones, Charles H.; Zhang, Guojian

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniabactin (Ybt) is a mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product natively produced by the pathogen Yersinia pestis. The compound enables iron scavenging capabilities upon host infection and is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase featuring a polyketide synthase module. This pathway has been engineered for expression and biosynthesis using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. In the current work, the biosynthetic process for Ybt formation was improved through the incorporation of a dedicated step to eliminate the need for exogenous salicylate provision. When this improvement was made, the compound was tested in parallel applications that highlight the metal-chelating nature of the compound. In the first application, Ybt was assessed as a rust remover, demonstrating a capacity of ∼40% compared to a commercial removal agent and ∼20% relative to total removal capacity. The second application tested Ybt in removing copper from a variety of nonbiological and biological solution mixtures. Success across a variety of media indicates potential utility in diverse scenarios that include environmental and biomedical settings. PMID:26025901

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MbtI, a protein essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2005-01-01

    MbtI, the putative isochorismate synthase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in M. tuberculosis, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, depends on the secretion of salicylate-based siderophores called mycobactins for the acquisition of extracellular iron, which is essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium. The protein MbtI is thought to be the isochorismate synthase enzyme responsible for the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, the first step in the salicylate production required for mycobactin biosynthesis. MbtI has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å. They belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.8, b = 163.4, c = 194.9 Å, consistent with the presence of either two, three or four molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MbtI, a protein essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, depends on the secretion of salicylate-based siderophores called mycobactins for the acquisition of extracellular iron, which is essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium. The protein MbtI is thought to be the isochorismate synthase enzyme responsible for the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, the first step in the salicylate production required for mycobactin biosynthesis. MbtI has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å. They belong to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.8, b = 163.4, c = 194.9 Å, consistent with the presence of either two, three or four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:16508110

  1. Inhibition of Siderophore Biosynthesis by 2-Triazole Substituted Analogues of 5’-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine: Antibacterial Nucleosides Effective Against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Amol; Boshoff, Helena I.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Neres, João; Labello, Nicholas P.; Somu, Ravindranadh V.; Xing, Chengguo; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis, biochemical, and biological evaluation of a systematic series of 2-triazole derivatives of 5’-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) are described as inhibitors of aryl acid adenylating enzymes (AAAE) involved in siderophore biosynthesis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Structure activity relationships revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate a wide range of substituents at the 4-position of the triazole moiety and a majority of the compounds possessed subnanomolar apparent inhibition constants. However, the in vitro potency did not always translate into whole cell biological activity against M. tuberculosis, suggesting intrinsic resistance, due to limited permeability, plays an important role in the observed activities. Additionally, the well-known valence tautomerism between 2-azidopurines and their fused tetrazole counterparts led to an unexpected facile acylation of the purine N-6 amino group. PMID:19053762

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MbtI, a protein essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, depends on the secretion of salicylate-based siderophores called mycobactins for the acquisition of extracellular iron, which is essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium. The protein MbtI is thought to be the isochorismate synthase enzyme responsible for the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, the first step in the salicylate production required for mycobactin biosynthesis. MbtI has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.8 A. They belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 51.8, b = 163.4, c = 194.9 A, consistent with the presence of either two, three or four molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  3. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of salicylate synthase, a chorismate-utilizing enyme involved in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, James F. Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Ladner, Jane E.

    2006-03-01

    Salicylate synthase, which catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of the siderophore yersiniabactin, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å. Bacteria have evolved elaborate schemes that help them thrive in environments where free iron is severely limited. Siderophores such as yersiniabactin are small iron-scavenging molecules that are deployed by bacteria during iron starvation. Several studies have linked siderophore production and virulence. Yersiniabactin, produced by several Enterobacteriaceae, is derived from the key metabolic intermediate chorismic acid via its conversion to salicylate by salicylate synthase. Crystals of salicylate synthase from the uropathogen Escherichia coli CFT073 have been grown by vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as the precipitant. The monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals diffract to 2.5 Å. The unit-cell parameters are a = 57.27, b = 164.07, c = 59.04 Å, β = 108.8°. The solvent content of the crystals is 54% and there are two molecules of the 434-amino-acid protein in the asymmetric unit. It is anticipated that the structure will reveal key details about the reaction mechanism and the evolution of salicylate synthase.

  4. Microbial Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    Iron is of great importance for many metabolic processes since the redox potential between its two valence states Fe2+ and Fe3+ lies within the range of physiological processes. Actually, iron is not a rare element, it is fourth in abundance in the earth crust, but it is not readily available for microorganisms. In the soil ferric oxide hydrates are formed at pH values around seven and the concentration of free Fe3+ is at best 10-17 mol/dm3 while about 10-6 mol/dm3 would be needed. In living organisms iron is usually strongly bound to peptidic substances such as transferrins. To increase the supply of soluble iron microorganisms other than those living in an acidic habitat may circumvent the problem by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ (182), which seems to be of major importance for marine phytoplankton (151); see also amphiphilic marine bacteria (Sect.2.8) and Fe2+ binding ligands (Sect. 7) below. An important alternative is the production of Fe3+ chelating compounds, so-called siderophores. Siderophores are secondary metabolites with masses below 2,000 Da and a high affinity to Fe3+. Small iron-siderophore complexes can enter the cell via unspecific porins, larger ones need a transport system that recognizes the ferri-siderophore at the cell surface. In the cell, iron is released mostly by reduction to the less strongly bound Fe2+ state (137), and the free siderophore is re-exported ("shuttle mechanism"); for a modified shuttle system see pyoverdins (Sect. 2.1) and amonabactins (Sect. 2.7). Rarely the siderophore is degraded in the periplasmatic space as, e.g. enterobactin (Sect. 2.7). Alternatively Fe3+ is transferred at the cell surface from the ferri-siderophore to a trans-membrane transport system ("taxi mechanism"). A probably archaic and unspecific variety of the taxi mechanism comprises the reduction of Fe3+ at the cell surface (see ferrichrome A, Sect. 2.6 (99, 105)). The terms "shuttle" and "taxi mechanism" were coined by Raymond and Carrano (296).

  5. Self-poisoning of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by interrupting siderophore recycling.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Wells, Ryan M; Madduri, Ashoka V R; Renfrow, Matthew B; Ratledge, Colin; Moody, D Branch; Niederweis, Michael

    2014-02-04

    Siderophores are small iron-binding molecules secreted by bacteria to scavenge iron. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, produces the siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin. Complexes of the mycobacterial membrane proteins MmpS4 and MmpS5 with the transporters MmpL4 and MmpL5 are required for siderophore export and virulence in Mtb. Here we show that, surprisingly, mycobactin or carboxymycobactin did not rescue the low-iron growth defect of the export mutant but severely impaired growth. Exogenous siderophores were taken up by the export mutant, and siderophore-delivered iron was used, but the deferrated siderophores accumulated intracellularly, indicating a blockade of siderophore recycling. This hypothesis was confirmed by the observation that radiolabeled carboxymycobactin was taken up and secreted again by Mtb. Addition of iron salts to an Mtb siderophore biosynthesis mutant stimulated more growth in the presence of a limiting amount of siderophores than iron-loaded siderophores alone. Thus, recycling enables Mtb to acquire iron at lower metabolic cost because Mtb cannot use iron salts without siderophores. Exogenous siderophores were bactericidal for the export mutant in submicromolar quantities. High-resolution mass spectrometry revealed that endogenous carboxymycobactin also accumulated in the export mutant. Toxic siderophore accumulation is prevented by a drug that inhibits siderophore biosynthesis. Intracellular accumulation of siderophores was toxic despite the use of an alternative iron source such as hemin, suggesting an additional inhibitory mechanism independent of iron availability. This study indicates that targeting siderophore export/recycling would deliver a one-two punch to Mtb: restricting access to iron and causing toxic intracellular siderophore accumulation.

  6. Microbial siderophore-based iron assimilation and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Chen, Wei-Hung; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-06-01

    Siderophores are structurally diverse, complex natural products that bind metals with extraordinary specificity and affinity. The acquisition of iron is critical for the survival and virulence of many pathogenic microbes and diverse strategies have evolved to synthesize, import and utilize iron. There has been a substantial increase of known siderophore scaffolds isolated and characterized in the past decade and the corresponding biosynthetic gene clusters have provided insight into the varied pathways involved in siderophore biosynthesis, delivery and utilization. Additionally, therapeutic applications of siderophores and related compounds are actively being developed. The study of biosynthetic pathways to natural siderophores augments the understanding of the complex mechanisms of bacterial iron acquisition, and enables a complimentary approach to address virulence through the interruption of siderophore biosynthesis or utilization by targeting the key enzymes to the siderophore pathways.

  7. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores.

  8. The Siderophore Metabolome of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Baars, Oliver; Zhang, Xinning

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a detailed characterization of the siderophore metabolome, or “chelome,” of the agriculturally important and widely studied model organism Azotobacter vinelandii. Using a new high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, we found over 35 metal-binding secondary metabolites, indicative of a vast chelome in A. vinelandii. These include vibrioferrin, a siderophore previously observed only in marine bacteria. Quantitative analyses of siderophore production during diazotrophic growth with different sources and availabilities of Fe showed that, under all tested conditions, vibrioferrin was present at the highest concentration of all siderophores and suggested new roles for vibrioferrin in the soil environment. Bioinformatic searches confirmed the capacity for vibrioferrin production in Azotobacter spp. and other bacteria spanning multiple phyla, habitats, and lifestyles. Moreover, our studies revealed a large number of previously unreported derivatives of all known A. vinelandii siderophores and rationalized their origins based on genomic analyses, with implications for siderophore diversity and evolution. Together, these insights provide clues as to why A. vinelandii harbors multiple siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters. Coupled with the growing evidence for alternative functions of siderophores, the vast chelome in A. vinelandii may be explained by multiple, disparate evolutionary pressures that act on siderophore production. PMID:26452553

  9. The Siderophore Metabolome of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Baars, Oliver; Zhang, Xinning; Morel, François M M; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2015-10-09

    In this study, we performed a detailed characterization of the siderophore metabolome, or "chelome," of the agriculturally important and widely studied model organism Azotobacter vinelandii. Using a new high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, we found over 35 metal-binding secondary metabolites, indicative of a vast chelome in A. vinelandii. These include vibrioferrin, a siderophore previously observed only in marine bacteria. Quantitative analyses of siderophore production during diazotrophic growth with different sources and availabilities of Fe showed that, under all tested conditions, vibrioferrin was present at the highest concentration of all siderophores and suggested new roles for vibrioferrin in the soil environment. Bioinformatic searches confirmed the capacity for vibrioferrin production in Azotobacter spp. and other bacteria spanning multiple phyla, habitats, and lifestyles. Moreover, our studies revealed a large number of previously unreported derivatives of all known A. vinelandii siderophores and rationalized their origins based on genomic analyses, with implications for siderophore diversity and evolution. Together, these insights provide clues as to why A. vinelandii harbors multiple siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters. Coupled with the growing evidence for alternative functions of siderophores, the vast chelome in A. vinelandii may be explained by multiple, disparate evolutionary pressures that act on siderophore production.

  10. Fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Haas, Hubertus

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are chelators synthesized by microbes to sequester iron. This article summarizes the knowledge on the fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus. In recent years, A. fumigatus became a role model for fungal biosynthesis, uptake and degradation of siderophores as well as regulation of siderophore-mediated iron handling and the elucidation of siderophore functions. Siderophore functions comprise uptake, intracellular transport and storage of iron. This proved to be crucial not only for adaptation to iron starvation conditions but also for germination, asexual and sexual propagation, antioxidative defense, mutual interaction, microbial competition as well as virulence in plant and animal hosts. Recent studies also indicate the high potential of siderophores and its biosynthetic pathway to improve diagnosis and therapy of fungal infections.

  11. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N5-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a reduced

  12. Iron-Regulated Protein HupB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Positively Regulates Siderophore Biosynthesis and Is Essential for Growth in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Satya Deo; Choudhury, Mitali; Yousuf, Suhail; Wheeler, Paul R.; Gordon, Stephen V.; Ranjan, Akash

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses the 28-kDa protein HupB (Rv2986c) and the Fe3+-specific high-affinity siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin upon iron limitation. The objective of this study was to understand the functional role of HupB in iron acquisition. A hupB mutant strain of M. tuberculosis, subjected to growth in low-iron medium (0.02 μg Fe ml−1), showed a marked reduction of both siderophores with low transcript levels of the mbt genes encoding the MB biosynthetic machinery. Complementation of the mutant strain with hupB restored siderophore production to levels comparable to that of the wild type. We demonstrated the binding of HupB to the mbtB promoter by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA footprinting. The latter revealed the HupB binding site to be a 10-bp AT-rich region. While negative regulation of the mbt machinery by IdeR is known, this is the first report of positive regulation of the mbt operon by HupB. Interestingly, the mutant strain failed to survive inside macrophages, suggesting that HupB plays an important role in vivo. PMID:24610707

  13. Detection of photoactive siderophore biosynthetic genes in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Gärdes, Astrid; Triana, Christopher; Amin, Shady A; Green, David H; Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-06-01

    Iron is an essential element for oceanic microbial life but its low bioavailability limits microorganisms in large areas of the oceans. To acquire this metal many marine bacteria produce organic chelates that bind and transport iron (siderophores). While it has been hypothesized that the global production of siderophores by heterotrophic bacteria and some cyanobacteria constitutes the bulk of organic ligands binding iron in the ocean because stability constants of siderophores and these organic ligands are similar, and because ligand concentrations rise sharply in response to iron fertilization events, direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. This lack is due to the difficulty in characterizing these ligands due both to their extremely low concentrations and their highly heterogeneous nature. The situation for characterizing photoactive siderophores in situ is more problematic because of their expected short lifetimes in the photic zone. An alternative approach is to make use of high sensitivity molecular technology (qPCR) to search for siderophore biosynthesis genes related to the production of photoactive siderophores. In this way one can access their "biochemical potential" and utilize this information as a proxy for the presence of these siderophores in the marine environment. Here we show, using qPCR primers designed to detect biosynthetic genes for the siderophores vibrioferrin, petrobactin and aerobactin that such genes are widespread and based on their abundance, the "biochemical potential" for photoactive siderophore production is significant. Concurrently we also briefly examine the microbial biodiversity responsible for such production as a function of depth and location across a North Atlantic transect.

  14. Siderophore production by actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfeng; Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-08-01

    Produced by bacteria, fungi and plants, siderophores are low-molecular-weight chelating agents (200-2,000 Da) to facilitate uptake of iron (Fe). They play an important role in extracellular Fe solubilization from minerals to make it available to microorganisms. Siderophores have various chemical structures and form a family of at least 500 different compounds. Some antibiotics (i.e., albomycins, ferrimycins, danomycins, salmycins, and tetracyclines) can bind Fe and some siderophores showed diverse biological activities. Functions and applications of siderophores derived from actinobacteria were reviewed to better understand the diverse metabolites.

  15. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  16. Structure, function and binding selectivity and stereoselectivity of siderophore-iron outer membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Brillet, Karl

    2012-01-01

    To get access to iron, microorganisms produce and release into their environment small organic metal chelators called siderophores. In parallel, they produce siderophore-iron outer membrane transporters (also called TonB-Dependent Transporters or TBDT) embedded in the outer membrane; these proteins actively reabsorb the siderophore loaded with iron from the extracellular medium. This active uptake requires energy in the form of the proton motive force transferred from the inner membrane to the outer membrane transporter via the inner membrane TonB complex. Siderophores produced by microorganisms are structurally very diverse with molecular weights of 150 up to 2000Da. Siderophore-iron uptake from the extracellular medium by TBDTs is a highly selective and sometimes even stereoselective process, with each siderophore having a specific TBDT. Unlike the siderophores, all TBDTs have similar structures and belong to the outer membrane β-barrel protein superfamily. The way in which the siderophore-iron complex passes through the TBDT is still unclear. In some bacteria, TBDTs are also partners of signaling cascades regulating the expression of proteins involved in siderophore biosynthesis and siderophore-iron acquisition.

  17. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence.

    PubMed

    Condon, Bradford J; Oide, Shinichi; Gibson, Donna M; Krasnoff, Stuart B; Turgeon, B Gillian

    2014-08-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or reductive iron assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies with the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus identified two genes, NPS2 and NPS6, encoding different nonribosomal peptide synthetases responsible for biosynthesis of intra- and extracellular siderophores, respectively. Deletion of NPS6 results in loss of extracellular siderophore biosynthesis, attenuated virulence, hypersensitivity to oxidative and iron-depletion stress, and reduced asexual sporulation, while nps2 mutants are phenotypically wild type in all of these traits but defective in sexual spore development when NPS2 is missing from both mating partners. Here, it is reported that nps2nps6 mutants have more severe phenotypes than both nps2 and nps6 single mutants. In contrast, mutants lacking the FTR1 or FET3 genes encoding the permease and ferroxidase components, respectively, of the alternate RIA system, are like wild type in all of the above phenotypes. However, without supplemental iron, combinatorial nps6ftr1 and nps2nps6ftr1 mutants are less virulent, are reduced in growth, and are less able to combat oxidative stress and to sporulate asexually, compared with nps6 mutants alone. These findings demonstrate that, while the role of RIA in metabolism and virulence is overshadowed by that of extracellular siderophores as a high-affinity iron acquisition mechanism in C. heterostrophus, it functions as a critical backup for the fungus.

  18. Iron(III)-siderophore coordination chemistry: Reactivity of marine siderophores.

    PubMed

    Butler, Alison; Theisen, Roslyn M

    2010-02-01

    Two remarkable features of many siderophores produced by oceanic bacteria are the prevalence of an α-hydroxy-carboxylic acid functionality either in the form of the amino acid β-hydroxy aspartic acid or in the form of citric acid, as well as the predominance of amphiphilic siderophores. This review will provide an overview of the photoreactivity that takes place when siderophores containing β-hydroxy aspartic acid and citric acid are coordinated to iron(III). This photoreactivity raises questions about the role of this photochemistry in microbial iron acquisition as well as upper-ocean iron cycling. The self-assembly of amphiphilic siderophores and the coordination-induced phase-change of the micelle-to-vesicle transformation will also be reviewed. The distinctive photosensitive and self-assembly properties of marine siderophores hint at possibly new microbial iron acquisition mechanisms.

  19. Synthesis of siderophores by plant-associated metallotolerant bacteria under exposure to Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Złoch, Michał; Thiem, Dominika; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    Rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria are well known producers of siderophores, organic compounds that chelate ferric iron (Fe(3+)), and therefore play an important role in plant growth promotion in metalliferous areas, thereby improving bioremediation processes. However, in addition to their primary function in iron mobilization, siderophores also have the capacity to chelate other heavy metals, such as Al(3+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), that can affect homeostasis and the heavy metal tolerance of microorganisms. The main goal of our study was to select the most efficient siderophore-producing bacterial strains isolated from the roots (endophytes) and rhizosphere of Betula pendula L. and Alnus glutinosa L. growing at two heavy metal contaminated sites in southern Poland. Siderophore biosynthesis of these strains in the presence of increasing concentrations of Cd(2+) (0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mM) under iron-deficiency conditions was analysed using spectrophotometric chemical tests for hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates, as well as the separation of bacterial siderophores by HPLC and characterization of their structure by UHPLC-QTOF/MS. We proved that (i) siderophore-producing bacterial strains seems to be more abundant in the rhizosphere (47%) than in root endophytes (18%); (ii) the strains most effective at siderophore synthesis belonged to the genus Streptomyces and were able to secrete three types of siderophores under Cd(2+) stress: hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates; (iii) in general, the addition of Cd(2+) enhanced siderophore synthesis, particularly ferrioxamine B synthesis, which may indicate that siderophores play a significant role in tolerance to Cd(2+) in Streptomyces sp.

  20. Two Catechol Siderophores, Acinetobactin and Amonabactin, Are Simultaneously Produced by Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida Sharing Part of the Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Balado, Miguel; Souto, Alba; Vences, Ana; Careaga, Valeria P; Valderrama, Katherine; Segade, Yuri; Rodríguez, Jaime; Osorio, Carlos R; Jiménez, Carlos; Lemos, Manuel L

    2015-12-18

    The iron uptake mechanisms based on siderophore synthesis used by the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida are still not completely understood, and the precise structure of the siderophore(s) is unknown. The analysis of genome sequences revealed that this bacterium possesses two gene clusters putatively involved in the synthesis of siderophores. One cluster is a candidate to encode the synthesis of acinetobactin, the siderophore of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, while the second cluster shows high similarity to the genes encoding amonabactin synthesis in Aeromonas hydrophila. Using a combination of genomic analysis, mutagenesis, biological assays, chemical purification, and structural determination procedures, here we demonstrate that most A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strains produce simultaneously the two siderophores, acinetobactin and amonabactin. Interestingly, the synthesis of both siderophores relies on a single copy of the genes encoding the synthesis of the catechol moiety (2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid) and on one encoding a phosphopantetheinyl transferase. These genes are present only in the amonabactin cluster, and a single mutation in any of them abolishes production of both siderophores. We could also demonstrate that some strains, isolated from fish raised in seawater, produce only acinetobactin since they present a deletion in the amonabactin biosynthesis gene amoG. Our study represents the first evidence of simultaneous production of acinetobactin and amonabactin by a bacterial pathogen and reveals the plasticity of bacterial genomes and biosynthetic pathways. The fact that the same siderophore is produced by unrelated pathogens highlights the importance of these systems and their interchangeability between different bacteria.

  1. Siderophores: More than Stealing Iron

    PubMed Central

    Behnsen, Judith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Siderophores are small molecular iron chelators that are produced by microbes and whose most notable function is to sequester iron from the host and provide this essential metal nutrient to microbes. Recent studies have proposed additional, noncanonical roles for siderophores, including the acquisition of noniron metals and modulation of host functions. Recently, Holden et al. (V. I. Holden, P. Breen, S. Houle, C. M. Dozois, and M. A. Bachman, mBio 7:e01397-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01397-16) showed that siderophores secreted by Klebsiella pneumoniae during lung infection induce stabilization of the transcription factor HIF-1α, increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the lung, and promote dissemination of K. pneumoniae to the spleen. Thus, their study demonstrated novel roles for siderophores in vivo, beyond iron sequestration. The interaction of siderophores with host cells further promotes the pathogenicity of K. pneumoniae and is likely relevant for other pathogens that also secrete siderophores in the host. PMID:27935843

  2. Potential of siderophore production by bacteria isolated from heavy metal: polluted and rhizosphere soils.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Khalid A; Joo, Jin Ho

    2014-06-01

    Recently, heavy metals have been shown to have a stimulating effect on siderophore biosynthesis in various bacteria. In addition, several studies have found that siderophore production is greater in bacteria isolated from soil near plant roots. The aim of this study was to compare the production of siderophores by bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and uncontaminated soils. Chrome azurol sulphonate was used to detect siderophore secretion by several bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and rhizosphere-uncontaminated soils with both a qualitative disc diffusion method and a quantitative ultraviolet spectrophotometric method. Siderophore production by rhizosphere bacteria was significantly greater than by bacteria isolated from contaminated soil. The Pearson's correlation test indicated a positive correlation between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere using the quantitative and qualitative detection methods and the amount of heavy metal in the soil. However, a significant negative correlation was observed between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from heavy metal-contaminated soil and the amount of heavy metal (r value of -0.775, P < 0.001).

  3. Genome mining and functional genomics for siderophore production in Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Franken, Angelique C W; Lechner, Beatrix E; Werner, Ernst R; Haas, Hubertus; Lokman, B Christien; Ram, Arthur F J; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; de Weert, Sandra; Punt, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    Iron is an essential metal for many organisms, but the biologically relevant form of iron is scarce because of rapid oxidation resulting in low solubility. Simultaneously, excessive accumulation of iron is toxic. Consequently, iron uptake is a highly controlled process. In most fungal species, siderophores play a central role in iron handling. Siderophores are small iron-specific chelators that can be secreted to scavenge environmental iron or bind intracellular iron with high affinity. A second high-affinity iron uptake mechanism is reductive iron assimilation (RIA). As shown in Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans, synthesis of siderophores in Aspergilli is predominantly under control of the transcription factors SreA and HapX, which are connected by a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Abolishing this fine-tuned regulation corroborates iron homeostasis, including heme biosynthesis, which could be biotechnologically of interest, e.g. the heterologous production of heme-dependent peroxidases. Aspergillus niger genome inspection identified orthologues of several genes relevant for RIA and siderophore metabolism, as well as sreA and hapX. Interestingly, genes related to synthesis of the common fungal extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C were absent. Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) confirmed the absence of triacetylfusarinine C, and demonstrated that the major secreted siderophores of A. niger are coprogen B and ferrichrome, which is also the dominant intracellular siderophore. In A. niger wild type grown under iron-replete conditions, the expression of genes involved in coprogen biosynthesis and RIA was low in the exponential growth phase but significantly induced during ascospore germination. Deletion of sreA in A. niger resulted in elevated iron uptake and increased cellular ferrichrome accumulation. Increased sensitivity toward phleomycin and high iron concentration reflected the toxic effects of excessive

  4. In silico analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetases of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri: identification of putative siderophore and lipopeptide biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Etchegaray, Augusto; Silva-Stenico, Maria E; Moon, David H; Tsai, Siu M

    2004-01-01

    The genomes of the plant pathogens Xanthomonas axonopodis (Xac) and Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) were analysed with the aim of deducing their ability to produce nonribosomal peptides. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes were identified in two separate loci of Xac. While the genes of locus 1 are common to both strains, locus 2 was only found in Xac. Dissection and phylogenetic analysis of the condensation and thioesterase domains of the NRPSs of loci 1 and 2 of Xac revealed homology, respectively, with siderophore and lipopeptide synthetases. Further analysis of locus 1 revealed genes related to polyketide and polyamine biosynthesis that could be involved in the assembly of substrates for siderophore biosynthesis in both strains. In vitro production of siderophores by both Xac and Xcc was confirmed. Since bacterial siderophores and lipopeptides can be pathogenic and are typically produced nonribosomally, these results suggest that the identified genes could be involved in phytotoxin production.

  5. Xanthoferrin, the α-hydroxycarboxylate-type siderophore of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, is required for optimum virulence and growth inside cabbage.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Rai, Rikky; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-06-27

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causes black rot, a serious disease of crucifers. Xanthomonads encode a siderophore biosynthesis and uptake gene cluster xss (Xanthomonas siderophore synthesis) involved in the production of a vibrioferrin-type siderophore. However, little is known about the role of the siderophore in the iron uptake and virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris. In this study, we show that X. campestris pv. campestris produces an α-hydroxycarboxylate-type siderophore (named xanthoferrin), which is required for growth under low-iron conditions and for optimum virulence. A mutation in the siderophore synthesis xssA gene causes deficiency in siderophore production and growth under low-iron conditions. In contrast, the siderophore utilization ΔxsuA mutant is able to produce siderophore, but exhibits a defect in the utilization of the siderophore-iron complex. Our radiolabelled iron uptake studies confirm that the ΔxssA and ΔxsuA mutants exhibit defects in ferric iron (Fe(3+) ) uptake. The ΔxssA mutant is able to utilize and transport the exogenous xanthoferrin-Fe(3+) complex; in contrast, the siderophore utilization or uptake mutant ΔxsuA exhibits defects in siderophore uptake. Expression analysis of the xss operon using a chromosomal gusA fusion indicates that the xss operon is expressed during in planta growth and under low-iron conditions. Furthermore, exogenous iron supplementation in cabbage leaves rescues the in planta growth deficiency of ΔxssA and ΔxsuA mutants. Our study reveals that the siderophore xanthoferrin is an important virulence factor of X. campestris pv. campestris which promotes in planta growth by the sequestration of Fe(3+) .

  6. Evaluation of photo-reactive siderophore producing bacteria before, during and after a bloom of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum.

    PubMed

    Yarimizu, Kyoko; Polido, Geraldine; Gärdes, Astrid; Carter, Melissa L; Hilbern, Mary; Carrano, Carl J

    2014-06-01

    Evidence is increasing for a mutualistic relationship between phytoplankton and heterotrophic marine bacteria. It has been proposed that bacteria producing photoactive iron binding compounds known as siderophores could play an important role in such mutualistic associations by producing bioavailable iron utilizable by phytoplankton and in exchange receive autotrophically derived DOM. In order to understand the potential role photoactive siderophores might be playing in bacterial-algal mutualism or marine biogeochemistry in general, it is important to be able to detect and quantify their presence in various environments. One approach to accomplish that end is to make use of high sensitivity genomics technology (qPCR) to search for siderophore biosynthesis genes related to the production of photoactive siderophores. In this way one can access their "biochemical potential" and utilize this information as a proxy for the presence of these siderophores in the marine environment. In this report we studied the correlation of the presence of bacteria producing one of the three photoactive siderophores relative to total bacterial and dinoflagellate numbers from surface water at the Scripps Pier before, during, and after fall bloom of the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum. We believe that these findings will aid us in gauging the importance of photoactive siderophores in the marine environment and in harmful algal bloom dynamics in particular.

  7. Characterization of microbial siderophores by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pluháček, Tomáš; Lemr, Karel; Ghosh, Dipankar; Milde, David; Novák, Jiří; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Siderophores play important roles in microbial iron piracy, and are applied as infectious disease biomarkers and novel pharmaceutical drugs. Inductively coupled plasma and molecular mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with high resolution separations allow characterization of siderophores in complex samples taking advantages of mass defect data filtering, tandem mass spectrometry, and iron-containing compound quantitation. The enrichment approaches used in siderophore analysis and current ICP-MS technologies are reviewed. The recent tools for fast dereplication of secondary metabolites and their databases are reported. This review on siderophores is concluded with their recent medical, biochemical, geochemical, and agricultural applications in mass spectrometry context.

  8. Hunger for iron: the alternative siderophore iron scavenging systems in highly virulent Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Rakin, Alexander; Schneider, Lukas; Podladchikova, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Low molecular weight siderophores are used by many living organisms to scavenge scarcely available ferric iron. Presence of at least a single siderophore-based iron acquisition system is usually acknowledged as a virulence-associated trait and a pre-requisite to become an efficient and successful pathogen. Currently, it is assumed that yersiniabactin (Ybt) is the solely functional endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in highly virulent Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B). Genes responsible for biosynthesis, transport, and regulation of the yersiniabactin (ybt) production are clustered on a mobile genetic element, the High-Pathogenicity Island (HPI) that is responsible for broad dissemination of the ybt genes in Enterobacteriaceae. However, the ybt gene cluster is absent from nearly half of Y. pseudotuberculosis O3 isolates and epidemic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 isolates responsible for the Far East Scarlet-like Fever. Several potential siderophore-mediated iron uptake gene clusters are documented in Yersinia genomes, however, neither of them have been proven to be functional. It has been suggested that at least two siderophores alternative to Ybt may operate in the highly virulent Yersinia pestis/Y. pseudotuberculosis group, and are referred to as pseudochelin (Pch) and yersiniachelin (Ych). Furthermore, most sporadic Y. pseudotuberculosis O1 strains possess gene clusters encoding all three iron scavenging systems. Thus, the Ybt system appears not to be the sole endogenous siderophore iron uptake system in the highly virulent yersiniae and may be efficiently substituted and/or supplemented by alternative iron siderophore scavenging systems.

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens pirates both ferrioxamine and ferricoelichelin siderophores from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Galet, Justine; Deveau, Aurélie; Hôtel, Laurence; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Leblond, Pierre; Aigle, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Iron is essential in many biological processes. However, its bioavailability is reduced in aerobic environments, such as soil. To overcome this limitation, microorganisms have developed different strategies, such as iron chelation by siderophores. Some bacteria have even gained the ability to detect and utilize xenosiderophores, i.e., siderophores produced by other organisms. We illustrate an example of such an interaction between two soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, which produce the siderophores pyoverdine and enantiopyochelin and the siderophores desferrioxamines B and E and coelichelin, respectively. During pairwise cultures on iron-limiting agar medium, no induction of siderophore synthesis by P. fluorescens BBc6R8 was observed in the presence of S. ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Cocultures with a Streptomyces mutant strain that produced either coelichelin or desferrioxamines, as well as culture in a medium supplemented with desferrioxamine B, resulted in the absence of pyoverdine production; however, culture with a double mutant deficient in desferrioxamines and coelichelin production did not. This strongly suggests that P. fluorescens BBbc6R8 utilizes the ferrioxamines and ferricoelichelin produced by S. ambofaciens as xenosiderophores and therefore no longer activates the production of its own siderophores. A screening of a library of P. fluorescens BBc6R8 mutants highlighted the involvement of the TonB-dependent receptor FoxA in this process: the expression of foxA and genes involved in the regulation of its biosynthesis was induced in the presence of S. ambofaciens. In a competitive environment, such as soil, siderophore piracy could well be one of the driving forces that determine the outcome of microbial competition.

  10. Mammalian siderophores, siderophore-binding lipocalins, and the labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K

    2012-04-20

    Bacteria use tight-binding, ferric-specific chelators called siderophores to acquire iron from the environment and from the host during infection; animals use proteins such as transferrin and ferritin to transport and store iron. Recently, candidate compounds that could serve endogenously as mammalian siderophore equivalents have been identified and characterized through associations with siderocalin, the only mammalian siderophore-binding protein currently known. Siderocalin, an antibacterial protein, acts by sequestering iron away from infecting bacteria as siderophore complexes. Candidate endogenous siderophores include compounds that only effectively transport iron as ternary complexes with siderocalin, explaining pleiotropic activities in normal cellular processes and specific disease states.

  11. Catechol Siderophore Transport by Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Allred, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Payne, Shelley M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Siderophores, small iron-binding molecules secreted by many microbial species, capture environmental iron for transport back into the cell. Vibrio cholerae synthesizes and uses the catechol siderophore vibriobactin and also uses siderophores secreted by other species, including enterobactin produced by Escherichia coli. E. coli secretes both canonical cyclic enterobactin and linear enterobactin derivatives likely derived from its cleavage by the enterobactin esterase Fes. We show here that V. cholerae does not use cyclic enterobactin but instead uses its linear derivatives. V. cholerae lacked both a receptor for efficient transport of cyclic enterobactin and enterobactin esterase to promote removal of iron from the ferrisiderophore complex. To further characterize the transport of catechol siderophores, we show that the linear enterobactin derivatives were transported into V. cholerae by either of the catechol siderophore receptors IrgA and VctA, which also transported the synthetic siderophore MECAM [1,3,5-N,N′,N″-tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-triaminomethylbenzene]. Vibriobactin is transported via the additional catechol siderophore receptor ViuA, while the Vibrio fluvialis siderophore fluvibactin was transported by all three catechol receptors. ViuB, a putative V. cholerae siderophore-interacting protein (SIP), functionally substituted for the E. coli ferric reductase YqjH, which promotes the release of iron from the siderophore in the bacterial cytoplasm. In V. cholerae, ViuB was required for the use of vibriobactin but was not required for the use of MECAM, fluvibactin, ferrichrome, or the linear derivatives of enterobactin. This suggests the presence of another protein in V. cholerae capable of promoting the release of iron from these siderophores. IMPORTANCE Vibrio cholerae is a major human pathogen and also serves as a model for the Vibrionaceae, which include other serious human and fish pathogens. The ability of these species to persist and

  12. Diverging roles of bacterial siderophores during infection.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Bachman, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight, high affinity iron chelating molecules that are essential virulence factors in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Whereas the chemical structure of siderophores is extremely variable, the function of siderophores has been narrowly defined as the chelation and delivery of iron to bacteria for proliferation. The discovery of the host protein Lipocalin 2, capable of specifically sequestering the siderophore Enterobactin but not its glycosylated-derivative Salmochelin, indicated that diversity in structure could be an immune evasion mechanism that provides functional redundancy during infection. However, there is growing evidence that siderophores are specialized in their iron-acquisition functions, can perturb iron homeostasis in their hosts, and even bind non-iron metals to promote bacterial fitness. The combination of siderophores produced by a pathogen can enable inter-bacterial competition, modulate host cellular pathways, and determine the bacterial "replicative niche" during infection. This review will examine both classical and novel functions of siderophores to address the concept that siderophores are non-redundant virulence factors used to enhance bacterial pathogenesis.

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of the Iron Starvation Response in Bordetella pertussis Provides New Insights into Siderophore Utilization and Virulence Gene Expression ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Cummings, Craig A.; Liew, Sin-Yee; Relman, David A.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2011-01-01

    Serological studies of patients with pertussis and the identification of antigenic Bordetella pertussis proteins support the hypothesis that B. pertussis perceives an iron starvation cue and expresses multiple iron source utilization systems in its natural human host environment. Furthermore, previous studies using a murine respiratory tract infection model showed that several of these B. pertussis iron systems are required for colonization and persistence and are differentially expressed over the course of infection. The present study examined genome-wide changes in B. pertussis gene transcript abundance in response to iron starvation in vitro. In addition to known iron source utilization genes, we identified a previously uncharacterized iron-repressed cytoplasmic membrane transporter system, fbpABC, that is required for the utilization of multiple structurally distinct siderophores including alcaligin, enterobactin, ferrichrome, and desferrioxamine B. Expression of type III secretion system genes was also found to be upregulated during iron starvation in both B. pertussis strain Tohama I and Bordetella bronchiseptica strain RB50. In a survey of type III secretion system protein production by an assortment of B. pertussis laboratory-adapted and low-passage clinical isolate strains, iron limitation increased the production and secretion of the type III secretion system-specific translocation apparatus tip protein Bsp22 in all Bvg-proficient strains. These results indicate that iron starvation in the infected host is an important environmental cue influencing not only Bordetella iron transport gene expression but also the expression of other important virulence-associated genes. PMID:21742863

  14. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  15. Resistance to oxidative stress via regulating siderophore-mediated iron acquisition by the citrus fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hung; Yang, Siwy Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2014-05-01

    The ability of the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata to detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) is crucial for pathogenesis to citrus. We report regulation of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition and ROS resistance by the NADPH oxidase (NOX), the redox activating yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulator, and the high-osmolarity glycerol 1 (HOG1) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The A. alternata nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NPS6) is essential for the biosynthesis of siderophores, contributing to iron uptake under low-iron conditions. Fungal strains impaired for NOX, YAP1, HOG1 or NPS6 all display increased sensitivity to ROS. Exogenous addition of iron at least partially rescues ROS sensitivity seen for NPS6, YAP1, HOG1, and NOX mutants. Importantly, expression of the NPS6 gene and biosynthesis of siderophores are regulated by NOX, YAP1 and HOG1, supporting a functional link among these regulatory pathways. Although iron fully rescues H2O2 sensitivity seen in mutants impaired for the response regulator SKN7, neither expression of NPS6 nor biosynthesis of siderophores is controlled by SKN7. Our results indicate that the acquisition of environmental iron has profound effects on ROS detoxification.

  16. Production of the Catechol Type Siderophore Bacillibactin by the Honey Bee Pathogen Paenibacillus larvae

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Poppinga, Lena; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Genersch, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood. This bacterial infection of honey bee brood is a notifiable epizootic posing a serious threat to global honey bee health because not only individual larvae but also entire colonies succumb to the disease. In the recent past considerable progress has been made in elucidating molecular aspects of host pathogen interactions during pathogenesis of P. larvae infections. Especially the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome of P. larvae was a major step forward and revealed the existence of several giant gene clusters coding for non-ribosomal peptide synthetases which might act as putative virulence factors. We here present the detailed analysis of one of these clusters which we demonstrated to be responsible for the biosynthesis of bacillibactin, a P. larvae siderophore. We first established culture conditions allowing the growth of P. larvae under iron-limited conditions and triggering siderophore production by P. larvae. Using a gene disruption strategy we linked siderophore production to the expression of an uninterrupted bacillibactin gene cluster. In silico analysis predicted the structure of a trimeric trithreonyl lactone (DHB-Gly-Thr)3 similar to the structure of bacillibactin produced by several Bacillus species. Mass spectrometric analysis unambiguously confirmed that the siderophore produced by P. larvae is identical to bacillibactin. Exposure bioassays demonstrated that P. larvae bacillibactin is not required for full virulence of P. larvae in laboratory exposure bioassays. This observation is consistent with results obtained for bacillibactin in other pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25237888

  17. Production of the catechol type siderophore bacillibactin by the honey bee pathogen Paenibacillus larvae.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Gillian; Müller, Sebastian; Garcia-Gonzalez, Eva; Poppinga, Lena; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Genersch, Elke

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae is the etiological agent of American Foulbrood. This bacterial infection of honey bee brood is a notifiable epizootic posing a serious threat to global honey bee health because not only individual larvae but also entire colonies succumb to the disease. In the recent past considerable progress has been made in elucidating molecular aspects of host pathogen interactions during pathogenesis of P. larvae infections. Especially the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome of P. larvae was a major step forward and revealed the existence of several giant gene clusters coding for non-ribosomal peptide synthetases which might act as putative virulence factors. We here present the detailed analysis of one of these clusters which we demonstrated to be responsible for the biosynthesis of bacillibactin, a P. larvae siderophore. We first established culture conditions allowing the growth of P. larvae under iron-limited conditions and triggering siderophore production by P. larvae. Using a gene disruption strategy we linked siderophore production to the expression of an uninterrupted bacillibactin gene cluster. In silico analysis predicted the structure of a trimeric trithreonyl lactone (DHB-Gly-Thr)3 similar to the structure of bacillibactin produced by several Bacillus species. Mass spectrometric analysis unambiguously confirmed that the siderophore produced by P. larvae is identical to bacillibactin. Exposure bioassays demonstrated that P. larvae bacillibactin is not required for full virulence of P. larvae in laboratory exposure bioassays. This observation is consistent with results obtained for bacillibactin in other pathogenic bacteria.

  18. The variable hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440.

    PubMed

    Ejje, Najwa; Soe, Cho Zin; Gu, Jiesi; Codd, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the marine actinomycete Salinispora tropica CNB-440 revealed a high frequency of gene clusters which code for the biosynthesis of known and novel secondary metabolites. Of these metabolites, bioinformatics analysis predicted that S. tropica CNB-440 could potentially biosynthesize, as high affinity Fe(iii) ligands, siderophores from the hydroxamic acid desferrioxamine class (sid1 gene cluster) and the phenolate-thia(oxa)zoli(di)ne class (sid2 and sid4 gene clusters). In this work, we have used Ni(ii)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) to pre-fractionate the hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome of S. tropica CNB-440 from the secondary metabolome, to reveal low abundance siderophores. LC-MS measurements and electronic absorption spectra from purified extracts incubated with exogenous Fe(iii) revealed eight siderophores from the desferrioxamine class (DFOA2, DFOA1a, DFOA1b, DFOB, DFON, DFOD2, DFOE, DFOD1), which included two constitutional isomers (DFOA1a, DFOA1b), and one new siderophore (DFON), the latter which would require assembly from a combination of 1,5-diaminopentane and 1,6-diaminohexane as diamine substrates. Three additional species (m/zobs 496.14, 792.34 and 804.34) with electronic absorption spectra characteristic of complexes formed between Fe(iii) and hydroxamic acid-type siderophores were evident under some conditions. The signal at m/zobs 792.34 eluted in the hydrophobic region of the reverse-phase LC and correlated with a DFOD1 analogue with a C-terminal branched chain fatty acid ([M + K(+)](+)m/zcalc 792.35), which has been previously identified from marine sediment dwelling Micrococcus luteus KLE1011. The S. tropica CNB-440 hydroxamic acid siderophore metabolome was modulated by culture conditions (pH 7, 22 °C; pH 7, 28 °C; pH 9, 28 °C) designed to simulate the variable marine environment. An increase in temperature at constant pH value showed increased levels of DFOA2 and DFOA1, and

  19. Requirement of siderophore biosynthesis for plant colonization by Salmonella enterica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminated fresh produce has become the number one vector of non-typhoidal salmonellosis to humans. However, Salmonella enterica genes essential for the life cycle of this organism outside the mammalian host are for the most part unknown. Screening deletion mutants led to the discovery that an aro...

  20. Impact of siderophore production by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 on epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea 1a/96.

    PubMed

    Wensing, Annette; Braun, Sascha D; Büttner, Petra; Expert, Dominique; Völksch, Beate; Ullrich, Matthias S; Weingart, Helge

    2010-05-01

    The use of naturally occurring microbial antagonists to suppress plant diseases offers a favorable alternative to classical methods of plant protection. The soybean epiphyte Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93 shows great potential for controlling P. syringae pv. glycinea, the causal agent of bacterial blight of soybean. Its activity against P. syringae pv. glycinea is highly reproducible even in field trials, and the suppression mechanisms involved are of special interest. In this work we demonstrated that P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 produced a significantly larger amount of siderophores than the pathogen P. syringae pv. glycinea produced. While P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 and P. syringae pv. glycinea produce the same siderophores, achromobactin and pyoverdin, the regulation of siderophore biosynthesis in the former organism is very different from that in the latter organism. The epiphytic fitness of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis was determined following spray inoculation of soybean leaves. The population size of the siderophore-negative mutant P. syringae pv. syringae strain 22d/93DeltaSid was 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild type 10 days after inoculation. The growth deficiency was compensated for when wound inoculation was used, indicating the availability of iron in the presence of small lesions on the leaves. Our results suggest that siderophore production has an indirect effect on the biocontrol activity of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93. Although siderophore-defective mutants of P. syringae pv. syringae 22d/93 still suppressed development of bacterial blight caused by P. syringae pv. glycinea, siderophore production enhanced the epiphytic fitness and thus the competitiveness of the antagonist.

  1. Siderophores in environmental research: roles and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, E; Holmström, S J M

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are organic compounds with low molecular masses that are produced by microorganisms and plants growing under low iron conditions. The primary function of these compounds is to chelate the ferric iron [Fe(III)] from different terrestrial and aquatic habitats and thereby make it available for microbial and plant cells. Siderophores have received much attention in recent years because of their potential roles and applications in various areas of environmental research. Their significance in these applications is because siderophores have the ability to bind a variety of metals in addition to iron, and they have a wide range of chemical structures and specific properties. For instance, siderophores function as biocontrols, biosensors, and bioremediation and chelation agents, in addition to their important role in weathering soil minerals and enhancing plant growth. The aim of this literature review is to outline and discuss the important roles and functions of siderophores in different environmental habitats and emphasize the significant roles that these small organic molecules could play in applied environmental processes. PMID:24576157

  2. Plant mechanisms of siderophore-iron utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanisms of siderophore iron-utilization by plants were examined to determine whether plants have direct mechanisms for acquiring iron from microbially-produced hydroxamate siderophores or simply take up inorganic iron in equilibrium with the chelate (shuttle mechanism). Experiments were designed to determine whether the monocot plant species, oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Victory) could acquire iron from ferrichrome under hydroponic conditions in which iron uptake was most likely to occur by direct use of the chelating agent. Ten-day-old iron-deficient seedlings, grown in aerated Hoagland's nutrient solution (minus iron) buffered at pH 7.4 with CaCO/sub 3/, were placed in fresh nutrient solution containing 10/sup -7.4/M radioactive /sup 55/FeCl/sub 3/ (23.7 mCi/mg) with the synthetic chelate, EDDHA (10..pi../sup 5/M), ferrichrome (10/sup -5/M), or with no chelate. After 6 days, shoot content of /sup 55/Fe in shoots of plants provided with ferrichrome was 100-fold greater than that in shoots of plants provided with EDDHA. Therefore iron uptake by oat under these conditions not only indicates direct use of ferrichrome, but also suggest that oat may be better able to acquire iron from siderophores than from synthetic chelates. One possible mechanism for direct use of chelating agents, may involve siderophore binding sites on the plasmalemma of root cortical cells where iron is split from the chelate by enzymatic reduction of ferric to ferrous iron. To demonstrate hypothesized siderophore binding sites on oat roots, experiments examined possible competition for presumed siderophore binding sites by an inert analog of ferrichrome constructed by irreversible chelation with chromium.

  3. Microbial production of four biodegradable siderophores under submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fazary, Ahmed E; Al-Shihri, Ayed S; Alfaifi, Mohammad Y; Saleh, Kamel A; Alshehri, Mohammed A; Elbehairi, Serag Eldin I; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2016-07-01

    Four siderophore analogues were isolated and purified from Escherichia coli, Bacillus spp. ST13, and Streptomyces pilosus microorganisms under some specific submerged fermentation conditions. In order to evaluate the highest production of this siderophore analogues through the growth, a rapid spectrophotometric screening semi-quantitative method was used, in which interestingly the analogues were isolated in its own form not its iron chelate. After chromatographic separation, the chemical structures of the isolated and purified siderophores were illustrated using detailed spectroscopic techniques. The biodegradation studies were done on that four novel isolated and purified siderophores following OECD protocols. In addition, the bioactivities of these siderophores and their iron complexes were examined and evaluated.

  4. XAFS Determination of Pb and Cd Speciation with Siderophores and the Metal/Siderophore/Kaolinite System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2007-02-01

    We provide evidence for hexadentate complexes of Pb2+ and Cd2+ with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) at pH 7.5, and 9.0, respectively. Analysis of the species of Pb2+ and Cd2+ adsorbed at the surface of kaolinite clay under the same pH conditions and in the presence of DFO-B indicate that Pb2+ is sorbed as a metal-siderophore complex while Cd2+ is not.

