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Sample records for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis

  1. The ornithine decarboxylase gene odc is required for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis in Bordetella spp.: putrescine is a precursor of alcaligin.

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, T J; Armstrong, S K

    1996-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions defining Bordetella bronchiseptica siderophore phenotypic complementation group III mutants BRM3 and BRM5 were found to reside approximately 200 to 300 bp apart by restriction mapping of cloned genomic regions associated with the insertion markers. DNA hybridization analysis using B. bronchiseptica genomic DNA sequences flanking the cloned BRM3 insertion marker identified homologous Bordetella pertussis UT25 cosmids that complemented the siderophore biosynthesis defect of the group III B. bronchiseptica mutants. Subcloning and complementation analysis localized the complementing activity to a 2.8-kb B. pertussis genomic DNA region. Nucleotide sequencing identified an open reading frame predicted to encode a polypeptide exhibiting strong similarity at the primary amino acid level with several pyridoxal phosphate-dependent amino acid decarboxylases. Alcaligin production was fully restored to group III mutants by supplementation of iron-depleted culture media with putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), consistent with defects in an ornithine decarboxylase activity required for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis. Concordantly, the alcaligin biosynthesis defect of BRM3 was functionally complemented by the heterologous Escherichia coli speC gene encoding an ornithine decarboxylase activity. Enzyme assays confirmed that group III B. bronchiseptica siderophore-deficient mutants lack an ornithine decarboxylase activity required for the biosynthesis of alcaligin. Siderophore production by an analogous mutant of B. pertussis constructed by allelic exchange was undetectable. We propose the designation odc for the gene defined by these mutations that abrogate alcaligin siderophore production. Putrescine is an essential precursor of alcaligin in Bordetella spp. PMID:8550442

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the Bordetella alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis operon.

    PubMed

    Kang, H Y; Armstrong, S K

    1998-02-01

    The alc gene cluster of Bordetella pertussis includes three genes, alcA, alcB, and alcC, which are involved in alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis in response to iron starvation. The production of AlcA, AlcB, and AlcC in Bordetella cells and the transcriptional organization of alcA, alcB, and alcC were investigated by using a set of three alc'-'lacZ gene fusion constructs that were contiguous with the known promoter upstream of alcA and extended to fusion junctions within each alc cistron. All three alc'-'lacZ fusions exhibited iron-repressible reporter gene expression which was abolished by deletion of the 105-bp alcA promoter-operator region. In an immunoblot analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for beta-galactosidase, the AlcA-LacZ, AlcB-LacZ, and AlcC-LacZ hybrid proteins were detected in Bordetella cells grown under iron-depleted conditions. A B. pertussis mutant in which the 105-bp alcA promoter-operator region was deleted by allelic exchange was unable to produce detectable levels of siderophore. Hybridization analysis using gene-specific probes showed that alc-specific transcript levels in the mutant were negligible compared with those of the wild-type parent. These results confirm that alcA, alcB, and alcC are cotranscribed from an iron-regulated control region immediately upstream of alcA. Transcript analysis using hybridization probes representing regions downstream of alcC demonstrated that alc transcription extends approximately 3.6 kb further downstream from the alcC coding region, suggesting the cotranscription of additional, uncharacterized alcaligin system genes.

  3. Impact of Alcaligin Siderophore Utilization on In Vivo Growth of Bordetella pertussis▿

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2007-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough, or pertussis, is an obligate human pathogen with diverse high-affinity transport systems for the assimilation of iron, a biometal that is essential for growth. Under iron starvation stress conditions, B. pertussis produces the siderophore alcaligin. The alcaligin siderophore gene cluster, consisting of the alcABCDERS and fauA genes, encodes activities required for alcaligin biosynthesis, the export of the siderophore from the cell, the uptake of the ferric alcaligin complex across the outer membrane, and the transcriptional activation of alcaligin system genes by an autogenous mechanism involving alcaligin sensing. The fauA gene encodes a 79-kDa TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor protein required for the uptake and utilization of ferric alcaligin as an iron source. In this study, using mixed-infection competition experiments in a mouse respiratory model, inactivation of the B. pertussis ferric alcaligin receptor protein was found to have a profound impact on in vivo growth and survival of a fauA mutant compared with a coinfecting wild-type strain. The attenuating effect of fauA inactivation was evident early in the course of the infection, suggesting that the contribution of ferric alcaligin transport to the ecological fitness of B. pertussis may be important for adaptation to iron-restricted host conditions that exist at the initial stages of infection. Alcaligin-mediated iron acquisition by B. pertussis may be critical for successful host colonization and establishment of infection. PMID:17724074

  4. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 and identification of aleB encoding the ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gilis, A; Khan, M A; Cornelis, P; Meyer, J M; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-01-01

    Siderophore production in response to iron limitation was observed in Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, and the corresponding siderophore was named alcaligin E. Alcaligin E was characterized as a phenolate-type siderophore containing neither catecholate nor hydroxamate groups. Alcaligin E promoted the growth of siderophore-deficient A. eutrophus mutants under iron-restricted conditions and promoted 59Fe uptake by iron-limited cells. However, the growth of the Sid- mutant AE1152, which was obtained from CH34 by Tn5-Tc mutagenesis, was completely inhibited by the addition of alcaligin E. AE1152 also showed strongly reduced 59Fe uptake in the presence of alcaligin E. This indicates that a gene, designated aleB, which is involved in transport of ferric iron-alcaligin E across the membrane is inactivated. The aleB gene was cloned, and its putative amino acid sequence showed strong similarity to those of ferric iron-siderophore receptor proteins. Both wild-type strain CH34 and aleB mutant AE1152 were able to use the same heterologous siderophores, indicating that AleB is involved only in ferric iron-alcaligin E uptake. Interestingly, no utilization of pyochelin, which is also a phenolate-type siderophore, was observed for A. eutrophus CH34. Genetic studies of different Sid- mutants, obtained after transposon mutagenesis, showed that the genes involved in alcaligin E and ferric iron-alcaligin E receptor biosynthesis are clustered in a 20-kb region on the A. eutrophus CH34 chromosome in the proximity of the cys-232 locus. PMID:8808942

  5. Identification of alcA, a Bordetella bronchiseptica gene necessary for alcaligin production.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1995-12-29

    The alcA gene, essential for the production of the dihydroxamate siderophore, alcaligin, by Bordetella bronchiseptica, was cloned and sequenced. The alcA gene was identified on a 4.7-kb EcoRI genomic fragment adjacent to a Tn5lac transposon insertion that inactivated alcaligin production in strain MBORD846. Analysis of the alcA nucleotide sequence revealed a putative Fur-binding site, suggesting that expression of this gene is repressed by iron. The deduced amino-acid sequence of this open reading frame had significant homology with the Escherichia coli iucD gene product, an enzyme required for biosynthesis of the dihydroxamate siderophore aerobactin.

  6. Aqueous solution speciation of Fe(III) complexes with dihydroxamate siderophores alcaligin and rhodotorulic acid and synthetic analogues using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spasojević, I; Boukhalfa, H; Stevens, R D; Crumbliss, A L

    2001-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of Fe3+ complexes of cyclic (alcaligin) and linear (rhodotorulic acid) dihydroxamate siderophores and synthetic linear eight-carbon-chain and two-carbon-chain dihydroxamic acids ([CH3N(OH)C=O)]2(CH2)n; H2Ln; n = 2 and 8) were investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Information was obtained relevant to the structure and the speciation of various Fe(III)-dihydroxamate complexes present in aqueous solution by (1) comparing different ionization techniques (ESI and FAB), (2) altering the experimental parameters (Fe3+/ligand ratio, pH, cone voltage), (3) using high-stability hexacoordinated Fe(III) siderophore complex mixtures (ferrioxamine B/ferrioxamine E) as a calibrant to quantify intrinsically neutral (H+ clustered or protonated) and intrinsically charged complexes, and (4) using mixed-metal complexes containing Fe3+, Ga3+, and Al3+. These results illustrate that for all dihydroxamic acid ligands investigated multiple tris- and bis-chelated mono- and di-Fe(III) species are present in relative concentrations that depend on the pH and Fe/L ratio.

  7. AcsD catalyzes enantioselective citrate desymmetrization in siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Stefan; Kadi, Nadia; McMahon, Stephen A; Song, Lijiang; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Oke, Muse; Liu, Huanting; Johnson, Kenneth A; Carter, Lester G; Botting, Catherine H; White, Malcolm F; Challis, Gregory L; Naismith, James H

    2009-03-01

    Bacterial pathogens need to scavenge iron from their host for growth and proliferation during infection. They have evolved several strategies to do this, one being the biosynthesis and excretion of small, high-affinity iron chelators known as siderophores. The biosynthesis of siderophores is an important area of study, not only for potential therapeutic intervention but also to illuminate new enzyme chemistries. Two general pathways for siderophore biosynthesis exist: the well-characterized nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-dependent pathway and the NRPS-independent siderophore (NIS) pathway, which relies on a different family of sparsely investigated synthetases. Here we report structural and biochemical studies of AcsD from Pectobacterium (formerly Erwinia) chrysanthemi, an NIS synthetase involved in achromobactin biosynthesis. The structures of ATP and citrate complexes provide a mechanistic rationale for stereospecific formation of an enzyme-bound (3R)-citryladenylate, which reacts with L-serine to form a likely achromobactin precursor. AcsD is a unique acyladenylate-forming enzyme with a new fold and chemical catalysis strategy. PMID:19182782

  8. Genetics and Assembly Line Enzymology of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, Jorge H.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2002-01-01

    The regulatory logic of siderophore biosynthetic genes in bacteria involves the universal repressor Fur, which acts together with iron as a negative regulator. However in other bacteria, in addition to the Fur-mediated mechanism of regulation, there is a concurrent positive regulation of iron transport and siderophore biosynthetic genes that occurs under conditions of iron deprivation. Despite these regulatory differences the mechanisms of siderophore biosynthesis follow the same fundamental enzymatic logic, which involves a series of elongating acyl-S-enzyme intermediates on multimodular protein assembly lines: nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). A substantial variety of siderophore structures are produced from similar NRPS assembly lines, and variation can come in the choice of the phenolic acid selected as the N-cap, the tailoring of amino acid residues during chain elongation, the mode of chain termination, and the nature of the capturing nucleophile of the siderophore acyl chain being released. Of course the specific parts that get assembled in a given bacterium may reflect a combination of the inventory of biosynthetic and tailoring gene clusters available. This modular assembly logic can account for all known siderophores. The ability to mix and match domains within modules and to swap modules themselves is likely to be an ongoing process in combinatorial biosynthesis. NRPS evolution will try out new combinations of chain initiation, elongation and tailoring, and termination steps, possibly by genetic exchange with other microorganisms and/or within the same bacterium, to create new variants of iron-chelating siderophores that can fit a particular niche for the producer bacterium. PMID:12040125

  9. Fungal siderophore biosynthesis is partially localized in peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Gründlinger, Mario; Yasmin, Sabiha; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Geley, Stephan; Schrettl, Markus; Hynes, Michael; Haas, Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores play a central role in iron metabolism and virulence of most fungi. Both Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus nidulans excrete the siderophore triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC) for iron acquisition. In A. fumigatus, green fluorescence protein-tagging revealed peroxisomal localization of the TAFC biosynthetic enzymes SidI (mevalonyl-CoA ligase), SidH (mevalonyl-CoA hydratase) and SidF (anhydromevalonyl-CoA transferase), while elimination of the peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS) impaired both, peroxisomal SidH-targeting and TAFC biosynthesis. The analysis of A. nidulans mutants deficient in peroxisomal biogenesis, ATP import or protein import revealed that cytosolic mislocalization of one or two but, interestingly, not all three enzymes impairs TAFC production during iron starvation. The PTS motifs are conserved in fungal orthologues of SidF, SidH and SidI. In agreement with the evolutionary conservation of the partial peroxisomal compartmentalization of fungal siderophore biosynthesis, the SidI orthologue of coprogen-type siderophore-producing Neurospora crassa was confirmed to be peroxisomal. Taken together, this study identified and characterized a novel, evolutionary conserved metabolic function of peroxisomes. PMID:23617799

  10. Biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis in C olletotrichum graminicola is required for modulation of immune responses of maize

    PubMed Central

    Albarouki, Emad; Schafferer, Lukas; Ye, Fanghua; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Haas, Hubertus; Deising, Holger B

    2014-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic maize pathogen C olletotrichum graminicola synthesizes one intracellular and three secreted siderophores. eGFP fusions with the key siderophore biosynthesis gene, SID1, encoding l-ornithine-N 5-monooxygenase, suggested that siderophore biosynthesis is rigorously downregulated specifically during biotrophic development. In order to investigate the role of siderophores during vegetative development and pathogenesis, SID1, which is required for synthesis of all siderophores, and the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene NPS6, synthesizing secreted siderophores, were deleted. Mutant analyses revealed that siderophores are required for vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, ROS tolerance, and cell wall integrity. Δsid1 and Δnps6 mutants were hampered in formation of melanized appressoria and impaired in virulence. In agreement with biotrophy-specific downregulation of siderophore biosynthesis, Δsid1 and Δnps6 strains were not affected in biotrophic development, but spread of necrotrophic hyphae was reduced. To address the question why siderophore biosynthesis is specifically downregulated in biotrophic hyphae, maize leaves were infiltrated with siderophores. Siderophore infiltration alone did not induce defence responses, but formation of biotrophic hyphae in siderophore-infiltrated leaves caused dramatically increased ROS formation and transcriptional activation of genes encoding defence-related peroxidases and PR proteins. These data suggest that fungal siderophores modulate the plant immune system. PMID:24674132

  11. Cellular organization of siderophore biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Evidence for siderosomes.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Véronique; Guillon, Laurent; Cunrath, Olivier; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2015-07-01

    Pyoverdine I (PVDI) and pyochelin (PCH) are the two major siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 to import iron. The biochemistry of the biosynthesis of these two siderophores has been described in detail in the literature over recent years. PVDI assembly requires the coordinated action of seven cytoplasmic enzymes and is followed by a periplasmic maturation before secretion of the siderophore into the extracellular medium by the efflux system PvdRT-OpmQ. PCH biosynthesis also involves seven cytoplasmic enzymes but no periplasmic maturation. Recent findings indicate that the cytoplasmic enzymes involved in each of these two siderophore biosynthesis pathways can form siderophore-specific multi-enzymatic complexes called siderosomes associated with the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane. This organization may optimize the transfer of the siderophore precursors between the various participating enzymes and avoid the diffusion of siderophore precursors, able to chelate metals, throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we describe these recently published findings and discuss the existence of these siderosomes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:25697961

  12. Siderophore Biosynthesis Governs the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by Coordinately Modulating the Differential Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; He, Yan; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections impose substantial health burdens on women worldwide. Urinary tract infections often incur a high risk of recurrence and antibiotic resistance, and uropathogenic E. coli accounts for approximately 80% of clinically acquired cases. The diagnosis of, treatment of, and drug development for urinary tract infections remain substantial challenges due to the complex pathogenesis of this condition. The clinically isolated UPEC 83972 strain was found to produce four siderophores: yersiniabactin, aerobactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The biosyntheses of some of these siderophores implies that the virulence of UPEC is mediated via the targeting of primary metabolism. However, the differential modulatory roles of siderophore biosyntheses on the differential metabolomes of UPEC and non-UPEC strains remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate how the differential metabolomes can be used to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC strains and to determine the associated regulatory roles of siderophore biosynthesis. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the identified differential metabolomes strongly differentiated UPEC from non-UPEC strains. Furthermore, we performed metabolome assays of mutants with different patterns of siderophore deletions; the data revealed that the mutations of all four siderophores exerted a stronger modulatory role on the differential metabolomes of the UPEC and non-UPEC strains relative to the mutation of any single siderophore and that this modulatory role primarily involved amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation in the carbon fixation pathway, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Surprisingly, the modulatory roles were strongly dependent on the type and number of mutated siderophores. Taken together, these results demonstrated that siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the differential metabolomes and thus may indicate novel targets for virulence-based diagnosis

  13. Reduced Virulence of a Bordetella bronchiseptica Siderophore Mutant in Neonatal Swine

    PubMed Central

    Register, Karen B.; Ducey, Thomas F.; Brockmeier, Susan L.; Dyer, David W.

    2001-01-01

    One means by which Bordetella bronchiseptica scavenges iron is through production of the siderophore alcaligin. A nonrevertible alcaligin mutant derived from the virulent strain 4609, designated DBB25, was constructed by insertion of a kanamycin resistance gene into alcA, one of the genes essential for alcaligin biosynthesis. The virulence of the alcA mutant in colostrum-deprived, caesarean-delivered piglets was compared with that of the parent strain in two experiments. At 1 week of age, piglets were inoculated with phosphate-buffered saline, 4609, or DBB25. Two piglets in each group were euthanatized on day 10 postinfection. The remainder were euthanatized at 21 days postinfection. Clinical signs, including fever, coughing, and sneezing, were present in both groups. Nasal washes performed 7, 14, and 21 days postinoculation demonstrated that strain DBB25 colonized the nasal cavity but did so at levels that were significantly less than those achieved by strain 4609. Analysis of colonization based on the number of CFU per gram of tissue recovered from the turbinate, trachea, and lung also demonstrated significant differences between DBB25 and 4609, at both day 10 and day 21 postinfection. Mild to moderate turbinate atrophy was apparent in pigs inoculated with strain 4609, while turbinates of those infected with strain DBB25 developed no or mild atrophy. We conclude from these results that siderophore production by B. bronchiseptica is not essential for colonization of swine but is required for maximal virulence. B. bronchiseptica mutants with nonrevertible defects in genes required for alcaligin synthesis may be candidates for evaluation as attenuated, live vaccine strains in conventionally reared pigs. PMID:11254568

  14. Gene Cluster Involved in the Biosynthesis of Griseobactin, a Catechol-Peptide Siderophore of Streptomyces sp. ATCC 700974▿

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Silke I.; Braun, Volkmar

    2010-01-01

    The main siderophores produced by streptomycetes are desferrioxamines. Here we show that Streptomyces sp. ATCC 700974 and several Streptomyces griseus strains, in addition, synthesize a hitherto unknown siderophore with a catechol-peptide structure, named griseobactin. The production is repressed by iron. We sequenced a 26-kb DNA region comprising a siderophore biosynthetic gene cluster encoding proteins similar to DhbABCEFG, which are involved in the biosynthesis of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate (DHBA) and in the incorporation of DHBA into siderophores via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Adjacent to the biosynthesis genes are genes that encode proteins for the secretion, uptake, and degradation of siderophores. To correlate the gene cluster with griseobactin synthesis, the dhb genes in ATCC 700974 were disrupted. The resulting mutants no longer synthesized DHBA and griseobactin; production of both was restored by complementation with the dhb genes. Heterologous expression of the dhb genes or of the entire griseobactin biosynthesis gene cluster in the catechol-negative strain Streptomyces lividans TK23 resulted in the synthesis and secretion of DHBA or griseobactin, respectively, suggesting that these genes are sufficient for DHBA and griseobactin biosynthesis. Griseobactin was purified and characterized; its structure is consistent with a cyclic and, to a lesser extent, linear form of the trimeric ester of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-arginyl-threonine complexed with aluminum under iron-limiting conditions. This is the first report identifying the gene cluster for the biosynthesis of DHBA and a catechol siderophore in Streptomyces. PMID:19915026

  15. Enzymatic Tailoring of Ornithine in the Biosynthesis of the Rhizobium Cyclic Trihydroxamate Siderophore Vicibactin

    PubMed Central

    Heemstra, John R.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Sattely, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    To acquire iron, the N2-fixing, symbiotic bacterium Rhizobium sp. produce the cyclic tri-hydroxamate siderophore vicibactin, containing a 30-membered tri-lactone scaffold. Herein we report the overproduction and purification of the six proteins VbsACGOLS in the bacterial host Escherichia coli and the reconstitution of the biosynthesis of vicibactin from primary metabolites. The flavoprotein VbsO acts as a pathway-initiating L-ornithine N5-hydroxylase, followed by VbsA which transfers (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl- from the CoA thioester to N5-hydroxyornithine to yield N5-((R)-3-hydroxybutyryl)-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine. VbsL is a PLP-dependent epimerase acting at C2 of the 10 atom monomer unit. VbsS, a nonribosomal peptide synthetase free standing module, then activates N5-((R)-3-hydroxybutyryl)-N5-hydroxy-D-ornithine as the AMP anhydride on the way to cyclotrimerization to the vicibactin scaffold. The last step, tris-acetylation of the C2 amino group of desacetyl-D-vicibactin to the mature siderophore vicibactin is catalyzed distributively by VbsC, using three molecules of acetyl-CoA. PMID:19778043

  16. Elevated zinc induces siderophore biosynthesis genes and a zntA-like gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, S; Wilson, T L; Kukuk, M L; Carty, H A

    2000-10-01

    Zinc-regulated genes were analyzed in Pseudomonas fluorescens employing mutagenesis with a reporter gene transposon. Six mutants responded with increased gene expression to elevated concentrations of zinc. Genetic and biochemical analysis revealed that in four of the six mutants the transposon had inserted into genes essential for the biosynthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. The growth of one of the mutants was severely impaired in the presence of elevated concentrations of cadmium and zinc ions. In this mutant, the transposon had inserted in a gene with high similarity to P-type ATPases involved in zinc and cadmium ion transport. Four mutants reacted with reduced gene expression to elevated concentrations of zinc. One of these mutants was sensitive to zinc, cadmium and copper ions. The genetic region targeted in this mutant did not show similarity to any known gene. PMID:11004401

  17. Unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores produced by Shewanella putrefaciens using precursor-directed biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Soe, Cho Z; Codd, Rachel

    2014-04-18

    To acquire iron essential for growth, the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens produces the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid putrebactin (pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 373.2) as its native siderophore. The assembly of pbH2 requires endogenous 1,4-diaminobutane (DB), which is produced from the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)-catalyzed decarboxylation of l-ornithine. In this work, levels of endogenous DB were attenuated in S. putrefaciens cultures by augmenting the medium with the ODC inhibitor 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DBO). The presence in the medium of DBO together with alternative exogenous non-native diamine substrates, (15)N2-1,4-diaminobutane ((15)N2-DB) or 1,4-diamino-2(E)-butene (E-DBE), resulted in the respective biosynthesis of (15)N-labeled pbH2 ((15)N4-pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 377.2, m/zobs 377.2) or the unsaturated pbH2 variant, named here: E,E-putrebactene (E,E-pbeH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 369.2, m/zobs 369.2). In the latter system, remaining endogenous DB resulted in the parallel biosynthesis of the monounsaturated DB-E-DBE hybrid, E-putrebactene (E-pbxH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 371.2, m/zobs 371.2). These are the first identified unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores. LC-MS measurements showed 1:1 complexes formed between Fe(III) and pbH2 ([Fe(pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 426.1, m/zobs 426.2), (15)N4-pbH2 ([Fe((15)N4-pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 430.1, m/zobs 430.1), E,E-pbeH2 ([Fe(E,E-pbe)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 422.1, m/zobs 422.0), or E-pbxH2 ([Fe(E-pbx)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 424.1, m/zobs 424.2). The order of the gain in siderophore-mediated Fe(III) solubility, as defined by the difference in retention time between the free ligand and the Fe(III)-loaded complex, was pbH2 (ΔtR = 8.77 min) > E-pbxH2 (ΔtR = 6.95 min) > E,E-pbeH2 (ΔtR = 6.16 min), which suggests one possible reason why nature has selected for saturated rather than unsaturated siderophores as Fe(III) solubilization agents. The potential to conduct multiple types of ex situ chemical

  18. SREB, a GATA Transcription Factor That Directs Disparate Fates in Blastomyces dermatitidis Including Morphogenesis and Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Gregory M.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Gallardo, Sergio S.; Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Vanden Wymelenberg, Amber J.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Suen, Garret; Currie, Cameron R.; Klein, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis belongs to a group of human pathogenic fungi that exhibit thermal dimorphism. At 22°C, these fungi grow as mold that produce conidia or infectious particles, whereas at 37°C they convert to budding yeast. The ability to switch between these forms is essential for virulence in mammals and may enable these organisms to survive in the soil. To identify genes that regulate this phase transition, we used Agrobacterium tumefaciens to mutagenize B. dermatitidis conidia and screened transformants for defects in morphogenesis. We found that the GATA transcription factor SREB governs multiple fates in B. dermatitidis: phase transition from yeast to mold, cell growth at 22°C, and biosynthesis of siderophores under iron-replete conditions. Insertional and null mutants fail to convert to mold, do not accumulate significant biomass at 22°C, and are unable to suppress siderophore biosynthesis under iron-replete conditions. The defect in morphogenesis in the SREB mutant was independent of exogenous iron concentration, suggesting that SREB promotes the phase transition by altering the expression of genes that are unrelated to siderophore biosynthesis. Using bioinformatic and gene expression analyses, we identified candidate genes with upstream GATA sites whose expression is altered in the null mutant that may be direct or indirect targets of SREB and promote the phase transition. We conclude that SREB functions as a transcription factor that promotes morphogenesis and regulates siderophore biosynthesis. To our knowledge, this is the first gene identified that promotes the conversion from yeast to mold in the dimorphic fungi, and may shed light on environmental persistence of these pathogens. PMID:20368971

  19. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis. PMID:26963250

  20. Genetic and Functional Analysis of the Biosynthesis of a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Siderophore in Burkholderia xenovorans LB400.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Straube, María José; Cámara, Beatriz; Tello, Mario; Montero-Silva, Francisco; Cárdenas, Franco; Seeger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    B. xenovorans LB400 is a model bacterium for the study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds. The aim of this study was the genomic and functional characterization of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase containing gene cluster that encodes a siderophore in B. xenovorans LB400. The mba gene cluster from strain LB400 encodes proteins involved in the biosynthesis and transport of a hydroxamate-type siderophore. Strain LB400 has a unique mba gene organization, although mba gene clusters have been observed in diverse Burkholderiales. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of promoters in the mba gene cluster that strongly suggest regulation by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) and by the alternative RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function sigma factor MbaF. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed the expression of iron-regulated transcriptional units mbaFGHIJKL, mbaN, mbaABCE, mbaO, mbaP and mbaD genes under iron limitation. Chrome azurol S (CAS) assay strongly suggests that strain LB400 synthesized a siderophore under iron limitation. Mass spectrometry ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses revealed that the siderophore is a non-ribosomal peptide, and forms an iron complex with a molecular mass of 676 Da. Based on bioinformatic prediction, CAS assay and MS analyses, we propose that the siderophore is L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-D-β-hydroxyAsp-L-Ser-L-Nδ-hydroxy-Nδ-formylOrn-1,4-diaminobutane that is closely related to malleobactin-type siderophores reported in B. thailandensis.

  1. Environmental Factors Modulating Antibiotic and Siderophore Biosynthesis by Pseudomonas fluorescens Biocontrol Strains

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Brion K.; Défago, Geneviève

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that regulate the biosynthesis of antimicrobial compounds by disease-suppressive strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens is an essential step toward improving the level and reliability of their biocontrol activity. We used liquid culture assays to identify several minerals and carbon sources which had a differential influence on the production of the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (PHL), pyoluteorin (PLT), and pyrrolnitrin and the siderophores salicylic acid and pyochelin by the model strain CHA0, which was isolated from a natural disease-suppressive soil in Switzerland. Production of PHL was stimulated by Zn2+, NH4Mo2+, and glucose; the precursor compound mono-acetylphloroglucinol was stimulated by the same factors as PHL. Production of PLT was stimulated by Zn2+, Co2+, and glycerol but was repressed by glucose. Pyrrolnitrin production was increased by fructose, mannitol, and a mixture of Zn2+ and NH4Mo2+. Pyochelin production was increased by Co2+, fructose, mannitol, and glucose. Interestingly, production of its precursor salicylic acid was increased by different factors, i.e., NH4Mo2+, glycerol, and glucose. The mixture of Zn2+ and NH4Mo2+ with fructose, mannitol, or glycerol further enhanced the production of PHL and PLT compared with either the minerals or the carbon sources used alone, but it did not improve siderophore production. Extending fermentation time from 2 to 5 days increased the accumulation of PLT, pyrrolnitrin, and pyochelin but not of PHL. When findings with CHA0 were extended to an ecologically and genetically diverse collection of 41 P. fluorescens biocontrol strains, the effect of certain factors was strain dependent, while others had a general effect. Stimulation of PHL by Zn2+ and glucose was strain dependent, whereas PLT production by all strains that can produce this compound was stimulated by Zn2+ and transiently repressed by glucose. Inorganic phosphate reduced PHL production by CHA0 and seven

  2. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women’s bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the “interactive metabolome”, which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI. PMID:27076285

  3. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  4. Baulamycins A and B, broad-spectrum antibiotics identified as inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M; Chlipala, George E; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A; Nusca, Tyler D; Scaglione, Jamie B; Hanna, Philip C; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H

    2014-01-29

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 μM and 19 μM against SbnE and 180 μM and 200 μM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus , B. anthracis , E. coli , and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents.

  5. Baulamycins A and B, Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Identified as Inhibitors of Siderophore Biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M.; Chlipala, George E.; Schultz, Pamela J.; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Scaglione, Jamie B.; Hanna, Philip C.; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 µM and 19 µM against SbnE and 180 µM and 200 µM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus, B. anthracis, E. coli and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents PMID:24401083

  6. A new salicylate synthase AmS is identified for siderophores biosynthesis in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T).

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Dai, Shengwang; Shen, Jinzhao; Ren, Biao; Huang, Pei; Wang, Qiushui; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Buchang; Dai, Huanqin; Zhang, Lixin

    2015-07-01

    Siderophores are important for the growth of bacteria or the applications in treatment of iron overload-associated diseases due to the iron-chelating property. Salicylate synthase played a key role in the biosynthesis of some NRPS-derived siderophores by the providing of an iron coordination moiety as the initial building block. A new salicylate synthase, namely AmS, was identified in the biosynthesis pathway of siderophore amychelin in Amycolatopsis methanolica 239(T), since it shunt chorismate, an integrant precursor, from primary to secondary metabolite flow. The amino acid sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that AmS grouped into a new cluster. In vitro assays of AmS revealed its wide temperature tolerance ranged from 0 to 40 °C and narrow pH tolerant ranged from 7.0 to 9.0. AmS was resistant to organic solvents and non-ionic detergents. Moreover, AmS converted chorismate to salicylate with K m of 129.05 μM, k cat of 2.20 min(-1) at optimal conditions, indicating its low substrate specificity and comparable velocity to reported counterparts (Irp9 and MbtI). These properties of AmS may improve the iron-seizing ability of A. methanolica to compete with its neighbors growing in natural environments. Most importantly, serine and cysteine residues were found to be important for the catalytic activity of AmS. This study presented AmS as a new cluster of salicylate synthase and the reaction mechanism and potential applications of salicylate synthase were highlighted as well. PMID:25586582

  7. Analysis of the pmsCEAB Gene Cluster Involved in Biosynthesis of Salicylic Acid and the Siderophore Pseudomonine in the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; van der Drift, Koen M. G. M.; Olsson, Per E.; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; van Loon, Leendert C.; Bakker, Peter A. H. M.

    2001-01-01

    Mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 defective in biosynthesis of the fluorescent siderophore pseudobactin still display siderophore activity, indicating the production of a second siderophore. A recombinant cosmid clone (pMB374-07) of a WCS374 gene library harboring loci necessary for the biosynthesis of salicylic acid (SA) and this second siderophore pseudomonine was isolated. The salicylate biosynthesis region of WCS374 was localized in a 5-kb EcoRI fragment of pMB374-07. The SA and pseudomonine biosynthesis region was identified by transfer of cosmid pMB374-07 to a pseudobactin-deficient strain of P. putida. Sequence analysis of the 5-kb subclone revealed the presence of four open reading frames (ORFs). Products of two ORFs (pmsC and pmsB) showed homologies with chorismate-utilizing enzymes; a third ORF (pmsE) encoded a protein with strong similarity with enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of siderophores in other bacterial species. The region also contained a putative histidine decarboxylase gene (pmsA). A putative promoter region and two predicted iron boxes were localized upstream of pmsC. We determined by reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR that the pmsCEAB genes are cotranscribed and that expression is iron regulated. In vivo expression of SA genes was achieved in P. putida and Escherichia coli cells. In E. coli, deletions affecting the first ORF (pmsC) diminished SA production, whereas deletion of pmsB abolished it completely. The pmsB gene induced low levels of SA production in E. coli when expressed under control of the lacZ promoter. Several lines of evidence indicate that SA and pseudomonine biosynthesis are related. Moreover, we isolated a Tn5 mutant (374-05) that is simultaneously impaired in SA and pseudomonine production. PMID:11222588

  8. Genetic organization and transcriptional analysis of a major gene cluster involved in siderophore biosynthesis in Pseudomonas putida WCS358.

    PubMed Central

    Marugg, J D; Nielander, H B; Horrevoets, A J; van Megen, I; van Genderen, I; Weisbeek, P J

    1988-01-01

    In iron-limited environments, the plant-growth-stimulating Pseudomonas putida WCS358 produces a yellow-green fluorescent siderophore called pseudobactin 358. The transcriptional organization and the iron-regulated expression of a major gene cluster involved in the biosynthesis and transport of pseudobactin 358 were analyzed in detail. The cluster comprises a region with a minimum length of 33.5 kilobases and contains at least five transcriptional units, of which some are relatively large. The directions of transcription of four transcriptional units were determined by RNA-RNA hybridization and by analysis in Escherichia coli minicells. The latter also demonstrated that large polypeptides were encoded by these transcriptional units. The results allowed us to localize several promoter regions on the DNA. The iron-dependent expression of at least two genes within this cluster appears to be regulated at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:2450869

  9. Identification of new, conserved, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases from fluorescent pseudomonads involved in the biosynthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine.

    PubMed

    Mossialos, Dimitris; Ochsner, Urs; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Koedam, Nico; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Fernández, Diana Uría; Schäfer, Mathias; Ravel, Jacques; Cornelis, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    Pyoverdines, the main siderophores of fluorescent pseudomonads, contain a peptide moiety, different for each pyoverdine, and an identical chromophore. While it has been shown that non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are involved in the biosynthesis of the peptide chain of pyoverdines, this was not demonstrated for the biosynthesis of the chromo-phore part. We found that PvsA, from Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400, and PvdL (PA2424), from Pseudomonas aeruginosa are similar NRPSs and functional homologues, necessary for the production of pyoverdine. Transcriptional lacZ fusions showed that pvdL is co-transcribed with the upstream PA2425 gene, encoding a putative thioesterase, and is iron-regulated via PvdS. Similarly, RT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of pvsA is repressed by iron. Analysis of the adenylation domains of PvsA, PvdL and their homologues, revealed that their N-terminus starts with an acyl-CoA ligase module, followed by three amino acid activation domains. Computer modelling of these domains suggests that PvsA in P. fluorescens and PvdL in P. aeruginosa are orthologues involved in the biosynthesis of the pyoverdine chromophore. PMID:12354233

  10. The pobA gene of Burkholderia cenocepacia encodes a group I Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferase required for biosynthesis of the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Atif H; Shastri, Sravanthi; Dave, Emma; Wowk, Irena; Agnoli, Kirsty; Cook, Anne M; Thomas, Mark S

    2011-02-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia produces the siderophores ornibactin and pyochelin under iron-restricted conditions. Biosynthesis of both siderophores requires the involvement of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). Using a transposon containing the lacZ reporter gene, two B. cenocepacia mutants were isolated which were deficient in siderophore production. Mutant IW10 was shown to produce normal amounts of ornibactin but only trace amounts of pyochelin, whereas synthesis of both siderophores was abolished in AHA27. Growth of AHA27, but not IW10, was inhibited under iron-restricted conditions. In both mutants, the transposon had integrated into the pobA gene, which encodes a polypeptide exhibiting similarity to the Sfp-type phosphopantetheinyltransferases (PPTases). These enzymes are responsible for activation of NRPSs by the covalent attachment of the 4'-phosphopantetheine (P-pant) moiety of coenzyme A. Previously characterized PPTase genes from other bacteria were shown to efficiently complement both mutants for siderophore production when provided in trans. The B. cenocepacia pobA gene was also able to efficiently complement an Escherichia coli entD mutant for production of the siderophore enterobactin. Using mutant IW10, in which the lacZ gene carried by the transposon is inserted in the same orientation as pobA, it was shown that pobA is not appreciably iron-regulated. Finally, we confirmed that Sfp-type bacterial PPTases can be subdivided into two distinct groups, and we present the amino acid signature sequences which characterize each of these groups. PMID:20966087

  11. Structure and Biosynthesis of Amychelin, an Unusual Mixed-Ligand Siderophore from Amycolatopsis sp. AA4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Actinobacteria generate a large number of structurally diverse small molecules with potential therapeutic value. Genomic analyses of this productive group of bacteria show that their genetic potential to manufacture small molecules exceeds their observed ability by roughly an order of magnitude, and this revelation has prompted a number of studies to identify members of the unknown majority. As a potential window into this cryptic secondary metabolome, pairwise assays for developmental interactions within a set of 20 sequenced actinomycetes were carried out. These assays revealed that Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, a so-called “rare” actinomycete, produces a novel siderophore, amychelin, which alters the developmental processes of several neighboring streptomycetes. Using this phenotype as an assay, we isolated amychelin and solved its structure by NMR and MS methods coupled with an X-ray crystallographic analysis of its Fe-complex. The iron binding affinity of amychelin was determined using EDTA competition assays, and a biosynthetic cluster was identified and annotated to provide a tentative biosynthetic scheme for amychelin. PMID:21699219

  12. Synthesis of chromone, quinolone, and benzoxazinone sulfonamide nucleosides as conformationally constrained inhibitors of adenylating enzymes required for siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, Curtis A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2013-08-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5'-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group on the basis of computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common β-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a β-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a β-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors.

  13. Synthesis of Chromone, Quinolone, and Benzoxazinone Sulfonamide Nucleosides as Conformationally Constrained Inhibitors of Adenylating Enzymes Required for Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Curtis A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5′-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb, but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group based on computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common β-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a β-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a β-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors. PMID:23805993

  14. Role for Ferredoxin:NAD(P)H Oxidoreductase (FprA) in Sulfate Assimilation and Siderophore Biosynthesis in Pseudomonads

    PubMed Central

    Glassing, Angela; Harper, Justin; Franklin, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylate) (PDTC), produced by certain pseudomonads, is a sulfur-containing siderophore that binds iron, as well as a wide range of transition metals, and it affects the net hydrolysis of the environmental contaminant carbon tetrachloride. The pathway of PDTC biosynthesis has not been defined. Here, we performed a transposon screen of Pseudomonas putida DSM 3601 to identify genes necessary for PDTC production (Pdt phenotype). Transposon insertions within genes for sulfate assimilation (cysD, cysNC, and cysG [cobA2]) dominated the collection of Pdt mutations. In addition, two insertions were within the gene for the LysR-type transcriptional activator FinR (PP1637). Phenotypic characterization indicated that finR mutants were cysteine bradytrophs. The Pdt phenotype of finR mutants could be complemented by the known target of FinR regulation, fprA (encoding ferredoxin:NADP+ oxidoreductase), or by Escherichia coli cysJI (encoding sulfite reductase). These data indicate that fprA is necessary for effective sulfate assimilation by P. putida and that the effect of finR mutation on PDTC production was due to deficient expression of fprA and sulfite reduction. fprA expression in both P. putida and P. aeruginosa was found to be regulated by FinR, but in a manner dependent upon reduced sulfur sources, implicating FinR in sulfur regulatory physiology. The genes and phenotypes identified in this study indicated a strong dependence upon intracellular reduced sulfur/cysteine for PDTC biosynthesis and that pseudomonads utilize sulfite reduction enzymology distinct from that of E. coli and possibly similar to that of chloroplasts and other proteobacteria. PMID:23794620

  15. Total Biosynthesis and Diverse Applications of the Nonribosomal Peptide-Polyketide Siderophore Yersiniabactin.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Jones, Charles H; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-08-15

    Yersiniabactin (Ybt) is a mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product natively produced by the pathogen Yersinia pestis. The compound enables iron scavenging capabilities upon host infection and is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase featuring a polyketide synthase module. This pathway has been engineered for expression and biosynthesis using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. In the current work, the biosynthetic process for Ybt formation was improved through the incorporation of a dedicated step to eliminate the need for exogenous salicylate provision. When this improvement was made, the compound was tested in parallel applications that highlight the metal-chelating nature of the compound. In the first application, Ybt was assessed as a rust remover, demonstrating a capacity of ∼40% compared to a commercial removal agent and ∼20% relative to total removal capacity. The second application tested Ybt in removing copper from a variety of nonbiological and biological solution mixtures. Success across a variety of media indicates potential utility in diverse scenarios that include environmental and biomedical settings. PMID:26025901

  16. Total Biosynthesis and Diverse Applications of the Nonribosomal Peptide-Polyketide Siderophore Yersiniabactin.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Jones, Charles H; Zhang, Guojian; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2015-08-15

    Yersiniabactin (Ybt) is a mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product natively produced by the pathogen Yersinia pestis. The compound enables iron scavenging capabilities upon host infection and is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase featuring a polyketide synthase module. This pathway has been engineered for expression and biosynthesis using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. In the current work, the biosynthetic process for Ybt formation was improved through the incorporation of a dedicated step to eliminate the need for exogenous salicylate provision. When this improvement was made, the compound was tested in parallel applications that highlight the metal-chelating nature of the compound. In the first application, Ybt was assessed as a rust remover, demonstrating a capacity of ∼40% compared to a commercial removal agent and ∼20% relative to total removal capacity. The second application tested Ybt in removing copper from a variety of nonbiological and biological solution mixtures. Success across a variety of media indicates potential utility in diverse scenarios that include environmental and biomedical settings.

  17. Total Biosynthesis and Diverse Applications of the Nonribosomal Peptide-Polyketide Siderophore Yersiniabactin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Mahmoud Kamal; Fawaz, Samar; Jones, Charles H.; Zhang, Guojian

    2015-01-01

    Yersiniabactin (Ybt) is a mixed nonribosomal peptide-polyketide natural product natively produced by the pathogen Yersinia pestis. The compound enables iron scavenging capabilities upon host infection and is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase featuring a polyketide synthase module. This pathway has been engineered for expression and biosynthesis using Escherichia coli as a heterologous host. In the current work, the biosynthetic process for Ybt formation was improved through the incorporation of a dedicated step to eliminate the need for exogenous salicylate provision. When this improvement was made, the compound was tested in parallel applications that highlight the metal-chelating nature of the compound. In the first application, Ybt was assessed as a rust remover, demonstrating a capacity of ∼40% compared to a commercial removal agent and ∼20% relative to total removal capacity. The second application tested Ybt in removing copper from a variety of nonbiological and biological solution mixtures. Success across a variety of media indicates potential utility in diverse scenarios that include environmental and biomedical settings. PMID:26025901

  18. The structure of MbtI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of the siderophore mycobactin, reveals it to be a salicylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Yu, Minmin; Gårdenborg, Therés; Middleditch, Martin; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2006-09-01

    The ability to acquire iron from the extracellular environment is a key determinant of pathogenicity in mycobacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis acquires iron exclusively via the siderophore mycobactin T, the biosynthesis of which depends on the production of salicylate from chorismate. Salicylate production in other bacteria is either a two-step process involving an isochorismate synthase (chorismate isomerase) and a pyruvate lyase, as observed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or a single-step conversion catalyzed by a salicylate synthase, as with Yersinia enterocolitica. Here we present the structure of the enzyme MbtI (Rv2386c) from M. tuberculosis, solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction at a resolution of 1.8 A, and biochemical evidence that it is the salicylate synthase necessary for mycobactin biosynthesis. The enzyme is critically dependent on Mg2+ for activity and produces salicylate via an isochorismate intermediate. MbtI is structurally similar to salicylate synthase (Irp9) from Y. enterocolitica and the large subunit of anthranilate synthase (TrpE) and shares the overall architecture of other chorismate-utilizing enzymes, such as the related aminodeoxychorismate synthase PabB. Like Irp9, but unlike TrpE or PabB, MbtI is neither regulated by nor structurally stabilized by bound tryptophan. The structure of MbtI is the starting point for the design of inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis, which may make useful lead compounds for the production of new antituberculosis drugs, given the strong dependence of pathogenesis on iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis. PMID:16923875

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MbtI, a protein essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Anthony J.; Ramsay, Rochelle J.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2005-01-01

    MbtI, the putative isochorismate synthase essential for siderophore biosynthesis in M. tuberculosis, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 1.8 Å resolution. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, depends on the secretion of salicylate-based siderophores called mycobactins for the acquisition of extracellular iron, which is essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium. The protein MbtI is thought to be the isochorismate synthase enzyme responsible for the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, the first step in the salicylate production required for mycobactin biosynthesis. MbtI has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.8 Å. They belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.8, b = 163.4, c = 194.9 Å, consistent with the presence of either two, three or four molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of MbtI, a protein essential for siderophore biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Anthony J; Ramsay, Rochelle J; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, depends on the secretion of salicylate-based siderophores called mycobactins for the acquisition of extracellular iron, which is essential for the growth and virulence of the bacterium. The protein MbtI is thought to be the isochorismate synthase enzyme responsible for the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, the first step in the salicylate production required for mycobactin biosynthesis. MbtI has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffract to a maximum resolution of 1.8 A. They belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 51.8, b = 163.4, c = 194.9 A, consistent with the presence of either two, three or four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:16508110

  1. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of salicylate synthase, a chorismate-utilizing enyme involved in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, James F. Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Ladner, Jane E.

    2006-03-01

    Salicylate synthase, which catalyzes the first step in the synthesis of the siderophore yersiniabactin, has been crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.5 Å. Bacteria have evolved elaborate schemes that help them thrive in environments where free iron is severely limited. Siderophores such as yersiniabactin are small iron-scavenging molecules that are deployed by bacteria during iron starvation. Several studies have linked siderophore production and virulence. Yersiniabactin, produced by several Enterobacteriaceae, is derived from the key metabolic intermediate chorismic acid via its conversion to salicylate by salicylate synthase. Crystals of salicylate synthase from the uropathogen Escherichia coli CFT073 have been grown by vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as the precipitant. The monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) crystals diffract to 2.5 Å. The unit-cell parameters are a = 57.27, b = 164.07, c = 59.04 Å, β = 108.8°. The solvent content of the crystals is 54% and there are two molecules of the 434-amino-acid protein in the asymmetric unit. It is anticipated that the structure will reveal key details about the reaction mechanism and the evolution of salicylate synthase.

  2. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of salicylate synthase, a chorismate-utilizing enyme involved in siderophore biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, James F.; Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Ladner, Jane E.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved elaborate schemes that help them thrive in environments where free iron is severely limited. Siderophores such as yersiniabactin are small iron-scavenging molecules that are deployed by bacteria during iron starvation. Several studies have linked siderophore production and virulence. Yersiniabactin, produced by several Enterobacteriaceae, is derived from the key metabolic intermediate chorismic acid via its conversion to salicylate by salicylate synthase. Crystals of salicylate synthase from the uropathogen Escherichia coli CFT073 have been grown by vapour diffusion using polyethylene glycol as the precipitant. The monoclinic (P21) crystals diffract to 2.5 Å. The unit-cell parameters are a = 57.27, b = 164.07, c = 59.04 Å, β = 108.8°. The solvent content of the crystals is 54% and there are two molecules of the 434-amino-acid protein in the asymmetric unit. It is anticipated that the structure will reveal key details about the reaction mechanism and the evolution of salicylate synthase. PMID:16511320

  3. Characterization of siderophores from Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Budde, A D; Leong, S A

    1989-11-01

    Two siderophores, ferrichrome and ferrichrome A, were found in cultures of Ustilago maydis (DC) Corda. Both siderophores were found intracellularly and extracellularly. Their authenticity was confirmed by thin layer chromatography, HPLC, UV-visible spectrometry, paper electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, NMR and fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy. Regulation of siderophore production by iron was examined. Repression of biosynthesis of extracellular siderophores occurred at 10(-5) M iron. Ferrichrome was found intracellularly at all iron concentrations employed; in general, ferrichrome A was not found to be cell-associated. PMID:2531844

  4. Microbial Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    Iron is of great importance for many metabolic processes since the redox potential between its two valence states Fe2+ and Fe3+ lies within the range of physiological processes. Actually, iron is not a rare element, it is fourth in abundance in the earth crust, but it is not readily available for microorganisms. In the soil ferric oxide hydrates are formed at pH values around seven and the concentration of free Fe3+ is at best 10-17 mol/dm3 while about 10-6 mol/dm3 would be needed. In living organisms iron is usually strongly bound to peptidic substances such as transferrins. To increase the supply of soluble iron microorganisms other than those living in an acidic habitat may circumvent the problem by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ (182), which seems to be of major importance for marine phytoplankton (151); see also amphiphilic marine bacteria (Sect.2.8) and Fe2+ binding ligands (Sect. 7) below. An important alternative is the production of Fe3+ chelating compounds, so-called siderophores. Siderophores are secondary metabolites with masses below 2,000 Da and a high affinity to Fe3+. Small iron-siderophore complexes can enter the cell via unspecific porins, larger ones need a transport system that recognizes the ferri-siderophore at the cell surface. In the cell, iron is released mostly by reduction to the less strongly bound Fe2+ state (137), and the free siderophore is re-exported ("shuttle mechanism"); for a modified shuttle system see pyoverdins (Sect. 2.1) and amonabactins (Sect. 2.7). Rarely the siderophore is degraded in the periplasmatic space as, e.g. enterobactin (Sect. 2.7). Alternatively Fe3+ is transferred at the cell surface from the ferri-siderophore to a trans-membrane transport system ("taxi mechanism"). A probably archaic and unspecific variety of the taxi mechanism comprises the reduction of Fe3+ at the cell surface (see ferrichrome A, Sect. 2.6 (99, 105)). The terms "shuttle" and "taxi mechanism" were coined by Raymond and Carrano (296).