  5. XAFS Determination of Pb and Cd Speciation with Siderophores and the Metal/Siderophore/Kaolinite System

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2007-02-02

    We provide evidence for hexadentate complexes of Pb2+ and Cd2+ with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) at pH 7.5, and 9.0, respectively. Analysis of the species of Pb2+ and Cd2+ adsorbed at the surface of kaolinite clay under the same pH conditions and in the presence of DFO-B indicate that Pb2+ is sorbed as a metal-siderophore complex while Cd2+ is not.

  6. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    PubMed Central

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  7. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition influences motility and is required for full virulence of the xylem-dwelling bacterial phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen.

  8. Siderophore-Based Iron Acquisition and Pathogen Control

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Marcus; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: High-affinity iron acquisition is mediated by siderophore-dependent pathways in the majority of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and fungi. Considerable progress has been made in characterizing and understanding mechanisms of siderophore synthesis, secretion, iron scavenging, and siderophore-delivered iron uptake and its release. The regulation of siderophore pathways reveals multilayer networks at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Due to the key role of many siderophores during virulence, coevolution led to sophisticated strategies of siderophore neutralization by mammals and (re)utilization by bacterial pathogens. Surprisingly, hosts also developed essential siderophore-based iron delivery and cell conversion pathways, which are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. In the last decades, natural and synthetic compounds have gained attention as potential therapeutics for iron-dependent treatment of infections and further diseases. Promising results for pathogen inhibition were obtained with various siderophore-antibiotic conjugates acting as “Trojan horse” toxins and siderophore pathway inhibitors. In this article, general aspects of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition, recent findings regarding iron-related pathogen-host interactions, and current strategies for iron-dependent pathogen control will be reviewed. Further concepts including the inhibition of novel siderophore pathway targets are discussed. PMID:17804665

  9. Citrate as a siderophore in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Guerinot, M L; Meidl, E J; Plessner, O

    1990-01-01

    Under iron-limiting conditions, many bacteria secrete ferric iron-specific ligands, generically termed siderophores, to aid in the sequestering and transport of iron. One strain of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, 61A152, was shown to produce a siderophore when 20 B. japonicum strains were screened with all six chemical assays commonly used to detect such production. Production by strain 61A152 was detected via the chrome azurol S assay, a general test for siderophores which is independent of siderophore structure. The iron-chelating compound was neither a catechol nor a hydroxamate and was ninhydrin negative. It was determined to be citric acid via a combination of thin-layer chromatography and high-voltage paper electrophoresis; this identification was verified by a specific enzymatic assay for citric acid. The inverse correlation which was observed between citric acid release and the iron content of the medium suggested that ferric citrate could serve as an iron source. This was confirmed via growth and transport assays. Exogenously added ferric citrate could be used to overcome iron starvation, and iron-deficient cells actively transported radiolabeled ferric citrate. These results, taken together, indicate a role for ferric citrate in the iron nutrition of this strain, which has been shown to be an efficient nitrogen-fixing strain on a variety of soybean cultivars. PMID:2140566

  10. Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle with iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore by Bacillus cereus YxeB.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Allred, Benjamin E; Sia, Allyson K; Nichiporuk, Rita; Andersen, Ulla N; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2013-08-20

    Small molecule iron-chelators, siderophores, are very important in facilitating the acquisition of Fe(III), an essential element for pathogenic bacteria. Many Gram-negative outer-membrane transporters and Gram-positive lipoprotein siderophore-binding proteins have been characterized, and the binding ability of outer-membrane transporters and siderophore-binding proteins for Fe-siderophores has been determined. However, there is little information regarding the binding ability of these proteins for apo-siderophores, the iron-free chelators. Here we report that Bacillus cereus YxeB facilitates iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore bound to the protein, the first Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle system. YxeB binds ferrioxamine B (FO, Fe-siderophore)/desferrioxamine B (DFO, apo-siderophore) in vitro. Disc-diffusion assays and growth assays using the yxeB mutant reveal that YxeB is responsible for importing the FO. Cr-DFO (a FO analog) is bound by YxeB in vitro and B. cereus imports or binds Cr-DFO in vivo. In vivo uptake assays using Cr-DFO and FO and growth assays using DFO and Cr-DFO show that B. cereus selectively imports and uses FO when DFO is present. Moreover, in vitro competition assays using Cr-DFO and FO clearly demonstrate that YxeB binds only FO, not Cr-DFO, when DFO is bound to the protein. Iron-exchange from FO to DFO bound to YxeB must occur when DFO is initially bound by YxeB. Because the metal exchange rate is generally first order in replacement ligand concentration, protein binding of the apo-siderophore acts to dramatically enhance the iron exchange rate, a key component of the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism.

  11. Siderophores Are Not Involved in Fe(III) Solubilization during Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fennessey, Christine M.; Jones, Morris E.; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. ΔSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. ΔSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. PMID:20190086

  12. Deciphering Protein Dynamics of the Siderophore Pyoverdine Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Guillon, Laurent; Altenburger, Stephan; Graumann, Peter L.; Schalk, Isabelle J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces the siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), to obtain iron. Siderophore pathways involve complex mechanisms, and the machineries responsible for biosynthesis, secretion and uptake of the ferri-siderophore span both membranes of Gram-negative bacteria. Most proteins involved in the PVD pathway have been identified and characterized but the way the system functions as a whole remains unknown. By generating strains expressing fluorescent fusion proteins, we show that most of the proteins are homogeneously distributed throughout the bacterial cell. We also studied the dynamics of these proteins using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). This led to the first diffusion coefficients ever determined in P. aeruginosa. Cytoplasmic and periplamic diffusion appeared to be slower than in Escherichia coli but membrane proteins seemed to behave similarly in the two species. The diffusion of cytoplasmic and periplasmic tagged proteins involved in the PVD pathway was dependent on the interaction network to which they belong. Importantly, the TonB protein, motor of the PVD-Fe uptake process, was mostly immobile but its mobility increased substantially in the presence of PVD-Fe. PMID:24205369

  13. Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Mechanistic Insights into Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires iron for normal growth but faces a limitation of the metal ion due to its low solubility at biological pH and the withholding of iron by the mammalian host. The pathogen expresses the Fe3+-specific siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin to chelate the metal ion from insoluble iron and the host proteins transferrin, lactoferrin, and ferritin. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, as knockout mutants, which were defective in siderophore synthesis or uptake, failed to survive in low-iron medium and inside macrophages. But as excess iron is toxic due to its catalytic role in the generation of free radicals, regulation of iron uptake is necessary to maintain optimal levels of intracellular iron. The focus of this review is to present a comprehensive overview of iron homeostasis in M. tuberculosis that is discussed in the context of mycobactin biosynthesis, transport of iron across the mycobacterial cell envelope, and storage of excess iron. The clinical significance of the serum iron status and the expression of the iron-regulated protein HupB in tuberculosis (TB) patients is presented here, highlighting the potential of HupB as a marker, notably in extrapulmonary TB cases. PMID:27402628

  14. Amplification of the groESL operon in Pseudomonas putida increases siderophore gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Wolfs, K; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1994-10-17

    Pseudobactin 358 is the yellow-green fluorescent siderophore [microbial iron(III) transport agent] produced by Pseudomonas putida WCS358 under iron-limiting conditions. The genes encoding pseudobactin 358 biosynthesis are iron-regulated at the level of transcription. In this study, the molecular characterization is reported of a cosmid clone of WCS358 DNA that can stimulate, in an iron-dependent manner, the activity of a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in the heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region in the clone was identified by subcloning, transposon mutagenesis and DNA sequencing as the groESL operon of strain WCS358. This increase in promoter activity was not observed when the groESL genes of strain WCS358 were integrated via a transposon vector into the genome of Pseudomonas A225, indicating that multiple copies of the operon are necessary for the increase in siderophore gene promoter activity. Amplification of the Escherichia coli and WCS358 groESL genes also increased iron-regulated promoter activity in the parent strain WCS358. The groESL operon codes for the chaperone proteins GroES and GroEL, which are responsible for mediating the folding and assembly of many proteins.

  15. Production of Siderophores Increases Resistance to Fusaric Acid in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jimena A.; Bernar, Evangelina M.; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Fusaric acid is produced by pathogenic fungi of the genus Fusarium, and is toxic to plants and rhizobacteria. Many fluorescent pseudomonads can prevent wilt diseases caused by these fungi. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of fusaric acid on P. protegens Pf-5 and elucidate the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to survive in the presence of the mycotoxin. The results confirm that fusaric acid negatively affects growth and motility of P. protegens. Moreover, a notable increase in secretion of the siderophore pyoverdine was observed when P. protegens was grown in the presence of fusaric acid. Concomitantly, levels of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, the second siderophore encoded by P. protegens, increased markedly. Moreover, while similar levels of resistance to fusaric acid were observed for P. protegens mutants unable to synthesize either pyoverdine or enanto-pyochelin and the wild type strain, a double mutant unable to synthesize both kinds of siderophores showed a dramatically reduced resistance to this compound. This reduced resistance was not observed when this mutant was grown under conditions of iron excess. Spectrophotometric titrations revealed that fusaric acid binds not only Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also Zn2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+, with high affinity. Our results demonstrate that iron sequestration accounts at least in part for the deleterious effect of the mycotoxin on P. protegens. PMID:25569682

  16. An antioxidant role for catecholate siderophores in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Achard, Maud E S; Chen, Kaiwen W; Sweet, Matthew J; Watts, Rebecca E; Schroder, Kate; Schembri, Mark A; McEwan, Alastair G

    2013-09-15

    Iron acquisition is an important aspect of the host-pathogen interaction. In the case of Salmonella it is established that catecholate siderophores are important for full virulence. In view of their very high affinity for ferric iron, functional studies of siderophores have been almost exclusively focused on their role in acquisition of iron from the host. In the present study, we investigated whether the siderophores (enterobactin and salmochelin) produced by Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium could act as antioxidants and protect from the oxidative stress encountered after macrophage invasion. Our results show that the ability to produce siderophores enhanced the survival of Salmonella in the macrophage mainly at the early stages of infection, coincident with the oxidative burst. Using siderophore biosynthetic and siderophore receptor mutants we demonstrated that salmochelin and enterobactin protect S. Typhimurium against ROS (reactive oxygen species) in vitro and that siderophores must be intracellular to confer full protection. We also investigated whether other chemically distinct siderophores (yersiniabactin and aerobactin) or the monomeric catechol 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate could provide protection against oxidative stress and found that only catecholate siderophores have this property. Collectively, the results of the present study identify additional functions for siderophores during host-pathogen interactions.

  17. Microbial siderophores and their potential applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Saha, Maumita; Sarkar, Subhasis; Sarkar, Biplab; Sharma, Bipin Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Tribedi, Prosun

    2016-03-01

    Siderophores are small organic molecules produced by microorganisms under iron-limiting conditions which enhance the uptake of iron to the microorganisms. In environment, the ferric form of iron is insoluble and inaccessible at physiological pH (7.35-7.40). Under this condition, microorganisms synthesize siderophores which have high affinity for ferric iron. These ferric iron-siderophore complexes are then transported to cytosol. In cytosol, the ferric iron gets reduced into ferrous iron and becomes accessible to microorganism. In recent times, siderophores have drawn much attention due to its potential roles in different fields. Siderophores have application in microbial ecology to enhance the growth of several unculturable microorganisms and can alter the microbial communities. In the field of agriculture, different types of siderophores promote the growth of several plant species and increase their yield by enhancing the Fe uptake to plants. Siderophores acts as a potential biocontrol agent against harmful phyto-pathogens and holds the ability to substitute hazardous pesticides. Heavy-metal-contaminated samples can be detoxified by applying siderophores, which explicate its role in bioremediation. Siderophores can detect the iron content in different environments, exhibiting its role as a biosensor. In the medical field, siderophore uses the "Trojan horse strategy" to form complexes with antibiotics and helps in the selective delivery of antibiotics to the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Certain iron overload diseases for example sickle cell anemia can be treated with the help of siderophores. Other medical applications of siderophores include antimalarial activity, removal of transuranic elements from the body, and anticancer activity. The aim of this review is to discuss the important roles and applications of siderophores in different sectors including ecology, agriculture, bioremediation, biosensor, and medicine.

  18. SO2426 is a positive regulator of siderophore expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 genome encodes a predicted orphan DNA-binding response regulator, SO2426. Previous studies with a SO2426-deficient MR-1 strain suggested a putative functional role for SO2426 in the regulation of iron acquisition genes, in particular, the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis operon so3030-3031-3032. To further investigate the functional role of SO2426 in iron homeostasis, we employed computational strategies to identify putative gene targets of SO2426 regulation and biochemical approaches to validate the participation of SO2426 in the control of siderophore biosynthesis in S. oneidensis MR-1. Results In silico prediction analyses revealed a single 14-bp consensus motif consisting of two tandem conserved pentamers (5'-CAAAA-3') in the upstream regulatory regions of 46 genes, which were shown previously to be significantly down-regulated in a so2426 deletion mutant. These genes included so3030 and so3032, members of an annotated siderophore biosynthetic operon in MR-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the SO2426 protein binds to its motif in the operator region of so3030. A "short" form of SO2426, beginning with a methionine at position 11 (M11) of the originally annotated coding sequence for SO2426, was also functional in binding to its consensus motif, confirming previous 5' RACE results that suggested that amino acid M11 is the actual translation start codon for SO2426. Alignment of SO2426 orthologs from all sequenced Shewanella spp. showed a high degree of sequence conservation beginning at M11, in addition to conservation of a putative aspartyl phosphorylation residue and the helix-turn-helix (HTH) DNA-binding domain. Finally, the so2426 deletion mutant was unable to synthesize siderophores at wild-type rates upon exposure to the iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl. Conclusions Collectively, these data support the functional characterization of SO2426 as a positive regulator of siderophore-mediated iron

  19. Interplay between Siderophores and Colibactin Genotoxin Biosynthetic Pathways in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Patricia; Marcq, Ingrid; Magistro, Giuseppe; Penary, Marie; Garcie, Christophe; Payros, Delphine; Boury, Michèle; Olier, Maïwenn; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Audebert, Marc; Chalut, Christian; Schubert, Sören; Oswald, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the biosynthetic pathways of several small iron-scavenging molecules known as siderophores (enterobactin, salmochelins and yersiniabactin) and of a genotoxin (colibactin) are known to require a 4′-phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPTase). Only two PPTases have been clearly identified: EntD and ClbA. The gene coding for EntD is part of the core genome of E. coli, whereas ClbA is encoded on the pks pathogenicity island which codes for colibactin. Interestingly, the pks island is physically associated with the high pathogenicity island (HPI) in a subset of highly virulent E. coli strains. The HPI carries the gene cluster required for yersiniabactin synthesis except for a gene coding its cognate PPTase. Here we investigated a potential interplay between the synthesis pathways leading to the production of siderophores and colibactin, through a functional interchangeability between EntD and ClbA. We demonstrated that ClbA could contribute to siderophores synthesis. Inactivation of both entD and clbA abolished the virulence of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) in a mouse sepsis model, and the presence of either functional EntD or ClbA was required for the survival of ExPEC in vivo. This is the first report demonstrating a connection between multiple phosphopantetheinyl-requiring pathways leading to the biosynthesis of functionally distinct secondary metabolites in a given microorganism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the strict association of the pks island with HPI has been selected in highly virulent E. coli because ClbA is a promiscuous PPTase that can contribute to the synthesis of both the genotoxin and siderophores. The data highlight the complex regulatory interaction of various virulence features with different functions. The identification of key points of these networks is not only essential to the understanding of ExPEC virulence but also an attractive and promising target for the development of anti-virulence therapy strategies

  20. Chemistry of Marine Ligands and Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vraspir, Julia M.; Butler, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are presented with unique challenges to obtain essential metal ions required to survive and thrive in the ocean. The production of organic ligands to complex transition metal ions is one strategy to both facilitate uptake of specific metals, such as iron, and to mitigate the potential toxic effects of other metal ions, such as copper. A number of important trace metal ions are complexed by organic ligands in seawater, including iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, and cadmium, thus defining the speciation of these metal ions in the ocean. In the case of iron, siderophores have been identified and structurally characterized. Siderophores are low molecular weight iron-binding ligands produced by marine bacteria. Although progress has been made toward the identity of in situ iron-binding ligands, few compounds have been identified that coordinate the other trace metals. Deciphering the chemical structures and production stimuli of naturally produced organic ligands and the organisms they come from is fundamental to understanding metal speciation and bioavailability. The current evidence for marine ligands, with an emphasis on siderophores, and discussion of the importance and implications of metal-binding ligands in controlling metal speciation and cycling within the world's oceans are presented.

  1. Purification of siderophores of Alcaligenes faecalis on Amberlite XAD.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B

    2006-05-01

    Studies on siderophore production using Alcaligenes faecalis BCCM ID 2374 revealed hydroxamate and catecholate type of siderophores at 347 microg mL-1. These fractions were purified on Amberlite XAD-4 column, which resulted in the separation of two bands having absorption maxima at 264 and 224 nm. The amount of pure siderophore obtained in powdered form from first and second fraction was 297 and 50 microg mL-1 respectively.

  2. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of chromium from hydroxide minerals.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Owen W; Akafia, Martin M; Andrews, Megan Y; Bargar, John R

    2014-05-01

    Biomolecules have significant impacts on the fate and transport of contaminant metals in soils and natural waters. Siderophores, Fe(iii)-binding agents that are exuded by microbes and plants, may form strong complexes with and promote the dissolution of contaminant metal ions, such as Co(iii), U(iv), or Pu(iv). Although aqueous Cr(iii)-siderophore complexes have been recognized in the laboratory setting for almost 40 years, few studies have explored interactions of siderophores with Cr-bearing minerals or considered their impacts on environmental chemistry. To better understand the possible effects of siderophores on chromium mobility, we conducted a series of dissolution experiments to quantify the dissolution rates of Cr(iii)(OH)3 in the presence of hydroxamate, catecholate, and α-hydroxycarboxylate siderophores over a range of environmentally relevant pH values. At pH = 5, dissolution rates in the presence of siderophores are similar to control experiments, suggesting a predominantly proton-promoted dissolution mechanism. At pH = 8, the sorption of the siderophores desferrioxamine B and rhizoferrin can be modeled by using Langmuir isotherms. The dissolution rates for these siderophores are proportional to the surface concentrations of sorbed siderophore, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of dissolution products indicates the formation of Cr(iii)HDFOB(+) and Cr(iii)rhizoferrin(3-) complexes, suggesting a ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism at alkaline pH. Because siderophores promote Cr(iii)(OH)3 dissolution at rates similar in magnitude to those of iron hydroxides and the resulting Cr(iii)-siderophore complexes may be persistent in solution, siderophores could potentially contribute to the mobilization of Cr in soils and sediments where it is abundant due to geological or anthropogenic sources.

  3. Siderophores: The special ingredient to cyanobacterial blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xue; Creed, Irena; Trick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lakes provide a number of significant ecological services including clean drinking water, habitat for aquatic biota, and economic benefits. The provision of these ecological services, as well as the health of these aquatic systems, is threatened by the excessive growth of algae, specifically, cyanobacteria. Historically, blooms have been linked to eutrophication but recent occurrences indicate that there are less dramatic changes that induce these blooms. Iron is an essential micronutrient required for specific essential metabolic pathways; however, the amount of biologically available iron in naturally occurring lake ranges from saturation to much lower than cell transport affinities. To assist in the modulation of iron availabilities, cyanobacteria in culture produce low molecular weight compounds that function in an iron binding and acquisition system; nevertheless, this has yet to be confirmed in naturally occurring lakes. This project explored the relationship of P, N and in particular, Fe, in the promotion of cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in 30 natural freshwater lakes located in and around the Elk Island National Park, Alberta. It is hypothesized that cyanobacteria produce and utilize iron chelators called siderophores in low Fe and nitrogen (N) conditions, creating a competitive advantage over other algae in freshwater lakes. Lakes were selected to represent a range of iron availability to explore the nutrient composition of lakes that propagated cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs) compared to lakes that did not. Lake water was analyzed for nutrients, microbial composition, siderophore concentration, and toxin concentration. Modifications were made to optimize the Czaky and Arnow tests for hydroxamate- and catecholate-type siderophores, respectively, for field conditions. Preliminary results indicate the presence of iron-binding ligands (0.11-2.34 mg/L) in freshwater lakes characterized by widely ranging Fe regimes (0.04-2.74 mg

  4. XAFS Determination of Pb and Cd Speciation with Siderophores and the Metal/Siderophore/Kaolinite System

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2008-06-16

    We provide evidence for hexadentate complexes of Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) at pH 7.5, and 9.0, respectively. Analysis of the species of Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed at the surface of kaolinite clay under the same pH conditions and in the presence of DFO-B indicate that Pb{sup 2+} is sorbed as a metal-siderophore complex while Cd{sup 2+} is not.

  5. Structure and biosynthetic assembly of cupriachelin, a photoreactive siderophore from the bioplastic producer Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Martin F; Kage, Hirokazu; Nett, Markus

    2012-03-21

    The bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 produces a family of linear lipopeptides when grown under low iron conditions. The structural composition of these molecules, exemplified by the main metabolite cupriachelin, is reminiscent of siderophores that are excreted by marine bacteria. Comparable to marine siderophores, the ferric form of cupriachelin exhibits photoreactive properties. Exposure to UV light induces an oxidation of its peptidic backbone and a concomitant reduction of the coordinated Fe(III). Here, we report the genomics-inspired isolation and structural characterization of cupriachelin as well as its encoding gene cluster, which was identified by insertional mutagenesis. Based upon the functional characterization of adenylation domain specificity, a model for cupriachelin biosynthesis is proposed.

  6. The Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore biosynthetic gene sidA, encoding L-ornithine N5-oxygenase, is required for virulence.

    PubMed

    Hissen, Anna H T; Wan, Adrian N C; Warwas, Mark L; Pinto, Linda J; Moore, Margo M

    2005-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of invasive mold infection and is a serious problem in immunocompromised populations worldwide. We have previously shown that survival of A. fumigatus in serum may be related to secretion of siderophores. In this study, we identified and characterized the sidA gene of A. fumigatus, which encodes l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase, the first committed step in hydroxamate siderophore biosynthesis. A. fumigatus sidA codes for a protein of 501 amino acids with significant homology to other fungal l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenases. A stable DeltasidA strain was created by deletion of A. fumigatus sidA. This strain was unable to synthesize the siderophores N',N",N'''-triacetylfusarinine C (TAF) and ferricrocin. Growth of the DeltasidA strain was the same as that of the wild type in rich media; however, the DeltasidA strain was unable to grow in low-iron defined media or media containing 10% human serum unless supplemented with TAF or ferricrocin. No significant differences in ferric reduction activities were observed between the parental strain and the DeltasidA strain, indicating that blocking siderophore secretion did not result in upregulation of this pathway. Unlike the parental strain, the DeltasidA strain was unable to remove iron from human transferrin. A rescued strain (DeltasidA + sidA) was constructed; it produced siderophores and had the same growth as the wild type on iron-limited media. Unlike the wild-type and rescued strains, the DeltasidA strain was avirulent in a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, indicating that sidA is necessary for A. fumigatus virulence.

  7. Reductive iron assimilation and intracellular siderophores assist extracellular siderophore-driven iron homeostasis and virulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an essential nutrient and prudent iron acquisition and management are key traits of a successful pathogen. Fungi use nonribosomally synthesized secreted iron chelators (siderophores) or Reductive Iron Assimilation (RIA) mechanisms to acquire iron in a high affinity manner. Previous studies...

  8. Structure determination of a siderophore peucechelin from Streptomyces peucetius.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Shinya; Komaki, Hisayuki; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kobayakawa, Fumiya; Hemmi, Hikaru

    2015-10-01

    Previously, Park et al. isolated a new siderophore from Streptomyces peucetius ATCC 27952 based on information of the genome sequence and the structure of the siderophore was deduced to be a cyclic peptide based on MS/MS analysis. To clarify the structure of the siderophore, we cultured S. peucetius with iron deficient medium. Through several chromatographic procedures, the siderophore named peucechelin was isolated with the yield enough to perform NMR experiments. The planar structure of peucechelin was elucidated by the combination of ESI-MS experiment and NMR spectroscopic analyses of the gallium (III) complex. Unlike the previously deduced cyclic structure, the structure was determined to be a linear peptide which was similar to a known siderophore foroxymithine. The stereochemistries of amino acids constituting peucechelin were determined by applying modified Marfey method to the hydrolysate. Since the biosynthetic gene of peucechelin was formerly determined by Park et al. the similar genes were searched using genome data of other streptomycetes. As a result, the similar genes were found in the genome data of S. venezuelae and S. purpureus. Isolation and identification of siderophore was performed from the iron deficient culture of S. venezuelae. The siderophore of S. venezuelae was identified to be known compound foroxymithine by analysis ESI-MS and NMR spectra in the similar manner with peucechelin. Production of foroxymithine was also observed in the iron deficient culture of S. purpureus. Based on the genome data, comparison of the biosynthetic genes of structurally related siderophores peucechelin and foroxymithine was accomplished in discussion.

  9. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of smectite by fluorescent Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ferret, Claire; Sterckeman, Thibault; Cornu, Jean-Yves; Gangloff, Sophie; Schalk, Isabelle J; Geoffroy, Valérie A

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are organic chelators produced by microorganisms to fulfil their iron requirements. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of iron-bearing minerals has been clearly documented for some siderophores, but few studies have addressed metabolizing siderophore-producing bacteria. We investigated iron acquisition from clays by fluorescent Pseudomonads, bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. We focused on the interactions between smectite and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium producing two structurally different siderophores: pyoverdine and pyochelin. The presence of smectite in iron-limited growth media promoted planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa and biofilm surrounding the smectite aggregates. Chemical analysis of the culture media indicated increases in the dissolved silicon, iron and aluminium concentrations following smectite supplementation. The use of P. aeruginosa mutants unable to produce either one or both of the two siderophores indicated that pyoverdine, the siderophore with the higher affinity for iron, was involved in iron and aluminium solubilization by the wild-type strain. However, in the absence of pyoverdine, pyochelin was also able to solubilize iron but with a twofold lower efficiency. In conclusion, pyoverdine and pyochelin, two structurally different siderophores, can solubilize structural iron from smectite and thereby make it available for bacterial growth.

  10. Turnerbactin, a novel triscatecholate siderophore from the shipworm endosymbiont Teredinibacter turnerae T7901.

    PubMed

    Han, Andrew W; Sandy, Moriah; Fishman, Brian; Trindade-Silva, Amaro E; Soares, Carlos A G; Distel, Daniel L; Butler, Alison; Haygood, Margo G

    2013-01-01

    Shipworms are marine bivalve mollusks (Family Teredinidae) that use wood for shelter and food. They harbor a group of closely related, yet phylogenetically distinct, bacterial endosymbionts in bacteriocytes located in the gills. This endosymbiotic community is believed to support the host's nutrition in multiple ways, through the production of cellulolytic enzymes and the fixation of nitrogen. The genome of the shipworm endosymbiont Teredinibacter turnerae T7901 was recently sequenced and in addition to the potential for cellulolytic enzymes and diazotrophy, the genome also revealed a rich potential for secondary metabolites. With nine distinct biosynthetic gene clusters, nearly 7% of the genome is dedicated to secondary metabolites. Bioinformatic analyses predict that one of the gene clusters is responsible for the production of a catecholate siderophore. Here we describe this gene cluster in detail and present the siderophore product from this cluster. Genes similar to the entCEBA genes of enterobactin biosynthesis involved in the production and activation of dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) are present in this cluster, as well as a two-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). A novel triscatecholate siderophore, turnerbactin, was isolated from the supernatant of iron-limited T. turnerae T7901 cultures. Turnerbactin is a trimer of N-(2,3-DHB)-L-Orn-L-Ser with the three monomeric units linked by Ser ester linkages. A monomer, dimer, dehydrated dimer, and dehydrated trimer of 2,3-DHB-L-Orn-L-Ser were also found in the supernatant. A link between the gene cluster and siderophore product was made by constructing a NRPS mutant, TtAH03. Siderophores could not be detected in cultures of TtAH03 by HPLC analysis and Fe-binding activity of culture supernatant was significantly reduced. Regulation of the pathway by iron is supported by identification of putative Fur box sequences and observation of increased Fe-binding activity under iron restriction. Evidence of a

  11. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  12. The Vibrio cholerae VctPDGC system transports catechol siderophores and a siderophore-free iron ligand.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Payne, Shelley M

    2011-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has an absolute requirement for iron. It transports the catechol siderophores vibriobactin, which it synthesizes and secretes, and enterobactin. These siderophores are transported across the inner membrane by one of two periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporters, VctPDGC or ViuPDGC. We show here that one of these inner membrane transport systems, VctPDGC, also promotes iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. Plasmids carrying the vctPDGC genes stimulated growth in both rich and minimal media of a Shigella flexneri mutant that produces no siderophores. vctPDGC also stimulated the growth of an Escherichia coli enterobactin biosynthetic mutant in low iron medium, and this effect did not require feoB, tonB or aroB. A tyrosine to phenylalanine substitution in the periplasmic binding protein VctP did not alter enterobactin transport, but eliminated growth stimulation in the absence of a siderophore. These data suggest that the VctPDGC system has the capacity to transport both catechol siderophores and a siderophore-free iron ligand. We also show that VctPDGC is the previously unidentified siderophore-independent iron transporter in V. cholerae, and this appears to complete the list of iron transport systems in V. cholerae.

  13. Beyond Iron: Non-Classical Biological Functions of Bacterial Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of “non-classical” siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was even documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  14. Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-14

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of "non-classical" siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity.

  15. Siderophore Production by Cystic Fibrosis Isolates of Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Darling, Patricia; Chan, Maria; Cox, Andrew D.; Sokol, Pamela A.

    1998-01-01

    Sixty-one Burkholderia cepacia isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and four plant isolates were screened for production of the siderophores salicylic acid (SA), pyochelin, cepabactin, and ornibactins and fingerprinted by a PCR-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. Of the 24 RAPD types determined, 22 (92%) were associated with isolates that produced SA, 21 (87%) were associated with isolates that produced ornibactins, 15 (60%) were associated with isolates that produced pyochelin, and 3 (12%) were associated with isolates that produced cepabactin. Of the 24 RAPD types plus 2 phenotypic variants of types 1 and 9, 3 were associated with isolates that produced all four siderophores, 8 were associated with isolates that produced three siderophores, 12 were associated with isolates that produced two siderophores, and 3 were associated with isolates that produced only one siderophore. These results suggest that the numbers and types of siderophores produced by CF isolates of B. cepacia correlate with RAPD type and that SA and ornibactins are the most prevalent siderophores produced. PMID:9453660

  16. Six Siderophore-Producing Microorganisms Identified in Biological Soil Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, K.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse microbial communities that colonize soils in arid and semi-arid environments. Cyanobacteria in BSCs are pioneer organisms that increase ecosystem habitability by providing fixed carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as by reducing water run-off and increasing infiltration. Photosynthesis and N fixation, in particular, require a variety of metals in large quantities, and yet, metals are predominantly insoluble in the environments where BSCs thrive. Therefore, BSC organisms must have efficient strategies for extracting metals from soil minerals. We hypothesized that BSC microbes, particularly the cyanobacteria, produce siderophores to serve their metal-acquisition needs. Siderophores are small organic compounds that bind Fe with high affinity and are produced by a variety of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria. Most siderophores bind Fe, primarily; however, some can also bind Mo, V, and Cu. Soil siderophores are released by microbes to increase the solubility of metals from minerals and to facilitate microbial uptake. Thus, siderophores serve as chemical weathering agents and provide a direct link between soil microbes and minerals. Studying siderophore production in BSCs provides insight into how BSCs tackle the challenge of acquiring insoluble metals, and may help conservationists determine useful fertilizers for BSC growth by facilitating metal acquisition. Biological soil crusts were collected near Moab, UT. Soil slurries were prepared in deionized water and transferred to modified BG-11 agar plates. The O-CAS agar plate assay was used to screen organisms for siderophore production. Siderophore producing microbes were isolated and identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing. Cultures were then grown in 3 L batch cultures under metal limitation, and siderophore presence was monitored using the traditional liquid CAS assay. After siderophore detection, cells were removed by centrifugation, organic compounds were separated using

  17. Yersinia High Pathogenicity Island genes modify the Escherichia coli primary metabolome independently of siderophore production

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Haitao; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial siderophores may enhance pathogenicity by scavenging iron but their expression has been proposed to exert a substantial metabolic cost. Here we describe a combined metabolomic-genetic approach to determine how mutations affecting the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin affect the Escherichia coli primary metabolome. Contrary to expectations, we did not find yersiniabactin biosynthesis to correspond to consistent metabolomic shifts. Instead, we found that targeted deletion of ybtU or ybtA, dissimilar genes with similar roles in regulating yersiniabactin expression, were associated with a specific shift in arginine pathway metabolites during growth in minimal media. This interaction was associated with high arginine levels in the model uropathogen Escherichia coli UTI89 compared to its ybtU and ybtA mutants and the K12 strain MG1655, which lacks yersiniabactin-associated genes. Because arginine is not a direct yersiniabactin biosynthetic substrate, these findings show that virulence-associated secondary metabolite systems may shape bacterial primary metabolism independently of substrate consumption. PMID:22035238

  18. Yersinia high pathogenicity island genes modify the Escherichia coli primary metabolome independently of siderophore production.

    PubMed

    Lv, Haitao; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2011-12-02

    Bacterial siderophores may enhance pathogenicity by scavenging iron, but their expression has been proposed to exert a substantial metabolic cost. Here we describe a combined metabolomic-genetic approach to determine how mutations affecting the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin affect the Escherichia coli primary metabolome. Contrary to expectations, we did not find yersiniabactin biosynthesis to correspond to consistent metabolomic shifts. Instead, we found that targeted deletion of ybtU or ybtA, dissimilar genes with similar roles in regulating yersiniabactin expression, were associated with a specific shift in arginine pathway metabolites during growth in minimal media. This interaction was associated with high arginine levels in the model uropathogen Escherichia coli UTI89 compared to its ybtU and ybtA mutants and the K12 strain MG1655, which lacks yersiniabactin-associated genes. Because arginine is not a direct yersiniabactin biosynthetic substrate, these findings show that virulence-associated secondary metabolite systems may shape bacterial primary metabolism independently of substrate consumption.

  19. Habitat structure and the evolution of diffusible siderophores in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, Rolf; Schiessl, Konstanze T; Waldvogel, Tuija; McNeill, Kristopher; Ackermann, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria typically rely on secreted metabolites, potentially shareable at the community level, to scavenge resources from the environment. The evolution of diffusible, shareable metabolites is, however, difficult to explain because molecules can get lost, or be exploited by cheating mutants. A key question is whether natural selection can act on molecule structure to control loss and shareability. We tested this possibility by collating information on diffusivity properties of 189 secreted iron-scavenging siderophores and the natural habitats occupied by the siderophore-producing species. In line with evolutionary theory, we found that highly diffusible siderophores have preferentially evolved in species living in structured habitats, such as soil and hosts, because structuring can keep producers and their shareable goods together. Poorly diffusible siderophores, meanwhile, have preferentially evolved in species living in unstructured habitats, such as seawater, indicating that these metabolites are less shareable and more likely provide direct benefits to the producers.

  20. Transcription termination Within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric-siderophore transport, fatD,C,B,A, and two genes for siderophorebiosynthesis, angR and angT and plays an important role in the virulence mechanism of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polyc...

  1. Tandem mass spectrometry of coprogen and deferoxamine hydroxamic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Simionato, Ana V C; de Souza, Gezimar D; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of fragmentation of hydroxamic siderophores are proposed comparing deuterated and nondeuterated samples. Standard siderophores (e.g. deferoxamine and coprogen) were directly injected into both ion trap and linear quadrupole mass spectrometers with electrospray ionization (ESI). Four and two fragmentation steps were carried out for deferoxamine and coprogen (analyzed by positive and negative ESI, respectively). Deferoxamine cleavages occurred in both peptide and hydroxamic bonds while the coprogen fragmentation pattern is more elaborate, since it contains Fe(III) in its structure.

  2. Chemical Characterization, Crossfeeding and Uptake Studies on Hydroxamate Siderophore of Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B; Meyer, J M; Kale, S P

    2011-06-01

    We report the production of two types of siderophores namely catecholate and hydroxamate in modified succinic acid medium (SM) from Alcaligenes faecalis. Two fractions of siderophores were purified on amberlite XAD, major fraction was hydroxamate type having a λ(max) at 224 nm and minor fraction appeared as catecholate with a λ(max) of 264 nm. The recovery yield obtained from major and minor fractions was 297 and 50 mg ml(-1) respectively. The IEF pattern of XAD-4 purified siderophore suggested the pI value of 6.5. Cross feeding studies revealed that A. faecalis accepts heterologous as well as self (hydroxamate) siderophore in both free and iron complexed forms however; the rate of siderophore uptake was more in case of siderophores complexed to iron. Siderophore iron uptake studies indicated the differences between hydroxamate siderophore of A. faecalis and Alc E, a siderophore of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

  3. Regulation of mammalian siderophore 2,5-DHBA in the innate immune response to infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhuoming; Reba, Scott; Chen, Wei-Dong; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Boom, W Henry; Petersen, Robert B; Rojas, Roxana; Viswanathan, Rajesh; Devireddy, L

    2014-06-02

    Competition for iron influences host-pathogen interactions. Pathogens secrete small iron-binding moieties, siderophores, to acquire host iron. In response, the host secretes siderophore-binding proteins, such as lipocalin 24p3, which limit siderophore-mediated iron import into bacteria. Mammals produce 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid, a compound that resembles a bacterial siderophore. Our data suggest that bacteria use both mammalian and bacterial siderophores. In support of this idea, supplementation with mammalian siderophore enhances bacterial growth in vitro. In addition, mice lacking the mammalian siderophore resist E. coli infection. Finally, we show that the host responds to infection by suppressing siderophore synthesis while up-regulating lipocalin 24p3 expression via TLR signaling. Thus, reciprocal regulation of 24p3 and mammalian siderophore is a protective mechanism limiting microbial access to iron.

  4. Azotobacter vinelandii siderophore can provide nitrogen to support the culture of the green algae Neochloris oleoabundans and Scenedesmus sp. BA032.

    PubMed

    Villa, Juan A; Ray, Erin E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-02-01

    Microalgae are viewed as a potential future agricultural and biofuel feedstock and also provide an ideal biological means of carbon sequestration based on rapid growth rates and high biomass yields. Any potential improvement using high-yield microalgae to fix carbon will require additional fertilizer inputs to provide the necessary nitrogen required for protein and nucleotide biosynthesis. The free-living diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii can fix nitrogen under aerobic conditions in the presence of reduced carbon sources such as sucrose or glycerol and is also known to produce a variety of siderophores to scavenge different metals from the environment. In this study, we identified two strains of green algae, Neochloris oleoabundans and Scenedesmus sp. BA032, that are able to utilize the A. vinelandii siderophore azotobactin as a source of nitrogen to support growth. When grown in a co-culture, S. sp. BA032 and N. oleoabundans obtained the nitrogen required for growth through the association with A. vinelandii. These results, indicating a commensalistic relationship, provide a proof of concept for developing a mutualistic or symbiotic relationship between these two species using siderophores as a nitrogen shuttle and might further indicate an additional fate of siderophores in the environment.

  5. Siderophore production in high iron environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, S. A.; Hoffman, C. L.; Moffett, J. W.; Edwards, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Up until recently, the geochemical cycling of Fe in deep sea hydrothermal plumes has assumed to be inorganically dominated, resulting in quantitative precipitation of all hydrothermally sourced Fe to the seafloor. Recent detection of organic Fe binding ligands within both the dissolved and particulate phase (Bennett et al., 2008; Toner et al., 2009), suggests that hydrothermally sourced Fe may be important on a global scale (Tagliabue et al., 2010). The source of these organic ligands is currently unknown; hypotheses include the possible entrainment of organic carbon from the biologically rich diffuse flow areas, or in-situ production from microbial processes. However, the microbial production of organic ligands is only expected when Fe is a limited micronutrient, which is not the case in the hydrothermal environment. The importance of Fe cycling microorganisms within hydrothermal systems was previously overlooked due to the poor energetics with regards to Fe oxidation and reduction. But their recent detection within the hydrothermal system, both around low temperature Fe rich mineral deposits and within hydrothermal plumes (Edwards et al., 2004; Sylvan et al., In prep) suggests that they may have an important role in the hydrothermal Fe cycle, potentially resulting in an interplay between Fe and organic carbon. Within the laboratory, we have carried out experiments to investigate an Fe oxidizing bacteria in a variety of high Fe environments. We have detected both the production of siderophores and an increase in reduced Fe when the Fe oxidizing bacteria is exposed to both Fe(III) and Fe(II) rich minerals. The role of these microbes in the mineral dissolution of Fe sulfides along the seafloor and within the hydrothermal plume, may have important implications on the speciation of Fe and the role of siderophores in the marine environment. Bennett, S.A. et al. 2008. EPSL, 270: 157-167. Edwards, K.J. et al. 2004. Geomicrobiology Journal, 21: 393-404. Sylvan, J.B. et al

  6. Mechanisms of siderophore sorption to smectite and siderophore-enhanced release of structural Fe 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, Elizabeth A.; Johnston, Cliff T.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2008-07-01

    Sorption of the trihydroxamate siderophores desferrioxamine-B and -D (DFOB and DFOD, respectively) and of the monohydroxamate ligand acetohydroxamic acid (aHA) to smectite were examined in batch sorption studies (pH 5.5, 0.1 M ionic strength) coupled with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Both DFOB and DFOD, which have similar molecular structures but different charge properties (cationic versus neutral, respectively) showed a high affinity for smectite. In contrast, the smaller aHA molecule did not sorb appreciably. XRD analysis indicated that DFOB and DFOD each absorbed in the interlamellar region of the clay to give d-spacings of 13.4-13.7 Å at equilibrium solution concentrations <250 μM. FTIR spectra of sorbed DFOB and DFOD indicated that the conformation of each species was distinct from its conformation in the crystalline or dissolved states. At elevated initial solution concentrations of 500-1500 μM, DFOB formed a bilayer in the clay interlayer. Changes in the FTIR spectra of the DFOB-loaded clay samples at these higher surface loadings were consistent with the presence of a metal-siderophore complex in the interlayer. DFOB and DFOD both enhanced Fe and Al release from smectite, but aHA did not. Possible dissolution mechanisms are discussed in light of the FTIR and batch dissolution results.

  7. Intracellular siderophore but not extracellular siderophore is required for full virulence in Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Giuliano Garisto Donzelli, Bruno; Gibson, Donna M; Krasnoff, Stuart B

    2015-09-01

    Efficient iron acquisition mechanisms are fundamental for microbial survival in the environment and for pathogen virulence within their hosts. M. robertsii produces two known iron-binding natural products: metachelins, which are used to scavenge extracellular iron, and ferricrocin, which is strictly intracellular. To study the contribution of siderophore-mediated iron uptake and storage to M. robertsii fitness, we generated null mutants for each siderophore synthase gene (mrsidD and mrsidC, respectively), as well as for the iron uptake transcriptional repressor mrsreA. All of these mutants showed impaired germination speed, differential sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, and differential ability to overcome iron chelation on growth-limiting iron concentrations. RT-qPCR data supported regulation of mrsreA, mrsidC, and mrsidD by supplied iron in vitro and during growth within the insect host, Spodoptera exigua. We also observed strong upregulation of the insect iron-binding proteins, transferrins, during infection. Insect bioassays revealed that ferricrocin is required for full virulence against S. exigua; neither the loss of metachelin production nor the deletion of the transcription factor mrsreA significantly affected M. robertsii virulence.

  8. The role of siderophores in the transport of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Hobart, D.E.

    1993-12-31

    Iron exists in aerobic soil and water environments most commonly as insoluble Fe(III). Siderophores are powerful, microbially produced chelating agents that are used to mobilize the insoluble Fe(III) cation. Over 80 siderophores have been isolated and characterized, with some reportedly having iron-binding constants as high as 10{sup 52}. Fe(III) and Pu(IV) are similar in their charge/ionic radius ratio (4.6 and 4.2, respectively); therefore, Pu(IV) may serve as analog to Fe(III). It is possible that some radioactive wastes could be chelated by naturally occurring siderophores, thereby altering the transport rates of those elements through the subsurface environment. This investigation was initiated to investigate that possibility. The binding of {sup 239}(IV) by four chelating agents is reported in this paper: a siderophore isolated and purified from a Pseudomonas sp.; desferal, a ferrioxamine siderophore commonly used for deferration therapy; EDTA, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; and, citrate, trisodium salt.

  9. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil.

    PubMed

    Luján, Adela M; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-02-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil-water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations.

  10. Siderophore-based detection of Fe(III) and microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tengfei; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2012-08-01

    Siderophores are low-molecular-weight iron chelators that are produced and exported by bacteria, fungi and plants during periods of nutrient deprivation. The structures, biosynthetic logic, and coordination chemistry of these molecules have fascinated chemists for decades. Studies of such fundamental phenomena guide the use of siderophores and siderophore conjugates in a variety of medicinal applications that include iron-chelation therapies and drug delivery. Sensing applications constitute another important facet of siderophore-based technologies. The high affinities of siderophores for both ferric ions and siderophore receptors, proteins expressed on the cell surface that are required for ferric siderophore import, indicate that these small molecules may be employed for the selective capture of metal ions, proteins, and live bacteria. This minireview summaries progress in methods that utilize native bacterial and fungal siderophore scaffolds for the detection of Fe(III) or microbial pathogens.

  11. Siderophore production and biofilm formation as linked social traits.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Freya; Buckling, Angus

    2009-05-01

    The virulence of pathogenic microbes can depend on individual cells cooperating in the concerted production of molecules that facilitate host colonization or exploitation. However, cooperating groups can be exploited by social defectors or 'cheats'. Understanding the ecology and evolution of cooperation is therefore relevant to clinical microbiology. We studied two genetically linked cooperative traits involved in host exploitation by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clones that defected from cooperative production of iron-scavenging siderophores were deficient in biofilm formation. The presence of such clones in mixed biofilms with a wild-type clone led to reduced biofilm mass. The fitness advantage of siderophore-deficient mutants in the presence of wild-type bacteria was no greater in biofilm than in planktonic culture, suggesting that these mutants did not gain an additional advantage by exploiting wild-type biofilm polymer. Reduced biofilm formation therefore represents a pleiotropic cost of defection from siderophore production.

  12. Synthesis of L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid, a siderophore and antibiotic precursor.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Takayama, Shin-ichi J; Rai, Dushyant K; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2014-03-20

    L-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (L-Dap) is an amino acid that is a precursor of antibiotics and staphyloferrin B a siderophore produced by Staphylococcus aureus. SbnA and SbnB are encoded by the staphyloferrin B biosynthetic gene cluster and are implicated in L-Dap biosynthesis. We demonstrate here that SbnA uses PLP and substrates O-phospho-L-serine and L-glutamate to produce a metabolite N-(1-amino-1-carboxyl-2-ethyl)-glutamic acid (ACEGA). SbnB is shown to use NAD(+) to oxidatively hydrolyze ACEGA to yield α-ketoglutarate and L-Dap. Also, we describe crystal structures of SbnB in complex with NADH and ACEGA as well as with NAD(+) and α-ketoglutarate to reveal the residues required for substrate binding, oxidation, and hydrolysis. SbnA and SbnB contribute to the iron sparing response of S. aureus that enables staphyloferrin B biosynthesis in the absence of an active tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  13. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  14. Genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang; Ding, Yanqin; Zhu, Hui; Yao, Liangtong; Du, Binghai

    2009-01-01

    The genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere was studied by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rRNA sequence homology and phylogenetics analysis methods. Studies demonstrated that 85% of the total 354 isolates produced siderophores in iron limited liquid medium. A total of 28 ARDRA patterns were identified among the 299 siderophore-producing bacterial isolates. The 28 ARDRA patterns represented bacteria of 14 different genera belonging to six bacterial divisions, namely β-, γ-, α-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria. Especially, γ-Proteobacteria consisting of Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Pantoea, Erwinia and Stenotrophomonas genus encountered 18 different ARDRA groups. Results also showed a greater siderophore-producing bacterial diversity than previous researches. For example, Sphingobacterium (isolates G-2-21-1 and G-2-27-2), Pseudomonas poae (isolate G-2-1-1), Enterobacter endosymbiont (isolates G-2-10-2 and N-5-10), Delftia acidovorans (isolate G-1-15), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (isolates N-46-11HH and N-5-20) were reported to be able to produce siderophores under low-iron conditions for the first time. Gram-negative isolates were more frequently encountered, with more than 95% total frequency. For Gram-positive bacteria, the Bacillus and Rhodococcus were the only two genera, with 1.7% total frequency. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas and Enterobacter were dominant in this environment, with 44.5% and 24.7% total frequency, respectively. It was also found that 75 percent of the isolates that had the high percentages of siderophore units (% between 40 and 60) belonged to Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas sp. G-229-21 screened out in this study may have potential to apply to low-iron soil to prevent plant soil-borne fungal pathogen diseases. PMID:24031358

  15. Disruption of transporters affiliated with enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis gene cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 has pleiotropic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic ...

  16. Role of Siderophores in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Arctic Soils : Effect of Direct Amendment of Siderophores to Arctic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, A. J.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), where ferric iron (Fe3+) is reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) anaerobically, is an important respiratory pathway used by soil bacteria. DIR contributes to carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the wet sedge tundra biome in the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) in Alaska, and could competitively inhibit the production of methane, a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2, from arctic soils. The occurrence of DIR as a dominant anaerobic process depends on the availability of substantial levels of Fe3+ in soils. Siderophores are metabolites made by microbes to dissolve Fe3+ from soil minerals in iron deficient systems, making Fe3+ soluble for micronutrient uptake. However, as the ACP is not iron deficient, siderophores in arctic soils may play a vital role in anaerobic respiration by dissolving Fe3+ for DIR. We studied the effects of direct siderophore addition to arctic soils through a field study conducted in Barrow, Alaska, and a laboratory incubation study conducted at San Diego State University. In the field experiment, 50μM deferroxamine mesylate (a siderophore), 50μM trisodium nitrilotriacetate (an organic chelator) or an equal volume of water was added to isolated experimental plots, replicated in clusters across the landscape. Fe2+ concentrations were measured in soil pore water samples collected periodically to measure DIR over time in each. In the laboratory experiment, frozen soil samples obtained from drained thaw lake basins in the ACP, were cut into cores and treated with the above-mentioned compounds to the same final concentrations. Along with measuring Fe2+ concentrations, CO2 output was also measured to monitor DIR over time in each core. Experimental addition of siderophores to soils in both the field and laboratory resulted in increased concentrations of soluble Fe3+ and a sustained increase in Fe2+concentrations over time, along with increased respiration rates in siderophore-amended cores. These results show increased DIR in

  17. MbtH-like protein-mediated cross-talk between non-ribosomal peptide antibiotic and siderophore biosynthetic pathways in Streptomyces coelicolor M145.

    PubMed

    Lautru, Sylvie; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Challis, Gregory L

    2007-05-01

    MbtH-like proteins are a family of small proteins encoded by genes found in many, but not all, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-encoding gene clusters that direct the biosynthesis of peptide antibiotics and siderophores. Studies published to date have not elucidated the function of MbtH-like proteins, nor have they clarified whether they are required for metabolite biosynthesis. Here it is shown that only one of two genes (cdaX or cchK) encoding MbtH-like proteins in Streptomyces coelicolor is required for biosynthesis of the peptide siderophore coelichelin and the calcium-dependent peptide antibiotic (CDA). The cdaX and cchK genes can functionally complement each other in trans, suggesting that CdaX and CchK can cross-talk with the coelichelin and CDA biosynthetic pathways, respectively. Transcriptional analyses of wild-type S. coelicolor and a double cchK/cdaX replacement mutant indicate that CchK and CdaX may not be involved in transcriptional regulation of coelichelin and CDA biosynthetic gene clusters.

  18. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  19. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  20. Purification and structural characterization of siderophore (corynebactin) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Zajdowicz, Sheryl; Haller, Jon C; Krafft, Amy E; Hunsucker, Steve W; Mant, Colin T; Duncan, Mark W; Hodges, Robert S; Jones, David N M; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Corynebacterium diphtheriae must compete with host iron-sequestering mechanisms for iron. C. diphtheriae can acquire iron by a siderophore-dependent iron-uptake pathway, by uptake and degradation of heme, or both. Previous studies showed that production of siderophore (corynebactin) by C. diphtheriae is repressed under high-iron growth conditions by the iron-activated diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) and that partially purified corynebactin fails to react in chemical assays for catecholate or hydroxamate compounds. In this study, we purified corynebactin from supernatants of low-iron cultures of the siderophore-overproducing, DtxR-negative mutant strain C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔdtxR by sequential anion-exchange chromatography on AG1-X2 and Source 15Q resins, followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on Zorbax C8 resin. The Chrome Azurol S (CAS) chemical assay for siderophores was used to detect and measure corynebactin during purification, and the biological activity of purified corynebactin was shown by its ability to promote growth and iron uptake in siderophore-deficient mutant strains of C. diphtheriae under iron-limiting conditions. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis demonstrated that corynebactin has a novel structure, consisting of a central lysine residue linked through its α- and ε- amino groups by amide bonds to the terminal carboxyl groups of two different citrate residues. Corynebactin from C. diphtheriae is structurally related to staphyloferrin A from Staphylococcus aureus and rhizoferrin from Rhizopus microsporus in which d-ornithine or 1,4-diaminobutane, respectively, replaces the central lysine residue that is present in corynebactin.

  1. Siderophore-promoted Dissolution of Cobalt from Hydroxide Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Y.; Hesterberg, D; Duckworth, O

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that siderophores, a class of biogenic ligands with high affinities for Fe(III), can also strongly complex Co(III), an element essential to the normal metabolic function of microbes and animals. This study was conducted to quantify the rates and identify the products and mechanisms of the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Co from synthetic Co-bearing minerals. The dissolution reactions of heterogenite (CoOOH) and four Co-substituted goethites (Co-FeOOH) containing different Co concentrations were investigated in the presence of a trihydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB), using batch and flow-through experiments. Results showed that DFOB-promoted dissolution of Co from Co-bearing minerals may occur via pH-dependent ligand-promoted or reductive dissolution mechanisms. For heterogenite, ligand-promoted dissolution was the dominant pathway at neutral to alkaline pH, while production of dissolved Co(II) for pH <6. It was not possible from our data to decouple the separate contributions of homogenous and heterogeneous reduction reactions to the aqueous Co(II) pool. Cobalt substitution in Co-substituted goethite, possibly caused by distortion of goethite structure and increased lattice strain, resulted in enhanced total dissolution rates of both Co and Fe. The DFOB-promoted dissolution rates of Co-bearing minerals, coupled with the high affinity of Co(III) for DFOB, suggest that siderophores may be effective for increasing Co solubility, and thus possibly Co bioavailability. The results also suggest that siderophores may contribute to the mobilization of radioactive {sup 60}Co from Co-bearing mineral phases through mineral weathering and dissolution processes.

  2. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of cobalt from hydroxide minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hesterberg, Dean L.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2010-05-01

    Recent research has revealed that siderophores, a class of biogenic ligands with high affinities for Fe(III), can also strongly complex Co(III), an element essential to the normal metabolic function of microbes and animals. This study was conducted to quantify the rates and identify the products and mechanisms of the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Co from synthetic Co-bearing minerals. The dissolution reactions of heterogenite (CoOOH) and four Co-substituted goethites (Co-FeOOH) containing different Co concentrations were investigated in the presence of a trihydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFOB), using batch and flow-through experiments. Results showed that DFOB-promoted dissolution of Co from Co-bearing minerals may occur via pH-dependent ligand-promoted or reductive dissolution mechanisms. For heterogenite, ligand-promoted dissolution was the dominant pathway at neutral to alkaline pH, while production of dissolved Co(II) for pH <6. It was not possible from our data to decouple the separate contributions of homogenous and heterogeneous reduction reactions to the aqueous Co(II) pool. Cobalt substitution in Co-substituted goethite, possibly caused by distortion of goethite structure and increased lattice strain, resulted in enhanced total dissolution rates of both Co and Fe. The DFOB-promoted dissolution rates of Co-bearing minerals, coupled with the high affinity of Co(III) for DFOB, suggest that siderophores may be effective for increasing Co solubility, and thus possibly Co bioavailability. The results also suggest that siderophores may contribute to the mobilization of radioactive 60Co from Co-bearing mineral phases through mineral weathering and dissolution processes.

  3. Purification and Structural Characterization of Siderophore (Corynebactin) from Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    PubMed Central

    Zajdowicz, Sheryl; Haller, Jon C.; Krafft, Amy E.; Hunsucker, Steve W.; Mant, Colin T.; Duncan, Mark W.; Hodges, Robert S.; Jones, David N. M.; Holmes, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    During infection, Corynebacterium diphtheriae must compete with host iron-sequestering mechanisms for iron. C. diphtheriae can acquire iron by a siderophore-dependent iron-uptake pathway, by uptake and degradation of heme, or both. Previous studies showed that production of siderophore (corynebactin) by C. diphtheriae is repressed under high-iron growth conditions by the iron-activated diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) and that partially purified corynebactin fails to react in chemical assays for catecholate or hydroxamate compounds. In this study, we purified corynebactin from supernatants of low-iron cultures of the siderophore-overproducing, DtxR-negative mutant strain C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔdtxR by sequential anion-exchange chromatography on AG1-X2 and Source 15Q resins, followed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) on Zorbax C8 resin. The Chrome Azurol S (CAS) chemical assay for siderophores was used to detect and measure corynebactin during purification, and the biological activity of purified corynebactin was shown by its ability to promote growth and iron uptake in siderophore-deficient mutant strains of C. diphtheriae under iron-limiting conditions. Mass spectrometry and NMR analysis demonstrated that corynebactin has a novel structure, consisting of a central lysine residue linked through its α- and ε- amino groups by amide bonds to the terminal carboxyl groups of two different citrate residues. Corynebactin from C. diphtheriae is structurally related to staphyloferrin A from Staphylococcus aureus and rhizoferrin from Rhizopus microsporus in which d-ornithine or 1,4-diaminobutane, respectively, replaces the central lysine residue that is present in corynebactin. PMID:22514641

  4. Production of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS)- Dependent Siderophore by Aeromonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Amsaveni, Ramasamy; Sureshkumar, Muthusamy; Aravinth, Arthanari; Mary, Joseph Reshma; Vivekanandhan, Govindasami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aeromonas species are Gram-negative ubiquitous bacteria, facultative anaerobic rods that infect both invertebrates and vertebrates. Various fish species develop hemorrhagic disease and furunculosis due to Aeromonas spp. Aeromonas strains generate certain active compounds such as siderophores, which are the final products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) activity. The present study attempted to investigate the prevalence of Aeromonas isolates in marketed fish sources. We also examined the siderophore production ability of these isolates. Methods: Among the molecular tools, 16S rRNA analysis was used to identify Aeromonas species and their epidemiological distributions. The hemolytic activity of the strains and biochemical assays were used to confirm the identity of the isolates. We also determined the chemical nature of siderophores in these strains. Results: A total of seven Aeromonas isolates obtained from fish were included to determine the siderophore production. Of 7 isolates, 4 produced siderophore, and their chemical nature was also determined. The siderophore produced by Aeromonas was invariably found to be of hydroxamate. Four Aeromonas isolates were selected for PCR identification of NRPS-encoding gene. The conserved sequence was present in all four selected isolates. Furthermore, siderophores were qualitatively tested for their antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and a significant level of inhibitory activity was observed in siderophores from the four isolates. Conclusion: Our results showed the ability of the isolated strains in production of siderophores with a high level of activity against Salmonella paratyphi. These siderophores could find applications in biomedical industries. PMID:27155016

  5. RirA is the iron response regulator of the rhizobactin 1021 biosynthesis and transport genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011.

    PubMed

    Viguier, Caroline; O Cuív, Páraic; Clarke, Paul; O'Connell, Michael

    2005-05-15

    The genes encoding the biosynthesis and transport of rhizobactin 1021, a siderophore produced by Sinorhizobium meliloti, are negatively regulated by iron. Mutagenesis of rirA, the rhizobial iron regulator, resulted in abolition of the iron responsive regulation of the biosynthesis and transport genes. Bioassay analysis revealed that the siderophore is produced in the presence of iron in a rirA mutant. RNA analysis and GFP fusions supported the conclusion that RirA is the mediator of iron-responsive transcriptional repression of the two transcripts encoding the biosynthesis and transport genes. RirA in S. meliloti appears to fulfil the role often observed for Fur in other bacterial species. The regulator was found to mediate the iron-responsive expression of two additional genes, smc02726 and dppA1, repressing the former while activating the latter. The rirA mutant nodulated the host plant Medicago sativa (alfalfa) and fixed nitrogen as effectively as the wild type.

  6. The ssbL Gene Harbored by the ColV Plasmid of an Escherichia coli Neonatal Meningitis Strain Is an Auxiliary Virulence Factor Boosting the Production of Siderophores through the Shikimate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Chloé; Bidet, Philippe; Benoist, Jean-François; Schlemmer, Dimitri; Sobral, Elsa; d'Humières, Camille

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture iron is a challenge for most bacteria. The neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli strain S88 possesses several iron uptake systems, notably including siderophores. Transcriptional analysis of the ColV plasmid pS88 has shown strong induction of a previously undescribed gene with low identity to three E. coli chromosomal genes encoding phospho-2-dehydro-3-deoxyheptonate aldolases involved in aromatic amino acid and catecholate/phenolate siderophore biosynthesis through the shikimate pathway. Here, we investigated the role of this gene, ssbLp (ssbL carried on the plasmid), in siderophore biosynthesis and, consequently, in S88 virulence. We constructed an S88 mutant designated S88 ΔssbLp, which exhibited reduced growth under low-iron conditions compared to the wild-type strain. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of culture supernatants showed that the mutant secreted significantly smaller amounts of enterobactin, salmochelin SX, and yersiniabactin than the wild-type strain. The mutant was also less virulent in a neonatal rat sepsis model, with significantly lower bacteremia and mortality. Supplementation with chorismate, the final product of the shikimate pathway, restored the wild-type phenotype in vitro. In a collection of human extraintestinal E. coli isolates, we found that ssbL was present only in strains harboring the iro locus, encoding salmochelins, and was located either on the chromosome or on plasmids. Acquisition of the iro locus has been accompanied by acquisition of the auxiliary gene ssbL, which boosts the metabolic pathway essential for catecholate/phenolate siderophore biosynthesis and could represent potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24443535

  7. The ssbL gene harbored by the ColV plasmid of an Escherichia coli neonatal meningitis strain is an auxiliary virulence factor boosting the production of siderophores through the shikimate pathway.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Chloé; Bidet, Philippe; Benoist, Jean-François; Schlemmer, Dimitri; Sobral, Elsa; d'Humières, Camille; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2014-04-01

    The ability to capture iron is a challenge for most bacteria. The neonatal meningitis Escherichia coli strain S88 possesses several iron uptake systems, notably including siderophores. Transcriptional analysis of the ColV plasmid pS88 has shown strong induction of a previously undescribed gene with low identity to three E. coli chromosomal genes encoding phospho-2-dehydro-3-deoxyheptonate aldolases involved in aromatic amino acid and catecholate/phenolate siderophore biosynthesis through the shikimate pathway. Here, we investigated the role of this gene, ssbLp (ssbL carried on the plasmid), in siderophore biosynthesis and, consequently, in S88 virulence. We constructed an S88 mutant designated S88 ΔssbLp, which exhibited reduced growth under low-iron conditions compared to the wild-type strain. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis of culture supernatants showed that the mutant secreted significantly smaller amounts of enterobactin, salmochelin SX, and yersiniabactin than the wild-type strain. The mutant was also less virulent in a neonatal rat sepsis model, with significantly lower bacteremia and mortality. Supplementation with chorismate, the final product of the shikimate pathway, restored the wild-type phenotype in vitro. In a collection of human extraintestinal E. coli isolates, we found that ssbL was present only in strains harboring the iro locus, encoding salmochelins, and was located either on the chromosome or on plasmids. Acquisition of the iro locus has been accompanied by acquisition of the auxiliary gene ssbL, which boosts the metabolic pathway essential for catecholate/phenolate siderophore biosynthesis and could represent potential therapeutic targets.

  8. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by the siderophore ferrioxamine B

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.R.; Thorp, H.H.

    1995-12-01

    The reduction of nitrogen oxides by transition metal complexes has been an area of intense research due to importance in the environment and physiology. We present a unique catalytic system in which the iron siderophore ferrioxamine B (E{sub l/2}(Fe(III/II))=-0.76 V v SSCE) facilitate, the reduction of nitric oxide at potentials as low as -0.6 V v. SSCE. The reduction proceeds through a rapidly formed iron-containing intermediate that can be observed in the visible spectrum. This absorbance exhibits a strong 1000 cm{sup -1} catalytic cycle. progression at room temperature. This species is the resting state of the catalytic cycle. The differential binding constant of the siderophore ligand for Fe(III) over Fe(II) provides part of the driving force in the catalytic cycle.

  9. Siderocalin outwits the coordination chemistry of vibriobactin, a siderophore of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Correnti, Colin; Clifton, Matthew C; Strong, Roland K; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2013-09-20

    The human protein siderocalin (Scn) inhibits bacterial iron acquisition by binding catechol siderophores. Several pathogenic bacteria respond by making stealth siderophores that are not recognized by Scn. Fluvibactin and vibriobactin, respectively of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio cholerae , include an oxazoline adjacent to a catechol. This chelating unit binds iron either in a catecholate or a phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode. The latter has been suggested to make vibriobactin a stealth siderophore without directly identifying the coordination mode in relation to Scn binding. We use Scn binding assays with the two siderophores and two oxazoline-substituted analogs and the crystal structure of Fe-fluvibactin:Scn to show that the oxazoline does not prevent Scn binding; hence, vibriobactin is not a stealth siderophore. We show that the phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode is present at physiological pH and is not bound by Scn. However, Scn binding shifts the coordination to the catecholate mode and thereby inactivates this siderophore.

  10. Siderophore mediated uranium sequestration by marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus BDU 130911.

    PubMed

    Rashmi, Vijayaraghavan; Shylajanaciyar, Mohandass; Rajalakshmi, Ramamoorthy; D'Souza, Stanley F; Prabaharan, Dharmar; Uma, Lakshmanan

    2013-02-01

    Four different marine cyanobacterial morphotypes were tested for their efficacy to produce siderophores in Fe minus [Fe(-)], Fe minus Uranium dosed [Fe(-)U(+)], and Fe dosed Uranium dosed [Fe(-)U(+)] media. Of the four organisms tested, Synechococcus elongatus BDU 130911 produced the highest amount of siderophore of 58μgmg(-1) dryweight. The results clearly indicate that uranium induces siderophore production in marine cyanobacteria even in the presence of iron [Fe(-)U(+)] condition. The type of siderophore revealed by FeCl(3), Tetrazolium and Atkin's tests is a hydroxamate; and thin layer chromatogram also authenticates our finding. Uranium siderophore complexation was confirmed through modified Chrome Azurol S (CAS) assay as well as based on residual uranium presence. In silico docking studies further validate siderophore complexation with uranium.

  11. Structural basis for hijacking siderophore receptors by antimicrobial lasso peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mathavan, Indran; Zirah, Séverine; Mehmood, Shahid; Choudhury, Hassanul G.; Goulard, Christophe; Li, Yanyan; Robinson, Carol V.; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Beis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    The lasso peptide microcin J25 is known to hijack the siderophore receptor FhuA for initiating internalization. Here, we provide the first structural evidence on the recognition mechanism and our biochemical data show that another closely related lasso peptide cannot interact with FhuA. Our work provides an explanation on the narrow activity spectrum of lasso peptides and opens the path to the development of new antibacterials. PMID:24705590

  12. Azospirillum brasilense siderophores with antifungal activity against Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Tortora, María L; Díaz-Ricci, Juan C; Pedraza, Raúl O

    2011-04-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum is one of the most important diseases in strawberry crop. Due to environmental pollution and resistance produced by chemical fungicides, nowadays biological control is considered a good alternative for crop protection. Among biocontrol agents, there are plant growth-promoting bacteria, such as members of the genus Azospirillum. In this work, we demonstrate that under iron limiting conditions different strains of A. brasilense produce siderophores, exhibiting different yields and rates of production according to their origin. Chemical assays revealed that strains REC2 and REC3 secrete catechol type siderophores, including salicylic acid, detected by thin layer chromatography coupled with fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Siderophores produced by them showed in vitro antifungal activity against C. acutatum M11. Furthermore, this latter coincided with results obtained from phytopathological tests performed in planta, where a reduction of anthracnose symptoms on strawberry plants previously inoculated with A. brasilense was observed. These outcomes suggest that some strains of A. brasilense could act as biocontrol agent preventing anthracnose disease in strawberry.

  13. The siderophore yersiniabactin binds copper to protect pathogens during infection

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Hung, Chia S.; Crowley, Jan R.; Stapleton, Ann E.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens secrete chemically diverse iron chelators called siderophores, which may exert additional distinctive functions in vivo. Among these, uropathogenic E.coli often co-express the virulence-associated siderophore yersiniabactin (Ybt) along with catecholate siderophores. Here we used a novel mass-spectrometric screening approach to reveal that yersiniabactin is also a physiologically favorable copper (II) ligand. Direct mass-spectrometric detection of the resulting Cu(II)-Ybt complex in mice and humans with E. coli urinary tract infections demonstrates copper binding to be a physiologically relevant in vivo interaction during infection. Yersiniabactin expression corresponded to higher copper resistance among human urinary tract isolates, suggesting a protective role for this interaction. Chemical and genetic characterization showed that yersiniabactin helps bacteria resist copper toxicity by sequestering host-derived copper (II) and preventing its catechol-mediated reduction to copper (I). Together, these studies reveal a new virulence-associated function for yersiniabactin that is distinct from iron binding. PMID:22772152

  14. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  15. Identification and characterization of a siderophore regulatory gene (pfrA) of Pseudomonas putida WCS358: homology to the alginate regulatory gene algQ of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Venturi, V; Ottevanger, C; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J

    1993-10-01

    Genes encoding biosynthesis of pseudobactin 358 (a microbial iron transport agent) and its cognate outer membrane receptor protein, PupA, are transcribed only under iron limitation in plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358. Two cosmid clones were identified from a gene bank of WCS358 DNA which could independently and in an iron-dependent manner activate transcription from a WCS358 siderophore gene promoter in heterologous Pseudomonas strain A225. The functional region of one of the clones was localized by subcloning, transposon Tn3Gus mutagenesis, and DNA sequencing. Genomic transposon insertion mutants in the functional region lost the capacity to activate a siderophore gene promoter fusion transcriptionally; furthermore, these mutants no longer produced pseudobactin 358. The activating region consisted of a single gene designated pfrA (Pseudomonas ferric regulator). The pfrA gene codes for a single polypeptide, PfrA, of approximately 18 kDa, which has 58% identity to AlgQ (also known as AlgR2), a positive regulator involved in transcriptionally regulating alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cross-complementation studies between the pfrA gene of P. putida and the algQ gene of P. aeruginosa revealed that pfrA can restore mucoidy (alginate production) in an algQ mutant and that algQ could poorly complement a pfrA genomic mutant. It is concluded that PfrA is involved in the positive regulation of siderophore biosynthetic genes in response to iron limitation; furthermore, pfrA and algQ appeared to be interchangeable between P. putida and P. aeruginosa.

  16. Microbial Copper-binding Siderophores at the Host-Pathogen Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun-Ik; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic microorganisms secrete small molecule chelators called siderophores defined by their ability to bind extracellular ferric iron, making it bioavailable to microbes. Recently, a siderophore produced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, yersiniabactin, was found to also bind copper ions during human infections. The ability of yersiniabactin to protect E. coli from copper toxicity and redox-based phagocyte defenses distinguishes it from other E. coli siderophores. Here we compare yersiniabactin to other extracellular copper-binding molecules and review how copper-binding siderophores may confer virulence-associated gains of function during infection pathogenesis. PMID:26055720

  17. The Ins and Outs of siderophore mediated iron uptake by extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Garénaux, Amélie; Caza, Mélissa; Dozois, Charles M

    2011-11-21

    Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are responsible for many infectious diseases in livestock, such as airsacculitis in poultry, acute mastitis in dairy animals and neonatal septicaemia and urinary tract infections (UTI) in pigs and cattle. In their animal hosts, ExPEC have to cope with low iron availability. By using different strategies, ExPEC strains are able to retrieve iron sequestered by host proteins. One of these strategies is the use of siderophores, which are small secreted molecules with high affinity for iron. ExPEC are known to synthesize up to four different types of siderophores: enterobactin, salmochelins, yersiniabactin and aerobactin. Steps required for iron acquisition by siderophores include (1) siderophore synthesis in the cytoplasm, (2) siderophore secretion, (3) ferri-siderophore reception, (4) ferri-siderophore internalization and (5) iron release in the cytoplasm. Each siderophore has specific properties and may be differentially regulated to provide different advantages, potentially allowing ExPEC to adapt to different environmental conditions or to overcome host innate immunity. Iron acquisition by siderophores plays a significant role in ExPEC virulence and, as it requires outer membrane receptors, it constitutes an interesting target for the development of vaccines that could be used to limit the number of infectious diseases due to ExPEC in livestock.

  18. Siderophore uptake in bacteria and the battle for iron with the host; a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Chu, Byron C; Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Johanson, Ted H; Krewulak, Karla D; Lau, Cheryl K; Peacock, R Sean; Slavinskaya, Zoya; Vogel, Hans J

    2010-08-01

    Siderophores are biosynthetically produced and secreted by many bacteria, yeasts, fungi and plants, to scavenge for ferric iron (Fe(3+)). They are selective iron-chelators that have an extremely high affinity for binding this trivalent metal ion. The ferric ion is poorly soluble but it is the form of iron that is predominantly found in oxygenated environments. Siderophore uptake in bacteria has been extensively studied and over the last decade, detailed structural information for many of the proteins that are involved in their transport has become available. Specifically, numerous crystal structures for outer membrane siderophore transporters, as well as for soluble periplasmic siderophore-binding proteins, have been reported. Moreover, unique siderophore-binding proteins have recently been serendipitously discovered in humans, and the structures of some of their siderophore-complexes have been characterized. The binding pockets for different ferric-siderophores in these proteins have been described in great molecular detail. In addition to highlighting this structural information, in this review paper we will also briefly discuss the relevant chemical properties of iron, and provide a perspective on our current understanding of the human and bacterial iron uptake pathways. Potential clinical uses of siderophores will also be discussed. The emerging overall picture is that iron metabolism plays an extremely important role during bacterial infections. Because levels of free ferric iron in biological systems are always extremely low, there is serious competition for iron and for ferric-siderophores between pathogenic bacteria and the human or animal host.

  19. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Himpsl, Stephanie D; Pearson, Melanie M; Arewång, Carl J; Nusca, Tyler D; Sherman, David H; Mobley, Harry L T

    2010-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly upregulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596-2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore have reduced fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis.

  20. Microbial Copper-binding Siderophores at the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    PubMed

    Koh, Eun-Ik; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2015-07-31

    Numerous pathogenic microorganisms secrete small molecule chelators called siderophores defined by their ability to bind extracellular ferric iron, making it bioavailable to microbes. Recently, a siderophore produced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, yersiniabactin, was found to also bind copper ions during human infections. The ability of yersiniabactin to protect E. coli from copper toxicity and redox-based phagocyte defenses distinguishes it from other E. coli siderophores. Here we compare yersiniabactin to other extracellular copper-binding molecules and review how copper-binding siderophores may confer virulence-associated gains of function during infection pathogenesis.

  1. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  2. New insights into the role of siderophores as triggers of plant immunity: what can we learn from animals?

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-06-01

    Microorganisms use siderophores to obtain iron from the environment. In pathogenic interactions, siderophores are involved in iron acquisition from the host and are sometimes necessary for the expression of full virulence. This review summarizes the main data describing the role of these iron scavengers in animal and plant defence systems. To protect themselves against iron theft, mammalian hosts have developed a hypoferremia strategy that includes siderophore-binding molecules called siderocalins. In addition to microbial ferri-siderophore sequestration, siderocalins are involved in triggering immunity. In plants, no similar mechanisms have been described and many fewer data are available, although recent advances have shed light on the role of siderophores in plant-pathogen interactions. Siderophores can trigger immunity in plants in several contexts. The most frequently described situation involving siderophores is induced systemic resistance (ISR) triggered by plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria. Although ISR responses have been observed after treating roots with certain siderophores, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Immunity can also be triggered by siderophores in leaves. Siderophore perception in plants appears to be different from the well-known perception mechanisms of other microbial compounds, known as microbe-associated molecular patterns. Scavenging iron per se appears to be a novel mechanism of immunity activation, involving complex disturbance of metal homeostasis. Receptor-specific recognition of siderophores has been described in animals, but not in plants. The review closes with an overview of the possible mechanisms of defence activation, via iron scavenging by siderophores or specific siderophore recognition by the plant host.

  3. Synthesis and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Siderophore Biosynthesis Inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kathryn M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Dawadi, Surendra; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed biosynthetic step of the mycobactins, which are important virulence factors associated with iron acquisition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MbtA is a validated therapeutic target for antitubercular drug development. 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1) is a bisubstrate inhibitor of MbtA and exhibits exceptionally potent biochemical and antitubercular activity. However, 1 suffers from sub-optimal drug disposition properties resulting in a short half-life (t1/2), low exposure (AUC), and low bioavailability (F). Four strategies were pursued to address these liabilities including the synthesis of prodrugs, increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl moiety, modulation of the lipophilicity, and strategic introduction of fluorine into 1. Complete pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of all compounds was performed. The most successful modifications involved fluorination of the nucleoside that provided substantial improvements in t1/2 and AUC. Increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl linker yielded incremental enhancements while modulation of the lipophilicity and prodrug approaches led to substantially poorer PK parameters. PMID:26110337

  4. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of nucleoside prodrugs designed to target siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dawadi, Surendra; Kawamura, Shuhei; Rubenstein, Anja; Remmel, Rory; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2016-03-15

    The nucleoside antibiotic, 5'-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1), possesses potent whole-cell activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB). This compound is also active in vivo, but suffers from poor drug disposition properties that result in poor bioavailability and rapid clearance. The synthesis and evaluation of a systematic series of lipophilic ester prodrugs containing linear and α-branched alkanoyl groups from two to twelve carbons at the 3'-position of a 2'-fluorinated analog of 1 is reported with the goal to improve oral bioavailability. The prodrugs were stable in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and under physiological conditions (pH 7.4). The prodrugs were also remarkably stable in mouse, rat, and human serum (relative serum stability: human∼rat≫mouse) displaying a parabolic trend in the SAR with hydrolysis rates increasing with chain length up to eight carbons (t1/2=1.6 h for octanoyl prodrug 7 in mouse serum) and then decreasing again with higher chain lengths. The permeability of the prodrugs was also assessed in a Caco-2 cell transwell model. All of the prodrugs were found to have reduced permeation in the apical-to-basolateral direction and enhanced permeation in the basolateral-to-apical direction relative to the parent compound 2, resulting in efflux ratios 5-28 times greater than 2. Additionally, Caco-2 cells were found to hydrolyze the prodrugs with SAR mirroring the serum stability results and a preference for hydrolysis on the apical side. Taken together, these results suggest that the described prodrug strategy will lead to lower than expected oral bioavailability of 2 and highlight the contribution of intestinal esterases for prodrug hydrolysis.

  5. Metachelins, mannosylated and N-oxidized coprogen-type siderophores from Metarhizium robertsii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Under iron-depleted culture conditions, the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii (Bischoff, Humber, and Rehner) (= M. anisopliae) produces a complex of extracellular siderophores including novel O-glycosylated and/or N-oxidized coprogen-type compounds as well as the known fungal siderophore...

  6. Structural dependence of Mn complexation by siderophores: Donor group dependence on complex stability and reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, James M.; Parker, Dorothy L.; Bargar, John R.; Jarzecki, Andrzej A.; Tebo, Bradley M.; Sposito, Garrison; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2012-07-01

    Siderophores traditionally have been viewed as solely being involved in the biogeochemical cycling of Fe(III). This paradigm, however, ignores the diverse roles siderophores may play in the cycling of other trace metals, such as Mn, Co, Mo, and V. Recent work has shown that siderophores form complexes with high stability constants with Mn(III), which are in some cases higher than that of the corresponding Fe(III) complex. Herein, we report on a structural analysis of the dissolved Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-siderophore complexes of rhizoferrin and two pyoverdin-type siderophores using X-ray spectroscopic techniques. Additionally, the stability constants of the Mn(III)-pyoverdinPaA and Mn(III)-rhizoferrin complexes have been quantified as log β111 = 47.5 ± 0.3 and log β110 = 29.8 ± 0.3, respectively. Comparisons of thermodynamic stability and solution structures of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-complexes with a variety of siderophores demonstrate the relationship between donor group identity, siderophore structure, and strength of complex formation. Rhizoferrin and two mixed-moiety pyoverdins bind with a higher affinity for Mn(III) than Fe(III), possibly because of binding moiety composition which makes them better able to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortion. In contrast, Fe(III) forms complexes of higher relative stability with siderophores that contain hydroxamate and catecholate moieties, more rigid donor groups that form five-membered chelate rings.

  7. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred.

  8. Environmental Actinide Mobility: Plutonium and Uranium Interactions with Exopolysaccharides and Siderophores of Aerobic Soil Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Mary P.; Vanderberg, Laura

    2001-06-01

    Research efforts into understanding the effect of siderophores and capsules on actinide speciation and resultant environmental behavior are ongoing. Investigations on both siderophores have progressed. The redox chemistry of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) with DFO under acidic conditions was examined by UV-Vis and NMR spectroscopies. Pu(VI) was instantly reduced to Pu(V) by DFO and DFO cleavage resulted. Neither DFO nor the cleavage product appeared to coordinate with Pu(V) in the pH range examined. Growth of S. pilosus for cellular translocation experiments was optimized and experiments to determine DFO-mediated uranium uptake by S. pilosus are underway. OFS siderophore(s) production has been optimized and product identification is underway. Siderophore-like molecules were positive for the Arnow assay and had UV absorbance bands at 250nm and 315nm, suggesting catecholates-type molecules. Siderophores were produced with C13 - C16 as carbon source in AM-1 salts medium with 1.0mM iron. Siderophore accumulation was slowest on C13 due to the slower growth of OFS on this substrate. The C16 concentration in the culture influenced siderophore production, with highest levels at 1.0% and 2.0%.

  9. Trihydroxamate siderophore-fluoroquinolone conjugates are selective sideromycin antibiotics that target Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Long, Timothy E; Möllmann, Ute; Miller, Marvin J

    2013-03-20

    Siderophores are multidentate iron(III) chelators used by bacteria for iron assimilation. Sideromycins, also called siderophore-antibiotic conjugates, are a unique subset of siderophores that enter bacterial cells via siderophore uptake pathways and deliver the toxic antibiotic in a "Trojan horse" fashion. Sideromycins represent a novel antibiotic delivery technology with untapped potential for developing sophisticated microbe-selective antibacterial agents that limit the emergence of bacterial resistance. The chemical synthesis of a series of mono-, bis-, and trihydroxamate sideromycins are described here along with their biological evaluation in antibacterial susceptibility assays. The linear hydroxamate siderophores used for the sideromycins in this study were derived from the ferrioxamine family and inspired by the naturally occurring salmycin sideromycins. The antibacterial agents used were a β-lactam carbacepholosporin, Lorabid, and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, chosen for the different locations of their biological targets, the periplasm (extracellular) and the cytoplasm (intracellular). The linear hydroxamate-based sideromycins were selectively toxic toward Gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus SG511 (MIC = 1.0 μM for the trihydroxamate-fluoroquinolone sideromycin). Siderophore-sideromycin competition assays demonstrated that only the fluoroquinolone sideromycins required membrane transport to reach their cytoplasmic biological target and that a trihydroxamate siderophore backbone was required for protein-mediated active transport of the sideromycins into S. aureus cells via siderophore uptake pathways. This work represents a comprehensive study of linear hydroxamate sideromycins and teaches how to build effective hydroxamate-based sideromycins as Gram-positive selective antibiotic agents.

  10. Siderophore production and facilitated uptake of iron plutonium in p. putida.

    SciTech Connect

    Boukhalfa, H.; Lack, J. G.; Reilly, S. D.; Hersman, L. E.; Neu, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Bioremediation is a very attractive alternative for restoration of contaminated soil and ground water . This is particularly true for radionuclide contamination, which tends to be low in concentration and distributed over large surface areas . Microorganisms, through their natural metabolism, produce a large variety of organic molecules of different size and functionality . These molecules interact with contaminants present in the microbe's environment . Through these interactions bio-molecules can solubilize, oxidize, reduce or precipitate major metal contaminant in soils and ground water . We are studying these interaction for actinides and common soil subsurface bacteria . One focus has been on siderophores, small molecules that have great affinity for hard metal ions, and their potential to affect the distribution and mobility of actinide contaminants . The metal siderophores assembly can be recognized and taken up by micro-organisms through their interference with their iron uptake system . The first step in the active iron transport consists of Fe(III)-siderophore recognition by membrane receptors, which requires specific stereo orientation of the Fe(III)-siderophore complex . Recent investigations have shown that siderophores can form strong complexes with a large variety of toxic metals and may mediate their introduction inside the cell . We have previously shown that a Puhydroxamate siderophore assembly is recognized and taken up by the Microbacterium flavescens (JG-9). However, it is not clear if Pu-siderophore assemblies of other siderophores are also recognized.

  11. TonB-Dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the ...

  12. Kinetics of iron acquisition from ferric siderophores by Paracoccus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, R.J.; Weimar, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The kinetics of iron accumulation by iron-starved Paracoccus denitrificans during the first 2 min of exposure to 55Fe-labeled ferric siderophore chelates is described. Iron is acquired from the ferric chelate of the natural siderophore L-parabactin in a process exhibiting biphastic kinetics by Lineweaver-Burk analysis. The kinetic data for 1 microM less than (Fe L-parabactin) less than 10 microM fit a regression line which suggests a low-affinity system (Km = 3.9 +/- 1.2 microM, Vmax = 494 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1), whereas the data for 0.1 microM less than or equal to (Fe L-parabactin) less than or equal to 1 microM fit another line consistent with a high-affinity system (Km = 0.24 +/- 0.06 microM, Vmax = 108 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). The Km of the high-affinity uptake is comparable to the binding affinity we had previously reported for the purified ferric L-parabactin receptor protein in the outer membrane. In marked contrast, ferric D-parabactin data fit a single regression line corresponding to a simple Michaelis-Menten process with comparatively low affinity (Km = 3.1 +/- 0.9 microM, Vmax = 125 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). Other catecholamide siderophores with an intact oxazoline ring derived from L-threonine (L-homoparabactin, L-agrobactin, and L-vibriobactin) also exhibit biphasic kinetics with a high-affinity component similar to ferric L-parabactin. Circular dichroism confirmed that these ferric chelates, like ferric L-parabactin, exist as the lambda enantiomers.

  13. Echinomycin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Michio; Nakazawa, Takehito; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    Echinomycin is an antitumor antibiotic secondary metabolite isolated from streptomycetes, whose core structure is biosynthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). The echinomycin biosynthetic pathway was successfully reconstituted in Escherichia coli. NRPS often contains a thioesterase domain at its C terminus for cyclorelease of the elongating peptide chain. Those thioesterase domains were shown to exhibit significant substrate tolerance. More recently, an oxidoreductase Ecm17, which forms the disulfide bridge in triostin A, was characterized. Surprisingly, an unrelated disulfide-forming enzyme GliT for gliotoxin biosynthesis was also able to catalyze the same reaction, providing another example of broad substrate specificity in secondary metabolite biosynthetic enzymes. Those promiscuous catalysts can be a valuable tool in generating diversity in natural products analogs we can produce heterologously.

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  15. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-03-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae.

  16. Secretion, but not overall synthesis, of catecholate siderophores contributes to virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Caza, Mélissa; Lépine, François; Dozois, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) use siderophores to sequester iron during infection. Enterobactin and salmochelins are catecholate siderophores produced by some ExPEC strains and other pathogenic enterobacteria. Siderophore export and synthesis mutants of avian ExPEC strain χ7122 were tested in a chicken infection model. In single-strain infections, siderophore-negative (ΔentDΔiuc), ΔentS and ΔentSΔiroC export mutants were attenuated in tissues and blood, whereas the ΔiroC export mutant was only attenuated in blood. Interestingly, the ΔentD mutant, producing only aerobactin, retained full virulence, and loss of entD in the ΔentSΔiroC mutant restored virulence. LC-MS/MS quantification of siderophores in export mutants demonstrated that loss of entS impaired enterobactin and mono-glucosylated enterobactin secretion, whereas loss of iroC impaired di- and tri-glucosylated enterobactin secretion. Loss of entS and/or iroC resulted in intracellular accumulation and increased secretion of siderophore monomers. Catecholate siderophore export mutants also demonstrated decreased fitness in a co-challenge infection model. By contrast, catecholate siderophore synthesis mutants (ΔentD and ΔiroB) competed as well as the wild-type strain. Results establish that EntS and IroC mediate specific export of catecholate siderophores and the role of these exporters for ExPEC virulence is contingent on enterobactin synthesis, which is not required when other siderophores like aerobactin are functional.

  17. Catechol siderophores repress the pyochelin pathway and activate the enterobactin pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an opportunity for siderophore-antibiotic conjugates development.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Véronique; Baco, Etienne; Cunrath, Olivier; August, Pamela Saint; Perraud, Quentin; Zill, Nicolas; Schleberger, Christian; Schmidt, Alexander; Paulen, Aurélie; Bumann, Dirk; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that antibiotic vectorization by siderophores (iron chelators produced by bacteria) considerably increases the efficacy of such drugs. The siderophore serves as a vector: when the pathogen tries to take up iron via the siderophore, it also takes up the antibiotic. Catecholates are among the most common iron-chelating compounds used in synthetic siderophore-antibiotic conjugates. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and proteomic approaches, we showed that the presence of catecholate compounds in the medium of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to strong activation of the transcription and expression of the outer membrane transporter PfeA, the ferri-enterobactin importer. Iron-55 uptake assays on bacteria with and without PfeA expression confirmed that catechol compounds imported iron into P. aeruginosa cells via PfeA. Uptake rates were between 0.3 × 10(3) and 2 × 10(3) Fe atoms/bacterium/min according to the used catechol siderophore in iron-restricted medium, and remained as high as 0.8 × 10(3) Fe atoms/bacterium/min for enterobactin, even in iron-rich medium. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and proteomic approaches showed that in parallel to this switching on of PfeA expression, a repression of the expression of pyochelin (PCH) pathway genes (PCH being one of the two siderophores produced by P. aeruginosa for iron acquisition) was observed.

  18. Direct evidence of iron uptake by the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism without iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Allred, Benjamin E; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2014-09-19

    Iron is an essential element for all organisms, and microorganisms produce small molecule iron-chelators, siderophores, to efficiently acquire Fe(III). Gram-positive bacteria possess lipoprotein siderophore-binding proteins (SBPs) on the membrane. Some of the SBPs bind both apo-siderophores (iron-free) and Fe-siderophore (iron-chelated) and only import Fe-siderophores. When the SBP initially binds an apo-siderophore, the SBP uses the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism (the SBPs exchange Fe(III) from a Fe-siderophore to the apo-siderophore bound to the protein) and/or displacement mechanism (the apo-siderophore bound to the SBP is released and a Fe-siderophore is then bound to the protein) to import the Fe-siderophore. Previously, we reported that the Bacillus cereus SBP, YxeB, exchanges Fe(III) from a ferrioxamine B (FO) to a desferrioxamine B (DFO) bound to YxeB using the siderophore-shuttle mechanism although the iron exchange was indirectly elucidated. Synthetic Cr-DFO (inert metal FO analog) and Ga-DFO (nonreducible FO analog) are bound to YxeB and imported via YxeB and the corresponding permeases and ATPase. YxeB exchanges Fe(III) from FO and Ga(III) from Ga-DFO to DFO bound to the protein, indicating that the metal-exchange occurs without metal reduction. YxeB also binds DFO derivatives including acetylated DFO (apo-siderophore) and acetylated FO (AcFO, Fe-siderophore). The iron from AcFO is transferred to DFO when bound to YxeB, giving direct evidence of iron exchange. Moreover, YxeB also uses the displacement mechanism when ferrichrome (Fch) is added to the DFO:YxeB complex. Uptake by the displacement mechanism is a minor pathway compared to the shuttle mechanism.

  19. The two-component regulators GacS and GacA positively regulate a nonfluorescent siderophore through the Gac/Rsm signaling cascade in high-siderophore-yielding Pseudomonas sp. strain HYS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinyan; Chen, Min; Jiang, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores, which are produced to overcome iron deficiency, are believed to be closely related to the adaptability of bacteria. The high-siderophore-yielding Pseudomonas sp. strain HYS simultaneously secretes the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine and another nonfluorescent siderophore that is a major contributor to the high siderophore yield. Transposon mutagenesis revealed siderophore-related genes, including the two-component regulators GacS/GacA and a special cluster containing four open reading frames (the nfs cluster). Deletion mutations of these genes abolished nonfluorescent-siderophore production, and expression of the nfs cluster depended on gacA, indicating that gacS-gacA may control the nonfluorescent siderophore through regulation of the nfs cluster. Furthermore, regulation of the nonfluorescent siderophore by GacS/GacA involved the Gac/Rsm pathway. In contrast, inactivation of GacS/GacA led to upregulation of the fluorescent pyoverdine. The two siderophores were secreted under different iron conditions, probably because of differential effects of GacS/GacA. The global GacS/GacA regulatory system may control iron uptake by modulating siderophore production and may enable bacteria to adapt to changing iron environments.

  20. Transposon-mediated random gene disruption with moderate halophilic bacteria and its application for halophilic bacterial siderophore analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Nishino, Tomohiko

    2016-12-01

    Analytical conditions using chromo azurol S was validated for quantification of siderophore in aqueous samples, followed by the characterization of siderophore derived from newly isolated moderately halophilic bacteria. Conditions with good linearity between the absorbance and the siderophore concentration were obtained at a siderophore concentration less than 20 µM, in the wavelength range between 630 and 660 nm with developing time for at least 2 h. Of the halophilic bacteria isolated from Tunisian soil, Halomonas sp., namely strain 21a was selected as siderophore producing halophiles. The strain produced siderophore significantly in the absence of iron in minimal medium. Siderophore-deficient mutant, namely IIa10, of the strain 21a was obtained from gene disruptant library constructed using transposon complex by electroporation. Genomic sequence analysis of the mutant IIa10 revealed that the transposon-inserted gene was TonB-dependent receptor.

  1. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1–2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle. PMID:27911777

  2. Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium: effect of growth phase and cultural conditions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia; Neto, Isabel F F; Machado, Manuela D; Soares, Helena M V M; Soares, Eduardo V

    2014-01-01

    Siderophore production by Bacillus megaterium was detected, in an iron-deficient culture medium, during the exponential growth phase, prior to the sporulation, in the presence of glucose; these results suggested that the onset of siderophore production did not require glucose depletion and was not related with the sporulation. The siderophore production by B. megaterium was affected by the carbon source used. The growth on glycerol promoted the very high siderophore production (1,182 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass); the opposite effect was observed in the presence of mannose (251 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). The growth in the presence of fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, maltose or sucrose, originated similar concentrations of siderophore (546-842 μmol g(-1) dry weight biomass). Aeration had a positive effect on the production of siderophore. Incubation of B. megaterium under static conditions delayed and reduced the growth and the production of siderophore, compared with the incubation in stirred conditions.

  3. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, Rene M; Mende, Daniel R; Hawco, Nicholas J; McIlvin, Matthew R; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N; Saito, Mak A; Sedwick, Peter N; DeLong, Edward F; Repeta, Daniel J

    2016-12-13

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1-2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  4. Siderophore-based microbial adaptations to iron scarcity across the eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiteau, Rene M.; Mende, Daniel R.; Hawco, Nicholas J.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Saito, Mak A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearly all iron dissolved in the ocean is complexed by strong organic ligands of unknown composition. The effect of ligand composition on microbial iron acquisition is poorly understood, but amendment experiments using model ligands show they can facilitate or impede iron uptake depending on their identity. Here we show that siderophores, organic compounds synthesized by microbes to facilitate iron uptake, are a dynamic component of the marine ligand pool in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Siderophore concentrations in iron-deficient waters averaged 9 pM, up to fivefold higher than in iron-rich coastal and nutrient-depleted oligotrophic waters, and were dominated by amphibactins, amphiphilic siderophores with cell membrane affinity. Phylogenetic analysis of amphibactin biosynthetic genes suggests that the ability to produce amphibactins has transferred horizontally across multiple Gammaproteobacteria, potentially driven by pressures to compete for iron. In coastal and oligotrophic regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, amphibactins were replaced with lower concentrations (1–2 pM) of hydrophilic ferrioxamine siderophores. Our results suggest that organic ligand composition changes across the surface ocean in response to environmental pressures. Hydrophilic siderophores are predominantly found across regions of the ocean where iron is not expected to be the limiting nutrient for the microbial community at large. However, in regions with intense competition for iron, some microbes optimize iron acquisition by producing siderophores that minimize diffusive losses to the environment. These siderophores affect iron bioavailability and thus may be an important component of the marine iron cycle.