  5. Acyl peptidic siderophores: structures, biosyntheses and post-assembly modifications.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Butler, Alison

    2015-06-01

    Acyl peptidic siderophores are produced by a variety of bacteria and possess unique amphiphilic properties. Amphiphilic siderophores are generally produced in a suite where the iron(III)-binding headgroup remains constant while the fatty acid appendage varies by length and functionality. Acyl peptidic siderophores are commonly synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases; however, the method of peptide acylation during biosynthesis can vary between siderophores. Following biosynthesis, acyl siderophores can be further modified enzymatically to produce a more hydrophilic compound, which retains its ferric chelating abilities as demonstrated by pyoverdine from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the marinobactins from certain Marinobacter species. Siderophore hydrophobicity can also be altered through photolysis of the ferric complex of certain β-hydroxyaspartic acid-containing acyl peptidic siderophores. PMID:25677460

  6. The Siderophore Metabolome of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Baars, Oliver; Zhang, Xinning

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a detailed characterization of the siderophore metabolome, or “chelome,” of the agriculturally important and widely studied model organism Azotobacter vinelandii. Using a new high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) approach, we found over 35 metal-binding secondary metabolites, indicative of a vast chelome in A. vinelandii. These include vibrioferrin, a siderophore previously observed only in marine bacteria. Quantitative analyses of siderophore production during diazotrophic growth with different sources and availabilities of Fe showed that, under all tested conditions, vibrioferrin was present at the highest concentration of all siderophores and suggested new roles for vibrioferrin in the soil environment. Bioinformatic searches confirmed the capacity for vibrioferrin production in Azotobacter spp. and other bacteria spanning multiple phyla, habitats, and lifestyles. Moreover, our studies revealed a large number of previously unreported derivatives of all known A. vinelandii siderophores and rationalized their origins based on genomic analyses, with implications for siderophore diversity and evolution. Together, these insights provide clues as to why A. vinelandii harbors multiple siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters. Coupled with the growing evidence for alternative functions of siderophores, the vast chelome in A. vinelandii may be explained by multiple, disparate evolutionary pressures that act on siderophore production. PMID:26452553

  7. Fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Haas, Hubertus

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are chelators synthesized by microbes to sequester iron. This article summarizes the knowledge on the fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus. In recent years, A. fumigatus became a role model for fungal biosynthesis, uptake and degradation of siderophores as well as regulation of siderophore-mediated iron handling and the elucidation of siderophore functions. Siderophore functions comprise uptake, intracellular transport and storage of iron. This proved to be crucial not only for adaptation to iron starvation conditions but also for germination, asexual and sexual propagation, antioxidative defense, mutual interaction, microbial competition as well as virulence in plant and animal hosts. Recent studies also indicate the high potential of siderophores and its biosynthetic pathway to improve diagnosis and therapy of fungal infections.

  8. Fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Covering: up to 2014 Siderophores are chelators synthesized by microbes to sequester iron. This article summarizes the knowledge on the fungal siderophore metabolism with a focus on Aspergillus fumigatus. In recent years, A. fumigatus became a role model for fungal biosynthesis, uptake and degradation of siderophores as well as regulation of siderophore-mediated iron handling and the elucidation of siderophore functions. Siderophore functions comprise uptake, intracellular transport and storage of iron. This proved to be crucial not only for adaptation to iron starvation conditions but also for germination, asexual and sexual propagation, antioxidative defense, mutual interaction, microbial competition as well as virulence in plant and animal hosts. Recent studies also indicate the high potential of siderophores and its biosynthetic pathway to improve diagnosis and therapy of fungal infections. PMID:25140791

  9. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N(5)-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a

  10. Siderophore Biosynthesis but Not Reductive Iron Assimilation Is Essential for the Dimorphic Fungus Nomuraea rileyi Conidiation, Dimorphism Transition, Resistance to Oxidative Stress, Pigmented Microsclerotium Formation, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhongkang; Liu, Xuee; Song, Zhangyong; Li, Ren; Shao, Changwen; Yin, Youping

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an indispensable factor for the dimorphic insect pathogenic Nomuraea rileyi to form persistent microsclerotia which can replace conidia or blastospores for commercial mass production. There are two high affinity iron acquisition pathways in N. rileyi, siderophore-assisted iron mobilization and reductive iron assimilation systems. Transcription of the two iron uptake pathways related genes is induced under iron-limiting conditions. Stage-specific iron uptake-related genes expression during microsclerotia development shows siderophore-mediated iron acquisition genes are rigorously upregulated specifically during the formation and mature period while reductive iron assimilation related genes just display a higher expression at the late maturation period. Abrogation of reductive iron assimilation, by the deletion of the high affinity iron permease (NrFtrA), has no visible effect on microsclerotia biogenesis in N. rileyi. In sharp contrast, N. rileyi L-ornithine-N5-monooxygenase (NrSidA), required for synthesis of all siderophores, is absolutely necessary for the development of pigmented microsclerotia. In agreement with the lower intracellular iron contents of microsclerotia in ΔNrSidA strains, not only the pigments, but both the number and the biomass are also noticeably reduced. Certain concentration of ROS is required for promoting microsclerotia biogenesis. Combined with expression pattern analysis of related genes and quantitative of intracellular iron or extracellular siderophore in WT and mutants, these data demonstrate the lack of adequate intracellular iron caused by the loss of the siderophore results in the deficiency of ROS detoxication. Furthermore, ΔNrSidA strains show significantly increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide. Besides, NrSidA, but not NrFtrA, play a crucial role in vegetative growth under iron-limiting conditions, conidiation, and dimorphic switching. Remarkably, the slower growth of the ΔNrSidA strains in vivo due to a reduced

  11. Iron-Regulated Protein HupB of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Positively Regulates Siderophore Biosynthesis and Is Essential for Growth in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Satya Deo; Choudhury, Mitali; Yousuf, Suhail; Wheeler, Paul R.; Gordon, Stephen V.; Ranjan, Akash

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis expresses the 28-kDa protein HupB (Rv2986c) and the Fe3+-specific high-affinity siderophores mycobactin and carboxymycobactin upon iron limitation. The objective of this study was to understand the functional role of HupB in iron acquisition. A hupB mutant strain of M. tuberculosis, subjected to growth in low-iron medium (0.02 μg Fe ml−1), showed a marked reduction of both siderophores with low transcript levels of the mbt genes encoding the MB biosynthetic machinery. Complementation of the mutant strain with hupB restored siderophore production to levels comparable to that of the wild type. We demonstrated the binding of HupB to the mbtB promoter by both electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNA footprinting. The latter revealed the HupB binding site to be a 10-bp AT-rich region. While negative regulation of the mbt machinery by IdeR is known, this is the first report of positive regulation of the mbt operon by HupB. Interestingly, the mutant strain failed to survive inside macrophages, suggesting that HupB plays an important role in vivo. PMID:24610707

  12. Detection of photoactive siderophore biosynthetic genes in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Gärdes, Astrid; Triana, Christopher; Amin, Shady A; Green, David H; Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-06-01

    Iron is an essential element for oceanic microbial life but its low bioavailability limits microorganisms in large areas of the oceans. To acquire this metal many marine bacteria produce organic chelates that bind and transport iron (siderophores). While it has been hypothesized that the global production of siderophores by heterotrophic bacteria and some cyanobacteria constitutes the bulk of organic ligands binding iron in the ocean because stability constants of siderophores and these organic ligands are similar, and because ligand concentrations rise sharply in response to iron fertilization events, direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. This lack is due to the difficulty in characterizing these ligands due both to their extremely low concentrations and their highly heterogeneous nature. The situation for characterizing photoactive siderophores in situ is more problematic because of their expected short lifetimes in the photic zone. An alternative approach is to make use of high sensitivity molecular technology (qPCR) to search for siderophore biosynthesis genes related to the production of photoactive siderophores. In this way one can access their "biochemical potential" and utilize this information as a proxy for the presence of these siderophores in the marine environment. Here we show, using qPCR primers designed to detect biosynthetic genes for the siderophores vibrioferrin, petrobactin and aerobactin that such genes are widespread and based on their abundance, the "biochemical potential" for photoactive siderophore production is significant. Concurrently we also briefly examine the microbial biodiversity responsible for such production as a function of depth and location across a North Atlantic transect.

  13. Role of a GATA-type transcriptional repressor Sre1 in regulation of siderophore biosynthesis in the marine-derived Aureobasidium pullulans HN6.2.

    PubMed

    Chi, Zhe; Wang, Xing-Xing; Geng, Qian; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The GATA-type transcriptional repressor structural gene SRE1 was isolated from both the genomic DNA and mRNA of the marine yeast Aureobasidium pullulans HN6.2 by inverse PCR and RACE. An open reading frame (ORF) of 1,002 bp encoding a 334 amino acid protein (a calculated isoelectric point: 8.6) with a calculated molecular weight of 35.1 kDa was characterized. The corresponding gene had one single intron of 51 bp, and in its promoter two putative 5'-HGATAR-3' sequences could be recognized. The deduced protein from the cloned gene contained two conserved zinc-finger domains [Cys-(X2)-Cys-(X17)-Cys-(X2)-Cys)], nine sequences of Ser(Thr)-Pro-X-X which was characteristics of the regulator, and one cysteine-rich central domain which was located between the two zinc fingers. The SRE1 gene in A. pullulans HN6.2 was disrupted by integrating the hygromycin B phosphotransferase gene into the ORF of the SRE1 gene using homologous recombination. Two hundreds of the disruptants (Δsre1) (one of them was named R6) obtained still synthesized both intracellular and extracellular siderophores in the presence of added Fe(3+) and the expression of the SidA gene encoding L-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase in the disruptant R6 was also partially derepressed in the presence of added Fe(3+). The colonies of the disruptant R6 grown on the iron-replete medium with 1.5 and 2.0 mM Fe(3+) and also with 1.5 mM Fe(2+) became brown. In contrast, A. pullulans HN6.2 could not grow in the iron-replete medium with 1.5 mM and 2.0 mM Fe(3+). The brown-colored colonies of the disruptant R6 also had high level of siderophore and iron.

  14. The crystal structure of Rv1347c, a putative antibiotic resistance protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, reveals a GCN5-related fold and suggests an alternative function in siderophore biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Card, G L; Peterson, N A; Smith, C A; Rupp, B; Schick, B M; Baker, E N

    2005-02-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of TB, is a devastating human pathogen. The emergence of multi-drug resistance in recent years has prompted a search for new drug targets and for a better understanding of mechanisms of resistance. Here we focus on the gene product of an open reading frame from M. tuberculosis, Rv1347c, which is annotated as a putative aminoglycoside N-acetyltransferase. The Rv1347c protein does not show this activity, however, and we show from its crystal structure, coupled with functional and bioinformatic data, that its most likely role is in the biosynthesis of mycobactin, the M. tuberculosis siderophore. The crystal structure of Rv1347c was determined by MAD phasing from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution (R = 0.227, R{sub free} = 0.257). The protein is monomeric, with a fold that places it in the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) family of acyltransferases. Features of the structure are an acylCoA binding site that is shared with other GNAT family members, and an adjacent hydrophobic channel leading to the surface that could accommodate long-chain acyl groups. Modeling the postulated substrate, the N{sup {var_epsilon}}-hydroxylysine side chain of mycobactin, into the acceptor substrate binding groove identifies two residues at the active site, His130 and Asp168, that have putative roles in substrate binding and catalysis.

  15. Heterologous expression, purification, and characterization of an l-ornithine N(5)-hydroxylase involved in pyoverdine siderophore biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ge, Li; Seah, Stephen Y K

    2006-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that produces the siderophore pyoverdine, which enables it to acquire the essential nutrient iron from its host. Formation of the iron-chelating hydroxamate functional group in pyoverdine requires the enzyme PvdA, a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the N(5) hydroxylation of l-ornithine. pvdA from P. aeruginosa was successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzyme was purified for the first time. The enzyme possessed its maximum activity at pH 8.0. In the absence of l-ornithine, PvdA has an NADPH oxidase activity of 0.24 +/- 0.02 micromol min(-1) mg(-1). The substrate l-ornithine stimulated this activity by a factor of 5, and the reaction was tightly coupled to the formation of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is specific for NADPH and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD(+)) as cofactors, as it cannot utilize NADH and flavin mononucleotide. By fluorescence titration, the dissociation constants for NADPH and FAD(+) were determined to be 105.6 +/- 6.0 microM and 9.9 +/- 0.3 microM, respectively. Steady-state kinetic analysis showed that the l-ornithine-dependent NADPH oxidation obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent K(m) and V(max) values of 0.58 mM and 1.34 micromol min(-1) mg(-1). l-Lysine was a nonsubstrate effector that stimulated NADPH oxidation, but uncoupling occurred and hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated l-lysine was produced. l-2,4-Diaminobutyrate, l-homoserine, and 5-aminopentanoic acid were not substrates or effectors, but they were competitive inhibitors of the l-ornithine-dependent NADPH oxidation reaction, with K(ic)s of 3 to 8 mM. The results indicate that the chemical nature of effectors is important for simulation of the NADPH oxidation rate in PvdA. PMID:17015659

  16. Characterization and Fungal Inhibition Activity of Siderophore from Wheat Rhizosphere Associated Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Strain HIRFA32.

    PubMed

    Maindad, D V; Kasture, V M; Chaudhari, H; Dhavale, D D; Chopade, B A; Sachdev, D P

    2014-09-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus HIRFA32 from wheat rhizosphere produced catecholate type of siderophore with optimum siderophore (ca. 92 % siderophore units) in succinic acid medium without FeSO4 at 28 °C and 24 h of incubation. HPLC purified siderophore appeared as pale yellow crystals with molecular weight [M(+1)] m/z 347.18 estimated by LCMS. The structure elucidated by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HMQC, HMBC, NOESY and decoupling studies, revealed that siderophore composed of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid with hydroxyhistamine and threonine as amino acid subunits. In vitro study demonstrated siderophore mediated mycelium growth inhibition (ca. 46.87 ± 0.5 %) of Fusarium oxysporum. This study accounts to first report on biosynthesis of acinetobactin-like siderophore by the rhizospheric strain of A. calcoaceticus and its significance in inhibition of F. oxysporum.

  17. Siderophore production by Pseudomonas pseudomallei.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H M; Chaowagul, W; Sokol, P A

    1991-01-01

    Eighty-four strains of Pseudomonas pseudomallei isolated from patients with melioidosis were examined for siderophore production. All the strains were shown to produce siderophore both on chrome azurol S agar plates and in liquid medium under iron-deficient conditions. Chemical assays indicated that the siderophore belongs to the hydroxamate class. Addition of iron to the culture medium resulted in increased culture growth with markedly decreased yield of siderophore. Siderophore produced by strain U7 was purified by gel filtration chromatography, and the molecular weight was estimated to be 1,000. When this partially purified siderophore was added to culture medium, it promoted iron uptake by P. pseudomallei in the presence of EDTA and enhanced growth of the organism in the presence of transferrin. We have given this siderophore the trivial name malleobactin. PMID:1825486

  18. Synthesis of siderophores by plant-associated metallotolerant bacteria under exposure to Cd(2.).

    PubMed

    Złoch, Michał; Thiem, Dominika; Gadzała-Kopciuch, Renata; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    Rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria are well known producers of siderophores, organic compounds that chelate ferric iron (Fe(3+)), and therefore play an important role in plant growth promotion in metalliferous areas, thereby improving bioremediation processes. However, in addition to their primary function in iron mobilization, siderophores also have the capacity to chelate other heavy metals, such as Al(3+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+), that can affect homeostasis and the heavy metal tolerance of microorganisms. The main goal of our study was to select the most efficient siderophore-producing bacterial strains isolated from the roots (endophytes) and rhizosphere of Betula pendula L. and Alnus glutinosa L. growing at two heavy metal contaminated sites in southern Poland. Siderophore biosynthesis of these strains in the presence of increasing concentrations of Cd(2+) (0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 mM) under iron-deficiency conditions was analysed using spectrophotometric chemical tests for hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates, as well as the separation of bacterial siderophores by HPLC and characterization of their structure by UHPLC-QTOF/MS. We proved that (i) siderophore-producing bacterial strains seems to be more abundant in the rhizosphere (47%) than in root endophytes (18%); (ii) the strains most effective at siderophore synthesis belonged to the genus Streptomyces and were able to secrete three types of siderophores under Cd(2+) stress: hydroxamates, catecholates and phenolates; (iii) in general, the addition of Cd(2+) enhanced siderophore synthesis, particularly ferrioxamine B synthesis, which may indicate that siderophores play a significant role in tolerance to Cd(2+) in Streptomyces sp. PMID:27183333

  19. Role of the FeoB Protein and Siderophore in Promoting Virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae on Rice▿

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Alok; Sonti, Ramesh V.

    2010-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight, a serious disease of rice. Our analysis revealed that the X. oryzae pv. oryzae genome encodes genes responsible for iron uptake through FeoB (homolog of the major bacterial ferrous iron transporter) and a siderophore. A mutation in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae feoB gene causes severe virulence deficiency, growth deficiency in iron-limiting medium, and constitutive production of a siderophore. We identified an iron regulated xss gene cluster, in which xssABCDE (Xanthomonas siderophore synthesis) and xsuA (Xanthomonas siderophore utilization) genes encode proteins involved in biosynthesis and utilization of X. oryzae pv. oryzae siderophore. Mutations in the xssA, xssB, and xssE genes cause siderophore deficiency and growth restriction under iron-limiting conditions but are virulence proficient. An xsuA mutant displayed impairment in utilization of native siderophore, suggesting that XsuA acts as a specific receptor for a ferric-siderophore complex. Histochemical and fluorimetric assays with gusA fusions indicate that, during in planta growth, the feoB gene is expressed and that the xss operon is not expressed. This study represents the first report describing a role for feoB in virulence of any plant-pathogenic bacterium and the first functional characterization of a siderophore-biosynthetic gene cluster in any xanthomonad. PMID:20382771

  20. Role of the FeoB protein and siderophore in promoting virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae on rice.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Alok; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2010-06-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight, a serious disease of rice. Our analysis revealed that the X. oryzae pv. oryzae genome encodes genes responsible for iron uptake through FeoB (homolog of the major bacterial ferrous iron transporter) and a siderophore. A mutation in the X. oryzae pv. oryzae feoB gene causes severe virulence deficiency, growth deficiency in iron-limiting medium, and constitutive production of a siderophore. We identified an iron regulated xss gene cluster, in which xssABCDE (Xanthomonas siderophore synthesis) and xsuA (Xanthomonas siderophore utilization) genes encode proteins involved in biosynthesis and utilization of X. oryzae pv. oryzae siderophore. Mutations in the xssA, xssB, and xssE genes cause siderophore deficiency and growth restriction under iron-limiting conditions but are virulence proficient. An xsuA mutant displayed impairment in utilization of native siderophore, suggesting that XsuA acts as a specific receptor for a ferric-siderophore complex. Histochemical and fluorimetric assays with gusA fusions indicate that, during in planta growth, the feoB gene is expressed and that the xss operon is not expressed. This study represents the first report describing a role for feoB in virulence of any plant-pathogenic bacterium and the first functional characterization of a siderophore-biosynthetic gene cluster in any xanthomonad.

  1. Contribution of Siderophore Systems to Growth and Urinary Tract Colonization of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Rebecca E.; Totsika, Makrina; Challinor, Victoria L.; Mabbett, Amanda N.; Ulett, Glen C.; De Voss, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that define asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) Escherichia coli colonization of the human urinary tract remain to be properly elucidated. Here, we utilize ABU E. coli strain 83972 as a model to dissect the contribution of siderophores to iron acquisition, growth, fitness, and colonization of the urinary tract. We show that E. coli 83972 produces enterobactin, salmochelin, aerobactin, and yersiniabactin and examine the role of these systems using mutants defective in siderophore biosynthesis and uptake. Enterobactin and aerobactin contributed most to total siderophore activity and growth in defined iron-deficient medium. No siderophores were detected in an 83972 quadruple mutant deficient in all four siderophore biosynthesis pathways; this mutant did not grow in defined iron-deficient medium but grew in iron-limited pooled human urine due to iron uptake via the FecA ferric citrate receptor. In a mixed 1:1 growth assay with strain 83972, there was no fitness disadvantage of the 83972 quadruple biosynthetic mutant, demonstrating its capacity to act as a “cheater” and utilize siderophores produced by the wild-type strain for iron uptake. An 83972 enterobactin/salmochelin double receptor mutant was outcompeted by 83972 in human urine and the mouse urinary tract, indicating a role for catecholate receptors in urinary tract colonization. PMID:21930757

  2. Potential of siderophore production by bacteria isolated from heavy metal: polluted and rhizosphere soils.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Khalid A; Joo, Jin Ho

    2014-06-01

    Recently, heavy metals have been shown to have a stimulating effect on siderophore biosynthesis in various bacteria. In addition, several studies have found that siderophore production is greater in bacteria isolated from soil near plant roots. The aim of this study was to compare the production of siderophores by bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and uncontaminated soils. Chrome azurol sulphonate was used to detect siderophore secretion by several bacterial strains isolated from heavy metal-contaminated and rhizosphere-uncontaminated soils with both a qualitative disc diffusion method and a quantitative ultraviolet spectrophotometric method. Siderophore production by rhizosphere bacteria was significantly greater than by bacteria isolated from contaminated soil. The Pearson's correlation test indicated a positive correlation between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere using the quantitative and qualitative detection methods and the amount of heavy metal in the soil. However, a significant negative correlation was observed between the amount of siderophore produced by bacteria isolated from heavy metal-contaminated soil and the amount of heavy metal (r value of -0.775, P < 0.001).

  3. Biosynthesis, characterization and biological evalutation of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes of neoaspergillic acid, a hydroxamate siderophore produced by co-cultures of two marine-derived mangrove epiphytic fungi.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Wu, Jingshu; Chen, Guangying; Lu, Weihong; Pan, Jiahui

    2011-08-01

    A hydroxamate siderophore, neoaspergillic acid (1), and a red pigment, ferrineoaspergillin (2) which is an Fe(III) complex of 1, were produced by co-cultures of two epiphytic fungi from a rotten fruit of the mangrove Avicennia marina from the South China Sea, and a new Cu(II) complex of 1, designated as cuprineoaspergillin (3), was also prepared by treatment of 1 with cupric acetate. All the compounds (1-3) were characterized by physical and chemical techniques, including 1H NMR, ESIMS, and photoelectron energy spectra. In the bioassays, compounds 1-3 showed significant inhibitory activities against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and compound 1 also exhibited moderate inhibitory activities against human cancer cell lines SPC-A-1, BEL-7402, SGC-7901 and K562.

  4. Iron acquisition with the natural siderophore enantiomers pyochelin and enantio-pyochelin in Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Youard, Zeb A; Wenner, Nicolas; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2011-06-01

    The bacterial siderophore pyochelin is composed of salicylate and two cysteine-derived heterocycles, the second of which is modified by reduction and N-methylation during biosynthesis. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first cysteine residue is converted to its D-isoform during thiazoline ring formation, whereas the second cysteine remains in its L-configuration. Stereochemistry is opposite in the Pseudomonas fluorescens siderophore enantio-pyochelin, in which the first ring originates from L-cysteine and the second ring from D-cysteine. Both siderophores promote growth of the producer organism during iron limitation and induce the expression of their biosynthesis genes by activating the transcriptional AraC-type regulator PchR. However, neither siderophore is functional as an iron carrier or as a transcriptional inducer in the other species, demonstrating that both processes are highly stereospecific. Stereospecificity of pyochelin/enantio-pyochelin-mediated iron uptake is ensured at two levels: (i) by the outer membrane siderophore receptors and (ii) by the cytosolic PchR regulators. PMID:21188474

  5. Thioquinolobactin, a Pseudomonas siderophore with antifungal and anti-Pythium activity.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Tehrani, Kourosch Abbaspour; Laus, George; Jackson, Robert W; Cooper, Richard M; Cornelis, Pierre

    2007-02-01

    Under conditions of iron limitation Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 produces two siderophores, pyoverdine, and a second siderophore quinolobactin, which itself results from the hydrolysis of the unstable molecule 8-hydroxy-4-methoxy-2-quinoline thiocarboxylic acid (thioquinolobactin). Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 also displays a strong in vitro antagonism against the Oomycete Pythium, which is repressed by iron, suggesting the involvement of a siderophore(s). While a pyoverdine-negative mutant retains most of its antagonism, a thioquinolobactin-negative mutant only slowed-down Pythium growth, and a double pyoverdine-, thioquinolobactin-negative mutant, which does not produce any siderophore, totally lost its antagonism against Pythium. The siderophore thioquinolobactin could be purified and identified from spent medium and showed anti-Pythium activity, but it was quickly hydrolysed to quinolobactin, which we showed has no antimicrobial activity. Analysis of antagonism-affected transposon mutants revealed that genes involved in haem biosynthesis and sulfur assimilation are important for the production of thioquinolobactin and the expression of antagonism. PMID:17222140

  6. Individual and combined roles of malonichrome, ferricrocin, and TAFC siderophores in Fusarium graminearum pathogenic and sexual development

    PubMed Central

    Oide, Shinichi; Berthiller, Franz; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Adam, Gerhard; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Intra- and extracellular iron-chelating siderophores produced by fungal non-ribosomal peptide synthetases have been shown to be involved in reproductive and pathogenic developmental processes and in iron and oxidative stress management. Here we report individual and combined contributions of three of these metabolites to developmental success of the destructive cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. In previous work, we determined that deletion of the NPS2 gene, responsible for intracellular siderophore biosynthesis, results in inability to produce sexual spores when mutants of this homothallic ascomycete are selfed. Deletion of the NPS6 gene, required for extracellular siderophore biosynthesis, does not affect sexual reproduction but results in sensitivity to iron starvation and oxidative stress and leads to reduced virulence to the host. Building on this, we report that double mutants lacking both NPS2 and NPS6 are augmented in all collective phenotypes of single deletion strains (i.e., abnormal sexual and pathogenic development, hypersensitivity to oxidative and iron-depletion stress), which suggests overlap of function. Using comparative biochemical analysis of wild-type and mutant strains, we show that NPS1, a third gene associated with siderophore biosynthesis, is responsible for biosynthesis of a second extracellular siderophore, malonichrome. nps1 mutants fail to produce this metabolite. Phenotypic characterization reveals that, although single nps1 mutants are like wild-type with respect to sexual development, hypersensitivity to ROS and iron-depletion stress, and virulence to the host, triple nps1nps2nps6 deletion strains, lacking all three siderophores, are even more impaired in these attributes than double nps2nps6 strains. Thus, combinatorial mutants lacking key iron-associated genes uncovered malonichrome function. The intimate connection between presence/absence of siderophores and resistance/sensitivity to ROS is central to sexual and pathogenic

  7. Pseudomonas fluorescens Pirates both Ferrioxamine and Ferricoelichelin Siderophores from Streptomyces ambofaciens

    PubMed Central

    Galet, Justine; Deveau, Aurélie; Hôtel, Laurence; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Leblond, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential in many biological processes. However, its bioavailability is reduced in aerobic environments, such as soil. To overcome this limitation, microorganisms have developed different strategies, such as iron chelation by siderophores. Some bacteria have even gained the ability to detect and utilize xenosiderophores, i.e., siderophores produced by other organisms. We illustrate an example of such an interaction between two soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, which produce the siderophores pyoverdine and enantiopyochelin and the siderophores desferrioxamines B and E and coelichelin, respectively. During pairwise cultures on iron-limiting agar medium, no induction of siderophore synthesis by P. fluorescens BBc6R8 was observed in the presence of S. ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Cocultures with a Streptomyces mutant strain that produced either coelichelin or desferrioxamines, as well as culture in a medium supplemented with desferrioxamine B, resulted in the absence of pyoverdine production; however, culture with a double mutant deficient in desferrioxamines and coelichelin production did not. This strongly suggests that P. fluorescens BBbc6R8 utilizes the ferrioxamines and ferricoelichelin produced by S. ambofaciens as xenosiderophores and therefore no longer activates the production of its own siderophores. A screening of a library of P. fluorescens BBc6R8 mutants highlighted the involvement of the TonB-dependent receptor FoxA in this process: the expression of foxA and genes involved in the regulation of its biosynthesis was induced in the presence of S. ambofaciens. In a competitive environment, such as soil, siderophore piracy could well be one of the driving forces that determine the outcome of microbial competition. PMID:25724953

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens pirates both ferrioxamine and ferricoelichelin siderophores from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Galet, Justine; Deveau, Aurélie; Hôtel, Laurence; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Leblond, Pierre; Aigle, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Iron is essential in many biological processes. However, its bioavailability is reduced in aerobic environments, such as soil. To overcome this limitation, microorganisms have developed different strategies, such as iron chelation by siderophores. Some bacteria have even gained the ability to detect and utilize xenosiderophores, i.e., siderophores produced by other organisms. We illustrate an example of such an interaction between two soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, which produce the siderophores pyoverdine and enantiopyochelin and the siderophores desferrioxamines B and E and coelichelin, respectively. During pairwise cultures on iron-limiting agar medium, no induction of siderophore synthesis by P. fluorescens BBc6R8 was observed in the presence of S. ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Cocultures with a Streptomyces mutant strain that produced either coelichelin or desferrioxamines, as well as culture in a medium supplemented with desferrioxamine B, resulted in the absence of pyoverdine production; however, culture with a double mutant deficient in desferrioxamines and coelichelin production did not. This strongly suggests that P. fluorescens BBbc6R8 utilizes the ferrioxamines and ferricoelichelin produced by S. ambofaciens as xenosiderophores and therefore no longer activates the production of its own siderophores. A screening of a library of P. fluorescens BBc6R8 mutants highlighted the involvement of the TonB-dependent receptor FoxA in this process: the expression of foxA and genes involved in the regulation of its biosynthesis was induced in the presence of S. ambofaciens. In a competitive environment, such as soil, siderophore piracy could well be one of the driving forces that determine the outcome of microbial competition.

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens pirates both ferrioxamine and ferricoelichelin siderophores from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Galet, Justine; Deveau, Aurélie; Hôtel, Laurence; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Leblond, Pierre; Aigle, Bertrand

    2015-05-01

    Iron is essential in many biological processes. However, its bioavailability is reduced in aerobic environments, such as soil. To overcome this limitation, microorganisms have developed different strategies, such as iron chelation by siderophores. Some bacteria have even gained the ability to detect and utilize xenosiderophores, i.e., siderophores produced by other organisms. We illustrate an example of such an interaction between two soil bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 and Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC 23877, which produce the siderophores pyoverdine and enantiopyochelin and the siderophores desferrioxamines B and E and coelichelin, respectively. During pairwise cultures on iron-limiting agar medium, no induction of siderophore synthesis by P. fluorescens BBc6R8 was observed in the presence of S. ambofaciens ATCC 23877. Cocultures with a Streptomyces mutant strain that produced either coelichelin or desferrioxamines, as well as culture in a medium supplemented with desferrioxamine B, resulted in the absence of pyoverdine production; however, culture with a double mutant deficient in desferrioxamines and coelichelin production did not. This strongly suggests that P. fluorescens BBbc6R8 utilizes the ferrioxamines and ferricoelichelin produced by S. ambofaciens as xenosiderophores and therefore no longer activates the production of its own siderophores. A screening of a library of P. fluorescens BBc6R8 mutants highlighted the involvement of the TonB-dependent receptor FoxA in this process: the expression of foxA and genes involved in the regulation of its biosynthesis was induced in the presence of S. ambofaciens. In a competitive environment, such as soil, siderophore piracy could well be one of the driving forces that determine the outcome of microbial competition. PMID:25724953

  10. Diverging roles of bacterial siderophores during infection.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Bachman, Michael A

    2015-06-01

    Siderophores are low molecular weight, high affinity iron chelating molecules that are essential virulence factors in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Whereas the chemical structure of siderophores is extremely variable, the function of siderophores has been narrowly defined as the chelation and delivery of iron to bacteria for proliferation. The discovery of the host protein Lipocalin 2, capable of specifically sequestering the siderophore Enterobactin but not its glycosylated-derivative Salmochelin, indicated that diversity in structure could be an immune evasion mechanism that provides functional redundancy during infection. However, there is growing evidence that siderophores are specialized in their iron-acquisition functions, can perturb iron homeostasis in their hosts, and even bind non-iron metals to promote bacterial fitness. The combination of siderophores produced by a pathogen can enable inter-bacterial competition, modulate host cellular pathways, and determine the bacterial "replicative niche" during infection. This review will examine both classical and novel functions of siderophores to address the concept that siderophores are non-redundant virulence factors used to enhance bacterial pathogenesis.

  11. Monitoring iron uptake by siderophores.

    PubMed

    Hoegy, Françoise; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important element for almost all forms of life. In order to get access to this essential nutriment, Pseudomonads produce two major siderophores, pyoverdine PVD and pyochelin (PCH). Uptake of iron in bacterial cells can be monitored accurately using (55)Fe. Bacteria cells are incubated in the presence of either PVD or PCH loaded with (55)Fe. After incubation, extracellular iron ions are separated from those accumulated in the bacteria cells by either centrifugation or filtration on glass microfiber filters, for the PCH and PVD assays, respectively. (55)Fe contained in the harvested cells on the filter or in the cell pellet is counted in scintillation cocktail. The number of moles of (55)Fe transported can be determined using the specific activity of the radionuclide. PMID:24818918

  12. Siderophores are not involved in Fe(III) solubilization during anaerobic Fe(III) respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Fennessey, Christine M; Jones, Morris E; Taillefert, Martial; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a wide range of anaerobic electron acceptors, including sparingly soluble Fe(III) oxides. In the present study, S. oneidensis was found to produce Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration, a respiratory strategy postulated to destabilize Fe(III) and produce more readily reducible soluble organic Fe(III). In-frame gene deletion mutagenesis, siderophore detection assays, and voltammetric techniques were combined to determine (i) if the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration were synthesized via siderophore biosynthesis systems and (ii) if the Fe(III)-siderophore reductase was required for respiration of soluble organic Fe(III) as an anaerobic electron acceptor. Genes predicted to encode the siderophore (hydroxamate) biosynthesis system (SO3030 to SO3032), the Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptor (SO3033), and the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase (SO3034) were identified in the S. oneidensis genome, and corresponding in-frame gene deletion mutants were constructed. DeltaSO3031 was unable to synthesize siderophores or produce soluble organic Fe(III) during aerobic respiration yet retained the ability to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. DeltaSO3034 retained the ability to synthesize siderophores during aerobic respiration and to solubilize and respire Fe(III) at wild-type rates during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration. These findings indicate that the Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligands produced by S. oneidensis during anaerobic Fe(III) oxide respiration are not synthesized via the hydroxamate biosynthesis system and that the Fe(III)-hydroxamate reductase is not essential for respiration of Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as an anaerobic electron acceptor.

  13. TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2011-04-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the conserved β-barrel and plug domains of TonB-dependent proteins but only 18 of them have an N-terminal signaling domain characteristic of TonB-dependent transducers (TBDTs), which participate in cell-surface signaling systems. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18 TBDTs and 27 TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which lack the N-terminal signaling domain, suggest a complex evolutionary history including horizontal transfer among different microbial lineages. Putative functions were assigned to certain TBDRs and TBDTs in clades including well-characterized orthologs from other Pseudomonas spp. A mutant of Pf-5 with deletions in pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis genes was constructed and characterized for iron-limited growth and utilization of a spectrum of siderophores. The mutant could utilize as iron sources a large number of pyoverdines with diverse structures as well as ferric citrate, heme, and the siderophores ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, enterobactin, and aerobactin. The diversity and complexity of the TBDTs and TBDRs with roles in iron uptake clearly indicate the importance of iron in the fitness and survival of Pf-5 in the environment. PMID:21080032

  14. The Pseudomonas siderophore quinolobactin is synthesized from xanthurenic acid, an intermediate of the kynurenine pathway.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Baysse, Christine; Koedam, Nico; Tehrani, Kourosh Abbaspour; Verheyden, Lieve; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Schäfer, Mathias; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Meyer, Jean-Marie; De Greve, Henri; Cornelis, Pierre

    2004-04-01

    To cope with iron deficiency fluorescent pseudomonads produce pyoverdines which are complex peptidic siderophores that very efficiently scavenge iron. In addition to pyoverdine some species also produce other siderophores. Recently, it was shown that Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 produces the siderophore quinolobactin, an 8-hydroxy-4-methoxy-2-quinoline carboxylic acid (Mossialos, D., Meyer, J.M., Budzikiewicz, H., Wolff, U., Koedam, N., Baysse, C., Anjaiah, V., and Cornelis, P. (2000) Appl Environ Microbiol 66: 487-492). The entire quinolobactin biosynthetic, transport and uptake gene cluster, consisting out of two operons comprising 12 open reading frames, was cloned and sequenced. Based on the genes present and physiological complementation assays a biosynthetic pathway for quinolobactin is proposed. Surprisingly, this pathway turned out to combine genes derived from the eukaryotic tryptophan-xanthurenic acid branch of the kynurenine pathway and from the pathway for the biosynthesis of pyridine-2,6-bis(thiocarboxylic acid) from P. stutzeri, PDTC. These results clearly show the involvement of the tryptophan-kynurenine-xanthurenic acid pathway in the synthesis of an authentic quinoline siderophore. PMID:15066027

  15. Siderophores in environmental research: roles and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, E; Holmström, S J M

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are organic compounds with low molecular masses that are produced by microorganisms and plants growing under low iron conditions. The primary function of these compounds is to chelate the ferric iron [Fe(III)] from different terrestrial and aquatic habitats and thereby make it available for microbial and plant cells. Siderophores have received much attention in recent years because of their potential roles and applications in various areas of environmental research. Their significance in these applications is because siderophores have the ability to bind a variety of metals in addition to iron, and they have a wide range of chemical structures and specific properties. For instance, siderophores function as biocontrols, biosensors, and bioremediation and chelation agents, in addition to their important role in weathering soil minerals and enhancing plant growth. The aim of this literature review is to outline and discuss the important roles and functions of siderophores in different environmental habitats and emphasize the significant roles that these small organic molecules could play in applied environmental processes. PMID:24576157

  16. Plant mechanisms of siderophore-iron utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanisms of siderophore iron-utilization by plants were examined to determine whether plants have direct mechanisms for acquiring iron from microbially-produced hydroxamate siderophores or simply take up inorganic iron in equilibrium with the chelate (shuttle mechanism). Experiments were designed to determine whether the monocot plant species, oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Victory) could acquire iron from ferrichrome under hydroponic conditions in which iron uptake was most likely to occur by direct use of the chelating agent. Ten-day-old iron-deficient seedlings, grown in aerated Hoagland's nutrient solution (minus iron) buffered at pH 7.4 with CaCO/sub 3/, were placed in fresh nutrient solution containing 10/sup -7.4/M radioactive /sup 55/FeCl/sub 3/ (23.7 mCi/mg) with the synthetic chelate, EDDHA (10..pi../sup 5/M), ferrichrome (10/sup -5/M), or with no chelate. After 6 days, shoot content of /sup 55/Fe in shoots of plants provided with ferrichrome was 100-fold greater than that in shoots of plants provided with EDDHA. Therefore iron uptake by oat under these conditions not only indicates direct use of ferrichrome, but also suggest that oat may be better able to acquire iron from siderophores than from synthetic chelates. One possible mechanism for direct use of chelating agents, may involve siderophore binding sites on the plasmalemma of root cortical cells where iron is split from the chelate by enzymatic reduction of ferric to ferrous iron. To demonstrate hypothesized siderophore binding sites on oat roots, experiments examined possible competition for presumed siderophore binding sites by an inert analog of ferrichrome constructed by irreversible chelation with chromium.

  17. The csbX gene of Azotobacter vinelandii encodes an MFS efflux pump required for catecholate siderophore export.

    PubMed

    Page, William J; Kwon, Elena; Cornish, Anthony S; Tindale, Anne E

    2003-11-21

    The csbX gene of Azotobacter vinelandii was regulated in an iron-repressible manner from a divergent promoter upstream of the catecholate siderophore biosynthesis (csb) operon and was predicted to encode an efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily. Other proteins that were most similar to CsbX were encoded by genes found in the catecholate siderophore biosynthesis operons of Aeromonas hydrophila and Stigmatella aurantiaca. Inactivation of csbX resulted in 57-100% decrease in the amount of catecholates released when compared to the wild-type in iron-limited medium. CsbX was most important for the export of the high affinity chelator protochelin with the majority of the catecholates released by csbX mutants being the protochelin intermediates azotochelin and aminochelin.

  18. XAFS Determination of Pb and Cd Speciation with Siderophores and the Metal/Siderophore/Kaolinite System

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2007-02-02

    We provide evidence for hexadentate complexes of Pb2+ and Cd2+ with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) at pH 7.5, and 9.0, respectively. Analysis of the species of Pb2+ and Cd2+ adsorbed at the surface of kaolinite clay under the same pH conditions and in the presence of DFO-B indicate that Pb2+ is sorbed as a metal-siderophore complex while Cd2+ is not.

  19. Citrate as a siderophore in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Guerinot, M L; Meidl, E J; Plessner, O

    1990-01-01

    Under iron-limiting conditions, many bacteria secrete ferric iron-specific ligands, generically termed siderophores, to aid in the sequestering and transport of iron. One strain of the nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, 61A152, was shown to produce a siderophore when 20 B. japonicum strains were screened with all six chemical assays commonly used to detect such production. Production by strain 61A152 was detected via the chrome azurol S assay, a general test for siderophores which is independent of siderophore structure. The iron-chelating compound was neither a catechol nor a hydroxamate and was ninhydrin negative. It was determined to be citric acid via a combination of thin-layer chromatography and high-voltage paper electrophoresis; this identification was verified by a specific enzymatic assay for citric acid. The inverse correlation which was observed between citric acid release and the iron content of the medium suggested that ferric citrate could serve as an iron source. This was confirmed via growth and transport assays. Exogenously added ferric citrate could be used to overcome iron starvation, and iron-deficient cells actively transported radiolabeled ferric citrate. These results, taken together, indicate a role for ferric citrate in the iron nutrition of this strain, which has been shown to be an efficient nitrogen-fixing strain on a variety of soybean cultivars. PMID:2140566

  20. Siderophore-Based Iron Acquisition and Pathogen Control

    PubMed Central

    Miethke, Marcus; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary: High-affinity iron acquisition is mediated by siderophore-dependent pathways in the majority of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria and fungi. Considerable progress has been made in characterizing and understanding mechanisms of siderophore synthesis, secretion, iron scavenging, and siderophore-delivered iron uptake and its release. The regulation of siderophore pathways reveals multilayer networks at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Due to the key role of many siderophores during virulence, coevolution led to sophisticated strategies of siderophore neutralization by mammals and (re)utilization by bacterial pathogens. Surprisingly, hosts also developed essential siderophore-based iron delivery and cell conversion pathways, which are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. In the last decades, natural and synthetic compounds have gained attention as potential therapeutics for iron-dependent treatment of infections and further diseases. Promising results for pathogen inhibition were obtained with various siderophore-antibiotic conjugates acting as “Trojan horse” toxins and siderophore pathway inhibitors. In this article, general aspects of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition, recent findings regarding iron-related pathogen-host interactions, and current strategies for iron-dependent pathogen control will be reviewed. Further concepts including the inhibition of novel siderophore pathway targets are discussed. PMID:17804665

  1. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Acquisition Influences Motility and Is Required for Full Virulence of the Xylem-Dwelling Bacterial Phytopathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii

    PubMed Central

    Burbank, Lindsey; Mohammadi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Iron is a key micronutrient for microbial growth but is often present in low concentrations or in biologically unavailable forms. Many microorganisms overcome this challenge by producing siderophores, which are ferric-iron chelating compounds that enable the solubilization and acquisition of iron in a bioactive form. Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, produces a siderophore under iron-limiting conditions. The proteins involved in the biosynthesis and export of this siderophore are encoded by the iucABCD-iutA operon, which is homologous to the aerobactin biosynthetic gene cluster found in a number of enteric pathogens. Mutations in iucA and iutA resulted in a decrease in surface-based motility that P. stewartii utilizes during the early stages of biofilm formation, indicating that active iron acquisition impacts surface motility for P. stewartii. Furthermore, bacterial movement in planta is also dependent on a functional siderophore biosynthesis and uptake pathway. Most notably, siderophore-mediated iron acquisition is required for full virulence in the sweet corn host, indicating that active iron acquisition is essential for pathogenic fitness for this important xylem-dwelling bacterial pathogen. PMID:25326304

  2. Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle with iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore by Bacillus cereus YxeB.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Allred, Benjamin E; Sia, Allyson K; Nichiporuk, Rita; Andersen, Ulla N; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2013-08-20

    Small molecule iron-chelators, siderophores, are very important in facilitating the acquisition of Fe(III), an essential element for pathogenic bacteria. Many Gram-negative outer-membrane transporters and Gram-positive lipoprotein siderophore-binding proteins have been characterized, and the binding ability of outer-membrane transporters and siderophore-binding proteins for Fe-siderophores has been determined. However, there is little information regarding the binding ability of these proteins for apo-siderophores, the iron-free chelators. Here we report that Bacillus cereus YxeB facilitates iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore bound to the protein, the first Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle system. YxeB binds ferrioxamine B (FO, Fe-siderophore)/desferrioxamine B (DFO, apo-siderophore) in vitro. Disc-diffusion assays and growth assays using the yxeB mutant reveal that YxeB is responsible for importing the FO. Cr-DFO (a FO analog) is bound by YxeB in vitro and B. cereus imports or binds Cr-DFO in vivo. In vivo uptake assays using Cr-DFO and FO and growth assays using DFO and Cr-DFO show that B. cereus selectively imports and uses FO when DFO is present. Moreover, in vitro competition assays using Cr-DFO and FO clearly demonstrate that YxeB binds only FO, not Cr-DFO, when DFO is bound to the protein. Iron-exchange from FO to DFO bound to YxeB must occur when DFO is initially bound by YxeB. Because the metal exchange rate is generally first order in replacement ligand concentration, protein binding of the apo-siderophore acts to dramatically enhance the iron exchange rate, a key component of the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism.