  5. Genetics and molecular biology of siderophore-mediated iron transport in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, J H

    1989-01-01

    The possession of specialized iron transport systems may be crucial for bacteria to override the iron limitation imposed by the host or the environment. One of the most commonly found strategies evolved by microorganisms is the production of siderophores, low-molecular-weight iron chelators that have very high constants of association for their complexes with iron. Thus, siderophores act as extracellular solubilizing agents for iron from minerals or organic compounds, such as transferrin and lactoferrin in the host vertebrate, under conditions of iron limitation. Transport of iron into the cell cytosol is mediated by specific membrane receptor and transport systems which recognize the iron-siderophore complexes. In this review I have analyzed in detail three siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems: the plasmid-encoded anguibactin system of Vibrio anguillarum, the aerobactin-mediated iron assimilation system present in the pColV-K30 plasmid and in the chromosomes of many enteric bacteria, and the chromosomally encoded enterobactin iron uptake system, found in Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The siderophore systems encoded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, namely, pyochelin and pyoverdin, as well as the siderophore amonabactin, specified by Aeromonas hydrophila, are also discussed. The potential role of siderophore-mediated systems as virulence determinants in the specific host-bacteria interaction leading to disease is also analyzed with respect to the influence of these systems in the expression of other factors, such as toxins, in the bacterial virulence repertoire. PMID:2531838

  6. Identification of rhtX and fptX, novel genes encoding proteins that show homology and function in the utilization of the siderophores rhizobactin 1021 by Sinorhizobium meliloti and pyochelin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively.

    PubMed

    Cuív, Páraic O; Clarke, Paul; Lynch, Damien; O'Connell, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Rhizobactin 1021 is a hydroxymate siderophore produced by the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011. A regulon comprising rhtA, encoding the outer membrane receptor protein for the ferrisiderophore; the biosynthesis operon rhbABCDEF; and rhrA, the Ara-C-like regulator of the receptor and biosynthesis genes has been previously described. We report the discovery of a gene, located upstream of rhbA and named rhtX (for "rhizobactin transport"), which is required, in addition to rhtA, to confer the ability to utilize rhizobactin 1021 on a strain of S. meliloti that does not naturally utilize the siderophore. Rhizobactin 1021 is structurally similar to aerobactin, which is transported in Escherichia coli via the IutA outer membrane receptor and the FhuCDB inner membrane transport system. E. coli expressing iutA and fhuCDB was found to also transport rhizobactin 1021. We demonstrated that RhtX alone could substitute for FhuCDB to transport rhizobactin 1021 in E. coli. RhtX shows similarity to a number of uncharacterized proteins which are encoded proximal to genes that are either known to be or predicted to be involved in iron acquisition. Among these is PA4218 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is located close to the gene cluster that functions in pyochelin biosynthesis and outer membrane transport. PA4218 was mutated by allelic replacement, and the mutant was found to have a pyochelin utilization-defective phenotype. It is proposed that PA4218 be named fptX (for "ferripyochelin transport"). RhtX and FptX appear to be members of a novel family of permeases that function as single-subunit transporters of siderophores.

  7. Ergothioneine Biosynthesis and Functionality in the Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Kevin J; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Keeffe, Grainne O'; Keller, Markus A; Werner, Ernst R; Lindner, Herbert; Jones, Gary W; Haas, Hubertus; Doyle, Sean

    2016-10-17

    Ergothioneine (EGT; 2-mercaptohistidine trimethylbetaine) is a trimethylated and sulphurised histidine derivative which exhibits antioxidant properties. Here we report that deletion of Aspergillus fumigatus egtA (AFUA_2G15650), which encodes a trimodular enzyme, abrogated EGT biosynthesis in this opportunistic pathogen. EGT biosynthetic deficiency in A. fumigatus significantly reduced resistance to elevated H2O2 and menadione, respectively, impaired gliotoxin production and resulted in attenuated conidiation. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed substantial proteomic remodelling in ΔegtA compared to wild-type under both basal and ROS conditions, whereby the abundance of 290 proteins was altered. Specifically, the reciprocal differential abundance of cystathionine γ-synthase and β-lyase, respectively, influenced cystathionine availability to effect EGT biosynthesis. A combined deficiency in EGT biosynthesis and the oxidative stress response regulator Yap1, which led to extreme oxidative stress susceptibility, decreased resistance to heavy metals and production of the extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C and increased accumulation of the intracellular siderophore ferricrocin. EGT dissipated H2O2 in vitro, and elevated intracellular GSH levels accompanied abrogation of EGT biosynthesis. EGT deficiency only decreased resistance to high H2O2 levels which suggests functionality as an auxiliary antioxidant, required for growth at elevated oxidative stress conditions. Combined, these data reveal new interactions between cellular redox homeostasis, secondary metabolism and metal ion homeostasis.

  8. Ergothioneine Biosynthesis and Functionality in the Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Keeffe, Grainne O’; Keller, Markus A.; Werner, Ernst R.; Lindner, Herbert; Jones, Gary W.; Haas, Hubertus; Doyle, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ergothioneine (EGT; 2-mercaptohistidine trimethylbetaine) is a trimethylated and sulphurised histidine derivative which exhibits antioxidant properties. Here we report that deletion of Aspergillus fumigatus egtA (AFUA_2G15650), which encodes a trimodular enzyme, abrogated EGT biosynthesis in this opportunistic pathogen. EGT biosynthetic deficiency in A. fumigatus significantly reduced resistance to elevated H2O2 and menadione, respectively, impaired gliotoxin production and resulted in attenuated conidiation. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed substantial proteomic remodelling in ΔegtA compared to wild-type under both basal and ROS conditions, whereby the abundance of 290 proteins was altered. Specifically, the reciprocal differential abundance of cystathionine γ-synthase and β-lyase, respectively, influenced cystathionine availability to effect EGT biosynthesis. A combined deficiency in EGT biosynthesis and the oxidative stress response regulator Yap1, which led to extreme oxidative stress susceptibility, decreased resistance to heavy metals and production of the extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C and increased accumulation of the intracellular siderophore ferricrocin. EGT dissipated H2O2 in vitro, and elevated intracellular GSH levels accompanied abrogation of EGT biosynthesis. EGT deficiency only decreased resistance to high H2O2 levels which suggests functionality as an auxiliary antioxidant, required for growth at elevated oxidative stress conditions. Combined, these data reveal new interactions between cellular redox homeostasis, secondary metabolism and metal ion homeostasis. PMID:27748436

  9. Metal oxyhydroxide dissolution as promoted by structurally diverse siderophores and oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akafia, Martin M.; Harrington, James M.; Bargar, John R.; Duckworth, Owen W.

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores, a class of biogenic ligands with high affinities for Fe(III), promote the dissolution of metal ions from sparingly soluble mineral phases. However, most geochemical studies have focused on quantifying the reactivity of DFOB, a model trishydroxamate siderophore. This study utilized three different siderophores, desferrioxamine B, rhizoferrin, and protochelin, with structures that contain the most commonly observed binding moieties of microbial siderophores to examine the siderophore-promoted dissolution rates of FeOOH, CoOOH, and MnOOH in the absence and presence of the ubiquitous low molecular mass organic acid oxalate by utilizing batch dissolution experiments at pH = 5-9. Metal-siderophore complex and total dissolved metal concentrations were monitored for durations of one hour to fourteen days, depending on the metal oxyhydroxide identity and solution pH. The results demonstrate that MnOOH and CoOOH generally dissolve more quickly in the presence of siderophores than FeOOH. Whereas FeOOH dissolved exclusively by a ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism, MnOOH and CoOOH dissolved predominantly by a reductive dissolution mechanism under most experimental conditions. For FeOOH, siderophore-promoted dissolution rates trended with the stability constant of the corresponding aqueous Fe(III) complex. In the presence of oxalate, measured siderophore-promoted dissolution rates were found to increase, decrease, or remain unchanged as compared to the observed rates in single-ligand systems, depending on the pH of the system, the siderophore present, and the identity of the metal oxyhydroxide. Increases in observed dissolution rates in the presence of oxalate were generally greater for FeOOH than for MnOOH or CoOOH. These results elucidate potential dissolution mechanisms of both ferric and non-ferric oxyhydroxide minerals by siderophores in the environment, and may provide further insights into the biological strategies of metal acquisition facilitated by

  10. Bacterial siderophores promote dissolution of UO2 under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Scott W; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Kraemer, Stephan M

    2005-08-01

    Tetravalent actinides are often considered environmentally immobile due to their strong hydrolysis and formation of sparingly soluble oxide phases. However, biogenic ligands commonly found in the soil environment may increase their solubility and mobility. We studied the adsorption and dissolution kinetics of UO2 in the presence of a microbial siderophore, desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B), under reducing conditions. Using batch and continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR),we found that DFO-B increases the solubility of UIV and accelerates UO2 dissolution rates through a ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism. DFO-B adsorption to UO2 followed a Langmuir-type isotherm. The maximum adsorbed DFO-B concentrations were 3.3 micromol m(-2) between pH 3 and 8 and declined above pH 8. DFO-B dissolved UO2 at a DFO-B surface-saturated net rate of 64 nmol h(-1) m(-2) (pH 7.5, l = 0.01 M) according to the first-order rate equation R = kL[Lads], with a rate coefficient kL of 0.019 h(-1). Even at very low siderophore concentrations (e.g. 1 microM), net dissolution rates (16 nmol h(-1) m(-2), pH 7.5, l = 0.01 M) were substantially greater than net proton-promoted dissolution rates (3 nmol h(-1) m(-2), pH 7-7.5, l = 0.01 M). Interestingly, adding dissolved FeIII had negligible effects on DFO-B-promoted UO2 dissolution rates, despite its potential as a competitor for DFO-B and as an oxidant of UIV. Our results suggest that strong organic ligands could influence the environmental mobility of tetravalent actinides and should be considered in predictions for nuclear waste storage and remediation strategies.

  11. Effect of metals on a siderophore producing bacterial isolate and its implications on microbial assisted bioremediation of metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Teja; Bhosle, Saroj

    2013-11-01

    A bacterial isolate producing siderophore under iron limiting conditions, was isolated from mangroves of Goa. Based on morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomical and 16S rDNA studies, the isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NAR38.1. Preliminary characterization of the siderophore indicated it to be catecholate type with dihydroxy benzoate as the core component. Optimum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 in mineral salts medium (MSM) without any added iron with glucose as the carbon source. Addition of NaCl in the growth medium showed considerable decrease in siderophore production above 2% NaCl. Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) below 2 μM and 40 μM concentrations respectively, induced siderophore production, above which the production was repressed. Binding studies of the siderophore with Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) indicated its high affinity towards Fe(+3). The siderophore concentration in the extracellular medium was enhanced when MSM was amended with essential metals Zn, Co, Mo and Mn, however, decreased with Cu, while the concentration was reduced with abiotic metals As, Pb, Al and Cd. Significant increase in extracellular siderophore production was observed with Pb and Al at concentrations of 50 μM and above. The effect of metals on siderophore production was completely mitigated in presence of Fe. The results implicate effect of metals on the efficiency of siderophore production by bacteria for potential application in bioremediation of metal contaminated iron deficient soils especially in the microbial assisted phytoremediation processes.

  12. Effect of heavy-metal on synthesis of siderophores by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ZGKD3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Peili; Xing, Zhukang; Zhang, Yuxiu; Chai, Tuanyao

    2017-01-01

    Most siderophore-producing bacteria could improve the plant growth. Here, the effect of heavy-metal on the growth, total siderophore and pyoverdine production of the Cd tolerance Pseudomonas aeruginosa ZGKD3 were investigated. The results showed that ZGKD3 exhibited tolerance to heavy metals, and the metal tolerance decreased in the order Mn2+>Pb2+>Ni2+>Cu2+>Zn2+>Cd2+. The total siderophore and pyoverdine production of ZGKD3 induced by metals of Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Pb2+ and Mn2+ were different, the total siderophore and pyoverdine production reduced in the order Cd2+>Pb2+>Mn2+>Ni2+>Zn2+ >Cu2+ and Zn2+>Cd2+>Mn2+>Pb2+>Ni2+>Cu2+, respectively. These results suggested that ZGKD3 could grow in heavy-metal contaminated soil and had the potential of improving phytoremediation efficiency in Cd and Zn contaminated soils.

  13. Discovery and Characterization of New Hydroxamate Siderophores, Baumannoferrin A and B, produced by Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Penwell, William F; DeGrace, Nancy; Tentarelli, Sharon; Gauthier, Lise; Gilbert, Catherine M; Arivett, Brock A; Miller, Alita A; Durand-Reville, Thomas F; Joubran, Camil; Actis, Luis A

    2015-07-27

    Acinetobacter baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin but grows under iron limitation. Accordingly, analyses of AYE iron-restricted culture supernatants resulted in the isolation of two fractions, which contained only hydroxamates and showed siderophore activity. Structural analyses identified baumannoferrin A and baumannoferrin B, which differ only by a double bond. These siderophores are composed of citrate, 1,3-diaminopropane, 2,4-diaminobutyrate, decenoic acid, and α-ketoglutarate. Analysis of the AYE genome showed the presence of a 12-gene cluster coding for proteins similar to those involved in the production and utilization of the hydroxamate siderophores acinetoferrin and achromobactin. As A. baumannii AYE does not produce acinetobactin and harbors only one gene cluster encoding the production and utilization of a siderophore, this strain's growth under iron limitation depends on baumannoferrin, a novel hydroxamate that could play a role in its virulence.

  14. Growth and siderophores production in Alcaligenes faecalis is regulated by metal ions.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Chincholkar, S B

    2010-06-01

    During stationary phase of growth under low stress of iron in succinic acid medium, Alcaligenes feacalis BCCM ID 2374 produced microbial iron chelators. Increase in iron concentration supported bacterial growth but suppressed siderophores production, 1 μM and 2 μM of iron was optimum for maximum siderophore yield, i.e. 354 and 360 μg/ml in untreated and deferrated medium, respectively. Threshold level of iron, which suppressed siderophores production in A. feacalis BCCM ID 2374, was 20 μM. Ten micromoles and above concentration of CuCl(2) and CoCl(2), and 20 μM of MgCl(2), MgSO(4), ZnCl(2) and ZnSO(4) severely affected siderophores production.

  15. Variation in Siderophore Biosynthetic Gene Distribution and Production across Environmental and Faecal Populations of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Porcelli, Ida; Sheppard, Samuel K.; Lucchini, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for Escherichia coli growth and survival in the host and the external environment, but its availability is generally low due to the poor solubility of its ferric form in aqueous environments and the presence of iron-withholding proteins in the host. Most E. coli can increase access to iron by excreting siderophores such as enterobactin, which have a very strong affinity for Fe3+. A smaller proportion of isolates can generate up to 3 additional siderophores linked with pathogenesis; aerobactin, salmochelin, and yersiniabactin. However, non-pathogenic E. coli are also able to synthesise these virulence-associated siderophores. This raises questions about their role in the ecology of E. coli, beyond virulence, and whether specific siderophores might be linked with persistence in the external environment. Under the assumption that selection favours phenotypes that confer a fitness advantage, we compared siderophore production and gene distribution in E. coli isolated either from agricultural plants or the faeces of healthy mammals. This population-level comparison has revealed that under iron limiting growth conditions plant-associated isolates produced lower amounts of siderophores than faecal isolates. Additionally, multiplex PCR showed that environmental isolates were less likely to contain loci associated with aerobactin and yersiniabactin synthesis. Although aerobactin was linked with strong siderophore excretion, a significant difference in production was still observed between plant and faecal isolates when the analysis was restricted to strains only able to synthesise enterobactin. This finding suggests that the regulatory response to iron limitation may be an important trait associated with adaptation to the non-host environment. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the ability to produce multiple siderophores facilitates E. coli gut colonisation and plays an important role in E. coli commensalism. PMID:25756870

  16. Variation in siderophore biosynthetic gene distribution and production across environmental and faecal populations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Searle, Laura J; Méric, Guillaume; Porcelli, Ida; Sheppard, Samuel K; Lucchini, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for Escherichia coli growth and survival in the host and the external environment, but its availability is generally low due to the poor solubility of its ferric form in aqueous environments and the presence of iron-withholding proteins in the host. Most E. coli can increase access to iron by excreting siderophores such as enterobactin, which have a very strong affinity for Fe3+. A smaller proportion of isolates can generate up to 3 additional siderophores linked with pathogenesis; aerobactin, salmochelin, and yersiniabactin. However, non-pathogenic E. coli are also able to synthesise these virulence-associated siderophores. This raises questions about their role in the ecology of E. coli, beyond virulence, and whether specific siderophores might be linked with persistence in the external environment. Under the assumption that selection favours phenotypes that confer a fitness advantage, we compared siderophore production and gene distribution in E. coli isolated either from agricultural plants or the faeces of healthy mammals. This population-level comparison has revealed that under iron limiting growth conditions plant-associated isolates produced lower amounts of siderophores than faecal isolates. Additionally, multiplex PCR showed that environmental isolates were less likely to contain loci associated with aerobactin and yersiniabactin synthesis. Although aerobactin was linked with strong siderophore excretion, a significant difference in production was still observed between plant and faecal isolates when the analysis was restricted to strains only able to synthesise enterobactin. This finding suggests that the regulatory response to iron limitation may be an important trait associated with adaptation to the non-host environment. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the ability to produce multiple siderophores facilitates E. coli gut colonisation and plays an important role in E. coli commensalism.

  17. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia.

  18. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  19. Chemical and structural characterization of hydroxamate siderophore produced by marine Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Murugappan, R M; Aravinth, A; Karthikeyan, M

    2011-02-01

    In the present study, 22 different bacteria were isolated from open ocean water from the Gulf of Mannar, India. Of the 22 isolates, 4 were identified as Vibrio spp. (VM1, VM2, VM3 and VM4) and found to produce siderophores (iron-binding chelators) under iron-limited conditions. Different media were found to have an influence on siderophore production. Maximum siderophore production was observed with VM1 isolate in MM9 salts medium at 48 h of incubation. The isolate was confirmed as Vibrio harveyi based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra revealed the hydroxamate nature of the siderophore produced. Further characterization of the siderophore revealed it to be of dihydroxamate nature, forming hexadentate ligands with Fe(III) ions. A narrow shift in ultraviolet (UV)-Vis spectrum was observed on photolysis due to ligand oxidation. Growth-promotion bioassay with Aeromonas hydrophila, Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli confirmed the iron-scavenging property of the siderophore produced by Vibrio harveyi.

  20. Metachelins, mannosylated and N-oxidized coprogen-type siderophores from Metarhizium robertsii.

    PubMed

    Krasnoff, Stuart B; Keresztes, Ivan; Donzelli, Bruno G G; Gibson, Donna M

    2014-07-25

    Under iron-depleted culture conditions, the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii (Bischoff, Humber, and Rehner) (= M. anisopliae) produces a complex of extracellular siderophores including novel O-glycosylated and N-oxidized coprogen-type compounds as well as the known fungal siderophores N(α)-dimethylcoprogen (NADC) and dimerumic acid (DA). Metachelin A (1), the most abundant component in the M. robertsii siderophore mixture, was characterized as a 1094 Da analogue of NADC that is O-glycosylated by β-mannose at both terminal hydroxyl groups and N-oxidized at the dimethylated α-nitrogen. The mixture also contained a 1078 Da analogue, metachelin B (2), which lacks the N-oxide modification. Also characterized were the aglycone of 1, i.e., the N-oxide of NADC (3), and the monomannoside of DA (6). N-Oxide and O-glycosyl substituents are unprecedented among microbial siderophores. At high ESIMS source energy and at room temperature in DMSO, 1 underwent Cope elimination, resulting in loss of the N(α)-dimethyl group and dehydration of the α-β bond. High-resolution ESIMS data confirmed that all tri- and dihydroxamate siderophores (1-6) complex with trivalent Fe, Al, and Ga. In a chrome azurol S assay, all of the M. robertsii siderophores showed iron-binding activity roughly equivalent to that of desferrioxamine B.

  1. The fate of siderophores: antagonistic environmental interactions in exudate-mediated micronutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Harrington, James M; Duckworth, Owen W; Haselwandter, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Organisms acquire metals from the environment by releasing small molecules that solubilize and promote their specific uptake. The best known example of this nutrient uptake strategy is the exudation of siderophores, which are a structurally-diverse class of molecules that are traditionally viewed as being integral to iron uptake. Siderophores have been proposed to act through a variety of processes, but their effectiveness can be mitigated by a variety of chemical and physical processes of both biotic and abiotic origin. Processes that occur at the surface of minerals can degrade or sequester siderophores, preventing them from fulfilling their function of returning metals to the organism. In addition, biotic processes including enzymatic degradation of the siderophore and piracy of the metal or of the siderophore complex also disrupt iron uptake. Some organisms have adapted their nutrient acquisition strategies to address these potential pitfalls, producing multiple siderophores and other exudates that take advantage of varying kinetic and thermodynamic factors to allow the continued uptake of metals. A complete understanding of the factors that contribute to metal uptake in nature will require a concerted effort to study processes identified in laboratory systems in the context of more complicated environmental systems.

  2. Siderophore-drug complexes: potential medicinal applications of the 'Trojan horse' strategy.

    PubMed

    Górska, Agnieszka; Sloderbach, Anna; Marszałł, Michał Piotr

    2014-09-01

    The ability of bacteria to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents poses problems in the treatment of numerous bacterial infections. One method to circumvent permeability-mediated drug resistance involves the employment of the 'Trojan horse' strategy. The Trojan horse concept involves the use of bacterial iron uptake systems to enter and kill bacteria. The siderophore-drug complex is recognized by specific siderophore receptors and is then actively transported across the outer membrane. The recently identified benefits of this strategy have led to the synthesis of a series of siderophore-based antibiotics. Several studies have shown that siderophore-drug conjugates make it possible to design antibiotics with improved cell transport and reduce the frequency of resistance mutants. Growing interest in siderophore-drug conjugates for the treatment of human diseases including iron overload, cancer, and malaria has driven the search for new siderophore-drug complexes. This strategy may have special importance for the development of iron oxide nanoparticle-based therapeutics.

  3. Plant growth promoting activity of an auxin and siderophore producing isolate of Streptomyces under saline soil conditions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Akram; Karimi, Ebrahim; Dahaji, Peyman Abaszadeh; Javid, Majid Ghorbani; Dalvand, Yadola; Askari, Hossein

    2012-04-01

    A biocontrol Streptomyces isolate (C) was tested for its plant growth promoting qualities under saline conditions. Exposure to elevated osmotic strengths up to 300 mM NaCl increased dry weight and cfu/ml significantly. The isolate C produced indolyl-3-acetic acid (IAA) into the medium in the amount of 2.4 μg/ml. The amount of auxin increased after adding salt and reached to 4.7 μg/ml in 300 mM NaCl. Biosynthesis of siderophore was detectable and increased in presence of NaCl. Streptomyces isolate C showed good solubilization of tricalcium phosphate in culture medium with 92 mg/l. Solubilization decreased in presence of NaCl. Soil treatment with isolate C increased the growth and development of wheat plant in normal and saline conditions. In this treatment there were significant increases in germination rate, percentage and uniformity, shoot length and dry weight compared to the control. Applying the bacterial inocula increased the concentration of N, P, Fe and Mn in wheat shoots grown in normal and saline soil, but had non-significant effect on other micro and macronutrients concentrations. Results of this study show that Streptomyces isolate C has potential to be utilized as biofertilizer in saline soils.

  4. Pumping iron to keep fit: modulation of siderophore secretion helps efficient aromatic utilization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-07-01

    Studies of biotechnology applications of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 have been predominantly focused on regulation and expression of the toluene degradation (TOL) pathway. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the role of other physiological factors influencing aromatic utilization. In this report, we demonstrate that P. putida KT2440 increases its siderophore secretion in response to the availability of benzyl alcohol, a model aromatic substrate. It is argued that accelerated siderophore secretion in response to aromatic substrates provides an iron 'boost' which is required for the effective functioning of the iron-dependent oxygenases responsible for ring opening. Direct evidence for the cardinal role of siderophores in aromatic utilization is provided by evaluation of per capita siderophore secretion and comparative growth assessments of wild-type and siderophore-negative mutant strains grown on an alternative carbon source. Accelerated siderophore secretion can be viewed as a compensatory mechanism in P. putida in the context of its inability to secrete more than one type of siderophore (pyoverdine) or to utilize heterologous siderophores. Stimulated siderophore secretion might be a key factor in successful integration and proliferation of this organism as a bio-augmentation agent for aromatic degradation. It not only facilitates efficient aromatic utilization, but also provides better opportunities for iron assimilation amongst diverse microbial communities, thereby ensuring better survival and proliferation.

  5. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, E S Challaraj; Ananthi, T; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  6. Structure and Mechanism of the Siderophore-Interacting Protein from the Fuscachelin Gene Cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Chen, Wei-Hung; Bruner, Steven D

    2015-06-30

    Microbial iron acquisition is a complex process and frequently a key and necessary step for survival. Among the several paths for iron assimilation, small molecule siderophore-mediated transport is a commonly employed strategy of many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific binding of siderophores to metal is also exploited in therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence and metal toxicity. The intracellular fate of iron acquired via the siderophore pathway is one of the least understood steps in the complex process at the molecular level. A common route to cellular incorporation is the single-electron reduction of ferric to ferrous iron catalyzed by specific and/or nonspecific reducing agents. The biosynthetic gene clusters for siderophores often contain representatives of one or two families of redox-active enzymes: the flavin-containing "siderophore-interacting protein" and iron-sulfur ferric siderophore reductases. Here we present the structure and characterization of the siderophore-interacting protein, FscN, from the fuscachelin siderophore gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca. The structure shows a flavoreductase fold with a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor along with an unexpected metal bound adjacent to the flavin site. We demonstrated that FscN is redox-active and measured the binding and reduction of ferric fuscachelin. This work provides a structural basis for the activity of a siderophore-interacting protein and further insight into the complex and important process of iron acquisition and utilization.

  7. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  8. Unusual non-fluorescent broad spectrum siderophore activity (SID EGYII) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 and a new insight towards simple siderophore bioassay.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Present study highlights an unusual non-fluorescent hydroxamate broad spectrum siderophore (SID EGYII) activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801, a soil bacterial isolate, along with simple low cost effective siderophore bioassay. Detection of SID EGYII activity qualitatively was proved by masking this activity against Erwinia amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800, an indicator strain, in well-cut diffusion assay containing 100 µM FeCl3. SID EGYII activity was expressed quantitatively as arbitrary units [Siderophore arbitrary units (SAU)] 380 SAU/mL against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. Maximal SID EGYII activity was achieved upon growing P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 in PYB broth at 180 rpm for 24 h. SID EGYII displayed a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against some human pathogens (i.e., Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts) and a fireblight plant pathogen. Interestingly, transformants of Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3)pSID/EGYII harboring P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 plasmid demonstrated a perceivable antimicrobial activity against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. The broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the unusual non-fluorescent SID EGYII would underpin its high potential in targeting bacterial pathogens posing probable threats to human health and agricultural economy. The present simple low cost effective bioassay is a new insight towards an alternative to the expensive cumbersome siderophore Chrome Azurol S assay.

  9. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    PubMed

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed.

  10. An extended siderophore suite from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 revealed by LC-ICPMS-ESIMS.

    PubMed

    Boiteau, Rene M; Repeta, Daniel J

    2015-05-01

    Siderophores are thought to play an important role in iron cycling in the ocean, but relatively few marine siderophores have been identified. Sensitive, high throughput methods hold promise for expediting the discovery and characterization of new siderophores produced by marine microbes. We developed a methodology for siderophore characterization that combines liquid chromatography (LC) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) with high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). To demonstrate this approach, we investigated siderophore production by the marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Three hydroxamate siderophores, synechobactin A-C, have been previously isolated and characterized from this strain. These compounds consist of an iron binding head group attached to a fatty acid side chain of variable length (C12, C10, and C8 respectively). In this study, we detected six iron-containing compounds in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 media by LC-ICPMS. To identify the molecular ions of these siderophores, we aligned the chromatographic retention times of peaks from the LC-ICPMS chromatogram with features detected from LC-ESIMS spectra using an algorithm designed to recognize metal isotope patterns. Three of these compounds corresponded to synechobactins A (614 m/z), B (586 m/z), and C (558 m/z). The MS2 spectra of these compounds revealed diagnostic synechobactin fragmentation patterns which were used to confirm the identity of the three unknown compounds (600, 628, and 642 m/z) as new members of the synechobactin suite with side chain lengths of 11, 13, and 14 carbons. These results demonstrate the potential of combined LCMS techniques for the identification of novel iron-organic complexes.

  11. Colorimetric determination of catechol siderophores in microbial cultures.

    PubMed

    Rioux, C; Jordan, D C; Rattray, J B

    1983-08-01

    A highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the selective detection of catechol compounds such as catechol siderophores (e.g., enterobactin) is described. The basis of the method involves the ability of the vicinal aromatic hydroxyl groups under acidic conditions to bring about a reduction of Fe3+ (from ferric ammonium citrate) to Fe2+. Detection of Fe2+ in the presence of Fe3+ is made with 1,10-phenanthroline under previously established conditions. The assay mixture is heated at 60 degrees C for 1 h to accelerate the development of color which is subsequently measured at 510 nm. The Beer-Lambert law is obeyed over the range of 0.16 to 60 microM 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Compared to the Arnow nitration method, the assay is more responsive, is approximately seven times more sensitive, and is effective with catechols substituted at positions 3 and 4. The method gives positive results with catechols such as DL-DOPA, L-dopamine, (+/-)-epinephrine, and DL-norepinephrine. Very rapid color development is obtained with ascorbic acid and p-diols, while m-diols are poorly detected. Low degrees of reactivity are shown by hydroxylamino and hydroxamate compounds. Phenolic, sulfydryl, indolyl, and quinonyl derivatives do not interfere with the reaction. The method has been adapted to determine catechol compounds in the culture medium of bacterial cells grown at different iron concentrations.

  12. Selective ciprofloxacin antibiotic detection by fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Madhuri K; Tayade, Kundan C; Sahoo, Suban K; Mahulikar, Pramod P; Kuwar, Anil S; Chaudhari, Bhushan L

    2016-07-15

    Fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin (PVD) was produced from a soil isolate Pseudomonas monteilii strain MKP 213. The PVD was purified near to homogeneity and applied for the fluorescent chemosensing of various antibiotics in aqueous solution (pH=7.0). Upon addition of ciprofloxacin, PVD showed new UV-vis absorption bands at 252 and 321nm due to an internal charge transfer mechanism. Also, the addition of ciprofloxacin induced a highly selective fluorescence enhancement of PVD with a 13nm blue shift from 458 to 445nm. The combination of a long peptide chain along with the chromophore unit of PVD generates a converging cleft for ciprofloxacin recognition with LOD and LOQ of 7.13μM and 21.6μM, respectively without interference from other studied antibiotics. The association constant (Ka) of PVD with ciprofloxacin was calculated to be as low as 1.40×10(5)M(-1) using Benesi-Hildebrand plot depicting its significance in detection. The pharmaceutical tablet analysis measures the sensing with negligible matrix effect and quantitative recovery.

  13. Complexation of Pu(IV) with the natural siderophore desferrioxamine B and the redox properties of Pu(IV)(siderophore) complexes.

    PubMed

    Boukhalfa, Hakim; Reilly, Sean D; Neu, Mary P

    2007-02-05

    The bioavailability and mobility of Pu species can be profoundly affected by siderophores and other oxygen-rich organic ligands. Pu(IV)(siderophore) complexes are generally soluble and may constitute with other soluble organo-Pu(IV) complexes the main fraction of soluble Pu(IV) in the environment. In order to understand the impact of siderophores on the behavior of Pu species, it is important to characterize the formation and redox behavior of Pu(siderophore) complexes. In this work, desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) was investigated for its capacity to bind Pu(IV) as a model siderophore and the properties of the complexes formed were characterized by optical spectroscopy measurements. In a 1:1 Pu(IV)/DFO-B ratio, the complexes Pu(IV)(H2DFO-B)4+, Pu(IV)(H1DFO-B)3+, Pu(IV)(DFO-B)2+, and Pu(IV)(DFO-B)(OH)+ form with corresponding thermodynamic stability constants log beta1,1,2 = 35.48, log beta1,1,1 = 34.87, log beta1,1,0 = 33.98, and log beta1,1,-1 = 27.33, respectively. In the presence of excess DFO-B, the complex Pu(IV)H2(DFO-B)22+ forms with the formation constant log beta2,1,2 = 62.30. The redox potential of the complex Pu(IV)H2(DFO-B)22+ was determined by cyclic voltammetry to be E1/2 = -0.509 V, and the redox potential of the complex Pu(IV)(DFO-B)2+ was estimated to be E1/2 = -0.269 V. The redox properties of Pu(IV)(DFO-B)2+ complexes indicate that Pu(III)(siderophore) complexes are more than 20 orders of magnitude less stable than their Pu(IV) analogues. This indicates that under reducing conditions, stable Pu(siderophore) complexes are unlikely to persist.

  14. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity.

  15. Scavenging Iron: A Novel Mechanism of Plant Immunity Activation by Microbial Siderophores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W.G.; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H2O2 staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  16. O-CAS, a fast and universal method for siderophore detection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miranda, S; Cabirol, N; George-Téllez, R; Zamudio-Rivera, L S; Fernández, F J

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the popular CAS assay for siderophore detection, based on the utilization of chrome azurol S, was redesigned and optimized to produce a new, fast, non-toxic, and easy method to determine a wide variety of microorganisms capable of siderophore production on a solid medium. Furthermore, this specific bioassay allows for the identification of more than one single siderophore-producing microorganism at the same time, using an overlay technique in which a modified CAS medium is cast upon culture agar plates (thus its name "O-CAS", for overlaid CAS). Detection was optimized through adjustments to the medium's composition and a quantifying strategy. Specificity of the bioassay was tested on microorganisms known for siderophore production. As a result, a total of 48 microorganisms were isolated from three different types of samples (fresh water, salt water, and alkaline soil), of which 36 were determined as siderophore producers. The compounds identified through this method belonged to both hydroxamate and catechol-types, previously reported to cause color change of the CAS medium from blue to orange and purple, respectively. Some isolated microorganisms, however, caused a color change that differed from previous descriptions.

  17. In Vitro Cultivation of 'Unculturable' Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores.

    PubMed

    Vartoukian, Sonia R; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome.

  18. Linear fusigen as the major hydroxamate siderophore of the ectomycorrhizal Basidiomycota Laccaria laccata and Laccaria bicolor.

    PubMed

    Haselwandter, Kurt; Häninger, Gerlinde; Ganzera, Markus; Haas, Hubertus; Nicholson, Graeme; Winkelmann, Günther

    2013-12-01

    A screening for siderophores produced by the ectomycorrhizal fungi Laccaria laccata and Laccaria bicolor in synthetic low iron medium revealed the release of several different hydroxamate siderophores of which four major siderophores could be identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. While ferricrocin, coprogen and triacetylfusarinine C were assigned as well as other known fungal siderophores, a major peak of the siderophore mixture revealed an average molecular mass of 797 for the iron-loaded compound. High resolution mass spectrometry indicated an absolute mass of m/z = 798.30973 ([M + H](+)). With a relative error of Δ = 0.56 ppm this corresponds to linear fusigen (C33H52N6O13Fe; MW = 797.3). The production of large amounts of linear fusigen by these basidiomycetous mycorrhizal fungi may possibly explain the observed suppression of plant pathogenic Fusarium species. For comparative purposes Fusarium roseum was included in this study as a well known producer of cyclic and linear fusigen.

  19. The Heterologous Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and Ferrichrome Activate Signaling Pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, María A.; Sparrius, Marion; Kloet, Roy; Jiménez, Connie R.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina; Bitter, Wilbert

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes two siderophores, pyoverdine and pyochelin, under iron-limiting conditions. These siderophores are recognized at the cell surface by specific outer membrane receptors, also known as TonB-dependent receptors. In addition, this bacterium is also able to incorporate many heterologous siderophores of bacterial or fungal origin, which is reflected by the presence of 32 additional genes encoding putative TonB-dependent receptors. In this work, we have used a proteomic approach to identify the inducing conditions for P. aeruginosa TonB-dependent receptors. In total, 11 of these receptors could be discerned under various conditions. Two of them are only produced in the presence of the hydroxamate siderophores ferrioxamine B and ferrichrome. Regulation of their synthesis is affected by both iron and the presence of a cognate siderophore. Analysis of the P. aeruginosa genome showed that both receptor genes are located next to a regulatory locus encoding an extracytoplasmic function sigma factor and a transmembrane sensor. The involvement of this putative regulatory locus in the specific induction of the ferrioxamine B and ferrichrome receptors has been demonstrated. These results show that P. aeruginosa has evolved multiple specific regulatory systems to allow the regulation of TonB-dependent receptors. PMID:16484199

  20. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones.

  1. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi.

  2. Yersiniabactin and other siderophores produced by clinical isolates of Enterobacter spp. and Citrobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Mokracka, Joanna; Koczura, Ryszard; Kaznowski, Adam

    2004-01-15

    We analyzed the ability of extraintestinal strains of Enterobacter spp. and Citrobacter spp. to employ different siderophore-mediated strategies of iron acquisition. All strains produced iron-chelating compounds. Cross-feeding assays indicated that most isolates of both Enterobacter spp. and Citrobacter spp. excreted catecholate siderophore enterobactin, less produced aerobactin, and single strains excreted hydroxamates different from aerobactin. Besides, we analyzed if the strains had the ability to produce the siderophore yersiniabactin coded by the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI). The presence of HPI genes was observed in single isolates of three species: E. cloaceae, E. aerogenes and C. koseri. A detailed polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed differences in the genetic organization of the HPIs; however, in a cross-feeding test we proved that yersiniabactin was produced and the island was functional.

  3. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments.

  4. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Trilactone Siderophores: Where Chiral Recognition Occurs in Enterobactin and Bacillibactin Iron Transport1

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Rebecca J.; Zawadzka, Anna M.; Hoette, Trisha M.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Bacillibactin and enterobactin are hexadentate catecholate siderophores produced by bacteria upon iron limitation to scavenge ferric ion and seem to be the ultimate siderophores of their two respective domains: Gram-positive and Gram-negative. Iron acquisition mediated by these trilactone-based ligands necessitates enzymatic hydrolysis of the scaffold for successful intracellular iron delivery. The esterases BesA and Fes hydrolyze bacillibactin and enterobactin, respectively, as well as the corresponding iron complexes. Bacillibactin binds iron through three 2,3-catecholamide moieties linked to a tri-threonine scaffold via glycine spacers, whereas in enterobactin the iron-binding moieties are directly attached to a tri-l-serine backbone; although apparently minor, these structural differences result in markedly different iron coordination properties and iron transport behavior. Comparison of the solution thermodynamic and circular dichroism properties of bacillibactin, enterobactin and the synthetic analogs d-enterobactin, SERGlyCAM and d-SERGlyCAM has determined the role of each different feature in the siderophores' molecular structures in ferric complex stability and metal chirality. While opposite metal chiralities in the different complexes did not affect transport and incorporation in Bacillus subtilis, ferric complexes formed with the various siderophores did not systematically promote growth of the bacteria. The bacillibactin esterase BesA is less specific than the enterobactin esterase Fes; BesA can hydrolyze the trilactones of both siderophores, while only the tri-l-serine trilactone is a substrate of Fes. Both enzymes are stereospecific and cannot cleave tri-d-serine lactones. These data provide a complete picture of the microbial iron transport mediated by these two siderophores, from initial recognition and transport to intracellular iron release. PMID:19673474

  5. The effect of soil horizon and mineral type on the distribution of siderophores in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Engy; Holmström, Sara J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies like production of siderophores. Siderophores are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe(III)-binding compounds, that can increase the bioavailability of iron by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals. In the present study, we investigated the composition of dissolved and adsorbed siderophores of the hydroxamate family in the soil horizons of podzol and the effect of specific mineral types on siderophores. Three polished mineral specimens of 3 cm × 4 cm × 3 mm (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) were inserted in the soil horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial) and B (upper illuvial)). After two years, soil samples were collected from both the bulk soil of the whole profile and from the soil attached to the mineral surfaces. The concentration of ten different fungal tri-hydroxamates within ferrichromes, fusigen and coprogens families, and five bacterial hydroxamates within the ferrioxamine family were detected. All hydroxamate types were determined in both soil water (dissolved) and soil methanol (adsorbed) extracts along the whole soil profile by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS); hence, the study is the most extensive of its kind. We found that coprogens and fusigen were present in much higher concentrations in bulk soil than were ferrioxamines and ferrichromes. On the other hand, the presence of the polished mineral completely altered the distribution of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with the dissolved and adsorbed hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. Thus siderophore composition in the soil environment is controlled by the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of each soil horizon and also by the available mineral types.

  6. A nonribosomal peptide synthetase mediates siderophore production and virulence in the citrus fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hung; Lin, Ching-Hsuan; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2013-06-01

    Alternaria species produce and excrete dimethyl coprogen siderophores to acquire iron. The Alternaria alternata gene AaNPS6, encoding a polypeptide analogous to fungal nonribosomal peptide synthetases, was found to be required for the production of siderophores and virulence on citrus. Siderophores purified from culture filtrates of the wild-type strain did not induce any phytotoxicity on the leaves of citrus. Fungal strains lacking AaNPS6 produced little or no detectable extracellular siderophores and displayed an increased sensitivity to H₂O₂, superoxide-generating compounds (KO₂ and menadione) and iron depletion. Δnps6 mutants were also defective for the production of melanin and conidia. The introduction of a wild-type AaNPS6 under the control of its endogenous promoter to a Δnps6 null mutant at least partially restored siderophore production and virulence to citrus, demonstrating a functional link between iron uptake and fungal pathogenesis. Elevated sensitivity to H₂O₂, seen for the Δnps6 null strain could be relieved by exogenous application of ferric iron. The expression of the AaNPS6 gene was highly up-regulated under low-iron conditions and apparently controlled by the redox-responsive yeast transcriptional regulator YAP1. Hence, the maintenance of iron homeostasis via siderophore-mediated iron uptake also plays an important role in resistance to toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our results demonstrate further the critical role of ROS detoxification for the pathogenicity of A. alternata in citrus.

  7. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  8. Iron-dependent remodeling of fungal metabolic pathways associated with ferrichrome biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Alexandre; Labbé, Simon

    2010-06-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe excretes and accumulates the hydroxamate-type siderophore ferrichrome. The sib1(+) and sib2(+) genes encode, respectively, a siderophore synthetase and an l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase that participate in ferrichrome biosynthesis. In the present report, we demonstrate that sib1(+) and sib2(+) are repressed by the GATA-type transcriptional repressor Fep1 in response to high levels of iron. We further found that the loss of Fep1 results in increased ferrichrome production. We showed that a sib1Delta sib2Delta mutant strain exhibits a severe growth defect on iron-poor media. We determined that two metabolic pathways are involved in biosynthesis of ornithine, an obligatory precursor of ferrichrome. Ornithine is produced by hydrolysis of arginine by the Car1 and Car3 proteins. Although car3(+) was constitutively expressed, car1(+) transcription levels were repressed upon exposure to iron, with a concomitant decrease of Car1 arginase activity. Ornithine is also generated by transformation of glutamate, which itself is produced by two separate biosynthetic pathways which are transcriptionally regulated by iron in an opposite fashion. In one pathway, the glutamate dehydrogenase Gdh1, which produces glutamate from 2-ketoglutarate, was repressed under iron-replete conditions in a Fep1-dependent manner. The other pathway involves two coupled enzymes, glutamine synthetase Gln1 and Fe-S cluster-containing glutamate synthase Glt1, which were both repressed under iron-limiting conditions but were expressed under iron-replete conditions. Collectively, these results indicate that under conditions of iron deprivation, yeast remodels metabolic pathways linked to ferrichrome synthesis in order to limit iron utilization without compromising siderophore production and its ability to sequester iron from the environment.

  9. Protein Biosynthesis in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenko, A. V.; Levitskii, S. A.; Vinogradova, E. N.; Atkinson, G. C.; Hauryliuk, V.; Zenkin, N.; Kamenski, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis. PMID:24228873

  10. Protein biosynthesis in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, A V; Levitskii, S A; Vinogradova, E N; Atkinson, G C; Hauryliuk, V; Zenkin, N; Kamenski, P A

    2013-08-01

    Translation, that is biosynthesis of polypeptides in accordance with information encoded in the genome, is one of the most important processes in the living cell, and it has been in the spotlight of international research for many years. The mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in bacteria and in the eukaryotic cytoplasm are now understood in great detail. However, significantly less is known about translation in eukaryotic mitochondria, which is characterized by a number of unusual features. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about mitochondrial translation in different organisms while paying special attention to the aspects of this process that differ from cytoplasmic protein biosynthesis.

  11. Transcription termination within the iron transport-biosynthesis operon of Vibrio anguillarum requires an antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Stork, Michiel; Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Welch, Timothy J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2007-05-01

    The iron transport-biosynthesis (ITB) operon in Vibrio anguillarum includes four genes for ferric siderophore transport, fatD, -C, -B, and -A, and two genes for siderophore biosynthesis, angR and angT. This cluster plays an important role in the virulence mechanisms of this bacterium. Despite being part of the same polycistronic mRNA, the relative levels of transcription for the fat portion and for the whole ITB message differ profoundly, the levels of the fat transcript being about 17-fold higher. Using S1 nuclease mapping, lacZ transcriptional fusions, and in vitro studies, we were able to show that the differential gene expression within the ITB operon is due to termination of transcription between the fatA and angR genes, although a few transcripts proceeded beyond the termination site to the end of this operon. This termination process requires a 427-nucleotide antisense RNA that spans the intergenic region and acts as a novel transcriptional terminator.

  12. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms.

  13. Substrate induction of siderophore transport in Bacillus subtilis mediated by a novel one-component regulator

    PubMed Central

    Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Summary When iron is scarce, Bacillus subtilis expresses genes involved in the synthesis and uptake of the siderophore bacillibactin (BB) and uptake systems to pirate other microbial siderophores. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional induction of the feuABCybbA operon, encoding the Fe-BB uptake system, is mediated by Btr (formerly YbbB) which is encoded by the immediately upstream gene. Btr contains an AraC-type DNA binding domain fused to a substrate binding protein (SBP) domain related to FeuA, the SBP for Fe-BB uptake. When cells are iron-limited, the Fur-mediated repression of btr is relieved and Btr binds to a conserved direct repeat sequence adjacent to feuA to activate transcription. If BB is present, Btr further activates feuA expression. Btr binds with high affinity to both apo-BB and Fe-BB and the resulting complex displays a significantly increased efficacy as a transcriptional activator relative to Btr alone. Btr can also activate transcription in response to the structurally similar siderophore enterobactin, although genetic analyses indicate that the two siderophores make distinct interactions with the Btr substrate binding domain. Thus, the FeuABC transporter is optimally expressed under conditions of iron starvation, when Fur-mediated repression is relieved, and in the presence of its cognate substrate. PMID:17725565

  14. Siderophore-mediated mechanism of gallium uptake demonstrated in the microorganism Ustilago sphaerogena

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, T.; Hoffer, P.B.

    1980-10-01

    The radioactive gallium analog of ferrichrome, Ga-67 deferriferrichrome, has been prepared and compared with ferrichrome in the specific siderophore-transport system of Ustilago sphaerogena. The gallium analog is taken up by the cells in an active transport process indistinguishable from that of ferrichrome. The findings may explain how Ga(III) mimics Fe(III) in clinical use.

  15. Dissolution mechanisms of goethite in the presence of siderophores and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    In dynamic natural systems such as soils and surface waters, transient biogeochemical processes can induce strong chemical non-steady-state conditions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of non-steady-state conditions on ligand-controlled iron oxide dissolution. The rates of goethite dissolution at pH 6 in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (oxalate, citrate or malonate) were observed. Non-steady-state conditions were induced by rapid additions of fungal, bacterial or plant siderophores. In the presence of the low molecular weight organic acids, dissolved iron concentrations are below detection limit as predicted by equilibrium solubility calculations. The rapid addition of the siderophores triggered reproducible, fast dissolution of kinetically labile iron from the iron oxide surface. The same effect was observed upon rapid additions of high citrate concentrations to goethite-oxalate suspensions. The concentration of the labile iron pool at the mineral surface was a function of the surface concentration of the low molecular weight organic acids and of the reaction time before addition of the siderophores. Isotopic exchange with 59Fe independently confirmed the existence of the labile iron pool before addition of the siderophore. A dissolution mechanism was elucidated that is consistent with these observations and with accepted models of ligand-controlled dissolution. We conclude that the fast dissolution reaction observed here is an important process in biological iron acquisition and that it is based on a general geochemical mechanism.

  16. Hydroxamate siderophore synthesis by Phialocephala fortinii, a typical dark septate fungal root endophyte.

    PubMed

    Bartholdy; Berreck, M; Haselwandter, K

    2001-03-01

    The siderophore production of various isolates of Phialocephala fortinii was assessed quantitatively as well as qualitatively in batch assays under pure culture conditions at different pH values and iron(III) concentrations. We found a distinct effect of both of these parameters on siderophore synthesis and as well as on fungal growth. In comparative analyses of two of the isolates, maximum siderophore production was found at a pH in the range of pH 4.0 to 4.5 while, under the experimental conditions employed, the optimal concentration of ferric iron was determined to be between 20-40 microg iron (III) l(-1) (0.36-0.72 microM, respectively). HPLC analysis of the culture filtrate of most of the isolates of P. fortinii revealed the excretion of ferricrocin as main hydroxamate siderophore, followed by ferrirubin and ferrichrome C. The pattern of release of these three substances proved to be dependent on pH and iron(III) concentration of the culture medium, and to be specific for each isolate under investigation.