  3. Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle with iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore by Bacillus cereus YxeB

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Allred, Benjamin E.; Sia, Allyson K.; Nichiporuk, Rita; Andersen, Ulla N.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule iron-chelators, siderophores, are very important in facilitating the acquisition of Fe(III), an essential element for pathogenic bacteria. Many Gram-negative outer-membrane transporters and Gram-positive lipoprotein siderophore-binding proteins have been characterized, and the binding ability of outer-membrane transporters and siderophore-binding proteins for Fe-siderophores has been determined. However, there is little information regarding the binding ability of these proteins for apo-siderophores, the iron-free chelators. Here we report that Bacillus cereus YxeB facilitates iron-exchange from Fe-siderophore to apo-siderophore bound to the protein, the first Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle system. YxeB binds ferrioxamine B (FO, Fe-siderophore)/desferrioxamine B (DFO, apo-siderophore) in vitro. Disc-diffusion assays and growth assays using the yxeB mutant reveal that YxeB is responsible for importing the FO. Cr-DFO (a FO analog) is bound by YxeB in vitro and B. cereus imports or binds Cr-DFO in vivo. In vivo uptake assays using Cr-DFO and FO and growth assays using DFO and Cr-DFO show that B. cereus selectively imports and uses FO when DFO is present. Moreover, in vitro competition assays using Cr-DFO and FO clearly demonstrate that YxeB binds only FO, not Cr-DFO, when DFO is bound to the protein. Iron-exchange from FO to DFO bound to YxeB must occur when DFO is initially bound by YxeB. Because the metal exchange rate is generally first order in replacement ligand concentration, protein binding of the apo-siderophore acts to dramatically enhance the iron exchange rate, a key component of the Gram-positive siderophore-shuttle mechanism. PMID:23924612

  4. A cell biological view of the siderophore pyochelin iron uptake pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Cunrath, Olivier; Gasser, Véronique; Hoegy, Françoise; Reimmann, Cornelia; Guillon, Laurent; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2015-01-01

    Pyochelin (PCH) is a siderophore produced and secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for iron capture. Using (55) Fe uptake and binding assays, we showed that PCH-Fe uptake in P. aeruginosa involves, in addition to the highly studied outer membrane transporter FptA, the inner membrane permease FptX, which recognizes PCH-(55) Fe with an affinity of 0.6 ± 0.2 nM and transports the ferri-siderophore complex from the periplasm into the cytoplasm: fptX deletion inhibited (55) Fe accumulation in the bacterial cytoplasm. Chromosomal replacement was used to generate P. aeruginosa strains producing fluorescent fusions with FptX, PchR (an AraC regulator), PchA (the first enzyme involved in the PCH biosynthesis) and PchE (a non-ribosomic peptide-synthetase involved in a further step). Fluorescence imaging and cellular fractionation showed a uniform repartition of FptX in the inner membrane. PchA and PchE were found in the cytoplasm, associated to the inner membrane all over the bacteria and also concentrated at the bacterial poles. PchE clustering at the bacterial poles was dependent on PchA expression, but on the opposite PchA clustering and membrane association was PchE-independent. PchA and PchE cellular organization suggests the existence of a siderosome for PCH biosynthesis as previously proposed for pyoverdine biosynthesis (another siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa). PMID:24947078

  5. Production of Siderophores Increases Resistance to Fusaric Acid in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Jimena A.; Bernar, Evangelina M.; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Fusaric acid is produced by pathogenic fungi of the genus Fusarium, and is toxic to plants and rhizobacteria. Many fluorescent pseudomonads can prevent wilt diseases caused by these fungi. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of fusaric acid on P. protegens Pf-5 and elucidate the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to survive in the presence of the mycotoxin. The results confirm that fusaric acid negatively affects growth and motility of P. protegens. Moreover, a notable increase in secretion of the siderophore pyoverdine was observed when P. protegens was grown in the presence of fusaric acid. Concomitantly, levels of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, the second siderophore encoded by P. protegens, increased markedly. Moreover, while similar levels of resistance to fusaric acid were observed for P. protegens mutants unable to synthesize either pyoverdine or enanto-pyochelin and the wild type strain, a double mutant unable to synthesize both kinds of siderophores showed a dramatically reduced resistance to this compound. This reduced resistance was not observed when this mutant was grown under conditions of iron excess. Spectrophotometric titrations revealed that fusaric acid binds not only Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also Zn2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+, with high affinity. Our results demonstrate that iron sequestration accounts at least in part for the deleterious effect of the mycotoxin on P. protegens. PMID:25569682

  6. Production of siderophores increases resistance to fusaric acid in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jimena A; Bernar, Evangelina M; Jung, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Fusaric acid is produced by pathogenic fungi of the genus Fusarium, and is toxic to plants and rhizobacteria. Many fluorescent pseudomonads can prevent wilt diseases caused by these fungi. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of fusaric acid on P. protegens Pf-5 and elucidate the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to survive in the presence of the mycotoxin. The results confirm that fusaric acid negatively affects growth and motility of P. protegens. Moreover, a notable increase in secretion of the siderophore pyoverdine was observed when P. protegens was grown in the presence of fusaric acid. Concomitantly, levels of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, the second siderophore encoded by P. protegens, increased markedly. Moreover, while similar levels of resistance to fusaric acid were observed for P. protegens mutants unable to synthesize either pyoverdine or enanto-pyochelin and the wild type strain, a double mutant unable to synthesize both kinds of siderophores showed a dramatically reduced resistance to this compound. This reduced resistance was not observed when this mutant was grown under conditions of iron excess. Spectrophotometric titrations revealed that fusaric acid binds not only Fe2+ and Fe3+, but also Zn2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+, with high affinity. Our results demonstrate that iron sequestration accounts at least in part for the deleterious effect of the mycotoxin on P. protegens. PMID:25569682

  7. Microbial siderophores and their potential applications: a review.

    PubMed

    Saha, Maumita; Sarkar, Subhasis; Sarkar, Biplab; Sharma, Bipin Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Tribedi, Prosun

    2016-03-01

    Siderophores are small organic molecules produced by microorganisms under iron-limiting conditions which enhance the uptake of iron to the microorganisms. In environment, the ferric form of iron is insoluble and inaccessible at physiological pH (7.35-7.40). Under this condition, microorganisms synthesize siderophores which have high affinity for ferric iron. These ferric iron-siderophore complexes are then transported to cytosol. In cytosol, the ferric iron gets reduced into ferrous iron and becomes accessible to microorganism. In recent times, siderophores have drawn much attention due to its potential roles in different fields. Siderophores have application in microbial ecology to enhance the growth of several unculturable microorganisms and can alter the microbial communities. In the field of agriculture, different types of siderophores promote the growth of several plant species and increase their yield by enhancing the Fe uptake to plants. Siderophores acts as a potential biocontrol agent against harmful phyto-pathogens and holds the ability to substitute hazardous pesticides. Heavy-metal-contaminated samples can be detoxified by applying siderophores, which explicate its role in bioremediation. Siderophores can detect the iron content in different environments, exhibiting its role as a biosensor. In the medical field, siderophore uses the "Trojan horse strategy" to form complexes with antibiotics and helps in the selective delivery of antibiotics to the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Certain iron overload diseases for example sickle cell anemia can be treated with the help of siderophores. Other medical applications of siderophores include antimalarial activity, removal of transuranic elements from the body, and anticancer activity. The aim of this review is to discuss the important roles and applications of siderophores in different sectors including ecology, agriculture, bioremediation, biosensor, and medicine.

  8. A Chimeric Siderophore Halts Swarming Vibrio**

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Thomas; Clardy, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Some bacteria under some circumstances swarm; they move rapidly and collectively over a surface. In an effort to understand the molecular signals controlling swarming, we isolated two strains from the same red seaweed – Vibrio alginolyticus B522, a vigorous swarmer, and Shewanella algae B516, which inhibits V. alginolyticus swarming in its vicinity. Plate assays combined with NMR, MS, and X-ray diffraction analyses identified a small molecule, which was named avaroferrin, as a potent swarming inhibitor. Avaroferrin, a previously unreported cyclic dihydroxamate siderophore, is a chimera of two well-known siderophores: putrebactin and bisucaberin. The sequenced genome of S. algae revealed avaroferrin’s biosynthetic gene cluster to be a mashup of putrebactin and bisucaberin biosynthetic genes. Avaroferrin blocks swarming through its ability to bind iron in a form that cannot be pirated by V. alginolyticus, thereby securing this essential resource for its producer. PMID:24615751

  9. Microbial Tailoring of Acyl Peptidic Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marine bacteria produce an abundance of suites of acylated siderophores characterized by a unique, species-dependent headgroup that binds iron(III) and one of a series of fatty acid appendages. Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produces a suite of seven acylated marinobactins, with fatty acids ranging from saturated and unsaturated C12–C18 fatty acids. In the present study, we report that in the late log phase of growth, the fatty acids are hydrolyzed by an amide hydrolase producing the peptidic marinobactin headgroup. Halomonas aquamarina str. DS40M3, another marine bacterium isolated originally from the same sample of open ocean water as Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, produces the acyl aquachelins, also as a suite composed of a peptidic headgroup distinct from that of the marinobactins. In contrast to the acyl marinobactins, hydrolysis of the suite of acyl aquachelins is not detected, even when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is grown into the stationary phase. The Marinobacter cell-free extract containing the acyl amide hydrolase is active toward exogenous acyl-peptidic siderophores (e.g., aquachelin C, loihichelin C, as well as octanoyl homoserine lactone used in quorum sensing). Further, when H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 is cultured together with Marinobacter sp. DS40M6, the fatty acids of both suites of siderophores are hydrolyzed, and the aquachelin headgroup is also produced. The present study demonstrates that coculturing bacteria leads to metabolically tailored metabolites compared to growth in a single pure culture, which is interesting given the importance of siderophore-mediated iron acquisition for bacterial growth and that Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and H. aquamarina str. DS40M3 were isolated from the same sample of seawater. PMID:24735218

  10. Siderophores: The special ingredient to cyanobacterial blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xue; Creed, Irena; Trick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lakes provide a number of significant ecological services including clean drinking water, habitat for aquatic biota, and economic benefits. The provision of these ecological services, as well as the health of these aquatic systems, is threatened by the excessive growth of algae, specifically, cyanobacteria. Historically, blooms have been linked to eutrophication but recent occurrences indicate that there are less dramatic changes that induce these blooms. Iron is an essential micronutrient required for specific essential metabolic pathways; however, the amount of biologically available iron in naturally occurring lake ranges from saturation to much lower than cell transport affinities. To assist in the modulation of iron availabilities, cyanobacteria in culture produce low molecular weight compounds that function in an iron binding and acquisition system; nevertheless, this has yet to be confirmed in naturally occurring lakes. This project explored the relationship of P, N and in particular, Fe, in the promotion of cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in 30 natural freshwater lakes located in and around the Elk Island National Park, Alberta. It is hypothesized that cyanobacteria produce and utilize iron chelators called siderophores in low Fe and nitrogen (N) conditions, creating a competitive advantage over other algae in freshwater lakes. Lakes were selected to represent a range of iron availability to explore the nutrient composition of lakes that propagated cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs) compared to lakes that did not. Lake water was analyzed for nutrients, microbial composition, siderophore concentration, and toxin concentration. Modifications were made to optimize the Czaky and Arnow tests for hydroxamate- and catecholate-type siderophores, respectively, for field conditions. Preliminary results indicate the presence of iron-binding ligands (0.11-2.34 mg/L) in freshwater lakes characterized by widely ranging Fe regimes (0.04-2.74 mg

  11. XAFS Determination of Pb and Cd Speciation with Siderophores and the Metal/Siderophore/Kaolinite System

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2008-06-16

    We provide evidence for hexadentate complexes of Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) at pH 7.5, and 9.0, respectively. Analysis of the species of Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed at the surface of kaolinite clay under the same pH conditions and in the presence of DFO-B indicate that Pb{sup 2+} is sorbed as a metal-siderophore complex while Cd{sup 2+} is not.

  12. Functional and Structural Analysis of the Siderophore Synthetase AsbB through Reconstitution of the Petrobactin Biosynthetic Pathway from Bacillus anthracis*

    PubMed Central

    Nusca, Tyler D.; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Lee, Jung Yeop; Eschenfeldt, William; Stols, Lucy; Schofield, Michael M.; Scaglione, Jamie B.; Dixon, Shandee D.; Oves-Costales, Daniel; Challis, Gregory L.; Hanna, Philip C.; Pfleger, Brian F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Sherman, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Petrobactin, a mixed catechol-carboxylate siderophore, is required for full virulence of Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. The asbABCDEF operon encodes the biosynthetic machinery for this secondary metabolite. Here, we show that the function of five gene products encoded by the asb operon is necessary and sufficient for conversion of endogenous precursors to petrobactin using an in vitro system. In this pathway, the siderophore synthetase AsbB catalyzes formation of amide bonds crucial for petrobactin assembly through use of biosynthetic intermediates, as opposed to primary metabolites, as carboxylate donors. In solving the crystal structure of the B. anthracis siderophore biosynthesis protein B (AsbB), we disclose a three-dimensional model of a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase. Structural characteristics provide new insight into how this bifunctional condensing enzyme can bind and adenylate multiple citrate-containing substrates followed by incorporation of both natural and unnatural polyamine nucleophiles. This activity enables formation of multiple end-stage products leading to final assembly of petrobactin. Subsequent enzymatic assays with the nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like AsbC, AsbD, and AsbE polypeptides show that the alternative products of AsbB are further converted to petrobactin, verifying previously proposed convergent routes to formation of this siderophore. These studies identify potential therapeutic targets to halt deadly infections caused by B. anthracis and other pathogenic bacteria and suggest new avenues for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of novel compounds. PMID:22408253

  13. Structure and biosynthetic assembly of cupriachelin, a photoreactive siderophore from the bioplastic producer Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Martin F; Kage, Hirokazu; Nett, Markus

    2012-03-21

    The bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 produces a family of linear lipopeptides when grown under low iron conditions. The structural composition of these molecules, exemplified by the main metabolite cupriachelin, is reminiscent of siderophores that are excreted by marine bacteria. Comparable to marine siderophores, the ferric form of cupriachelin exhibits photoreactive properties. Exposure to UV light induces an oxidation of its peptidic backbone and a concomitant reduction of the coordinated Fe(III). Here, we report the genomics-inspired isolation and structural characterization of cupriachelin as well as its encoding gene cluster, which was identified by insertional mutagenesis. Based upon the functional characterization of adenylation domain specificity, a model for cupriachelin biosynthesis is proposed.

  14. Structure and biosynthetic assembly of cupriachelin, a photoreactive siderophore from the bioplastic producer Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Martin F; Kage, Hirokazu; Nett, Markus

    2012-03-21

    The bacterium Cupriavidus necator H16 produces a family of linear lipopeptides when grown under low iron conditions. The structural composition of these molecules, exemplified by the main metabolite cupriachelin, is reminiscent of siderophores that are excreted by marine bacteria. Comparable to marine siderophores, the ferric form of cupriachelin exhibits photoreactive properties. Exposure to UV light induces an oxidation of its peptidic backbone and a concomitant reduction of the coordinated Fe(III). Here, we report the genomics-inspired isolation and structural characterization of cupriachelin as well as its encoding gene cluster, which was identified by insertional mutagenesis. Based upon the functional characterization of adenylation domain specificity, a model for cupriachelin biosynthesis is proposed. PMID:22381697

  15. The Aspergillus fumigatus siderophore biosynthetic gene sidA, encoding L-ornithine N5-oxygenase, is required for virulence.

    PubMed

    Hissen, Anna H T; Wan, Adrian N C; Warwas, Mark L; Pinto, Linda J; Moore, Margo M

    2005-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the leading cause of invasive mold infection and is a serious problem in immunocompromised populations worldwide. We have previously shown that survival of A. fumigatus in serum may be related to secretion of siderophores. In this study, we identified and characterized the sidA gene of A. fumigatus, which encodes l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenase, the first committed step in hydroxamate siderophore biosynthesis. A. fumigatus sidA codes for a protein of 501 amino acids with significant homology to other fungal l-ornithine N(5)-oxygenases. A stable DeltasidA strain was created by deletion of A. fumigatus sidA. This strain was unable to synthesize the siderophores N',N",N'''-triacetylfusarinine C (TAF) and ferricrocin. Growth of the DeltasidA strain was the same as that of the wild type in rich media; however, the DeltasidA strain was unable to grow in low-iron defined media or media containing 10% human serum unless supplemented with TAF or ferricrocin. No significant differences in ferric reduction activities were observed between the parental strain and the DeltasidA strain, indicating that blocking siderophore secretion did not result in upregulation of this pathway. Unlike the parental strain, the DeltasidA strain was unable to remove iron from human transferrin. A rescued strain (DeltasidA + sidA) was constructed; it produced siderophores and had the same growth as the wild type on iron-limited media. Unlike the wild-type and rescued strains, the DeltasidA strain was avirulent in a mouse model of invasive aspergillosis, indicating that sidA is necessary for A. fumigatus virulence.

  16. Uranium extraction by complexation with siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahamonde Castro, Cristina

    One of the major concerns of energy production is the environmental impact associated with the extraction of natural resources. Nuclear energy fuel is obtained from uranium, an abundant and naturally occurring element in the environment, but the currently used techniques for uranium extraction leave either a significant fingerprint (open pit mines) or a chemical residue that alters the pH of the environment (acid or alkali leaching). It is therefore clear that a new and greener approach to uranium extraction is needed. Bioleaching is one potential alternative. In bioleaching, complexants naturally produced from fungi or bacteria may be used to extract the uranium. In the following research, the siderophore enterobactin, which is naturally produced by bacteria to extract and solubilize iron from the environment, is evaluated to determine its potential for complexing with uranium. To determine whether enterobactin could be used for uranium extraction, its acid dissociation and its binding strength with the metal of interest must be determined. Due to the complexity of working with radioactive materials, lanthanides were used as analogs for uranium. In addition, polyprotic acids were used as structural and chemical analogs for the siderophore during method development. To evaluate the acid dissociation of enterobactin and the subsequent binding constants with lanthanides, three different analytical techniques were studied including: potentiometric titration, UltraViolet Visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). After evaluation of three techniques, a combination of ITC and potentiometric titrations was deemed to be the most viable way for studying the siderophore of interest. The results obtained from these studies corroborate the ideal pH range for enterobactin complexation to the lanthanide of interest and pave the way for determining the strength of complexation relative to other naturally occurring metals. Ultimately, this

  17. Ornicorrugatin, a new siderophore from Pseudomonas fluorescens AF76.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Schäfer, Mathias; Wathelet, Bernard; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    From a pyoverdin-negative mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens AF76 a new lipopeptidic siderophore (ornicorrugatin) could be isolated. It is structurally related to the siderophore of Pseudomonas corrugata differing in the replacement of one Dab unit by Orn. PMID:18386480

  18. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of smectite by fluorescent Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Ferret, Claire; Sterckeman, Thibault; Cornu, Jean-Yves; Gangloff, Sophie; Schalk, Isabelle J; Geoffroy, Valérie A

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are organic chelators produced by microorganisms to fulfil their iron requirements. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of iron-bearing minerals has been clearly documented for some siderophores, but few studies have addressed metabolizing siderophore-producing bacteria. We investigated iron acquisition from clays by fluorescent Pseudomonads, bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. We focused on the interactions between smectite and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium producing two structurally different siderophores: pyoverdine and pyochelin. The presence of smectite in iron-limited growth media promoted planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa and biofilm surrounding the smectite aggregates. Chemical analysis of the culture media indicated increases in the dissolved silicon, iron and aluminium concentrations following smectite supplementation. The use of P. aeruginosa mutants unable to produce either one or both of the two siderophores indicated that pyoverdine, the siderophore with the higher affinity for iron, was involved in iron and aluminium solubilization by the wild-type strain. However, in the absence of pyoverdine, pyochelin was also able to solubilize iron but with a twofold lower efficiency. In conclusion, pyoverdine and pyochelin, two structurally different siderophores, can solubilize structural iron from smectite and thereby make it available for bacterial growth. PMID:25646536

  19. Chemistry and biology of pyoverdines, Pseudomonas primary siderophores.

    PubMed

    Cézard, C; Farvacques, N; Sonnet, P

    2015-01-01

    as signal molecules for the production of acute virulence factors and are involved in biofilm formation as well. The ongoing expanding pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa has become a major public health problem, and finding alternative strategies to classical antibiotics is urgently needed. Pyoverdines along with the iron pathway recently gained interest among academical researchers as potential new approaches to "fight" the bacteria. This review describes the classification of the nearly 60 pyoverdines identified so far, their structural and chemical properties and their (bio)synthesis. The different mechanisms underlying the steps of a pyoverdine's life in Pseudomonas are detailed as well: the affinity by which a pyoverdine chelates iron(III), the description of the interactions inducing the siderophore-receptor recognition, the specific transport of the pyoverdine-Fe(III) complex. As pyoverdine production and severe infections are linked, we will also report on situations where pyoverdines are considered as being P. aeruginosa Achilles heel: the propensity of FpvA to transport exo-pyoverdines, organic synthesis of pyoverdines and analogs, grafting of antibiotics on pyoverdines in a Trojan Horse strategy. PMID:25312210

  20. Turnerbactin, a Novel Triscatecholate Siderophore from the Shipworm Endosymbiont Teredinibacter turnerae T7901

    PubMed Central

    Han, Andrew W.; Sandy, Moriah; Fishman, Brian; Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Soares, Carlos A. G.; Distel, Daniel L.; Butler, Alison; Haygood, Margo G.

    2013-01-01

    Shipworms are marine bivalve mollusks (Family Teredinidae) that use wood for shelter and food. They harbor a group of closely related, yet phylogenetically distinct, bacterial endosymbionts in bacteriocytes located in the gills. This endosymbiotic community is believed to support the host's nutrition in multiple ways, through the production of cellulolytic enzymes and the fixation of nitrogen. The genome of the shipworm endosymbiont Teredinibacter turnerae T7901 was recently sequenced and in addition to the potential for cellulolytic enzymes and diazotrophy, the genome also revealed a rich potential for secondary metabolites. With nine distinct biosynthetic gene clusters, nearly 7% of the genome is dedicated to secondary metabolites. Bioinformatic analyses predict that one of the gene clusters is responsible for the production of a catecholate siderophore. Here we describe this gene cluster in detail and present the siderophore product from this cluster. Genes similar to the entCEBA genes of enterobactin biosynthesis involved in the production and activation of dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) are present in this cluster, as well as a two-module non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). A novel triscatecholate siderophore, turnerbactin, was isolated from the supernatant of iron-limited T. turnerae T7901 cultures. Turnerbactin is a trimer of N-(2,3-DHB)-L-Orn-L-Ser with the three monomeric units linked by Ser ester linkages. A monomer, dimer, dehydrated dimer, and dehydrated trimer of 2,3-DHB-L-Orn-L-Ser were also found in the supernatant. A link between the gene cluster and siderophore product was made by constructing a NRPS mutant, TtAH03. Siderophores could not be detected in cultures of TtAH03 by HPLC analysis and Fe-binding activity of culture supernatant was significantly reduced. Regulation of the pathway by iron is supported by identification of putative Fur box sequences and observation of increased Fe-binding activity under iron restriction. Evidence of a

  1. The Vibrio cholerae VctPDGC system transports catechol siderophores and a siderophore-free iron ligand.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Payne, Shelley M

    2011-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has an absolute requirement for iron. It transports the catechol siderophores vibriobactin, which it synthesizes and secretes, and enterobactin. These siderophores are transported across the inner membrane by one of two periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporters, VctPDGC or ViuPDGC. We show here that one of these inner membrane transport systems, VctPDGC, also promotes iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. Plasmids carrying the vctPDGC genes stimulated growth in both rich and minimal media of a Shigella flexneri mutant that produces no siderophores. vctPDGC also stimulated the growth of an Escherichia coli enterobactin biosynthetic mutant in low iron medium, and this effect did not require feoB, tonB or aroB. A tyrosine to phenylalanine substitution in the periplasmic binding protein VctP did not alter enterobactin transport, but eliminated growth stimulation in the absence of a siderophore. These data suggest that the VctPDGC system has the capacity to transport both catechol siderophores and a siderophore-free iron ligand. We also show that VctPDGC is the previously unidentified siderophore-independent iron transporter in V. cholerae, and this appears to complete the list of iron transport systems in V. cholerae.

  2. Beyond Iron: Non-Classical Biological Functions of Bacterial Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of “non-classical” siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was even documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  3. Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-14

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of "non-classical" siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  4. Six Siderophore-Producing Microorganisms Identified in Biological Soil Crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, K.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Poret-peterson, A. T.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2011-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse microbial communities that colonize soils in arid and semi-arid environments. Cyanobacteria in BSCs are pioneer organisms that increase ecosystem habitability by providing fixed carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) as well as by reducing water run-off and increasing infiltration. Photosynthesis and N fixation, in particular, require a variety of metals in large quantities, and yet, metals are predominantly insoluble in the environments where BSCs thrive. Therefore, BSC organisms must have efficient strategies for extracting metals from soil minerals. We hypothesized that BSC microbes, particularly the cyanobacteria, produce siderophores to serve their metal-acquisition needs. Siderophores are small organic compounds that bind Fe with high affinity and are produced by a variety of microorganisms, including cyanobacteria. Most siderophores bind Fe, primarily; however, some can also bind Mo, V, and Cu. Soil siderophores are released by microbes to increase the solubility of metals from minerals and to facilitate microbial uptake. Thus, siderophores serve as chemical weathering agents and provide a direct link between soil microbes and minerals. Studying siderophore production in BSCs provides insight into how BSCs tackle the challenge of acquiring insoluble metals, and may help conservationists determine useful fertilizers for BSC growth by facilitating metal acquisition. Biological soil crusts were collected near Moab, UT. Soil slurries were prepared in deionized water and transferred to modified BG-11 agar plates. The O-CAS agar plate assay was used to screen organisms for siderophore production. Siderophore producing microbes were isolated and identified by16S rRNA gene sequencing. Cultures were then grown in 3 L batch cultures under metal limitation, and siderophore presence was monitored using the traditional liquid CAS assay. After siderophore detection, cells were removed by centrifugation, organic compounds were separated using

  5. Habitat structure and the evolution of diffusible siderophores in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kümmerli, Rolf; Schiessl, Konstanze T; Waldvogel, Tuija; McNeill, Kristopher; Ackermann, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria typically rely on secreted metabolites, potentially shareable at the community level, to scavenge resources from the environment. The evolution of diffusible, shareable metabolites is, however, difficult to explain because molecules can get lost, or be exploited by cheating mutants. A key question is whether natural selection can act on molecule structure to control loss and shareability. We tested this possibility by collating information on diffusivity properties of 189 secreted iron-scavenging siderophores and the natural habitats occupied by the siderophore-producing species. In line with evolutionary theory, we found that highly diffusible siderophores have preferentially evolved in species living in structured habitats, such as soil and hosts, because structuring can keep producers and their shareable goods together. Poorly diffusible siderophores, meanwhile, have preferentially evolved in species living in unstructured habitats, such as seawater, indicating that these metabolites are less shareable and more likely provide direct benefits to the producers. PMID:25250530

  6. Siderophore and haem iron use by Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Sutak, Robert; Chamot, Christophe; Tachezy, Jan; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2004-12-01

    The ability of the parasitic flagellate Tritrichomonas foetus to use various iron sources for its physiological requirements was studied. The siderophores ferrioxamine B, ferrichrome, triacetylfusarinine, coprogen, enterobactin and pyoverdine sustained growth of the cells under iron-limited conditions, and siderophore iron was incorporated into the major iron protein of T. foetus, ferredoxin. The kinetics of siderophore uptake by the cells indicated that a non-saturable transport is involved, unlike the uptake of a ferrous salt. Siderophore uptake by the cells did not involve extracellular reductive dissociation of the ferric chelates, although T. foetus cells had some ferrireductase activity on ferric citrate. Fluorescent analogues of siderophores were used to show that the siderophores taken up by the cells were in small intracellular vesicles. The fluorescence emission maximum of pyoverdine in these intracellular vesicles shifted from 460 nm to 530 nm, indicating a very acidic environment. The results suggest that a wide range of chemically unrelated siderophores can be taken up non-specifically and efficiently used by T. foetus; the mechanism involved may be pinocytosis and removal of the iron from the siderophores in acidic intracellular vesicles. Haemin also sustained the growth of T. foetus cells under iron-limited conditions. The use of haemin iron by the cells probably involves haem oxygenase, since traces of biliverdin were found in the medium when haemin was the iron source. The iron uptake and ferrireductase activities of the cells do not seem to be regulated by the amounts of iron and copper in the growth medium. PMID:15583151

  7. Tandem mass spectrometry of coprogen and deferoxamine hydroxamic siderophores.

    PubMed

    Simionato, Ana V C; de Souza, Gezimar D; Rodrigues-Filho, Edson; Glick, James; Vouros, Paul; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2006-01-01

    Mechanisms of fragmentation of hydroxamic siderophores are proposed comparing deuterated and nondeuterated samples. Standard siderophores (e.g. deferoxamine and coprogen) were directly injected into both ion trap and linear quadrupole mass spectrometers with electrospray ionization (ESI). Four and two fragmentation steps were carried out for deferoxamine and coprogen (analyzed by positive and negative ESI, respectively). Deferoxamine cleavages occurred in both peptide and hydroxamic bonds while the coprogen fragmentation pattern is more elaborate, since it contains Fe(III) in its structure.

  8. Identification of the hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin in Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Nina; Gagnon, René; Wichard, Thomas; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin was identified in Cladosporium cladosporioides growth medium by solid phase extraction and ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC/QTOF-MS). Both desferricrocin and ferricrocin were detected in the extracellular medium assisted by high resolution mass spectrometry. This is the first identification of a hydroxamate siderophore in Cladosporium cladosporioides. This finding emphasizes the common meaning of ferricrocin in fungi. PMID:24868878

  9. Identification of the hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin in Cladosporium cladosporioides.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Nina; Gagnon, René; Wichard, Thomas; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2014-04-01

    The hydroxamate siderophore ferricrocin was identified in Cladosporium cladosporioides growth medium by solid phase extraction and ultra high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to a time of flight mass spectrometer (UHPLC/QTOF-MS). Both desferricrocin and ferricrocin were detected in the extracellular medium assisted by high resolution mass spectrometry. This is the first identification of a hydroxamate siderophore in Cladosporium cladosporioides. This finding emphasizes the common meaning of ferricrocin in fungi.

  10. Iron metabolism in Pseudomonas: salicylic acid, a siderophore of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHAO.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Azelvandre, P; Georges, C

    1992-12-01

    Under iron-starvation conditions of growth, Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, a soil isolate involved in phytopathogenic fungi antagonisms, produced, together with pyoverdine, a second iron-chelating compound which was purified and identified by spectroscopy, HPLC and 1H-NMR to be salicylic acid. Mutants unable to synthesize pyoverdine overproduced this compound by a factor of 9-14. The biosynthesis of salicylic acid was under iron control; it was fully inhibited by 5 microM added iron in the growth medium. In contrast, salicylic acid of either bacterial or commercial origin facilitated labeled iron incorporation in iron-starved cells. Based on these two relationships observed with bacterial iron metabolism it is concluded that salicylic acid has a siderophore function for this strain. PMID:1292472

  11. The Hydroxamate Siderophore Rhequichelin Is Required for Virulence of the Pathogenic Actinomycete Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Hondalus, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that the facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi produces a nondiffusible and catecholate-containing siderophore (rhequibactin) involved in iron acquisition during saprophytic growth. Here, we provide evidence that the rhbABCDE cluster directs the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore, rhequichelin, that plays a key role in virulence. The rhbC gene encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase that is predicted to produce a tetrapeptide consisting of N5-formyl-N5-hydroxyornithine, serine, N5-hydroxyornithine, and N5-acyl-N5-hydroxyornithine. The other rhb genes encode putative tailoring enzymes mediating modification of ornithine residues incorporated into the hydroxamate product of RhbC. Transcription of rhbC was upregulated during growth in iron-depleted medium, suggesting that it plays a role in iron acquisition. This was confirmed by deletion of rhbCD, rendering the resulting strain R. equi SID2 unable to grow in the presence of the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl. Supernatant of the wild-type strain rescued the phenotype of R. equi SID2. The importance of rhequichelin in virulence was highlighted by the rapid increase in transcription levels of rhbC following infection and the inability of R. equi SID2 to grow within macrophages. Unlike the wild-type strain, R. equi SID2 was unable to replicate in vivo and was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Rhequichelin is thus a key virulence-associated factor, although nonpathogenic Rhodococcus species also appear to produce rhequichelin or a structurally closely related compound. Rhequichelin biosynthesis may therefore be considered an example of cooption of a core actinobacterial trait in the evolution of R. equi virulence. PMID:22966042

  12. Detection and differentiation of microbial siderophores by isoelectric focusing and chrome azurol S overlay.

    PubMed

    Koedam, N; Wittouck, E; Gaballa, A; Gillis, A; Höfte, M; Cornelis, P

    1994-10-01

    Siderophores are microbial, low molecular weight iron-chelating compounds. Fluorescent Pseudomonads produce different, strain-specific fluorescent siderophores (pyoverdines) as well as non-fluorescent siderophores in response to low iron conditions. We present an isoelectric focusing method applicable to unpurified as well as to purified pyoverdine samples where the fluorescent siderophores are visualized under UV illumination. Siderophores from different Pseudomonas sp., amongst which are P. aeruginosa, P. fluorescens and P. putida, including egg yolk, rhizospheric and clinical isolates as well as some derived Tn5 mutants were separated by this technique. Different patterns could be observed for strains known to produce different siderophores. The application of the chrome azurol S assay as a gel overlay further allows immediate detection of non-fluorescent siderophores or possibly degradation products with residual siderophore activity. The method was also applied to other microbial siderophores such as deferrioxamine B. PMID:7812113

  13. In vitro-binding of the natural siderophore enantiomers pyochelin and enantiopyochelin to their AraC-type regulators PchR in Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Chi; Youard, Zeb A; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2013-12-01

    The enantiomeric siderophores pyochelin and enantiopyochelin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas protegens promote growth under iron limitation and activate transcription of their biosynthesis and uptake genes via the AraC-type regulator PchR. Here we investigated siderophore binding to PchR in vitro using fluorescence spectroscopy. A fusion of the N-terminal domain of P. aeruginosa PchR with maltose binding protein (MBP-PchR'PAO) bound iron-loaded (ferri-) pyochelin with an affinity (Kd) of 41 ± 5 μM. By contrast, no binding occurred with ferri-enantiopyochelin. Stereospecificity of a similar fusion protein of the P. protegens PchR (MBP-PchR'CHA0) was less pronounced. The Kd's of MBP-PchR'CHA0 for ferri-enantiopyochelin and ferri-pyochelin were 24 ± 5 and 40 ± 7 μM, respectively. None of the proteins interacted with the iron-free siderophore enantiomers, suggesting that transcriptional activation by PchR occurs only when the respective siderophore actively procures iron to the cell. PMID:24037597

  14. Non-nucleoside Inhibitors of BasE, An Adenylating Enzyme in the Siderophore Biosynthetic Pathway of the Opportunistic Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Neres, João; Engelhart, Curtis A.; Drake, Eric J.; Wilson, Daniel J.; Fu, Peng; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Gulick, Andrew M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are small-molecule iron chelators produced by bacteria and other microorganisms for survival under iron limiting conditions, such as found in a mammalian host. Siderophore biosynthesis is essential for the virulence of many important Gram-negative pathogens including Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. We performed high-throughput screening of against BasE, which is involved in siderophore biosynthesis in A. baumannii and identified 6-phenyl-1-(pyridin-4-ylmethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine-4-carboxylic acid 15. Herein we report the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of a systematic series of analogues of the HTS hit 15. Analogue 67 is the most potent analogue with a KD of 2 nM against BasE. Structural characterization of the inhibitors with BasE reveal they bind in a unique orientation in the active site occupying all three substrate binding sites, and thus can be considered multisubstrate inhibitors. These results provide a foundation for future studies aimed at both increasing enzyme potency and antibacterial activity. PMID:23437866

  15. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil

    PubMed Central

    Luján, Adela M.; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-01-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil–water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations. PMID:25694506

  16. Siderophore cooperation of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens in soil.

    PubMed

    Luján, Adela M; Gómez, Pedro; Buckling, Angus

    2015-02-01

    While social interactions play an important role for the evolution of bacterial siderophore production in vitro, the extent to which siderophore production is a social trait in natural populations is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that siderophores act as public goods in a natural physical environment of Pseudomonas fluorescens: soil-based compost. We show that monocultures of siderophore producers grow better than non-producers in soil, but non-producers can exploit others' siderophores, as shown by non-producers' ability to invade populations of producers when rare. Despite this rare advantage, non-producers were unable to outcompete producers, suggesting that producers and non-producers may stably coexist in soil. Such coexistence is predicted to arise from the spatial structure associated with soil, and this is supported by increased fitness of non-producers when grown in a shaken soil-water mix. Our results suggest that both producers and non-producers should be observed in soil, as has been observed in marine environments and in clinical populations. PMID:25694506

  17. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Peek, Mary E.; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; McCarty, Nael A.; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules) and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL's published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs. PMID:22973307

  18. Siderophore production and utilization by milk spoilage Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed

    Brown, A G; Luke, R K J

    2010-04-01

    Many bacteria respond to potentially growth-limiting availability of iron by producing low-molecular-weight iron chelators (siderophores). The aim of this work was to examine the siderophores synthesized and utilized by Pseudomonas spp. implicated in milk spoilage. Twenty isolates of Pseudomonas spp. previously shown to have significant milk spoilage potential were tested for the ability to produce siderophores. Of these, 14 produced pyoverdin and 2 of these also produced pyochelin; 1 produced only pyochelin; 1 produced only salicylate; 2 produced non-pyoverdin, hydroxamate-containing siderophore; and 2 produced chrome azurol sulfonate reactive material that was neither pyoverdin nor pyochelin. There was considerable diversity among the pyoverdins produced. All isolates were shown to utilize iron complexed with exogenous pyoverdin, but usage of particular exogenous pyoverdins differed among isolates. Interference with the iron-uptake systems of the Pseudomonas spp. may be a means by which food spoilage can be slowed, and the pyoverdin system would appear to be a potential target. However, given the diversity of pyoverdins produced and utilized, and the presence of other siderophores, successful interference with bacterial iron acquisition in this context may be challenging. PMID:20338412

  19. Genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fang; Ding, Yanqin; Zhu, Hui; Yao, Liangtong; Du, Binghai

    2009-01-01

    The genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere was studied by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rRNA sequence homology and phylogenetics analysis methods. Studies demonstrated that 85% of the total 354 isolates produced siderophores in iron limited liquid medium. A total of 28 ARDRA patterns were identified among the 299 siderophore-producing bacterial isolates. The 28 ARDRA patterns represented bacteria of 14 different genera belonging to six bacterial divisions, namely β-, γ-, α-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria. Especially, γ-Proteobacteria consisting of Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Pantoea, Erwinia and Stenotrophomonas genus encountered 18 different ARDRA groups. Results also showed a greater siderophore-producing bacterial diversity than previous researches. For example, Sphingobacterium (isolates G-2-21-1 and G-2-27-2), Pseudomonas poae (isolate G-2-1-1), Enterobacter endosymbiont (isolates G-2-10-2 and N-5-10), Delftia acidovorans (isolate G-1-15), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (isolates N-46-11HH and N-5-20) were reported to be able to produce siderophores under low-iron conditions for the first time. Gram-negative isolates were more frequently encountered, with more than 95% total frequency. For Gram-positive bacteria, the Bacillus and Rhodococcus were the only two genera, with 1.7% total frequency. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas and Enterobacter were dominant in this environment, with 44.5% and 24.7% total frequency, respectively. It was also found that 75 percent of the isolates that had the high percentages of siderophore units (% between 40 and 60) belonged to Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas sp. G-229-21 screened out in this study may have potential to apply to low-iron soil to prevent plant soil-borne fungal pathogen diseases. PMID:24031358

  20. Characterization of iron uptake from hydroxamate siderophores by Chlorella vulgaris

    SciTech Connect

    Allnutt, F.C.T.

    1985-01-01

    Iron uptake by Chlorella vulgaris from ferric-hydroxamate siderophores and the possible production of siderophores by these algae was investigated. No production of siderophores or organic acids was observed. Iron from the two hydroxamate siderophores tested, ferrioximine B (Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB) and ferric-rhodotorulate (Fe/sup 3 +/-RA), was taken up at the same rate as iron chelated by citrate or caffeate. Two synthetic chelates, Fe/sup 3 +/-EDTA and Fe/sup 3 +/-EDDHA, provided iron at a slower rate. Iron uptake was inhibited by 50 ..mu..M CCCP or 1 mM vanadate. Cyanide (100 ..mu..M KCN) or 25 ..mu..M antimycin A failed to demonstrate a link between uptake and respiration. Labeled iron (/sup 55/Fe) was taken up while labeled ligands ((/sup 14/C) citrate or RA) were not accumulated. Cation competition from Ni/sup 2 +/ and Co/sup 2 +/ observed using Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB and Fe/sup 3 +/-RA while iron uptake from Fe/sup 3 +/-citrate was stimulated. Iron-stress induced iron uptake from the hydroxamate siderophores. Ferric reduction from the ferric-siderophores was investigated with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and bathophenathroline disulfonate (BPDS). Ferric reduction was induced by iron-stress and inhibited by CCCP. A close correlation between iron uptake and ferric reduction was measured by the EPR method. Ferric reduction measured by the BPDS method was greater than that measure by EPR. BPDS reduction was interpreted to indicate a potential for reduction while EPR measures the physiological rate of reduction. BPDS inhibition of iron uptake and ferricyanide interference with reduction indicate that reduction and uptake occur exposed to the external medium. Presumptive evidence using a binding dose response curve for Fe/sup 3 +/-DFOB indicated that a receptor may be involved in this mechanism.

  1. High-molecular-mass, iron-repressed cytoplasmic proteins in fluorescent Pseudomonas: potential peptide-synthetases for pyoverdine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Georges, C; Meyer, J M

    1995-10-01

    High molecular-mass cytoplasmic proteins were detected in iron-starved, pyoverdine-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. chlororaphis, P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. aptata and P. tolaasii. They appeared to be specifically located in the cytoplasm and thus were termed 'IRCPs', for iron-repressed cytoplasmic proteins. A strain-dependent gel electrophoresis pattern with multiple bands of M(r) values ranging from 180 to 600 kDa was usually observed for these proteins. Strains synthesizing pyoverdines differing in their peptide part presented different IRCP gel electrophoresis profiles, whereas strains synthesizing identical pyoverdines had identical IRCP gel electrophoresis profiles. Some mutants affected in pyoverdine biosynthesis presented a perturbed IRCP pattern, and no IRCPs were detected in non-fluorescent Pseudomonas strains either unable to synthesize siderophores or synthesizing non-peptidic siderophores. The data strongly suggest that the IRCPs could be related to peptide synthetases involved in the biosynthesis of the peptidic part of pyoverdine-type siderophores. PMID:7590169

  2. Role of bacterial siderophores in dissolution of hornblende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, Laura J.; Kalinowski, Birgitta E.; Brantley, Susan L.; Ferry, James G.

    2000-02-01

    Hornblende, a common mineral in granitic soils, may act as a source for a variety of metals needed by bacterial species for enzyme function (e.g., Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Co, Mo, V, Ni). A species of the bacterial genus Streptomyces was cultured from an Adirondack soil and isolated because of its ability to grow robustly in low Fe medium with hornblende present. Studies with unbuffered culture medium, to discover whether Streptomyces sp. cultures affected solution pH, showed a decrease of 2.0 pH units in 21 d, then an increase of 3.0 pH units at 56 d. Cells that adhered to the hornblende surface at 56 days were difficult to remove, presumably because of mycelial growth deep into pits and cracks. Decreases and increases in pH may have been due to production of organic acids and ammonia respectively. Increases in pH could also have been related to release of components during death of organisms. In a buffered medium, Streptomyces sp. increased the initial Fe release rate from hornblende approximately fivefold over that of an abiotic control. A catechol derivative, produced by the Streptomyces sp. and characterized by chromatography and mass spectrometry, is presumed to cause this Fe release enhancement. Hornblende dissolution was also analyzed in the presence of a commercially available hydroxamate siderophore, desferrioxamine mesylate (DFAM). DFAM is the methane sulfonate form of one of many siderophores known to be a product of streptomycetes. The rate of Fe release obtained when incubating the hornblende with 24 μm of DFAM was similar to the rate observed in the presence of the Streptomyces sp. isolate. Higher concentrations of DFAM increased the dissolution rate nonlinearly, described by the rate equation R = (7.6 × 10 -13)C 0.47, where R is the release rate of Fe (mol/m 2s), and C is the concentration (mol/l) of DFAM. The DFAM also increased release of Al and Si from hornblende into solution; however, these release rates were not increased by addition of the

  3. Cloning, mutagenesis, and nucleotide sequence of a siderophore biosynthetic gene (amoA) from Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed Central

    Barghouthi, S; Payne, S M; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1991-01-01

    Many isolates of the Aeromonas species produce amonabactin, a phenolate siderophore containing 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHB). An amonabactin biosynthetic gene (amoA) was identified (in a Sau3A1 gene library of Aeromonas hydrophila 495A2 chromosomal DNA) by its complementation of the requirement of Escherichia coli SAB11 for exogenous 2,3-DHB to support siderophore (enterobactin) synthesis. The gene amoA was subcloned as a SalI-HindIII 3.4-kb DNA fragment into pSUP202, and the complete nucleotide sequence of amoA was determined. A putative iron-regulatory sequence resembling the Fur repressor protein-binding site overlapped a possible promoter region. A translational reading frame, beginning with valine and encoding 396 amino acids, was open for 1,188 bp. The C-terminal portion of the deduced amino acid sequence showed 58% identity and 79% similarity with the E. coli EntC protein (isochorismate synthetase), the first enzyme in the E. coli 2,3-DHB biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that amoA probably encodes a step in 2,3-DHB biosynthesis and is the A. hydrophila equivalent of the E. coli entC gene. An isogenic amonabactin-negative mutant, A. hydrophila SB22, was isolated after marker exchange mutagenesis with Tn5-inactivated amoA (amoA::Tn5). The mutant excreted neither 2,3-DHB nor amonabactin, was more sensitive than the wild-type to growth inhibition by iron restriction, and used amonabactin to overcome iron starvation. Images PMID:1830579

  4. Role of Siderophores in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in Arctic Soils : Effect of Direct Amendment of Siderophores to Arctic Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, A. J.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Lipson, D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), where ferric iron (Fe3+) is reduced to ferrous iron (Fe2+) anaerobically, is an important respiratory pathway used by soil bacteria. DIR contributes to carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the wet sedge tundra biome in the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) in Alaska, and could competitively inhibit the production of methane, a stronger greenhouse gas than CO2, from arctic soils. The occurrence of DIR as a dominant anaerobic process depends on the availability of substantial levels of Fe3+ in soils. Siderophores are metabolites made by microbes to dissolve Fe3+ from soil minerals in iron deficient systems, making Fe3+ soluble for micronutrient uptake. However, as the ACP is not iron deficient, siderophores in arctic soils may play a vital role in anaerobic respiration by dissolving Fe3+ for DIR. We studied the effects of direct siderophore addition to arctic soils through a field study conducted in Barrow, Alaska, and a laboratory incubation study conducted at San Diego State University. In the field experiment, 50μM deferroxamine mesylate (a siderophore), 50μM trisodium nitrilotriacetate (an organic chelator) or an equal volume of water was added to isolated experimental plots, replicated in clusters across the landscape. Fe2+ concentrations were measured in soil pore water samples collected periodically to measure DIR over time in each. In the laboratory experiment, frozen soil samples obtained from drained thaw lake basins in the ACP, were cut into cores and treated with the above-mentioned compounds to the same final concentrations. Along with measuring Fe2+ concentrations, CO2 output was also measured to monitor DIR over time in each core. Experimental addition of siderophores to soils in both the field and laboratory resulted in increased concentrations of soluble Fe3+ and a sustained increase in Fe2+concentrations over time, along with increased respiration rates in siderophore-amended cores. These results show increased DIR in

  5. Disruption of transporters affiliated with enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis gene cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 has pleiotropic effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic ...

  6. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  7. Biofilm and siderophore effects on secondary waste water disinfection.

    PubMed

    Saidi, N; Kouki, S; Mehri, I; Ben Rejeb, A; Belila, A; Hassen, A; Ouzari, H

    2011-10-01

    The efficiency of ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection of wastewater effluent using a large-scale pilot system was studied. The relationship between biofilm and siderophore production and UV doses received by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ATCC 15442 was determined. UV decreased pyoverdine production and enhanced biofilm production. Consequently external factors conditioned by both pyoverdine and biofilm may affect the UV effect on bacterial disinfection.

  8. Synthesis of fluorescent probes based on the pyochelin siderophore scaffold.

    PubMed

    Noël, Sabrina; Guillon, Laurent; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2011-03-01

    Pyochelin is a siderophore common to several pathogenic bacterial strains. Two conjugates, 1 and 2, between the NBD (4-nitro-benzo[1,2,5]oxadiazole) fluorophore and an N3''-functionalized pyochelin were synthesized. These fluorescent probes unexpectedly increased their fluorescence in an aqueous medium in the presence of iron(III) and were transported into bacterial cells. PMID:21294578

  9. Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunde

    2014-01-01

    lndole-3-acetic acid (IAA), the most important natural auxin in plants, is mainly synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan (Trp). Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have unambiguously established the first complete Trp-dependent auxin biosynthesis pathway. The first chemical step of auxin biosynthesis is the removal of the amino group from Trp by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) family of transaminases to generate indole-3-pyruvate (IPA). IPA then undergoes oxidative decarboxylation catalyzed by the YUCCA (YUC) family of flavin monooxygenases to produce IAA. This two-step auxin biosynthesis pathway is highly conserved throughout the plant kingdom and is essential for almost all of the major developmental processes. The successful elucidation of a complete auxin biosynthesis pathway provides the necessary tools for effectively modulating auxin concentrations in plants with temporal and spatial precision. The progress in auxin biosynthesis also lays a foundation for understanding polar auxin transport and for dissecting auxin signaling mechanisms during plant development. PMID:24955076

  10. Alr0397 Is an Outer Membrane Transporter for the Siderophore Schizokinen in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    PubMed Central

    Nicolaisen, Kerstin; Moslavac, Suncana; Samborski, Anastazia; Valdebenito, Marianne; Hantke, Klaus; Maldener, Iris; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.; Flores, Enrique; Schleiff, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    Iron uptake in proteobacteria by TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters represents a well-explored subject. In contrast, the same process has been scarcely investigated in cyanobacteria. The heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is known to secrete the siderophore schizokinen, but its transport system has remained unidentified. Inspection of the genome of strain PCC 7120 shows that only one gene encoding a putative TonB-dependent iron transporter, namely alr0397, is positioned close to genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of a hydroxamate siderophore. The expression of alr0397, which encodes an outer membrane protein, was elevated under iron-limited conditions. Inactivation of this gene caused a moderate phenotype of iron starvation in the mutant cells. The characterization of the mutant strain showed that Alr0397 is a TonB-dependent schizokinen transporter (SchT) of the outer membrane and that alr0397 expression and schizokinen production are regulated by the iron homeostasis of the cell. PMID:18805987

  11. An Extracellular Siderophore Is Required to Maintain the Mutualistic Interaction of Epichloë festucae with Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Linda J.; Koulman, Albert; Christensen, Michael; Lane, Geoffrey A.; Fraser, Karl; Forester, Natasha; Johnson, Richard D.; Bryan, Gregory T.; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    We have identified from the mutualistic grass endophyte Epichloë festucae a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase gene (sidN) encoding a siderophore synthetase. The enzymatic product of SidN is shown to be a novel extracellular siderophore designated as epichloënin A, related to ferrirubin from the ferrichrome family. Targeted gene disruption of sidN eliminated biosynthesis of epichloënin A in vitro and in planta. During iron-depleted axenic growth, ΔsidN mutants accumulated the pathway intermediate N5-trans-anhydromevalonyl-N5-hydroxyornithine (trans-AMHO), displayed sensitivity to oxidative stress and showed deficiencies in both polarized hyphal growth and sporulation. Infection of Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) with ΔsidN mutants resulted in perturbations of the endophyte-grass symbioses. Deviations from the characteristic tightly regulated synchronous growth of the fungus with its plant partner were observed and infected plants were stunted. Analysis of these plants by light and transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in the distribution and localization of ΔsidN mutant hyphae as well as deformities in hyphal ultrastructure. We hypothesize that lack of epichloënin A alters iron homeostasis of the symbiotum, changing it from mutually beneficial to antagonistic. Iron itself or epichloënin A may serve as an important molecular/cellular signal for controlling fungal growth and hence the symbiotic interaction. PMID:23658520

  12. MmpL transporter-mediated export of cell-wall associated lipids and siderophores in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacteria produce a large variety of surface-exposed lipids with unusual structures. Some of these compounds are ubiquitously present in mycobacteria and play an important role in the structural organization of the cell envelope, while others are species-specific. The biosynthesis of most of these lipids requires modular polyketide synthases (PKS) or non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) that are intracellular, suggesting that the assembly of these compounds takes place in the cytosolic compartment or near the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The molecular mechanisms that mediate the export of these lipid components across the cell envelope remain poorly understood. Mycobacterial membrane protein Large (MmpL) transporters, a subclass of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) transporters, appear to play a major role in this process, acting as scaffold proteins that couple lipid synthesis and transport. Recent studies have shown that this family of transporters also contributes to siderophore secretion in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The goal of this review is to provide the most recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lipid and siderophore transport mediated by MmpL transporters. PMID:27553408

  13. NPS6, Encoding a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Involved in Siderophore-Mediated Iron Metabolism, Is a Conserved Virulence Determinant of Plant Pathogenic Ascomycetes[W

    PubMed Central

    Oide, Shinichi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Krasnoff, Stuart; Gibson, Donna; Haas, Hubertus; Yoshioka, Keiko; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2006-01-01

    NPS6, encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase, is a virulence determinant in the maize (Zea mays) pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus and is involved in tolerance to H2O2. Deletion of NPS6 orthologs in the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogen, Cochliobolus miyabeanus, the wheat (Triticum aestivum) pathogen, Fusarium graminearum, and the Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen, Alternaria brassicicola, resulted in reduced virulence and hypersensitivity to H2O2. Introduction of the NPS6 ortholog from the saprobe Neurospora crassa to the Δnps6 strain of C. heterostrophus restored wild-type virulence to maize and tolerance to H2O2, demonstrating functional conservation in filamentous ascomycete phytopathogens and saprobes. Increased sensitivity to iron depletion was identified as a conserved phenotype of Δnps6 strains. Exogenous application of iron enhanced the virulence of Δnps6 strains of C. heterostrophus, C. miyabeanus, F. graminearum, and A. brassicicola to each host. NPS6 is responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular siderophores by C. heterostrophus, F. graminearum, and A. brassicicola. Application of the extracellular siderophore of A. brassicicola restored wild-type virulence of the ΔAbnps6 strain to Arabidopsis. It is proposed that the role of extracellular siderophores in fungal virulence to plants is to supply an essential nutrient, iron, to their producers in planta and not to act as phytotoxins, depriving their hosts of iron. PMID:17056706

  14. Production of Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS)- Dependent Siderophore by Aeromonas Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Amsaveni, Ramasamy; Sureshkumar, Muthusamy; Aravinth, Arthanari; Mary, Joseph Reshma; Vivekanandhan, Govindasami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aeromonas species are Gram-negative ubiquitous bacteria, facultative anaerobic rods that infect both invertebrates and vertebrates. Various fish species develop hemorrhagic disease and furunculosis due to Aeromonas spp. Aeromonas strains generate certain active compounds such as siderophores, which are the final products of non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) activity. The present study attempted to investigate the prevalence of Aeromonas isolates in marketed fish sources. We also examined the siderophore production ability of these isolates. Methods: Among the molecular tools, 16S rRNA analysis was used to identify Aeromonas species and their epidemiological distributions. The hemolytic activity of the strains and biochemical assays were used to confirm the identity of the isolates. We also determined the chemical nature of siderophores in these strains. Results: A total of seven Aeromonas isolates obtained from fish were included to determine the siderophore production. Of 7 isolates, 4 produced siderophore, and their chemical nature was also determined. The siderophore produced by Aeromonas was invariably found to be of hydroxamate. Four Aeromonas isolates were selected for PCR identification of NRPS-encoding gene. The conserved sequence was present in all four selected isolates. Furthermore, siderophores were qualitatively tested for their antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and a significant level of inhibitory activity was observed in siderophores from the four isolates. Conclusion: Our results showed the ability of the isolated strains in production of siderophores with a high level of activity against Salmonella paratyphi. These siderophores could find applications in biomedical industries. PMID:27155016

  15. Siderocalin outwits the coordination chemistry of vibriobactin, a siderophore of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Allred, Benjamin E; Correnti, Colin; Clifton, Matthew C; Strong, Roland K; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2013-09-20

    The human protein siderocalin (Scn) inhibits bacterial iron acquisition by binding catechol siderophores. Several pathogenic bacteria respond by making stealth siderophores that are not recognized by Scn. Fluvibactin and vibriobactin, respectively of Vibrio fluvialis and Vibrio cholerae , include an oxazoline adjacent to a catechol. This chelating unit binds iron either in a catecholate or a phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode. The latter has been suggested to make vibriobactin a stealth siderophore without directly identifying the coordination mode in relation to Scn binding. We use Scn binding assays with the two siderophores and two oxazoline-substituted analogs and the crystal structure of Fe-fluvibactin:Scn to show that the oxazoline does not prevent Scn binding; hence, vibriobactin is not a stealth siderophore. We show that the phenolate-oxazoline coordination mode is present at physiological pH and is not bound by Scn. However, Scn binding shifts the coordination to the catecholate mode and thereby inactivates this siderophore.

  16. Azospirillum brasilense siderophores with antifungal activity against Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Tortora, María L; Díaz-Ricci, Juan C; Pedraza, Raúl O

    2011-04-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum is one of the most important diseases in strawberry crop. Due to environmental pollution and resistance produced by chemical fungicides, nowadays biological control is considered a good alternative for crop protection. Among biocontrol agents, there are plant growth-promoting bacteria, such as members of the genus Azospirillum. In this work, we demonstrate that under iron limiting conditions different strains of A. brasilense produce siderophores, exhibiting different yields and rates of production according to their origin. Chemical assays revealed that strains REC2 and REC3 secrete catechol type siderophores, including salicylic acid, detected by thin layer chromatography coupled with fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Siderophores produced by them showed in vitro antifungal activity against C. acutatum M11. Furthermore, this latter coincided with results obtained from phytopathological tests performed in planta, where a reduction of anthracnose symptoms on strawberry plants previously inoculated with A. brasilense was observed. These outcomes suggest that some strains of A. brasilense could act as biocontrol agent preventing anthracnose disease in strawberry.

  17. Azospirillum brasilense siderophores with antifungal activity against Colletotrichum acutatum.

    PubMed

    Tortora, María L; Díaz-Ricci, Juan C; Pedraza, Raúl O

    2011-04-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungus Colletotrichum acutatum is one of the most important diseases in strawberry crop. Due to environmental pollution and resistance produced by chemical fungicides, nowadays biological control is considered a good alternative for crop protection. Among biocontrol agents, there are plant growth-promoting bacteria, such as members of the genus Azospirillum. In this work, we demonstrate that under iron limiting conditions different strains of A. brasilense produce siderophores, exhibiting different yields and rates of production according to their origin. Chemical assays revealed that strains REC2 and REC3 secrete catechol type siderophores, including salicylic acid, detected by thin layer chromatography coupled with fluorescence spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. Siderophores produced by them showed in vitro antifungal activity against C. acutatum M11. Furthermore, this latter coincided with results obtained from phytopathological tests performed in planta, where a reduction of anthracnose symptoms on strawberry plants previously inoculated with A. brasilense was observed. These outcomes suggest that some strains of A. brasilense could act as biocontrol agent preventing anthracnose disease in strawberry. PMID:21234749

  18. Germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa that responds to siderophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlang, G.; Williams, N. P.

    1977-01-01

    A conditionally germination-defective mutant of Neurospora crassa has been found to be partially curable by ferricrocin and other siderophores. The mutant conidia rapidly lose their membrane-bound siderophores when suspended in buffer or growth media. Germination is consequently delayed unless large numbers of conidia are present (positive population effect). This indicates that the mutant has a membrane defect involving the siderophore attachment site.

  19. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  20. Microbial Copper-binding Siderophores at the Host-Pathogen Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eun-Ik; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogenic microorganisms secrete small molecule chelators called siderophores defined by their ability to bind extracellular ferric iron, making it bioavailable to microbes. Recently, a siderophore produced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli, yersiniabactin, was found to also bind copper ions during human infections. The ability of yersiniabactin to protect E. coli from copper toxicity and redox-based phagocyte defenses distinguishes it from other E. coli siderophores. Here we compare yersiniabactin to other extracellular copper-binding molecules and review how copper-binding siderophores may confer virulence-associated gains of function during infection pathogenesis. PMID:26055720

  1. Affinity purification of a siderophore that exhibits an antagonistic effect against soft rot bacterium.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mohamed; Baddar, Doa; El'Masry, Mohamed Hisham

    2008-07-01

    Bacterial colonies were isolated from different Egyptian soil samples. From these isolates, one bacterial species was found to produce siderophore. Using classical and biochemical identification methods, the siderophore producing isolate was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Based on the affinity of siderophores for metal ions, an affinity chromatography system was designed for the purification of the siderophore in one step. It was possible to isolate 25 mg siderophore per liter of culture media. The purified siderophore was found to exist in two forms of approximately 30 and 90 kD. They are believed to be polymers of several siderophore molecules. Both forms were found to be active against the pathogen Erwinia carotovora var. carotovora, the causal bacteria of soft rot disease on potato tubers. The advantage of this method over other purification methods is that it uses metal ion so it can be applied for the purification of the known types of siderophores. Moreover, the purification is based on affinity chromatography, so the siderophore purity state permits several biotechnological applications without further treatments. PMID:18707585

  2. Effect of ferric iron on siderophore production and pyrene degradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L.

    PubMed

    Husain, Saleha

    2008-10-01

    The effect of ferric iron [Fe(III)] on pyrene degradation and siderophore production was studied in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L. In the presence of 0.5 microM of Fe(III) and 50 mg of pyrene per liter of medium as a carbon source, 2.2 mg of pyrene was degraded per liter of medium per day and 25.3 microM of 2,3-DHBA (2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid) equivalent of siderophores was produced per day. However, the pyrene degradation rate was 1.3 times higher and no siderophores were produced with the addition of 1 microM of Fe(III). Similar trends were seen with 50 mg of succinate per liter of medium as a carbon source, although the growth of strain 29L and the succinate degradation rate were higher. In the absence of siderophore production, pyrene and succinate continued to be biodegraded. This indicates that Fe(III) and not siderophore production affects the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Only 18% of strain 29L mutants capable of growth on pyrene produced siderophores, while among the mutants capable of growth on succinate, only 10% produced siderophores. This indicates that siderophores are not required for pyrene biodegradation. Fe(III) enhances pyrene degradation in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L but it may be utilized by mechanisms other than siderophores. PMID:18626691

  3. Synthesis and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Siderophore Biosynthesis Inhibitors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Kathryn M.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Dawadi, Surendra; Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Barry, Clifton E.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed biosynthetic step of the mycobactins, which are important virulence factors associated with iron acquisition in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. MbtA is a validated therapeutic target for antitubercular drug development. 5′-O-[N-(salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (1) is a bisubstrate inhibitor of MbtA and exhibits exceptionally potent biochemical and antitubercular activity. However, 1 suffers from sub-optimal drug disposition properties resulting in a short half-life (t1/2), low exposure (AUC), and low bioavailability (F). Four strategies were pursued to address these liabilities including the synthesis of prodrugs, increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl moiety, modulation of the lipophilicity, and strategic introduction of fluorine into 1. Complete pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis of all compounds was performed. The most successful modifications involved fluorination of the nucleoside that provided substantial improvements in t1/2 and AUC. Increasing the pKa of the acyl-sulfonyl linker yielded incremental enhancements while modulation of the lipophilicity and prodrug approaches led to substantially poorer PK parameters. PMID:26110337

  4. Fluorescent siderophore-based chemosensors: iron(III) quantitative determinations.

    PubMed

    Palanché, T; Marmolle, F; Abdallah, M A; Shanzer, A; Albrecht-Gary, A M

    1999-04-01

    A highly sensitive and selective method is described for a rapid and easy determination of iron(III). This procedure is based on fluorimetric detection combined with the attractive properties of siderophores and biomimetic ligands, which are strong and selective ferric chelators. Azotobactin delta, a bacterial fluorescent siderophore, three fluorescent derivatives of desferriferrioxamine B with a linear structure (NBD-, MA-, NCP-desferriferrioxamine B) and one tripodal biomimetic ligand of desferriferrichrome carrying an anthracenyl fluorescent probe were examined. A very efficient static quenching mechanism by iron was observed for all the ligands considered in this work. Our results identify azotobactin delta as the most promising chemosensor of ferric traces in water, more sensitive than the NBD-desferriferrioxamine B fluorescent ligand. Under more lipophilic conditions, the anthryl-desferriferrichrome biomimetic analogue showed similar analytical potential and was found to be more sensitive than the lipophilic MA- and NCP-desferriferrioxamine B. Their detection limits were respectively 0.5 ng mL-1 for azotobactin delta and 0.6 ng mL-1 for the anthryl tripodal chelator. The calibration curves were linear over the range 0-95 ng mL-1 and 0-180 ng mL-1. Various foreign cations have been examined and only copper(II) and aluminium(III) were shown to interfere when present in similar concentrations as iron(III). The developed procedure using fluorescent siderophores or biomimetic ligands of iron(III) may be applied (1) to monitor iron-(III)-dependent biological systems and (2) to determine iron(III) quantitatively in natural waters and in biological systems.

  5. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred. PMID:25943160

  6. An overview of siderophores for iron acquisition in microorganisms living in the extreme.

    PubMed

    De Serrano, Luis O; Camper, Anne K; Richards, Abigail M

    2016-08-01

    Siderophores are iron-chelating molecules produced by microbes when intracellular iron concentrations are low. Low iron triggers a cascade of gene activation, allowing the cell to survive due to the synthesis of important proteins involved in siderophore synthesis and transport. Generally, siderophores are classified by their functional groups as catecholates, hydroxamates and hydroxycarboxylates. Although other chemical structural modifications and functional groups can be found. The functional groups participate in the iron-chelating process when the ferri-siderophore complex is formed. Classified as acidophiles, alkaliphiles, halophiles, thermophiles, psychrophiles, piezophiles, extremophiles have particular iron requirements depending on the environmental conditions in where they grow. Most of the work done in siderophore production by extremophiles is based in siderophore concentration and/or genomic studies determining the presence of siderophore synthesis and transport genes. Siderophores produced by extremophiles are not well known and more work needs to be done to elucidate chemical structures and their role in microorganism survival and metal cycling in extreme environments. PMID:27457587

  7. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred.

  8. [Isolation, identification and over- siderophores production of Pseudomonas fluorescens sp-f].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Shao-Xing; Xie, Zhi-Xiong; Shen, Ping

    2006-10-01

    Strain sp-f was isolated, a siderophores over producing bacterium, using an improved universal Chrome Azurol S(CAS)-agar plate method from Donghu Lake. The result of the CAS solution siderophores quantitative determination showed the lowest As/Ar (OD680) ratio could be as low as 0.09 with Su (Siderophore Unit) of 90%. Some more experiments were made to make out the pertinence between its growth and siderophores production, indicating that its siderophores quantity reached maximum amount during the prophase of logarithmic growth. After then, siderophores concentration stopped accumulating and turned to be stable at stationary phase. Based on the characteristics of morphology, cultivation, physiology, (G + C) mol % content, 16S rDNA sequence and BIOLOG Station system analysis, it was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens sp-f strain. RP-HPLC analysis showed there exist at least 3 kinds of catecholate siderophores, including fluorescent and non-fluorescent pyoverdins. But only fluorescent pyoverdin's excretion was completely repressed by the 200 micromol/L Fe2+ in the medium. And the non-pyoverdin siderophores excretion was induced at the same time, contrarily. PMID:17172011

  9. TonB-Dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the ...

  10. Digital image quantification of siderophores on agar plates.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-03-01

    This article presents visual image data and detailed methodology for the use of a new method for quantifying the exudation of siderophores during fungal growth. The data include images showing time series for calibration, fungal exudation, and negative controls, as well as replication accuracy information. In addition, we provide detailed protocols for making CAS assay layer plates, the digital analysis protocol for determining area of color change, and discuss growth media that do and do not work with the layer plate method. The results of these data, their interpretation, and further discussion can be found in Andrews et al., 2016 [1]. PMID:26937467

  11. The Influence of Siderophores Produced by Alkaliphilic Microorganisms on Iron and Metal Contaminant Speciation and Solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. M.; Peyton, B. M.; Petersen, J. N.; Apel, W. A.; Camper, A. K.

    2003-12-01

    Halomonas campisalis strain 4A has been identified as capable of producing siderophores under halo-alkaliphilic growth conditions. Because of the scarcity of iron under the alkaline conditions in which Halomonas campisalis thrives, we hypothesize that the siderophores secreted by Halomonas campisalis and other alkaliphilic bacteria will have a stronger affinity for binding and solubilizing ferrous iron than siderophores produced by mesophilic bacteria. Siderophore production by Halomonas campisalis was confirmed through the use of the chrome azural S (CAS) agar plate method which showed a red orange halo around the bacterial colonies indicative of siderophore production. The siderophores were found to be produced under conditions of both high salinity and pH with a salt concentrations ranging from 0.4 - 1.8 M NaCl and pH ranging from 8 - 11. The siderophores produced have been determined to be of the hydroxamate class via the Csaky method. A negative response to the Arnow assay indicated that the siderophore produced does not contain any catechol moieties in its chemical structure. It was found that maximum siderophore production was equivalent to approximately 400 mM desferrioxamine and occurred during mid stationary phase. Similar results were found at pH 8, 10 and 11. A purification scheme was developed that involved an initial extraction of the siderophore from the growth medium into benzyl alcohol followed by precipitation with diethyl ether. Additional purification was achieved via ion exchange chromatography and size exclusion chromatography. Final purification was achieved via HPLC. The structure of the purified siderophore was analyzed via LC/MS/MS equipped with an ESI source. To date, few studies have included the siderophores produced by microorganisms capable of tolerating highly saline and alkaline environments. In addition to unique structure and high affinity for iron, it is further hypothesized that siderophores from alkaliphilic bacteria will also

  12. Acinetobactin Isomerization Enables Adaptive Iron Acquisition in Acinetobacter baumannii through pH-Triggered Siderophore Swapping.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Justin A; Wencewicz, Timothy A

    2016-02-12

    Pathogenic strains of Acinetobacter baumannii excrete multiple siderophores that enhance iron scavenging from host sources. The oxazoline siderophore pre-acinetobactin undergoes an unusual non-enzymatic isomerization, producing the isoxazolidinone acinetobactin. In this study, we explored the kinetics, mechanism, and biological consequence of this siderophore swapping. Pre-acinetobactin is excreted to the extracellular space where the isomerization to acinetobactin occurs with a pH-rate profile consistent with 5-exo-tet cyclization at C5' with clean stereochemical inversion. Pre-acinetobactin persists at pH <6, and acinetobactin is rapidly formed at pH >7, matching each siderophore's pH preference for iron(III) chelation and A. baumannii growth promotion. Acinetobactin isomerization provides two siderophores for the price of one, enabling A. baumannii to sequester iron over a broad pH range likely to be encountered during the course of an infection. PMID:27624967

  13. Catechol siderophores repress the pyochelin pathway and activate the enterobactin pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an opportunity for siderophore-antibiotic conjugates development.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Véronique; Baco, Etienne; Cunrath, Olivier; August, Pamela Saint; Perraud, Quentin; Zill, Nicolas; Schleberger, Christian; Schmidt, Alexander; Paulen, Aurélie; Bumann, Dirk; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that antibiotic vectorization by siderophores (iron chelators produced by bacteria) considerably increases the efficacy of such drugs. The siderophore serves as a vector: when the pathogen tries to take up iron via the siderophore, it also takes up the antibiotic. Catecholates are among the most common iron-chelating compounds used in synthetic siderophore-antibiotic conjugates. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and proteomic approaches, we showed that the presence of catecholate compounds in the medium of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to strong activation of the transcription and expression of the outer membrane transporter PfeA, the ferri-enterobactin importer. Iron-55 uptake assays on bacteria with and without PfeA expression confirmed that catechol compounds imported iron into P. aeruginosa cells via PfeA. Uptake rates were between 0.3 × 10(3) and 2 × 10(3) Fe atoms/bacterium/min according to the used catechol siderophore in iron-restricted medium, and remained as high as 0.8 × 10(3) Fe atoms/bacterium/min for enterobactin, even in iron-rich medium. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and proteomic approaches showed that in parallel to this switching on of PfeA expression, a repression of the expression of pyochelin (PCH) pathway genes (PCH being one of the two siderophores produced by P. aeruginosa for iron acquisition) was observed. PMID:26718479

  14. Growth of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is promoted by exogenous hydroxamate and catechol siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, M S; Dolence, J A; Dolence, E K; Darwish, I; Miller, M J; Malouin, F; Jacques, M

    1996-01-01

    Siderophores bind ferric ions and are involved in receptor-specific iron transport into bacteria. Six types of siderophores were tested against strains representing the 12 different serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Ferrichrome and bis-catechol-based siderophores showed strong growth-promoting activities for A. pleuropneumoniae in a disk diffusion assay. Most strains of A. pleuropneumoniae tested were able to use ferrichrome (21 of 22 or 95%), ferrichrome A (20 of 22 or 90%), and lysine-based bis-catechol (20 of 22 or 90%), while growth of 36% (8 of 22) was promoted by a synthetic hydroxamate, N5-acetyl-N5-hydroxy-L-ornithine tripeptide. A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 (strain FMV 87-682) and serotype 5 (strain 2245) exhibited a distinct yellow halo around colonies on Chrome Azurol S agar plates, suggesting that both strains can produce an iron chelator (siderophore) in response to iron stress. The siderophore was found to be neither a phenolate nor a hydroxamate by the chemical tests of Arnow and Csaky, respectively. This is the first report demonstrating the production of an iron chelator and the use of exogenous siderophores by A. pleuropneumoniae. A spermidine-based bis-catechol siderophore conjugated to a carbacephalosporin was shown to inhibit growth of A. pleuropneumoniae. A siderophore-antibiotic-resistant strain was isolated and shown to have lost the ability to use ferrichrome, synthetic hydroxamate, or catechol-based siderophores when grown under conditions of iron restriction. This observation indicated that a common iron uptake pathway, or a common intermediate, for hydroxamate- and catechol-based siderophores may exist in A. pleuropneumoniae. PMID:8975614

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  16. Plant Fe status affects the composition of siderophore-secreting microbes in the rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chong Wei; Li, Gui Xin; Yu, Xue Hui; Zheng, Shao Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Soil microbes have been demonstrated to play an important role in favouring plant iron (Fe) uptake under Fe-limiting conditions. However, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. This present study reported the effects of plant Fe status on the composition of siderophore-secreting microbes in the rhizosphere, and their potential function in improving plant Fe nutrition. Methods An Fe-efficient plant, red clover (Trifolium pratense ‘Kenland’) was cultured in a calcareous soil to obtain rhizosphere soils with (Fe-sufficient) or without (Fe-stressed) foliar FeEDTA spraying. The siderophore-producing ability of rhizospheric microbes was measured. The bioavailability of the siderophore-solubilized Fe from iron oxides/hydroxides was tested in hydroponic culture. Key Results In rhizosphere soil, the number of microbes that secreted siderophores quickly was more in the Fe-stressed treatment than in the Fe-sufficient one, while the number of microbes that did not secret siderophores was the opposite. A significantly higher concentration of phenolics was detected in the rhizosphere soil of Fe-stressed plants. Moreover, after the soil was incubated with phenolic root exudates, the composition of the siderophore-secreting microbial community was similar with that of the rhizosphere of Fe-stressed plant. Additionally, the siderophores produced by a rhizospheric microbe isolated from the Fe-stressed treatment can well solubilize iron oxides/hydroxides, and the utilization of the siderophore-solubilized Fe by plant was even more efficient than EDTA-Fe. Conclusions Iron-deficiency stress of red clover would alter the composition of siderophore-secreting microbes in the rhizosphere, which is probably due to the phenolics secretion of the root, and may in turn help to improve the solubility of Fe in soils and plant Fe nutrition via elevated microbial siderophore secretion. PMID:20356952

  17. Fatty acid hydrolysis of acyl marinobactin siderophores by Marinobacter acylases.

    PubMed

    Kem, Michelle P; Naka, Hiroaki; Iinishi, Akira; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2015-01-27

    The marine bacteria Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 and Marinobacter nanhaiticus D15-8W produce a suite of acyl peptidic marinobactin siderophores to acquire iron under iron-limiting conditions. During late-log phase growth, the marinobactins are hydrolyzed to form the marinobactin headgroup with release of the corresponding fatty acid tail. The bntA gene, a homologue of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyoverdine acylase gene, pvdQ, was identified from Marinobacter sp. DS40M6. A bntA knockout mutant of Marinobacter sp. DS40M6 produced the suite of acyl marinobactins A-E, without the usual formation of the marinobactin headgroup. Another marinobactin-producing species, M. nanhaiticus D15-8W, is predicted to have two pvdQ homologues, mhtA and mhtB. MhtA and MhtB have 67% identical amino acid sequences. MhtA catalyzes hydrolysis of the apo-marinobactin siderophores as well as the quorum sensing signaling molecule, dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone. In contrast to hydrolysis of the suite of apo-marinobactins by MhtA, hydrolysis of the iron(III)-bound marinobactins was not observed. PMID:25588131

  18. Pseudomonas siderophores in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lois W; Reid, David W; Sharples, Katrina J; Lamont, Iain L

    2011-12-01

    The lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis become chronically infected with the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which heralds progressive lung damage and a decline in health. Iron is a crucial micronutrient for bacteria and its acquisition is a key factor in infection. P. aeruginosa can acquire this element by secreting pyoverdine and pyochelin, iron-chelating compounds (siderophores) that scavenge iron and deliver it to the bacteria. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake is generally considered a key factor in the ability of P. aeruginosa to cause infection. We have investigated the amounts of pyoverdine in 148 sputum samples from 36 cystic fibrosis patients (30 infected with P. aeruginosa and 6 as negative controls). Pyoverdine was present in 93 samples in concentrations between 0.30 and 51 μM (median 4.6 μM) and there was a strong association between the amount of pyoverdine and the number of P. aeruginosa present. However, pyoverdine was not present, or below the limits of detection (~0.3 μM), in 21 sputum samples that contained P. aeruginosa. Pyochelin was also absent, or below the limits of detection (~1 μM), in samples from P. aeruginosa-infected patients with little or no detectable pyoverdine. Our data show that pyoverdine is an important iron-scavenging molecule for P. aeruginosa in many cystic fibrosis patients, but other P. aeruginosa iron-uptake systems must be active in some patients to satisfy the bacterial need for iron. PMID:21643731

  19. The Two-Component Regulators GacS and GacA Positively Regulate a Nonfluorescent Siderophore through the Gac/Rsm Signaling Cascade in High-Siderophore-Yielding Pseudomonas sp. Strain HYS

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinyan; Chen, Min; Jiang, Zhen; Hu, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores, which are produced to overcome iron deficiency, are believed to be closely related to the adaptability of bacteria. The high-siderophore-yielding Pseudomonas sp. strain HYS simultaneously secretes the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine and another nonfluorescent siderophore that is a major contributor to the high siderophore yield. Transposon mutagenesis revealed siderophore-related genes, including the two-component regulators GacS/GacA and a special cluster containing four open reading frames (the nfs cluster). Deletion mutations of these genes abolished nonfluorescent-siderophore production, and expression of the nfs cluster depended on gacA, indicating that gacS-gacA may control the nonfluorescent siderophore through regulation of the nfs cluster. Furthermore, regulation of the nonfluorescent siderophore by GacS/GacA involved the Gac/Rsm pathway. In contrast, inactivation of GacS/GacA led to upregulation of the fluorescent pyoverdine. The two siderophores were secreted under different iron conditions, probably because of differential effects of GacS/GacA. The global GacS/GacA regulatory system may control iron uptake by modulating siderophore production and may enable bacteria to adapt to changing iron environments. PMID:24982309

  20. The two-component regulators GacS and GacA positively regulate a nonfluorescent siderophore through the Gac/Rsm signaling cascade in high-siderophore-yielding Pseudomonas sp. strain HYS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinyan; Chen, Min; Jiang, Zhen; Hu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores, which are produced to overcome iron deficiency, are believed to be closely related to the adaptability of bacteria. The high-siderophore-yielding Pseudomonas sp. strain HYS simultaneously secretes the fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine and another nonfluorescent siderophore that is a major contributor to the high siderophore yield. Transposon mutagenesis revealed siderophore-related genes, including the two-component regulators GacS/GacA and a special cluster containing four open reading frames (the nfs cluster). Deletion mutations of these genes abolished nonfluorescent-siderophore production, and expression of the nfs cluster depended on gacA, indicating that gacS-gacA may control the nonfluorescent siderophore through regulation of the nfs cluster. Furthermore, regulation of the nonfluorescent siderophore by GacS/GacA involved the Gac/Rsm pathway. In contrast, inactivation of GacS/GacA led to upregulation of the fluorescent pyoverdine. The two siderophores were secreted under different iron conditions, probably because of differential effects of GacS/GacA. The global GacS/GacA regulatory system may control iron uptake by modulating siderophore production and may enable bacteria to adapt to changing iron environments. PMID:24982309

  1. How pH Modulates the Reactivity and Selectivity of a Siderophore-Associated Flavin Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze the oxygenation of diverse organic molecules using O2, NADPH, and the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. The fungal FMO SidA initiates peptidic siderophore biosynthesis via the highly selective hydroxylation of l-ornithine, while the related amino acid l-lysine is a potent effector of reaction uncoupling to generate H2O2. We hypothesized that protonation states could critically influence both substrate-selective hydroxylation and H2O2 release, and therefore undertook a study of SidA’s pH-dependent reaction kinetics. Consistent with other FMOs that stabilize a C4a-OO(H) intermediate, SidA’s reductive half reaction is pH independent. The rate constant for the formation of the reactive C4a-OO(H) intermediate from reduced SidA and O2 is likewise independent of pH. However, the rate constants for C4a-OO(H) reactions, either to eliminate H2O2 or to hydroxylate l-Orn, were strongly pH-dependent and influenced by the nature of the bound amino acid. Solvent kinetic isotope effects of 6.6 ± 0.3 and 1.9 ± 0.2 were measured for the C4a-OOH/H2O2 conversion in the presence and absence of l-Lys, respectively. A model is proposed in which l-Lys accelerates H2O2 release via an acid–base mechanism and where side-chain position determines whether H2O2 or the hydroxylation product is observed. PMID:24490904

  2. Endocytic delivery of lipocalin-siderophore-iron complex rescues the kidney from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kiyoshi; Lee, H. Thomas; Rapoport, Dana; Drexler, Ian R.; Foster, Kirk; Yang, Jun; Schmidt-Ott, Kai M.; Chen, Xia; Li, Jau Yi; Weiss, Stacey; Mishra, Jaya; Cheema, Faisal H.; Markowitz, Glenn; Suganami, Takayoshi; Sawai, Kazutomo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Kunis, Cheryl; D’Agati, Vivette; Devarajan, Prasad; Barasch, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase–associated lipocalin (Ngal), also known as siderocalin, forms a complex with iron-binding siderophores (Ngal:siderophore:Fe). This complex converts renal progenitors into epithelial tubules. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Ngal:siderophore:Fe protects adult kidney epithelial cells or accelerates their recovery from damage. Using a mouse model of severe renal failure, ischemia-reperfusion injury, we show that a single dose of Ngal (10 μg), introduced during the initial phase of the disease, dramatically protects the kidney and mitigates azotemia. Ngal activity depends on delivery of the protein and its siderophore to the proximal tubule. Iron must also be delivered, since blockade of the siderophore with gallium inhibits the rescue from ischemia. The Ngal:siderophore:Fe complex upregulates heme oxygenase-1, a protective enzyme, preserves proximal tubule N-cadherin, and inhibits cell death. Because mouse urine contains an Ngal-dependent siderophore-like activity, endogenous Ngal might also play a protective role. Indeed, Ngal is highly accumulated in the human kidney cortical tubules and in the blood and urine after nephrotoxic and ischemic injury. We reveal what we believe to be a novel pathway of iron traffic that is activated in human and mouse renal diseases, and it provides a unique method for their treatment. PMID:15711640

  3. Genetics and molecular biology of siderophore-mediated iron transport in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, J H

    1989-01-01

    The possession of specialized iron transport systems may be crucial for bacteria to override the iron limitation imposed by the host or the environment. One of the most commonly found strategies evolved by microorganisms is the production of siderophores, low-molecular-weight iron chelators that have very high constants of association for their complexes with iron. Thus, siderophores act as extracellular solubilizing agents for iron from minerals or organic compounds, such as transferrin and lactoferrin in the host vertebrate, under conditions of iron limitation. Transport of iron into the cell cytosol is mediated by specific membrane receptor and transport systems which recognize the iron-siderophore complexes. In this review I have analyzed in detail three siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems: the plasmid-encoded anguibactin system of Vibrio anguillarum, the aerobactin-mediated iron assimilation system present in the pColV-K30 plasmid and in the chromosomes of many enteric bacteria, and the chromosomally encoded enterobactin iron uptake system, found in Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The siderophore systems encoded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, namely, pyochelin and pyoverdin, as well as the siderophore amonabactin, specified by Aeromonas hydrophila, are also discussed. The potential role of siderophore-mediated systems as virulence determinants in the specific host-bacteria interaction leading to disease is also analyzed with respect to the influence of these systems in the expression of other factors, such as toxins, in the bacterial virulence repertoire. PMID:2531838

  4. Kinetics of iron acquisition from ferric siderophores by Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, R J; Weimar, W R

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of iron accumulation by iron-starved Paracoccus denitrificans during the first 2 min of exposure to 55Fe-labeled ferric siderophore chelates is described. Iron is acquired from the ferric chelate of the natural siderophore L-parabactin in a process exhibiting biphastic kinetics by Lineweaver-Burk analysis. The kinetic data for 1 microM less than [Fe L-parabactin] less than 10 microM fit a regression line which suggests a low-affinity system (Km = 3.9 +/- 1.2 microM, Vmax = 494 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1), whereas the data for 0.1 microM less than or equal to [Fe L-parabactin] less than or equal to 1 microM fit another line consistent with a high-affinity system (Km = 0.24 +/- 0.06 microM, Vmax = 108 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). The Km of the high-affinity uptake is comparable to the binding affinity we had previously reported for the purified ferric L-parabactin receptor protein in the outer membrane. In marked contrast, ferric D-parabactin data fit a single regression line corresponding to a simple Michaelis-Menten process with comparatively low affinity (Km = 3.1 +/- 0.9 microM, Vmax = 125 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). Other catecholamide siderophores with an intact oxazoline ring derived from L-threonine (L-homoparabactin, L-agrobactin, and L-vibriobactin) also exhibit biphasic kinetics with a high-affinity component similar to ferric L-parabactin. Circular dichroism confirmed that these ferric chelates, like ferric L-parabactin, exist as the lambda enantiomers. The A forms ferric parabactin (ferrin D- and L-parabactin A), in which the oxazoline ring is hydrolyzed to the open-chain threonyl structure, exhibit linear kinetics with a comparatively high Km (1.4 +/- 0.3 microM) and high Vmax (324 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 of protein-1). Furthermore, the marked stereospecificity seen between ferric D- and L-parabactins is absent; i.e., iron acquisition from ferric parabactin A is non stereospecific. The mechanistic

  5. Burkholderia genome mining for nonribosomal peptide synthetases reveals a great potential for novel siderophores and lipopeptides synthesis.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Pupin, Maude; Kieu, Nam Phuong; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Béchet, Max; Deravel, Jovana; Krier, François; Höfte, Monica; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an important genus encompassing a variety of species, including pathogenic strains as well as strains that promote plant growth. We have carried out a global strategy, which combined two complementary approaches. The first one is genome guided with deep analysis of genome sequences and the second one is assay guided with experiments to support the predictions obtained in silico. This efficient screening for new secondary metabolites, performed on 48 gapless genomes of Burkholderia species, revealed a total of 161 clusters containing nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs), with the potential to synthesize at least 11 novel products. Most of them are siderophores or lipopeptides, two classes of products with potential application in biocontrol. The strategy led to the identification, for the first time, of the cluster for cepaciachelin biosynthesis in the genome of Burkholderia ambifaria AMMD and a cluster corresponding to a new malleobactin-like siderophore, called phymabactin, was identified in Burkholderia phymatum STM815 genome. In both cases, the siderophore was produced when the strain was grown in iron-limited conditions. Elsewhere, the cluster for the antifungal burkholdin was detected in the genome of B. ambifaria AMMD and also Burkholderia sp. KJ006. Burkholderia pseudomallei strains harbor the genetic potential to produce a novel lipopeptide called burkhomycin, containing a peptidyl moiety of 12 monomers. A mixture of lipopeptides produced by Burkholderia rhizoxinica lowered the surface tension of the supernatant from 70 to 27 mN·m(-1) . The production of nonribosomal secondary metabolites seems related to the three phylogenetic groups obtained from 16S rRNA sequences. Moreover, the genome-mining approach gave new insights into the nonribosomal synthesis exemplified by the identification of dual C/E domains in lipopeptide NRPSs, up to now essentially found in Pseudomonas strains.

  6. Bacterial siderophores promote dissolution of UO2 under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Scott W; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Kraemer, Stephan M

    2005-08-01

    Tetravalent actinides are often considered environmentally immobile due to their strong hydrolysis and formation of sparingly soluble oxide phases. However, biogenic ligands commonly found in the soil environment may increase their solubility and mobility. We studied the adsorption and dissolution kinetics of UO2 in the presence of a microbial siderophore, desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B), under reducing conditions. Using batch and continuous flow stirred tank reactors (CFSTR),we found that DFO-B increases the solubility of UIV and accelerates UO2 dissolution rates through a ligand-promoted dissolution mechanism. DFO-B adsorption to UO2 followed a Langmuir-type isotherm. The maximum adsorbed DFO-B concentrations were 3.3 micromol m(-2) between pH 3 and 8 and declined above pH 8. DFO-B dissolved UO2 at a DFO-B surface-saturated net rate of 64 nmol h(-1) m(-2) (pH 7.5, l = 0.01 M) according to the first-order rate equation R = kL[Lads], with a rate coefficient kL of 0.019 h(-1). Even at very low siderophore concentrations (e.g. 1 microM), net dissolution rates (16 nmol h(-1) m(-2), pH 7.5, l = 0.01 M) were substantially greater than net proton-promoted dissolution rates (3 nmol h(-1) m(-2), pH 7-7.5, l = 0.01 M). Interestingly, adding dissolved FeIII had negligible effects on DFO-B-promoted UO2 dissolution rates, despite its potential as a competitor for DFO-B and as an oxidant of UIV. Our results suggest that strong organic ligands could influence the environmental mobility of tetravalent actinides and should be considered in predictions for nuclear waste storage and remediation strategies. PMID:16124306

  7. FptA, the Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a phenolate siderophore receptor homologous to hydroxamate siderophore receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Ankenbauer, R G; Quan, H N

    1994-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin is structurally unique among siderophores and possesses neither hydroxamate- nor catecholate-chelating groups. The structural gene encoding the 75-kDa outer membrane Fe(III)-pyochelin receptor FptA has been isolated by plasmid rescue techniques and sequenced. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the isolated FptA protein corresponded to that deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the fptA structural gene. The mature FptA protein has 682 amino acids and a molecular mass of 75,993 Da and has considerable overall homology with the hydroxamate siderophore receptors FpvA of P. aeruginosa, PupA and PupB of Pseudomonas putida, and FhuE of Escherichia coli. This observation indicates that homologies between siderophore receptors are an unreliable predictor of siderophore ligand class recognition by a given receptor. The fptA gene was strongly regulated by iron; fptA transcription was totally repressed by 30 microM FeCl3, as determined by Northern (RNA) blotting. The promoter of the fptA gene contained the sequence 5'-ATAATGATAAGCATTATC-3', which matches the consensus E. coli Fur-binding site at 17 of 18 positions. The -10 promoter region and transcriptional start site of the fptA gene reside within this Fur-binding site. Images PMID:8288523

  8. Ergothioneine Biosynthesis and Functionality in the Opportunistic Fungal Pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Kevin J.; Lechner, Beatrix Elisabeth; Keeffe, Grainne O’; Keller, Markus A.; Werner, Ernst R.; Lindner, Herbert; Jones, Gary W.; Haas, Hubertus; Doyle, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ergothioneine (EGT; 2-mercaptohistidine trimethylbetaine) is a trimethylated and sulphurised histidine derivative which exhibits antioxidant properties. Here we report that deletion of Aspergillus fumigatus egtA (AFUA_2G15650), which encodes a trimodular enzyme, abrogated EGT biosynthesis in this opportunistic pathogen. EGT biosynthetic deficiency in A. fumigatus significantly reduced resistance to elevated H2O2 and menadione, respectively, impaired gliotoxin production and resulted in attenuated conidiation. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed substantial proteomic remodelling in ΔegtA compared to wild-type under both basal and ROS conditions, whereby the abundance of 290 proteins was altered. Specifically, the reciprocal differential abundance of cystathionine γ-synthase and β-lyase, respectively, influenced cystathionine availability to effect EGT biosynthesis. A combined deficiency in EGT biosynthesis and the oxidative stress response regulator Yap1, which led to extreme oxidative stress susceptibility, decreased resistance to heavy metals and production of the extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C and increased accumulation of the intracellular siderophore ferricrocin. EGT dissipated H2O2 in vitro, and elevated intracellular GSH levels accompanied abrogation of EGT biosynthesis. EGT deficiency only decreased resistance to high H2O2 levels which suggests functionality as an auxiliary antioxidant, required for growth at elevated oxidative stress conditions. Combined, these data reveal new interactions between cellular redox homeostasis, secondary metabolism and metal ion homeostasis. PMID:27748436

  9. Effect of metals on a siderophore producing bacterial isolate and its implications on microbial assisted bioremediation of metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Teja; Bhosle, Saroj

    2013-11-01

    A bacterial isolate producing siderophore under iron limiting conditions, was isolated from mangroves of Goa. Based on morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomical and 16S rDNA studies, the isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NAR38.1. Preliminary characterization of the siderophore indicated it to be catecholate type with dihydroxy benzoate as the core component. Optimum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 in mineral salts medium (MSM) without any added iron with glucose as the carbon source. Addition of NaCl in the growth medium showed considerable decrease in siderophore production above 2% NaCl. Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) below 2 μM and 40 μM concentrations respectively, induced siderophore production, above which the production was repressed. Binding studies of the siderophore with Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) indicated its high affinity towards Fe(+3). The siderophore concentration in the extracellular medium was enhanced when MSM was amended with essential metals Zn, Co, Mo and Mn, however, decreased with Cu, while the concentration was reduced with abiotic metals As, Pb, Al and Cd. Significant increase in extracellular siderophore production was observed with Pb and Al at concentrations of 50 μM and above. The effect of metals on siderophore production was completely mitigated in presence of Fe. The results implicate effect of metals on the efficiency of siderophore production by bacteria for potential application in bioremediation of metal contaminated iron deficient soils especially in the microbial assisted phytoremediation processes.

  10. The role of siderophores in metal homeostasis of members of the genus Burkholderia.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anugraha; Jenul, Christian; Carlier, Aurelien L; Eberl, Leo

    2016-02-01

    Although members of the genus Burkholderia can utilize a high-affinity iron uptake system to sustain growth under iron-limiting conditions, many strains also produce siderophores, suggesting that they may serve alternative functions. Here we demonstrate that the two Burkholderia siderophores pyochelin and ornibactin can protect the cells from metal toxicity and thus play an alternative role in metal homeostasis. We also demonstrate that metals such as copper and zinc induce the production of ornibactin. PMID:26621188

  11. Trihydroxamate Siderophore-Fluoroquinolone Conjugates are Selective Sideromycin Antibiotics that Target Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Long, Timothy E.; Möllmann, Ute; Miller, Marvin J.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophores are multidentate iron(III) chelators used by bacteria for iron assimilation. Sideromycins, also called siderophore-antibiotic conjugates, are a unique subset of siderophores that enter bacterial cells via siderophore uptake pathways and deliver the toxic antibiotic in a ‘Trojan Horse’ fashion. Sideromycins represent a novel antibiotic delivery technology with untapped potential for developing sophisticated microbe-selective antibacterial agents that limit the emergence of bacterial resistance. The chemical synthesis of a series of mono-, bis-, and trihydroxamate sideromycins are described here along with their biological evaluation in antibacterial susceptibility assays. The linear hydroxamate siderophores used for the sideromycins in this study were derived from the ferrioxamine family and inspired by the naturally occurring salmycin sideromycins. The antibacterial agents used were a β-lactam carbacepholosporin, Lorabid®, and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, chosen for the different locations of their biological targets, the periplasm (extracellular) and the cytoplasm (intracellular). The linear hydroxamate-based sideromycins were selectively toxic towards Gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus SG511 (MIC = 1.0 µM for the trihydroxamate-fluoroquinolone sideromycin). Siderophore-sideromycin competition assays demonstrated that only the fluoroquinolone sideromycins required membrane transport to reach their cytoplasmic biological target and that a trihydroxamate siderophore backbone was required for protein-mediated active transport of the sideromycins into S. aureus cells via siderophore uptake pathways. This work represents a comprehensive study of linear hydroxamate sideromycins and teaches how to build effective hydroxamate-based sideromycins as Gram-positive selective antibiotic agents. PMID:23350642

  12. Development and Application of an Assay for Uranyl Complexation by Fungal Metabolites, Including Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Joanna C.; Halliday, Verity; Robson, Geoffrey D.; Trinci, Anthony P. J.; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Livens, Francis R.; Collison, David; Taylor, Robin J.

    2003-01-01

    An assay to detect UO22+ complexation was developed based on the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay for siderophores (B. Schwyn and J. B. Neilands, Anal. Biochem. 160:47-56, 1987) and was used to investigate the ability of fungal metabolites to complex actinides. In this assay the discoloration of two dyed agars (one containing a CAS-Fe3+ dye and the other containing a CAS-UO22+ dye) caused by ligands was quantified. The assay was tested by using the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO), and the results showed that there was a regular, reproducible relationship between discoloration and the amount of siderophore added. The ratio of the discoloration on the CAS-UO22+ agar to the discoloration on the CAS-Fe3+ agar was independent of the amount of siderophore added. A total of 113 fungi and yeasts were isolated from three soil samples taken from the Peak District National Park. The fungi were screened for the production of UO22+ chelators by using the CAS-based assay and were also tested specifically for hydroxamate siderophore production by using the hydroxamate siderophore auxotroph Aureobacterium flavescens JG-9. This organism is highly sensitive to the presence of hydroxamate siderophores. However, the CAS-based assay was found to be less sensitive than the A. flavescens JG-9 assay. No significant difference between the results for each site for the two tests was found. Three isolates were selected for further study and were identified as two Pencillium species and a Mucor species. Our results show that the new assay can be effectively used to screen fungi for the production of UO22+ chelating ligands. We suggest that hydroxamate siderophores can be produced by mucoraceous fungi. PMID:12788768

  13. Diversity of siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems in fluorescent pseudomonads: not only pyoverdines.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Pierre; Matthijs, Sandra

    2002-12-01

    Fluorescent pseudomonads are gamma-proteobacteria known for their capacity to colonize various ecological niches. This adaptability is reflected by their sophisticated and diverse iron uptake systems. The majority of fluorescent pseudomonads produce complex peptidic siderophores called pyoverdines or pseudobactins, which are very efficient iron scavengers. A tremendous variety of pyoverdines has been observed, each species producing a different pyoverdine. This variety can be used as an interesting tool to study the diversity and taxonomy of fluorescent pseudomonads. Other siderophores, including newly described ones, are also produced by pseudomonads, sometimes endowed with interesting properties in addition to iron scavenging, such as formation of complexes with other metals or antimicrobial activity. Factors other than iron limitation, and different regulatory proteins also seem to influence the production of siderophores in pseudomonads and are reviewed here as well. Another peculiarity of pseudomonads is their ability to use a large number of heterologous siderophores via different TonB-dependent receptors. A first genomic analysis of receptors in four different fluorescent pseudomonads suggests that their siderophore ligand repertoire is likely to overlap, and that not all receptors recognize siderophores as ligands. PMID:12534462

  14. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia. PMID:22038645

  15. Siderophore production by actinomycetes isolates from two soil sites in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joanna; Postmaster, Armin; Soon, Hooi Peng; Keast, David; Carson, Kerry C

    2012-04-01

    The actinomycetes are metabolically flexible soil micro-organisms capable of producing a range of compounds of interest, including siderophores. Siderophore production by actinomycetes sampled from two distinct and separate geographical sites in Western Australia were investigated and found to be generally similar in the total percentage of siderophore producers found. The only notable difference was the proportion of isolates producing catechol siderophores with only 3% found in site 1 (from the north-west of Western Australia and reportedly containing 40% magnetite) and 17% in site 2 (a commercial stone fruit orchard in the hills east of Perth with a soil base ranging from sandy loam to laterite). Further detailed characterization of isolates of interest identified a Streptomyces that produced extracellularly excreted enterobactin, the characteristic Enterobacteriaceae siderophore, and also revealed some of the conditions required for enterobactin production. Carriage of the entF gene, which codes for the synthetase responsible for the final assembly of the tri-cyclic structure of enterobactin, was confirmed by PCR in this isolate. Another separate Streptomyces produced a compound that matched the UV/VIS spectra of heterobactin, a siderophore previously only described in Rhodococcus and Nocardia.