  17. Interspecies modulation of bacterial development through iron competition and siderophore piracy.

    PubMed

    Traxler, Matthew F; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    While soil-dwelling actinomycetes are renowned for secreting natural products, little is known about the roles of these molecules in mediating actinomycete interactions. In a previous co-culture screen, we found that one actinomycete, Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, inhibited aerial hyphae formation in adjacent colonies of Streptomyces coelicolor. A siderophore, amychelin, mediated this developmental arrest. Here we present genetic evidence that confirms the role of the amc locus in the production of amychelin and in the inhibition of S. coelicolor development. We further characterize the Amycolatopsis sp. AA4 - S. coelicolor interaction by examining expression of developmental and iron acquisition genes over time in co-culture. Manipulation of iron availability and/or growth near Amycolatopsis sp. AA4 led to alterations in expression of the critical developmental gene bldN, and other key downstream genes in the S. coelicolor transcriptional cascade. In Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, siderophore genes were downregulated when grown near S. coelicolor, leading us to find that deferrioxamine E, produced by S. coelicolor, could be readily utilized by Amycolatopsis sp. AA4. Collectively these results suggest that competition for iron via siderophore piracy and species-specific siderophores can alter patterns of gene expression and morphological differentiation during actinomycete interactions.

  18. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzka, A. M.; Kim, Y.; Maltseva, N; Nichiporuk, R; Fan, Y; Joachimiak, A; Raymond, KN

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB{sup {nu}}) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB{sup {nu}} with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich domains connected by a long {alpha}-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  19. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, Stephan M.; Cheah, Sing-Foong; Zapf, Rita; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Sposito, Garrison

    1998-08-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. In this paper, we report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D1, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) mu-mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 mu M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 mu-mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 mu-M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH > 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  20. Effect of hydroxamate siderophores on Fe release and Pb(II) adsorption by goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, S.M.; Cheah, S.F.; Zapf, R.; Xu, J.; Raymond, K.N.; Sposito, G.

    1999-10-01

    Hydroxamate siderophores are biologically-synthesized, Fe(III)-specific ligands which are common in soil environments. The authors report an investigation of their adsorption by the iron oxyhydroxide, goethite; their influence on goethite dissolution kinetics; and their ability to affect Pb(II) adsorption by the goethite surface. The siderophores used were desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a fungal siderophore, and desferrioxamine D{sub 1}, an acetyl derivative of DFO-B (DFO-D1). Siderophore adsorption isotherms yielded maximum surface concentrations of 1.5 (DFO-B) or 3.5 (DFO-D1) {micro}mol/g at pH 6.6, whereas adsorption envelopes showed either cation-like (DFO-B) or ligand-like (DFO-D1) behavior. Above pH 8, the adsorbed concentrations of both siderophores were similar. The dissolution rate of goethite in the presence of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 was 0.02 or 0.17 {micro}mol/g hr, respectively. Comparison of these results with related literature data on the reactions between goethite and acetohydroxamic acid, a monohydroxamate ligand, suggested that the three hydroxamate groups in DFO-D1 coordinate to Fe(III) surface sites relatively independently. The results also demonstrated a significant depleting effect of 240 {micro}M DFO-B or DFO-D1 on Pb(II) adsorption by goethite at pH {gt} 6.5, but there was no effect of adsorbed Pb(II) on the goethite dissolution rate.

  1. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all known organisms. Bacteria, fungi, and graminaceous plants are capable of exuding siderophores as part of an iron acquisition strategy. The production of these strong iron chelating ligands is induced by iron limited conditions. Grasses under iron stress, for example, exude phytosiderophores into the rhizosphere in a special diurnal rhythm (Roemheld and Marschner 1986). A few hours after sunrise the exudation starts, culminates around noon and is shut down again until about 4 hours after noon. The phytosiderophores diffuse into the rhizosphere (Marschner et al. 1986) and are passively back transported to the plants by advective flow induced by high transpiration around noon. Despite a fairly short residence time of the phytosiderophores in the rhizosphere, it is a very effective strategy for iron acquisition. To investigate the effect of such pulse inputs of siderophores on iron acquisition, we studied the dissolution mechanism of goethite (alpha-FeOOH), a mineral phase common in soils, under non-steady state conditions. In consideration of the chemical complexity of the rhizosphere, we also investigated the effect of other organic ligands commonly found in the rhizosphere (e. g. oxalate) on the dissolution kinetics. The dissolution experiments were conducted in batch reactors with a constant goethite solids concentration of 2.5 g/l, an ionic strength of 0.01 M, a pH of 6 and 100 microM oxalate. To induce non-steady state conditions, 3 mM phytosiderophores were added to a batch after the goethite-oxalate suspension reacted for a certain time period. Before the siderophore was added to the goethite-oxalate suspension, no dissolution of iron was observed. But, with the addition of the siderophore, a high rate was observed for the iron mobilization under these non-steady state conditions that subsequently was followed by a slow steady state dissolution rate. The results of these non-steady state experiments are very

  2. Investigation of the mechanism of iron acquisition by the marine bacterium Alteromonas luteoviolaceus: Characterization of siderophore production

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.T.; Butler, A. )

    1991-12-01

    Iron availability in the ocean ranges from one to four orders of magnitude below typical growth requirements of bacteria. The discrepancy between Fe availability and requirements raises questions about the mechanisms that marine bacteria use to sequester Fe{sup 3+}. Surprisingly little is known about the siderophores produced by marine bacteria. Growth conditions of an open-ocean bacterial isolate, Alteromonas luteoviolaceus, were investigated to determine the conditions which enhance siderophore production. Methods to isolate and purify the siderophores were determined. The siderophores produced by A. luteoviolaceus were partially characterized by mass spectral analysis, amino acid analysis, qualitative analytical tests, chemical degradation, and nuclear magnetic resonance. A new set of outer membrane proteins was also produced when the bacterium was grown under Fe-limited conditions.

  3. Role of Nitrosomonas europaea NitABC iron transporter in the uptake of Fe3+-siderophore complexes.

    PubMed

    Vajrala, Neeraja; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Bottomley, Peter J; Arp, Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea has a single three-gene operon (nitABC) encoding an iron ABC transporter system (NitABC). Phylogenetic analysis clustered the subunit NitB with Fe(3+)-ABC transporter permease components from other organisms. The N. europaea strain deficient in nitB (nitB::kan) grew well in either Fe-replete or Fe-limited media and in Fe-limited medium containing the catecholate-type siderophore, enterobactin or the citrate-based dihydroxamate-type siderophore, aerobactin. However, the nitB::kan mutant strain was unable to grow in Fe-limited media containing either the hydroxamate-type siderophores, ferrioxamine and ferrichrome or the mixed-chelating type siderophore, pyoverdine. Exposure of N. europaea cells to a ferrichrome analog coupled to the fluorescent moiety naphthalic diimide (Fhu-NI) led to increase in fluorescence in the wild type but not in nitB::kan mutant cells. Spheroplasts prepared from N. europaea wild type exposed to Fhu-NI analog retained the fluorescence, while spheroplasts of the nitB::kan mutant were not fluorescent. NitABC transports intact Fe(3+)-ferrichrome complex into the cytoplasm and is an atypical ABC type iron transporter for Fe(3+) bound to ferrioxamine, ferrichrome or pyoverdine siderophores into the cytoplasm. The mechanisms to transport iron in either the Fe(3+) or Fe(2+) forms or Fe(3+) associated with enterobactin or aerobactin siderophores into the cell across the cytoplasmic membrane are as yet undetermined.

  4. Structure and functional analysis of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein from the fuscachelin gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Li, Kunhua; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a complex, multicomponent process critical for most organisms' survival and virulence. Small iron chelating molecules, siderophores, mediate transport as key components of common pathways for iron assimilation in many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific metal binding siderophores is of general interest in terms of host/guest chemistry and is a potential target toward the development of therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence. The siderophore pathway of the moderate thermophile, Thermobifida fusca, is an excellent model system to study the process in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe the structure and characterization of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein, FscJ from the fuscachelin gene cluster of T. fusca. The structure shows a di-domain arrangement connected with a long α-helix hinge. Several X-ray structures detail ligand-free conformational changes at different pH values, illustrating complex interdomain flexibility of the siderophore receptors. We demonstrated that FscJ has a unique recognition mechanism and details the binding interaction with ferric-fuscachelin A through ITC and docking analysis. The presented work provides a structural basis for the complex molecular mechanisms of siderophore recognition and transportation.

  5. Aflatoxin biosynthesis: current frontiers.

    PubMed

    Roze, Ludmila V; Hong, Sung-Yong; Linz, John E

    2013-01-01

    Aflatoxins are among the principal mycotoxins that contaminate economically important food and feed crops. Aflatoxin B1 is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogen known and is also an immunosuppressant. Occurrence of aflatoxins in crops has vast economic and human health impacts worldwide. Thus, the study of aflatoxin biosynthesis has become a focal point in attempts to reduce human exposure to aflatoxins. This review highlights recent advances in the field of aflatoxin biosynthesis and explores the functional connection between aflatoxin biosynthesis, endomembrane trafficking, and response to oxidative stress. Dissection of the regulatory mechanisms involves a complete comprehension of the aflatoxin biosynthetic process and the dynamic network of transcription factors that orchestrates coordinated expression of the target genes. Despite advancements in the field, development of a safe and effective multifaceted approach to solve the aflatoxin food contamination problem is still required.

  6. Antifungal attributes of siderophore produced by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, Mudgulkar Bhimsen; Jayachandra, Sharanappa Yaradoddi; Kumar, Subhash Katti Anil; Dayanand, Agsar

    2014-05-01

    Siderophores produced by Pseudomonas sp. play a vital role in controlling several plant diseases. Public concern about chemical pesticides has fostered an interest to seek alternative control strategies. Production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25 in King B medium was estimated at 400 nm and was partially purified by gel filtration chromatography using Sephadex G 25. Antifungal activity and inhibition of spore germination was studied against the phytopathogens like Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceri, Fusarium udum, and Aspergillus niger by well plate assay and microphotographic method. Zone of inhibition of 3.0 cm was observed for F. udum and A. niger, proving it as potential biocontrol agent against phytopathogens. Partial 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that the isolate JAS-25 exhibited 99% homology with P. aeruginosa and could be of novel species and the sequence of the strain was deposited in Genbank with the accession number JX104229.

  7. Breaking a pathogen’s iron will: inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Audrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials. PMID:25970810

  8. Effects of the Microbial Siderophore DFO-B on Pb and Cd Speciation in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2009-04-08

    This study investigates the complexation environments of aqueous Pb and Cd in the presence of the trihydroxamate microbial siderophore, desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) as a function of pH. Complexation of aqueous Pb and Cd with DFO-B was predicted using equilibrium speciation calculation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at Pb L(III) edge and Cd K edge was used to characterize Pb and Cd-DFO-B complexes at pH values predicted to best represent each of the metal-siderophore complexes. Pb was not found to be complexed measurably by DFO-B at pH 3.0, but was complexed by all three hydroxamate groups to form a totally 'caged' hexadentate structure at pH 7.5-9.0. At the intermediate pH value (pH 4.8), a mixture of Pb-DFOB complexes involving binding of the metal through one and two hydroxamate groups was observed. Cd, on the other hand, remained as hydrated Cd{sup 2+} at pH 5.0, occurred as a mixture of Cd-DFOB and inorganic species at pH 8.0, and was bound by three hydroxamate groups from DFO-B at pH 9.0. Overall, the solution species observed with EXAFS were consistent with those predicted thermodynamically. However, Pb speciation at higher pH values differed from that predicted and suggests that published constants underestimate the binding constant for complexation of Pb with all three hydroxamate groups of the DFO-B ligand. This molecular-level understanding of metal-siderophore solution coordination provides physical evidence for complexes of Pb and Cd with DFO-B, and is an important first step toward understanding processes at the microbial- and/or mineral-water interface in the presence of siderophores.

  9. Breaking a pathogen's iron will: Inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Audrey L

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials.

  10. Dissolution of Hausmannite (Mn(3)O(4)) in the Presence of the Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, J.; Duckworth, O.W.; Bargar, J.R.; Sposito, G.

    2009-06-02

    That microbial siderophores may be mediators of Mn(III) biogeochemistry is suggested by recent studies showing that these well known Fe(III)-chelating ligands form very stable Mn(III) aqueous complexes. In this study, we examine the influence of desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a trihydroxamate siderophore, on the dissolution of hausmannite, a mixed valence Mn(II,III) oxide found in soils and freshwater sediments. Batch dissolution experiments were conducted both in the absence (pH 4-9) and in the presence of 100 {mu}M DFOB (pH 5-9). In the absence of the ligand, there is a sharp decrease in the extent of proton-promoted dissolution above pH 5 and no appreciable dissolution above pH 8. The resulting aqueous Mn{sup 2+} activities were in good agreement with previous studies, indirectly supporting the accepted two-step mechanism involving the formation of manganite and reprecipitation of hausmannite. Desferrioxamine B enhanced hausmannite dissolution over the entire pH range investigated, both via the formation of a Mn(III) complex and through surface-catalyzed reductive dissolution. Above pH 8, non-reductive ligand-promoted dissolution dominated, whereas below pH 8, dissolution was non-stoichiometric with respect to DFOB. Concurrent proton-promoted, ligand-promoted, reductive, and induced dissolution was observed, with Mn release by either reductive or induced dissolution increasing linearly with decreasing pH. The fast kinetics of the DFOB-promoted dissolution of hausmannite, as compared to iron oxides, suggest that the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Mn(III)-bearing minerals may compete with the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Fe(III)-bearing minerals.

  11. Dissolution of hausmannite (Mn 3O 4) in the presence of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Jasquelin; Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2007-12-01

    That microbial siderophores may be mediators of Mn(III) biogeochemistry is suggested by recent studies showing that these well known Fe(III)-chelating ligands form very stable Mn(III) aqueous complexes. In this study, we examine the influence of desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a trihydroxamate siderophore, on the dissolution of hausmannite, a mixed valence Mn(II, III) oxide found in soils and freshwater sediments. Batch dissolution experiments were conducted both in the absence (pH 4-9) and in the presence of 100 μM DFOB (pH 5-9). In the absence of the ligand, there is a sharp decrease in the extent of proton-promoted dissolution above pH 5 and no appreciable dissolution above pH 8. The resulting aqueous Mn 2+ activities were in good agreement with previous studies, indirectly supporting the accepted two-step mechanism involving the formation of manganite and reprecipitation of hausmannite. Desferrioxamine B enhanced hausmannite dissolution over the entire pH range investigated, both via the formation of a Mn(III) complex and through surface-catalyzed reductive dissolution. Above pH 8, non-reductive ligand-promoted dissolution dominated, whereas below pH 8, dissolution was non-stoichiometric with respect to DFOB. Concurrent proton-promoted, ligand-promoted, reductive, and induced dissolution was observed, with Mn release by either reductive or induced dissolution increasing linearly with decreasing pH. The fast kinetics of the DFOB-promoted dissolution of hausmannite, as compared to iron oxides, suggest that the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Mn(III)-bearing minerals may compete with the siderophore-promoted dissolution of Fe(III)-bearing minerals.

  12. Siderophores as drug delivery agents: application of the "Trojan Horse" strategy.

    PubMed

    Möllmann, Ute; Heinisch, Lothar; Bauernfeind, Adolf; Köhler, Thilo; Ankel-Fuchs, Dorothe

    2009-08-01

    The outer membrane permeability barrier is an important resistance factor of bacterial pathogens. In combination with drug inactivating enzymes, target alteration and efflux, it can increase resistance dramatically. A strategy to overcome this membrane-mediated resistance is the misuse of bacterial transport systems. Most promising are those for iron transport. They are vital for virulence and survival of bacteria in the infected host, where iron depletion is a defense mechanism against invading pathogens. We synthesized biomimetic siderophores as shuttle vectors for active transport of antibiotics through the bacterial membrane. Structure activity relationship studies resulted in siderophore aminopenicillin conjugates that were highly active against Gram-negative pathogens which play a crucial role in destructive lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients and in severe nosocomial infections. The mechanism of action and the uptake of the compounds via specific iron siderophore transport routes were demonstrated. The novel conjugates were active against systemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in mice with ED(50) values comparable to the quinolone ofloxacin and show low toxicity.

  13. Quantum Chemical Study of the Fe(III)-Desferrioxamine B Siderophore Complex-Electronic Structure, Vibrational Frequencies, and Equilibrium Fe-Isotope Fractionation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-19

    chemical study of the Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B siderophore complex—Electronic structure, vibrational frequencies, and equilibrium Fe-isotope fractionation...Fitzwater, 1988). Siderophores , an important class of organic acids with large complexation constants for Fe, are produced by sev- eral organisms in order...to overcome iron deficiencies (Wie- derhold et al., 2006). Due to their exceptionally high affinity for Fe, siderophores complex Fe(III) by extracting

  14. Biosynthesis of Polyisoprenoids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invention is a process for synthesis of a polymer with the same chemical structure as Natural Rubber (NR) obtained from Hevea brasiliensis and other plant species. The research collaborators recently proposed that NR biosynthesis proceeds via a carbocationic polymerization. Based on this theory...

  15. Fate of ferrisiderophores after import across bacterial outer membranes: different iron release strategies are observed in the cytoplasm or periplasm depending on the siderophore pathways.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Isabelle J; Guillon, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    Siderophore production and utilization is one of the major strategies deployed by bacteria to get access to iron, a key nutrient for bacterial growth. The biological function of siderophores is to solubilize iron in the bacterial environment and to shuttle it back to the cytoplasm of the microorganisms. This uptake process for Gram-negative species involves TonB-dependent transporters for translocation across the outer membranes. In Escherichia coli and many other Gram-negative bacteria, ABC transporters associated with periplasmic binding proteins import ferrisiderophores across cytoplasmic membranes. Recent data reveal that in some siderophore pathways, this step can also be carried out by proton-motive force-dependent permeases, for example the ferrichrome and ferripyochelin pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Iron is then released from the siderophores in the bacterial cytoplasm by different enzymatic mechanisms depending on the nature of the siderophore. Another strategy has been reported for the pyoverdine pathway in P. aeruginosa: iron is released from the siderophore in the periplasm and only siderophore-free iron is transported into the cytoplasm by an ABC transporter having two atypical periplasmic binding proteins. This review presents recent findings concerning both ferrisiderophore and siderophore-free iron transport across bacterial cytoplasmic membranes and considers current knowledge about the mechanisms involved in iron release from siderophores.

  16. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  17. Histidine biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Stepansky, A; Leustek, T

    2006-03-01

    The study of histidine metabolism has never been at the forefront of interest in plant systems despite the significant role that the analysis of this pathway has played in development of the field of molecular genetics in microbes. With the advent of methods to analyze plant gene function by complementation of microbial auxotrophic mutants and the complete analysis of plant genome sequences, strides have been made in deciphering the histidine pathway in plants. The studies point to a complex evolutionary origin of genes for histidine biosynthesis. Gene regulation studies have indicated novel regulatory networks involving histidine. In addition, physiological studies have indicated novel functions for histidine in plants as chelators and transporters of metal ions. Recent investigations have revealed intriguing connections of histidine in plant reproduction. The exciting new information suggests that the study of plant histidine biosynthesis has finally begun to flower.

  18. In Vitro Cultivation of ‘Unculturable’ Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Vartoukian, Sonia R.; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Wade, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome. PMID:26764907

  19. Lead and cadmium-induced oxidative stress impacting mycelial growth of Oudemansiella radicata in liquid medium alleviated by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan-Ru; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Deng, Jia-Yu; Zhao, Qi-Qi; Xu, Heng

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the effects of siderophores produced by six bacteria on mycelium growth, Cd and Pb accumulation, lipid peroxidation, protein content and antioxidant enzyme in Oudemansiella radicata were investigated in Cd and Pb-containing liquid medium. The results showed that inoculation with siderophore-containing filtrates (SCF) partly enhanced the growth of O. radicata after 15 days, with 0.8-32.4% biomass increase for Cd and 0.7-20.8% for Pb compared to control(s), which lacked siderophore. The maximum enhancement for accumulation were found to be confined to Bacillus sp. FFQ2(s) (26.5%) for Cd and Pseudomonas sp. CY63(s) (158.9%) for Pb. A significant decrease in MDA content indicated that lipid peroxidation in O. radicata was alleviated by siderophores. Besides, antioxidant enzyme SOD and POD activities also displayed obviously decrease in SCF-treated mycelium compared to control(s) treatment, while CAT activity did not present significant change. Protein level in O. radicata treated by SCF increased from 0.3 to 138.0% for Cd and from 10.9 to 107.1% for Pb compared to control(s). Therefore, the present work suggests that microbial siderophores can reduce the toxicity of metals to mycelium and then alleviate heavy metals-inducing oxidative stress in O. radicata.

  20. Iron assimilation and siderophore production by Vibrio ordalii strains isolated from diseased Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Balado, Miguel; Toranzo, Alicia E; Poblete-Morales, Matías; Lemos, Manuel L; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-03-30

    Vibrio ordalii is the causative agent of vibriosis in several cultured salmonid species worldwide. Despite its impact on aquaculture, relatively little information is available about its virulence factors. The present study demonstrates for the first time that V. ordalii possesses different systems of iron acquisition, one involving siderophore synthesis and another one that uses direct binding of heme to use iron. Using 6 strains of V. ordalii from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and the V. ordalii type strain, we could demonstrate that all strains could grow in presence of the chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and produced siderophores in solid and liquid media. Cross-feeding assays among V. ordalii strains evidenced variability in the siderophores produced. Bioassays and PCR data suggest that V. ordalii could produce a siderophore with a structure similar to piscibactin, although the production of a second siderophore in certain strains cannot be discarded. Furthermore, all strains were able to use hemin and hemoglobin as the only iron sources, although the cell yield was higher when using hemoglobin. A hemin-binding assay indicated the presence of constitutive heme-binding molecules at the cell surface of V. ordalii. Virulence tests using rainbow trout as a model of infection revealed a clear relationship between iron-uptake ability and pathogenicity in V. ordalii.

  1. Biosynthesis of Hemes.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2007-04-01

    This review is concerned specifically with the structures and biosynthesis of hemes in E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. However, inasmuch as all tetrapyrroles share a common biosynthetic pathway, much of the material covered here is applicable to tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in other organisms. Conversely, much of the available information about tetrapyrrole biosynthesis has been gained from studies of other organisms, such as plants, algae, cyanobacteria, and anoxygenic phototrophs, which synthesize large quantities of these compounds. This information is applicable to E. coli and serovar Typhimurium. Hemes play important roles as enzyme prosthetic groups in mineral nutrition, redox metabolism, and gas-and redox-modulated signal transduction. The biosynthetic steps from the earliest universal precursor, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), to protoporphyrin IX-based hemes constitute the major, common portion of the pathway, and other steps leading to specific groups of products can be considered branches off the main axis. Porphobilinogen (PBG) synthase (PBGS; also known as ALA dehydratase) catalyzes the asymmetric condensation of two ALA molecules to form PBG, with the release of two molecules of H2O. Protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (PPX) catalyzes the removal of six electrons from the tetrapyrrole macrocycle to form protoporphyrin IX in the last biosynthetic step that is common to hemes and chlorophylls. Several lines of evidence converge to support a regulatory model in which the cellular level of available or free protoheme controls the rate of heme synthesis at the level of the first step unique to heme synthesis, the formation of GSA by the action of GTR.

  2. Characterization of Fluorescent Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake in Pseudomonas sp. Strain M114: Evidence for the Existence of an Additional Ferric Siderophore Receptor.

    PubMed

    Morris, J; O'sullivan, D J; Koster, M; Leong, J; Weisbeek, P J; O'gara, F

    1992-02-01

    In Pseudomonas sp. strain M114, the outer membrane receptor for ferric pseudobactin M114 was shown to transport ferric pseudobactins B10 and A225, in addition to its own. The gene encoding this receptor, which was previously cloned on pCUP3, was localized by Tn5 mutagenesis to a region comprising >1.6 kb of M114 DNA. A mutant (strain M114R1) lacking this receptor was then created by a marker exchange technique. Characterization of this mutant by using purified pseudobactin M114 in radiolabeled ferric iron uptake studies confirmed that it was completely unable to utilize this siderophore for acquisition of iron. In addition, it lacked an outer membrane protein band of 89 kDa when subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. As a result, growth of the mutant was severely restricted under low-iron conditions. However, this phenotype was reversed in the presence of another fluorescent siderophore (pseudobactin MT3A) from Pseudomonas sp. strain MT3A, suggesting the presence of a second receptor in strain M114. Furthermore, wild-type Pseudomonas sp. strain B24 was not able to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A, and this phenotype was not reversed upon expression of the M114 receptor encoded on pCUP3. However, a cosmid clone (pMS1047) that enabled strain B24 to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A was isolated from an M114 gene bank. Radiolabel transport assays with purified pseudobactin MT3A confirmed this event. Plasmid pMS1047 was shown to encode an outer membrane protein of 81 kDa in strain B24 under iron-limiting conditions; this protein corresponds to a similar protein in strain M114.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics of interlinked public goods traits: an experimental study of siderophore production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ross-Gillespie, A; Dumas, Z; Kümmerli, R

    2015-01-01

    Public goods cooperation is common in microbes, and there is much interest in understanding how such traits evolve. Research in recent years has identified several important factors that shape the evolutionary dynamics of such systems, yet few studies have investigated scenarios involving interactions between multiple public goods. Here, we offer general predictions about the evolutionary trajectories of two public goods traits having positive, negative or neutral regulatory influence on one another's expression, and we report on a test of some of our predictions in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa's production of two interlinked iron-scavenging siderophores. First, we confirmed that both pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores do operate as public goods under appropriate environmental conditions. We then tracked their production in lines experimentally evolved under different iron-limitation regimes known to favour different siderophore expression profiles. Under strong iron limitation, where pyoverdine represses pyochelin, we saw a decline in pyoverdine and a concomitant increase in pyochelin - consistent with expansion of pyoverdine-defective cheats derepressed for pyochelin. Under moderate iron limitation, pyochelin declined - again consistent with an expected cheat invasion scenario - but there was no concomitant shift in pyoverdine because cross-suppression between the traits is unidirectional only. Alternating exposure to strong and moderate iron limitation caused qualitatively similar though lesser shifts compared to the constant-environment regimes. Our results confirm that the regulatory interconnections between public goods traits can significantly modulate the course of evolution, yet also suggest how we can start to predict the impacts such complexities will have on phenotypic divergence and community stability.

  4. Characterization of anguibactin, a novel siderophore from Vibrio anguillarum 775(pJM1).

    PubMed Central

    Actis, L A; Fish, W; Crosa, J H; Kellerman, K; Ellenberger, S R; Hauser, F M; Sanders-Loehr, J

    1986-01-01

    Anguibactin, a siderophore produced by cells of Vibrio anguillarum 775 harboring the pJM1 plasmid, has now been isolated from the supernatants of iron-deficient cultures. This iron-reactive material was purified by adsorption onto an XAD-7 resin and subsequent gel filtration on a Sephadex LH-20 column. The resulting neutral compound produced an ion at m/z 348 in mass spectrometry and contained one sulfur, four oxygen, and four nitrogen atoms as determined by elemental analysis. Its strong UV absorbance and blue fluorescence were suggestive of a phenolic moiety. In colorimetric reactions anguibactin behaved like a catechol. The catechol assignment was supported by the appearance of a new absorption band at 510 nm in the ferric complex and by the appearance of peaks at 1,367, 1,447, 1,469, and 1,538 cm-1 in the resonance Raman spectrum. In addition, the infrared spectrum gave evidence of a secondary amide function, but no free carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid groups were observed. A third iron-ligating group was suggested by the liberation of three protons during iron binding; mass spectrometry of the resulting material yielded a molecular ion characteristic of a 1:1 complex of ferric anguibactin. The purified anguibactin exhibited specific growth-promoting activity under iron-limiting conditions for a siderophore-deficient mutant of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1). A novel structure for anguibactin was indicated by the failure of a large number of known siderophores and synthetic chelators to yield a similar type of specific cross-feeding in the V. anguillarum bioassay. PMID:3013839

  5. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry.

    PubMed

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  6. The Legionella pneumophila Siderophore Legiobactin Is a Polycarboxylate That Is Identical in Structure to Rhizoferrin.

    PubMed

    Burnside, Denise M; Wu, Yuyang; Shafaie, Saman; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease, secretes a siderophore (legiobactin) that promotes bacterial infection of the lung. In past work, we determined that cytoplasmic LbtA (from Legiobactin gene A) promotes synthesis of legiobactin, inner membrane LbtB aids in export of the siderophore, and outer membrane LbtU and inner membrane LbtC help mediate ferrilegiobactin uptake and assimilation. However, the past studies examined legiobactin contained within bacterial culture supernatants. By utilizing high-pressure liquid chromatography that incorporates hydrophilic interaction-based chemistry, we have now purified legiobactin from supernatants of virulent strain 130b that is suitable for detailed chemical analysis. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) revealed that the molecular mass of (protonated) legiobactin is 437.140 Da. On the basis of the results obtained from both MS analysis and various forms of nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that legiobactin is composed of two citric acid residues linked by a putrescine bridge and thus is identical in structure to rhizoferrin, a polycarboxylate-type siderophore made by many fungi and several unrelated bacteria. Both purified legiobactin and rhizoferrin obtained from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans were able to promote Fe(3+) uptake by wild-type L. pneumophila as well as enhance growth of iron-starved bacteria. These results did not occur with 130b mutants lacking lbtU or lbtC, indicating that both endogenously made legiobactin and exogenously derived rhizoferrin are assimilated by L. pneumophila in an LbtU- and LbtC-dependent manner.

  7. Involvement of SirABC in Iron-Siderophore Import in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Suzanne E.; Sebulsky, M. Tom; Heinrichs, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus SirA was previously identified as a lipoprotein, and SirB and SirC are thought to encode the transmembrane domains of an ABC transporter. Sir proteins show similarity to iron-siderophore transporters in several bacteria. Here, we show that the iron-regulated sirABC operon is divergently transcribed from the sbn operon that encodes enzymes involved in the synthesis of staphylobactin, a recently described siderophore produced by S. aureus. Mutation of either sirA or sirB increased the resistance of iron-starved S. aureus to streptonigrin and resulted in compromised growth in iron-restricted, but not iron-rich, media. We also demonstrated that sirA and sirB mutants are compromised in the ability to transport iron complexed to staphylobactin but are not compromised for uptake of other iron complexes, such as ferric hydroxamates, ferric enterobactin, or ferric citrate. SirA- and SirB-deficient S. aureus, however, retain the ability to produce staphylobactin. Moreover, we found that transcription from the sbn operon was increased, relative to the wild type, in both sirA and sirB knockout strains, likely in response to an increased level of iron starvation in these cells. These results provide evidence of a role for these proteins in iron import in S. aureus and for full fitness of the bacterium in iron-restricted environments and demonstrate a function for S. aureus genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of an endogenously produced siderophore. PMID:15576785

  8. An Infrared Spectroscopy Study Of Pb(II) And Siderophore Sorption To Montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, P. A.; Hunter, E. L.; Quicksall, A. N.; Haack, E.; Johnston, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    Aerobic microorganisms exude low molecular weight organic ligands known as siderophores in order to acquire nutrient Fe. Because siderophores can also bind other metals such as Pb, Zn, and Cd, they may affect metal sorption, fate, and transport. This study combined batch sorption experiments, thermodynamic modeling, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and spectroscopic analysis, to investigate Pb(II) and desferrioxamine B (DFOB) sorption to montmorillonite, alone and in combination, at pH 3-9, ~22 C, and in 0.1 M NaCl. Samples at pH 3, 5.5, and 7.5 were analyzed by XRD and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and samples at pH5.5 were analyzed by in-situ Attenuated Total Reflection Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). DFOB does not bind Pb substantially at pH 3, and sorption results showed that the ligand only minimally affects Pb sorption at this pH. However, combination of batch sorption experiments with XRD, FTIR, and ATR-FTIR analysis suggested that Pb(II)/DFOB (co)absorption in the interlayer is likely an important sorption mechanism at pH 5.5 and 7.5 under both air-dried and aqueous conditions. The precise structure of the sorption complex(es) could not be determined by these methods. Some adsorption of Pb(II)/DFOB to the external clay surface is also possible. In the absence of DFOB, a Pb-carbonate complex or precipitate (perhaps hydrocerrusite) was detected by FTIR. Overall, results showed that a microbial siderophore may affect Pb sorption to montmorillonite, that (co)absorption in the interlayer region can be important, and that sorption effects can vary substantially depending upon solution conditions.

  9. Multiplicity and specificity of siderophore uptake in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Stevanovic, Mara; Kranzler, Chana; Pernil, Rafael; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Many cyanobacteria secrete siderophores to sequester iron. Alternatively, mechanisms to utilize xenosiderophores have evolved. The overall uptake systems are comparable to that of other bacteria involving outer membrane transporters energized by TonB as well as plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the function of the bioinformatically-inferred components is largely not established and recent studies showed a high diversity of the complexity of the uptake systems in different cyanobacteria. Thus, we approached the systems of the filamentous Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 as a model of a siderophore-secreting cyanobacterium. Anabaena sp. produces schizokinen and uptake of Fe-schizokinen involves the TonB-dependent transporter, schizokinen transporter (SchT), and the ABC-type transport system FhuBCD. We confirm that this system is also relevant for the uptake of structurally similar Fe-siderophore complexes like Fe-aerobactin. Moreover, we demonstrate a function of the TonB-dependent transporter IutA2 in Fe-schizokinen uptake in addition to SchT. The iutA2 mutant shows growth defects upon iron limitation, alterations in Fe-schizokinen uptake and in the transcription profile of the Fe-schizokinen uptake system. The physiological properties of the mutant confirm the importance of iron uptake for cellular function, e.g. for the Krebs cycle. Based on the relative relation of expression of schT and iutA2 as well as of the iron uptake rate to the degree of starvation, a model for the need of the co-existence of two different outer membrane transporters for the same substrate is discussed.

  10. Stability of YREE complexes with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B at seawater ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Emily A.; Schijf, Johan

    2011-11-01

    Organic complexation of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREEs), although generally believed to be important, is an understudied aspect of YREE solution speciation in the open ocean. We report the first series of stability constants for complexes of YREEs (except Ce and Pm) with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), representing a class of small organic ligands that have an extraordinary selectivity for Fe(III) and are found in surface seawater at low-picomolar concentrations. Constants were measured by potentiometric titration of DFOB (pH 3-10) in the presence of single YREEs, in simple media at seawater ionic strength (NaClO 4 or NaCl, I = 0.7 M). Under these circumstances, the terminal amine of DFOB does not deprotonate. The four acid dissociation constants of the siderophore were determined separately by potentiometric titration of DFOB alone. Values for the bidentate (log β1), tetradentate (log β2), and hexadentate (log β3) complexes of La-Lu range from 4.88 to 6.53, 7.70 to 11.27, and 10.09 to 15.19, respectively, while Y falls between Gd and Tb in each case. Linear free-energy relations of the three stability constants with the first YREE hydrolysis constant, log β1∗, yield regression coefficients of >0.97. On the other hand, plots of the constants vs. the radius of the inner hydration sphere display an increasing deviation from linearity for the lightest REEs (La > Pr > Nd). This may signify steric constraints in DFOB folding around bulkier cations, a larger mismatch in coordination number, or a substantial degree of covalence in the YREE-hydroxamate bond. Complexes of the YREEs with DFOB are many orders of magnitude more stable than those with carbonate, the dominant inorganic YREE ligand in seawater. Speciation modeling with MINEQL indicates that, for an average seawater composition, the hexadentate complex could constitute as much as 28% of dissolved Lu at free DFOB concentrations as low as 10 -13 M. Such conditions might

  11. Microbial siderophores and root exudates enhanced goethite dissolution and Fe/As uptake by As-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Fu, Jing-Wei; Da Silva, Evandro; Shi, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Yue; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-04-01

    Arsenic (As) in soils is often adsorbed on Fe-(hydro)oxides surface, rendering them more resistant to dissolution, which is undesirable for phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata prefers to grow in calcareous soils where available Fe and As are low. To elucidate its mechanisms of acquiring Fe and As from insoluble sources in soils, we investigated dissolution of goethite with pre-adsorbed arsenate (AsV; As-goethite) in presence of four organic ligands, including two root exudates (oxalate and phytate, dominant in P. vittata) and two microbial siderophores (PG12-siderophore and desferrioxamine B). Their presence increased As solubilization from As-goethite from 0.03 to 0.27-5.33 mg L(-1) compared to the control. The siderophore/phytate bi-ligand treatment released 7.42 mg L(-1) soluble Fe, which was 1.2-fold that of the sum of siderophore and phytate, showing a synergy in promoting As-goethite dissolution. In the ligand-mineral-plant system, siderophore/phytate was most effective in releasing As and Fe from As-goethite. Moreover, the continuous plant uptake induced more As-goethite dissolution. The continued release of As and Fe significantly enhanced their plant uptake (from 0.01 to 0.43 mg plant(-1) As and 2.7-14.8 mg plant(-1) Fe) and plant growth (from 1.2 to 3.1 g plant(-1) fw) in P. vittata. Since microbial siderophores and root exudates often coexist in soil rhizosphere, their synergy in enhancing dissolution of insoluble As-Fe minerals may play an important role in efficient phytoremediation of As-contaminated soils.

  12. Siderophore-promoted transfer of rare earth elements and iron from volcanic ash into glacial meltwater, river and ocean water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Michael; Tepe, Nathalie; Mohwinkel, Dennis

    2013-02-01

    The rare earth elements (REE) are a group of trace elements that have short marine residence times and that in river, lake and marine surface waters are typically associated with organic and inorganic particles. Explosive volcanic eruptions, such as the 2010 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland, produce volcanic ash particles which can be an important source of iron and other nutrients for aquatic organisms. To become bioavailable, however, this iron needs to be solubilized by complexing agents, such as siderophores. A well-studied example of such a chelator is the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamin-B (DFOB). Based on results from incubation experiments with glacial meltwater-rich river waters from southern Iceland, which are rich in suspended volcanic ash and that had been incubated with and without DFOB, respectively, we here show that siderophores not only enhance the release of iron, but also promote the mobilization of REE from these particles. In the presence of DFOB, partial dissolution of volcanic ash (and presumably other lithic particles) produces a flux of dissolved REE into ambient waters, that is characterized by depletion of the light REE over the middle REE and by selective enrichment of cerium, due to the formation of dissolved Ce(IV)-DFOB complexes. In siderophore-rich environments, this siderophore-bound REE flux has the potential to modify the concentrations and distribution of the dissolved REE and of the isotopic composition of dissolved Nd in glacial meltwaters, river waters and seawater and might be a component of the boundary effects between shelf sediments and seawater, which are assumed to account for the “missing Nd flux” to seawater. Thermodynamic data further suggest that siderophore-promoted element mobilization could also be important for other polyvalent (trace) elements, such as Hf.

  13. Multiple biosynthetic and uptake systems mediate siderophore-dependent iron acquisition in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877.

    PubMed

    Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Lautru, Sylvie; Francou, Francois-Xavier; Leblond, Pierre; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Challis, Gregory L

    2006-11-01

    Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition has been well studied in many bacterial pathogens because it contributes to virulence. In contrast, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition by saprophytic bacteria has received relatively little attention. The independent identification of the des and cch gene clusters that direct production of the tris-hydroxamate ferric iron-chelators desferrioxamine E and coelichelin, respectively, which could potentially act as siderophores in the saprophyte Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), has recently been reported. Here it is shown that the des cluster also directs production of desferrioxamine B in S. coelicolor and that very similar des and cch clusters direct production of desferrioxamines E and B, and coelichelin, respectively, in Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Sequence analyses of the des and cch clusters suggest that components of ferric-siderophore uptake systems are also encoded within each cluster. The construction and analysis of a series of mutants of S. coelicolor lacking just biosynthetic genes or both the biosynthetic and siderophore uptake genes from the des and cch clusters demonstrated that coelichelin and desferrioxamines E and B all function as siderophores in this organism and that at least one of these metabolites is required for growth under defined conditions even in the presence of significant quantities of ferric iron. These experiments also demonstrated that a third siderophore uptake system must be present in S. coelicolor, in addition to the two encoded within the cch and des clusters, which show selectivity for coelichelin and desferrioxamine E, respectively. The ability of the S. coelicolor mutants to utilize a range of exogenous xenosiderophores for iron acquisition was also examined, showing that the third siderophore-iron transport system has broad specificity for tris-hydroxamate-containing siderophores. Together, these results define a complex system of multiple biosynthetic and uptake pathways for

  14. Chirality and protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Banik, Sindrila Dutta; Nandi, Nilashis

    2013-01-01

    Chirality is present at all levels of structural hierarchy of protein and plays a significant role in protein biosynthesis. The macromolecules involved in protein biosynthesis such as aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and ribosome have chiral subunits. Despite the omnipresence of chirality in the biosynthetic pathway, its origin, role in current pathway, and importance is far from understood. In this review we first present an introduction to biochirality and its relevance to protein biosynthesis. Major propositions about the prebiotic origin of biomolecules are presented with particular reference to proteins and nucleic acids. The problem of the origin of homochirality is unresolved at present. The chiral discrimination by enzymes involved in protein synthesis is essential for keeping the life process going. However, questions remained pertaining to the mechanism of chiral discrimination and concomitant retention of biochirality. We discuss the experimental evidence which shows that it is virtually impossible to incorporate D-amino acids in protein structures in present biosynthetic pathways via any of the two major steps of protein synthesis, namely aminoacylation and peptide bond formation reactions. Molecular level explanations of the stringent chiral specificity in each step are extended based on computational analysis. A detailed account of the current state of understanding of the mechanism of chiral discrimination during aminoacylation in the active site of aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and peptide bond formation in ribosomal peptidyl transferase center is presented. Finally, it is pointed out that the understanding of the mechanism of retention of enantiopurity has implications in developing novel enzyme mimetic systems and biocatalysts and might be useful in chiral drug design.

  15. Siderophore Cephalosporin Cefiderocol Utilizes Ferric Iron Transporter Systems for Antibacterial Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Toru; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Sato, Takafumi; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Cefiderocol (S-649266) is a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin conjugated with a catechol moiety at the third-position side chain. The in vitro activity of cefiderocol against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was enhanced under iron-depleted conditions, whereas that of ceftazidime was not affected. The monitoring of [thiazole-14C]cefiderocol revealed the increased intracellular accumulation of cefiderocol in P. aeruginosa cells incubated under iron-depleted conditions compared with those incubated under iron-sufficient conditions. Cefiderocol was shown to have potent chelating activity with ferric iron, and extracellular iron was efficiently transported into P. aeruginosa cells in the presence of cefiderocol as well as siderophores, while enhanced transport of extracellular ferric iron was not observed when one of the hydroxyl groups of the catechol moiety of cefiderocol was replaced with a methoxy group. We conclude that cefiderocol forms a chelating complex with iron, which is actively transported into P. aeruginosa cells via iron transporters, resulting in potent antibacterial activity of cefiderocol against P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736756

  16. Siderophore-manganese(lll) Interactions. II. Manganite dissolution promoted by desferrioxamine B.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Owen W; Sposito, Garrison

    2005-08-15

    Recent laboratory and field studies suggest that Mn(lll) forms persistent aqueous complexes with high-affinity ligands. Aqueous Mn(lll) species thus may play a significant but largely unexplored role in biogeochemical processes. One formation mechanism for these species is the dissolution of Mn(lll)-bearing minerals. To investigate this mechanism, we measured the steady-state dissolution rates of manganite (gamma-MnOOH) in the presence of desferrioxamine B (DFOB), a common trihydroxamate siderophore. We find that DFOB dissolves manganite by both reductive and nonreductive reaction pathways. For pH > 6.5, a nonreductive ligand-promoted reaction is the dominant dissolution pathway, with a steady-state dissolution rate proportional to the surface concentration of DFOB. In the absence of reductants, the aqueous Mn(lIl)HDFOB+ complex resulting from dissolution is stable for at least several weeks at circumneutral to alkaline pH and at 25 degrees C. For pH < 6.5, Mn2+ is the dominant aqueous species resulting from manganite dissolution, implicating a reductive dissolution pathway. These results have important implications for the biogeochemical cycling of both manganese and siderophores--as well as Fe(lll)--in natural waters and soils.

  17. Isolation and characterization of siderophore producing antagonistic rhizobacteria against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, Supriya; Kumar, Sudheer; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Srivastava, Alok K; Arora, Dilip K

    2014-06-01

    Plant protection through siderophore producing rhizobacteria (SPR) has emerged as a sustainable approach for crop health management. In present study, 220 bacteria isolated from tomato rhizosphere were screened for in vitro antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani AG-4. Nine potent antagonistic strains viz., Alcaligenes sp. (MUN1, MB21, and MPF37), Enterobacter sp. (MPM1), Pseudomonas sp. (M10A and MB65), P. aeruginosa (MPF14 and MB123) and P. fluorescens (MPF47) were identified on the basis of physiological characters and 16S rDNA sequencing. These strains were able to produce hydrolytic enzymes, hydrogen cyanide, indole acetic acid, although, only few strains were able to solubilize phosphate. Two strains (MB123 and MPF47) showed significant disease reduction in glasshouse conditions were further evaluated under field conditions using three different application methods. Application of P. fluorescens (MPF47) in nursery as soil mix + seedling root treatments prior to transplantation resulted in significant disease reduction compared to control. Total chlorophyll and available iron were significantly higher in the MPF47 treated plants in contrast to infected control. In conclusion, siderophore producing bacteria MPF47 have strong biocontrol abilities and its application as soil mix + seedling root treatments provided strong shield to plant roots against R. solani and could be used for effective bio-management of pathogen.

  18. Induction of siderophore activity in Anabaena spp. and its moderation of copper toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.E.; Stuart, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.

    1987-05-01

    Growth of Anabaena sp. strain 7120 (in the absence of chelators or added iron) was inhibited by the addition of 2.1 to 6.5 ..mu..M copper and was abolished by copper concentrations of 10 /sup +/M or higher. When the copper was chelated to schizokinen, the toxic effects were eliminated. Analysis of culture filtrates showed that the cupric schizokinen remains in the medium, thereby lowering the amount of copper taken up by the cells. Although this organism actively transports ferric schizokinen, it apparently does not recognize the cupric complex. Thus, Anabaena sp. is protected from copper toxicity under conditions in which siderophore is being produced. For cells grown in low iron, the accumulation of extracellular schizokinen was observed to parallel cell growth and continue well into stationary phase. The actual iron status of the organism was monitored by using iron uptake velocity as an assay. Cultures grown on 0.1 ..mu..M added iron were found to be severely iron limited upon reaching stationary phase, thus explaining the continued production of schizokinen. These data show that the siderophore system in Anabaena spp. has developed primarily as a response to iron starvation and that additional functions such as alleviation of copper toxicity or allelopathic inhibition of other algal species are merely secondary benefits.

  19. Antimalarial action of hydroxamate-based iron chelators and potentiation of desferrioxamine action by reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, J; Tsafack, A; Amichai, Y; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxamate-based chelators of iron are potent inhibitors of in vitro growth of Plasmodium falciparum. Two types of such chelators, the natural desferrioxamine and the synthetic reversed siderophore RSFileum2, are prototypes of antimalarial agents whose action spectra differ in the speed of action, stage dependence, and degree of reversibility of effects. This work explores the possibility of improving the antimalarial efficacy of these agents by using them in various combinations on in vitro cultures of P. falciparum. Growth assessment was based both on total nucleic acid synthesis and on parasitemia. The results indicate that the synthetic reversed siderophore more than complements the antimalarial action of desferrioxamine when applied during either ring, trophozoite, or mixed stages. The combined drug effects were significantly higher than the additive effect of the individual drugs. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for both reversible effects and irreversible (i.e., sustained) effects. Following an 8-h window of exposure the combined drug treatment caused parasite growth arrest and prevented its recovery, even 3 days after the treatment. The fact that such a combination of iron chelators displays a wider action spectrum than either drug alone has implications for the design of chemotherapy regimens. PMID:7695330

  20. Ternary complex formation facilitates a redox mechanism for iron release from a siderophore.

    PubMed

    Mies, Kassy A; Wirgau, Joseph I; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2006-04-01

    While the naturally occurring reducing agents glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (H2A) alone are ineffective at reducing iron(III) sequestered by the siderophore ferrioxamine B, the addition of an iron(II) chelator, sulfonated bathophenanthroline (BPDS), facilitates reduction by either reducing agent. A mechanism is described in which a ternary complex is formed between ferrioxamine B and BPDS in a rapidly established pre-equilibrium step, which is followed by rate limiting reduction of the ternary complex by glutathione or ascorbate. Spectral, thermodynamic, and kinetic evidence are given for ternary complex formation. Ascorbate was found to be slightly more efficient at reducing the ternary complex than glutathione (k4=2.1 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1) and k4=6.3 x 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively) at pH 7. Reduction is followed by a rapid ligand exchange step where iron is released from ferrioxamine B to form tris-(BPDS)iron(II). The implications of these results for siderophore mediated iron transport and release are discussed.