  16. Cloning and Characterization of Aerobactin Biosynthesis Genes of the Biological Control Agent Enterobacter cloacae

    PubMed Central

    Loper, Joyce E.; Ishimaru, Carol A.; Carnegie, Susan R.; Vanavichit, Apichart

    1993-01-01

    Five strains of Enterobacter cloacae that are biological control agents of Pythium damping-off diseases produced the hydroxamate siderophore aerobactin under iron-limiting conditions. Genes determining aerobactin biosynthesis of the biocontrol strain E. cloacae EcCT-501 were localized to a 12.3-kb region, which conferred aerobactin production to Escherichia coli DH5α. The aerobactin biosynthesis genes of E. cloacae hybridized to those of the pColV-K30 plasmid of E. coli, but restriction patterns of the aerobactin regions of pColV-K30 and E. cloacae differed. A derivative strain with a deletion in the aerobactin biosynthesis locus was as effective as strain EcCT-501 in biological control of Pythium damping-off of cucumber. Thus, aerobactin production did not contribute significantly to the biological control activity of EcCT-501 under the conditions of this study. PMID:16349118

  17. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  18. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, E S Challaraj; Ananthi, T; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  19. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions. PMID:25088485

  20. Siderophore-Producing Bacteria from a Sand Dune Ecosystem and the Effect of Sodium Benzoate on Siderophore Production by a Potential Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Gaonkar, Teja; Nayak, Pramoda Kumar; Garg, Sandeep; Bhosle, Saroj

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation in natural ecosystems is dependent upon the availability of micronutrients and cofactors, of which iron is one of the essential elements. Under aerobic and alkaline conditions, iron oxidizes to Fe+3 creating iron deficiency. To acquire this essential growth-limiting nutrient, bacteria produce low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators termed siderophores. In this study, siderophore-producing bacteria from rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere areas of coastal sand dunes were isolated using a culture-dependent approach and were assigned to 8 different genera with the predominance of Bacillus sp. Studies on the ability of these isolates to grow on sodium benzoate revealed that a pigmented bacterial culture TMR2.13 identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed growth on mineral salts medium (MSM) with 2% of sodium benzoate and produced a yellowish fluorescent siderophore identified as pyoverdine. This was inhibited above 54 μM of added iron in MSM with glucose without affecting growth, while, in presence of sodium benzoate, siderophore was produced even up to the presence of 108 μM of added iron. Increase in the requirement of iron for metabolism of aromatic compounds in ecosystems where the nutrient deficiencies occur naturally would be one of the regulating factors for the bioremediation process. PMID:22629215

  1. Siderophore-producing bacteria from a sand dune ecosystem and the effect of sodium benzoate on siderophore production by a potential isolate.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Teja; Nayak, Pramoda Kumar; Garg, Sandeep; Bhosle, Saroj

    2012-01-01

    Bioremediation in natural ecosystems is dependent upon the availability of micronutrients and cofactors, of which iron is one of the essential elements. Under aerobic and alkaline conditions, iron oxidizes to Fe(+3) creating iron deficiency. To acquire this essential growth-limiting nutrient, bacteria produce low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators termed siderophores. In this study, siderophore-producing bacteria from rhizosphere and nonrhizosphere areas of coastal sand dunes were isolated using a culture-dependent approach and were assigned to 8 different genera with the predominance of Bacillus sp. Studies on the ability of these isolates to grow on sodium benzoate revealed that a pigmented bacterial culture TMR2.13 identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed growth on mineral salts medium (MSM) with 2% of sodium benzoate and produced a yellowish fluorescent siderophore identified as pyoverdine. This was inhibited above 54 μM of added iron in MSM with glucose without affecting growth, while, in presence of sodium benzoate, siderophore was produced even up to the presence of 108 μM of added iron. Increase in the requirement of iron for metabolism of aromatic compounds in ecosystems where the nutrient deficiencies occur naturally would be one of the regulating factors for the bioremediation process.

  2. Unusual non-fluorescent broad spectrum siderophore activity (SID EGYII) by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 and a new insight towards simple siderophore bioassay.

    PubMed

    Embaby, Amira M; Heshmat, Yasmin; Hussein, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Present study highlights an unusual non-fluorescent hydroxamate broad spectrum siderophore (SID EGYII) activity from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801, a soil bacterial isolate, along with simple low cost effective siderophore bioassay. Detection of SID EGYII activity qualitatively was proved by masking this activity against Erwinia amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800, an indicator strain, in well-cut diffusion assay containing 100 µM FeCl3. SID EGYII activity was expressed quantitatively as arbitrary units [Siderophore arbitrary units (SAU)] 380 SAU/mL against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. Maximal SID EGYII activity was achieved upon growing P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 in PYB broth at 180 rpm for 24 h. SID EGYII displayed a broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against some human pathogens (i.e., Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and yeasts) and a fireblight plant pathogen. Interestingly, transformants of Escherichia coli JM109 (DE3)pSID/EGYII harboring P. aeruginosa strain EGYII DSM 101801 plasmid demonstrated a perceivable antimicrobial activity against E. amylovora strain EGY1 DSM 101800. The broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of the unusual non-fluorescent SID EGYII would underpin its high potential in targeting bacterial pathogens posing probable threats to human health and agricultural economy. The present simple low cost effective bioassay is a new insight towards an alternative to the expensive cumbersome siderophore Chrome Azurol S assay. PMID:27015845

  3. Artificial siderophores. 1. Synthesis and microbial iron transport capabilities.

    PubMed

    Lee, B H; Miller, M J; Prody, C A; Neilands, J B

    1985-03-01

    Several di- and trihydroxamate analogues of natural microbial iron chelators have been prepared. The syntheses involved linkage of core structural units, including pyridinedicarboxylic acid, benzenetricarboxylic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, and tricarballylic acid, by amide bonds to 1-amino-omega-(hydroxyamino)alkanes to provide the polyhydroxamates 1-5. The required protected (hydroxyamino)alkanes 8, 16, and 21 were prepared by different routes. 1-Amino-3-[(benzyloxy)amino]propane di-p-toluenesulfonate (8) was prepared from the N-protected aminopropanol 6 by oxidation to the aldehyde, formation of the substituted oxime, and reduction with NaBH3CN followed by deprotection of the Boc group. The pentyl derivatives 16 and 21 were made by direct alkylation with either benzyl acetohydroxamate or N-carbobenzoxy-O-benzylhydroxylamine. In Escherichia coli RW193 most of the analogues behaved nutritionally as ferrichrome. However, in E. coli AN193, a mutant lacking the ferrichrome receptor, capacity to use other natural siderophores was retained while response to all analogues was lost.

  4. Salicylic acid is not a bacterial siderophore: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Chipperfield, J R; Ratledge, C

    2000-06-01

    Using a newly available program for calculating the concentrations and speciation of various ions (Pettit, LD & Powell KJ, 'SolEq' Academic Software, 1999), we have calculated that at pH 7 the amount of free Fe(III) present in an aqueous solution is 1.4 x 10(-9) M and not 10(-18) M as is usually quoted. In the presence of salicylic acid, included in the calculations at 10(-4) M, the solubility of Fe(III) is increased to only 9.8 x 10(-9) M suggesting that salicylate is unable to act as a siderophore although it is produced as an extracellular product by several bacterial genera when grown iron deficiently. In the presence of 40 mM phosphate, the soluble Fe(III) concentration is decreased by 10(4) at pH 7 and again this is hardly affected by the presence of salicylate. Thus, for microorganisms grown either in vitro or in vivo, salicylate is unlikely to function as a iron solubilizing agent. The same conclusions may also apply to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid.

  5. Selective ciprofloxacin antibiotic detection by fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Madhuri K; Tayade, Kundan C; Sahoo, Suban K; Mahulikar, Pramod P; Kuwar, Anil S; Chaudhari, Bhushan L

    2016-07-15

    Fluorescent siderophore pyoverdin (PVD) was produced from a soil isolate Pseudomonas monteilii strain MKP 213. The PVD was purified near to homogeneity and applied for the fluorescent chemosensing of various antibiotics in aqueous solution (pH=7.0). Upon addition of ciprofloxacin, PVD showed new UV-vis absorption bands at 252 and 321nm due to an internal charge transfer mechanism. Also, the addition of ciprofloxacin induced a highly selective fluorescence enhancement of PVD with a 13nm blue shift from 458 to 445nm. The combination of a long peptide chain along with the chromophore unit of PVD generates a converging cleft for ciprofloxacin recognition with LOD and LOQ of 7.13μM and 21.6μM, respectively without interference from other studied antibiotics. The association constant (Ka) of PVD with ciprofloxacin was calculated to be as low as 1.40×10(5)M(-1) using Benesi-Hildebrand plot depicting its significance in detection. The pharmaceutical tablet analysis measures the sensing with negligible matrix effect and quantitative recovery. PMID:26971273

  6. Chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of gallidermin-siderophore conjugates.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Sabesan; Sit, Clarissa S; Vederas, John C

    2011-04-01

    The lantibiotic gallidermin was modified at lysine residues by regioselective attachment of derivatives of pyochelin, agrobactin and desferrioxamine B with the objective of having siderophore receptors of Gram-negative bacteria transport the antibiotic-iron chelator conjugate through the outer membrane. All of the conjugates retained activity against the Gram-positive indicator strain, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris HP. However, testing of the conjugates against several Gram-negative strains yielded unexpected results. Bacteria treated with 100 μM of the conjugates complexed with Fe(3+) grew better than bacteria grown in iron-free media but worse than bacteria grown in the same media supplemented with 10 μM FeCl(3). Although these findings indicate that the conjugates are unable to inhibit the growth of Gram-negative bacteria, they indicate penetration of the outer membrane and provide structure-activity information for design of other lantibiotic conjugates. The synthetic strategy is applicable for linking biomarkers or fluorescence probes to gallidermin for studies on its localization and mode of action. As there are many lantibiotics that operate with unknown mechanisms of action, this chemical approach provides a means to modify such peptides with biomarkers for biological investigations. PMID:21290068

  7. Comparison of siderophore production and utilization in pathogenic and environmental isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Chambers, C E; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica strains of serotypes lethal to mice have been reported previously to produce an endogenous siderophore. In this study, an ethyl acetate-extractable siderophore was characterized and given the name yersiniophore. Yersiniophore was produced by 16 of 16 human isolates of serotypes O:4, O:4,32, O:8, O:21, and one nonhuman isolate of serotype O:21. It was not produced by isolates of serotype O:3, O:5, or O:9. One strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produced yersiniophore, but strains of Yersinia kristensenii, Yersinia frederiksenii, and Yersinia intermedia did not produce or utilize yersiniophore. Food and water isolates of Y. enterocolitica produced a water-soluble siderophore but not yersiniophore. Sixty-two strains of Y. enterocolitica including 42 isolates from human infections, 2 animal isolates, and 18 water and food isolates were examined for utilization of yersiniophore, the water-soluble siderophore, and ferrioxamine. Yersiniophore promoted growth rate, iron binding, and uptake in 17 of 62 strains, all of which produced yersiniophore. Ten of 17 food and water isolates and one human isolate were capable of utilizing the water-soluble siderophore. Utilization studies suggest that at least one additional water-soluble siderophore may be produced. Ferrioxamine promoted the growth of 60 of 62 strains examined; however, only the 17 strains which produced yersiniophore actively accumulated [59Fe]ferrioxamine. Yersiniophore production and utilization may be important in clinical infections since all human strains belonging to serotype O:8 produced yersinophore. The water-soluble siderophore was not detected in human isolates.

  8. Comparison of siderophore production and utilization in pathogenic and environmental isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, C E; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica strains of serotypes lethal to mice have been reported previously to produce an endogenous siderophore. In this study, an ethyl acetate-extractable siderophore was characterized and given the name yersiniophore. Yersiniophore was produced by 16 of 16 human isolates of serotypes O:4, O:4,32, O:8, O:21, and one nonhuman isolate of serotype O:21. It was not produced by isolates of serotype O:3, O:5, or O:9. One strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis produced yersiniophore, but strains of Yersinia kristensenii, Yersinia frederiksenii, and Yersinia intermedia did not produce or utilize yersiniophore. Food and water isolates of Y. enterocolitica produced a water-soluble siderophore but not yersiniophore. Sixty-two strains of Y. enterocolitica including 42 isolates from human infections, 2 animal isolates, and 18 water and food isolates were examined for utilization of yersiniophore, the water-soluble siderophore, and ferrioxamine. Yersiniophore promoted growth rate, iron binding, and uptake in 17 of 62 strains, all of which produced yersiniophore. Ten of 17 food and water isolates and one human isolate were capable of utilizing the water-soluble siderophore. Utilization studies suggest that at least one additional water-soluble siderophore may be produced. Ferrioxamine promoted the growth of 60 of 62 strains examined; however, only the 17 strains which produced yersiniophore actively accumulated [59Fe]ferrioxamine. Yersiniophore production and utilization may be important in clinical infections since all human strains belonging to serotype O:8 produced yersinophore. The water-soluble siderophore was not detected in human isolates. Images PMID:8126201

  9. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    PubMed

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed.

  10. Bacterial siderophores efficiently provide iron to iron-starved tomato plants in hydroponics culture.

    PubMed

    Radzki, W; Gutierrez Mañero, F J; Algar, E; Lucas García, J A; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos Solano, B

    2013-09-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements for a proper plant development. Providing plants with an accessible form of iron is crucial when it is scant or unavailable in soils. Chemical chelates are the only current alternative and are highly stable in soils, therefore, posing a threat to drinking water. The aim of this investigation was to quantify siderophores produced by two bacterial strains and to determine if these bacterial siderophores would palliate chlorotic symptoms of iron-starved tomato plants. For this purpose, siderophore production in MM9 medium by two selected bacterial strains was quantified, and the best was used for biological assay. Bacterial culture media free of bacteria (S) and with bacterial cells (BS), both supplemented with Fe were delivered to 12-week-old plants grown under iron starvation in hydroponic conditions; controls with full Hoagland solution, iron-free Hoagland solution and water were also conducted. Treatments were applied twice along the experiment, with a week in between. At harvest, plant yield, chlorophyll content and nutritional status in leaves were measured. Both the bacterial siderophore treatments significantly increased plant yield, chlorophyll and iron content over the positive controls with full Hoagland solution, indicating that siderophores are effective in providing Fe to the plant, either with or without the presence of bacteria. In summary, siderophores from strain Chryseobacterium C138 are effective in supplying Fe to iron-starved tomato plants by the roots, either with or without the presence of bacteria. Based on the amount of siderophores produced, an effective and economically feasible organic Fe chelator could be developed. PMID:23812968

  11. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones. PMID:25062779

  12. In Vitro Cultivation of 'Unculturable' Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores.

    PubMed

    Vartoukian, Sonia R; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome.

  13. Scavenging iron: a novel mechanism of plant immunity activation by microbial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-04-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H₂O₂ staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  14. Scavenging Iron: A Novel Mechanism of Plant Immunity Activation by Microbial Siderophores1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W.G.; Rigault, Martine; Riache, Nassima; Joseph, Delphine; Desmaële, Didier; Mouille, Grégory; Boutet, Stéphanie; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Thomine, Sébastien; Expert, Dominique; Dellagi, Alia

    2014-01-01

    Siderophores are specific ferric iron chelators synthesized by virtually all microorganisms in response to iron deficiency. We have previously shown that they promote infection by the phytopathogenic enterobacteria Dickeya dadantii and Erwinia amylovora. Siderophores also have the ability to activate plant immunity. We have used complete Arabidopsis transcriptome microarrays to investigate the global transcriptional modifications in roots and leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants after leaf treatment with the siderophore deferrioxamine (DFO). Physiological relevance of these transcriptional modifications was validated experimentally. Immunity and heavy-metal homeostasis were the major processes affected by DFO. These two physiological responses could be activated by a synthetic iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid, indicating that siderophores eliciting activities rely on their strong iron-chelating capacity. DFO was able to protect Arabidopsis against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Siderophore treatment caused local modifications of iron distribution in leaf cells visible by ferrocyanide and diaminobenzidine-H2O2 staining. Metal quantifications showed that DFO causes a transient iron and zinc uptake at the root level, which is presumably mediated by the metal transporter iron regulated transporter1 (IRT1). Defense gene expression and callose deposition in response to DFO were compromised in an irt1 mutant. Consistently, plant susceptibility to D. dadantii was increased in the irt1 mutant. Our work shows that iron scavenging is a unique mechanism of immunity activation in plants. It highlights the strong relationship between heavy-metal homeostasis and immunity. PMID:24501001

  15. In Vitro Cultivation of 'Unculturable' Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores.

    PubMed

    Vartoukian, Sonia R; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Wade, William G

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome. PMID:26764907

  16. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones.

  17. Layer plate CAS assay for the quantitation of siderophore production and determination of exudation patterns for fungi.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Megan Y; Santelli, Cara M; Duckworth, Owen W

    2016-02-01

    The chrome azurol S (CAS) assay measures the chelating activity of siderophores, but its application (especially to fungi) is limited by toxicity issues. In this note, we describe a modified version of the CAS assay that is suitable for quantifying siderophore exudation for microorganisms, including fungi. PMID:26712125

  18. Rhizoferrin: a complexone type siderophore of the Mucorales and entomophthorales (Zygomycetes).

    PubMed

    Thieken, A; Winkelmann, G

    1992-07-01

    The present investigation presents evidence that rhizoferrin, a novel polycarboxylate or complexone-type siderophore, originally isolated from Rhizopus microsporus, represents the common siderophore within the Zygomycetes. Thus, rhizoferrin could be detected by HPLC analysis in various families of the Mucorales, e.g., Rhizopus microsporus var. rhizopodiformis, Mucor mucedo and Phycomyces nitens (Mucoraceae), Chaetostylum fresenii and Cokeromyces recurvatus (Thamnidiaceae), Cunninghamella elegans and Mycotypha africana (Choanephoraceae) and Mortierella vinacea (Mortierellaceae) and in Basidiobolus microsporus (Entomophthorales). The function of rhizoferrin as a siderophore in the fungus R. microsporus var. rhizopodiformis was demonstrated by time- and concentration-dependent uptake of [55Fe]-labelled rhizoferrin, yielding saturation kinetics with values of Km = 8 microM and V(max) = 1.2 nmol min-1 (mg dry wt)-1.

  19. Antagonistic control of microbial pathogens under iron limitations by siderophore producing bacteria in a chemostat setup.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Eberl, Hermann J

    2011-03-21

    Certain bacteria develop iron chelation mechanisms that allow them to scavenge dissolved iron from the environment and to make it unavailable to competitors. This is achieved by producing siderophores that bind the iron which is later liberated internally in the cell. Under conditions of iron limitation, siderophore producing bacteria have therefore an antagonistic growth advantage over other species. This has been observed in particular in agricultural and aquacultural systems, as well as in food microbiology. We investigate here the possibility of a probiotic biocontrol strategy to eradicate a well established, often pathogenic, non-chelating population by supplementing the system with generally regarded as safe siderophore producing bacteria. Set in a chemostat setup, our modeling and simulation studies suggest that this is indeed possible in a finite time treatment. PMID:21192949

  20. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition mechanisms in Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2.

    PubMed Central

    Biosca, E G; Fouz, B; Alcaide, E; Amaro, C

    1996-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus biotype 2 is a primary pathogen for eels and, as has recently been suggested, an opportunistic pathogen for humans. In this study we have investigated the ability of V. vulnificus biotype 2 to obtain iron by siderophore-mediated mechanisms and evaluated the importance of free iron in vibriosis. The virulence degree for eels was dependent on iron availability from host fluids, as was revealed by a reduction in the 50% lethal dose for iron-overloaded eels. This biotype produced both phenolate- and hydroxamate-type siderophores of an unknown nature and two new outer membrane proteins of around 84 and 72 kDa in response to iron starvation. No alterations in lipopolysaccharide patterns were detected in response to iron stress. Finally, our data suggest that V. vulnificus biotype 2 uses the hydroxamate-type siderophore for removal of iron from transferrin rather than relying on a receptor for this iron-binding protein. PMID:8975620

  1. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments.

  2. Structural characterization of amphiphilic siderophores produced by a soda lake isolate, Halomonas sp. SL01, reveals cysteine-, phenylalanine- and proline-containing head groups.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Luis O'mar Serrano; Schwarz, Benjamin; Richards, Abigail M

    2015-11-01

    Soap Lake, located in Washington State, is a naturally occurring saline and alkaline lake. Several organisms inhabiting this lake have been identified as producers of siderophores that are unique in structure. Bacterial isolates, enriched from Soap Lake sediment and water samples, were screened for siderophore production using both the chrome azurol S (CAS) agar plate and liquid methods. Bacterial isolate Halomonas sp. SL01 was found to produce relatively high concentrations of siderophores in liquid medium (up to 40 µM). Siderophores from the isolate were separated from the culture supernatant using solid phase extraction and purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Siderophore structure was determined using LC/MS/MS (liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry) and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC. Two distinct new families of amphiphilic siderophores were produced by isolate SL01. All siderophores ranged in size from 989 to 1096 atomic mass units and consisted of a conserved peptidic head group (per family), which coordinates iron, coupled to fatty acid moieties. The fatty acyl moieties were C10-C14 in length and some with hydroxyl substitutions at the third α position. These siderophores resembled amphiphilic aquachelin siderophores produced by Halomonas aquamarina strain DS40M3, a marine bacterium as well as siderophores from isolate Halomonas sp. SL28 that was found to produce amphiphilic siderophores. Bacteria thriving under saline and alkaline conditions are capable of producing unique siderophores resembling those produced by microbes inhabiting marine environments. PMID:26439615

  3. Discovery of a Nonclassical Siderophore, Legiobactin, Produced by Strains of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Mark R.; Scheel, Tracy Aber; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms by which Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular parasite and the agent of Legionnaires' disease, acquires iron are largely unexplained. Several earlier studies indicated that L. pneumophila does not elaborate siderophores. However, we now present evidence that supernatants from L. pneumophila cultures can contain a nonproteinaceous, high-affinity iron chelator. More specifically, when aerobically grown in a low-iron, chemically defined medium (CDM), L. pneumophila secretes a substance that is reactive in the chrome azurol S (CAS) assay. Importantly, the siderophore-like activity was only observed when the CDM cultures were inoculated to relatively high density with bacteria that had been grown overnight to log or early stationary phase in CDM or buffered yeast extract. Inocula derived from late-stationary-phase cultures, despite ultimately growing, consistently failed to result in the elaboration of siderophore-like activity. The Legionella CAS reactivity was detected in the culture supernatants of the serogroup 1 strains 130b and Philadelphia-1, as well as those from representatives of other serogroups and other Legionella species. The CAS-reactive substance was resistant to boiling and protease treatment and was associated with the <1-kDa supernatant fraction. As would also be expected for a siderophore, the addition of 0.5 or 2.0 μM iron to the cultures repressed the expression of the CAS-reactive substance. Interestingly, the supernatants were negative in the Arnow, Csáky, and Rioux assays, indicating that the Legionella siderophore was not a classic catecholate or hydroxamate and, hence, might have a novel structure. We have designated the L. pneumophila siderophore legiobactin. PMID:10633110

  4. The effect of soil horizon and mineral type on the distribution of siderophores in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Engy; Holmström, Sara J. M.

    2014-04-01

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies like production of siderophores. Siderophores are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe(III)-binding compounds, that can increase the bioavailability of iron by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals. In the present study, we investigated the composition of dissolved and adsorbed siderophores of the hydroxamate family in the soil horizons of podzol and the effect of specific mineral types on siderophores. Three polished mineral specimens of 3 cm × 4 cm × 3 mm (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) were inserted in the soil horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial) and B (upper illuvial)). After two years, soil samples were collected from both the bulk soil of the whole profile and from the soil attached to the mineral surfaces. The concentration of ten different fungal tri-hydroxamates within ferrichromes, fusigen and coprogens families, and five bacterial hydroxamates within the ferrioxamine family were detected. All hydroxamate types were determined in both soil water (dissolved) and soil methanol (adsorbed) extracts along the whole soil profile by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS); hence, the study is the most extensive of its kind. We found that coprogens and fusigen were present in much higher concentrations in bulk soil than were ferrioxamines and ferrichromes. On the other hand, the presence of the polished mineral completely altered the distribution of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with the dissolved and adsorbed hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. Thus siderophore composition in the soil environment is controlled by the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of each soil horizon and also by the available mineral types.

  5. Biosynthesis of a Complex Yersiniabactin-Like Natural Product via the mic Locus in Phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum▿†

    PubMed Central

    Kreutzer, Martin F.; Kage, Hirokazu; Gebhardt, Peter; Wackler, Barbara; Saluz, Hans P.; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Nett, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A genome mining study in the plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 unveiled a polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene cluster putatively involved in siderophore biosynthesis. Insertional mutagenesis confirmed the respective locus to be operational under iron-deficient conditions and spurred the isolation of the associated natural product. Bioinformatic analyses of the gene cluster facilitated the structural characterization of this compound, which was subsequently identified as the antimycoplasma agent micacocidin. The metal-chelating properties of micacocidin were evaluated in competition experiments, and the cellular uptake of gallium-micacocidin complexes was demonstrated in R. solanacearum GMI1000, indicating a possible siderophore role. Comparative genomics revealed a conservation of the micacocidin gene cluster in defined, but globally dispersed phylotypes of R. solanacearum. PMID:21724891

  6. Specificity of siderophore receptors in membrane vesicles of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed Central

    Aswell, J E; Haydon, A H; Turner, H R; Dawkins, C A; Arceneaux, J E

    1977-01-01

    Membrane vesicles of Bacillus megaterium strains SK11 and Ard1 bound the ferrischizokinen and ferriferrioxamine B siderhores (iron transport cofactors). An approximately equimolar uptake of both labels of [3H, 59Fe]ferrischizokinen indicated binding of the intact chelate. Binding reached equilibrium in 2 to 5 min, was temperature independent, and was unaltered by the addition of several energy sources. A 91% dissociation of bound [Fe]ferrischizokinen was achieved in 60 s by the addition of excess ferrischizokinen. Ferriaerobactin, a siderophore which is structurally related to ferrischizokinen, caused no detectable release of bound [59Fe]ferrischizokinen. Of several other ferrigydroxamates tested, only ferriferrichrome A achieved the release (11%) of [Fe]ferrischizokinen. Rapid dissociation (92%) of bound [59Fe]ferriferrioxamine B by the addition of ferriferrioxamine B was observed, and a 67% release of [59Fe]ferriferrioxamine B was caused by ferriA2265, its structural relative. Ferrischizokinen, ferriferrichrome A, and ferrirhodotorulic acid produced a 6, 25, and 29% dissociation, respectively, of [59Fe]ferriferrioxamine B; ferriaerobactin caused no dissociation. [59Fe]ferriaerobactin was bound by the membranes, but its dissociation was not effected by unlabeled ferriaerobactin, suggesting no specific receptors for this chelate. The respective binding affinity constants and maximal binding capacities of membrane vesicles of strain SK11 were 2 x 10(7) M-1 and 280 pmol per mg of protein for ferrischizokinen and 7 x 10(7) M-1 and 37 pmol per mg of protein for ferriferrioxamine B. These values in strain Ard1 were, respectively, 1.4 x 10(7) M-1 and 186 pmol per mg of protein for ferrischizokinen and 11 x 10(7) M-1 and 23 pmol per mg of protein for ferriferrioxamine B. Separate, specific binding sites (receptors) for ferrischizokinen and ferriferrioxamine B exist on the vesicles. The ferrischizokinen receptors have a lower affinity but a higher binding capacity

  7. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms.

  8. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms. PMID:25414032

  9. Dissolution mechanisms of goethite in the presence of siderophores and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2007-12-01

    In dynamic natural systems such as soils and surface waters, transient biogeochemical processes can induce strong chemical non-steady-state conditions. In this paper, we investigate the effects of non-steady-state conditions on ligand-controlled iron oxide dissolution. The rates of goethite dissolution at pH 6 in the presence of low molecular weight organic acids (oxalate, citrate or malonate) were observed. Non-steady-state conditions were induced by rapid additions of fungal, bacterial or plant siderophores. In the presence of the low molecular weight organic acids, dissolved iron concentrations are below detection limit as predicted by equilibrium solubility calculations. The rapid addition of the siderophores triggered reproducible, fast dissolution of kinetically labile iron from the iron oxide surface. The same effect was observed upon rapid additions of high citrate concentrations to goethite-oxalate suspensions. The concentration of the labile iron pool at the mineral surface was a function of the surface concentration of the low molecular weight organic acids and of the reaction time before addition of the siderophores. Isotopic exchange with 59Fe independently confirmed the existence of the labile iron pool before addition of the siderophore. A dissolution mechanism was elucidated that is consistent with these observations and with accepted models of ligand-controlled dissolution. We conclude that the fast dissolution reaction observed here is an important process in biological iron acquisition and that it is based on a general geochemical mechanism.

  10. Interspecies modulation of bacterial development through iron competition and siderophore piracy

    PubMed Central

    Traxler, Matthew F.; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R.; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Summary While soil-dwelling actinomycetes are renowned for secreting natural products, little is known about the roles of these molecules in mediating actinomycete interactions. In a previous co-culture screen, we found that one actinomycete, Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, inhibited aerial hyphae formation in adjacent colonies of Streptomyces coelicolor. A siderophore, amychelin, mediated this developmental arrest. Here we present genetic evidence that confirms the role of the amc locus in the production of amychelin and in the inhibition of S. coelicolor development. We further characterize the Amycolatopsis sp. AA4 - S. coelicolor interaction by examining expression of developmental and iron acquisition genes over time in co-culture. Manipulation of iron availability and/or growth near Amycolatopsis sp. AA4 led to alterations in expression of the critical developmental gene bldN, and other key down-stream genes in the S. coelicolor transcriptional cascade. In Amycolatopsis sp. AA4, siderophore genes were down-regulated when grown near S. coelicolor, leading us to find that deferrioxamine E, produced by S. coelicolor, could be readily utilized by Amycolatopsis sp. AA4. Collectively these results suggest that competition for iron via siderophore piracy and species-specific siderophores can alter patterns of gene expression and morphological differentiation during actinomycete interactions. PMID:22931126

  11. Identification of a hotdog fold thioesterase involved in the biosynthesis of menaquinone in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjiao; Ma, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaolei; Jiang, Ming; Song, Haigang; Guo, Zhihong

    2013-06-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a model organism for elucidation of menaquinone biosynthesis, for which a hydrolytic step from 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) to 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoate is still unaccounted for. Recently, a hotdog fold thioesterase has been shown to catalyze this conversion in phylloquinone biosynthesis, suggesting that its closest homolog, YbgC in Escherichia coli, may be the DHNA-CoA thioesterase in menaquinone biosynthesis. However, this possibility is excluded by the involvement of YbgC in the Tol-Pal system and its complete lack of hydrolytic activity toward DHNA-CoA. To identify the hydrolytic enzyme, we have performed an activity-based screen of all nine Escherichia coli hotdog fold thioesterases and found that YdiI possesses a high level of hydrolytic activity toward DHNA-CoA, with high substrate specificity, and that another thioesterase, EntH, from siderophore biosynthesis exhibits a moderate, much lower DHNA-CoA thioesterase activity. Deletion of the ydiI gene from the bacterial genome results in a significant decrease in menaquinone production, which is little affected in ΔybgC and ΔentH mutants. These results support the notion that YdiI is the DHNA-CoA thioesterase involved in the biosynthesis of menaquinone in the model bacterium.

  12. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore.

    PubMed

    Zawadzka, Anna M; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Nichiporuk, Rita; Fan, Yao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB(nu)) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB(nu) with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-A crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two alpha/beta/alpha sandwich domains connected by a long alpha-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  13. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Nichiporuk, Rita; Fan, Yao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePBν) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePBν with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-Å crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two α/β/α sandwich domains connected by a long α-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies. PMID:19955416

  14. Characterization of a Bacillus subtilis transporter for petrobactin, an anthrax stealth siderophore

    SciTech Connect

    Zawadzka, A. M.; Kim, Y.; Maltseva, N; Nichiporuk, R; Fan, Y; Joachimiak, A; Raymond, KN

    2009-12-22

    Iron deprivation activates the expression of components of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus subtilis, including not only the synthesis and uptake of its siderophore bacillibactin but also expression of multiple ABC transporters for iron scavenging using xenosiderophores. The yclNOPQ operon is shown to encode the complete transporter for petrobactin (PB), a photoreactive 3,4-catecholate siderophore produced by many members of the B. cereus group, including B. anthracis. Isogenic disruption mutants in the yclNOPQ transporter, including permease YclN, ATPase YclP, and a substrate-binding protein YclQ, are unable to use either PB or the photoproduct of FePB (FePB{sup {nu}}) for iron delivery and growth, in contrast to the wild-type B. subtilis. Complementation of the mutations with the copies of the respective genes restores this capability. The YclQ receptor binds selectively iron-free and ferric PB, the PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and FePB{sup {nu}} with high affinity; the ferric complexes are seen in ESI-MS, implying strong electrostatic interaction between the protein-binding pocket and siderophore. The first structure of a Gram-positive siderophore receptor is presented. The 1.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of YclQ reveals a bilobal periplasmic binding protein (PBP) fold consisting of two {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich domains connected by a long {alpha}-helix with the binding pocket containing conserved positively charged and aromatic residues and large enough to accommodate FePB. Orthologs of the B. subtilis PB-transporter YclNOPQ in PB-producing Bacilli are likely contributors to the pathogenicity of these species and provide a potential target for antibacterial strategies.

  15. Stereospecificity of the siderophore pyochelin outer membrane transporters in fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Hoegy, Françoise; Lee, Xiaoyun; Noel, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Reimmann, Cornelia; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2009-05-29

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) are enantiomer siderophores that are produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, under iron limitation. Pch promotes growth of P. aeruginosa when iron is scarce, and EPch carries out the same biological function in P. fluorescens. However, the two siderophores are unable to promote growth in the heterologous species, indicating that siderophore-mediated iron uptake is highly stereospecific. In the present work, using binding and iron uptake assays, we found that FptA, the Fe-Pch outer membrane transporter of P. aeruginosa, recognized (K(d) = 2.5 +/- 1.1 nm) and transported Fe-Pch but did not interact with Fe-EPch. Likewise, FetA, the Fe-EPch receptor of P. fluorescens, was specific for Fe-EPch (K(d) = 3.7 +/- 2.1 nm) but did not bind and transport Fe-Pch. Growth promotion experiments performed under iron-limiting conditions confirmed that FptA and FetA are highly specific for Pch and EPch, respectively. When fptA and fetA along with adjacent transport genes involved in siderophore uptake were swapped between the two bacterial species, P. aeruginosa became able to utilize Fe-EPch as an iron source, and P. fluorescens was able to grow with Fe-Pch. Docking experiments using the FptA structure and binding assays showed that the stereospecificity of Pch recognition by FptA was mostly due to the configuration of the siderophore chiral centers C4'' and C2'' and was only weakly dependent on the configuration of the C4' carbon atom. Together, these findings increase our understanding of the stereospecific interaction between Pch and its outer membrane receptor FptA. PMID:19297329

  16. Stereospecificity of the Siderophore Pyochelin Outer Membrane Transporters in Fluorescent Pseudomonads*

    PubMed Central

    Hoegy, Françoise; Lee, Xiaoyun; Noel, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Mislin, Gaëtan L. A.; Reimmann, Cornelia; Schalk, Isabelle J.

    2009-01-01

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) are enantiomer siderophores that are produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, under iron limitation. Pch promotes growth of P. aeruginosa when iron is scarce, and EPch carries out the same biological function in P. fluorescens. However, the two siderophores are unable to promote growth in the heterologous species, indicating that siderophore-mediated iron uptake is highly stereospecific. In the present work, using binding and iron uptake assays, we found that FptA, the Fe-Pch outer membrane transporter of P. aeruginosa, recognized (Kd = 2.5 ± 1.1 nm) and transported Fe-Pch but did not interact with Fe-EPch. Likewise, FetA, the Fe-EPch receptor of P. fluorescens, was specific for Fe-EPch (Kd = 3.7 ± 2.1 nm) but did not bind and transport Fe-Pch. Growth promotion experiments performed under iron-limiting conditions confirmed that FptA and FetA are highly specific for Pch and EPch, respectively. When fptA and fetA along with adjacent transport genes involved in siderophore uptake were swapped between the two bacterial species, P. aeruginosa became able to utilize Fe-EPch as an iron source, and P. fluorescens was able to grow with Fe-Pch. Docking experiments using the FptA structure and binding assays showed that the stereospecificity of Pch recognition by FptA was mostly due to the configuration of the siderophore chiral centers C4″ and C2″ and was only weakly dependent on the configuration of the C4′ carbon atom. Together, these findings increase our understanding of the stereospecific interaction between Pch and its outer membrane receptor FptA. PMID:19297329

  17. Burkholderia pseudomallei known siderophores and hemin uptake are dispensable for lethal murine melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Kvitko, Brian H; Goodyear, Andrew; Propst, Katie L; Dow, Steven W; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a mostly saprophytic bacterium, but can infect humans where it causes the difficult-to-manage disease melioidosis. Even with proper diagnosis and prompt therapeutic interventions mortality rates still range from >20% in Northern Australia to over 40% in Thailand. Surprisingly little is yet known about how B. pseudomallei infects, invades and survives within its hosts, and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of critical nutrients such as iron to the bacterium's pathogenesis. It was previously assumed that B. pseudomallei used iron-acquisition systems commonly found in other bacteria, for example siderophores. However, our previous discovery of a clinical isolate carrying a large chromosomal deletion missing the entire malleobactin gene cluster encoding the bacterium's major high-affinity siderophore while still being fully virulent in a murine melioidosis model suggested that other iron-acquisition systems might make contributions to virulence. Here, we deleted the major siderophore malleobactin (mba) and pyochelin (pch) gene clusters in strain 1710b and revealed a residual siderophore activity which was unrelated to other known Burkholderia siderophores such as cepabactin and cepaciachelin, and not due to increased secretion of chelators such as citrate. Deletion of the two hemin uptake loci, hmu and hem, showed that Hmu is required for utilization of hemin and hemoglobin and that Hem cannot complement a Hmu deficiency. Prolonged incubation of a hmu hem mutant in hemoglobin-containing minimal medium yielded variants able to utilize hemoglobin and hemin suggesting alternate pathways for utilization of these two host iron sources. Lactoferrin utilization was dependent on malleobactin, but not pyochelin synthesis and/or uptake. A mba pch hmu hem quadruple mutant could use ferritin as an iron source and upon intranasal infection was lethal in an acute murine melioidosis model. These data suggest that B. pseudomallei may employ

  18. Trypanosome Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Taroh

    2009-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite, causes sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana disease in domestic animals in central Africa. The trypanosome surface is extensively covered by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins known as variant surface glycoproteins and procyclins. GPI anchoring is suggested to be important for trypanosome survival and establishment of infection. Trypanosomes are not only pathogenically important, but also constitute a useful model for elucidating the GPI biosynthesis pathway. This review focuses on the trypanosome GPI biosynthesis pathway. Studies on GPI that will be described indicate the potential for the design of drugs that specifically inhibit trypanosome GPI biosynthesis. PMID:19724691

  19. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all known organisms. Bacteria, fungi, and graminaceous plants are capable of exuding siderophores as part of an iron acquisition strategy. The production of these strong iron chelating ligands is induced by iron limited conditions. Grasses under iron stress, for example, exude phytosiderophores into the rhizosphere in a special diurnal rhythm (Roemheld and Marschner 1986). A few hours after sunrise the exudation starts, culminates around noon and is shut down again until about 4 hours after noon. The phytosiderophores diffuse into the rhizosphere (Marschner et al. 1986) and are passively back transported to the plants by advective flow induced by high transpiration around noon. Despite a fairly short residence time of the phytosiderophores in the rhizosphere, it is a very effective strategy for iron acquisition. To investigate the effect of such pulse inputs of siderophores on iron acquisition, we studied the dissolution mechanism of goethite (alpha-FeOOH), a mineral phase common in soils, under non-steady state conditions. In consideration of the chemical complexity of the rhizosphere, we also investigated the effect of other organic ligands commonly found in the rhizosphere (e. g. oxalate) on the dissolution kinetics. The dissolution experiments were conducted in batch reactors with a constant goethite solids concentration of 2.5 g/l, an ionic strength of 0.01 M, a pH of 6 and 100 microM oxalate. To induce non-steady state conditions, 3 mM phytosiderophores were added to a batch after the goethite-oxalate suspension reacted for a certain time period. Before the siderophore was added to the goethite-oxalate suspension, no dissolution of iron was observed. But, with the addition of the siderophore, a high rate was observed for the iron mobilization under these non-steady state conditions that subsequently was followed by a slow steady state dissolution rate. The results of these non-steady state experiments are very

  20. Investigation of the mechanism of iron acquisition by the marine bacterium Alteromonas luteoviolaceus: Characterization of siderophore production

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.T.; Butler, A. )

    1991-12-01

    Iron availability in the ocean ranges from one to four orders of magnitude below typical growth requirements of bacteria. The discrepancy between Fe availability and requirements raises questions about the mechanisms that marine bacteria use to sequester Fe{sup 3+}. Surprisingly little is known about the siderophores produced by marine bacteria. Growth conditions of an open-ocean bacterial isolate, Alteromonas luteoviolaceus, were investigated to determine the conditions which enhance siderophore production. Methods to isolate and purify the siderophores were determined. The siderophores produced by A. luteoviolaceus were partially characterized by mass spectral analysis, amino acid analysis, qualitative analytical tests, chemical degradation, and nuclear magnetic resonance. A new set of outer membrane proteins was also produced when the bacterium was grown under Fe-limited conditions.

  1. Adsorption of hydroxamate siderophores and EDTA on goethite in the presence of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Siderophore-promoted iron acquisition by microorganisms usually occurs in the presence of other organic molecules, including biosurfactants. We have investigated the influence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the adsorption of the siderophores DFOB (cationic) and DFOD (neutral) and the ligand EDTA (anionic) onto goethite (α-FeOOH) at pH 6. We also studied the adsorption of the corresponding 1:1 Fe(III)-ligand complexes, which are products of the dissolution process. Adsorption of the two free siderophores increased in a similar fashion with increasing SDS concentration, despite their difference in molecule charge. In contrast, SDS had little effect on the adsorption of EDTA. Adsorption of the Fe-DFOB and Fe-DFOD complexes also increased with increasing SDS concentrations, while adsorption of Fe-EDTA decreased. Our results suggest that hydrophobic interactions between adsorbed surfactants and siderophores are more important than electrostatic interactions. However, for strongly hydrophilic molecules, such as EDTA and its iron complex, the influence of SDS on their adsorption seems to depend on their tendency to form inner-sphere or outer-sphere surface complexes. Our results demonstrate that surfactants have a strong influence on the adsorption of siderophores to Fe oxides, which has important implications for siderophore-promoted dissolution of iron oxides and biological iron acquisition. PMID:19523232

  2. Breaking a pathogen's iron will: Inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Audrey L

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials. PMID:25970810

  3. Breaking a pathogen’s iron will: inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Audrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials. PMID:25970810

  4. Survival of Aspergillus fumigatus in serum involves removal of iron from transferrin: the role of siderophores.

    PubMed

    Hissen, A H T; Chow, J M T; Pinto, L J; Moore, M M

    2004-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a filamentous fungus which can cause invasive disease in immunocompromised individuals. A. fumigatus can grow in medium containing up to 80% human serum, despite very low concentrations of free iron. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism by which A. fumigatus obtains iron from the serum iron-binding protein transferrin. In iron-depleted minimal essential medium (MEM), A. fumigatus growth was supported by the addition of holotransferrin (holoTf) or FeCl(3) but not by the addition of apotransferrin (apoTf). Proteolytic degradation of transferrin by A. fumigatus occurred in MEM-serum; however, transferrin degradation did not occur until late logarithmic phase. Moreover, transferrin was not degraded by A. fumigatus incubated in MEM-holoTf. Urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that in MEM-holoTf, holoTf was completely converted to apoTf by A. fumigatus. In human serum, all of the monoferric transferrin was converted to apoTf within 8 h. Siderophores were secreted by A. fumigatus after 8 h of growth in MEM-serum and 12 h in MEM-holoTf. The involvement of small molecules in iron acquisition was confirmed by the fact that transferrin was deferrated by A. fumigatus even when physically separated by a 12-kDa-cutoff membrane. Five siderophores were purified from A. fumigatus culture medium, and the two major siderophores were identified as triacetylfusarinine C and ferricrocin. Both triacetylfusarinine C and ferricrocin removed iron from holoTf with an affinity comparable to that of ferrichrome. These data indicate that A. fumigatus survival in human serum in vitro involves siderophore-mediated removal of iron from transferrin. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin may play a secondary role in iron acquisition. PMID:14977945

  5. Effects of the Microbial Siderophore DFO-B on Pb and Cd Speciation in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2009-04-08

    This study investigates the complexation environments of aqueous Pb and Cd in the presence of the trihydroxamate microbial siderophore, desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) as a function of pH. Complexation of aqueous Pb and Cd with DFO-B was predicted using equilibrium speciation calculation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at Pb L(III) edge and Cd K edge was used to characterize Pb and Cd-DFO-B complexes at pH values predicted to best represent each of the metal-siderophore complexes. Pb was not found to be complexed measurably by DFO-B at pH 3.0, but was complexed by all three hydroxamate groups to form a totally 'caged' hexadentate structure at pH 7.5-9.0. At the intermediate pH value (pH 4.8), a mixture of Pb-DFOB complexes involving binding of the metal through one and two hydroxamate groups was observed. Cd, on the other hand, remained as hydrated Cd{sup 2+} at pH 5.0, occurred as a mixture of Cd-DFOB and inorganic species at pH 8.0, and was bound by three hydroxamate groups from DFO-B at pH 9.0. Overall, the solution species observed with EXAFS were consistent with those predicted thermodynamically. However, Pb speciation at higher pH values differed from that predicted and suggests that published constants underestimate the binding constant for complexation of Pb with all three hydroxamate groups of the DFO-B ligand. This molecular-level understanding of metal-siderophore solution coordination provides physical evidence for complexes of Pb and Cd with DFO-B, and is an important first step toward understanding processes at the microbial- and/or mineral-water interface in the presence of siderophores.

  6. Norepinephrine represses the expression of toxA and the siderophore genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Lyte, Mark; Freestone, Primrose P; Ajmal, Aziba; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2009-10-01

    Among the different extracellular virulence factors produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa are exotoxin A (ETA) and the pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores. Production of ETA and the siderophores requires the function of the iron-starvation sigma factor PvdS, the transcriptional activator RegA, and the AraC-activator PchR. Iron represses the production of ETA and the siderophores by repressing the expression of pvdS, regA, and pchR. PvdS regulates the expression of the ETA gene, toxA, regA, and the pyoverdine synthesis genes. The catecholamine norepinephrine enhances the growth of pathogenic bacteria by transferring iron from host-binding proteins. In this study, we elucidated the mechanism by which norepinephrine and other catecholamines induce P. aeruginosa growth. We also investigated whether norepinephrine regulates the expression of toxA and the siderophore genes, and the mechanism of this regulation. Norepinephrine enhanced the growth of P. aeruginosa by supplying iron from transferrin. This provision of iron repressed the expression of toxA, the pyoverdine genes pvdD and pvdE, and their regulators, pvdS, regA, and pchR, suggesting that norepinephrine accomplishes this repression through PvdS and PchR. Additionally, norepinephrine bypassed PvdS and supported the growth of a pvdS deletion mutant, indicating that norepinephrine transfers iron to P. aeruginosa independent of pyoverdine. Thus, norepinephrine apparently influences the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa by affecting its pattern of growth and the production of virulence factors. PMID:19686346

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies to Ferric Pseudobactin, the Siderophore of Plant Growth-Promoting Pseudomonas putida B10

    PubMed Central

    Buyer, Jeffrey S.; Sikora, Lawrence J.; Kratzke, Marian G.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to ferric pseudobactin, the siderophore (microbial iron transport agent) of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida B10, have been developed. Three immunoglobulin G subclass 1-type monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. Each antibody appears to be unique on the basis of their reactions with ferric pseudobactin and with culture supernatants from other pseudomonads. None of the three cross-reacts with ferric pseudobactin-type siderophores produced by seven other pseudomonads. However, P. aeruginosa ATCC 15692 and P. fluorescens ATCC 17400 produced relatively high-molecular-mass compounds (mass greater than approximately 30,000 daltons) that did react with the antibodies. The compound from P. aeruginosa was not iron regulated, while the compound from P. fluorescens was produced only under iron-limiting conditions. A competitive assay using these antibodies has a detection limit of 5 × 10−12 mol of ferric pseudobactin. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of monoclonal antibodies reactive with siderophores. PMID:16348116

  8. A novel MFS transporter encoding gene in Fusarium verticillioides probably involved in iron-siderophore transport.

    PubMed

    López-Errasquín, Elena; González-Jaén, M Teresa; Callejas, Carmen; Vázquez, Covadonga

    2006-09-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is a ubiquitous group of proteins involved in the transport of a wide range of compounds, including toxins produced by fungal species. In this paper, a novel MFS encoding gene (Fusarium iron related gene or FIR1), which had shown an up-regulation in fumonisin-inducing conditions, has been identified and characterized. The deduced protein sequence, which predicted 14 transmembrane domains typical of MFS transporters and its phylogenetic relationships with representative members of MFS transporters suggested a possible function of FIR1 as a siderophore transporter. A real-time RT-PCR protocol has been developed to analyse the expression pattern of the FIR1 gene in relation to siderophore production. The results indicated that the synthesis of extracellular siderophores by F. verticillioides observed in absence of extracellular iron was repressed in iron-supplemented cultures and showed a good correspondence with FIR1 gene expression. However, the pattern of FIR1 gene expression observed suggested that this gene did not seem to be functionally related to fumonisin production.