  1. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  2. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 and the Identification of Functional NRPS Genes for Siderophore Production

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Haimeng; Yang, Yanan; Liu, Kai; Xu, Wenfeng; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong; Du, Binghai

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of rhizosphere bacteria that promote plant growth. Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 is a member of PGPR that produces siderophores. The draft genome sequence of MTQ3 has been reported. Here, we analyzed the genome sequence of MTQ3 and performed a comparative genome analysis of four sequenced Delftia strains, revealing genetic relationships among these strains. In addition, genes responsible for bacteriocin and nonribosomal peptide synthesis were detected in the genomes of each strain. To reveal the functions of NRPS genes in siderophore production in D. tsuruhatensis MTQ3, three NRPS genes were knocked out to obtain the three mutants MTQ3-Δ1941, MTQ3-Δ1945, and MTQ3-Δ1946, which were compared with the wild-type strain. In qualitative and quantitative analyses using CAS assay, the mutants failed to produce siderophores. Accordingly, the NRPS genes in MTQ3 were functionally related to siderophore production. These results clarify one mechanism by which plant growth is promoted in MTQ3 and have important applications in agricultural production. PMID:27847812

  3. THE APPLICATION OF SIDEROPHORES FOR METAL RECOVERY AND WASTE REMEDIATION: EXAMINATION OF CORRELATIONS FOR PREDICTION OF METAL AFFINITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The naturally occurring metal-chelating compounds known as siderophores may be useful in environmental applications but limited metal specificity data is available for this class of compounds. Correlations that predict ligand-metal affinity versus mtal ion charge density and hyd...

  4. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 and the Identification of Functional NRPS Genes for Siderophore Production.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haimeng; Yang, Yanan; Liu, Kai; Xu, Wenfeng; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong; Du, Binghai; Ding, Yanqin; Wang, Chengqiang

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a group of rhizosphere bacteria that promote plant growth. Delftia tsuruhatensis MTQ3 is a member of PGPR that produces siderophores. The draft genome sequence of MTQ3 has been reported. Here, we analyzed the genome sequence of MTQ3 and performed a comparative genome analysis of four sequenced Delftia strains, revealing genetic relationships among these strains. In addition, genes responsible for bacteriocin and nonribosomal peptide synthesis were detected in the genomes of each strain. To reveal the functions of NRPS genes in siderophore production in D. tsuruhatensis MTQ3, three NRPS genes were knocked out to obtain the three mutants MTQ3-Δ1941, MTQ3-Δ1945, and MTQ3-Δ1946, which were compared with the wild-type strain. In qualitative and quantitative analyses using CAS assay, the mutants failed to produce siderophores. Accordingly, the NRPS genes in MTQ3 were functionally related to siderophore production. These results clarify one mechanism by which plant growth is promoted in MTQ3 and have important applications in agricultural production.

  5. Evaluation of Stress-Induced Microbial Siderophore from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain S1 as a Potential Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitor in Wound Healing Applications.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Sita Lakshmi; Kandhasamy, S; Ramanathan, Giriprasath; Sivagnanam, Uma Tiruchirapalli; Perumal, P T

    2016-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes capable of causing various inflammatory and various degenerative diseases if over-expressed. The active site of these enzymes is a zinc binding motif which binds to the specific site on the substrate and induce degradation. Hence an inhibitor is required to form a complex with zinc motif which hampers the binding ability of MMPs. To obtain novel MMPs inhibitor for wound healing, the chelating activity of siderophore from the microbial source was focused. During screening for siderophore production, strain S1 produced the highest amount of siderophore in the minimal salts medium. The isolate was confirmed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain S1 based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The activity of the siderophore was assayed using chrome azurol sulphonate and purified by the chromatographic techniques. The structural evidence through Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that the isolated siderophore is a catecholate type with the distinctive characters. The positive results of calcein and fluozin-3 assays indicate that siderophore could bind to divalent metal ions, namely Fe(2+) and Zn(2+). As the siderophore compound focused on wound healing property, the in vitro studies revealed the viability of NH3T3 fibroblast cells and its efficiency in matrix modulating was confirmed through gelatin zymogram.

  6. Increased iron-stress resilience of maize through inoculation of siderophore-producing Arthrobacter globiformis from mine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Vandana; Rau, Nupur; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common among graminaceous crops. Ecologically successful wild grasses from iron-limiting habitats are likely to harbour bacteria which secrete efficient high-affinity iron-chelating molecules (siderophores) to solubilize and mobilize iron. Such siderophore-producing rhizobacteria may increase the iron-stress resilience of graminaceous crops. Considering this, 51 rhizobacterial isolates of Dichanthium annulatum from iron-limiting abandoned mine (∼84% biologically unavailable iron) were purified and tested for siderophore production; and efficacy of Arthrobacter globiformis inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience of maize and wheat was also evaluated. 16S rRNA sequence analyses demonstrated that siderophore-producing bacteria were taxonomically diverse (seven genera, nineteen species). Among these, Gram-positive Bacillus (eleven species) was prevalent (76.92%). A. globiformis, a commonly found rhizobacterium of graminaceous crops was investigated in detail. Its siderophore has high iron-chelation capacity (ICC: 13.0 ± 2.4 μM) and effectively dissolutes diverse iron-complexes (FeCl3 : 256.13 ± 26.56 μM/ml; Fe2 O3 red: 84.3 ± 4.74 μM/ml; mine spoil: 123.84 ± 4.38 μM/ml). Siderophore production (ICC) of A. globiformis BGDa404 also varied with supplementation of different iron complexes. In plant bioassay with iron-deficiency sensitive species maize, A. globiformis inoculation triggered stress-associated traits (peroxidase and proline) in roots, enhanced plant biomass, uptake of iron and phosphate, and protein and chlorophyll contents. However, in iron deficiency tolerant species wheat, growth improvement was marginal. The present study illustrates: (i) rhizosphere of D. annulatum colonizing abandoned mine as a "hotspot" of siderophore-producing bacteria; and (ii) potential of A. globiformis BGDa404 inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience in maize. A. globiformis BGDa404 has the potential to develop as

  7. Designer microbes for biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Quin, Maureen B.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have long been adapted for the biosynthetic production of useful compounds. There is increasing demand for the rapid and cheap microbial production of diverse molecules in an industrial setting. Microbes can now be designed and engineered for a particular biosynthetic purpose, thanks to recent developments in genome sequencing, metabolic engineering, and synthetic biology. Advanced tools exist for the genetic manipulation of microbes to create novel metabolic circuits, making new products accessible. Metabolic processes can be optimized to increase yield and balance pathway flux. Progress is being made towards the design and creation of fully synthetic microbes for biosynthetic purposes. Together, these emerging technologies will facilitate the production of designer microbes for biosynthesis. PMID:24646570

  8. Microbial biosynthesis of alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Andreas; Rude, Mathew A; Li, Xuezhi; Popova, Emanuela; del Cardayre, Stephen B

    2010-07-30

    Alkanes, the major constituents of gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel, are naturally produced by diverse species; however, the genetics and biochemistry behind this biology have remained elusive. Here we describe the discovery of an alkane biosynthesis pathway from cyanobacteria. The pathway consists of an acyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and an aldehyde decarbonylase, which together convert intermediates of fatty acid metabolism to alkanes and alkenes. The aldehyde decarbonylase is related to the broadly functional nonheme diiron enzymes. Heterologous expression of the alkane operon in Escherichia coli leads to the production and secretion of C13 to C17 mixtures of alkanes and alkenes. These genes and enzymes can now be leveraged for the simple and direct conversion of renewable raw materials to fungible hydrocarbon fuels.

  9. Terpenoid biosynthesis in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic organisms (archaea and eubacteria) are found in all habitats where life exists on our planet. This would not be possible without the astounding biochemical plasticity developed by such organisms. Part of the metabolic diversity of prokaryotes was transferred to eukaryotic cells when endosymbiotic prokaryotes became mitochondria and plastids but also in a large number of horizontal gene transfer episodes. A group of metabolites produced by all free-living organisms is terpenoids (also known as isoprenoids). In prokaryotes, terpenoids play an indispensable role in cell-wall and membrane biosynthesis (bactoprenol, hopanoids), electron transport (ubiquinone, menaquinone), or conversion of light into chemical energy (chlorophylls, bacteriochlorophylls, rhodopsins, carotenoids), among other processes. But despite their remarkable structural and functional diversity, they all derive from the same metabolic precursors. Here we describe the metabolic pathways producing these universal terpenoid units and provide a complete picture of the main terpenoid compounds found in prokaryotic organisms.

  10. Inner-membrane transporters for the siderophores pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enantio-pyochelin in Pseudomonas fluorescens display different enantioselectivities.

    PubMed

    Reimmann, Cornelia

    2012-05-01

    Iron uptake and transcriptional regulation by the enantiomeric siderophores pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, are stereospecific processes. The iron-loaded forms of Pch (ferriPch) and of EPch (ferriEPch) are recognized stereospecifically (i) at the outer membrane by the siderophore receptors FptA in P. aeruginosa and FetA in P. fluorescens and (ii) in the cytoplasm by the two AraC-type regulators PchR, which are activated by their cognate siderophore. Here, stereospecific siderophore recognition is shown to occur at the inner membrane also. In P. aeruginosa, translocation of ferriPch across the inner membrane is carried out by the single-subunit siderophore transporter FptX. In contrast, the uptake of ferriEPch into the cytoplasm of P. fluorescens was found to involve a classical periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporter (FetCDE), which is encoded by the fetABCDEF operon. Expression of a translational fetA-gfp fusion was repressed by ferric ions, and activated by the cognate siderophore bound to PchR, thus resembling the analogous regulation of the P. aeruginosa ferriPch transport operon fptABCX. The inner-membrane transporters FetCDE and FptX were expressed in combination with either of the two siderophore receptors FetA and FptA in a siderophore-negative P. aeruginosa mutant deleted for the fptABCX operon. Growth tests conducted under iron limitation with ferriPch or ferriEPch as the iron source revealed that FptX was able to transport ferriPch as well as ferriEPch, whereas FetCDE specifically transported ferriEPch. Thus, stereospecific siderophore recognition occurs at the inner membrane by the FetCDE transporter.

  11. Biosynthesis of methanopterin

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H. )

    1990-06-05

    The biosynthetic pathway for the generation of the methylated pterin in methanopterins was determined for the methanogenic bacteria Methanococcus volta and Methanobacterium formicicum. Extracts of M. volta were found to readily cleave L-7,8-dihydroneopterin to 7,8-dihydro-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which was confirmed to be a precursor of the pterin portion of the methanopterin. (methylene{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin was incorporated into methanopterin by growing cells of M. volta to an extent of 30%. Both the C-11 and C-12 methyl groups of methanopterin originate from (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. Cells grown in the presence of (methylene-{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)pterin, (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methylpterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4}, methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin, and (1-ethyl-{sup 3}H)-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin showed that only the non-7-methylated pterins were incorporated into methanopterin. Cells extracts of M. formicicum readily condensed synthetic (methylene-{sup 3}H)-7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin-PP with methaniline to generate demethylated methanopterin, which is then methylated to methanopterin by the cell extract in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine. These observations indicate that the pterin portion of methanopterin is biosynthetically derived from 7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which is coupled to methaniline by a pathway analogous to the biosynthesis of folic acid. This pathway for the biosynthesis of methanopterin represents the first example of the modification of the specificity of a coenzyme through a methylation reaction.

  12. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  13. Microbial siderophores exert a subtle role in Arabidopsis during infection by manipulating the immune response and the iron status.

    PubMed

    Dellagi, Alia; Segond, Diego; Rigault, Martine; Fagard, Mathilde; Simon, Clara; Saindrenan, Patrick; Expert, Dominique

    2009-08-01

    Siderophores (ferric ion chelators) are secreted by organisms in response to iron deficiency. The pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi produces two siderophores, achromobactin and chrysobactin (CB), which are required for systemic dissemination in host plants. Previous studies have shown that CB is produced in planta and can trigger the up-regulation of the plant ferritin gene AtFER1. To further investigate the function of CB during pathogenesis, we analyzed its effect in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants following leaf infiltration. CB activates the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated signaling pathway, while the CB ferric complex is ineffective, suggesting that the elicitor activity of this siderophore is due to its iron-binding property. We confirmed this hypothesis by testing the effect of siderophores structurally unrelated to CB, including deferrioxamine. There was no activation of SA-dependent defense in plants grown under iron deficiency before CB treatment. Transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding the root ferrous ion transporter and ferric chelate reductase, and determination of the activity of this enzyme in response to CB or deferrioxamine, showed that these compounds induce a leaf-to-root iron deficiency signal. This root response as well as ferritin gene up-regulation in the leaf were not compromised in a SA-deficient mutant line. Using the Arabidopsis-E. chrysanthemi pathosystem, we have shown that CB promotes bacterial growth in planta and can modulate plant defenses through an antagonistic mechanism between SA and jasmonic acid signaling cascades. Collectively, these data reveal a new link between two processes mediated by SA and iron in response to microbial siderophores.

  14. Acquisition of Fe from Natural Organic Matter by an Aerobic Pseudomonas Bacterium: Siderophores and Cellular Fe Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, K.; Dehner, C.; Dubois, J.; Maurice, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerobic microorganisms have evolved various strategies to acquire nutrient Fe, including release of Fe-chelating siderophores. The potential importance of siderophores in Fe acquisition from natural organic matter (NOM) (reverse osmosis, RO; and XAD-8 samples with naturally associated Fe) was investigated using a wild type strain (WT) of aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina that produces siderophore(s) and an engineered mutant that cannot. Microbial growth under Fe-limited batch conditions was monitored via optical density, and a β-galactosidase biosensor assay was used to quantify cellular Fe status. Both WT and mutant strains acquired Fe from NOM. Fe ‘stress’ in the presence of the RO sample decreased with increasing [Fe] (as determined by different [DOC]s) and was consistently less for the WT. For both WT and mutant, maximum growth in the presence of RO sample increased as: 1 mgC/L (0.2μM Fe) < 100 mgC/L (20μM Fe) < 10 mgC/L (2μM Fe). Comparison of XAD-8 and RO samples ([DOC] varied to give 2μM [Fe]total for each), showed that although there were no apparent differences in internal Fe status, growth was better on the XAD-8 sample. Chelex treatment to partially remove metals associated with the RO sample increased Fe stress but did not substantially affect growth. Results demonstrated that: (1) siderophores are useful but not necessary for Fe acquisition from NOM by P. mendocina and (2) NOM may have complex effects on microbial growth, related not just to Fe content but potentially to the presence of other (trace)metals such as Al and/or to effects on biofilm development.

  15. Siderophores, the answer for micro to nanosized asbestos fibre related health hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Shabori; Ledwani, Lalita; John, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies on the potential toxicity of High Aspect Ratio Nanoparticles (HARN) has yet once again reinforced the health hazard imposed by asbestos fibres ranging from nano to micro size. Asbestos a naturally occurring fibrous mineral declared a Group I definite carcinogen by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer), a unit of WHO in the year 1987, has been extensively used since World War II to the near past for various commercial products. According to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, asbestos-related diseases, resulting from exposure at workplace claims more than 107000 lives every year worldwide. The various types of toxic effects induced by asbestos in humans include - i) inflammation and fibrogenesis of lung, ii) mesothelioma iii) asbestosis and iv) bronchogenic carcinoma. The stability of asbestos in natural environment and its biological aggressiveness is related to their fibrous structure and dimensions. The actual risk associated with the exposure to nanosized asbestos, which is still unknown and escapes most regulations worldwide, has been shown in various toxicity assessment studies conducted on various animal models.In an effort to reduce the size of asbestos and therby its toxicity by limiting its biopersistence, oxalic acid treatment of asbestos coupled to power ultrasound treatment was carried out. The nanosized particles formed were still found to retain their hazardous effect. Similar were the results obtained on strong acid treatment of asbestos as well. A probable solution to the asbestos toxicity problem therefore envisaged was bioremediation. This involved the secretion of iron chelating molecules termed siderophores by microbes, which are of significance due to their ability to form very stable and soluble complexes with iron. Iron in asbestos composition is a major factor responsible for its carcinogenicity, removal or extraction of which would prove to be an effective answer to the worldwide problem

  16. Dissolution Kinetics of Hausmannite in the Presence of the Siderophore, DFO-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Duckworth, O. W.; Sposito, G.

    2004-12-01

    Siderophores are organic ligands with a very high affinity for Fe(III) that have been shown to dissolve iron-(III) bearing minerals, thus increasing the bioavailability of this nutrient. Recent work also has shown that siderophores are capable of forming stable Mn (III) complexes in aqueous environments and that they can promote the dissolution of Mn (III)-bearing minerals such as manganite (γ -MnOOH). The goal of this study was to investigate the dissolution kinetics of the mineral, hausmannite, in the presence of desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a common trihydroxamate siderophore, synthesized by fungi and bacteria, which may play a role in the reduction of soluble Mn (III) to Mn2^+. Hausmannite, a mixed-valence Mn (II, III) oxide mineral with the formula Mn3O4, is a proposed intermediate in the oxidation of Mn2^+ to thermodynamically stable MnO2. Hausmannite particles were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET specific surface area, and SEM imaging. The extent and rate of dissolution were measured as a function of pH and ligand concentration in batch reactors at 25 ± 3 ° C. Total Mn concentrations were measured by ICP-AES, while complexed-Mn (III) was measured using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. In the absence of the ligand, the greatest amount of total Mn in solution was observed at pH ≈ 5. There was a sharp decrease in the extent of dissolution at pH > 5, however, and no appreciable dissolution occurred at pH > 8. In the presence of DFO-B, ligand-promoted dissolution dominated at pH > 8, with more than 90 % of the ligand complexed within 1 hour after addition. Below pH ≈ 8, a complex combination of reductive, ligand-promoted, and proton-promoted dissolution was observed. Our study revealed that complex mechanisms are involved in the DFOB-promoted dissolution of hausmannite, with several dissolution pathways occurring simultaneously. The results presented herein may have implications for mineral weathering, the biogeochemical cycling of Fe and Mn

  17. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  18. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  19. RNA-seq Analysis Reveals That an ECF σ Factor, AcsS, Regulates Achromobactin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Jessica W.; Greenwald, Charles J.; Philmus, Benjamin J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a and many other microorganisms; therefore, B728a has evolved methods of iron acquirement including the use of iron-chelating siderophores. In this study an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, AcsS, encoded within the achromobactin gene cluster is shown to be a major regulator of genes involved in the biosynthesis and secretion of this siderophore. However, production of achromobactin was not completely abrogated in the deletion mutant, implying that other regulators may be involved such as PvdS, the sigma factor that regulates pyoverdine biosynthesis. RNA-seq analysis identified 287 genes that are differentially expressed between the AcsS deletion mutant and the wild type strain. These genes are involved in iron response, secretion, extracellular polysaccharide production, and cell motility. Thus, the transcriptome analysis supports a role for AcsS in the regulation of achromobactin production and the potential activity of both AcsS and achromobactin in the plant-associated lifestyle of strain B728a. PMID:22529937

  20. SAR and Structural Analysis of Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP3

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A main challenge in the development of new agents for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections is the identification of chemotypes that efficiently penetrate the cell envelope and are not susceptible to established resistance mechanisms. Siderophore-conjugated monocarbams are attractive because of their ability to hijack the bacteria’s iron uptake machinery for transport into the periplasm and their inherent stability to metallo-β-lactamases. Through development of the SAR we identified a number of modifications to the scaffold that afforded active anti-P. aeruginosa agents with good physicochemical properties. Through crystallographic efforts we gained a better understanding into how these compounds bind to the target penicillin binding protein PBP3 and factors to consider for future design. PMID:26005529

  1. Mitophagy confers resistance to siderophore-mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Natalia V.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In the arms race of bacterial pathogenesis, bacteria produce an array of toxins and virulence factors that disrupt core host processes. Hosts mitigate the ensuing damage by responding with immune countermeasures. The iron-binding siderophore pyoverdin is a key virulence mediator of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its pathogenic mechanism has not been established. Here we demonstrate that pyoverdin enters Caenorhabditis elegans and that it is sufficient to mediate host killing. Moreover, we show that iron chelation disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and triggers mitophagy both in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Finally, we show that mitophagy provides protection both against the extracellular pathogen P. aeruginosa and to treatment with a xenobiotic chelator, phenanthroline, in C. elegans. Although autophagic machinery has been shown to target intracellular bacteria for degradation (a process known as xenophagy), our report establishes a role for authentic mitochondrial autophagy in the innate immune defense against P. aeruginosa. PMID:25624506

  2. Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl)-enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production in an estuarine Alcaligenes faecalis strain.

    PubMed

    Khanolkar, Dnyanada; Dubey, S K; Naik, Milind Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTCl) has been used extensively as an antifouling agent in ship paints, which results in the contamination of aquatic sites. These contaminated sites serve as enrichment areas for TBTCl-resistant bacterial strains. One TBTCl-resistant bacterial strain was isolated from the sediments of Zuari estuary, Goa, India, which is a major hub of various ship-building activities. Based on biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, this bacterial strain was identified as Alcaligenes faecalis and designated as strain SD5. It could degrade ≥3 mM TBTCl by using it as a sole carbon source and transform it into the less toxic dibutyltin chloride, which was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Interestingly, this bacterial strain also showed enhanced exopolysaccharide and siderophore production when cells were exposed to toxic levels of TBTCl, suggesting their involvement in conferring resistance to this antifouling biocide as well as degradative capability respectively.

  3. Siderophore Promoted Dissolution of a Series of Mn-Substituted Goethites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrom, S. J.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of organic ligands, like siderophores, can strongly influence mineral dissolution. Recent research suggests that at least some siderophores enhance mineral dissolution by formation of surface complexes with Fe and Mn. The impact of biogeochemical weathering caused by exudates of plants, fungi and bacteria containing siderophores has been discussed. We have studied the dissolution kinetics of Mn-substituted goethites (mol % Mn < 11) in the presences of 80 μM desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a common and well-studied hydroxamate siderophore that has been identified in both terrestrial and marine environments and which forms very stable 1:1 complexes with Fe(III) or Mn(III). (The stability constants at I = 0.1 are 1030.6 and 1028.3, respectively.) A series of Mn-substituted goethites (α-MnxFe1-xOOH) were synthesized from ferrihydrite in the presence of Mn(II) in alkaline media. The Fe(III) in octahedral positions in the mineral structure was partially replaced by Mn, which was confirmed visually by the change to darker color when the content of Mn increased and proved by infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of the samples. Substitution of Fe in the goethite by Mn caused a change in the cell dimensions. The calculated unit cell edge lengths a and c decreased, while b increased, for the Mn-goethites compared to pure goethite. The difference of the unit cell parameters between the pure goethite and the Mn-substituted goethites increased with increased Mn content, providing further confirmation that Fe had been substituted by Mn incorporated into the goethite structure. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy analysis of the Mn-substituted goethites showed that the oxidation state of Mn in the samples was, as expected, Mn(III), even when Mn-goethites were prepared from Mn(II) solutions. Both SEM and TEM micrographs showed that the Mn-substituted goethite crystals had the same acicular shape as pure goethite. The specific surface area

  4. Synthesis, metal coordination, and cellular internalization of a siderophore-bearing NIR fluorescent carbocyanine probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yunpeng; Xu, Baogang; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel

    2006-02-01

    In order to explore novel NIR fluorescent probes for optical imaging in biomedicines, one desferrioxamine (DFO)-bearing NIR fluorescent probe was designed and synthesized based on a dicarboxylic acid-containing carbocyanine (Cypate). Similar to the free DFO, the resulting conjugate Cypate-DFO showed high binding affinity with Fe(III) and Ga(III) as identified by ES-MS. Nevertheless, the iron binding was found to quench its fluorescent emission significantly, suggesting that the siderophore moiety might perturb the spectroscopic properties of the attached carbocyanine fluorophore through metal binding. As observed by fluorescence microscopy, Cypate-DFO showed significant cellular internalization in A549 cells in vitro. Further studies on novel Cypate-DFO derivatives of this type may reveal some exciting properties and biological activities.

  5. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2012-02-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed {beta}-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs.

  6. Fusarinine C, a novel siderophore-based bifunctional chelator for radiolabeling with Gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chuangyan; Summer, Dominik; Rangger, Christine; Haas, Hubertus; Haubner, Roland; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2015-05-15

    Fusarinine C (FSC), a siderophore-based chelator coupled with the model peptide c(RGDfK) (FSC(succ-RGD)3), revealed excellent targeting properties in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we report the details of radiolabeling conditions and specific activity as well as selectivity for (68)Ga. (68)Ga labeling of FSC(succ-RGD)3 was optimized regarding peptide concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and buffer system. Specific activity (SA) of [(68)Ga]FSC(succ-RGD)3 was compared with (68)Ga-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, 1-glutaric acid-4,7 acetic acid RGD ([(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD). Stability was evaluated in 1000-fold ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution (pH 7) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Metal competition tests (Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, and Ni) were carried out using [(68)Ga]-triacetylfusarinine C. High radiochemical yield was achieved within 5 min at room temperature, in particular allowing labeling with (68)Ga up to pH 8 with excellent stability in 1000-fold EDTA solution and PBS. The 10-fold to 20-fold lower concentrations of FSC(succ-RGD)3 led to the same radiochemical yield compared with [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD with SA up to 1.8 TBq/µmol. Metal competition tests showed high selective binding of (68)Ga to FSC. FSC is a multivalent siderophore-based bifunctional chelator allowing fast and highly selective labeling with (68)Ga in a wide pH range and results in stable complexes with high SA. Thus it is exceptionally well suited for the development of new (68)Ga-tracers for in vivo molecular imaging with PET.

  7. Hydroxamate siderophore-promoted reactions between iron(II) and nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook; Duckworth, Owen W.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies show that ferrous iron (Fe II), which is often abundant in anaerobic soil and groundwater, is capable of abiotically reducing many subsurface contaminants. However, studies also demonstrate that Fe II redox reactivity in geochemical systems is heavily dependent upon metal speciation. This contribution examines the influence of hydroxamate ligands, including the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), on Fe II reactions with nitroaromatic groundwater contaminants (NACs). Experimental results demonstrate that ring-substituted NACs are reduced to the corresponding aniline products in aqueous solutions containing Fe II complexes with DFOB and two monohydroxamate ligands (acetohydroxamic acid and salicylhydroxamic acid). Reaction rates are heavily dependent upon solution conditions and the identities of both the Fe II-complexing hydroxamate ligand and the target NAC. Trends in the observed pseudo-first-order rate constants for reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene ( kobs, s -1) are quantitatively linked to the formation of Fe II species with standard one-electron reduction potentials, EH0 (Fe III/Fe II), below -0.3 V. Linear free energy relationships correlate reaction rates with the EH0 (Fe III/Fe II) values of different electron-donating Fe II complexes and with the apparent one-electron reduction potentials of different electron-accepting NACs, EH1'(ArNO 2). Experiments describing a redox auto-decomposition mechanism for Fe II-DFOB complexes that occurs at neutral pH and has implications for the stability of hydroxamate siderophores in anaerobic environments are also presented. Results from this study indicate that hydroxamates and other Fe III-stabilizing organic ligands can form highly redox-active Fe II complexes that may contribute to the natural attenuation and remediation of subsurface contaminants.

  8. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  9. Parallels in lignin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jing-Ke; Banks, Jo Ann

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of vascular plants is the development of a complex water-conducting system, which is physically reinforced by the heterogeneous aromatic polymer lignin. Syringyl lignin, a major building block of lignin, is often thought to be uniquely characteristic of angiosperms; however, it was demonstrated over fifty years ago that that syringyl lignin is found in another group of plants, known as the lycophytes, the ancestors of which diverged from all the other vascular plant lineages 400 million years ago.1 To determine the biochemical basis for this common biosynthetic ability, we isolated and characterized cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases (P450s) from the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii and compared them to the enzyme that is required for syringyl lignin synthesis in angiosperms. Our results showed that one of these P450s encodes an enzyme that is functionally analogous to but phylogenetically independent from its angiosperm counterpart. Here, we discuss the evolution of lignin biosynthesis in vascular plants and the role of Selaginella moellendorffii in plant comparative biology and genomics. PMID:19704782

  10. Fur regulation of the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and iron-acquisition systems in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Wu, Chien-Chen; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Chi, Chia; Lin, Jing-Ciao; Chen, Yeh; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2011-02-01

    The ferric uptake regulator Fur has been reported to repress the expression of rmpA, a regulatory gene for the mucoid phenotype, leading to decreased capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. Here, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Fur also repressed the expression of the CPS regulatory genes rmpA2 and rcsA. Interestingly, deletion of rmpA or rcsA but not rmpA2 from the Δfur strain was able to suppress the deletion effect of Fur. The availability of extracellular iron affected the amount of CPS, suggesting that Fur regulates CPS biosynthesis in an Fe(II)-dependent manner. Increased production of siderophores was observed in the Δfur strain, suggesting that uptake of extracellular iron in K. pneumoniae is regulated by Fur. Fur titration assays and qRT-PCR analyses demonstrated that at least six of the eight putative iron-acquisition systems, identified by a blast search in the contig database of K. pneumoniae CG43, were directly repressed by Fur. We conclude that Fur has a dual role in the regulation of CPS biosynthesis and iron acquisition in K. pneumoniae.

  11. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  12. Characterization of Fe(III) sequestration by an analog of the cytotoxic siderophore brasilibactin A: implications for the iron transport mechanism in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Harrington, James M; Park, Heekwang; Ying, Yongcheng; Hong, Jiyong; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacteria such as M. tuberculosis represent a significant health concern throughout much of the developing world. In mycobacteria and other pathogenic bacteria, an important virulence factor is the ability of the bacterium to obtain iron from its host. One means of obtaining iron is through the use of siderophores. Brasilibactin A is a membrane bound siderophore produced by Nocardia brasiliensis with structural similarity to the mycobactin class of siderophore in mycobacteria. A characterization of the protonation constants and Fe(III) affinity of a water soluble Brasilibactin A analog (Bbtan) has been performed. Using protonation constants and competition with EDTA, the stability constant of the 1 : 1 Fe(III)-Bbtan complex was found to be log β(110) = 26.96. The pFe of Bbtan is 22.73, somewhat low for a proposed siderophore molecule. The redox potential of the Fe-Bbtan complex was found to be -300 mV vs. NHE, very high for an iron-siderophore complex. The combination of relatively low complex stability and ease of iron reduction may play a crucial role in the mechanism of mycobactin siderophore-mediated iron uptake in mycobacteria and related organisms.

  13. A new fluorimetric method for the detection and quantification of siderophores using Calcein Blue, with potential as a bacterial detection tool.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Ranjini; Alagumaruthanayagam, Alagiachidambaram; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2015-03-01

    The presence of microorganisms in biological fluids like urine and blood is an indication of vulnerability to infections. Iron is one of the important micronutrients required for bacterial growth. In an iron-deficit environment, bacteria release high-affinity iron-chelating compounds called siderophores which can be used as non-invasive target molecules for the detection of such pathogens. However, only limited reagents and procedures are available to detect the presence of these organic molecules. The present study aims at detecting the presence of siderophores in the iron-depleted media, exploiting the reversible quenching of Calcein Blue and iron(III) complex. The fluorescence of Calcein Blue is known to be quenched in the presence of iron(III); if a stronger chelator removes this ion from the fluorophore, the fluorescence of the fluorophore is regained. This behaviour of the fluorophore was exploited to detect and quantify siderophores down to 50 and 800 nM equivalent of standard siderophore, deferroxamine mesylate (desferal) in Dulbecco's PBS and siderophore quantification (SPQ) medium, respectively. The siderophores released by pathogens, equivalent to standard desferal, were in the range of 1.29 to 5.00 μM and those for non-pathogens were below 1.19 μM. The simple, sensitive and cost-effective method performed in a 96-well plate was able to detect and quantify iron chelators within 7-8 h of incubation.

  14. Growth promoting influence of siderophore-producing Pseudomonas strains GRP3A and PRS9 in maize (Zea mays L.) under iron limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Johri, B N

    2003-01-01

    Maize seeds were bacterized with siderophore-producing pseudomonads with the goal to develop a system suitable for better iron uptake under iron-stressed conditions. Siderophore production was compared in fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. GRP3A, PRS9 and P. chlororaphis ATCC 9446 in standard succinate (SSM) and citrate (SCM) media. Succinate was better suited for siderophore production, however, deferration of media resulted in increased siderophore production in all the strains. Maximum siderophore level (216.23 microg/ml) was observed in strain PRS9 in deferrated SSM after 72 h of incubation. Strains GRP3A and PRS9 were used for plant growth promotion experiments. Strains GRP3A and PRS9 were also antagonistic against the phytopathogens, Colletotrichum dematium, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Bacterization of maize seeds with strains GRP3A and PRS9 showed significant increase in germination percentage and plant growth. Maximum shoot and root length and dry weight were observed with 10 microM Fe3+ along with bacterial inoculants suggesting application of siderophore producing plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains in crop productivity in calcareous soil system.

  15. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  16. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  17. Synthesis and structural characterization of hexacoordinate silicon, germanium, and titanium complexes of the E. coli siderophore enterobactin.

    PubMed

    Baramov, Todor; Keijzer, Karlijn; Irran, Elisabeth; Mösker, Eva; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Süssmuth, Roderich

    2013-08-05

    The E. coli siderophore enterobactin, one of the strongest Fe(III) chelators known to date, is also capable of binding Si(IV) under physiological conditions. We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of the tris(catecholate) Si(IV) -enterobactin complex and its Ge(IV) and Ti(IV) analogues. Comparative structural analysis, supported by quantum-chemical calculations, reveals the correlation between the ionic radius and the structural changes in enterobactin upon complexation.

  18. Siderophore production and the evolution of investment in a public good: An adaptive dynamics approach to kin selection.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; van Baalen, Minus; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2016-01-07

    Like many other bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequesters iron from the environment through the secretion, and subsequent uptake, of iron-binding molecules. As these molecules can be taken up by other bacteria in the population than those who secreted them, this is a form of cooperation through a public good. Traditionally, this problem has been studied by comparing the relative fitnesses of siderophore-producing and non-producing strains, but this gives no information about the fate of strains that do produce intermediate amounts of siderophores. Here, we investigate theoretically how the amount invested in this form of cooperation evolves. We use a mechanistic description of the laboratory protocols used in experimental evolution studies to describe the competition and cooperation of the bacteria. From this dynamical model we derive the fitness following the adaptive dynamics method. The results show how selection is driven by local siderophore production and local competition. Because siderophore production reduces the growth rate, local competition decreases with the degree of relatedness (which is a dynamical variable in our model). Our model is not restricted to the analysis of small phenotypic differences and allows for theoretical exploration of the effects of large phenotypic differences between cooperators and cheats. We predict that an intermediate ESS level of cooperation (molecule production) should exist. The adaptive dynamics approach allows us to assess evolutionary stability, which is often not possible in other kin-selection models. We found that selection can lead to an intermediate strategy which in our model is always evolutionarily stable, yet can allow invasion of strategies that are much more cooperative. Our model describes the evolution of a public good in the context of the ecology of the microorganism, which allows us to relate the extent of production of the public good to the details of the interactions.

  19. [Application potential of siderophore-producing rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Li; Lin, Qing-Qi; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Siderophore-producing rhizobacteria (SPR) are a group of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, being able to play an important role in assisting the phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils. Based on the comprehensive analysis of related researches at home and abroad, this paper elaborated the functions of SPR in alleviating the heavy metals stress and toxicity to plants and the mechanisms of SPR in improving the heavy metals bioavailability in soil, and indicated that SPR had good application potential in promoting the plant growth in heavy metals-contaminated soils and reinforcing the heavy metals accumulation in plants. The contradictory phenomena of SPR in increasing or decreasing heavy metals accumulation in plants, which existed in current researches, were also analyzed. Aiming at the deficiencies in current researches, it was suggested that in the future researches, the mechanisms of the interactions between SPR and plants, especially hyperaccumulators, should be further studied, the key factors affecting the heavy metals complexation and mobilization in soil by siderophores should also be further clarified, the effects of siderophores on the heavy metals bioavailability and its subsequent influence on the heavy metals uptake by plants should be comprehensively considered, and the measures for improving the colonization of SPR in heavy metals-contaminated soil should be explored.

  20. Terbium, a fluorescent probe for investigation of siderophore pyochelin interactions with its outer membrane transporter FptA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Binsheng; Hoegy, Françoise; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Mesini, Philippe J; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2011-10-01

    Pyochelin (Pch) is a siderophore and FptA is its outer membrane transporter produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to import iron. The fluorescence of the element terbium is affected by coordinated ligands and it can therefore be used as a probe to investigate the pyochelin-iron uptake pathway in P. aeruginosa. At pH 8.0, terbium fluorescence is greatly enhanced in the presence of pyochelin indicating chelation of the metal by the siderophore. Titration curves showed a 2:1 (Pch:Tb(3+)) stoichiometry and an affinity of K=(2±-1)×10(11)M(-2) was determined. Pch-Tb interaction with the transporter FptA could be followed in vitro and in vivo in P. aeruginosa cells, by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between three partners: the tryptophans of FptA (donor), Pch (acceptor for the Trps and donor for Tb(3+)) and Tb(3+) (acceptor). Pch-Tb binds to the Pch-Fe outer membrane transporter FptA with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 4.6μM. This three-partner FRET is a potentially valuable tool for investigation of the interactions between FptA and its siderophore Pch.

  1. Inter-relationships of MnO 2 precipitation, siderophore-Mn (III) complex formation, siderophore degradation, and iron limitation in Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Morita, Takami; Mozafarzadeh, Mylene L.; Verity, Rebecca; McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2007-12-01

    To examine the pathways that form Mn (III) and Mn (IV) in the Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and MnB1, and to test whether the siderophore pyoverdine (PVD) inhibits Mn (IV)O 2 formation, cultures were subjected to various protocols at known concentrations of iron and PVD. Depending on growth conditions, P. putida produced one of two oxidized Mn species - either soluble PVD-Mn (III) complex or insoluble Mn (IV)O 2 minerals - but not both simultaneously. PVD-Mn (III) was present, and MnO 2 precipitation was inhibited, both in iron-limited cultures that had synthesized 26-50 μM PVD and in iron-replete (non-PVD-producing) cultures that were supplemented with 10-550 μM purified PVD. PVD-Mn (III) arose by predominantly ligand-mediated air oxidation of Mn (II) in the presence of PVD, based on the following evidence: (a) yields and rates of this reaction were similar in sterile media and in cultures, and (b) GB-1 mutants deficient in enzymatic Mn oxidation produced PVD-Mn (III) as efficiently as wild type. Only wild type, however, could degrade PVD-Mn (III), a process linked to the production of both MnO 2 and an altered PVD with absorbance and fluorescence spectra markedly different from those of either PVD or PVD-Mn (III). Two conditions, the presence of bioavailable iron and the absence of PVD at concentrations exceeding those of Mn, both had to be satisfied for MnO 2 to appear. These results suggest that P. putida cultures produce soluble Mn (III) or MnO 2 by different and mutually inhibitory pathways: enzymatic catalysis yielding MnO 2 under iron sufficiency or PVD-promoted oxidation yielding PVD-Mn (III) under iron limitation. Since PVD-producing Pseudomonas species are environmentally prevalent Mn oxidizers, these data predict influences of iron (via PVD-Mn (III) versus MnO 2) on the global oxidation/reduction cycling of various pollutants, recalcitrant organic matter, and elements such as C, S, N, Cr, U, and Mn.

  2. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  3. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; Enders, Tara A; Strader, Lucia C

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development.

  4. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development. PMID:23580748

  5. Iron-Binding Compounds from Agrobacterium spp.: Biological Control Strain Agrobacterium rhizogenes K84 Produces a Hydroxamate Siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Penyalver, Ramón; Oger, Philippe; López, María M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron-binding compounds were produced in various amounts in response to iron starvation by a collection of Agrobacterium strains belonging to the species A. tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, and A. vitis. The crown gall biocontrol agent A. rhizogenes strain K84 produced a hydroxamate iron chelator in large amounts. Production of this compound, and also of a previously described antibiotic-like substance called ALS84, occurred only in cultures of strain K84 grown in iron-deficient medium. Similarly, sensitivity to ALS84 was expressed only when susceptible cells were tested in low-iron media. Five independent Tn5-induced mutants of strain K84 affected in the production of the hydroxamate iron chelator showed a similar reduction in the production of ALS84. One of these mutants, M8-10, was completely deficient in the production of both agents and grew poorly compared to the wild type under iron-limiting conditions. Thus, the hydroxamate compound has siderophore activity. A 9.1-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 insertion from this mutant was cloned and marker exchanged into wild-type strain K84. The homogenote lost the ability to produce the hydroxamate siderophore and also ALS84. A cosmid clone was isolated from a genomic library of strain K84 that restored to strain M8-10 the ability to produce of the siderophore and ALS84, as well as growth in iron-deficient medium. This cosmid clone contained the region in which Tn5 was located in the mutant. Sequence analysis showed that the Tn5 insert in this mutant was located in an open reading frame coding for a protein that has similarity to those of the gramicidin S synthetase repeat superfamily. Some such proteins are required for synthesis of hydroxamate siderophores by other bacteria. Southern analysis revealed that the biosynthetic gene from strain K84 is present only in isolates of A. rhizogenes that produce hydroxamate-type compounds under low-iron conditions. Based on physiological and genetic analyses showing

  6. Nanospecific Inhibition of Pyoverdine Siderophore Production in Pseudomonas Chlororaphis O6 by CuO Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Johnson, William P.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lea, Alan S.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-03-01

    As traditional antibiotics become less effective against a growing number of pathogens, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming more widely applied as biocides. NPs of Ag, ZnO, and CuO exhibit dose-dependent antimicrobial activity; however, information is scant on the impact of sublethal levels of NPs on bacteria. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a sublethal concentration (200 mg/L) of commercial CuO NPs on the expression of genes involved in the production of the fluorescent siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD) in the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. PVDs are important in microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions, and are a virulence factor in pathogenic pseudomonads. Cells challenged with the NPs had reduced amounts of PVD in their periplasm and the external medium. The NPs impaired the expression of genes involved in transport of the PVD precursor through the plasmamembrane, PVD maturation in the periplasm, and export through the outer membrane. Also, expression from one of three predicted Fe-PVD receptors was reduced by the NPs. As these effects were not observed for cells challenged with copper ions, this is a nanoparticlespecific phenomenon mediating cellular reprogramming in bacteria, affecting secondary metabolism and thus associated critical microbial processes. The regulation of bacterial genes and secondary metabolites by sublethal doses of a common metal oxide NP has strong environmental and medical implications.

  7. Iron(III) complexation by Vanchrobactin, a siderophore of the bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Emilia; Brandariz, Isabel; Jiménez, Carlos; Soengas, Raquel G

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum serotype O2 strain RV22 produces the mono catecholate siderophore Vanchrobactin (Vb) under conditions of iron deficiency. Vb contains two potential bidentate coordination sites: catecholate and salicylate groups. The iron(III) coordination properties of Vb is investigated in aqueous solutions using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The stepwise equilibrium constants (log K) for successive addition of Vb dianion to a ferric ion are 19.9; 13.3, and 9.5, respectively, for an overall association constant of 42.7. Based on the previous results, we estimated the equilibrium concentration of free iron(III) under physiological conditions for pH 7.4 solution containing 10(-6) M total iron and 10(-5) M total Vb as pFe = 20 (=-log[Fe(3+)]). The Vb model compounds catechol (Cat) and 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)benzamide (Dhb) have also been examined, and the obtained results show that the interaction of the whole system of Vb that contains the ferric-chelating groups of both Dhb and Cat, is synergically greater than the separate parts; i.e. Vb is the best chelating agent either in acid or basic media. In summary, bacteria employing Vb-mediated iron transport thus are able to compete effectively for iron with other microorganisms within which they live.

  8. Acceleration of Fe-silicate mineral dissolution for CO2 sequestration via microbial siderophore production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; Nealson, K. H.; West, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the dissolution of silicate minerals will ultimately neutralize anthropogenic CO2 emissions, the slow natural timescale of this process limits its ability to mitigate any of the societal impacts of high atmospheric pCO2. As a result, much research has been focused on developing ways to significantly accelerate silicate mineral dissolution rates. Harnessing the effects of microbial activity is one particularly attractive strategy because research has shown that microbes can appreciably accelerate mineral dissolution rates and they require little external energy input. At present, one major hurdle in the development of microbe-based CO2 sequestration techniques is the observation that bacteria only accelerate dissolution rates under particular culturing conditions. In this work, natural and genetic mutant strains of the bacterial genera Shewanella, Pseudomonas, and Marinobacter are used to identify the geochemical and genetic factors that underlie the 'accelerated-weathering phenotype' in order to support the development of microbe-based CO2 sequestration techniques using olivine as a model mineral. Preliminary results suggest that microbial siderophore production at circum-neutral pH results in significantly accelerated olivine dissolution rates.

  9. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  10. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  11. Stability of the Cadmium Complex with the Bacterial Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, E. A.; Schijf, J.

    2010-12-01

    The divalent transition metal cadmium occurs in seawater at ultra-trace levels. In the open ocean, dissolved Cd(II) displays a nutrient-like profile characterized by a strong gradient from low picomolar concentrations in surface waters to a mid-depth maximum of around 1 nM. Its vertical distribution is highly correlated with that of dissolved phosphate, seemingly at odds with the general perception that Cd is a very toxic element. On the other hand, in Zn-depleted waters Cd(II) has been found to replace Zn(II) or Co(II) in a functional, albeit less efficient form of carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme enabling the assimilation of bicarbonate into organic matter. Considering these opposing roles, it is likely that phytoplankton regulates the toxicity and/or bioavailability of Cd(II) through the production of certain strong organic ligands, as it has been shown to do for example in the case of Cu(II). Siderophores are a fascinating class of organic ligands excreted by microorganisms to facilitate the acquisition of micronutrient Fe(III), preciously scarce due to its extremely low solubility in seawater. The linear trihydroxamic acid desferrioxamine B (DFOB) is naturally present in open ocean surface waters at picomolar concentrations and, because of its use as a pharmaceutical agent in the treatment of human iron overload disorders, the only purified siderophore commercially available in practicable quantities. The optimal spacing of three bidentate O-bearing functional groups along a flexible carbon frame allows the molecule to wrap around the Fe3+ ion in a polydentate heterocyclic structure that perfectly matches its ionic radius and preferred coordination. Despite its resultant exceptional affinity and selectivity for Fe3+ (β ~ 1031), DFOB also forms very stable complexes with an array of differently sized and charged cations. The only previous report on the stability constant of the Cd(II)-DFOB complex, dating from 1963, proposes a values of 108 at 0.1 M ionic

  12. A spectroscopic study of the effects of a microbial siderophore on Pb adsorption to kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2010-11-12

    Batch adsorption experiments were combined with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) analysis to determine the mechanism(s) whereby the microbial trihydroxamate siderophore ligand desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) affects Pb sorption to kaolinite at pH 4, 6, and 7.5 (in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, 22 C; Pb:DFO-B ratio 120:240 {micro}M). In the absence of DFO-B, Pb adsorbs only slightly to kaolinite at pH 4, by a combination of inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Adsorption increases at pH 6, and sorption (adsorption/surface precipitation) further increases at pH 7.5. At pH 4, DFO-B does not bind Pb in solution appreciably, and the Pb adsorption mechanism(s) is unchanged by the presence of DFO-B. At pH 6, DFO-B slightly enhances Pb adsorption, due at least in part to formation of a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. At pH 7.5, DFO-B decreases Pb sorption and Pb adsorption is dominated by a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. Although XAS and thermodynamic speciation modeling indicate that Pb is bound by multiple DFO-B functional groups in solution at pH 7.5, the DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite surface complex appears to involve only a single hydroxamate group. This study thus demonstrates that the detailed structure of a ternary surface complex cannot necessarily be predicted from the structure of the solution organic-metal complex.

  13. Ti(IV) and the Siderophore Desferrioxamine B: A Tight Complex Has Biological and Environmental Implications.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kayleigh E; Batchler, Kathleen L; Zalouk, Célia; Valentine, Ann M

    2017-02-06

    The siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) binds Ti(IV) tightly and precludes its hydrolytic precipitation under biologically and environmentally relevant conditions. This interaction of DFOB with Ti(IV) is investigated by using spectro-potentiometric and spectro-photometric titrations, mass spectrometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and computational modeling. The data from pH 2-10 suggest two one-proton equilibria among three species, with one species predominating below pH 3.5, a second from pH 3.5 to 8, and a third above pH 8. The latter species is prone to slow hydrolytic precipitation. Electrospray mass spectrometry allowed the detection of [Ti(IV) (HDFOB)](2+) and [Ti(DFOB)](+); these species were assigned as the pH < 3.5 and the 3.5 < pH < 8 species, respectively. The stability constant for Ti(IV)-DFOB was determined by using UV/vis-monitored competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Taking into consideration the available binding constant of Ti(IV) and EDTA, the data reveal values of log β111 = 41.7, log β110 = 38.1, and log β11-1 = 30.1. The former value was supported by ITC, with the transfer of Ti(IV) from EDTA to DFOB determined to be both enthalpically and entropically favorable. Computational methods yielded a model of Ti-DFOB. The physiological and environmental implications of this tight interaction and the potential role of DFOB in solubilizing Ti(IV) are discussed.

  14. Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov., a siderophore-producing bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Wen-Ming; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated CC-OPY-1(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated site in Taiwan. CC-OPY-1(T) produces siderophores, and can grow at temperatures of 25-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0 and tolerate <5 % (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of CC-OPY-1(T) showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (96.9 %) and lower sequence similarity to remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on gyrB and rpoB gene sequences supported the classification of CC-OPY-1(T) as a novel member of the genus Pseudomonas. The predominant quinone system of strain CC-OPY-1T was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 68.4 ± 0.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and two unknown phospholipids (PL1-2). Due to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, CC-OPY-1(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-OPY-1(T) ( = BCRC 80399(T) = JCM 18195(T)).

  15. Negative cerium anomalies in manganese (hydr)oxide precipitates due to cerium oxidation in the presence of dissolved siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Tepe, Nathalie; Pourret, Olivier; Bau, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results on the sorption behavior of rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) on precipitating manganese (hydr)oxide in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). In marked contrast to inorganic systems, where preferential adsorption of HREY and depletion of LREY is commonly observed in manganese (hydr)oxide precipitates, sorption of REY in presence of the DFOB siderophore leads to HREY-depleted and LREY-enriched patterns in the precipitates. Moreover, our data indicate that surface oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) during sorption onto manganese (hydr)oxides and the resulting development of a positive Ce anomaly, which are commonly observed in inorganic experiments, are prevented in the presence of DFOB. Instead, Ce(III) is oxidized to Ce(IV) but associated with the dissolved desferrioxamine B which forms complexes with Ce(IV), that are at least twenty orders of magnitude more stable than those with Ce(III) and REY(III). The overall result is the formation of a positive Ce anomaly in the solution and a negative Ce anomaly in the Mn (hydr)oxides. The distribution of the strictly trivalent REY and Eu(III) between the manganese (hydr)oxide phase and the remaining ambient solution mimics the distribution of published stability constants for complexes of REY(III) with DFOB, i.e. the heavy REY form more stable complexes with the ligand and hence are better shielded from sorption than the LREY. Surface complexation modeling corroborates our experimental results. Negative Ce anomalies in Mn precipitates have been described from biogenic Mn oxides. Our results provide experimental evidence for the development of negative Ce anomalies in abiogenic Mn (hydr)oxide precipitates and show that the presence of the widespread siderophore desferrioxamine B during mineral precipitation results in HREY-depleted Mn (hydr)oxides with negative Ce anomalies.

  16. Structural Reassignment and Absolute Stereochemistry of Madurastatin C1 (MBJ-0034) and the Related Aziridine Siderophores: Madurastatins A1, B1, and MBJ-0035.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Andrew R; Mosaei, Hamed; Morton, Stephanie; Waddell, Paul G; Wills, Corinne; McFarlane, William; Gray, Joe; Goodfellow, Michael; Errington, Jeff; Allenby, Nick; Zenkin, Nikolay; Hall, Michael J

    2017-04-11

    The madurastatins are pentapeptide siderophores originally described as containing an unusual salicylate-capped N-terminal aziridine ring. Isolation of madurastatin C1 (1) (also designated MBJ-0034), from Actinomadura sp. DEM31376 (itself isolated from a deep sea sediment), prompted structural reevaluation of the madurastatin siderophores, in line with the recent work of Thorson and Shaaban. NMR spectroscopy in combination with partial synthesis allowed confirmation of the structure of madurastatin C1 (1) as containing an N-terminal 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)oxazoline in place of the originally postulated aziridine, while absolute stereochemistry was determined via Harada's advanced Marfey's method. Therefore, this work further supports Thorson and Shaaban's proposed structural revision of the madurastatin class of siderophores (madurastatins A1 (2), B1 (3), C1 (1), and MBJ-0036 (4)) as N-terminal 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)oxazolines.

  17. Targeted Antibiotic Delivery: Selective Siderophore Conjugation with Daptomycin Confers Potent Activity Against Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Manuka; Miller, Patricia A; Möllmann, Ute; Claypool, William D; Schroeder, Valerie A; Wolter, William R; Suckow, Mark; Yu, Honglin; Li, Shuang; Huang, Weiqiang; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Miller, Marvin J

    2017-03-13

    In order to address the dire need for new antibiotics to treat specific strains of drug resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, a mixed ligand analog of the natural Acinetobacter baumannii selective siderophore, fimsbactin, was coupled to daptomycin, a Gram-positive only antibiotic. The resulting conjugate, 11, has potent activity against multi-drug resistant strains of A. baumannii, both in vitro and in vivo. The study also indicates that conjugation of siderophores to "drugs" that are much larger than the siderophore (iron transport agent) itself facilitates active uptake that circumvents the normal permeability problems in Gram-negative bacteria. The results demonstrate the ability to extend activity of a normally Gram-positive only antibiotic to create a potent and targeted Gram-negative antibiotic using a bacterial iron transport based sideromycin Trojan Horse strategy.

  18. Biocontrol Potential of Siderophore Producing Heavy Metal Resistant Alcaligenes sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RZS3 vis-à-vis Organophosphorus Fungicide.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Patel, P R

    2011-07-01

    In present study in vitro phytopathogen suppression activity of siderophoregenic preparations of Ni and Mn resistant Alcaligenes sp. STC1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RZS3 SH-94B isolated from soil were found superior over the chemical pesticide. Siderophore rich culture broth and siderophore rich supernatant exerted antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger NCIM 1025, Aspergillus flavus NCIM 650, Fusarium oxysporum NCIM 1281, Alternaria alternata ARI 715, Cercospora arachichola, Metarhizium anisopliae NCIM 1311 and Pseudomonas solanacerum NCIM 5103. Siderophore rich broth and supernatant exhibited potent antifungal activity vis-à-vis oraganophosphorus chemical fungicide; kitazine. The minimum fungicidal concentration required was 25 μl for Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Fusarium oxysporum, Cercospora arachichola, Metarhizium anisopliae, Pseudomonas solanacerum and 75 μl for A. alternata.

  19. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  20. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E.; Patey, Sara A.; Crandon, Jared L.; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A.; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Blinn, Christina M.; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S.; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S.; Rooney, Michael T.; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E.; Eakin, Ann E.; Nicolau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R2 = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26438502

  1. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aryun; Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E; Patey, Sara A; Crandon, Jared L; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A; McLaughlin, Robert E; Blinn, Christina M; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S; Rooney, Michael T; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E; Eakin, Ann E; Nicolau, David P

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R(2) = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa.

  2. Biosynthesis of Bacterial Cell Walls.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    amino acid accumulation level in Lactobacillus plantarum and Streptococcus faecalis despite a normal initial transport rate. In the course of these...biosynthesis of a dipeptide, D-alanylcysteine; A demonstration that a pantothenic acid deficiency renders L. plantarum unusually sensitive to lysozyme digestion...A quantitative description of the lipid constituents of S. faecalis and L. plantarum ; An investigation of the biochemical basis of a marked lytic

  3. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis and release.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Denise P; Dupuy, Corinne

    2017-01-31

    Thyroid hormones (TH) 3,5,3',5'- tetraiodothyronine or thyroxine (T4) and 3,5,3'- triiodothyronine (T3) contain iodine atoms as part of their structure, and their synthesis occur in the unique structures called thyroid follicles. Iodide reaches thyroid cells through the bloodstream that supplies the basolateral plasma membrane of thyrocytes, where it is avidly taken up through the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS). Thyrocytes are also specialized in the secretion of the high molecular weight protein thyroglobulin (TG) in the follicular lumen. The iodination of the tyrosyl residues of TG preceeds TH biosynthesis, which depends on the interaction of iodide, TG, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) at the apical plasma membrane of thyrocytes. Thyroid hormone biosynthesis is under the tonic control of thyrotropin (TSH), while the iodide recycling ability is very important for normal thyroid function. We discuss herein the biochemical aspects of TH biosynthesis and release, highlighting the novel molecules involved in the process.

  4. A Transmissible Plasmid-Borne Pathogenicity Island Confers Piscibactin Biosynthesis in the Fish Pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Fuentes-Monteverde, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Jaime; Jiménez, Carlos; Lemos, Manuel L.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    The fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida produces the siderophore piscibactin. A gene cluster that resembles the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI) encodes piscibactin biosynthesis. Here, we report that this HPI-like cluster is part of a hitherto-uncharacterized 68-kb plasmid dubbed pPHDP70. This plasmid lacks homologs of genes that mediate conjugation, but we found that it could be transferred at low frequencies from P. damselae subsp. piscicida to a mollusk pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain and to other Gram-negative bacteria, likely dependent on the conjugative functions of the coresident plasmid pPHDP60. Following its conjugative transfer, pPHDP70 restored the capacity of a vibrioferrin mutant of V. alginolyticus to grow under low-iron conditions, and piscibactin became detectable in its supernatant. Thus, pPHDP70 appears to harbor all the genes required for piscibactin biosynthesis and transport. P. damselae subsp. piscicida strains cured of pPHDP70 no longer produced piscibactin, had impaired growth under iron-limited conditions, and exhibited markedly decreased virulence in fish. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of pPHDP70, with its capacity for piscibactin-mediated iron acquisition, in the virulence of P. damselae subsp. piscicida. Horizontal transmission of this plasmid-borne piscibactin synthesis gene cluster in the marine environment may facilitate the emergence of new pathogens. PMID:26092457

  5. Genomics of iron acquisition in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora: insights in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore desferrioxamine E.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-10-01

    Genomics has clarified the biosynthetic pathway for desferrioxamine E critical for iron acquisition in the enterobacterial fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Evidence for each of the individual steps and the role of desferrioxamine E biosynthesis in pathogen virulence and cell protection from host defenses is presented. Using comparative genomics, it can be concluded that desferrioxamine biosynthesis is ancestral within the genera Erwinia and Pantoea.

  6. Enhanced phytoextraction of an agricultural Cr- and Pb-contaminated soil by bioaugmentation with siderophore-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Bazot, Stéphane; Lebeau, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction may enhance the phytoextraction efficiency thanks to larger metal mobilization by microbial metabolites. Green fluorescent protein-tagged cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens or Ralstonia metallidurans, able to produce siderophores, were inoculated in an agricultural soil containing Cr (488 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (382 mg kg(-1)) and maize was cultivated. Bacteria were inoculated as free or immobilized cells in Ca-alginate beads, with skim milk in the aim at improving both the bacterial survival and the in situ siderophore production. Skim milk addition increased inoculated Pseudomonads concentration in soil. Soil inoculation with free cells of R. metallidurans supplied with skim milk increased Cr accumulation in maize shoots by a factor of 5.2 and inoculation with immobilized P. aeruginosa cells supplied with skim milk increased Cr and Pb uptake by maize shoots by a factor of 5.4 and 3.8, respectively. However total metal taken up by the whole plant decreases almost always with bioaugmentation. Translocation factor also increased with P. aeruginosa or R. metallidurans by a factor of 6 up to 7. Inoculated bacteria concentration in soil was correlated with metals in the exchangeable fraction. Cr and Pb concentrations in the exchangeable fraction were correlated with metal contents in shoots or roots. Our results suggest that bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction is a relevant method in the aim at increasing the phytoextraction rate which usually limits the use of phytoremediation technologies.

  7. Colloidal Cutin-like Siderophoric Molecules Mobilize Plutonium from Contaminated Soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), USA

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Santschi, P; Roberts, K; Zhong, J; Hatcher, P; Hung, C; Francis, A; Dodge, C; Honeyman, B

    2008-01-01

    Relatively recently, inorganic colloids have been invoked to reconcile the apparent contradictions between expectations based on classical dissolved-phase Pu transport and field observations of 'enhanced' Pu mobility (Kersting et al. Nature 1999, 397, 56-59). A new paradigm for Pu transport is mobilization and transport via biologically produced ligands. This study for the first time reports a new finding of Pu being transported, at sub-pM concentrations, by a cutin-like natural substance containing siderophore-like moieties and virtually all mobile Pu. Most likely, Pu is complexed by chelating groups derived from siderophores that are covalently bound to a backbone of cutin-derived soil degradation products, thus revealing the history of initial exposure to Pu. Features such as amphiphilicity and small size make this macromolecule an ideal collector for actinides and other metals and a vector for their dispersal. Cross-linking to the hydrophobic domains (e.g., by polysaccharides) gives this macromolecule high mobility and a means of enhancing Pu transport. This finding provides a new mechanism for Pu transport through environmental systems that would not have been predicted by Pu transport models.

  8. Colloidal cutin-like substances cross-linked to siderophore decomposition products mobilizing plutonium from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Santschi, P H; Zhong, J Y; Hatcher, P G; Francis, A J; Dodge, C J; Roberts, K A; Hung, C C; Honeyman, B D

    2008-11-15

    Relatively recently, inorganic colloids have been invoked to reconcile the apparent contradictions between expectations based on classical dissolved-phase Pu transport and field observations of "enhanced" Pu mobility (Kersting et al. Nature 1999, 397, 56-59). A new paradigm for Pu transport is mobilization and transport via biologically produced ligands. This study for the first time reports a new finding of Pu being transported, at sub-pM concentrations, by a cutin-like natural substance containing siderophore-like moieties and virtually all mobile Pu. Most likely, Pu is complexed by chelating groups derived from siderophores that are covalently bound to a backbone of cutin-derived soil degradation products, thus revealing the history of initial exposure to Pu. Features such as amphiphilicity and small size make this macromolecule an ideal collector for actinides and other metals and a vector for their dispersal. Cross-linking to the hydrophobic domains (e.g., by polysaccharides) gives this macromolecule high mobility and a means of enhancing Pu transport. This finding provides a new mechanism for Pu transport through environmental systems that would not have been predicted by Pu transport models.

  9. Microbial mobilization of cesium from illite: Role of organic acids and siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazotte, Alice; Peron, Olivier; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lebeau, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the behavior of cesium (Cs) in soils and geological formations is interesting in the context of nuclear accidents and nuclear waste disposals. Indeed, this radionuclide with a 30-years half-life can contaminate crops and more generally the food chain. Cs with properties similar to potassium is known to be strongly accumulated in the clays of upper soil horizons. While excavation of contaminated soil cannot be feasible for the whole contaminated surfaces (huge volumes to be cleaned-up), in situ methods could provide a sustainable and low cost solution. Phytoextraction is one of a few solutions for in situ remediation of soils contaminated by trace elements and it preserves the quality of agricultural soils. However, many improvements are still needed to enhance phytoextraction effectiveness. The combination of bioaugmentation (soil inoculation with exogenous microorganisms) with phytoextraction is likely to increase the bioaccessibility of radionuclides and their accumulation in plants. The role of bacteria on soil-pollutants can be direct (direct metal complexation) and/or indirect (weathering of clays adsorbing Cs). This study aims to provide more specifically a mechanistic understanding of the bacterial mobilization of Cs from soil with the prospect of soil bioremediation. Bacterial metabolites of Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 17400) were supplied to illite spiked with 0.1 and 1 mM of Cs. Purified siderophores including pyoverdine from P. fluorescens, or the whole metabolites from the bacterial culture supernatant were compared to low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) (citric and oxalic acids) at 0.04 mM, or synthetic chelants, i.e., acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) and desferrioxamine mesylate (DFOM) ranging from 50 µM up to 250 µM. The release of Cs and the structural alteration of illite (release of Al, Fe and Si) were monitored. When compared to the control, no release of Cs from illite was observed with LMWOA. On the contrary, a slight release

  10. Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part II: Siderophore-promoted dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2008-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) coprecipitated with exopolymers of plants and microbes may differ in its geochemical reactivity from its abiotic counterpart. We synthesized Fh in the presence and absence of acid polysaccharides (polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan) and characterized the physical and structural properties of the precipitates formed [Mikutta C., Mikutta R., Bonneville S., Wagner F., Voegelin A., Christl I. and Kretzschmar R. (2008) Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta]. In this paper, we focus on the reactivity of PGA and alginate coprecipitates and pure Fh, and studied their interaction with the microbial siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) in the presence and absence of low molecular weight organic (LMWO) acid anions (malate, citrate). Batch adsorption and dissolution experiments were performed in the dark at pH 7 in 10 mM NaClO 4 background electrolyte. In the dissolution experiments, different modes of ligand addition were applied (single, simultaneous, stepwise). With an estimated Langmuir sorption maximum of 15 mmol/mol Fe, a PGA coprecipitate with 11% C org sorbed about four times as much DFOB as pure Fh, and the amount of DFOB sorbed was ˜4-fold larger than estimated from the sum of DFOB sorption to pure Fh and PGA alone. The apparent initial dissolution rates, Rapp-initial, and pseudo-first order rate coefficients, k, of the coprecipitates exceeded those of pure Fh by up to two orders of magnitude. Citrate and malate exerted a strong synergistic effect on the DFOB-promoted dissolution of pure Fh, whereas synergistic effects of both anions were absent or negligible for the coprecipitates. Rapp-initial of the citrate and DFOB-promoted dissolution of PGA coprecipitates increased with increasing molar C/Fe ratio of the coprecipitates, independent of the charge of the LMWO ligand. Our results indicate that polyuronates stabilize Fh particles sterically and /or

  11. Deciphering the Substrate Specificity of SbnA, the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Staphyloferrin B Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus assembles the siderophore, staphyloferrin B, from l-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (l-Dap), α-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Recently, SbnA and SbnB were shown to produce l-Dap and α-ketoglutarate from O-phospho-l-serine (OPS) and l-glutamate. SbnA is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme with homology to O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylases; however, SbnA utilizes OPS instead of O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), and l-glutamate serves as a nitrogen donor instead of a sulfide. In this work, we examined how SbnA dictates substrate specificity for OPS and l-glutamate using a combination of X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of SbnA crystals incubated with OPS revealed the structure of the PLP-α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Formation of the intermediate induced closure of the active site pocket by narrowing the channel leading to the active site and forming a second substrate binding pocket that likely binds l-glutamate. Three active site residues were identified: Arg132, Tyr152, Ser185 that were essential for OPS recognition and turnover. The Y152F/S185G SbnA double mutant was completely inactive, and its crystal structure revealed that the mutations induced a closed form of the enzyme in the absence of the α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Lastly, l-cysteine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of SbnA by forming a nonproductive external aldimine with the PLP cofactor. These results suggest a regulatory link between siderophore and l-cysteine biosynthesis, revealing a potential mechanism to reduce iron uptake under oxidative stress. PMID:26794841

  12. Deciphering the Substrate Specificity of SbnA, the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step in Staphyloferrin B Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kobylarz, Marek J; Grigg, Jason C; Liu, Yunan; Lee, Mathew S F; Heinrichs, David E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2016-02-16

    Staphylococcus aureus assembles the siderophore, staphyloferrin B, from l-2,3-diaminopropionic acid (l-Dap), α-ketoglutarate, and citrate. Recently, SbnA and SbnB were shown to produce l-Dap and α-ketoglutarate from O-phospho-l-serine (OPS) and l-glutamate. SbnA is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme with homology to O-acetyl-l-serine sulfhydrylases; however, SbnA utilizes OPS instead of O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS), and l-glutamate serves as a nitrogen donor instead of a sulfide. In this work, we examined how SbnA dictates substrate specificity for OPS and l-glutamate using a combination of X-ray crystallography, enzyme kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis. Analysis of SbnA crystals incubated with OPS revealed the structure of the PLP-α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Formation of the intermediate induced closure of the active site pocket by narrowing the channel leading to the active site and forming a second substrate binding pocket that likely binds l-glutamate. Three active site residues were identified: Arg132, Tyr152, Ser185 that were essential for OPS recognition and turnover. The Y152F/S185G SbnA double mutant was completely inactive, and its crystal structure revealed that the mutations induced a closed form of the enzyme in the absence of the α-aminoacrylate intermediate. Lastly, l-cysteine was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of SbnA by forming a nonproductive external aldimine with the PLP cofactor. These results suggest a regulatory link between siderophore and l-cysteine biosynthesis, revealing a potential mechanism to reduce iron uptake under oxidative stress.

  13. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration.

  14. Campylobacter jejuni ferric-enterobactin receptor CfrA is TonB3 dependent and mediates iron acquisition from structurally different catechol siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Naikare, Hemant; Butcher, James; Flint, Annika; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Stintzi, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 does not produce any endogenous siderophores of its own yet requires the CfrA enterobactin transporter for in vivo colonization. In addition, the genome of C. jejuni NCTC11168 contains three distinct TonB energy transduction systems, named TonB1, TonB2, and TonB3, that have not been tested for their role in siderophore uptake or their functional redundancy. We demonstrate that C. jejuni NCTC11168 transports ferric-enterobactin in an energy dependant manner that requires TonB3 for full activity with TonB1 showing partial functional redundancy. Moreover C. jejuni NCTC11168 can utilize a wide variety of structurally different catechol siderophores as sole iron sources during growth. This growth is solely dependent on the CfrA enterobactin transporter and highlights the wide range of substrates that this transporter can recognize. TonB3 is also required for growth on most catechol siderophores. Furthermore, either TonB1 or TonB3 is sufficient for growth on hemin or hemoglobin as a sole iron source demonstrating functional redundancy between TonB1 and TonB3. In vivo colonization assays with isogenic deletion mutants revealed that both TonB1 and TonB3 are required for chick colonization with TonB2 dispensable in this model. These results further highlight the importance of iron transport for efficient C. jejuni colonization. PMID:23702883

  15. Interactions of the periplasmic binding protein CeuE with Fe(III) n-LICAM4− siderophore analogues of varied linker length

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Ellis J.; Hughes, Adam; Blagova, Elena V.; Moroz, Olga V.; Thomas, Ross P.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Raines, Daniel J.; Duhme-Klair, Anne-Kathrin; Wilson, Keith S.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria use siderophores to mediate the transport of essential Fe(III) into the cell. In Campylobacter jejuni the periplasmic binding protein CeuE, an integral part of the Fe(III) transport system, has adapted to bind tetradentate siderophores using a His and a Tyr side chain to complete the Fe(III) coordination. A series of tetradentate siderophore mimics was synthesized in which the length of the linker between the two iron-binding catecholamide units was increased from four carbon atoms (4-LICAM4−) to five, six and eight (5-, 6-, 8-LICAM4−, respectively). Co-crystal structures with CeuE showed that the inter-planar angles between the iron-binding catecholamide units in the 5-, 6- and 8-LICAM4− structures are very similar (111°, 110° and 110°) and allow for an optimum fit into the binding pocket of CeuE, the inter-planar angle in the structure of 4-LICAM4− is significantly smaller (97°) due to restrictions imposed by the shorter linker. Accordingly, the protein-binding affinity was found to be slightly higher for 5- compared to 4-LICAM4− but decreases for 6- and 8-LICAM4−. The optimum linker length of five matches that present in natural siderophores such as enterobactin and azotochelin. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the relative importance of the Fe(III)-coordinating residues H227 and Y288. PMID:28383577

  16. Efficacy of the Salmonella siderophore receptor protein vaccine against lymph node carriage and fecal shedding of Samonella in commercial feedlot cattle: A randomized complete block design study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the Salmonella Newport siderophore receptor protein (SRP)® vaccine for reducing lymph node (LN) carriage and fecal shedding of Salmonella at harvest was investigated in a study of commercial feedlot cattle. The study was designed as a randomized complete block with pen as the experi...

  17. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  18. Glucosinolate biosynthesis in Eruca sativa.

    PubMed

    Katsarou, Dimitra; Omirou, Michalis; Liadaki, Kalliopi; Tsikou, Daniela; Delis, Costas; Garagounis, Constantine; Krokida, Afrodite; Zambounis, Antonis; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K

    2016-12-01

    Glucosinolates (GSLs) are a highly important group of secondary metabolites in the Caparalles order, both due to their significance in plant-biome interactions and to their chemoprotective properties. This study identified genes involved in all steps of aliphatic and indolic GSL biosynthesis in Eruca sativa, a cultivated plant closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana with agronomic and nutritional value. The impact of nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) availability on GSL biosynthetic pathways at a transcriptional level, and on the final GSL content of plant leaf and root tissues, was investigated. N and S supply had a significant and interactive effect on the GSL content of leaves, in a structure-specific and tissue-dependent manner; the metabolites levels were significantly correlated with the relative expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. A more complex effect was observed in roots, where aliphatic and indolic GSLs and related biosynthetic genes responded differently to the various nutritional treatments suggesting that nitrogen and sulfur availability are important factors that control plant GSL content at a transcriptional level. The biological activity of extracts derived from these plants grown under the specific nutritional schemes was examined. N and S availability were found to significantly affect the cytotoxicity of E. sativa extracts on human cancer cells, supporting the notion that carefully designed nutritional schemes can promote the accumulation of chemoprotective substances in edible plants.

  19. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation for elucidating the type II FAS pathways in other bacteria (White et al., 2005). However, fatty acid biosynthesis is more diverse in the phylum Actinobacteria: Mycobacterium, possess both FAS systems while Streptomyces species have only the multi-enzyme FAS II system and Corynebacterium species exclusively FAS I. In this review we present an overview of the genome organization, biochemical properties and physiological relevance of the two FAS systems in the three genera of actinomycetes mentioned above. We also address in detail the biochemical and structural properties of the acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) that catalyzes the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis in actinomycetes, and discuss the molecular bases of their substrate specificity and the structure-based identification of new ACCase inhibitors with anti-mycobacterial properties. PMID:21204864

  20. Biosynthesis of mycobacterial methylglucose lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Vitor; Maranha, Ana; Alarico, Susana; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterial pathogenesis is closely associated with a unique cell envelope rich in complex carbohydrates and unique lipids, among which are the mycolic acids. Mycobacteria also synthesize unique intracellular polymethylated polysaccharides (PMPSs), namely methylglucose lipopolysaccharides (MGLPs), which are acylated with short-chain fatty acids, and methylmannose polysaccharides (MMPs). Since PMPSs modulate the synthesis of long-chain fatty acids in vitro, the possibility of a similar role in vivo and the regulation of mycolic acids assembly have been anticipated. Unlike MGLPs, MMPs have been identified in M. smegmatis and other fast-growing mycobacteria but not in M. tuberculosis, implying an essential role for MGLPs in this pathogen and turning the biosynthetic enzymes into attractive drug targets. The genome of M. tuberculosis was decoded 14 years ago but only recently has the identity of the genes involved in MGLPs biosynthesis been investigated. Two gene clusters (Rv1208-Rv1213 and Rv3030-Rv3037c) containing a few genes considered to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth, have initially been proposed to coordinate MGLPs biosynthesis. Among these genes, only the product of Rv1208 for the first step in the MGLPs pathway has, so far, been crystallized and its three-dimensional structure been determined. However, recent results indicate that at least three additional clusters may be involved in this pathway. The functional assignment of authentic roles to some of these M. tuberculosis H37Rv genes sheds new light on the intricacy of MGLPs biogenesis and renewed interest on their biological role.

  1. Regulation of Oil Biosynthesis in Algae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    transportation fuels can potentially be addressed by exploring oil (triacylglycerol) biosynthesis in microalgae . Many microalgae , including Chlamydomonas...biosynthesis in microalgae have not been studied at the molecular level. Chlamydomonas is being used as a microalgal model to identify genes and regulatory...of this phenomenon will shed light on the physiological significance of oil production in microalgae . A first paper describing this interesting

  2. Microbial Siderophores Exert a Subtle Role in Arabidopsis during Infection by Manipulating the Immune Response and the Iron Status1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dellagi, Alia; Segond, Diego; Rigault, Martine; Fagard, Mathilde; Simon, Clara; Saindrenan, Patrick; Expert, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Siderophores (ferric ion chelators) are secreted by organisms in response to iron deficiency. The pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi produces two siderophores, achromobactin and chrysobactin (CB), which are required for systemic dissemination in host plants. Previous studies have shown that CB is produced in planta and can trigger the up-regulation of the plant ferritin gene AtFER1. To further investigate the function of CB during pathogenesis, we analyzed its effect in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants following leaf infiltration. CB activates the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated signaling pathway, while the CB ferric complex is ineffective, suggesting that the elicitor activity of this siderophore is due to its iron-binding property. We confirmed this hypothesis by testing the effect of siderophores structurally unrelated to CB, including deferrioxamine. There was no activation of SA-dependent defense in plants grown under iron deficiency before CB treatment. Transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding the root ferrous ion transporter and ferric chelate reductase, and determination of the activity of this enzyme in response to CB or deferrioxamine, showed that these compounds induce a leaf-to-root iron deficiency signal. This root response as well as ferritin gene up-regulation in the leaf were not compromised in a SA-deficient mutant line. Using the Arabidopsis-E. chrysanthemi pathosystem, we have shown that CB promotes bacterial growth in planta and can modulate plant defenses through an antagonistic mechanism between SA and jasmonic acid signaling cascades. Collectively, these data reveal a new link between two processes mediated by SA and iron in response to microbial siderophores. PMID:19448037

  3. Chemical Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B Affords Insight into the Molecular Structure, Iron Chelation, and Biological Activity of a Polycarboxylate Siderophore Deployed by the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Julie L H; Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-07-22

    Staphyloferrin B (SB) is a citrate-based polycarboxylate siderophore produced and utilized by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus for acquiring iron when colonizing the vertebrate host. The first chemical synthesis of SB is reported, which enables further molecular and biological characterization and provides access to structural analogues of the siderophore. Under conditions of iron limitation, addition of synthetic SB to bacterial growth medium recovered the growth of the antibiotic resistant community isolate S. aureus USA300 JE2. Two structural analogues of SB, epiSB and SBimide, were also synthesized and employed to investigate how epimerization of the citric acid moiety or imide formation influence its function as a siderophore. Epimerization of the citric acid stereocenter perturbed the iron-binding properties and siderophore function of SB as evidenced by experimental and computational modeling studies. Although epiSB provided growth recovery to S. aureus USA300 JE2 cultured in iron-deficient medium, the effect was attenuated relative to that of SB. Moreover, SB more effectively sequestered the Fe(III) bound to human holo-transferrin, an iron source of S. aureus, than epiSB. SBimide is an imide analogous to the imide forms of other citric acid siderophores that are often observed when these molecules are isolated from natural sources. Here, SBimide is shown to be unstable, converting to native SB at physiological pH. SB is considered to be a virulence factor of S. aureus, a pathogen that poses a particular threat to public health because of the number of drug-resistant strains emerging in hospital and community settings. Iron acquisition by S. aureus is important for its ability to colonize the human host and cause disease, and new chemical insights into the structure and function of SB will inform the search for new therapeutic strategies for combating S. aureus infections.

  4. Bacterial ability in AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction: Relation to arsenic tolerance, P uptake, and siderophore production.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Teplitski, Max; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between bacterial ability in arsenic transformation, siderophore production, and P uptake was investigated using six arsenic-resistant bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. Bacterial strains of PG5 and 12 were better arsenite (AsIII) oxidizers (31-46 vs. 6.2-21% of 1 mM AsIII) whereas PG 6, 9, 10 and 16 were better arsenate (AsV) reducers (58-95 vs. 7.5-46% of 1 mM AsV). Increase in AsV concentration from 0 to 1 mM induced 3.0-8.4 times more P uptake by bacteria but increase in P concentration from 0.1 to 1 mM reduced AsV uptake by 17-71%, indicating that P and AsV were taken up by P transporters. Bacteria producing more siderophores (PG5 and 12; >73 μM equiv) showed greater AsIII oxidation and AsIII resistance than those producing less siderophore (PG 6, 9, 10 and 16; <23 μM equiv). This observation was further supported by results obtained from mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens impaired in siderophore production, as they were 23-25% less tolerant to AsIII than the wild-type. Arsenic-resistant bacteria increased their arsenic tolerance by retaining less arsenic in cells via efficient AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction, which were impacted by P uptake and siderophore production.

  5. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dideriksen, K.; Baker, J. A.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2008-05-01

    In oxic oceans, most of the dissolved iron (Fe) exists as complexes with siderophore-like, strongly coordinating organic ligands. Thus, the isotope composition of the little amount of free inorganic Fe that is available for precipitation and preservation in the geological record may largely be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron. We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fe-desferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two differently complexed Fe(III) pools were separated by addition of Na 2CO 3, which led to immediate precipitation of the inorganic Fe without causing significant dissociation of Fe-desferrioxamine complexes. Experiments using enriched 57Fe tracer showed that isotopic equilibration between the 57Fe-labelled inorganic species and the isotopically "normal" siderophore-bound Fe was rapid during the first few seconds and then became slower. Consequently, the data fitted poorly to first and second order reaction equations. However, with a two-stage reaction, the data fit perfectly with a first order equation for the slower stage, indicating that approximately 40% re-equilibration may take place during the separation of the two pools. To further test if the induced precipitation leads to experimental artefacts, the fractionation during precipitation of inorganic Fe was determined. Assuming a Rayleigh-type fractionation during precipitation, this experiment yielded an isotope fractionation factor of α56Fe solution-solid = 1.00027. Calculations based on these results indicate that isotopic re-equilibration is unlikely to significantly affect our determined equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically complexed Fe. To determine the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically bound Fe(III), experiments with variable

  6. The Biogeochemistry of Pu and U: Distribution of Radionuclides Affected by Micro-Organisms and Their Siderophores, Reductants, and Exopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Traina, Samuel J.

    2003-06-01

    Investigations to date focused on studying the dissolution of oxides and desorption of metals by the siderophore, Desferrioxamine B (DFB), with different metal ions adsorbed onto the solids. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to probe the surface structural environment of sorbed metal ions. Results indicated that while DFB effectively dissolved iron oxides with different adsorbed metals, this process was also affected by the type of the metal adsorbed. For pure hematite, samples with adsorbed metals had less dissolved Fe by DFB than the one without. Different type of metal ion seemed to have no significant effects on Fe dissolution under these experimental conditions. This result suggested that while adsorbed metals blocked available surface sites on hematite surfaces for DFB causing less Fe release, Fe dissolution by DFB from the well crystalline structure of hematite was not affected by the adsorbed metal ions.

  7. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Ann M.; Amthor, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills nearly 1 million people each year, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has become increasingly resistant to current therapies. Isoprenoid synthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive target for the development of new antimalarials. The phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin is a specific inhibitor of isoprenoid synthesis and has been a helpful tool to outline the essential functions of isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum. Isoprenoids are a large, diverse class of hydrocarbons that function in a variety of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes. In P. falciparum, isoprenoids are used for tRNA isopentenylation and protein prenylation, as well as the synthesis of vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinone, and dolichols. Recently, isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum has been shown to be regulated by a sugar phosphatase. We outline what is known about isoprenoid function and the regulation of isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum, in order to identify valuable directions for future research. PMID:25217461

  8. Transcriptional regulation of cuticle biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Nikolai; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2014-01-01

    Plant cuticle is the hydrophobic protection layer that covers aerial plant organs and plays a pivotal role during plant development and interactions of plants with the environment. The mechanical structure and chemical composition of cuticle lipids and other secondary metabolites vary considerably between plant species, and in response to environmental stimuli and stresses. As the cuticle plays an important role in responses of plants to major abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity, close attention has been paid to molecular processes underlying the stress-induced biosynthesis of cuticle components. This review addresses the genetic networks responsible for cuticle formation and in particular highlights the role of transcription factors that regulate cuticle formation in response to abiotic stresses.

  9. Starch granules: structure and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Buléon, A; Colonna, P; Planchot, V; Ball, S

    1998-08-01

    The emphasis of this review is on starch structure and its biosynthesis. Improvements in understanding have been brought about during the last decade through the development of new physicochemical and biological techniques, leading to real scientific progress. All this literature needs to be kept inside the general literature about biopolymers, despite some confusing results or discrepancies arising from the biological variability of starch. However, a coherent picture of starch over all the different structural levels can be presented, in order to obtain some generalizations about its structure. In this review we will focus first on our present understanding of the structures of amylose and amylopectin and their organization within the granule, and we will then give insights on the biosynthetic mechanisms explaining the biogenesis of starch in plants.

  10. Adsorption to metal oxides of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyoverdine and implications for bacterial biofilm formation on metals.

    PubMed

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2007-06-19

    The initiation of biofilm formation is poorly understood, and in particular, the contribution of chemical bond formation between bacterial cells and metal surfaces has received little attention. We have previously used in situ infrared spectroscopy to show, during the initial stages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, the formation of coordinate covalent bonds between titanium dioxide particle films and pyoverdine, a mixed catecholate and hydroxamate siderophore. Here we show using infrared spectroscopy that pyoverdine can also form covalent bonds with particle films of Fe2O3, CrOOH, and AlOOH. Adsorption to the metal oxides through the catechol-like 2,3-diamino-6,7-dihydroxyquinoline part of pyoverdine was most evident in the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed pyoverdine molecule. Weaker infrared absorption bands that are consistent with the hydroxamic acids of pyoverdine binding covalently to TiO2, Fe2O3, and AlOOH surfaces were also observed. The adsorption of pyoverdine to TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces showed a pH dependence that is indicative of the dominance of the catechol-like ligand of pyoverdine. Infrared absorption bands were also evident for pyoverdine associated with the cells of P. aeruginosa on TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces and were notably absent for genetically modified cells unable to synthesize or bind pyoverdine at the cell surface. These studies confirm the generality of pyoverdine-metal bond formation and suggest a wider involvement of siderophores in bacterial biofilm initiation on metals.

  11. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis.

  12. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  13. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  14. Advances in Understanding the Biosynthesis of Fumonisins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumonisins are a group of economically important mycotoxins that are derived polyketides. Since the cloning of the fumonisin polyketide synthase (PKS) gene from Fusarium verticillioides in 1999, significant advances have been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms for fumonisin biosynthesis...

  15. Oxidative mobilization of cerium and uranium and enhanced release of "immobile" high field strength elements from igneous rocks in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Kopf, Sebastian; Bau, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Polyvalent trace elements such as the high field strength elements (HFSE) are commonly considered rather immobile during low-temperature water-rock interaction. Hence, they have become diagnostic tools that are widely applied in geochemical studies. We present results of batch leaching experiments focused on the mobilization of certain HFSE (Y, Zr, Hf, Th, U and rare earth elements) from mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in the presence and absence, respectively, of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Our data show that DFOB strongly enhances the mobility of these trace elements during low-temperature water-rock interaction. The presence of DFOB produces two distinct features in the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) patterns of leaching solutions, regardless of the mineralogical and chemical composition or the texture of the rock type studied. Bulk rock-normalized REY patterns of leaching solutions with DFOB show (i) a very distinct positive Ce anomaly and (ii) depletion of La and other light REY relative to the middle REY, with a concave downward pattern between La and Sm. These features are not observed in experiments with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid or deionized water. In DFOB-bearing leaching solutions Ce and U are decoupled from and selectively enriched relative to light REY and Th, respectively, due to oxidation to Ce(IV) and U(VI). Oxidation of Ce3+ and U4+ is promoted by the significantly higher stability of the Ce(IV) and U(VI) DFOB complexes as compared to the Ce(III) and U(IV) DFOB complexes. This is similar to the relationship between the Ce(IV)- and Ce(III)-pentacarbonate complexes that cause positive Ce anomalies in alkaline lakes. However, while formation of Ce(IV) carbonate complexes is confined to alkaline environments, Ce(IV) DFOB complexes may produce positive Ce anomalies even in mildly acidic and near-neutral natural waters. Siderophore-promoted dissolution processes also significantly enhance mobility of other 'immobile' HFSE

  16. Transformations of Toxic Metals and Metalloids by Pseudomonas stutzeri Strain KC and its Siderophore Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Paszczynski, Andrzej J.; Crawford, Ronald L.

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid)Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid) (pdtc)(pdtc) is a siderophore produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri KCPseudomonas stutzeri KC that plays a role in conditioning the bacterial environment. It serves as a siderophore in solubilizing ferric iron and other micronutrient metals, and as a thiol-containing compound, it reacts with toxic heavy metals and metalloids, reducing metals like Cr(VI), Se(IV), and Te(IV) and precipitating metals as sulfides (e.g., Hg(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and As(III)), rendering them insoluble and less toxic. Understanding the mechanism by which bacteria use pdtc to interact with metals may contribute to our understanding of metal cycling in the biosphere, and may have potential for use in bioremediationbioremediation of heavy metals.

  17. Stereochemical control of DNA biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sosunov, Vasily V.; Santamaria, Fanny; Victorova, Lyubov S.; Gosselin, Gilles; Rayner, Bernard; Krayevsky, Alexander A.

    2000-01-01

    Stereochemical control of DNA biosynthesis was studied using several DNA-synthesizing complexes containing, in each case, a single substitution of a 2′-deoxy-d-nucleotide residue by an enantiomeric l-nucleotide residue in a DNA chain (either in the primer or in the template) as well as 2′-deoxy-l-ribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates (l-dNTPs) as substrates. Three template-dependent DNA polymerases were tested, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I Klenow fragment, Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase and avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase, as well as template-independent calf-thymus terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Very stringent control of stereoselectivity was demonstrated for template-dependent DNA polymerases, whereas terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase was less selective. DNA polymerase I and reverse transcriptase catalyzed formation of dinucleoside 5′,5′-tetraphosphates when l-dTTP was used as substrate. Comparison between models of template–primer complexes, modified or not by a single l-nucleotide residue, revealed striking differences in their geometry. PMID:10666459

  18. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  19. Biosynthesis of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes.

    PubMed

    Zamir, L O; Nikolakakis, A; Sauriol, F; Mamer, O

    1999-05-01

    Fusarium culmorum produces two major trichothecenes, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and sambucinol, and some minor apotrichothecenes. It was desired to investigate if during their biosynthesis a C-11-keto intermediate was involved. To verify this postulate, trichodiene, a known precursor to trichothecenes, was synthesized with two deuteriums at C-11 and one at C-15. It was then fed to F. culmorum cultures, and the derived metabolites were purified and analyzed. The results ruled out the involvement of an 11-keto intermediate but revealed two novel apotrichothecenes. The characterization of their structures suggested that one of the 2-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene stereoisomers (2alpha or 2beta) could be converted to sambucinol. These apotrichothecenes were therefore synthesized labeled specifically with two deuteriums at C-4 and C-15 and fed to F. culmorum cultures. Indeed, the result established for the first time that 2alpha-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene was a precursor to sambucinol. A biosynthetic scheme for the production of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes is described.

  20. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, Daniela; Nieselt, Kay; Hu, Wei-Shou; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-03-01

    Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, γ-butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor, a group of signalling molecules called SCBs (S. coelicolorbutanolides) regulates production of the pigmented antibiotics coelicolor polyketide (CPK), actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. The γ-butyrolactone synthase ScbA is responsible for the biosynthesis of SCBs. Here we show the results of a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of a scbA deletion mutant prior to and during the transition to antibiotic production. We report a strong perturbation in the expression of three pigmented antibiotic clusters in the mutant throughout the growth curve, thus providing a molecular explanation for the antibiotic phenotype observed previously. Our study also revealed, for the first time, that the secondary metabolite cluster responsible for synthesis of the siderophore desferrioxamine is under the control of SCB signalling. Moreover, expression of the genes encoding enzymes for primary metabolism pathways, which supply antibiotic precursors and genes for morphological differentiation, was found shifted earlier in time in the mutant. In conclusion, our time series analysis demonstrates new details of the regulatory effects of the γ-butyrolactone system in Streptomyces.

  1. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis gene cluster gene cpaM is required for speradine A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tokuoka, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Tomoki; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Koyama, Akifumi; Iio, Shin-Ichiro; Kubota, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Koyama, Yasuji; Totsuka, Akira; Shindo, Hitoshi; Sato, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Speradine A is a derivative of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) found in culture of an Aspergillus tamarii isolate. Heterologous expression of a predicted methyltransferase gene, cpaM, in the cpa biosynthesis gene cluster of A. tamarii resulted in the speradine A production in a 2-oxoCPA producing A. oryzae strain, indicating cpaM is involved in the speradine A biosynthesis.

  2. Efficiency of Lignin Biosynthesis: a Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    AMTHOR, JEFFREY S.

    2003-01-01

    Lignin is derived mainly from three alcohol monomers: p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol. Biochemical reactions probably responsible for synthesizing these three monomers from sucrose, and then polymerizing the monomers into lignin, were analysed to estimate the amount of sucrose required to produce a unit of lignin. Included in the calculations were amounts of respiration required to provide NADPH (from NADP+) and ATP (from ADP) for lignin biosynthesis. Two pathways in the middle stage of monomer biosynthesis were considered: one via tyrosine (found in monocots) and the other via phenylalanine (found in all plants). If lignin biosynthesis proceeds with high efficiency via tyrosine, 76·9, 70·4 and 64·3 % of the carbon in sucrose can be retained in the fraction of lignin derived from p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively. The corresponding carbon retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine are less, at 73·2, 65·7 and 60·7 %, respectively. Energy (i.e. heat of combustion) retention during lignin biosynthesis via tyrosine could be as high as 81·6, 74·5 and 67·8 % for lignin derived from p‐coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively, with the corresponding potential energy retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine being less, at 77·7, 69·5 and 63·9 %, respectively. Whether maximum efficiency occurs in situ is unclear, but these values are targets that can be considered in: (1) plant breeding programmes aimed at maximizing carbon or energy retention from photosynthate; (2) analyses of (minimum) metabolic costs of responding to environmental change or pest attack involving increased lignin biosynthesis; (3) understanding costs of lignification in older tissues; and (4) interpreting carbon balance measurements of organs and plants with large lignin concentrations. PMID:12714366

  3. Disruption of Transporters Affiliated with Enantio-Pyochelin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 Has Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.; Loper, Joyce E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. In this study, we investigated whether several transporters that are encoded by genes within or adjacent to the enantio-pyochelin biosynthetic cluster, serve as efflux systems for enantio-pyochelin and/or its intermediates. In addition, we determined whether these transporters have broad substrates range specificity using a Phenotype Microarray system. Intriguingly, knockouts of the pchH and fetF transporter genes resulted in mutant strains that secrete higher levels of enantio-pyochelin as well as its intermediates salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. Analyses of these mutants did not indicate significant change in transcription of biosynthetic genes involved in enantio-pyochelin production. In contrast, the deletion mutant of PFL_3504 resulted in reduced transcription of the biosynthetic genes as well as decreased dihydroaeruginoic acid concentrations in the culture supernatant, which could either point to regulation of gene expression by the transporter or its role in dihydroaeruginoic acid transport. Disruption of each of the transporters resulted in altered stress and/or chemical resistance profile of Pf-5, which may reflect that these transporters could have specificity for rather a broad range of substrates. PMID:27442435

  4. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  5. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kirienko, Daniel R; Revtovich, Alexey V; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and increased host

  6. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits.

    PubMed

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern.

  7. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern. PMID:25346743

  8. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  9. The solution structure, binding properties, and dynamics of the bacterial siderophore-binding protein FepB.

    PubMed

    Chu, Byron C H; Otten, Renee; Krewulak, Karla D; Mulder, Frans A A; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-10-17

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) FepB plays a key role in transporting the catecholate siderophore ferric enterobactin from the outer to the inner membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. The solution structures of the 34-kDa apo- and holo-FepB from Escherichia coli, solved by NMR, represent the first solution structures determined for the type III class of PBPs. Unlike type I and II PBPs, which undergo large "Venus flytrap" conformational changes upon ligand binding, both forms of FepB maintain similar overall folds; however, binding of the ligand is accompanied by significant loop movements. Reverse methyl cross-saturation experiments corroborated chemical shift perturbation results and uniquely defined the binding pocket for gallium enterobactin (GaEnt). NMR relaxation experiments indicated that a flexible loop (residues 225-250) adopted a more rigid and extended conformation upon ligand binding, which positioned residues for optimal interactions with the ligand and the cytoplasmic membrane ABC transporter (FepCD), respectively. In conclusion, this work highlights the pivotal role that structural dynamics plays in ligand binding and transporter interactions in type III PBPs.