  9. Iron assimilation and siderophore production by Vibrio ordalii strains isolated from diseased Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Balado, Miguel; Toranzo, Alicia E; Poblete-Morales, Matías; Lemos, Manuel L; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-03-30

    Vibrio ordalii is the causative agent of vibriosis in several cultured salmonid species worldwide. Despite its impact on aquaculture, relatively little information is available about its virulence factors. The present study demonstrates for the first time that V. ordalii possesses different systems of iron acquisition, one involving siderophore synthesis and another one that uses direct binding of heme to use iron. Using 6 strains of V. ordalii from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and the V. ordalii type strain, we could demonstrate that all strains could grow in presence of the chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and produced siderophores in solid and liquid media. Cross-feeding assays among V. ordalii strains evidenced variability in the siderophores produced. Bioassays and PCR data suggest that V. ordalii could produce a siderophore with a structure similar to piscibactin, although the production of a second siderophore in certain strains cannot be discarded. Furthermore, all strains were able to use hemin and hemoglobin as the only iron sources, although the cell yield was higher when using hemoglobin. A hemin-binding assay indicated the presence of constitutive heme-binding molecules at the cell surface of V. ordalii. Virulence tests using rainbow trout as a model of infection revealed a clear relationship between iron-uptake ability and pathogenicity in V. ordalii. PMID:27025309

  10. Iron assimilation and siderophore production by Vibrio ordalii strains isolated from diseased Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Chile.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Balado, Miguel; Toranzo, Alicia E; Poblete-Morales, Matías; Lemos, Manuel L; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben

    2016-03-30

    Vibrio ordalii is the causative agent of vibriosis in several cultured salmonid species worldwide. Despite its impact on aquaculture, relatively little information is available about its virulence factors. The present study demonstrates for the first time that V. ordalii possesses different systems of iron acquisition, one involving siderophore synthesis and another one that uses direct binding of heme to use iron. Using 6 strains of V. ordalii from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and the V. ordalii type strain, we could demonstrate that all strains could grow in presence of the chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl and produced siderophores in solid and liquid media. Cross-feeding assays among V. ordalii strains evidenced variability in the siderophores produced. Bioassays and PCR data suggest that V. ordalii could produce a siderophore with a structure similar to piscibactin, although the production of a second siderophore in certain strains cannot be discarded. Furthermore, all strains were able to use hemin and hemoglobin as the only iron sources, although the cell yield was higher when using hemoglobin. A hemin-binding assay indicated the presence of constitutive heme-binding molecules at the cell surface of V. ordalii. Virulence tests using rainbow trout as a model of infection revealed a clear relationship between iron-uptake ability and pathogenicity in V. ordalii.

  11. In Vitro Cultivation of ‘Unculturable’ Oral Bacteria, Facilitated by Community Culture and Media Supplementation with Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Vartoukian, Sonia R.; Adamowska, Aleksandra; Lawlor, Megan; Moazzez, Rebecca; Dewhirst, Floyd E.; Wade, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Over a third of oral bacteria are as-yet-uncultivated in-vitro. Siderophores have been previously shown to enable in-vitro growth of previously uncultivated bacteria. The objective of this study was to cultivate novel oral bacteria in siderophore-supplemented culture media. Various compounds with siderophore activity, including pyoverdines-Fe-complex, desferricoprogen and salicylic acid, were found to stimulate the growth of difficult-to-culture strains Prevotella sp. HOT-376 and Fretibacterium fastidiosum. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analysis demonstrated increased proportions of the as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes Dialister sp. HOT-119 and Megasphaera sp. HOT-123 on mixed culture plates supplemented with siderophores. Therefore a culture model was developed, which incorporated 15 μg siderophore (pyoverdines-Fe-complex or desferricoprogen) or 150 μl neat subgingival-plaque suspension into a central well on agar plates that were inoculated with heavily-diluted subgingival-plaque samples from subjects with periodontitis. Colonies showing satellitism were passaged onto fresh plates in co-culture with selected helper strains. Five novel strains, representatives of three previously-uncultivated taxa (Anaerolineae bacterium HOT-439, the first oral taxon from the Chloroflexi phylum to have been cultivated; Bacteroidetes bacterium HOT-365; and Peptostreptococcaceae bacterium HOT-091) were successfully isolated. All novel isolates required helper strains for growth, implying dependence on a biofilm lifestyle. Their characterisation will further our understanding of the human oral microbiome. PMID:26764907

  12. Characterization of Fluorescent Siderophore-Mediated Iron Uptake in Pseudomonas sp. Strain M114: Evidence for the Existence of an Additional Ferric Siderophore Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John; O'Sullivan, Daniel J.; Koster, Margot; Leong, John; Weisbeek, Peter J.; O'Gara, Fergal

    1992-01-01

    In Pseudomonas sp. strain M114, the outer membrane receptor for ferric pseudobactin M114 was shown to transport ferric pseudobactins B10 and A225, in addition to its own. The gene encoding this receptor, which was previously cloned on pCUP3, was localized by Tn5 mutagenesis to a region comprising >1.6 kb of M114 DNA. A mutant (strain M114R1) lacking this receptor was then created by a marker exchange technique. Characterization of this mutant by using purified pseudobactin M114 in radiolabeled ferric iron uptake studies confirmed that it was completely unable to utilize this siderophore for acquisition of iron. In addition, it lacked an outer membrane protein band of 89 kDa when subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. As a result, growth of the mutant was severely restricted under low-iron conditions. However, this phenotype was reversed in the presence of another fluorescent siderophore (pseudobactin MT3A) from Pseudomonas sp. strain MT3A, suggesting the presence of a second receptor in strain M114. Furthermore, wild-type Pseudomonas sp. strain B24 was not able to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A, and this phenotype was not reversed upon expression of the M114 receptor encoded on pCUP3. However, a cosmid clone (pMS1047) that enabled strain B24 to utilize ferric pseudobactin MT3A was isolated from an M114 gene bank. Radiolabel transport assays with purified pseudobactin MT3A confirmed this event. Plasmid pMS1047 was shown to encode an outer membrane protein of 81 kDa in strain B24 under iron-limiting conditions; this protein corresponds to a similar protein in strain M114. Images PMID:16348650

  13. The Legionella pneumophila Siderophore Legiobactin Is a Polycarboxylate That Is Identical in Structure to Rhizoferrin

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Denise M.; Wu, Yuyang; Shafaie, Saman

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the agent of Legionnaires' disease, secretes a siderophore (legiobactin) that promotes bacterial infection of the lung. In past work, we determined that cytoplasmic LbtA (from Legiobactin gene A) promotes synthesis of legiobactin, inner membrane LbtB aids in export of the siderophore, and outer membrane LbtU and inner membrane LbtC help mediate ferrilegiobactin uptake and assimilation. However, the past studies examined legiobactin contained within bacterial culture supernatants. By utilizing high-pressure liquid chromatography that incorporates hydrophilic interaction-based chemistry, we have now purified legiobactin from supernatants of virulent strain 130b that is suitable for detailed chemical analysis. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) revealed that the molecular mass of (protonated) legiobactin is 437.140 Da. On the basis of the results obtained from both MS analysis and various forms of nuclear magnetic resonance, we found that legiobactin is composed of two citric acid residues linked by a putrescine bridge and thus is identical in structure to rhizoferrin, a polycarboxylate-type siderophore made by many fungi and several unrelated bacteria. Both purified legiobactin and rhizoferrin obtained from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans were able to promote Fe3+ uptake by wild-type L. pneumophila as well as enhance growth of iron-starved bacteria. These results did not occur with 130b mutants lacking lbtU or lbtC, indicating that both endogenously made legiobactin and exogenously derived rhizoferrin are assimilated by L. pneumophila in an LbtU- and LbtC-dependent manner. PMID:26195554

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of interlinked public goods traits: an experimental study of siderophore production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ross-Gillespie, A; Dumas, Z; Kümmerli, R

    2015-01-01

    Public goods cooperation is common in microbes, and there is much interest in understanding how such traits evolve. Research in recent years has identified several important factors that shape the evolutionary dynamics of such systems, yet few studies have investigated scenarios involving interactions between multiple public goods. Here, we offer general predictions about the evolutionary trajectories of two public goods traits having positive, negative or neutral regulatory influence on one another's expression, and we report on a test of some of our predictions in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa's production of two interlinked iron-scavenging siderophores. First, we confirmed that both pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores do operate as public goods under appropriate environmental conditions. We then tracked their production in lines experimentally evolved under different iron-limitation regimes known to favour different siderophore expression profiles. Under strong iron limitation, where pyoverdine represses pyochelin, we saw a decline in pyoverdine and a concomitant increase in pyochelin - consistent with expansion of pyoverdine-defective cheats derepressed for pyochelin. Under moderate iron limitation, pyochelin declined - again consistent with an expected cheat invasion scenario - but there was no concomitant shift in pyoverdine because cross-suppression between the traits is unidirectional only. Alternating exposure to strong and moderate iron limitation caused qualitatively similar though lesser shifts compared to the constant-environment regimes. Our results confirm that the regulatory interconnections between public goods traits can significantly modulate the course of evolution, yet also suggest how we can start to predict the impacts such complexities will have on phenotypic divergence and community stability.

  15. Adsorption of enterobactin to metal oxides and the role of siderophores in bacterial adhesion to metals.

    PubMed

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2011-09-01

    The potential contribution of chemical bonds formed between bacterial cells and metal surfaces during biofilm initiation has received little attention. Previous work has suggested that bacterial siderophores may play a role in bacterial adhesion to metals. It has now been shown using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy that enterobactin, a catecholate siderophore secreted by Escherichia coli, forms covalent bonds with particle films of titanium dioxide, boehmite (AlOOH), and chromium oxide-hydroxide which model the surfaces of metals of significance in medical and industrial settings. Adsorption of enterobactin to the metal oxides occurred through the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moieties, with the trilactone macrocycle having little involvement. Vibrational modes of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl moiety of enterobactin, adsorbed to TiO(2), were assigned by comparing the observed IR spectra with those calculated by the density functional method. Comparison of the observed adsorbate IR spectrum with the calculated spectra of catecholate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)Ti(OH)(4)](2-) and salicylate-type [H(2)NCOC(6)H(3)O(2)HTi(OH)(4)](2-) surface complexes indicated that the catecholate type is dominant. Analysis of the spectra for enterobactin in solution and that adsorbed to TiO(2) revealed that the amide of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine group reorientates during coordination to surface Ti(IV) ions. Investigation into the pH dependence of enterobactin adsorption to TiO(2) surfaces showed that all 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl groups are involved. Infrared absorption bands attributed to adsorbed enterobactin were also strongly evident for E. coli cells attached to TiO(2) particle films. These studies give evidence of enterobactin-metal bond formation and further suggest the generality of siderophore involvement in bacterial biofilm initiation on metal surfaces.

  16. Characterization of anguibactin, a novel siderophore from Vibrio anguillarum 775(pJM1).

    PubMed Central

    Actis, L A; Fish, W; Crosa, J H; Kellerman, K; Ellenberger, S R; Hauser, F M; Sanders-Loehr, J

    1986-01-01

    Anguibactin, a siderophore produced by cells of Vibrio anguillarum 775 harboring the pJM1 plasmid, has now been isolated from the supernatants of iron-deficient cultures. This iron-reactive material was purified by adsorption onto an XAD-7 resin and subsequent gel filtration on a Sephadex LH-20 column. The resulting neutral compound produced an ion at m/z 348 in mass spectrometry and contained one sulfur, four oxygen, and four nitrogen atoms as determined by elemental analysis. Its strong UV absorbance and blue fluorescence were suggestive of a phenolic moiety. In colorimetric reactions anguibactin behaved like a catechol. The catechol assignment was supported by the appearance of a new absorption band at 510 nm in the ferric complex and by the appearance of peaks at 1,367, 1,447, 1,469, and 1,538 cm-1 in the resonance Raman spectrum. In addition, the infrared spectrum gave evidence of a secondary amide function, but no free carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid groups were observed. A third iron-ligating group was suggested by the liberation of three protons during iron binding; mass spectrometry of the resulting material yielded a molecular ion characteristic of a 1:1 complex of ferric anguibactin. The purified anguibactin exhibited specific growth-promoting activity under iron-limiting conditions for a siderophore-deficient mutant of V. anguillarum 775(pJM1). A novel structure for anguibactin was indicated by the failure of a large number of known siderophores and synthetic chelators to yield a similar type of specific cross-feeding in the V. anguillarum bioassay. PMID:3013839

  17. Evolutionary dynamics of interlinked public goods traits: an experimental study of siderophore production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ross-Gillespie, A; Dumas, Z; Kümmerli, R

    2015-01-01

    Public goods cooperation is common in microbes, and there is much interest in understanding how such traits evolve. Research in recent years has identified several important factors that shape the evolutionary dynamics of such systems, yet few studies have investigated scenarios involving interactions between multiple public goods. Here, we offer general predictions about the evolutionary trajectories of two public goods traits having positive, negative or neutral regulatory influence on one another's expression, and we report on a test of some of our predictions in the context of Pseudomonas aeruginosa's production of two interlinked iron-scavenging siderophores. First, we confirmed that both pyoverdine and pyochelin siderophores do operate as public goods under appropriate environmental conditions. We then tracked their production in lines experimentally evolved under different iron-limitation regimes known to favour different siderophore expression profiles. Under strong iron limitation, where pyoverdine represses pyochelin, we saw a decline in pyoverdine and a concomitant increase in pyochelin - consistent with expansion of pyoverdine-defective cheats derepressed for pyochelin. Under moderate iron limitation, pyochelin declined - again consistent with an expected cheat invasion scenario - but there was no concomitant shift in pyoverdine because cross-suppression between the traits is unidirectional only. Alternating exposure to strong and moderate iron limitation caused qualitatively similar though lesser shifts compared to the constant-environment regimes. Our results confirm that the regulatory interconnections between public goods traits can significantly modulate the course of evolution, yet also suggest how we can start to predict the impacts such complexities will have on phenotypic divergence and community stability. PMID:25421271

  18. Multiplicity and specificity of siderophore uptake in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Mareike; Stevanovic, Mara; Kranzler, Chana; Pernil, Rafael; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Many cyanobacteria secrete siderophores to sequester iron. Alternatively, mechanisms to utilize xenosiderophores have evolved. The overall uptake systems are comparable to that of other bacteria involving outer membrane transporters energized by TonB as well as plasma membrane-localized transporters. However, the function of the bioinformatically-inferred components is largely not established and recent studies showed a high diversity of the complexity of the uptake systems in different cyanobacteria. Thus, we approached the systems of the filamentous Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 as a model of a siderophore-secreting cyanobacterium. Anabaena sp. produces schizokinen and uptake of Fe-schizokinen involves the TonB-dependent transporter, schizokinen transporter (SchT), and the ABC-type transport system FhuBCD. We confirm that this system is also relevant for the uptake of structurally similar Fe-siderophore complexes like Fe-aerobactin. Moreover, we demonstrate a function of the TonB-dependent transporter IutA2 in Fe-schizokinen uptake in addition to SchT. The iutA2 mutant shows growth defects upon iron limitation, alterations in Fe-schizokinen uptake and in the transcription profile of the Fe-schizokinen uptake system. The physiological properties of the mutant confirm the importance of iron uptake for cellular function, e.g. for the Krebs cycle. Based on the relative relation of expression of schT and iutA2 as well as of the iron uptake rate to the degree of starvation, a model for the need of the co-existence of two different outer membrane transporters for the same substrate is discussed. PMID:27325117

  19. Synthesis and biological properties of thiazole-analogues of pyochelin, a siderophore of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Noël, Sabrina; Hoegy, Françoise; Rivault, Freddy; Rognan, Didier; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A

    2014-01-01

    Pyochelin is a siderophore common to all strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilized by this Gram-negative bacterium to acquire iron(III). FptA is the outer membrane transporter responsible of ferric-pyochelin uptake in P. aeruginosa. We describe in this Letter the synthesis and the biological properties ((55)Fe uptake, binding to FptA) of several thiazole analogues of pyochelin. Among them we report in this Letter the two first pyochelin analogues able to bind FptA without promoting any iron uptake in P. aeruginosa. PMID:24332092

  20. BIOSYNTHESIS OF YEAST CAROTENOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Kenneth L.; Nakayama, T. O. M.; Chichester, C. O.

    1964-01-01

    Simpson, Kenneth L. (University of California, Davis), T. O. M. Nakayama, and C. O. Chichester. Biosynthesis of yeast carotenoids. J. Bacteriol. 88:1688–1694. 1964.—The biosynthesis of carotenoids was followed in Rhodotorula glutinis and in a new strain, 62-506. The treatment of the growing cultures by methylheptenone, or ionone, vapors permitted observations of the intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway. On the basis of concentration changes and accumulation in blocked pathways, the sequence of carotenoid formation is postulated as phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, β-zeacarotene, γ-carotene, torulin, a C40 aldehyde, and torularhodin. Torulin and torularhodin were established as the main carotenoids of 62-506. PMID:14240958

  1. Biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    1. Candida pulcherrima was grown on a complex medium to which various compounds had been added to determine their effect on the biosynthesis of pulcherriminic acid. Most of the pulcherriminic acid synthesized by C. pulcherrima PRL2019 was derived from the l-[1-14C]leucine added to the medium. 2. The cyclic dipeptide of l-leucine (cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl) was shown, by trapping experiments involving cycloleucyl-leucyl isomers, to be synthesized by strain PRL2019. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was derived from l-leucine and was converted into pulcherriminic acid. Cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl was a precursor of pulcherriminic acid in strain PRL2007 also. 3. The results supported the hypothesis that pulcherriminic acid is derived from l-leucine and that cyclo-l-leucyl-l-leucyl is an intermediate in the biosynthesis. PMID:5837792

  2. Isotope-Assisted Screening for Iron-Containing Metabolites Reveals a High Degree of Diversity among Known and Unknown Siderophores Produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Sylvia M.; Atanasova, Lea; Neumann, Nora K. N.; Krska, Rudolf; Lemmens, Marc; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2013-01-01

    Due to low iron availability under environmental conditions, many microorganisms excrete iron-chelating agents (siderophores) to cover their iron demands. A novel screening approach for the detection of siderophores using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was developed to study the production of extracellular siderophores of 10 wild-type Trichoderma strains. For annotation of siderophores, an in-house library comprising 422 known microbial siderophores was established. After 96 h of cultivation, 18 different iron chelators were detected. Four of those (dimerum acid, fusigen, coprogen, and ferricrocin) were identified by measuring authentic standards. cis-Fusarinine, fusarinine A and B, and des-diserylglycylferrirhodin were annotated based on high-accuracy mass spectral analysis. In total, at least 10 novel iron-containing metabolites of the hydroxamate type were found. On average Trichoderma spp. produced 12 to 14 siderophores, with 6 common to all species tested. The highest number (15) of siderophores was detected for the most common environmental opportunistic and strongly fungicidic species, Trichoderma harzianum, which, however, did not have any unique compounds. The tropical species T. reesei had the most distinctive pattern, producing one unique siderophore (cis-fusarinine) and three others that were present only in T. harzianum and not in other species. The diversity of siderophores did not directly correlate with the antifungal potential of the species tested. Our data suggest that the high diversity of siderophores produced by Trichoderma spp. might be the result of further modifications of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) products and not due to diverse NRPS-encoding genes. PMID:23064341

  3. The anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes are encoded in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi: a possible evolutionary origin for the pJM1 plasmid–encoded system of Vibrio anguillarum?

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Hiroaki; Actis, Luis A; Crosa, Jorge H

    2013-01-01

    Many Vibrio anguillarum serotype O1 strains carry 65-kb pJM1-type plasmids harboring genes involved in siderophore anguibactin biosynthesis and transport. The anguibactin system is an essential factor for V. anguillarum to survive under iron-limiting conditions, and as a consequence, it is a very important virulence factor of this bacterium. Our comparative analysis of genomic data identified a cluster harboring homologs of anguibactin biosynthesis and transport genes in the chromosome of Vibrio harveyi. We have purified the putative anguibactin siderophore and demonstrated that it is indeed anguibactin by mass spectrometry and specific bioassays. Furthermore, we characterized two genes, angR and fatA, in this chromosome cluster that, respectively, participate in anguibactin biosynthesis and transport as determined by mutagenesis analysis. Furthermore, we found that the V. harveyi FatA protein is located in the outer membrane fractions as previously demonstrated in V. anguillarum. Based on our data, we propose that the anguibactin biosynthesis and transport cluster in the V. anguillarum pJM1 plasmid have likely evolved from the chromosome cluster of V. harveyi or vice versa. PMID:23335587

  4. Biosynthesis of 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-o-methyltyrosine in the saframycin/ safracin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Cheng-Yu; Tang, Man-Cheng; Peng, Chao; Li, Lei; He, Yan-Ling; Liu, Wen; Tang, Gong-Li

    2009-05-01

    The biosynthesis study of antibiotics saframycin (SFM) in Streptomyces lavendulae and safracin (SAC) in Pseudomonas fluorescens demonstrated that 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-Omethyltyrosine (3h5mOmTyr), a nonproteinogenic amino acid, is the precursor of the tetrahydroisoquinoline molecular core. In the biosynthetic gene cluster of SAC/SFM, sacD/ sfmD encodes a protein with high homology to each other but no sequence similarity to other known enzymes; sacF/ sfmM2 and sacG/sfmM3 encode methyltransferases for Cmethylation and O-methylation; and sacE/sfmF encodes a small protein with significant sequence similarity to the MbtH-like proteins, which are frequently found in the biosynthetic pathways of nonribosomal peptide antibiotics and siderophores. To address their function, the biosynthetic cassette of 3h5mOmTyr was heterologously expressed in S. coelicolor and P. putida, and an in-frame deletion and complementation in trans were carried out. The results revealed that (i) SfmD catalyzes the hydroxylation of aromatic rings;(ii) sacD/sacF/sacG in the SAC gene cluster and sfmD/sfmM2/sfmM3 in the SFM cluster are sufficient for the biosynthesis of 3h5mOmTyr; and (iii) the mbtH-like gene is not required for the biosynthesis of the 3h5mOmTyr precursor. PMID:19494690

  5. Characterization of Pyoverdinpss, the Fluorescent Siderophore Produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae†

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Yvonne S.; Gross, Dennis C.

    1987-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B301D produces a yellow-green, fluorescent siderophore, pyoverdinpss, in large quantities under iron-limited growth conditions. Maximum yields of pyoverdinpss of approximately 50 μg/ml occurred after 24 h of incubation in a deferrated synthetic medium. Increasing increments of Fe(III) coordinately repressed siderophore production until repression was complete at concentrations of ≥ 10 μM. Pyoverdinpss was isolated, chemically characterized, and found to resemble previously characterized pyoverdins in spectral traits (absorbance maxima of 365 and 410 nm for pyoverdinpss and its ferric chelate, respectively), size (1,175 molecular weight), and amino acid composition. Nevertheless, pyoverdinpss was structurally unique since amino acid analysis of reductive hydrolysates yielded β-hydroxyaspartic acid, serine, threonine, and lysine in a 2:2:2:1 ratio. Pyoverdinpss exhibited a relatively high affinity constant for Fe(III), with values of 1025 at pH 7.0 and 1032 at pH 10.0. Iron uptake assays with [55Fe]pyoverdinpss demonstrated rapid active uptake of 55Fe(III) by P. syringae pv. syringae B301D, while no uptake was observed for a mutant strain unable to acquire Fe(III) from ferric pyoverdinpss. The chemical and biological properties of pyoverdinpss are discussed in relation to virulence and iron uptake during plant pathogenesis. PMID:16347352

  6. Induction of siderophore activity in Anabaena spp. and its moderation of copper toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, S.E.; Stuart, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.

    1987-05-01

    Growth of Anabaena sp. strain 7120 (in the absence of chelators or added iron) was inhibited by the addition of 2.1 to 6.5 ..mu..M copper and was abolished by copper concentrations of 10 /sup +/M or higher. When the copper was chelated to schizokinen, the toxic effects were eliminated. Analysis of culture filtrates showed that the cupric schizokinen remains in the medium, thereby lowering the amount of copper taken up by the cells. Although this organism actively transports ferric schizokinen, it apparently does not recognize the cupric complex. Thus, Anabaena sp. is protected from copper toxicity under conditions in which siderophore is being produced. For cells grown in low iron, the accumulation of extracellular schizokinen was observed to parallel cell growth and continue well into stationary phase. The actual iron status of the organism was monitored by using iron uptake velocity as an assay. Cultures grown on 0.1 ..mu..M added iron were found to be severely iron limited upon reaching stationary phase, thus explaining the continued production of schizokinen. These data show that the siderophore system in Anabaena spp. has developed primarily as a response to iron starvation and that additional functions such as alleviation of copper toxicity or allelopathic inhibition of other algal species are merely secondary benefits.

  7. Isolation and characterization of siderophore producing antagonistic rhizobacteria against Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Rajesh Kumar; Srivastava, Supriya; Kumar, Sudheer; Kashyap, Prem Lal; Srivastava, Alok K; Arora, Dilip K

    2014-06-01

    Plant protection through siderophore producing rhizobacteria (SPR) has emerged as a sustainable approach for crop health management. In present study, 220 bacteria isolated from tomato rhizosphere were screened for in vitro antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani AG-4. Nine potent antagonistic strains viz., Alcaligenes sp. (MUN1, MB21, and MPF37), Enterobacter sp. (MPM1), Pseudomonas sp. (M10A and MB65), P. aeruginosa (MPF14 and MB123) and P. fluorescens (MPF47) were identified on the basis of physiological characters and 16S rDNA sequencing. These strains were able to produce hydrolytic enzymes, hydrogen cyanide, indole acetic acid, although, only few strains were able to solubilize phosphate. Two strains (MB123 and MPF47) showed significant disease reduction in glasshouse conditions were further evaluated under field conditions using three different application methods. Application of P. fluorescens (MPF47) in nursery as soil mix + seedling root treatments prior to transplantation resulted in significant disease reduction compared to control. Total chlorophyll and available iron were significantly higher in the MPF47 treated plants in contrast to infected control. In conclusion, siderophore producing bacteria MPF47 have strong biocontrol abilities and its application as soil mix + seedling root treatments provided strong shield to plant roots against R. solani and could be used for effective bio-management of pathogen. PMID:23686438

  8. Efficacy of a bacterial siderophore, pyoverdine, to supply iron to Solanum lycopersicum plants.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takeshi; Oobo, Takuro; Aozasa, Osamu

    2013-06-01

    Active uptake of ferric iron in microorganisms is based on siderophores. During iron deficiency, Pseudomonas fluorescens synthesizes siderophores, called pyoverdine, which have a high affinity for ferric iron. Strategy I plants generally cannot synthesize pyoverdine or take up ferric iron. We assessed the effect of pyoverdine chelated to ferric iron on iron nutrition in Solanum lycopersicum. Weight and photosynthetic pigment concentrations in the plants supplemented with the pyoverdine and ferric iron were restored to the rates of plants supplemented with ferrous iron. Leaves and roots accumulated significant iron after pyoverdine and ferric iron supplementation than when supplemented with ferric iron alone. When leaves and roots were supplemented with pyoverdine and ferric iron, the SlFRO1 expression level was suppressed to 20% and 50% relative to those decreased with ferric iron alone, respectively. The level of SlIRT1 in roots supplemented with pyoverdine and ferric iron decreased to 50% compared with the level in roots supplemented with ferric iron alone. These results suggest that SlFRO1 and SlIRT1 expression levels were suppressed and that iron content was restored by pyoverdine and ferric iron supplementation. Thus, the downregulation may have occurred because of negative feedback on mRNA expression. Pyoverdine-mediated ferric iron uptake by tomato is suggested to be a useful strategy to increase iron uptake from the environment. PMID:23332821

  9. Possible role of bacterial siderophores in inflammation. Iron bound to the Pseudomonas siderophore pyochelin can function as a hydroxyl radical catalyst.

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, T J; Cox, C D; Edeker, B L; Britigan, B E

    1990-01-01

    Tissue injury has been linked to neutrophil associated hydroxyl radical (.OH) generation, a process that requires an exogenous transition metal catalyst such as iron. In vivo most iron is bound in a noncatalytic form. To obtain iron required for growth, many bacteria secrete iron chelators (siderophores). Since Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are associated with considerable tissue destruction, we examined whether iron bound to the Pseudomonas siderophores pyochelin (PCH) and pyoverdin (PVD) could act as .OH catalysts. Purified PCH and PVD were iron loaded (Fe-PCH, Fe-PVD) and added to a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase superoxide- (.O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-generating system. Evidence for .OH generation was then sought using two different spin-trapping agents (5.5 dimethyl-pyrroline-1-oxide or N-t-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone), as well as the deoxyribose oxidation assay. Regardless of methodology, .OH generation was detected in the presence of Fe-PCH but not Fe-PVD. Inhibition of the process by catalase and/or SOD suggested .OH formation with Fe-PCH occurred via the Haber-Weiss reaction. Similar results were obtained when stimulated neutrophils were used as the source of .O2- and H2O2. Addition of Fe-PCH but not Fe-PVD to stimulated neutrophils yielded .OH as detected by the above assay systems. Since PCH and PVD bind ferric (Fe3+) but not ferrous (Fe2+) iron, .OH catalysis with Fe-PCH would likely involve .O2(-)-mediated reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ with subsequent release of "free" Fe2+. This was confirmed by measuring formation of the Fe2(+)-ferrozine complex after exposure of Fe-PCH, but not Fe-PVD, to enzymatically generated .O2-. These data show that Fe-PCH, but not Fe-PVD, is capable of catalyzing generation of .OH. Such a process could represent as yet another mechanism of tissue injury at sites of infection with P. aeruginosa. PMID:2170442

  10. THE APPLICATION OF SIDEROPHORES FOR METAL RECOVERY AND WASTE REMEDIATION: EXAMINATION OF CORRELATIONS FOR PREDICTION OF METAL AFFINITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The naturally occurring metal-chelating compounds known as siderophores may be useful in environmental applications but limited metal specificity data is available for this class of compounds. Correlations that predict ligand-metal affinity versus mtal ion charge density and hyd...

  11. Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 produces enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Youard, Zeb A; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Majcherczyk, Paul A; Schalk, Isabelle J; Reimmann, Cornelia

    2007-12-01

    The siderophore pyochelin is made by a thiotemplate mechanism from salicylate and two molecules of cysteine. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first cysteine residue is converted to its D-isoform during thiazoline ring formation whereas the second cysteine remains in its L-configuration, thus determining the stereochemistry of the two interconvertible pyochelin diastereoisomers as 4'R, 2''R, 4''R (pyochelin I) and 4'R, 2''S, 4''R (pyochelin II). Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 was found to make a different stereoisomeric mixture, which promoted growth under iron limitation in strain CHA0 and induced the expression of its biosynthetic genes, but was not recognized as a siderophore and signaling molecule by P. aeruginosa. Reciprocally, pyochelin promoted growth and induced pyochelin gene expression in P. aeruginosa, but was not functional in P. fluorescens. The structure of the CHA0 siderophore was determined by mass spectrometry, thin-layer chromatography, NMR, polarimetry, and chiral HPLC as enantio-pyochelin, the optical antipode of the P. aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin. Enantio-pyochelin was chemically synthesized and confirmed to be active in CHA0. Its potential biosynthetic pathway in CHA0 is discussed. PMID:17938167

  12. n-Alkylboronic acid inhibitors reveal determinants of ligand specificity in the quorum-quenching and siderophore biosynthetic enzyme PvdQ.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Kenneth D; Wu, Rui; Liu, Dali; Fast, Walter

    2014-10-28

    The enzyme PvdQ (E.C. 3.5.1.97) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase that catalyzes the removal of an N-myristyl substituent from a biosynthetic precursor of the iron-chelating siderophore pyoverdine. Inhibitors of pyoverdine biosynthesis are potential antibiotics since iron is essential for growth and scarce in most infections. PvdQ also catalyzes hydrolytic amide bond cleavage of selected N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals used by some Gram-negative pathogens to coordinate the transcription of virulence factors. The resulting quorum-quenching activity of PvdQ has potential applications in antivirulence therapies. To inform both inhibitor design and enzyme engineering efforts, a series of n-alkylboronic acid inhibitors of PvdQ was characterized to reveal determinants of ligand selectivity. A simple homologation series results in compounds with Ki values that span from 4.7 mM to 190 pM, with a dependence of ΔGbind values on chain length of -1.0 kcal/mol/CH2. X-ray crystal structures are determined for the PvdQ complexes with 1-ethyl-, 1-butyl-, 1-hexyl-, and 1-octylboronic acids at 1.6, 1.8, 2.0, and 2.1 Å resolution, respectively. The 1-hexyl- and 1-octylboronic acids form tetrahedral adducts with the active-site N-terminal Ser217 in the β-subunit of PvdQ, and the n-alkyl substituents are bound in the acyl-group binding site. The 1-ethyl- and 1-butylboronic acids also form adducts with Ser217 but instead form trigonal planar adducts and extend their n-alkyl substituents into an alternative binding site. These results are interpreted to propose a ligand discrimination model for PvdQ that informs the development of PvdQ-related tools and therapeutics. PMID:25290020

  13. Catecholate-siderophore produced by As-resistant bacterium effectively dissolved FeAsO4 and promoted Pteris vittata growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Yang, Guang-Mei; Guan, Dong-Xing; Ghosh, Piyasa; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    The impact of siderophore produced by arsenic-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas PG12 on FeAsO4 dissolution and plant growth were examined. Arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata was grown for 7 d in 0.2-strength Fe-free Hoagland solution containing FeAsO4 mineral and PG12-siderophore or fungal-siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Standard siderophore assays indicated that PG12-siderophore was catecholate-type. PG12-siderophore was more effective in promoting FeAsO4 dissolution, and Fe and As plant uptake than DFOB. Media soluble Fe and As in PG12 treatment were 34.6 and 3.07 μM, 1.6- and 1.4-fold of that in DFOB. Plant Fe content increased from 2.93 to 6.24 g kg(-1) in the roots and As content increased from 14.3 to 78.5 mg kg(-1) in the fronds. Besides, P. vittata in PG12 treatment showed 2.6-times greater biomass than DFOB. While P. vittata fronds in PG12 treatment were dominated by AsIII, those in DFOB treatment were dominated by AsV (61-77%). This study showed that siderophore-producing arsenic-resistant rhizobacteria may have potential in enhancing phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils. PMID:26247380

  14. Increased iron-stress resilience of maize through inoculation of siderophore-producing Arthrobacter globiformis from mine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Meenakshi; Mishra, Vandana; Rau, Nupur; Sharma, Radhey Shyam

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is common among graminaceous crops. Ecologically successful wild grasses from iron-limiting habitats are likely to harbour bacteria which secrete efficient high-affinity iron-chelating molecules (siderophores) to solubilize and mobilize iron. Such siderophore-producing rhizobacteria may increase the iron-stress resilience of graminaceous crops. Considering this, 51 rhizobacterial isolates of Dichanthium annulatum from iron-limiting abandoned mine (∼84% biologically unavailable iron) were purified and tested for siderophore production; and efficacy of Arthrobacter globiformis inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience of maize and wheat was also evaluated. 16S rRNA sequence analyses demonstrated that siderophore-producing bacteria were taxonomically diverse (seven genera, nineteen species). Among these, Gram-positive Bacillus (eleven species) was prevalent (76.92%). A. globiformis, a commonly found rhizobacterium of graminaceous crops was investigated in detail. Its siderophore has high iron-chelation capacity (ICC: 13.0 ± 2.4 μM) and effectively dissolutes diverse iron-complexes (FeCl3 : 256.13 ± 26.56 μM/ml; Fe2 O3 red: 84.3 ± 4.74 μM/ml; mine spoil: 123.84 ± 4.38 μM/ml). Siderophore production (ICC) of A. globiformis BGDa404 also varied with supplementation of different iron complexes. In plant bioassay with iron-deficiency sensitive species maize, A. globiformis inoculation triggered stress-associated traits (peroxidase and proline) in roots, enhanced plant biomass, uptake of iron and phosphate, and protein and chlorophyll contents. However, in iron deficiency tolerant species wheat, growth improvement was marginal. The present study illustrates: (i) rhizosphere of D. annulatum colonizing abandoned mine as a "hotspot" of siderophore-producing bacteria; and (ii) potential of A. globiformis BGDa404 inoculation to increase iron-stress resilience in maize. A. globiformis BGDa404 has the potential to develop as

  15. Inner-membrane transporters for the siderophores pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enantio-pyochelin in Pseudomonas fluorescens display different enantioselectivities.

    PubMed

    Reimmann, Cornelia

    2012-05-01

    Iron uptake and transcriptional regulation by the enantiomeric siderophores pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, are stereospecific processes. The iron-loaded forms of Pch (ferriPch) and of EPch (ferriEPch) are recognized stereospecifically (i) at the outer membrane by the siderophore receptors FptA in P. aeruginosa and FetA in P. fluorescens and (ii) in the cytoplasm by the two AraC-type regulators PchR, which are activated by their cognate siderophore. Here, stereospecific siderophore recognition is shown to occur at the inner membrane also. In P. aeruginosa, translocation of ferriPch across the inner membrane is carried out by the single-subunit siderophore transporter FptX. In contrast, the uptake of ferriEPch into the cytoplasm of P. fluorescens was found to involve a classical periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporter (FetCDE), which is encoded by the fetABCDEF operon. Expression of a translational fetA-gfp fusion was repressed by ferric ions, and activated by the cognate siderophore bound to PchR, thus resembling the analogous regulation of the P. aeruginosa ferriPch transport operon fptABCX. The inner-membrane transporters FetCDE and FptX were expressed in combination with either of the two siderophore receptors FetA and FptA in a siderophore-negative P. aeruginosa mutant deleted for the fptABCX operon. Growth tests conducted under iron limitation with ferriPch or ferriEPch as the iron source revealed that FptX was able to transport ferriPch as well as ferriEPch, whereas FetCDE specifically transported ferriEPch. Thus, stereospecific siderophore recognition occurs at the inner membrane by the FetCDE transporter. PMID:22343350

  16. Inner-membrane transporters for the siderophores pyochelin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enantio-pyochelin in Pseudomonas fluorescens display different enantioselectivities.

    PubMed

    Reimmann, Cornelia

    2012-05-01

    Iron uptake and transcriptional regulation by the enantiomeric siderophores pyochelin (Pch) and enantio-pyochelin (EPch) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens, respectively, are stereospecific processes. The iron-loaded forms of Pch (ferriPch) and of EPch (ferriEPch) are recognized stereospecifically (i) at the outer membrane by the siderophore receptors FptA in P. aeruginosa and FetA in P. fluorescens and (ii) in the cytoplasm by the two AraC-type regulators PchR, which are activated by their cognate siderophore. Here, stereospecific siderophore recognition is shown to occur at the inner membrane also. In P. aeruginosa, translocation of ferriPch across the inner membrane is carried out by the single-subunit siderophore transporter FptX. In contrast, the uptake of ferriEPch into the cytoplasm of P. fluorescens was found to involve a classical periplasmic binding protein-dependent ABC transporter (FetCDE), which is encoded by the fetABCDEF operon. Expression of a translational fetA-gfp fusion was repressed by ferric ions, and activated by the cognate siderophore bound to PchR, thus resembling the analogous regulation of the P. aeruginosa ferriPch transport operon fptABCX. The inner-membrane transporters FetCDE and FptX were expressed in combination with either of the two siderophore receptors FetA and FptA in a siderophore-negative P. aeruginosa mutant deleted for the fptABCX operon. Growth tests conducted under iron limitation with ferriPch or ferriEPch as the iron source revealed that FptX was able to transport ferriPch as well as ferriEPch, whereas FetCDE specifically transported ferriEPch. Thus, stereospecific siderophore recognition occurs at the inner membrane by the FetCDE transporter.

  17. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry.

    PubMed

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  18. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Dissolution from Nontronites Is Controlled by Mineral Cristallochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Parrello, Damien; Zegeye, Asfaw; Mustin, Christian; Billard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria living in oxic environments experience iron deficiency due to limited solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of iron-bearing minerals. To cope with iron deprivation, aerobic bacteria have evolved various strategies, including release of siderophores or other organic acids that scavenge external Fe(III) and deliver it to the cells. This research investigated the role of siderophores produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the acquisition of Fe(III) from two iron-bearing colloidal nontronites (NAu-1 and NAu-2), comparing differences in bioavailability related with site occupancy and distribution of Fe(III) in the two lattices. To avoid both the direct contact of the mineral colloids with the bacterial cells and the uncontrolled particle aggregation, nontronite suspensions were homogenously dispersed in a porous silica gel before the dissolution experiments. A multiparametric approach coupling UV-vis spectroscopy and spectral decomposition algorithm was implemented to monitor simultaneously the solubilisation of Fe and the production of pyoverdine in microplate-based batch experiments. Both nontronites released Fe in a particle concentration-dependent manner when incubated with the wild-type P. aeruginosa strain, however iron released from NAu-2 was substantially greater than from NAu-1. The profile of organic acids produced in both cases was similar and may not account for the difference in the iron dissolution efficiency. In contrast, a pyoverdine-deficient mutant was unable to mobilize Fe(III) from either nontronite, whereas iron dissolution occurred in abiotic experiments conducted with purified pyoverdine. Overall, our data provide evidence that P. aeruginosa indirectly mobilize Fe from nontronites primarily through the production of pyoverdine. The structural Fe present on the edges of NAu-2 rather than NAu-1 particles appears to be more bio-accessible, indicating that the distribution of Fe, in the tetrahedron and/or in the octahedron sites, governs

  19. Siderophores, the answer for micro to nanosized asbestos fibre related health hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Shabori; Ledwani, Lalita; John, P. J.

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies on the potential toxicity of High Aspect Ratio Nanoparticles (HARN) has yet once again reinforced the health hazard imposed by asbestos fibres ranging from nano to micro size. Asbestos a naturally occurring fibrous mineral declared a Group I definite carcinogen by IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer), a unit of WHO in the year 1987, has been extensively used since World War II to the near past for various commercial products. According to the most recent World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, asbestos-related diseases, resulting from exposure at workplace claims more than 107000 lives every year worldwide. The various types of toxic effects induced by asbestos in humans include - i) inflammation and fibrogenesis of lung, ii) mesothelioma iii) asbestosis and iv) bronchogenic carcinoma. The stability of asbestos in natural environment and its biological aggressiveness is related to their fibrous structure and dimensions. The actual risk associated with the exposure to nanosized asbestos, which is still unknown and escapes most regulations worldwide, has been shown in various toxicity assessment studies conducted on various animal models.In an effort to reduce the size of asbestos and therby its toxicity by limiting its biopersistence, oxalic acid treatment of asbestos coupled to power ultrasound treatment was carried out. The nanosized particles formed were still found to retain their hazardous effect. Similar were the results obtained on strong acid treatment of asbestos as well. A probable solution to the asbestos toxicity problem therefore envisaged was bioremediation. This involved the secretion of iron chelating molecules termed siderophores by microbes, which are of significance due to their ability to form very stable and soluble complexes with iron. Iron in asbestos composition is a major factor responsible for its carcinogenicity, removal or extraction of which would prove to be an effective answer to the worldwide problem

  20. Acquisition of Fe from Natural Organic Matter by an Aerobic Pseudomonas Bacterium: Siderophores and Cellular Fe Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, K.; Dehner, C.; Dubois, J.; Maurice, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Aerobic microorganisms have evolved various strategies to acquire nutrient Fe, including release of Fe-chelating siderophores. The potential importance of siderophores in Fe acquisition from natural organic matter (NOM) (reverse osmosis, RO; and XAD-8 samples with naturally associated Fe) was investigated using a wild type strain (WT) of aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina that produces siderophore(s) and an engineered mutant that cannot. Microbial growth under Fe-limited batch conditions was monitored via optical density, and a β-galactosidase biosensor assay was used to quantify cellular Fe status. Both WT and mutant strains acquired Fe from NOM. Fe ‘stress’ in the presence of the RO sample decreased with increasing [Fe] (as determined by different [DOC]s) and was consistently less for the WT. For both WT and mutant, maximum growth in the presence of RO sample increased as: 1 mgC/L (0.2μM Fe) < 100 mgC/L (20μM Fe) < 10 mgC/L (2μM Fe). Comparison of XAD-8 and RO samples ([DOC] varied to give 2μM [Fe]total for each), showed that although there were no apparent differences in internal Fe status, growth was better on the XAD-8 sample. Chelex treatment to partially remove metals associated with the RO sample increased Fe stress but did not substantially affect growth. Results demonstrated that: (1) siderophores are useful but not necessary for Fe acquisition from NOM by P. mendocina and (2) NOM may have complex effects on microbial growth, related not just to Fe content but potentially to the presence of other (trace)metals such as Al and/or to effects on biofilm development.

  1. Proteomics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1) cultured under conditions mimicking the cystic fibrosis lung reveals increased iron acquisition via the siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed

    Hare, Nathan J; Soe, Cho Zin; Rose, Barbara; Harbour, Colin; Codd, Rachel; Manos, Jim; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). While most CF patients are thought to acquire P. aeruginosa from the environment, person-to-person transmissible strains have been identified in CF clinics worldwide, and the molecular basis for transmissibility remains poorly understood. We undertook a complementary proteomics approach to characterize protein profiles from a transmissible, acute isolate of the Australian epidemic strain 1 (AES-1R), the virulent burns/wound isolate PA14, and the poorly virulent, laboratory-associated strain PAO1 when grown in an artificial medium that mimics the CF lung environment compared to growth in standard laboratory medium. Proteins elevated in abundance in AES-1R included those involved in methionine and S-adenosylmethionine biosynthesis and in the synthesis of phenazines. Proteomic data were validated by measuring culture supernatant levels of the virulence factor pyocyanin, which is the final product of the phenazine pathway. AES-1R and PAO1 released higher extracellular levels of pyocyanin compared to PA14 when grown in conditions that mimic the CF lung. Proteins associated with biosynthesis of the iron-scavenging siderophore pyochelin (PchDEFGH and FptA) were also present at elevated abundance in AES-1R and at much higher levels than in PAO1, whereas they were reduced in PA14. These protein changes resulted phenotypically in increased extracellular iron acquisition potential and, specifically, elevated pyochelin levels in AES-1R culture supernatants as detected by chrome azurol-S assay and fluorometry, respectively. Transcript analysis of pyochelin genes (pchDFG and fptA) showed they were highly expressed during the early stage of growth in artificial sputum medium (18 h) but returned to basal levels following the establishment of microcolony growth (72 h) consistent with that observed in the CF lung. This provides further

  2. Siderophore Promoted Dissolution of a Series of Mn-Substituted Goethites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstrom, S. J.; Sposito, G.