  10. Transcription activation by the siderophore sensor Btr is mediated by ligand-dependent stimulation of promoter clearance

    PubMed Central

    Gaballa, Ahmed; MacLellan, Shawn; Helmann, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial transcription factors often function as DNA-binding proteins that selectively activate or repress promoters, although the biochemical mechanisms vary. In most well-understood examples, activators function by either increasing the affinity of RNA polymerase (RNAP) for the target promoter, or by increasing the isomerization of the initial closed complex to the open complex. We report that Bacillus subtilis Btr, a member of the AraC family of activators, functions principally as a ligand-dependent activator of promoter clearance. In the presence of its co-activator, the siderophore bacillibactin (BB), the Btr:BB complex enhances productive transcription, while having only modest effects on either RNAP promoter association or the production of abortive transcripts. Btr binds to two direct repeat sequences adjacent to the −35 region; recognition of the downstream motif is most important for establishing a productive interaction between the Btr:BB complex and RNAP. The resulting Btr:BB dependent increase in transcription enables the production of the ferric-BB importer to be activated by the presence of its cognate substrate. PMID:22210890

  11. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, H I; León, J; Raskin, I

    1995-01-01

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-beta-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:11607533

  12. Bacterial exopolysaccharides: biosynthesis pathways and engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker; Rehm, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce a wide range of exopolysaccharides which are synthesized via different biosynthesis pathways. The genes responsible for synthesis are often clustered within the genome of the respective production organism. A better understanding of the fundamental processes involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the regulation of these processes is critical toward genetic, metabolic and protein-engineering approaches to produce tailor-made polymers. These designer polymers will exhibit superior material properties targeting medical and industrial applications. Exploiting the natural design space for production of a variety of biopolymer will open up a range of new applications. Here, we summarize the key aspects of microbial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and highlight the latest engineering approaches toward the production of tailor-made variants with the potential to be used as valuable renewable and high-performance products for medical and industrial applications. PMID:26074894

  13. Abscisic acid: biosynthesis, inactivation, homoeostasis and signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes during plant growth and abiotic stress responses. The endogenous ABA level is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms involving biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and signal transduction pathways. This complex regulatory network may target multiple levels, including transcription, translation and post-translational regulation of genes involved in ABA responses. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport have been characterized. The local ABA concentration is critical for initiating ABA-mediated signalling during plant development and in response to environmental changes. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms that regulate ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and homoeostasis. We also present the findings of recent research on ABA perception by cellular receptors, and ABA signalling in response to cellular and environmental conditions.

  14. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Triterpenoid Biosynthesis and Engineering in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Satoru; Saito, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Triterpenoid saponins are a diverse group of natural products in plants and are considered defensive compounds against pathogenic microbes and herbivores. Because of their various beneficial properties for humans, saponins are used in wide-ranging applications in addition to medicinally. Saponin biosynthesis involves three key enzymes: oxidosqualene cyclases, which construct the basic triterpenoid skeletons; cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, which mediate oxidations; and uridine diphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases, which catalyze glycosylations. The discovery of genes committed to saponin biosynthesis is important for the stable supply and biotechnological application of these compounds. Here, we review the identified genes involved in triterpenoid biosynthesis, summarize the recent advances in the biotechnological production of useful plant terpenoids, and discuss the bioengineering of plant triterpenoids. PMID:22639586

  16. [Advances in the biosynthesis research of ginsenosides].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Ling; Gao, Li-Li; Zhu, Ping

    2013-02-01

    Ginsenosides are the main active components of medicinal herbs including Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolium, which have potent effects of anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and apoptosis inhibition. But the low content of ginsenosides limits its development and usage. At present, how to improve the production of ginsenosides by biological technology has been a new research focus. Some advances in the biosynthesis of ginsenosides by tissue culture and biotransformation have been made in recent years. So far at least twenty genes related to the biosynthesis of ginsenosides from Panax genus plants have been cloned and functionally identified, which has laid a good foundation for the study on the synthetic biology of ginsenosides. This review outlines recent advances in several aspects and is expected to provide a theoretical support to the thorough research of the pathway and regulation of ginsenosides biosynthesis.

  17. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters.

  18. Biotin biosynthesis, transport and utilization in rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Navarro, Karina; Encarnación, Sergio; Dunn, Michael F

    2005-05-15

    Biotin, a B-group vitamin, performs an essential metabolic function in all organisms. Rhizobia are alpha-proteobacteria with the remarkable ability to form a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in combination with a compatible legume host, a process in which the importance of biotin biosynthesis and/or transport has been demonstrated for some rhizobia-legume combinations. Rhizobia have also been used to delimit the biosynthesis, metabolic effects and, more recently, transport of biotin. Molecular genetic analysis shows that an orthodox biotin biosynthesis pathway occurs in some rhizobia while others appear to synthesize the vitamin using alternative pathways. In addition to its well established function as a prosthetic group for biotin-dependent carboxylases, we are beginning to delineate a role for biotin as a metabolic regulator in rhizobia.

  19. Unconventional membrane lipid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria are surrounded by at least one bilayer membrane mainly composed of phospholipids (PLs). Biosynthesis of the most abundant PLs phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL) is well understood in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It recently emerged, however, that the diversity of bacterial membrane lipids is huge and that not yet explored biosynthesis pathways exist, even for the common PLs. A good example is the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It contains PE, PG and CL as major lipids and small amounts of the N-methylated PE derivatives monomethyl PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC = trimethylated PE). Xanthomonas campestris uses a repertoire of canonical and non-canonical enzymes for the synthesis of its membrane lipids. In this minireview, we briefly recapitulate standard pathways and integrate three recently discovered pathways into the overall picture of bacterial membrane biosynthesis.

  20. Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1987-11-01

    The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I/sub 50/ concentration of 3.2 ..mu..M. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I/sub 50/ of 4 ..mu..M. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4-/sup 3/H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and /sup 14/C-mevalonic acid. From the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs.

  1. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  2. Plant biochemistry: anthocyanin biosynthesis in roses.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Kanno, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Yoshio; Tsugawa, Hidehito; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2005-06-09

    Anthocyanin is the principal pigment in flowers, conferring intense red-to-blue cyanic colours on petals and helping to attract pollinators. Its biosynthesis involves glycosylation steps that are important for the stability of the pigment and for its aqueous solubility in vacuoles. Here we describe anthocyanin biosynthesis in roses (Rosa hybrida), which is unlike the pathway used in other flowers in that it relies on a single enzyme to achieve glycosylation at two different positions on the precursor molecule. Phylogenetic analysis also indicates that this previously unknown glucosyltransferase enzyme may be unique to roses, with glycosylation having apparently evolved into a single stabilizing step in other plants.

  3. Characterization of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae riboflavin biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, T E; Mulks, M H

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we report the identification, cloning, and complete nucleotide sequence of four genes from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae that are involved in riboflavin biosynthesis. The cloned genes can specify production of large amounts of riboflavin in Escherichia coli, can complement several defined genetic mutations in riboflavin biosynthesis in E. coli, and are homologous to riboflavin biosynthetic genes from E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Bacillus subtilis. The genes have been designated A. pleuropneumoniae ribGBAH because of their similarity in both sequence and arrangement to the B. subtilis ribGBAH operon. PMID:8522537

  4. The structural biology of phenazine biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Parsons, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The phenazines are a class of over 150 nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds of bacterial and archeal origin. Their redox properties not only explain their activity as broad-specificity antibiotics and virulence factors but also enable them to function as respiratory pigments, thus extending their importance to the primary metabolism of phenazine-producing species. Despite their discovery in the mid-19th century, the molecular mechanisms behind their biosynthesis have only been unraveled in the last decade. Here, we review the contribution of structural biology that has led to our current understanding of phenazine biosynthesis. PMID:25215885

  5. [Jasmonate biosynthesis--the latest discoveries].

    PubMed

    Wilmowicz, Emilia; Frankowski, Kamil; Sidłowska, Magdalena; Kućko, Agata; Kesy, Jacek; Gasiorowski, Adam; Glazińska, Paulina; Kopcewicz, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Jasmonates are plant hormones involved in many growth and development processes. They also participate in plant defense responses. Current progress in the study on biosynthesis and signaling of jasmonates has contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms regulating concentration of these hormones in the cell. Sustaining a proper level of jasmonates allow the plant to respond appropriately to changing conditions. It is possible due to the large number of enzymes and genes involved in biosynthesis of these hormones as well as multilevel control of their expression.

  6. Biosynthesis and biodegradation of wood components

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, T.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook containing 22 chapters by various authors covers the structure of wood, the localization of polysaccharides and lignins in wood cell walls, metabolism and synthetic function of cambial tissue, cell organelles and their function in the biosynthesis of cell wall components, biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides, lignin, cutin, suberin and associated waxes, phenolic acids and monolignols, quinones, flavonoids, tannins, stilbenes and terpenoid wood extractives, the occurrence of extractives, the metabolism of phenolic acids, wood degradation by micro-organisms and fungi, and biodegradation of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, and aromatic extractives of wood. An index is included.

  7. The expanding universe of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; Laflamme, P

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of many of the major gene families responsible for the generation of central intermediates and for their decoration, together with the development of large genomics and proteomics databases, has revolutionized our capability to identify exotic and interesting natural-product pathways. Over the next few years, these tools will facilitate dramatic advances in our knowledge of the biosynthesis of alkaloids, which will far surpass that which we have learned in the past 50 years. These tools will also be exploited for the rapid characterization of regulatory genes, which control the development of specialized cell factories for alkaloid biosynthesis.

  8. Differential expression of Bordetella pertussis iron transport system genes during infection

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Hanawa, Tomoko; Anderson, Mark T.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Temporal expression patterns of the Bordetella pertussis alcaligin, enterobactin, and heme iron acquisition systems were examined using alcA-, bfeA-, and bhuR-tnpR recombinase fusion strains in a mouse respiratory infection model. The iron systems were differentially expressed in vivo, showing early induction of the alcaligin and enterobactin siderophore systems, and delayed induction of the heme system in a manner consistent with predicted changes in host iron source availability during infection. Previous mixed infection competition studies established the importance of alcaligin and heme utilization for B. pertussis in vivo growth and survival. In this study, the contribution of the enterobactin system to the fitness of B. pertussis was confirmed using wild-type and enterobactin receptor mutant strains in similar competition infection experiments. As a correlate to the in vivo expression studies of B. pertussis iron systems in mice, sera from uninfected and B. pertussis-infected human donors were screened for antibody reactivity with Bordetella iron-repressible cell envelope proteins. Pertussis patient sera recognized multiple iron-repressible proteins including the known outer membrane receptors for alcaligin, enterobactin, and heme, supporting the hypothesis that B. pertussis is iron-starved and responds to the presence of diverse iron sources during natural infection. PMID:18554331

  9. Inhibition of Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis in Cercospora rosicola by Inhibitors of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Plant Growth Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Shirley M.; Poling, Stephen M.; Maier, Vincent P.; Orme, Edward D.

    1983-01-01

    The fungus Cercospora rosicola produces abscisic acid (ABA) as a secondary metabolite. We developed a convenient system using this fungus to determine the effects of compounds on the biosynthesis of ABA. Inasmuch as ABA and the gibberellins (GAs) both arise via the isoprenoid pathway, it was of interest to determine if inhibitors of GA biosynthesis affect ABA biosynthesis. All five putative inhibitors of GA biosynthesis tested inhibited ABA biosynthesis. Several plant growth retardants with poorly understood actions in plants were also tested; of these, six inhibited ABA biosynthesis to varying degrees and two had no effect. Effects of plant growth retardants on various branches of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway may help to explain some of the diverse and unexpected results reported for these compounds. Knowledge that certain inhibitors of GA biosynthesis also have the ability to inhibit ABA biosynthesis in C. rosicola indicates the need for further studies in plants on the mode of action of these compounds. PMID:16662775

  10. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis by Aspergillus flavus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) is an indole-tetramic acid mycotoxin produced by some strains of Aspergillus flavus. Characterization of the CPA biosynthesis gene cluster confirmed that formation of CPA is via a three-enzyme pathway. This review examines the structure and organization of the CPA genes, elu...

  11. The lipid biosynthesis hole in the rickettsiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a complementation assay in E. coli, we have shown that the propionyl-CoA carboxylase complex (PCC) from Wolbachia pipientis wMel, order Rickettsiales, provides for lipid biosynthesis through malonyl-CoA production. Normally, the prototypical prokaryote fatty acid synthesis (FASII) initiation ...

  12. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  13. Purification and Structural Characterization of “Simple Catechol”, the NGAL-Siderocalin Siderophore in Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Guan-Hu; Barasch, Jonathan; Xu, Jie; Wang, Wei; Hu, Feng-Lin; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2015-01-01

    The identification of ligands that bind the protein Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL, Siderocalin, Lipocalin-2) have helped to elucidate its function. NGAL-Siderocalin binds and sequesters the iron loaded bacterial siderophore enterochelin (Ent), defining the protein as an innate immune effector. Simple metabolic catechols can also form tight complexes with NGAL-Siderocalin and ferric iron, suggesting that the protein may act as an iron scavenger even in the absence of Ent. While different catechols have been detected in human urine, they have not been directly purified from a biofluid and demonstrated to ligate iron with NGAL-Siderocalin. This paper describes a “natural products” approach to identify small molecules that mediate iron binding to NGAL-Siderocalin. A 10K filtrate of human urine was subjected to multiple steps of column chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC, guided by NGAL-Siderocalin-iron binding assays and LC-MS detection. The co-factor forming a ternary structure with iron and NGAL-Siderocalin was identified as authentic simple catechol (dihydroxybenze) by ESI-HR-Mass, UV, and NMR spectrometric analysis. Comparison of the binding strengths of different catechols demonstrated that the vicinal-dihydroxyl groups were the key functional groups and that steric compatibilities of the catechol ring have the strongest effect on binding. Although catechol was a known NGAL-Siderocalin co-factor, our purification directly confirmed its presence in urine as well as its capacity to serve as an iron trap with NGAL-Siderocalin. PMID:26257890

  14. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modeling and Simulation of Cefiderocol, a Parenteral Siderophore Cephalosporin, for Dose Adjustment Based on Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Takayuki; Wajima, Toshihiro; Ishibashi, Toru; Arjona Ferreira, Juan Camilo; Echols, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Cefiderocol, a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin, exhibits potent efficacy against most Gram-negative bacteria, including carbapenem-resistant strains. Since cefiderocol is excreted primarily via the kidneys, this study was conducted to develop a population pharmacokinetics (PK) model to determine dose adjustment based on renal function. Population PK models were developed based on data for cefiderocol concentrations in plasma, urine, and dialysate with a nonlinear mixed-effects model approach. Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to calculate the probability of target attainment (PTA) of fraction of time during the dosing interval where the free drug concentration in plasma exceeds the MIC (Tf>MIC) for an MIC range of 0.25 to 16 μg/ml. For the simulations, dose regimens were selected to compare cefiderocol exposure among groups with different levels of renal function. The developed models well described the PK of cefiderocol for each renal function group. A dose of 2 g every 8 h with 3-h infusions provided >90% PTA for 75% Tf>MIC for an MIC of ≤4 μg/ml for patients with normal renal function, while a more frequent dose (every 6 h) could be used for patients with augmented renal function. A reduced dose and/or extended dosing interval was selected for patients with impaired renal function. A supplemental dose immediately after intermittent hemodialysis was proposed for patients requiring intermittent hemodialysis. The PK of cefiderocol could be adequately modeled, and the modeling-and-simulation approach suggested dose regimens based on renal function, ensuring drug exposure with adequate bactericidal effect.

  15. Effects Of The Microbial Siderophore Desferrioxamine-B On Pb Sorption To And Desorption From Nanohematite (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, P. A.; Barton, L. E.; Quicksall, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    Recent study has shown that Fe (hydr)oxide mineral structure, stability, reactivity, and bioavailability may change dramatically for particles less than a few tens of nanometers in size versus larger, bulk materials. The unique properties of nanoparticles, including their small size, high specific surface area, and tendency to aggregate, means that special care often must be taken in both mineral characterization and experimental design. For example, it can be essential to normalize for surface area within experimental reaction vessels; yet, geometric and BET surface area may differ due to particle aggregation, and other surface area measurements such as by water vapor adsorption need to be considered. High surface area nanoparticles may also undergo rapid dissolution, which has the potential to affect the results of typical sorption experiments. The research reported here was designed to investigate how nanoparticle size may affect Pb sorption to and desorption from hematite in the presence of a microbial siderophore (desferrioxamine B) that has high binding affinities for both Pb and Fe and that has been shown to substantially accelerate the dissolution of both Fe- and Pb-bearing minerals. Batch sorption/desorption and dissolution experiments were combined with modeling and spectroscopic analysis to determine how particle size affects complex and potentially interacting processes. Results show that particle size affects not only sorption and dissolution, but also how different mineral-water interface reactions may interact within a typical laboratory experiment involving nanoparticles. The results further demonstrate the importance of simultaneously monitoring sorption and dissolution when dealing with potentially highly reactive nanoparticles.

  16. Mn(II)/Mn(III) and Fe(III) binding capability of two Aspergillus fumigatus siderophores, desferricrocin and N', N″, N‴-triacetylfusarinine C.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Etelka; Szabó, Orsolya; Parajdi-Losonczi, Péter L; Balla, György; Pócsi, István

    2014-10-01

    Manganese(II) and manganese(III) complexes of the exocyclic desferricrocin (H3DFCR) and endocyclic triacetylfusarinine C (H3TAF) in solution have been studied by using pH-potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, relaxometry and cyclic voltammetry. A comparison between the present results and the corresponding ones for the open-chain analogues, desferrioxamine B (DFB) and desferricoprogen (DFC), shows (i) The dissociation processes of H3DFCR occur in the expected pH-range (pH7-10.5), but hydrogen bonding is assumed to be responsible for a quite low proton dissociation constant (pK=4.18) of H3TAF and also an unusually high one (10.59). (ii) Moderate stability complexes with 1:1 Mn(II) to ligand ratio are formed with all four siderophores. (iii) The coordination of the three hydroxamates of a siderophore takes place in stepwise processes, except the case of desferricrocin, with which, large-extent overlapping of the processes occurs. (iv) Out of the four tris-chelated [ML] type complexes, the complex of DFCR is the most compact, as it is indicated by the relaxivity values. (v) Following the stoichiometric oxidation of the Mn(II)-siderophore complexes at pH≥9, tris-chelated Mn(III) complexes are formed. To make a comparison between the stability of the Mn(III) and the corresponding Fe(III) complexes of DFCR and TAF, the determination of the stability of the Fe(III) complexes under our condition has also been performed, by using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Comparable stability of the corresponding complexes was found. (vi) Correlation study of the stability constants resulted in estimation of the constant of the Mn(III) monohydroxo complex, for which there was no data in the literature under our conditions.

  17. Tn5 insertion in the tonB gene promoter affects iron-related phenotypes and increases extracellular siderophore levels in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    de Paula Soares, Cleiton; Rodrigues, Elisete Pains; de Paula Ferreira, Jéssica; Simões Araújo, Jean Luiz; Rouws, Luc Felicianus Marie; Baldani, José Ivo; Vidal, Marcia Soares

    2015-03-01

    TonB-dependent receptors in concert with the TonB-ExbB-ExbD protein complex are responsible for the uptake of iron and substances such as vitamin B12 in several bacterial species. In this study, Tn5 mutagenesis of the sugarcane endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus led to the isolation of a mutant with a single Tn5-insertion in the promoter region of a tonB gene ortholog. This mutant, named Gdiaa31, displayed a reduced growth rate and a lack of response to iron availability when compared to the wild-type strain PAL5(T). Several efforts to generate null-mutants for the tonB gene by insertional mutagenesis were without success. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated reduced transcription of tonB in Gdiaa31 when compared to PAL5(T). tonB transcription was inhibited in the presence of Fe(3+) ions both in PAL5(T) and in Gdiaa31. In comparison with PAL5(T), Gdiaa31 also demonstrated decreased nitrogenase activity and biofilm formation capability, two iron-requiring physiological characteristics of G. diazotrophicus. Additionally, Gdiaa31 accumulated higher siderophore levels in culture supernatant. The genetic complementation of the Gdiaa31 strain with a plasmid that carried the tonB gene including its putative promoter region (pP(tonB)) restored nitrogenase activity and siderophore accumulation phenotypes. These results indicate that the TonB complex has a role in iron/siderophore transport and may be essential in the physiology of G. diazotrophicus.

  18. Is drug release necessary for antimicrobial activity of siderophore-drug conjugates? Syntheses and biological studies of the naturally occurring salmycin "Trojan Horse" antibiotics and synthetic desferridanoxamine-antibiotic conjugates.

    PubMed

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Möllmann, Ute; Long, Timothy E; Miller, Marvin J

    2009-08-01

    The recent rise in drug resistance found amongst community acquired infections has sparked renewed interest in developing antimicrobial agents that target resistant organisms and limit the natural selection of immune variants. Recent discoveries have shown that iron uptake systems in bacteria and fungi are suitable targets for developing such therapeutic agents. The use of siderophore-drug conjugates as "Trojan Horse" drug delivery agents has attracted particular interest in this area. This review will discuss efforts in our research group to study the salmycin class of "Trojan Horse" antibiotics. Inspired by the natural design of the salmycins, a series of desferridanoxamine-antibiotic conjugates were synthesized and tested in microbial growth inhibition assays. The results of these studies will be related to understanding the role of drug release in siderophore-mediated drug delivery with implications for future siderophore-drug conjugate design.

  19. Physiological control of amonabactin biosynthesis in Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Barghouthi, S; Young, R; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1989-01-01

    Amonabactin is a siderophore from Aeromonas hydrophila which is produced in two biologically active forms composed of the phenolate 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), lysine, glycine, and either trytophan (amonabactin T) or phenylalanine (amonabactin P). Amonabactin biosynthetic mutants (generated by chemical mutagenesis) that either produced no amonabactin or overproduced the siderophore were isolated and identified on chrome azurol S siderophore detection agar. Amonabactin-negative mutants were of two categories. One type produced no phenolates and used exogenous DHB to synthesize amonabactin (both forms) while the other type excreted DHB but not amonabactin. This suggests an amonabactin biosynthetic pathway composed of two segments, one producing DHB and the other assembling amonabactin from DHB and the amino acids. Overproduction mutants used amonabactin poorly or not at all, indicating that they contained lesions in amonabactin utilization. Adding the analog D-tryptophan to wild-type A. hydrophila cultures reduced synthesis of both amonabactin T and amonabactin P and lengthened the lag phase in iron restricted medium. The tryptophan and phenylalanine forms of amonabactin may be synthesized by a single assembly pathway that contains a novel enzyme (sensitive to D-tryptophan) which inserts either tryptophan or phenylalanine into amonabactin.

  20. Irp9, Encoded by the High-Pathogenicity Island of Yersinia enterocolitica, Is Able To Convert Chorismate into Salicylate, the Precursor of the Siderophore Yersiniabactin

    PubMed Central

    Pelludat, Cosima; Brem, Daniela; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    The Irp9 protein of Yersinia enterocolitica participates in the synthesis of salicylate, the precursor of the siderophore yersiniabactin. In Pseudomonas species, salicylate synthesis is mediated by two enzymes: isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate-lyase. Both enzymes are required for complementation of a Yersinia irp9 mutant. However, irp9 is not able to complement Escherichia coli entC for the production of enterobactin, which requires isochorismate as a precursor. These results suggest that Irp9 directly converts chorismate into salicylate. PMID:12949119

  1. Siderophore-mediated oxidation of Ce and fractionation of HREE by Mn (hydr)oxide-coprecipitation and sorption on MnO2: Experimental evidence for negative Ce-anomalies in abiogenic manganese precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Dennis; Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments with Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY), where the REY were sorbed on synthetic manganese dioxide as well as on coprecipitating manganese (hydr)oxide in the presence and absence of the siderophore desferrioxamine-B (DFOB). Siderophores are a group of globally abundant biogenic complexing agents which are excreted by plants and bacteria to enhance the bioavailability of Fe in oxic environments. The model siderophore used in this study, DFOB, is a hydroxamate siderophore occurring in almost all environmental settings with concentrations in the nanomolar to millimolar range and is one of the most thoroughly studied siderophores. In the absence of siderophores and other organic ligands, trivalent Ce is usually surface-oxidized to tetravalent Ce during sorption onto manganese (hydr)oxides. Such Mn precipitates, therefore, often show positive Ce anomalies, whereas the ambient solutions exhibit negative Ce anomalies (Ohta and Kawabe, 2001). In marked contrast, however, REY sorption in the presence of DFOB produces negative Ce anomalies in the Mn precipitates and a distinct and characteristic positive Ce anomaly in the residual siderophore-bearing solution. Furthermore, the heavy REY with ionic radii larger than the radius of Sm are also almost completely prevented from sorption onto the Mn solid phases. Sorption of REY onto Mn (hydr)oxides in the presence of DFOB creates a distinct and pronounced fractionation of Ce and the heavy REY from the light and middle REY. Apart from Ce, which is oxidized in solution by the siderophore, the distribution of the other REY mimics the stability constants for multi-dentate complexes of REY with DFOB, as determined by Christenson & Schijf (2011). Heavier REY are forming stronger complexes (and are hence better "protected" from sorption) than light REY, excluding Ce. Preferential partitioning of Ce into the liquid phase during the precipitation of Mn (hydr)oxides has only rarely been described for natural Mn (hydr

  2. Biosynthesis and Toxicological Effects of Patulin

    PubMed Central

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2010-01-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects. PMID:22069602

  3. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis. PMID:26510127

  4. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J.; Interrante, Maria Filsinger; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. Here, we engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof-of-principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  5. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Bromke, Mariusz A.

    2013-01-01

    Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity. PMID:24957993

  6. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  7. Natural rubber biosynthesis in plants: rubber transferase.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katrina; Xie, Wenshuang

    2012-01-01

    Rubber biosynthesis in plants is a fascinating biochemical system, which evolved at the dawn of the dicotyledoneae and is present in at least four of the dictolydonous superorders. Rubber biosynthesis is catalyzed by a membrane complex in a monolayer membrane envelope, requires two distinct substrates and a divalent cation cofactor, and produces a high-molecular-weight isoprenoid polymer. A solid understanding of this system underpins valuable papers in the literature. However, the published literature is rife with unreliable reports in which the investigators have fallen into traps created by the current incomplete understanding of the biochemistry of rubber synthesis. In this chapter, we attempt to guide both new and more established researchers around these pitfalls.

  8. Circular bacteriocins: biosynthesis and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Christina; Brede, Dag A; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2014-11-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides.

  9. Circular Bacteriocins: Biosynthesis and Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Brede, Dag A.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2014-01-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides. PMID:25172850

  10. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-04

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds.

  11. Heterocyclic Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Pharmacological Applications.

    PubMed

    Hotchandani, Tarun; Desgagne-Penix, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Amaryllidaceae alkaloids (AAs), which are natural heterocyclic compounds, are isolated from Amaryllidaceae plants such as narcissus, snowdrop and spider lily. AAs have been extensively studied due to their multiple pharmacological properties. Nevertheless, knowledge of AA synthesis in plants is lacking and most genes encoding enzymes involved in their production remain unknown. AAs are structurally complex compounds which are challenging for total chemical synthesis that is economically viable. Therefore the understanding of AA biosynthesis could allow for the development of biotechnologies for the production of natural AAs or analogues, maintaining or improving their pharmacological properties. In this review, we describe the progress regarding the biosynthesis and pharmacological properties of AAs. The most recent developments in neurological, anti-cancer and anti-microbial bioactivities of heterocyclic AAs are covered.

  12. Adsorption of Pb(ll) and Eu(III) by oxide minerals in the presence of natural and synthetic hydroxamate siderophores.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Stephan M; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N; Sposito, Garrison

    2002-03-15

    Trihydroxamate siderophores have been proposed for use as mediators of actinide and heavy metal mobility in contaminated subsurface zones. These microbially produced ligands, common in terrestrial and marine environments, recently have been derivatized synthetically to enhance their affinity for transuranic metal cations. However, the interactions between these synthetic derivative and adsorbed trace metals have not been characterized. In this paper we compare a natural siderophore, desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B), with its actinide-specific catecholate derivative, N-(2,3-dihydroxy-4-(methylamido)benzoyl)desferrioxamine-B (DFOMTA), as to their effect on the adsorption of Pb(II) and Eu(III) by goethite and boehmite. In the presence of 240 microM DFO-B, a strongly depleting effect on Eu(III) adsorption by goethite and boehmite occurred above pH 6. By contrast, almost total removal of Eu(III) from solution in the neutral to slightly acidic pH range was observed in the presence of either 10 or 100 microM DFOMTA, due primarilyto the formation of metal-DFOMTA precipitates. Addition of DFOMTA caused an increase in Pb(II) adsorption by goethite below pH 5, but a decrease above pH 5, such that the Pb(II) adsorption edge in the presence of DFOMTA strongly resembled the DFOMTA adsorption envelope, which showed a maximum near pH 5 and decreasing adsorption toward lower and higher pH.

  13. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-08-09

    The gene encoding a putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium S. frigidimarina was successfully cloned, followed by expression and purification of the gene product. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution and preliminary crystallographic analysis is promising with respect to structure determination and increased insight into the poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying iron acquisition. Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI-RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing.

  14. Enzymology of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Strijbis, Karin; Vaz, Frédéric M; Distel, Ben

    2010-05-01

    The water-soluble zwitterion carnitine is an essential metabolite in eukaryotes required for fatty acid oxidation as it functions as a carrier during transfer of activated acyl and acetyl groups across intracellular membranes. Most eukaryotes are able to synthesize carnitine endogenously, besides their capacity to take up carnitine from the diet or extracellular medium through plasma membrane transporters. This review discusses the current knowledge on carnitine homeostasis with special emphasis on the enzymology of the four steps of the carnitine biosynthesis pathway.

  15. Phenol biosynthesis in higher plants. Gallic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dewick, P. M.; Haslam, E.

    1969-01-01

    The biosynthesis of gallic acid in a number of higher plants was investigated by using l-[U-14C]phenylalanine, (−)-[G-14C]shikimic acid, d-[1-14C]glucose and d-[6-14C]glucose as tracers. The results are compared with those obtained similarly for caffeic acid and are interpreted in terms of the dehydrogenation of 5-dehydroshikimic acid as a normal route of metabolism for gallic acid. PMID:5807212

  16. Investigating the Elusive Mechanism of Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Xylophone V.; Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Tran, Vy M.; Nguyen, Khiem V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis requires numerous biosynthetic enzymes and activated sulfate and sugar donors. Although the sequence of biosynthetic events is resolved using reconstituted systems, little is known about the emergence of cell-specific GAG chains (heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and dermatan sulfate) with distinct sulfation patterns. We have utilized a library of click-xylosides that have various aglycones to decipher the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis in a cellular system. Earlier studies have shown that both the concentration of the primers and the structure of the aglycone moieties can affect the composition of the newly synthesized GAG chains. However, it is largely unknown whether structural features of aglycone affect the extent of sulfation, sulfation pattern, disaccharide composition, and chain length of GAG chains. In this study, we show that aglycones can switch not only the type of GAG chains, but also their fine structures. Our findings provide suggestive evidence for the presence of GAGOSOMES that have different combinations of enzymes and their isoforms regulating the synthesis of cell-specific combinatorial structures. We surmise that click-xylosides are differentially recognized by the GAGOSOMES to generate distinct GAG structures as observed in this study. These novel click-xylosides offer new avenues to profile the cell-specific GAG chains, elucidate the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis, and to decipher the biological actions of GAG chains in model organisms. PMID:19628873

  17. The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R; Leimkühler, Silke

    2015-03-01

    The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors (Moco) is an ancient, ubiquitous, and highly conserved pathway leading to the biochemical activation of molybdenum. Moco is the essential component of a group of redox enzymes, which are diverse in terms of their phylogenetic distribution and their architectures, both at the overall level and in their catalytic geometry. A wide variety of transformations are catalyzed by these enzymes at carbon, sulfur and nitrogen atoms, which include the transfer of an oxo group or two electrons to or from the substrate. More than 50 molybdoenzymes were identified to date. In all molybdoenzymes except nitrogenase, molybdenum is coordinated to a dithiolene group on the 6-alkyl side chain of a pterin called molybdopterin (MPT). The biosynthesis of Moco can be divided into three general steps, with a fourth one present only in bacteria and archaea: (1) formation of the cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate, (2) formation of MPT, (3) insertion of molybdenum into molybdopterin to form Moco, and (4) additional modification of Moco in bacteria with the attachment of a nucleotide to the phosphate group of MPT, forming the dinucleotide variant of Moco. This review will focus on the biosynthesis of Moco in bacteria, humans and plants.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  19. Controlling the delicate balance of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liang; Bauer, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are a family of compounds that contain four pyrrole rings. They are involved in many fundamental biological processes such as photoreception, electron transport, gas transport and also as cofactors for enzymatic reactions. As regulators of protein activity, tetrapyrroles mediate cellular response to light, oxygen and nutrient levels in the surrounding environment. Biosynthesis of haem tetrapyrroles shares, conserved pathways and enzymes among all three domains of life. This is contrasted by chlorophyll biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and chloroplasts, or cobalamin biosynthesis that is only present in eubacteria and archaea. This implicates haem as the most ancient, and chlorophyll as the most recent, of the common tetrapyrroles that are currently synthesized by existing organisms. Haem and chlorophyll are both toxic when synthesized in excess over apo-proteins that bind these tetrapyrroles. Accordingly, the synthesis of these tetrapyrroles has to be tightly regulated and coordinated with apo-protein production. The mechanism of regulating haem and chlorophyll synthesis has been studied intensively in Rhodobacter species and will be discussed. PMID:23754814

  20. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  1. [Regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes].

    PubMed

    Matseliukh, B P

    2006-01-01

    The review of literature presents the modern data about cascade regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes including basal and global levels. The first regulatory level is presented by related proteins of SARP family playing the role of positive transcription factors of pathway-specific genes of clusters of antibiotic biosynthesis. In their turn these regulatory genes are under the control of higher regulatory level represented by bldA- and A-factor-dependent cascade regulation and two-component signal transduction system (AfsK-AfsR, AbsAl-AbsA2, AfsQ1-AfsQ2 and others), consisting of sensor protein kinase and response regulator protein.Streptomycetes, in contrast to other microorganisms, have dozens of protein kinases and related regulator proteins that testifies to the great importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in cell response to internal and external signals. The role of camp, ppGpp and other proteins in regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis was also considered in this review.

  2. The ornibactin biosynthesis and transport genes of Burkholderia cenocepacia are regulated by an extracytoplasmic function sigma factor which is a part of the Fur regulon.

    PubMed

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Lowe, Carolyn A; Farmer, Kate L; Husnain, Seyyed I; Thomas, Mark S

    2006-05-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia mutants that fail to produce the siderophore ornibactin were obtained following mutagenesis with mini-Tn5Tp. These mutants were shown to be growth restricted under conditions of iron depletion. In eight of the mutants, the transposon had integrated into one of two genes, orbI and orbJ, encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases. In the other mutant, the transposon had inserted into an open reading frame, orbS, located upstream from orbI. The polypeptide product of orbS exhibits a high degree of similarity to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor PvdS but possesses an N-terminal extension of approximately 29 amino acids that is not present in PvdS. Three predicted OrbS-dependent promoters were identified within the ornibactin gene cluster, based on their similarity to PvdS-dependent promoters. The iron-regulated activity of these promoters was shown to require OrbS. Transcription of the orbS gene was found to be under the control of an iron-regulated sigma(70)-dependent promoter. This promoter, but not the OrbS-dependent promoters, was shown to be a target for repression by the global regulator Fur. Our results demonstrate that production of ornibactin by B. cenocepacia in response to iron starvation requires transcription of an operon that is dependent on the Fur-regulated ECF sigma factor gene orbS. A mechanism is also proposed for the biosynthesis of ornibactin.

  3. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  4. Acetamido sugar biosynthesis in the Euryarchaea.

    PubMed

    Namboori, Seema C; Graham, David E

    2008-04-01

    Archaea and eukaryotes share a dolichol phosphate-dependent system for protein N-glycosylation. In both domains, the acetamido sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) forms part of the core oligosaccharide. However, the archaeal Methanococcales produce GlcNAc using the bacterial biosynthetic pathway. Key enzymes in this pathway belong to large families of proteins with diverse functions; therefore, the archaeal enzymes could not be identified solely using comparative sequence analysis. Genes encoding acetamido sugar-biosynthetic proteins were identified in Methanococcus maripaludis using phylogenetic and gene cluster analyses. Proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were purified and assayed for the predicted activities. The MMP1680 protein encodes a universally conserved glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase. The MMP1077 phosphomutase converted alpha-D-glucosamine-6-phosphate to alpha-D-glucosamine-1-phosphate, although this protein is more closely related to archaeal pentose and glucose phosphomutases than to bacterial glucosamine phosphomutases. The thermostable MJ1101 protein catalyzed both the acetylation of glucosamine-1-phosphate and the uridylyltransferase reaction with UTP to produce UDP-GlcNAc. The MMP0705 protein catalyzed the C-2 epimerization of UDP-GlcNAc, and the MMP0706 protein used NAD(+) to oxidize UDP-N-acetylmannosamine, forming UDP-N-acetylmannosaminuronate (ManNAcA). These two proteins are similar to enzymes used for proteobacterial lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and gram-positive bacterial capsule production, suggesting a common evolutionary origin and a widespread distribution of ManNAcA. UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-ManNAcA biosynthesis evolved early in the euryarchaeal lineage, because most of their genomes contain orthologs of the five genes characterized here. These UDP-acetamido sugars are predicted to be precursors for flagellin and S-layer protein modifications and for the biosynthesis of methanogenic coenzyme B.

  5. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D.; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Spork, Anatol P.; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S.; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5′-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C–C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5′-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. PMID:25855790

  6. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  7. Caste-Selective Pheromone Biosynthesis in Honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plettner, Erika; Slessor, Keith N.; Winston, Mark L.; Oliver, James E.

    1996-03-01

    Queen and worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) produce a caste-related blend of functionalized 8- and 10-carbon fatty acids in their mandibular glands. The biological functions of these compounds match the queen's reproductive and the worker's nonreproductive roles in the colony. Studies with deuterated substrates revealed that the biosynthesis of these acids begins with stearic acid, which is hydroxylated at the 17th or 18th position. The 18-carbon hydroxy acid chains are shortened, and the resulting 10-carbon hydroxy acids are oxidized in a caste-selective manner, thereby determining many of the functional differences between queens and workers.

  8. Biosynthesis of caldariellaquinone in Sulfolobus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, D; White, R H

    1989-01-01

    The biosynthesis of caldariellaquionone (CQ) was studied in species of Sulfolobus by measuring the incorporation of stable isotopically labeled tyrosines into CQ. By feeding a series of tyrosines labeled with deuterium or 13C and then measuring the extent and position at which label was incorporated into CQ by mass spectrometry, it was shown that more than 95% of the label was incorporated into the benzo[b]thiophen-4,7-quinone moiety of CQ. From the labeling experiments, it is concluded that the benzo[b]thiophen-4,7-quinone is derived as an intact unit from all of the carbons of tyrosine except C-1. PMID:2512282

  9. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  10. Green biosynthesis of floxuridine by immobilized microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Cintia W; Britos, Claudia N; Lozano, Mario E; Sinisterra, Jose V; Trelles, Jorge A

    2012-06-01

    This work describes an efficient, simple, and green bioprocess for obtaining 5-halogenated pyrimidine nucleosides from thymidine by transglycosylation using whole cells. Biosynthesis of 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (floxuridine) was achieved by free and immobilized Aeromonas salmonicida ATCC 27013 with an 80% and 65% conversion occurring in 1 h, respectively. The immobilized biocatalyst was stable for more than 4 months in storage conditions (4 °C) and could be reused at least 30 times without loss of its activity. This microorganism was able to biosynthesize 2.0 mg L(-1) min(-1) (60%) of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine in 3 h. These halogenated pyrimidine 2'-deoxynucleosides are used as antitumoral agents.

  11. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  12. Teichoic acid biosynthesis as an antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Lincoln W; Santa Maria, John P; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-10-01

    The relentless spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens makes it imperative to develop new chemotherapeutic strategies to overcome infection. The bacterial cell wall has served as a rich source for both validated and unexploited pathways that are essential for virulence and survival. Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are cell wall polymers that play fundamental roles in Gram-positive bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, and both have been proposed as novel antibacterial targets. Here we describe recent progress toward the discovery of teichoic acid biosynthesis inhibitors and their potential as antibiotics to combat Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  13. Urinary Concentrations and Antibacterial Activity of BAL30072, a Novel Siderophore Monosulfactam, against Uropathogens after Intravenous Administration in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Marion; Blenk, Holger; Wagenlehner, Florian M. E.

    2016-01-01

    This annex study to a phase 1 study aimed to correlate urinary concentrations and bactericidal titers (UBTs) of BAL30072, a novel siderophore monosulfactam, in healthy subjects in order to evaluate which dosage of BAL30072 should be investigated in a clinical study on complicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Three cohorts of a total of 19 healthy male subjects were included in the add-on study and received the following BAL30072 dosages. The 1st cohort received 1 g once a day (q.d.) intravenously (i.v.) (1 h) on day 1 and 1 g thrice daily (t.i.d.) on day 2, the 2nd cohort received 2 g q.d. i.v. (1 h) on day 1 and 2 g t.i.d. on day 2, and the 3rd cohort received 1 g q.d. i.v. (4-h infusion) on day 8. Urine was collected up to 24 h after drug administration. UBTs were determined for seven Escherichia coli isolates (three wild type [WT], CTX-M-15, TEM-3, TEM-5, NDM-1), two Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (WT, KPC), one Proteus mirabilis isolate (WT), and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WT, VIM-1 plus AmpC). Urine drug concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The median urinary excretions of BAL30072 ranged between 38% and 46% (3 cohorts). The median UBTs after i.v. administration of 1 or 2 g q.d. and after 1 or 2 g t.i.d. showed positive UBTs for 24 h after the lowest dosage (1 g q.d.) for 5 of 7 of the Enterobacteriaceae strains and after the higher dosage of 2 g administered i.v. t.i.d. for all strains tested. After i.v. infusion of 1 g over 4 h, positive UBTs were demonstrated for three E. coli strains for up to 12 h, for the K. pneumoniae (KPC) strain for up to 8 h, and for the P. aeruginosa (VIM-1 plus AmpC) strain for up to only 4 h. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the E. coli (NDM-1) strain and the K. pneumoniae (WT) strain correlated well between broth and urine but did not correlate well for the two P. aeruginosa strains. BAL30072 exhibits positive UBTs for 24 h even after a dosage of 1

  14. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Daniel R.; Revtovich, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and

  15. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  16. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Cheng-Chih Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  17. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from (1-{sup 14}C)acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 {mu}M acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl{sub 2}, 1 mM each of the MnCl{sub 2} and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO{sub 3}, and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 {mu}g/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO{sub 3}, divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg{sup 2+} and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor.

  18. Biosynthesis of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer pheromone.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Rebecca A; Ragains, Justin R; Li, Weiqing; Ruvkun, Gary; Clardy, Jon; Mak, Ho Yi

    2009-02-10

    To sense its population density and to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage, Caenorhabditis elegans uses the dauer pheromone, which consists of ascaroside derivatives with short, fatty acid-like side chains. Although the dauer pheromone has been studied for 25 years, its biosynthesis is completely uncharacterized. The daf-22 mutant is the only known mutant defective in dauer pheromone production. Here, we show that daf-22 encodes a homolog of human sterol carrier protein SCPx, which catalyzes the final step in peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation. We also show that dhs-28, which encodes a homolog of the human d-bifunctional protein that acts just upstream of SCPx, is also required for pheromone production. Long-term daf-22 and dhs-28 cultures develop dauer-inducing activity by accumulating less active, long-chain fatty acid ascaroside derivatives. Thus, daf-22 and dhs-28 are required for the biosynthesis of the short-chain fatty acid-derived side chains of the dauer pheromone and link dauer pheromone production to metabolic state.

  19. Unique biosynthesis of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes).

    PubMed

    Sato, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    To the best of my knowledge, only 19 cyclic and 8 linear C35 terpenes have been identified to date, and no family name was assigned to this terpene class until recently. In 2011, it was proposed that these C35 terpenes should be called sesquarterpenes. This review highlights the biosynthesis of two kinds of sesquarterpenes (C35 terpenes) that are produced via cyclization of a linear C35 isoprenoid in Bacillus and Mycobacterium species. In Bacillus species, a new type of terpene cyclase that has no sequence homology with any known terpene synthases, as well as a bifunctional terpene cyclase that biosynthesizes two classes of cyclic terpenes with different numbers of carbons as natural products, have been identified. On the other hand, in Mycobacterium species, the first bifunctional Z-prenyltransferase has been found, but a novel terpene cyclase and a unique polyprenyl reductase remain unidentified. The identification of novel enzyme types should lead to the discovery of many homologous enzymes and their products including novel natural compounds. On the other hand, many enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of natural products have low substrate specificities in vitro. Therefore, to find novel natural products present in organisms, the multifunctionality of enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of natural products should be analyzed.

  20. Biosynthesis of 2-methylisoborneol in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Giglio, S; Chou, W K W; Ikeda, H; Cane, D E; Monis, P T

    2011-02-01

    The production of odiferous metabolites, such as 2-methlyisoborneol (MIB), is a major concern for water utilities worldwide. Although MIB has no known biological function, the presence of the earthy/musty taste and odor attributed to this compound result in the reporting of numerous complaints by consumers, which undermines water utility performance and the safe and adequate provision of potable waters. Cyanobacteria are the major producers of MIB in natural waters, by mechanisms that have heretofore remained largely unstudied. To investigate the fundamental biological mechanism of MIB biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, the genome of a MIB-producing Pseudanabaena limnetica was sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing, and the recombinant proteins derived from the putative MIB biosynthetic genes were biochemically characterized. We demonstrate that the biosynthesis of MIB in cyanobacteria is a result of 2 key reactions: 1) a S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation of the monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) to 2-methyl-GPP catalyzed by geranyl diphosphate 2-methyltransferase (GPPMT) and 2) further cyclization of 2-methyl-GPP to MIB catalyzed by MIB synthase (MIBS) as part of a MIB operon. Based on a comparison of the component MIB biosynthetic genes in actinomycetes and cyanobacterial organisms, we hypothesize that there have been multiple rearrangements of the genes in this operon.

  1. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  2. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL(-1) levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL(-1) ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL(-1) .

  3. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  4. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  5. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  6. BIOSYNTHESIS AND ACTION OF JASMONATES IN PLANTS.

    PubMed

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mullet, John E.

    1997-06-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives can modulate aspects of fruit ripening, production of viable pollen, root growth, tendril coiling, and plant resistance to insects and pathogens. Jasmonate activates genes involved in pathogen and insect resistance, and genes encoding vegetative storage proteins, but represses genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis. Jasmonic acid is derived from linolenic acid, and most of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway have been extensively characterized. Modulation of lipoxygenase and allene oxide synthase gene expression in transgenic plants raises new questions about the compartmentation of the biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. The activation of jasmonic acid biosynthesis by cell wall elicitors, the peptide systemin, and other compounds will be related to the function of jasmonates in plants. Jasmonate modulates gene expression at the level of translation, RNA processing, and transcription. Promoter elements that mediate responses to jasmonate have been isolated. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of how jasmonate biosynthesis is regulated and relates this information to knowledge of jasmonate modulated gene expression.

  7. Molecular regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-03-01

    Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes.

  8. Siderophore-mediated uptake of Fe sup 3+ by the plant growth-stimulating Pseudomonas putida strain WCS358 and by other rhizosphere microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    de Weger, L.A.; van Arendonk, J.J.C.M.; Recourt, K.; Lugtenberg, B. ); van der Hofstad, G.A.J.M.; Weisbeek, P.J. )

    1988-10-01

    Under iron-limited conditions, Pseudomonas putida WCS358 produces a siderophore, pseudobactin 358, which is essential for the plant growth-stimulating ability of this strain. Cells of strain WCS358, provided that they have been grown under Fe{sup 3+} limitation, take up {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+} from the {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+}-labeled pseudobactin 358 complex with K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of 0.23 {mu}M and 0.14 nmol/mg of cell dry weight per min, respectively. Uptake experiments with cells treated with various metabolic inhibitors showed that this Fe{sup 3+} uptake process was dependent on the proton motive force. Furthermore, strain WCS358 was shown to be able to take up Fe{sup 3+} complexed to the siderophore of another plant-beneficial P. fluorescens strain, WCS374. The tested pathogenic rhizobacteria and rhizofungi were neither able to grow on Fe{sup 3+}-deficient medium in the presence of pseudobactin 358 nor able to take up {sup 55}Fe{sub 3+} from {sup 55}Fe{sup 3+}-pseudobactin 358. The same applies for three cyanide-producing Pseudomonas strains which are supposed to be representatives of the minor pathogens. These results indicate that the extraordinary ability of strain WCS358 to compete efficiently for Fe{sup 3+} is based on the fact that the pathogenic and deleterious rhizosphere microorganisms, in contrast to strain WCS358 itself, are not able to take up Fe{sup 3+} from Fe{sup 3+}-pseudobactin 358 complexes.

  9. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  10. Phytochrome-mediated Carotenoids Biosynthesis in Ripening Tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R L; Jen, J J

    1975-09-01

    Red light induced and far red light inhibited carotenoid biosynthesis in ripening tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) when compared to controls kept in the dark. Red illumination following far red illumination reversed the inhibitory action of far red light on carotenoid biosynthesi