    2005-12-01

    The presence of organic ligands, like siderophores, can strongly influence mineral dissolution. Recent research suggests that at least some siderophores enhance mineral dissolution by formation of surface complexes with Fe and Mn. The impact of biogeochemical weathering caused by exudates of plants, fungi and bacteria containing siderophores has been discussed. We have studied the dissolution kinetics of Mn-substituted goethites (mol % Mn < 11) in the presences of 80 μM desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), a common and well-studied hydroxamate siderophore that has been identified in both terrestrial and marine environments and which forms very stable 1:1 complexes with Fe(III) or Mn(III). (The stability constants at I = 0.1 are 1030.6 and 1028.3, respectively.) A series of Mn-substituted goethites (α-MnxFe1-xOOH) were synthesized from ferrihydrite in the presence of Mn(II) in alkaline media. The Fe(III) in octahedral positions in the mineral structure was partially replaced by Mn, which was confirmed visually by the change to darker color when the content of Mn increased and proved by infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of the samples. Substitution of Fe in the goethite by Mn caused a change in the cell dimensions. The calculated unit cell edge lengths a and c decreased, while b increased, for the Mn-goethites compared to pure goethite. The difference of the unit cell parameters between the pure goethite and the Mn-substituted goethites increased with increased Mn content, providing further confirmation that Fe had been substituted by Mn incorporated into the goethite structure. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy analysis of the Mn-substituted goethites showed that the oxidation state of Mn in the samples was, as expected, Mn(III), even when Mn-goethites were prepared from Mn(II) solutions. Both SEM and TEM micrographs showed that the Mn-substituted goethite crystals had the same acicular shape as pure goethite. The specific surface area

  3. Mitophagy confers resistance to siderophore-mediated killing by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ruvkun, Gary

    2015-02-10

    In the arms race of bacterial pathogenesis, bacteria produce an array of toxins and virulence factors that disrupt core host processes. Hosts mitigate the ensuing damage by responding with immune countermeasures. The iron-binding siderophore pyoverdin is a key virulence mediator of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but its pathogenic mechanism has not been established. Here we demonstrate that pyoverdin enters Caenorhabditis elegans and that it is sufficient to mediate host killing. Moreover, we show that iron chelation disrupts mitochondrial homeostasis and triggers mitophagy both in C. elegans and mammalian cells. Finally, we show that mitophagy provides protection both against the extracellular pathogen P. aeruginosa and to treatment with a xenobiotic chelator, phenanthroline, in C. elegans. Although autophagic machinery has been shown to target intracellular bacteria for degradation (a process known as xenophagy), our report establishes a role for authentic mitochondrial autophagy in the innate immune defense against P. aeruginosa. PMID:25624506

  4. Siderophore typing, a powerful tool for the identification of fluorescent and nonfluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jean-Marie; Geoffroy, Valérie A; Baida, Nader; Gardan, Louis; Izard, Daniel; Lemanceau, Philippe; Achouak, Wafa; Palleroni, Norberto J

    2002-06-01

    A total of 301 strains of fluorescent pseudomonads previously characterized by conventional phenotypic and/or genomic taxonomic methods were analyzed through siderotyping, i.e., by the isoelectrophoretic characterization of their main siderophores and pyoverdines and determination of the pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake specificity of the strains. As a general rule, strains within a well-circumscribed taxonomic group, namely the species Pseudomonas brassicacearum, Pseudomonas fuscovaginae, Pseudomonas jessenii, Pseudomonas mandelii, Pseudomonas monteilii, "Pseudomonas mosselii," "Pseudomonas palleronii," Pseudomonas rhodesiae, "Pseudomonas salomonii," Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas thivervalensis, Pseudomonas tolaasii, and Pseudomonas veronii and the genomospecies FP1, FP2, and FP3 produced an identical pyoverdine which, in addition, was characteristic of the group, since it was structurally different from the pyoverdines produced by the other groups. In contrast, 28 strains belonging to the notoriously heterogeneous Pseudomonas fluorescens species were characterized by great heterogeneity at the pyoverdine level. The study of 23 partially characterized phenotypic clusters demonstrated that siderotyping is very useful in suggesting correlations between clusters and well-defined species and in detecting misclassified individual strains, as verified by DNA-DNA hybridization. The usefulness of siderotyping as a determinative tool was extended to the nonfluorescent species Pseudomonas corrugata, Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis, Pseudomonas graminis, and Pseudomonas plecoglossicida, which were seen to have an identical species-specific siderophore system and thus were easily differentiated from one another. Thus, the fast, accurate, and easy-to-perform siderotyping method compares favorably with the usual phenotypic and genomic methods presently necessary for accurate identification of pseudomonads at the species level. PMID:12039729

  5. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2012-02-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by {beta}-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed {beta}-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs.

  6. Thermospectroscopic study of the adsorption mechanism of the hydroxamic siderophore ferrioxamine B by calcium montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Siebner-Freibach, Hagar; Hadar, Yitzhak; Yariv, Shmuel; Lapides, Isaak; Chen, Yona

    2006-02-22

    The behavior of iron-chelating agents in soils is highly affected by interactions with the solid phase. Still this aspect is frequently ignored. In this research the adsorption of the siderophore ferrioxamine B by Ca-montmorillonite, as a free ligand (desferrioxamine B, DFOB) and as a complex with Fe3+ (ferrioxamine B, FOB), was studied, using thermo X-ray diffraction (thermo-XRD) in the temperature range 25-360 degrees C and thermo-FTIR spectroscopy in the temperature range 25-170 degrees C. The effect of pH (4-7.5) on the adsorption was examined. Extensive use of curve-fitting analysis was required due to significant overlapping of the characteristic absorption bands of the various functional groups. Thermo-XRD analysis showed that both DFOB and FOB penetrated into the interlayer space of Ca-montmorillonite. FTIR results indicated strong interactions of DFOB within the interlayer, which involved all functional groups (NH3+, secondary amide groups, and hydroxamate groups). In contrast, the folded Fe complex of FOB retained its molecular configuration upon adsorption, and the basal spacing of the clay increased correspondingly. FOB interacted in the interlayer space of the clay, mainly through the NH of the secondary amide groups and NH3+, while the functional groups bound to the central Fe cation remained unchanged. The suspension pH had no significant effect on both DFOB and FOB adsorption at the examined range. Adsorption protected the adsorbates from thermal degradation compared to the nonadsorbed samples up to 105 degrees C. At 170 degrees C both DFOB and FOB were already partially degraded, but to a lesser extent than the nonadsorbed samples. Degradation of the molecules occurred mainly through the hydroxamic groups, which constitute the Fe-chelating center in the hydroxamic siderophore. PMID:16478266

  7. Structural basis for effectiveness of siderophore-conjugated monocarbams against clinically relevant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seungil; Zaniewski, Richard P.; Marr, Eric S.; Lacey, Brian M.; Tomaras, Andrew P.; Evdokimov, Artem; Miller, J. Richard; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that causes nosocomial infections for which there are limited treatment options. Penicillin-binding protein PBP3, a key therapeutic target, is an essential enzyme responsible for the final steps of peptidoglycan synthesis and is covalently inactivated by β-lactam antibiotics. Here we disclose the first high resolution cocrystal structures of the P. aeruginosa PBP3 with both novel and marketed β-lactams. These structures reveal a conformational rearrangement of Tyr532 and Phe533 and a ligand-induced conformational change of Tyr409 and Arg489. The well-known affinity of the monobactam aztreonam for P. aeruginosa PBP3 is due to a distinct hydrophobic aromatic wall composed of Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 interacting with the gem-dimethyl group. The structure of MC-1, a new siderophore-conjugated monocarbam complexed with PBP3 provides molecular insights for lead optimization. Importantly, we have identified a novel conformation that is distinct to the high-molecular-weight class B PBP subfamily, which is identifiable by common features such as a hydrophobic aromatic wall formed by Tyr503, Tyr532, and Phe533 and the structural flexibility of Tyr409 flanked by two glycine residues. This is also the first example of a siderophore-conjugated triazolone-linked monocarbam complexed with any PBP. Energetic analysis of tightly and loosely held computed hydration sites indicates protein desolvation effects contribute significantly to PBP3 binding, and analysis of hydration site energies allows rank ordering of the second-order acylation rate constants. Taken together, these structural, biochemical, and computational studies provide a molecular basis for recognition of P. aeruginosa PBP3 and open avenues for future design of inhibitors of this class of PBPs. PMID:21135211

  8. Fusarinine C, a novel siderophore-based bifunctional chelator for radiolabeling with Gallium-68.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chuangyan; Summer, Dominik; Rangger, Christine; Haas, Hubertus; Haubner, Roland; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2015-05-15

    Fusarinine C (FSC), a siderophore-based chelator coupled with the model peptide c(RGDfK) (FSC(succ-RGD)3), revealed excellent targeting properties in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET). Here, we report the details of radiolabeling conditions and specific activity as well as selectivity for (68)Ga. (68)Ga labeling of FSC(succ-RGD)3 was optimized regarding peptide concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and buffer system. Specific activity (SA) of [(68)Ga]FSC(succ-RGD)3 was compared with (68)Ga-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, 1-glutaric acid-4,7 acetic acid RGD ([(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD). Stability was evaluated in 1000-fold ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution (pH 7) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Metal competition tests (Fe, Cu, Zn, Al, and Ni) were carried out using [(68)Ga]-triacetylfusarinine C. High radiochemical yield was achieved within 5 min at room temperature, in particular allowing labeling with (68)Ga up to pH 8 with excellent stability in 1000-fold EDTA solution and PBS. The 10-fold to 20-fold lower concentrations of FSC(succ-RGD)3 led to the same radiochemical yield compared with [(68)Ga]NODAGA-RGD with SA up to 1.8 TBq/µmol. Metal competition tests showed high selective binding of (68)Ga to FSC. FSC is a multivalent siderophore-based bifunctional chelator allowing fast and highly selective labeling with (68)Ga in a wide pH range and results in stable complexes with high SA. Thus it is exceptionally well suited for the development of new (68)Ga-tracers for in vivo molecular imaging with PET. PMID:25874571

  9. Methionine Biosynthesis in Lemna

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Gregory A.; Datko, Anne H.; Mudd, S. Harvey; Giovanelli, John

    1982-01-01

    Regulation of enzymes of methionine biosynthesis was investigated by measuring the specific activities of O-phosphohomoserine-dependent cystathionine γ-synthase, O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase, and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase in Lemna paucicostata Hegelm. 6746 grown under various conditions. For cystathionine γ-synthase, it was observed that (a) adding external methionine (2 μm) decreased specific activity to 15% of control, (b) blocking methionine synthesis with 0.05 μml-aminoethoxyvinylglycine or with 36 μm lysine plus 4 μm threonine (Datko, Mudd 1981 Plant Physiol 69: 1070-1076) caused a 2- to 3-fold increase in specific activity, and (c) blocking methionine synthesis and adding external methionine led to the decreased specific activity characteristic of methionine addition alone. Activity in extracts from control cultures was unaffected by addition of methionine, lysine, threonine, lysine plus threonine, S-adenosylmethionine, or S-methylmethionine sulfonium to the assay mixture. Parallel studies of O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase showed that O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase activity responded to growth conditions identically to cystathionine γ-synthase activity, whereas O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase activity remained unaffected. Lemna extracts did not catalyze lanthionine formation from O-acetylserine and cysteine. Estimates of kinetic constants for the three enzyme activities indicate that O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase has much higher activity and affinity for sulfide than O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase. The results suggest that (a) methionine, or one of its products, regulates the amount of active cystathionine γ-synthase in Lemna, (b) O-phosphohomoserine sulfhydrylase and cystathionine γ-synthase are probably activities of one enzyme that has low specificity for its sulfur-containing substrate, and (c) O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase is a separate enzyme. The relatively high activity and affinity for sulfide of

  10. Biosynthesis of methanopterin

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.H. )

    1990-06-05

    The biosynthetic pathway for the generation of the methylated pterin in methanopterins was determined for the methanogenic bacteria Methanococcus volta and Methanobacterium formicicum. Extracts of M. volta were found to readily cleave L-7,8-dihydroneopterin to 7,8-dihydro-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which was confirmed to be a precursor of the pterin portion of the methanopterin. (methylene{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin was incorporated into methanopterin by growing cells of M. volta to an extent of 30%. Both the C-11 and C-12 methyl groups of methanopterin originate from (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})methionine. Cells grown in the presence of (methylene-{sup 2}H)-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)pterin, (methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methylpterin, (ethyl-{sup 2}H{sub 4}, methyl-{sup 2}H{sub 3})-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin, and (1-ethyl-{sup 3}H)-6-(1 (RS)-hydroxyethyl)-7-methylpterin showed that only the non-7-methylated pterins were incorporated into methanopterin. Cells extracts of M. formicicum readily condensed synthetic (methylene-{sup 3}H)-7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin-PP with methaniline to generate demethylated methanopterin, which is then methylated to methanopterin by the cell extract in the presence of S-adenosylmethionine. These observations indicate that the pterin portion of methanopterin is biosynthetically derived from 7,8-H{sub 2}-6-(hydroxymethyl)pterin, which is coupled to methaniline by a pathway analogous to the biosynthesis of folic acid. This pathway for the biosynthesis of methanopterin represents the first example of the modification of the specificity of a coenzyme through a methylation reaction.

  11. RNA-seq Analysis Reveals That an ECF σ Factor, AcsS, Regulates Achromobactin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Jessica W.; Greenwald, Charles J.; Philmus, Benjamin J.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Gross, Dennis C.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a and many other microorganisms; therefore, B728a has evolved methods of iron acquirement including the use of iron-chelating siderophores. In this study an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, AcsS, encoded within the achromobactin gene cluster is shown to be a major regulator of genes involved in the biosynthesis and secretion of this siderophore. However, production of achromobactin was not completely abrogated in the deletion mutant, implying that other regulators may be involved such as PvdS, the sigma factor that regulates pyoverdine biosynthesis. RNA-seq analysis identified 287 genes that are differentially expressed between the AcsS deletion mutant and the wild type strain. These genes are involved in iron response, secretion, extracellular polysaccharide production, and cell motility. Thus, the transcriptome analysis supports a role for AcsS in the regulation of achromobactin production and the potential activity of both AcsS and achromobactin in the plant-associated lifestyle of strain B728a. PMID:22529937

  12. Siderophore-mediated iron transport correlates with the presence of specific iron-regulated proteins in the outer membrane of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed Central

    Reigh, G; O'Connell, M

    1993-01-01

    A universal chemical assay used to detect the production of siderophores in a range of Rhizobium strains showed that production is strain specific. Iron nutrition bioassays carried out on Rhizobium meliloti strains to determine cross-utilization of their siderophores showed that R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 could each use the siderophores produced by the other two but not the siderophore produced by R. meliloti DM4 (and vice versa). Mutants of R. meliloti 2011 and 220-5 defective in siderophore production were isolated by Tn5-mob mutagenesis. The Tn5-mob-containing EcoRI fragment of mutant R. meliloti 220-5-1 was cloned into pUC19. By using this fragment as a probe, the presence of a homologous region was observed in R. meliloti 2011 and 220-3 but not in R. meliloti DM4. A complementing cosmid from a gene bank of R. meliloti 2011 was identified by using the same probe. Introduction of this cosmid into R. meliloti 102F34, a strain not producing a siderophore, resulted in the ability of this strain to produce a siderophore and also in the ability to utilize the siderophores produced by R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 but not the siderophore produced by R. meliloti DM4. A comparative analysis of the outer membrane proteins prepared from iron-deficient cultures of R. meliloti 102F34 and 102F34 harboring the cosmid revealed the presence, in the latter, of a low-iron-induced outer membrane protein corresponding to a low-iron-induced protein in R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3. This protein is not present in R. meliloti DM4. The results suggest that R. meliloti 2011, 220-5, and 220-3 produce siderophores that are identical or sufficiently similar in structure to be transported by the membrane transport system of each strain while also indicating that utilization of a particular siderophore is correlated with the presence of specific outer membrane proteins. Images PMID:8416915

  13. Diverse inhibitors of aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Robert A; Boston, Rebecca S; Payne, Gary A

    2008-03-01

    Pre-harvest and post-harvest contamination of maize, peanuts, cotton, and tree nuts by members of the genus Aspergillus and subsequent contamination with the mycotoxin aflatoxin pose a widespread food safety problem for which effective and inexpensive control strategies are lacking. Since the discovery of aflatoxin as a potently carcinogenic food contaminant, extensive research has been focused on identifying compounds that inhibit its biosynthesis. Numerous diverse compounds and extracts containing activity inhibitory to aflatoxin biosynthesis have been reported. Only recently, however, have tools been available to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which these inhibitors affect aflatoxin biosynthesis. Many inhibitors are plant-derived and a few may be amenable to pathway engineering for tissue-specific expression in susceptible host plants as a defense against aflatoxin contamination. Other compounds show promise as protectants during crop storage. Finally, inhibitors with different modes of action could be used in comparative transcriptional and metabolomic profiling experiments to identify regulatory networks controlling aflatoxin biosynthesis.

  14. Cross-utilization and expression of outer membrane receptor proteins for siderophore uptake by Diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Indiragandhi, Pandiyan; Anandham, Rangasamy; Madhaiyan, Munusamy; Kim, Gil-Hah; Sa, Tongmin

    2008-12-01

    Siderophore production by entomo- and phytopathogens, plus the cross-utilization of these siderophores and expression of outer membrane receptor proteins (OMRPs) by Diamondback moth (DBM) gut bacterial strains, were all examined. All the tested strains grew in the presence of 2, 2'-dipyridyl, and the Brachybacterium sp. PSGB10, Pseudomonas sp. PRGB06, and Serratia marcescens FLGB16 strains were found to cross-utilize the siderophores of various entomopathogens, including Bacillus thuringiensis. A sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis also showed the presence of the OMRPs responsible for the siderophore cross-utilization. In contrast, Stenotrophomonas sp. PRGB08 was unable to cross-utilize siderophores and did not express OMRPs. Thus, siderophore cross-utilization and OMRP expression by the DBM gut bacterial strains would seem to support the potential for microbial populations in the insect gut to evolve efficient mechanisms to overcome any iron limitation imposed by the host insect and eventually contribute to the defense mechanism of the host insect. Furthermore, it is important to consider that other biologically active metabolites produced by insect gut microorganisms may also confer a protective effect on a host insect species.

  15. Serine biosynthesis and transport defects.

    PubMed

    El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2016-07-01

    l-serine is a non-essential amino acid that is biosynthesized via the enzymes phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), phosphoserine aminotransferase (PSAT), and phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP). Besides its role in protein synthesis, l-serine is a potent neurotrophic factor and a precursor of a number of essential compounds including phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, glycine, and d-serine. Serine biosynthesis defects result from impairments of PGDH, PSAT, or PSP leading to systemic serine deficiency. Serine biosynthesis defects present in a broad phenotypic spectrum that includes, at the severe end, Neu-Laxova syndrome, a lethal multiple congenital anomaly disease, intermediately, infantile serine biosynthesis defects with severe neurological manifestations and growth deficiency, and at the mild end, the childhood disease with intellectual disability. A serine transport defect resulting from deficiency of the ASCT1, the main transporter for serine in the central nervous system, has been recently described in children with neurological manifestations that overlap with those observed in serine biosynthesis defects. l-serine therapy may be beneficial in preventing or ameliorating symptoms in serine biosynthesis and transport defects, if started before neurological damage occurs. Herein, we review serine metabolism and transport, the clinical, biochemical, and molecular aspects of serine biosynthesis and transport defects, the mechanisms of these diseases, and the potential role of serine therapy. PMID:27161889

  16. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  17. Stereoselectivity in Polyphenol Biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselectivity plays an important role in the late stages of phenyl-propanoid metabolism, affording lignins, lignans, and neolignans. Stereoselectivity is manifested during monolignol (glucoside) synthesis, e.g., where the geometry (E or Z) of the pendant double bond affects the specificity of UDPG:coniferyl alcohol glucosyltransferases in different species. Such findings are viewed to have important ramifications in monolignol transport and storage processes, with roles for both E- and Z-monolignols and their glucosides in lignin/lignan biosynthesis being envisaged. Stereoselectivity is also of great importance in enantiose-lective enzymatic processes affording optically active lignans. Thus, cell-free extracts from Forsythia species were demonstrated to synthesize the enantiomerically pure lignans, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, and (-)-pinoresinol, when NAD(P)H, H2O2 and E-coniferyl alcohol were added. Progress toward elucidating the enzymatic steps involved in such highly stereoselective processes is discussed. Also described are preliminary studies aimed at developing methodologies to determine the subcellular location of late-stage phenylpropanoid metabolites (e.g., coniferyl alcohol) and key enzymes thereof, in intact tissue or cells. This knowledge is essential if questions regarding lignin and lignan tissue specificity and regulation of these processes are to be deciphered.

  18. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus cereus: identification of receptors for anthrax virulence-associated petrobactin†a

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzka, Anna M.; Abergel, Rebecca J.; Nichiporuk, Rita; Andersen, Ulla N.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    During growth under iron limitation, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, two human pathogens from the Bacillus cereus group of Gram-positive bacteria, secrete two siderophores, bacillibactin (BB) and petrobactin (PB), for iron acquisition via membrane-associated substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) and other ABC transporter components. Since PB is associated with virulence traits in B. anthracis, the PB-mediated iron uptake system presents a potential target for antimicrobial therapies; its characterization in B. cereus is described here. Separate transporters for BB, PB, and several xenosiderophores are suggested by 55Fe-siderophore uptake studies. The PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and the photoproduct of FePB (FePBν) also mediate iron delivery into iron-deprived cells. Putative SBPs were recombinantly expressed, and their ligand specificity and binding affinity assessed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The noncovalent complexes of the SBPs with their respective siderophores were characterized using ESI-MS. The differences between solution phase behavior and gas phase measurements are indicative of noncovalent interactions between the siderophores and the binding sites of their respective SBPs. These studies combined with bioinformatics sequence comparison identify SBPs from five putative transporters specific for BB and enterobactin (FeuA), 3,4-DHB and PB (FatB), PB (FpuA), schizokinen (YfiY), and desferrioxamine and ferrichrome (YxeB). The two PB receptors show different substrate ranges: FatB has the highest affinity for ferric 3,4-DHB, iron-free PB, FePB, and FePBν, whereas FpuA is specific to only apo- and ferric PB. The biochemical characterization of these SBPs provides the first identification of the transporter candidates that most likely play a role in the B. cereus group pathogenicity. PMID:19254027

  19. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition systems in Bacillus cereus: Identification of receptors for anthrax virulence-associated petrobactin .

    PubMed

    Zawadzka, Anna M; Abergel, Rebecca J; Nichiporuk, Rita; Andersen, Ulla N; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2009-04-28

    During growth under iron limitation, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, two human pathogens from the Bacillus cereus group of Gram-positive bacteria, secrete two siderophores, bacillibactin (BB) and petrobactin (PB), for iron acquisition via membrane-associated substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) and other ABC transporter components. Since PB is associated with virulence traits in B. anthracis, the PB-mediated iron uptake system presents a potential target for antimicrobial therapies; its characterization in B. cereus is described here. Separate transporters for BB, PB, and several xenosiderophores are suggested by (55)Fe-siderophore uptake studies. The PB precursor, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHB), and the photoproduct of FePB (FePB(nu)) also mediate iron delivery into iron-deprived cells. Putative SBPs were recombinantly expressed, and their ligand specificity and binding affinity were assessed using fluorescence spectroscopy. The noncovalent complexes of the SBPs with their respective siderophores were characterized using ESI-MS. The differences between solution phase behavior and gas phase measurements are indicative of noncovalent interactions between the siderophores and the binding sites of their respective SBPs. These studies combined with bioinformatics sequence comparison identify SBPs from five putative transporters specific for BB and enterobactin (FeuA), 3,4-DHB and PB (FatB), PB (FpuA), schizokinen (YfiY), and desferrioxamine and ferrichrome (YxeB). The two PB receptors show different substrate ranges: FatB has the highest affinity for ferric 3,4-DHB, iron-free PB, FePB, and FePB(nu), whereas FpuA is specific to only apo- and ferric PB. The biochemical characterization of these SBPs provides the first identification of the transporter candidates that most likely play a role in the B. cereus group pathogenicity.

  20. Synthesis and structural characterization of hexacoordinate silicon, germanium, and titanium complexes of the E. coli siderophore enterobactin.

    PubMed

    Baramov, Todor; Keijzer, Karlijn; Irran, Elisabeth; Mösker, Eva; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Süssmuth, Roderich

    2013-08-01

    The E. coli siderophore enterobactin, one of the strongest Fe(III) chelators known to date, is also capable of binding Si(IV) under physiological conditions. We report on the synthesis and structural characterization of the tris(catecholate) Si(IV) -enterobactin complex and its Ge(IV) and Ti(IV) analogues. Comparative structural analysis, supported by quantum-chemical calculations, reveals the correlation between the ionic radius and the structural changes in enterobactin upon complexation.

  1. Selective behavior of the siderophore pyoverdine a towards UO2 2+, Th4+, U4+ and other cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouby, M.; Billard, I.; Maccordick, H. J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents new results on the complexing properties of the siderophore pyoverdine. A towards U4+, Na+ and (CH3)4N+ in aqueous solutions. Comparison with previous data obtained for other actinides (UO2 2+ and Th4+) lead to propose some general trends of the complexation of actinides with pyoverdine. Experiments with two different bases may lead to the determination of some of the pK values of pyoverdine.

  2. Siderophore production and the evolution of investment in a public good: An adaptive dynamics approach to kin selection.

    PubMed

    Lee, William; van Baalen, Minus; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2016-01-01

    Like many other bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequesters iron from the environment through the secretion, and subsequent uptake, of iron-binding molecules. As these molecules can be taken up by other bacteria in the population than those who secreted them, this is a form of cooperation through a public good. Traditionally, this problem has been studied by comparing the relative fitnesses of siderophore-producing and non-producing strains, but this gives no information about the fate of strains that do produce intermediate amounts of siderophores. Here, we investigate theoretically how the amount invested in this form of cooperation evolves. We use a mechanistic description of the laboratory protocols used in experimental evolution studies to describe the competition and cooperation of the bacteria. From this dynamical model we derive the fitness following the adaptive dynamics method. The results show how selection is driven by local siderophore production and local competition. Because siderophore production reduces the growth rate, local competition decreases with the degree of relatedness (which is a dynamical variable in our model). Our model is not restricted to the analysis of small phenotypic differences and allows for theoretical exploration of the effects of large phenotypic differences between cooperators and cheats. We predict that an intermediate ESS level of cooperation (molecule production) should exist. The adaptive dynamics approach allows us to assess evolutionary stability, which is often not possible in other kin-selection models. We found that selection can lead to an intermediate strategy which in our model is always evolutionarily stable, yet can allow invasion of strategies that are much more cooperative. Our model describes the evolution of a public good in the context of the ecology of the microorganism, which allows us to relate the extent of production of the public good to the details of the interactions. PMID:26471069

  3. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  4. Study of the siderophore-producing Trichoderma asperellum Q1 on cucumber growth promotion under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Weizhen; Zhao, Lei

    2013-04-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile beneficial fungi which can stimulate growth and plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, the potential of Trichoderma isolate in promoting the cucumber growth under salt stress and its possible mechanisms were investigated. Strain Q1 was isolated from the rhizosphere of cucumber in greenhouse in China and identified as Trichoderma asperellum based on its morphological features and the molecular phylogenetic analyses. It exhibited some plant growth-promoting attributes of phosphate solubilization, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity, auxin and siderophore production. In pot trials, applying strain Q1 to cucumber plant had significantly promoted seedlings growth and alleviated the growth suppression induced by salt stress as confirmed by the changes in growth phenotype and several biochemical and physiological parameters. In solution culture experiments, the growth of cucumber seedlings was increased and the percentage of wilted cucumber seedlings was decreased in the treatment of siderophore-containing culture filtrate (SCF) of strain Q1 with insoluble Fe(3+) under salt stress. These results indicated that T. asperellum Q1 has a real potential to enhance cucumber growth by inducing physiological protection under saline stress, and its siderophores showed sign of alleviating negative effect of salinity and available iron deficiency.

  5. Terbium, a fluorescent probe for investigation of siderophore pyochelin interactions with its outer membrane transporter FptA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Binsheng; Hoegy, Françoise; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Mesini, Philippe J; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2011-10-01

    Pyochelin (Pch) is a siderophore and FptA is its outer membrane transporter produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to import iron. The fluorescence of the element terbium is affected by coordinated ligands and it can therefore be used as a probe to investigate the pyochelin-iron uptake pathway in P. aeruginosa. At pH 8.0, terbium fluorescence is greatly enhanced in the presence of pyochelin indicating chelation of the metal by the siderophore. Titration curves showed a 2:1 (Pch:Tb(3+)) stoichiometry and an affinity of K=(2±-1)×10(11)M(-2) was determined. Pch-Tb interaction with the transporter FptA could be followed in vitro and in vivo in P. aeruginosa cells, by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between three partners: the tryptophans of FptA (donor), Pch (acceptor for the Trps and donor for Tb(3+)) and Tb(3+) (acceptor). Pch-Tb binds to the Pch-Fe outer membrane transporter FptA with a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 4.6μM. This three-partner FRET is a potentially valuable tool for investigation of the interactions between FptA and its siderophore Pch. PMID:21861955

  6. Lead-enhanced siderophore production and alteration in cell morphology in a Pb-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 4EA.

    PubMed

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2011-02-01

    A lead-resistant bacterial strain 4EA from soil contaminated with car battery waste from Goa, India was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This lead-resistant bacterial isolate interestingly revealed lead-enhanced siderophore (pyochelin and pyoverdine) production up to 0.5 mM lead nitrate whereas cells exhibit a significant decline in siderophore production above 0.5 mM lead nitrate. The bacterial cells also revealed significant alteration in cell morphology as size reduction when exposed to 0.8 mM lead nitrate. Enhanced production of siderophore was evidently detected by chrome azurol S agar diffusion (CASAD) assay as increase in diameter of orange halo, and reduction in bacterial size along with significant biosorption of lead was recorded by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain 4EA also exhibits cross tolerance to other toxic metals viz. cadmium, mercury, and zinc besides resistance to multiple antibiotics such as ampicillin, erythromycin, amikacin, cephalexin, co-trimoxazole, mecillinam, lincomycin, ciphaloridine, oleondamycin, and nalidixic acid. PMID:20661573

  7. Inter-relationships of MnO 2 precipitation, siderophore-Mn (III) complex formation, siderophore degradation, and iron limitation in Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Morita, Takami; Mozafarzadeh, Mylene L.; Verity, Rebecca; McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2007-12-01

    To examine the pathways that form Mn (III) and Mn (IV) in the Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and MnB1, and to test whether the siderophore pyoverdine (PVD) inhibits Mn (IV)O 2 formation, cultures were subjected to various protocols at known concentrations of iron and PVD. Depending on growth conditions, P. putida produced one of two oxidized Mn species - either soluble PVD-Mn (III) complex or insoluble Mn (IV)O 2 minerals - but not both simultaneously. PVD-Mn (III) was present, and MnO 2 precipitation was inhibited, both in iron-limited cultures that had synthesized 26-50 μM PVD and in iron-replete (non-PVD-producing) cultures that were supplemented with 10-550 μM purified PVD. PVD-Mn (III) arose by predominantly ligand-mediated air oxidation of Mn (II) in the presence of PVD, based on the following evidence: (a) yields and rates of this reaction were similar in sterile media and in cultures, and (b) GB-1 mutants deficient in enzymatic Mn oxidation produced PVD-Mn (III) as efficiently as wild type. Only wild type, however, could degrade PVD-Mn (III), a process linked to the production of both MnO 2 and an altered PVD with absorbance and fluorescence spectra markedly different from those of either PVD or PVD-Mn (III). Two conditions, the presence of bioavailable iron and the absence of PVD at concentrations exceeding those of Mn, both had to be satisfied for MnO 2 to appear. These results suggest that P. putida cultures produce soluble Mn (III) or MnO 2 by different and mutually inhibitory pathways: enzymatic catalysis yielding MnO 2 under iron sufficiency or PVD-promoted oxidation yielding PVD-Mn (III) under iron limitation. Since PVD-producing Pseudomonas species are environmentally prevalent Mn oxidizers, these data predict influences of iron (via PVD-Mn (III) versus MnO 2) on the global oxidation/reduction cycling of various pollutants, recalcitrant organic matter, and elements such as C, S, N, Cr, U, and Mn.

  8. Manganese(III) binding to a pyoverdine siderophore produced by a manganese(II)-oxidizing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Sposito, Garrison; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2004-12-01

    The possible roles of siderophores (high affinity chelators of iron(III)) in the biogeochemistry of manganese remain unknown. Here we investigate the interaction of Mn(III) with a pyoverdine-type siderophore (PVD MnB1) produced by the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida strain MnB1. PVD MnB1 confirmed typical pyoverdine behavior with respect to: (a) its absorption spectrum at 350-600 nm, both in the absence and presence of Fe(III), (b) the quenching of its fluorescence by Fe(III), (c) the formation of a 1:1 complex with Fe(III), and (d) the thermodynamic stability constant of its Fe(III) complex. The Mn(III) complex of PVD MnB1 had a 1:1 Mn:pvd molar ratio, showed fluorescence quenching, and exhibited a light absorption spectrum (A max = 408-410 nm) different from that of either PVD MnB1-Fe(III) or uncomplexed PVD MnB1. Mn(III) competed strongly with Fe(III) for binding by PVD MnB1 in culture filtrates (pH 8, 4°C). Equilibration with citrate, a metal-binding ligand, did not detectably release Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex at a citrate/PVD MnB1 molar ratio of 830 (pH 8, 4°C), whereas pyrophosphate under the same conditions removed 55% of the Mn from its PVD MnB1 complex. Most of the PVD MnB1-complexed Mn was released by reaction with ascorbate, a reducing agent, or with EDTA, a ligand that is also oxidized by Mn(III). Data on the competition for binding to PVD MnB1 by Fe(III) vs. Mn(III) were used to determine a thermodynamic stability constant (nominally at 4°C) for the neutral species MnHPVD MnB1 (log K = 47.5 ± 0.5, infinite dilution reference state). This value was larger than that determined for FeHPVD MnB1 (log K = 44.6 ± 0.5). This result has important implications for the metabolism, solubility, speciation, and redox cycling of manganese, as well as for the biologic uptake of iron.

  9. Iron-Binding Compounds from Agrobacterium spp.: Biological Control Strain Agrobacterium rhizogenes K84 Produces a Hydroxamate Siderophore

    PubMed Central

    Penyalver, Ramón; Oger, Philippe; López, María M.; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2001-01-01

    Iron-binding compounds were produced in various amounts in response to iron starvation by a collection of Agrobacterium strains belonging to the species A. tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, and A. vitis. The crown gall biocontrol agent A. rhizogenes strain K84 produced a hydroxamate iron chelator in large amounts. Production of this compound, and also of a previously described antibiotic-like substance called ALS84, occurred only in cultures of strain K84 grown in iron-deficient medium. Similarly, sensitivity to ALS84 was expressed only when susceptible cells were tested in low-iron media. Five independent Tn5-induced mutants of strain K84 affected in the production of the hydroxamate iron chelator showed a similar reduction in the production of ALS84. One of these mutants, M8-10, was completely deficient in the production of both agents and grew poorly compared to the wild type under iron-limiting conditions. Thus, the hydroxamate compound has siderophore activity. A 9.1-kb fragment of chromosomal DNA containing the Tn5 insertion from this mutant was cloned and marker exchanged into wild-type strain K84. The homogenote lost the ability to produce the hydroxamate siderophore and also ALS84. A cosmid clone was isolated from a genomic library of strain K84 that restored to strain M8-10 the ability to produce of the siderophore and ALS84, as well as growth in iron-deficient medium. This cosmid clone contained the region in which Tn5 was located in the mutant. Sequence analysis showed that the Tn5 insert in this mutant was located in an open reading frame coding for a protein that has similarity to those of the gramicidin S synthetase repeat superfamily. Some such proteins are required for synthesis of hydroxamate siderophores by other bacteria. Southern analysis revealed that the biosynthetic gene from strain K84 is present only in isolates of A. rhizogenes that produce hydroxamate-type compounds under low-iron conditions. Based on physiological and genetic analyses showing

  10. Siderophore production and membrane alterations by Bordetella pertussis in response to iron starvation.

    PubMed Central

    Agiato, L A; Dyer, D W

    1992-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis was grown in iron (Fe)-free defined medium to limit the growth of the organism. Doubling times of the Fe-starved organism increased by approximately 1 h, and a 40% reduction in the final extent of growth in Fe-depleted medium was observed. Under these conditions, a hydroxamate siderophore named bordetellin was secreted by B. pertussis. Lactoferrin and transferrin supported growth of B. pertussis even when the protein was sequestered inside dialysis tubing. This suggested that binding of lactoferrin and transferrin to B. pertussis was not essential and that bordetellin production plays a major role in Fe uptake. Solid-phase dot blot assays indicated weak binding of lactoferrin to the cell surface, consistent with previous reports of a lactoferrin receptor. Three new proteins of 97, 77, and 63 kDa were synthesized in response to Fe starvation. Fe-inducible proteins of 103, 72, 24, 21, and 18 kDa were also observed. The synthesis of lipopolysaccharide was also altered by Fe availability. Images PMID:1309510

  11. Acceleration of Fe-silicate mineral dissolution for CO2 sequestration via microbial siderophore production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. A.; Nealson, K. H.; West, A.

    2013-12-01

    While the dissolution of silicate minerals will ultimately neutralize anthropogenic CO2 emissions, the slow natural timescale of this process limits its ability to mitigate any of the societal impacts of high atmospheric pCO2. As a result, much research has been focused on developing ways to significantly accelerate silicate mineral dissolution rates. Harnessing the effects of microbial activity is one particularly attractive strategy because research has shown that microbes can appreciably accelerate mineral dissolution rates and they require little external energy input. At present, one major hurdle in the development of microbe-based CO2 sequestration techniques is the observation that bacteria only accelerate dissolution rates under particular culturing conditions. In this work, natural and genetic mutant strains of the bacterial genera Shewanella, Pseudomonas, and Marinobacter are used to identify the geochemical and genetic factors that underlie the 'accelerated-weathering phenotype' in order to support the development of microbe-based CO2 sequestration techniques using olivine as a model mineral. Preliminary results suggest that microbial siderophore production at circum-neutral pH results in significantly accelerated olivine dissolution rates.

  12. Linkage between Catecholate Siderophores and the Multicopper Oxidase CueO in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Gregor; Thakali, Keshari; Klebba, Phillip E.; Thieme, Daniel; Müller, Axel; Wildner, Günter F.; Rensing, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The multicopper oxidase CueO had previously been demonstrated to exhibit phenoloxidase activity and was implicated in intrinsic copper resistance in Escherichia coli. Catecholates can potentially reduce Cu(II) to the prooxidant Cu(I). In this report we provide evidence that CueO protects E. coli cells by oxidizing enterobactin, the catechol iron siderophore of E. coli, in the presence of copper. In vitro, a mixture of enterobactin and copper was toxic for E. coli cells, but the addition of purified CueO led to their survival. Deletion of fur resulted in copper hypersensitivity that was alleviated by additional deletion of entC, preventing synthesis of enterobactin. In addition, copper added together with 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid or enterobactin was able to induce a Φ(cueO-lacZ) operon fusion more efficiently than copper alone. The reaction product of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid oxidation by CueO that can complex Cu(II) ions was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and identified as 2-carboxymuconate. PMID:15317788

  13. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Scott N.; Chung, Myung-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. PMID:26231649

  14. Nanospecific Inhibition of Pyoverdine Siderophore Production in Pseudomonas Chlororaphis O6 by CuO Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Johnson, William P.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lea, Alan S.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-03-01

    As traditional antibiotics become less effective against a growing number of pathogens, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming more widely applied as biocides. NPs of Ag, ZnO, and CuO exhibit dose-dependent antimicrobial activity; however, information is scant on the impact of sublethal levels of NPs on bacteria. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of a sublethal concentration (200 mg/L) of commercial CuO NPs on the expression of genes involved in the production of the fluorescent siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD) in the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. PVDs are important in microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions, and are a virulence factor in pathogenic pseudomonads. Cells challenged with the NPs had reduced amounts of PVD in their periplasm and the external medium. The NPs impaired the expression of genes involved in transport of the PVD precursor through the plasmamembrane, PVD maturation in the periplasm, and export through the outer membrane. Also, expression from one of three predicted Fe-PVD receptors was reduced by the NPs. As these effects were not observed for cells challenged with copper ions, this is a nanoparticlespecific phenomenon mediating cellular reprogramming in bacteria, affecting secondary metabolism and thus associated critical microbial processes. The regulation of bacterial genes and secondary metabolites by sublethal doses of a common metal oxide NP has strong environmental and medical implications.

  15. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus

    PubMed Central

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  16. Debaryomyces mycophilus sp. nov., a siderophore-dependent yeast isolated from woodlice.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Vu Nguyen; Van Dyk, Martha S; Wingfield, Michael J

    2002-08-01

    Four strains of an ascogenous yeast were isolated from the guts of the woodlice species Armadillidium vulgare (Latreille). This yeast differed from all known yeasts by its inability to grow in culture without the presence of a metabolite produced by some common soil fungi such as Cladosporium cladosporioides, Aspergillus alliaceus, and Penicillium spp. Phylogenetic analysis based on 18S rDNA and 26S rDNA (domain D1/D2) sequences indicated that the yeast represents a new taxon in the genus Debaryomyces. The new species Debaryomyces mycophilus is thus proposed. It was, furthermore, shown that the fungal metabolite necessary for growth of D. mycophilus did not provide the yeast with carbon, nitrogen or vitamins. The active compound was partially purified and it was shown that it is a siderophore used by the yeast as a source of iron. The addition of ferrichrome or high concentrations of FeCl(3) to growth media replaced the obligate dependence on a fungal metabolite. Symbiosis among fungi, based on the availability and utilization of iron, is an aspect of mycology that has not previously been recognized. The addition of chelated iron to isolation media could lead to the discovery of many unknown yeasts and fungi. PMID:12702293

  17. Burkholderia Diffusible Signal Factor Signals to Francisella novicida To Disperse Biofilm and Increase Siderophore Production.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; Chung, Myung-Chul; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, the ability to modulate biofilm production relies on specific signaling molecules that are either self-produced or made by neighboring microbes within the ecological niche. We analyzed the potential interspecies signaling effect of the Burkholderia diffusible signal factor (BDSF) on Francisella novicida, a model organism for Francisella tularensis, and demonstrated that BDSF both inhibits the formation and causes the dispersion of Francisella biofilm. Specificity was demonstrated for the cis versus the trans form of BDSF. Using transcriptome sequencing, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and activity assays, we found that BDSF altered the expression of many F. novicida genes, including genes involved in biofilm formation, such as chitinases. Using a chitinase inhibitor, the antibiofilm activity of BDSF was also shown to be chitinase dependent. In addition, BDSF caused an increase in RelA expression and increased levels of (p)ppGpp, leading to decreased biofilm production. These results support our observation that exposure of F. novicida to BDSF causes biofilm dispersal. Furthermore, BDSF upregulated the genes involved in iron acquisition (figABCD), increasing siderophore production. Thus, this study provides evidence for a potential role and mechanism of diffusible signal factor (DSF) signaling in the genus Francisella and suggests the possibility of interspecies signaling between Francisella and other bacteria. Overall, this study suggests that in response to the interspecies DSF signal, F. novicida can alter its gene expression and regulate its biofilm formation. PMID:26231649

  18. A novel siderophore system is essential for the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in airway mucus.

    PubMed

    Gi, Mia; Lee, Kang-Mu; Kim, Sang Cheol; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Yoon, Sang Sun; Choi, Jae Young

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa establishes airway infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. Here, we investigate the molecular interactions between P. aeruginosa and airway mucus secretions (AMS) derived from the primary cultures of normal human tracheal epithelial (NHTE) cells. PAO1, a prototype strain of P. aeruginosa, was capable of proliferating during incubation with AMS, while all other tested bacterial species perished. A PAO1 mutant lacking PA4834 gene became susceptible to AMS treatment. The ΔPA4834 mutant was grown in AMS supplemented with 100 μM ferric iron, suggesting that the PA4834 gene product is involved in iron metabolism. Consistently, intracellular iron content was decreased in the mutant, but not in PAO1 after the AMS treatment. Importantly, a PAO1 mutant unable to produce both pyoverdine and pyochelin remained viable, suggesting that these two major siderophore molecules are dispensable for maintaining viability during incubation with AMS. The ΔPA4834 mutant was regrown in AMS amended with 100 μM nicotianamine, a phytosiderophore whose production is predicted to be mediated by the PA4836 gene. Infectivity of the ΔPA4834 mutant was also significantly compromised in vivo. Together, our results identify a genetic element encoding a novel iron acquisition system that plays a previously undiscovered role in P. aeruginosa airway infection. PMID:26446565

  19. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms

    PubMed Central

    Strader, Lucia C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development. PMID:23580748

  20. Auxin biosynthesis and storage forms.

    PubMed

    Korasick, David A; Enders, Tara A; Strader, Lucia C

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin drives plant growth and morphogenesis. The levels and distribution of the active auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are tightly controlled through synthesis, inactivation, and transport. Many auxin precursors and modified auxin forms, used to regulate auxin homeostasis, have been identified; however, very little is known about the integration of multiple auxin biosynthesis and inactivation pathways. This review discusses the many ways auxin levels are regulated through biosynthesis, storage forms, and inactivation, and the potential roles modified auxins play in regulating the bioactive pool of auxin to affect plant growth and development.

  1. Alternate biosynthesis of valerenadiene and related sesquiterpenes.

    PubMed

    Paknikar, Shashikumar K; Kadam, Shahuraj H; Ehrlich, April L; Bates, Robert B

    2013-09-01

    It is proposed that the biosynthesis of the sesquiterpene valerenadiene, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of a sedative in valerian, involves cyclopropane and not cyclobutane intermediates and includes as a key step a cyclopropylcarbinylcation-cyclopropylcarbinylcation rearrangement analogous to the one observed in the conversion of presqualene to squalene in triterpene and steroid biosynthesis. Similar mechanisms are proposed for the biosynthesis of the related sesquiterpenes pacifigorgiol, tamariscene and (+)-pacifigorgia-1,10-diene. PMID:24273843

  2. Cytochrome c4 is required for siderophore expression by Legionella pneumophila, whereas cytochromes c1 and c5 promote intracellular infection.

    PubMed

    Yip, Emily S; Burnside, Denise M; Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2011-03-01

    A panel of cytochrome c maturation (ccm) mutants of Legionella pneumophila displayed a loss of siderophore (legiobactin) expression, as measured by both the chrome azurol S assay and a Legionella-specific bioassay. These data, coupled with the finding that ccm transcripts are expressed by wild-type bacteria grown in deferrated medium, indicate that the Ccm system promotes siderophore expression by L. pneumophila. To determine the basis of this newfound role for Ccm, we constructed and tested a set of mutants specifically lacking individual c-type cytochromes. Whereas ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (petC) mutants specifically lacking cytochrome c(1) and cycB mutants lacking cytochrome c(5) had normal siderophore expression, cyc4 mutants defective for cytochrome c(4) completely lacked legiobactin. These data, along with the expression pattern of cyc4 mRNA, indicate that cytochrome c(4) in particular promotes siderophore expression. In intracellular infection assays, petC mutants and cycB mutants, but not cyc4 mutants, had a reduced ability to infect both amoebae and macrophage hosts. Like ccm mutants, the cycB mutants were completely unable to grow in amoebae, highlighting a major role for cytochrome c(5) in intracellular infection. To our knowledge, these data represent both the first direct documentation of the importance of a c-type cytochrome in expression of a biologically active siderophore and the first insight into the relative importance of c-type cytochromes in intracellular infection events.

  3. Siderophores in Cloud Waters and Potential Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry: Production by Microorganisms Isolated at the Puy de Dôme Station.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, Virginie; Wirgot, Nolwenn; Joly, Muriel; Sancelme, Martine; Abrantes, Magali; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    A total of 450 bacteria and yeast strains isolated from cloud waters sampled at the puy de Dôme station in France (1465 m) were screened for their ability to produce siderophores. To achieve this, a high-throughput method in 96-well plates was adapted from the CAS (chrome azurol S) method. Notably, 42% of the isolates were siderophore producers. This production was examined according to the phyla of the tested strains and the type of chelating functional groups (i.e., hydroxamate, catechol, and mixed type). The most active bacteria in the clouds belong to the γ-Proteobacteria class, among which the Pseudomonas genus is the most frequently encountered. γ-Proteobacteria are produced in the majority of mixed function siderophores, such as pyoverdines, which bear a photoactive group. Finally, siderophore production was shown to vary with the origin of the air masses. The organic speciation of iron remains largely unknown in warm clouds. Our results suggest that siderophores could partly chelate Fe(III) in cloud waters and thus potentially impact the chemistry of the atmospheric aqueous phase. PMID:27479540

  4. Siderophore production by using free and immobilized cells of two pseudomonads cultivated in a medium enriched with Fe and/or toxic metals (Cr, Hg, Pb).

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Léger, Marie-Anne; Lebeau, Thierry

    2006-08-20

    Pseudomonads are serious candidates for siderophore production applied to toxic metal (TM) solubilization. The bioaugmentation of contaminated soils by these TM-solubilizing bacteria combined with phytoextraction is an emerging clean-up technology. Unfortunately, siderophore synthesis may be drastically reduced by soluble iron in soils and bacteria can suffer from TM toxicity. In this study, we compared siderophore production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens by using free and immobilized cells in Ca-alginate beads incubated in a medium containing Fe and/or TM (mixture of Cr, Hg, and Pb in concentrations which represented the soluble fraction of a contaminated agricultural soil). Free cell growth was stimulated by Fe, whatever the microorganism, the inoculum size and the presence or not of TM might have been. P. aeruginosa was less sensitive to TM than P. fluorescens. By comparison with free cells, immobilization with the high inoculum size showed less sensitivity to TM most probably because of lower metal diffusion in beads. Indeed, a maximum of 99.1% of Cr, 57.4% of Hg, and 99.6% of Pb were adsorbed onto beads. The addition of iron in the culture medium reduced significantly siderophore production of free cells while it led only to a low decrease with their immobilized counterparts, in particular with P. aeruginosa. In culture medium enriched with Fe and/or TM, siderophore-specific production of immobilized cells was higher than for free cells. PMID:16586510

  5. Siderophores in Cloud Waters and Potential Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry: Production by Microorganisms Isolated at the Puy de Dôme Station.

    PubMed

    Vinatier, Virginie; Wirgot, Nolwenn; Joly, Muriel; Sancelme, Martine; Abrantes, Magali; Deguillaume, Laurent; Delort, Anne-Marie

    2016-09-01

    A total of 450 bacteria and yeast strains isolated from cloud waters sampled at the puy de Dôme station in France (1465 m) were screened for their ability to produce siderophores. To achieve this, a high-throughput method in 96-well plates was adapted from the CAS (chrome azurol S) method. Notably, 42% of the isolates were siderophore producers. This production was examined according to the phyla of the tested strains and the type of chelating functional groups (i.e., hydroxamate, catechol, and mixed type). The most active bacteria in the clouds belong to the γ-Proteobacteria class, among which the Pseudomonas genus is the most frequently encountered. γ-Proteobacteria are produced in the majority of mixed function siderophores, such as pyoverdines, which bear a photoactive group. Finally, siderophore production was shown to vary with the origin of the air masses. The organic speciation of iron remains largely unknown in warm clouds. Our results suggest that siderophores could partly chelate Fe(III) in cloud waters and thus potentially impact the chemistry of the atmospheric aqueous phase.

  6. Phermone biosynthesis activation in fire ants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN), was identified to stimulate sex pheromone biosynthesis in a moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in mot...

  7. The Evolution of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biosynthesis of aflatoxin (AF) involves over 20 enzymatic reactions in a complex polyketide pathway that converts acetate and malonate to the intermediates sterigmatocystin (ST) and O-methylsterigmatocysin (OMST), the respective penultimate and ultimate precursors of AF. Although ST, OMST, and ...

  8. Transcriptional control of flavonoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shutian

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant secondary polyphenolic metabolites and fulfil many vital biological functions, offering a valuable metabolic and genetic model for studying transcriptional control of gene expression. Arabidopsis thaliana mainly accumulates 3 types of flavonoids, including flavonols, anthocyanins, and proanthocyanidins (PAs). Flavonoid biosynthesis involves a multitude of well-characterized enzymatic and regulatory proteins. Three R2R3-MYB proteins (MYB11, MYB12, and MYB111) control flavonol biosynthesis via activating the early biosynthetic steps, whereas the production of anthocyanins and PAs requires the MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) complex to activate the late biosynthetic genes. Additional regulators of flavonoid biosynthesis have recently come to light, which interact with R2R3-MYBs or bHLHs to organize or disrupt the formation of the MBW complex, leading to enhanced or compromised flavonoid production. This mini-review gives an overview of how these novel players modulate flavonoid metabolism and thus plant developmental processes and further proposes a fine-tuning mechanism to complete the complex regulatory network controlling flavonoid biosynthesis. PMID:24393776

  9. Stability of the Cadmium Complex with the Bacterial Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, E. A.; Schijf, J.

    2010-12-01

    The divalent transition metal cadmium occurs in seawater at ultra-trace levels. In the open ocean, dissolved Cd(II) displays a nutrient-like profile characterized by a strong gradient from low picomolar concentrations in surface waters to a mid-depth maximum of around 1 nM. Its vertical distribution is highly correlated with that of dissolved phosphate, seemingly at odds with the general perception that Cd is a very toxic element. On the other hand, in Zn-depleted waters Cd(II) has been found to replace Zn(II) or Co(II) in a functional, albeit less efficient form of carbonic anhydrase, a key enzyme enabling the assimilation of bicarbonate into organic matter. Considering these opposing roles, it is likely that phytoplankton regulates the toxicity and/or bioavailability of Cd(II) through the production of certain strong organic ligands, as it has been shown to do for example in the case of Cu(II). Siderophores are a fascinating class of organic ligands excreted by microorganisms to facilitate the acquisition of micronutrient Fe(III), preciously scarce due to its extremely low solubility in seawater. The linear trihydroxamic acid desferrioxamine B (DFOB) is naturally present in open ocean surface waters at picomolar concentrations and, because of its use as a pharmaceutical agent in the treatment of human iron overload disorders, the only purified siderophore commercially available in practicable quantities. The optimal spacing of three bidentate O-bearing functional groups along a flexible carbon frame allows the molecule to wrap around the Fe3+ ion in a polydentate heterocyclic structure that perfectly matches its ionic radius and preferred coordination. Despite its resultant exceptional affinity and selectivity for Fe3+ (β ~ 1031), DFOB also forms very stable complexes with an array of differently sized and charged cations. The only previous report on the stability constant of the Cd(II)-DFOB complex, dating from 1963, proposes a values of 108 at 0.1 M ionic

  10. Augmentation of oxidant injury to human pulmonary epithelial cells by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyochelin.

    PubMed Central

    Britigan, B E; Rasmussen, G T; Cox, C D

    1997-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections of the human lung, with resultant tissue injury. We have previously shown that iron bound to pyochelin, a siderophore secreted by the organism to acquire iron, is an efficient catalyst for hydroxyl radical (HO.) formation and augments injury to pulmonary artery endothelial cells resulting from their exposure to superoxide (O2.) and/or H2O2. Sources for O2-. and H2O2 included phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils and pyocyanin. Pyocyanin, another P. aeruginosa secretory product, undergoes cell-mediated redox, thereby forming O2-. and H2O2. In P. aeruginosa lung infections, damage to airway epithelial cells is probably more extensive than that to endothelial cells. Therefore, we examined whether ferripyochelin also augments oxidant-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. A549 cells, a human type II alveolar epithelial cell line, was exposed to H2O2, PMA-stimulated neutrophils, or pyocyanin, and injury was determined by release of 51Cr from prelabeled cells. Ferripyochelin significantly increased (> 10-fold) oxidant-mediated cell injury regardless of whether H2O2, neutrophils, or pyocyanin was employed. Apo-pyochelin was not effective, and ferripyochelin was not toxic by itself at the concentrations employed. Spin trapping with alpha-(4-pyrridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butyl-nitrone-ethanol confirmed the generation of HO., and injury was decreased by a variety of antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethylthiourea. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the presence of ferripyochelin at sites of P. aeruginosa lung infection could contribute to tissue injury through its ability to promote HO.-mediated damage to airway epithelial cells. PMID:9038317

  11. Alleviation of aluminum toxicity to Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae by the hydroxamate siderophore vicibactin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, N J; Carson, K C; Glenn, A R; Dilworth, M J; Hughes, M N; Poole, R K

    2001-03-01

    Acid rain solubilises aluminum which can exert toxic effects on soil bacteria. The root nodule bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae synthesises the hydroxamate siderophore vicibactin in response to iron limitation. We report the effect of vicibactin on the toxicity of aluminum(III) to R. leguminosarum and kinetic studies on the reaction of vicibactin with Al(III) and Fe(III). Aluminum (added as the nitrate) completely inhibited bacterial growth at 25 microM final concentration, whereas the preformed Al-vicibactin complex had no effect. When aluminum and vicibactin solutions were added separately to growing cultures, growth was partly inhibited at 25 microM final concentration of each, but fully inhibited at 50 microM final concentration of each. Growth was not inhibited at 50 microM Al and 100 microM vicibactin, probably reflecting the slow reaction between Al and vicibactin; this results in some aluminum remaining uncomplexed long enough to exert toxic effects on growth, partly at 25 microM Al and vicibactin and fully at 50 microM Al and vicibactin. At 100 microM vicibactin and 50 microM Al, Al was complexed more effectively and there was no toxic effect. It was anticipated that vicibactin might enhance the toxicity of Al by transporting it into the cell, but the Al-vicibactin complex was not toxic. Several explanations are possible: the Al-vicibactin complex is not taken up by the cell; the complex is taken up but Al is not released from vicibactin; Al is released in the cell but is precipitated immediately. However, vicibactin reduces the toxicity of Al by complexing it outside the cell.

  12. A spectroscopic study of the effects of a microbial siderophore on Pb adsorption to kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Haack, Elizabeth A.; Maurice, Patricia A.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2010-11-12

    Batch adsorption experiments were combined with X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) analysis to determine the mechanism(s) whereby the microbial trihydroxamate siderophore ligand desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) affects Pb sorption to kaolinite at pH 4, 6, and 7.5 (in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4}, 22 C; Pb:DFO-B ratio 120:240 {micro}M). In the absence of DFO-B, Pb adsorbs only slightly to kaolinite at pH 4, by a combination of inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Adsorption increases at pH 6, and sorption (adsorption/surface precipitation) further increases at pH 7.5. At pH 4, DFO-B does not bind Pb in solution appreciably, and the Pb adsorption mechanism(s) is unchanged by the presence of DFO-B. At pH 6, DFO-B slightly enhances Pb adsorption, due at least in part to formation of a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. At pH 7.5, DFO-B decreases Pb sorption and Pb adsorption is dominated by a DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite type A ternary surface complex. Although XAS and thermodynamic speciation modeling indicate that Pb is bound by multiple DFO-B functional groups in solution at pH 7.5, the DFO-B-Pb-kaolinite surface complex appears to involve only a single hydroxamate group. This study thus demonstrates that the detailed structure of a ternary surface complex cannot necessarily be predicted from the structure of the solution organic-metal complex.

  13. The Intracellular Pathogen Rhodococcus equi Produces a Catecholate Siderophore Required for Saprophytic Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Prescott, John F.; Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Meijer, Wim G.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the iron acquisition systems of the soilborne facultative intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi. We previously reported that expression of iupABC, encoding a putative siderophore ABC transporter system, is iron regulated and required for growth at low iron concentrations. Here we show that disruption of iupA leads to the concomitant accumulation of catecholates and a chromophore with absorption maxima at 341 and 528 nm during growth under iron-replete conditions. In contrast, the wild-type strain produces these compounds only in iron-depleted medium. Disruption of iupU and iupS, encoding nonribosomal peptide synthetases, prevented growth of the corresponding R. equi SID1 and SID3 mutants at low iron concentrations. However, only R. equi SID3 did not produce the chromophore produced by the wild-type strain during growth at low iron concentrations. The phenotype of R. equi SID3, but not that of R. equi SID1, could be rescued by coculture with the wild type, allowing growth at low iron concentrations. This strongly suggests that the product of the iupS gene is responsible for the synthesis of a diffusible compound required for growth at low iron concentrations. Transcription of iupU was constitutive, but that of iupS was iron regulated, with an induction of 3 orders of magnitude during growth in iron-depleted compared to iron-replete medium. Neither mutant was attenuated in vivo in a mouse infection model, indicating that the iupU- and iupS-encoded iron acquisition systems are primarily involved in iron uptake during saprophytic life. PMID:18156254

  14. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; Wildung, Mark R

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general "allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction" scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1R, 3R, 4S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil. PMID:16292524

  15. (-)-Menthol biosynthesis and molecular genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Davis, Edward M.; Ringer, Kerry L.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2005-12-01

    (-)-Menthol is the most familiar of the monoterpenes as both a pure natural product and as the principal and characteristic constituent of the essential oil of peppermint ( Mentha x piperita). In this paper, we review the biosynthesis and molecular genetics of (-)-menthol production in peppermint. In Mentha species, essential oil biosynthesis and storage is restricted to the peltate glandular trichomes (oil glands) on the aerial surfaces of the plant. A mechanical method for the isolation of metabolically functional oil glands, has provided a system for precursor feeding studies to elucidate pathway steps, as well as a highly enriched source of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes and of their corresponding transcripts with which cDNA libraries have been constructed to permit cloning and characterization of key structural genes. The biosynthesis of (-)-menthol from primary metabolism requires eight enzymatic steps, and involves the formation and subsequent cyclization of the universal monoterpene precursor geranyl diphosphate to the parent olefin (-)-(4 S)-limonene as the first committed reaction of the sequence. Following hydroxylation at C3, a series of four redox transformations and an isomerization occur in a general “allylic oxidation-conjugate reduction” scheme that installs three chiral centers on the substituted cyclohexanoid ring to yield (-)-(1 R, 3 R, 4 S)-menthol. The properties of each enzyme and gene of menthol biosynthesis are described, as are their probable evolutionary origins in primary metabolism. The organization of menthol biosynthesis is complex in involving four subcellular compartments, and regulation of the pathway appears to reside largely at the level of gene expression. Genetic engineering to up-regulate a flux-limiting step and down-regulate a side route reaction has led to improvement in the composition and yield of peppermint oil.

  16. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E.; Patey, Sara A.; Crandon, Jared L.; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A.; McLaughlin, Robert E.; Blinn, Christina M.; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S.; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S.; Rooney, Michael T.; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E.; Eakin, Ann E.; Nicolau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R2 = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26438502

  17. Pharmacodynamic Profiling of a Siderophore-Conjugated Monocarbam in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Assessing the Risk for Resistance and Attenuated Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Aryun; Kutschke, Amy; Ehmann, David E; Patey, Sara A; Crandon, Jared L; Gorseth, Elise; Miller, Alita A; McLaughlin, Robert E; Blinn, Christina M; Chen, April; Nayar, Asha S; Dangel, Brian; Tsai, Andy S; Rooney, Michael T; Murphy-Benenato, Kerry E; Eakin, Ann E; Nicolau, David P

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the risk of attenuated efficacy due to adaptive resistance for the siderophore-conjugated monocarbam SMC-3176 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by using a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) approach. MICs were determined in cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB) and in Chelex-treated, dialyzed MHB (CDMHB). Spontaneous resistance was assessed at 2× to 16× the MIC and the resulting mutants sequenced. Efficacy was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh model at 3.13 to 400 mg/kg of body weight every 3 h for 24 h and analyzed for association with free time above the MIC (fT>MIC). To closer emulate the conditions of the in vivo model, we developed a novel assay testing activity mouse whole blood (WB). All mutations were found in genes related to iron uptake: piuA, piuC, pirR, fecI, and pvdS. Against four P. aeruginosa isolates, SMC-3176 displayed predictable efficacy corresponding to the fT>MIC using the MIC in CDMHB (R(2) = 0.968 to 0.985), with stasis to 2-log kill achieved at 59.4 to 81.1%. Efficacy did not translate for P. aeruginosa isolate JJ 4-36, as the in vivo responses were inconsistent with fT>MIC exposures and implied a threshold concentration that was greater than the MIC. The results of the mouse WB assay indicated that efficacy was not predictable using the MIC for JJ 4-36 and four additional isolates, against which in vivo failures of another siderophore-conjugated β-lactam were previously reported. SMC-3176 carries a risk of attenuated efficacy in P. aeruginosa due to rapid adaptive resistance preventing entry via the siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems. Substantial in vivo testing is warranted for compounds using the siderophore approach to thoroughly screen for this in vitro-in vivo disconnect in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26438502

  18. Presence of the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin in the extracellular medium reduces toxic metal accumulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and increases bacterial metal tolerance.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Geoffroy, Valérie; Hoegy, Françoise; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2010-06-01

    In order to get access to iron, Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 produces two major siderophores pyoverdine (PVD) and pyochelin (PCH). Both siderophores are able to chelate many other metals in addition to iron. However, despite this property, only iron is transported efficiently into the bacteria by the PVD and PCH uptake pathways. Growth studies with P. aeruginosa strains showed a lower sensitivity to toxic metals for the siderophore-producing strain than for the mutants unable to produce siderophores. Moreover, addition of PVD or PCH to the growth medium of a siderophore-deficient strain considerably reduced the toxicity of toxic metals present at concentrations of 100 µM in iron-limited and iron-supplemented growth conditions. Measurement by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry of the concentration of metals present in bacteria incubated with metals in the presence or absence of PVD or PCH indicated that both siderophores were able to sequester metals from the extracellular medium of the bacteria, decreasing metal diffusion into the bacteria. Pyoverdine was able to sequester Al(3+) , Co(2+) , Cu(2+) , Eu(3+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) , Tb(3+) and Zn(2+) from the extracellular medium, and PCH, Al(3+) , Co(2+) , Cu(2+) , Ni(2+) , Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) . Moreover, the presence of 100 µM Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) increased PVD production by 290% and 380%, respectively, in a medium supplemented with iron. All these data suggest that PVD and PCH may contribute to P. aeruginosa resistance to heavy metals. PMID:23766115

  19. Gibberellin biosynthesis in Gibberlla fujikuroi

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.W.; Coolbaugh, R.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are a group of plant growth hormones which were first isolated from the fungus Gibberella fujikuori. We have examined the biosynthesis of GAs in this fungus in liquid cultures using HPLC followed by GC-MS. Furthermore we have used cell-free enzyme extracts with {sup 14}C-labeled intermediates to examine the regulation of specific parts of the biosynthetic pathway. GA{sub 3} is the predominant GA in well aerated cultures. GA{sub 4} and GA{sub 7}, intermediates in GA{sub 3} biosynthesis, accumulate in cultures with low levels of dissolved oxygen, but are not detectable in more aerated cultures. Light stimulates GA production in G. fujikuroi cultures grown from young stock. Cell-free enzyme studies indicate that light has no effect on incorporation of mevalonic acid into kaurene, but does significantly stimulate the oxidation of kaurenoic acid.

  20. Lignification: Flexibility, Biosynthesis and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiao

    2016-08-01

    Lignin is a complex phenolic polymer that is deposited in the secondary cell wall of all vascular plants. The evolution of lignin is considered to be a critical event during vascular plant development, because lignin provides mechanical strength, rigidity, and hydrophobicity to secondary cell walls to allow plants to grow tall and transport water and nutrients over a long distance. In recent years, great research efforts have been made to genetically alter lignin biosynthesis to improve biomass degradability for the production of second-generation biofuels. This global focus on lignin research has significantly advanced our understanding of the lignification process. Based on these advances, here I provide an overview of lignin composition, the biosynthesis pathway and its regulation. PMID:27131502

  1. Phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis and lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cole, Laura K; Vance, Jean E; Vance, Dennis E

    2012-05-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the major phospholipid component of all plasma lipoprotein classes. PC is the only phospholipid which is currently known to be required for lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Impaired hepatic PC biosynthesis significantly reduces the levels of circulating very low density lipoproteins (VLDLs) and high density lipoproteins (HDLs). The reduction in plasma VLDLs is due in part to impaired hepatic secretion of VLDLs. Less PC within the hepatic secretory pathway results in nascent VLDL particles with reduced levels of PC. These particles are recognized as being defective and are degraded within the secretory system by an incompletely defined process that occurs in a post-endoplasmic reticulum compartment, consistent with degradation directed by the low-density lipoprotein receptor and/or autophagy. Moreover, VLDL particles are taken up more readily from the circulation when the PC content of the VLDLs is reduced, likely due to a preference of cell surface receptors and/or enzymes for lipoproteins that contain less PC. Impaired PC biosynthesis also reduces plasma HDLs by inhibiting hepatic HDL formation and by increasing HDL uptake from the circulation. These effects are mediated by elevated expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and hepatic scavenger receptor class B type 1, respectively. Hepatic PC availability has recently been linked to the progression of liver and heart disease. These findings demonstrate that hepatic PC biosynthesis can regulate the amount of circulating lipoproteins and suggest that hepatic PC biosynthesis may represent an important pharmaceutical target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Triglyceride Metabolism and Disease.

  2. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  3. Enhanced phytoextraction of an agricultural Cr- and Pb-contaminated soil by bioaugmentation with siderophore-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Bazot, Stéphane; Lebeau, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction may enhance the phytoextraction efficiency thanks to larger metal mobilization by microbial metabolites. Green fluorescent protein-tagged cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens or Ralstonia metallidurans, able to produce siderophores, were inoculated in an agricultural soil containing Cr (488 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (382 mg kg(-1)) and maize was cultivated. Bacteria were inoculated as free or immobilized cells in Ca-alginate beads, with skim milk in the aim at improving both the bacterial survival and the in situ siderophore production. Skim milk addition increased inoculated Pseudomonads concentration in soil. Soil inoculation with free cells of R. metallidurans supplied with skim milk increased Cr accumulation in maize shoots by a factor of 5.2 and inoculation with immobilized P. aeruginosa cells supplied with skim milk increased Cr and Pb uptake by maize shoots by a factor of 5.4 and 3.8, respectively. However total metal taken up by the whole plant decreases almost always with bioaugmentation. Translocation factor also increased with P. aeruginosa or R. metallidurans by a factor of 6 up to 7. Inoculated bacteria concentration in soil was correlated with metals in the exchangeable fraction. Cr and Pb concentrations in the exchangeable fraction were correlated with metal contents in shoots or roots. Our results suggest that bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction is a relevant method in the aim at increasing the phytoextraction rate which usually limits the use of phytoremediation technologies.

  4. Coordinate regulation of siderophore and exotoxin A production: molecular cloning and sequencing of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fur gene.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, R W; Cox, C D; Vasil, M L

    1993-01-01

    A 5.9-kb DNA fragment was cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA103 by its ability to functionally complement a fur mutation in Escherichia coli. A fur null mutant E. coli strain that contains multiple copies of the 5.9-kb DNA fragment produces a 15-kDa protein which cross-reacts with a polyclonal anti-E. coli Fur serum. Sequencing of a subclone of the 5.9-kb DNA fragment identified an open reading frame predicted to encode a protein 53% identical to E. coli Fur and 49% identical to Vibrio cholerae Fur and Yersinia pestis Fur. While there is extensive homology among these Fur proteins, Fur from P. aeruginosa differs markedly at its carboxy terminus from all of the other Fur proteins. It has been proposed that this region is a metal-binding domain in E. coli Fur. A positive selection procedure involving the isolation of manganese-resistant mutants was used to isolate mutants of strain PA103 that produce altered Fur proteins. These manganese-resistant Fur mutants constitutively produce siderophores and exotoxin A when grown in concentrations of iron that normally repress their production. A multicopy plasmid carrying the P. aeruginosa fur gene restores manganese susceptibility and wild-type regulation of exotoxin A and siderophore production in these Fur mutants. Images PMID:8478325

  5. Enhanced phytoextraction of an agricultural Cr- and Pb-contaminated soil by bioaugmentation with siderophore-producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Bazot, Stéphane; Lebeau, Thierry

    2009-01-01

    Bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction may enhance the phytoextraction efficiency thanks to larger metal mobilization by microbial metabolites. Green fluorescent protein-tagged cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens or Ralstonia metallidurans, able to produce siderophores, were inoculated in an agricultural soil containing Cr (488 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (382 mg kg(-1)) and maize was cultivated. Bacteria were inoculated as free or immobilized cells in Ca-alginate beads, with skim milk in the aim at improving both the bacterial survival and the in situ siderophore production. Skim milk addition increased inoculated Pseudomonads concentration in soil. Soil inoculation with free cells of R. metallidurans supplied with skim milk increased Cr accumulation in maize shoots by a factor of 5.2 and inoculation with immobilized P. aeruginosa cells supplied with skim milk increased Cr and Pb uptake by maize shoots by a factor of 5.4 and 3.8, respectively. However total metal taken up by the whole plant decreases almost always with bioaugmentation. Translocation factor also increased with P. aeruginosa or R. metallidurans by a factor of 6 up to 7. Inoculated bacteria concentration in soil was correlated with metals in the exchangeable fraction. Cr and Pb concentrations in the exchangeable fraction were correlated with metal contents in shoots or roots. Our results suggest that bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction is a relevant method in the aim at increasing the phytoextraction rate which usually limits the use of phytoremediation technologies. PMID:18945474

  6. Pyochelin enantiomers and their outer-membrane siderophore transporters in fluorescent pseudomonads: structural bases for unique enantiospecific recognition.

    PubMed

    Brillet, Karl; Reimmann, Cornelia; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Noël, Sabrina; Rognan, Didier; Schalk, Isabelle J; Cobessi, David

    2011-10-19

    Pyochelin (Pch) and enantiopyochelin (EPch) are enantiomeric siderophores, with three chiral centers, produced under iron limitation conditions by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens , respectively. After iron chelation in the extracellular medium, Pch-Fe and EPch-Fe are recognized and transported by their specific outer-membrane transporters: FptA in P. aeruginosa and FetA in P. fluorescens . Structural analysis of FetA-EPch-Fe and FptA-Pch-Fe, combined with mutagenesis and docking studies revealed the structural basis of the stereospecific recognition of these enantiomers by their respective transporters. Whereas FetA and FptA have a low sequence identity but high structural homology, the Pch and EPch binding pockets do not share any structural homology, but display similar physicochemical properties. The stereospecific recognition of both enantiomers by their corresponding transporters is imposed by the configuration of the siderophore's C4'' and C2'' chiral centers. This recognition involves specific hydrogen bonds between the Arg91 guanidinium group and EPch-Fe for FetA and between the Leu117-Leu116 main chain and Pch-Fe for FptA. FetA and FptA are the first membrane receptors to be structurally described with opposite binding enantioselectivities for their ligands, giving insights into the structural basis of their enantiospecificity. PMID:21902256

  7. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of a Siderophore Cephalosporin, S-649266, against Enterobacteriaceae Clinical Isolates, Including Carbapenem-Resistant Strains.

    PubMed

    Kohira, Naoki; West, Joshua; Ito, Akinobu; Ito-Horiyama, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Rio; Sato, Takafumi; Rittenhouse, Stephen; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2015-11-16

    S-649266 is a novel siderophore cephalosporin antibiotic with a catechol moiety on the 3-position side chain. Two sets of clinical isolate collections were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of S-649266 against Enterobacteriaceae. These sets included 617 global isolates collected between 2009 and 2011 and 233 β-lactamase-identified isolates, including 47 KPC-, 49 NDM-, 12 VIM-, and 8 IMP-producers. The MIC90 values of S-649266 against the first set of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcescens, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter cloacae isolates were all ≤1 μg/ml, and there were only 8 isolates (1.3%) among these 617 clinical isolates with MIC values of ≥8 μg/ml. In the second set, the MIC values of S-649266 were ≤4 μg/ml against 109 strains among 116 KPC-producing and class B (metallo) carbapenemase-producing strains. In addition, S-649266 showed MIC values of ≤2 μg/ml against each of the 13 strains that produced other types of carbapenemases such as SME, NMC, and OXA-48. The mechanisms of the decreased susceptibility of 7 class B carbapenemase-producing strains with MIC values of ≥16 μg/ml are uncertain. This is the first report to demonstrate that S-649266, a novel siderophore cephalosporin, has significant antimicrobial activity against Enterobacteriaceae, including strains that produce carbapenemases such as KPC and NDM-1.

  8. Microbial mobilization of cesium from illite: Role of organic acids and siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazotte, Alice; Peron, Olivier; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lebeau, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the behavior of cesium (Cs) in soils and geological formations is interesting in the context of nuclear accidents and nuclear waste disposals. Indeed, this radionuclide with a 30-years half-life can contaminate crops and more generally the food chain. Cs with properties similar to potassium is known to be strongly accumulated in the clays of upper soil horizons. While excavation of contaminated soil cannot be feasible for the whole contaminated surfaces (huge volumes to be cleaned-up), in situ methods could provide a sustainable and low cost solution. Phytoextraction is one of a few solutions for in situ remediation of soils contaminated by trace elements and it preserves the quality of agricultural soils. However, many improvements are still needed to enhance phytoextraction effectiveness. The combination of bioaugmentation (soil inoculation with exogenous microorganisms) with phytoextraction is likely to increase the bioaccessibility of radionuclides and their accumulation in plants. The role of bacteria on soil-pollutants can be direct (direct metal complexation) and/or indirect (weathering of clays adsorbing Cs). This study aims to provide more specifically a mechanistic understanding of the bacterial mobilization of Cs from soil with the prospect of soil bioremediation. Bacterial metabolites of Pseudomonas fluorescens (ATCC 17400) were supplied to illite spiked with 0.1 and 1 mM of Cs. Purified siderophores including pyoverdine from P. fluorescens, or the whole metabolites from the bacterial culture supernatant were compared to low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) (citric and oxalic acids) at 0.04 mM, or synthetic chelants, i.e., acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) and desferrioxamine mesylate (DFOM) ranging from 50 µM up to 250 µM. The release of Cs and the structural alteration of illite (release of Al, Fe and Si) were monitored. When compared to the control, no release of Cs from illite was observed with LMWOA. On the contrary, a slight release

  9. Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part II: Siderophore-promoted dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2008-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) coprecipitated with exopolymers of plants and microbes may differ in its geochemical reactivity from its abiotic counterpart. We synthesized Fh in the presence and absence of acid polysaccharides (polygalacturonic acid (PGA), alginate, xanthan) and characterized the physical and structural properties of the precipitates formed [Mikutta C., Mikutta R., Bonneville S., Wagner F., Voegelin A., Christl I. and Kretzschmar R. (2008) Synthetic coprecipitates of exopolysaccharides and ferrihydrite. Part I: Characterization. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta]. In this paper, we focus on the reactivity of PGA and alginate coprecipitates and pure Fh, and studied their interaction with the microbial siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB) in the presence and absence of low molecular weight organic (LMWO) acid anions (malate, citrate). Batch adsorption and dissolution experiments were performed in the dark at pH 7 in 10 mM NaClO 4 background electrolyte. In the dissolution experiments, different modes of ligand addition were applied (single, simultaneous, stepwise). With an estimated Langmuir sorption maximum of 15 mmol/mol Fe, a PGA coprecipitate with 11% C org sorbed about four times as much DFOB as pure Fh, and the amount of DFOB sorbed was ˜4-fold larger than estimated from the sum of DFOB sorption to pure Fh and PGA alone. The apparent initial dissolution rates, Rapp-initial, and pseudo-first order rate coefficients, k, of the coprecipitates exceeded those of pure Fh by up to two orders of magnitude. Citrate and malate exerted a strong synergistic effect on the DFOB-promoted dissolution of pure Fh, whereas synergistic effects of both anions were absent or negligible for the coprecipitates. Rapp-initial of the citrate and DFOB-promoted dissolution of PGA coprecipitates increased with increasing molar C/Fe ratio of the coprecipitates, independent of the charge of the LMWO ligand. Our results indicate that polyuronates stabilize Fh particles sterically and /or

  10. Pyrimidine Biosynthesis in Lactobacillus leichmannii

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, Judith Y.; Downing, Mancourt

    1968-01-01

    Tracer studies of pyrimidine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus leichmannii (ATCC 7830) indicated that, while aspartate is utilized in the usual manner, the guanido carbon of arginine, rather than carbon dioxide, is utilized as a pyrimidine precursor. The guanido carbon of arginine also contributes, to some extent, to the carbon dioxide pool utilized for purine biosynthesis. The enzyme of the first reaction leading from arginine to pyrimidines, arginine deiminase, was investigated in crude bacterial extracts. It was inhibited by thymidylic acid and purine ribonucleotides, and to a lesser extent by purine deoxynucleotides and deoxycytidylic acid. Under the assay conditions employed, a number of nucleotides had no effect on the enzyme activity of the aspartate transcarbamylase of L. leichmannii. Growth of the cells in media containing uracil, compared to growth in media without uracil, resulted in a four- to fivefold decrease in the concentrations of aspartate transcar-bamylase and dihydroorotase and a twofold increase in the concentration of arginine deiminase, as estimated from specific enzyme activity in crude extracts of the cells. A small increase in specific enzyme activity of ornithine transcarbamylase and carbamate kinase was also observed in extracts obtained from cells grown on uracil. No appreciable change in concentration of any of the five enzymes studied was detected when the cells were grown in media containing thymidine or guanylic acid. A hypothetical scheme which suggests a relationship between the control of purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis in this bacterium and which is consistent with the experimental results obtained is presented. PMID:5686000

  11. A Transmissible Plasmid-Borne Pathogenicity Island Confers Piscibactin Biosynthesis in the Fish Pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Fuentes-Monteverde, Juan Carlos; Rodríguez, Jaime; Jiménez, Carlos; Lemos, Manuel L.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    The fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida produces the siderophore piscibactin. A gene cluster that resembles the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island (HPI) encodes piscibactin biosynthesis. Here, we report that this HPI-like cluster is part of a hitherto-uncharacterized 68-kb plasmid dubbed pPHDP70. This plasmid lacks homologs of genes that mediate conjugation, but we found that it could be transferred at low frequencies from P. damselae subsp. piscicida to a mollusk pathogenic Vibrio alginolyticus strain and to other Gram-negative bacteria, likely dependent on the conjugative functions of the coresident plasmid pPHDP60. Following its conjugative transfer, pPHDP70 restored the capacity of a vibrioferrin mutant of V. alginolyticus to grow under low-iron conditions, and piscibactin became detectable in its supernatant. Thus, pPHDP70 appears to harbor all the genes required for piscibactin biosynthesis and transport. P. damselae subsp. piscicida strains cured of pPHDP70 no longer produced piscibactin, had impaired growth under iron-limited conditions, and exhibited markedly decreased virulence in fish. Collectively, our findings highlight the importance of pPHDP70, with its capacity for piscibactin-mediated iron acquisition, in the virulence of P. damselae subsp. piscicida. Horizontal transmission of this plasmid-borne piscibactin synthesis gene cluster in the marine environment may facilitate the emergence of new pathogens. PMID:26092457

  12. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10.

    PubMed

    Gerc, Amy J; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites.

  13. Role of the phosphopantetheinyltransferase enzyme, PswP, in the biosynthesis of antimicrobial secondary metabolites by Serratia marcescens Db10

    PubMed Central

    Gerc, Amy J.; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphopantetheinyltransferase (PPTase) enzymes fulfil essential roles in primary and secondary metabolism in prokaryotes, archaea and eukaryotes. PPTase enzymes catalyse the essential modification of the carrier protein domain of fatty acid synthases, polyketide synthases (PKSs) and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). In bacteria and fungi, NRPS and PKS enzymes are often responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites with clinically relevant properties; these secondary metabolites include a variety of antimicrobial peptides. We have previously shown that in the Gram-negative bacterium Serratia marcescens Db10, the PPTase enzyme PswP is essential for the biosynthesis of an NRPS-PKS dependent antibiotic called althiomycin. In this work we utilize bioinformatic analyses to classify PswP as belonging to the F/KES subfamily of Sfp type PPTases and to putatively identify additional NRPS substrates of PswP, in addition to the althiomycin NRPS-PKS, in Ser. marcescens Db10. We show that PswP is required for the production of three diffusible metabolites by this organism, each possessing antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Genetic analyses identify the three metabolites as althiomycin, serrawettin W2 and an as-yet-uncharacterized siderophore, which may be related to enterobactin. Our results highlight the use of an individual PPTase enzyme in multiple biosynthetic pathways, each contributing to the ability of Ser. marcescens to inhibit competitor bacteria by the production of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. PMID:24847000

  14. Dysregulation of Plasmalogen Homeostasis Impairs Cholesterol Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Honsho, Masanori; Abe, Yuichi; Fujiki, Yukio

    2015-11-27

    Plasmalogen biosynthesis is regulated by modulating fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 stability in a manner dependent on cellular plasmalogen level. However, physiological significance of the regulation of plasmalogen biosynthesis remains unknown. Here we show that elevation of the cellular plasmalogen level reduces cholesterol biosynthesis without affecting the isoprenylation of proteins such as Rab and Pex19p. Analysis of intermediate metabolites in cholesterol biosynthesis suggests that the first oxidative step in cholesterol biosynthesis catalyzed by squalene monooxygenase (SQLE), an important regulator downstream HMG-CoA reductase in cholesterol synthesis, is reduced by degradation of SQLE upon elevation of cellular plasmalogen level. By contrast, the defect of plasmalogen synthesis causes elevation of SQLE expression, resulting in the reduction of 2,3-epoxysqualene required for cholesterol synthesis, hence implying a novel physiological consequence of the regulation of plasmalogen biosynthesis.

  15. Function of MbtH homologs in nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis and applications in secondary metabolite discovery.

    PubMed

    Baltz, Richard H

    2011-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes mycobactin, a peptide siderophore that is biosynthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Within the mycobactin biosynthetic gene cluster is a gene that encodes a 71-amino-acid protein MbtH. Many other NRPS gene clusters harbor mbtH homologs, and recent genetic, biochemical, and structural studies have begun to shed light on the function(s) of these proteins. In some cases, MbtH-like proteins are required for biosynthesis of their cognate peptides, and non-cognate MbtH-like proteins have been shown to be partially complementary. Biochemical studies revealed that certain MbtH-like proteins participate in tight binding to NRPS proteins containing adenylation (A) domains where they stimulate adenylation reactions. Expression of MbtH-like proteins is important for a number of applications, including optimal production of native and genetically engineered secondary metabolites produced by mechanisms that employ NRPS enzymes. They also may serve as beacons to identify gifted actinomycetes and possibly other bacteria that encode multiple functional NRPS pathways for discovery of novel secondary metabolites by genome mining.

  16. Accurate Mass MS/MS/MS Analysis of Siderophores Ferrioxamine B and E1 by Collision-Induced Dissociation Electrospray Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidebottom, Ashley M.; Karty, Jonathan A.; Carlson, Erin E.

    2015-11-01

    Siderophores are bacterially secreted, small molecule iron chelators that facilitate the binding of insoluble iron (III) for reuptake and use in various biological processes. These compounds are classified by their iron (III) binding geometry, as dictated by subunit composition and include groups such as the trihydroxamates (hexadentate ligand) and catecholates (bidentate). Small modifications to the core structure such as acetylation, lipid tail addition, or cyclization, make facile characterization of new siderophores difficult by molecular ion detection alone (MS1). We have expanded upon previous fragmentation-directed studies using electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS/MS) and identified diagnostic MS3 features from the trihydroxamate siderophore class for ferrioxamine B and E1 by accurate mass. Diagnostic features for MS3 include C-C, C-N, amide, and oxime cleavage events with proposed losses of water and -CO from the iron (III) coordination sites. These insights will facilitate the discovery of novel trihydroxamate siderophores from complex sample matrices.

  17. The siderophores of Pseudomonas fluorescens 18.1 and the importance of cyclopeptidic substructures for the recognition at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Amann, C; Taraz, K; Budzikiewicz, H; Meyer, J M

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the pyoverdin siderophore of Pseudomonas fluorescens 18.1 was elucidated by spectroscopic methods and chemical degradation. By cross feeding studies structurally closely related pyoverdins containing a C-terminal cyclopeptidic substructure were tested regarding the mutual recognition by the producing strains. Partial recognition of foreign pyoverdins was observed. PMID:11098814

  18. Siderophore-mediated iron acquisition in the entomopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila L48 and its close relative Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    PubMed

    Matthijs, Sandra; Laus, Georges; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Abbaspour-Tehrani, Kourosch; Schäfer, Mathias; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Cornelis, Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Pseudomonas entomophila L48 is a recently identified entomopathogenic bacterium which, upon ingestion, kills Drosophila melanogaster, and is closely related to P. putida. The complete genome of this species has been sequenced and therefore a genomic, genetic and structural analysis of the siderophore-mediated iron acquisition was undertaken. P. entomophila produces two siderophores, a structurally new and unique pyoverdine and the secondary siderophore pseudomonine, already described in P. fluorescens species. Structural analysis of the pyoverdine produced by the closely related P. putida KT2440 showed that this strain produces an already characterised pyoverdine, but different from P. entomophila, and no evidence was found for the production of a second siderophore. Growth stimulation assays with heterologous pyoverdines demonstrated that P. entomophila is able to utilize a large variety of structurally distinct pyoverdines produced by other Pseudomonas species. In contrast, P. putida KT2440 is able to utilize only its own pyoverdine and the pyoverdine produced by P. syringae LMG 1247. Our data suggest that although closely related, P. entomophila is a more efficient competitor for iron than P. putida. PMID:19459056

  19. Impact of substrates and cell immobilization on siderophore activity by Pseudomonads in a Fe and/or Cr, Hg, Pb containing-medium.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Lebeau, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    To increase the amount of bioavailable metals in phytoextraction purposes, soil bioaugmentation with Pseudomonads, as siderophore producers with high metal complexation levels, could be relevant. Unfortunately, siderophore synthesis may be inhibited by soluble iron in soil and bacteria can suffer at the same time from the toxicity of some other metals, predation and oligotrophy. To overcome these drawbacks, we attempted to co-locate a carbon substrate and Pseudomonas aeruginosa or P. fluorescens in Ca-alginate beads. First, free-cell cultures showed that glycerol, fructose, mannitol and skim milk enhanced the siderophore activity which was the highest in the medium with neither Fe or TM (toxic metal) (Cr, Hg and Pb) and the lowest in the Fe-containing medium without TM. The negative effect of iron was partly offset when TM was added to the medium. In a second part, co-location of microorganisms and substrates was only feasible with skim milk. By comparison with free cells, siderophore activity by immobilized cells was higher in culture media containing Fe with or without TM (up to a ratio of 9), and varied in a narrow margin, according to the medium composition. PMID:17112663

  20. Efficacy of the Salmonella siderophore receptor protein vaccine against lymph node carriage and fecal shedding of Samonella in commercial feedlot cattle: A randomized complete block design study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of the Salmonella Newport siderophore receptor protein (SRP)® vaccine for reducing lymph node (LN) carriage and fecal shedding of Salmonella at harvest was investigated in a study of commercial feedlot cattle. The study was designed as a randomized complete block with pen as the experi...

  1. Identification of extracellular siderophores and a related peptide from the endophytic fungus Epichloë festucae in culture and endophyte-infected Lolium perenne

    PubMed Central

    Koulman, Albert; Lee, T. Verne; Fraser, Karl; Johnson, Linda; Arcus, Vickery; Lott, J. Shaun; Rasmussen, Susanne; Lane, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    A number of genes encoding non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) have been identified in fungi of Epichloë/Neotyphodium species, endophytes of Pooid grasses, including sidN, putatively encoding a ferrichrome siderophore-synthesizing NRPS. Targeted gene replacement and complementation of sidN in Epichloë festucae has established that extracellular siderophore epichloënin A is the major product of the SidN enzyme complex (Johnson et al., 2007a). We report here high resolution mass spectrometric fragmentation experiments and NMR analysis of an isolated fraction establishing that epichloënin A is a siderophore of the ferrichrome family, comprising a cyclic sequence of four glycines, a glutamine and three Nδ-trans-anhydromevalonyl–Nδ-hydroxyornithine (AMHO) moieties. Epichloënin A is unusual among ferrichrome siderophores in comprising an octapeptide rather than hexapeptide sequence, and in incorporating a glutamine residue. During this investigation we have established that desferrichrome siderophores with pendant trans-AMHO groups can be distinguished from those with pendant cis-AMHO groups by the characteristic neutral loss of an hydroxyornithine moiety in the MS/MS spectrum. A minor component, epichloënin B, has been characterized as the triglycine variant by mass spectrometry. A peptide characterized by mass spectrometry as the putative deoxygenation product, epichloëamide has been detected together with ferriepichloënin A in guttation fluid from ryegrass (Lolium perenne) plants infected with wild-type E. festucae, but not in plants infected with the ΔsidN mutant strain, and also detected at trace levels in wild-type E. festucae fungal culture. PMID:22196939

  2. Microbial Siderophores Exert a Subtle Role in Arabidopsis during Infection by Manipulating the Immune Response and the Iron Status1[W

    PubMed Central

    Dellagi, Alia; Segond, Diego; Rigault, Martine; Fagard, Mathilde; Simon, Clara; Saindrenan, Patrick; Expert, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    Siderophores (ferric ion chelators) are secreted by organisms in response to iron deficiency. The pathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi produces two siderophores, achromobactin and chrysobactin (CB), which are required for systemic dissemination in host plants. Previous studies have shown that CB is produced in planta and can trigger the up-regulation of the plant ferritin gene AtFER1. To further investigate the function of CB during pathogenesis, we analyzed its effect in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants following leaf infiltration. CB activates the salicylic acid (SA)-mediated signaling pathway, while the CB ferric complex is ineffective, suggesting that the elicitor activity of this siderophore is due to its iron-binding property. We confirmed this hypothesis by testing the effect of siderophores structurally unrelated to CB, including deferrioxamine. There was no activation of SA-dependent defense in plants grown under iron deficiency before CB treatment. Transcriptional analysis of the genes encoding the root ferrous ion transporter and ferric chelate reductase, and determination of the activity of this enzyme in response to CB or deferrioxamine, showed that these compounds induce a leaf-to-root iron deficiency signal. This root response as well as ferritin gene up-regulation in the leaf were not compromised in a SA-deficient mutant line. Using the Arabidopsis-E. chrysanthemi pathosystem, we have shown that CB promotes bacterial growth in planta and can modulate plant defenses through an antagonistic mechanism between SA and jasmonic acid signaling cascades. Collectively, these data reveal a new link between two processes mediated by SA and iron in response to microbial siderophores. PMID:19448037

  3. Bacterial ability in AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction: Relation to arsenic tolerance, P uptake, and siderophore production.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Teplitski, Max; Ma, Lena Q

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between bacterial ability in arsenic transformation, siderophore production, and P uptake was investigated using six arsenic-resistant bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata. Bacterial strains of PG5 and 12 were better arsenite (AsIII) oxidizers (31-46 vs. 6.2-21% of 1 mM AsIII) whereas PG 6, 9, 10 and 16 were better arsenate (AsV) reducers (58-95 vs. 7.5-46% of 1 mM AsV). Increase in AsV concentration from 0 to 1 mM induced 3.0-8.4 times more P uptake by bacteria but increase in P concentration from 0.1 to 1 mM reduced AsV uptake by 17-71%, indicating that P and AsV were taken up by P transporters. Bacteria producing more siderophores (PG5 and 12; >73 μM equiv) showed greater AsIII oxidation and AsIII resistance than those producing less siderophore (PG 6, 9, 10 and 16; <23 μM equiv). This observation was further supported by results obtained from mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens impaired in siderophore production, as they were 23-25% less tolerant to AsIII than the wild-type. Arsenic-resistant bacteria increased their arsenic tolerance by retaining less arsenic in cells via efficient AsIII oxidation and AsV reduction, which were impacted by P uptake and siderophore production. PMID:25576133

  4. The FupA/B protein uniquely facilitates transport of ferrous iron and siderophore-associated ferric iron across the outer membrane of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Girija; Sen, Bhaswati

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative pathogen that replicates intracellularly within the mammalian host. One of the factors associated with virulence of F. tularensis is the protein FupA that mediates high-affinity transport of ferrous iron across the outer membrane. Together with its paralogue FslE, a siderophore-ferric iron transporter, FupA supports survival of the pathogen in the host by providing access to the essential nutrient iron. The FupA orthologue in the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) is encoded by the hybrid gene fupA/B, the product of an intergenic recombination event that significantly contributes to attenuation of the strain. We used (55)Fe transport assays with mutant strains complemented with the different paralogues to show that the FupA/B protein of LVS retains the capacity for high-affinity transport of ferrous iron, albeit less efficiently than FupA of virulent strain Schu S4. (55)Fe transport assays using purified siderophore and siderophore-dependent growth assays on iron-limiting agar confirmed previous findings that FupA/B also contributes to siderophore-mediated ferric iron uptake. These assays further demonstrated that the LVS FslE protein is a weaker siderophore-ferric iron transporter than the orthologue from Schu S4, and may be a result of the sequence variation between the two proteins. Our results indicate that iron-uptake mechanisms in LVS differ from those in Schu S4 and that functional differences in the outer membrane iron transporters have distinct effects on growth under iron limitation.

  5. Bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm lipocalin 2 induce hypoxia inducible factor 1α and proinflammatory cytokine secretion in cultured respiratory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Lenio, Steven; Kuick, Rork; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Shah, Yatrik M; Bachman, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Iron is essential for many cellular processes and is required by bacteria for replication. To acquire iron from the host, pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria secrete siderophores, including enterobactin (Ent). However, Ent is bound by the host protein lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), preventing bacterial reuptake of aferric or ferric Ent. Furthermore, the combination of Ent and Lcn2 (Ent+Lcn2) leads to enhanced secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to that induced by either stimulus alone. Modified or structurally distinct siderophores, including yersiniabactin (Ybt) and glycosylated Ent (GlyEnt, or salmochelin), deliver iron to bacteria despite the presence of Lcn2. We hypothesized that the robust immune response to Ent and Lcn2 requires iron chelation rather than the Ent+Lcn2 complex itself and also can be stimulated by Lcn2-evasive siderophores. To test this hypothesis, cultured respiratory epithelial cells were stimulated with combinations of purified siderophores and Lcn2 and analyzed by gene expression microarrays, quantitative PCR, and cytokine immunoassays. Ent caused HIF-1α protein stabilization, induced the expression of genes regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and repressed genes involved in cell cycle and DNA replication, whereas Lcn2 induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation by excess Ent or Ybt significantly increased Lcn2-induced secretion of IL-8, IL-6, and CCL20. Stabilization of HIF-1α was sufficient to enhance Lcn2-induced IL-6 secretion. These data indicate that respiratory epithelial cells can respond to bacterial siderophores that evade or overwhelm Lcn2 binding by increasing proinflammatory cytokine production.

  6. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration. PMID:19560175

  7. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration.

  8. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, regeneration and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Thöny, B; Auerbach, G; Blau, N

    2000-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor is essential for various processes, and is present in probably every cell or tissue of higher organisms. BH(4) is required for various enzyme activities, and for less defined functions at the cellular level. The pathway for the de novo biosynthesis of BH(4) from GTP involves GTP cyclohydrolase I, 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase. Cofactor regeneration requires pterin-4a-carbinolamine dehydratase and dihydropteridine reductase. Based on gene cloning, recombinant expression, mutagenesis studies, structural analysis of crystals and NMR studies, reaction mechanisms for the biosynthetic and recycling enzymes were proposed. With regard to the regulation of cofactor biosynthesis, the major controlling point is GTP cyclohydrolase I, the expression of which may be under the control of cytokine induction. In the liver at least, activity is inhibited by BH(4), but stimulated by phenylalanine through the GTP cyclohydrolase I feedback regulatory protein. The enzymes that depend on BH(4) are the phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylases, the latter two being the rate-limiting enzymes for catecholamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) biosynthesis, all NO synthase isoforms and the glyceryl-ether mono-oxygenase. On a cellular level, BH(4) has been found to be a growth or proliferation factor for Crithidia fasciculata, haemopoietic cells and various mammalian cell lines. In the nervous system, BH(4) is a self-protecting factor for NO, or a general neuroprotecting factor via the NO synthase pathway, and has neurotransmitter-releasing function. With regard to human disease, BH(4) deficiency due to autosomal recessive mutations in all enzymes (except sepiapterin reductase) have been described as a cause of hyperphenylalaninaemia. Furthermore, several neurological diseases, including Dopa-responsive dystonia, but also Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, autism and depression, have been suggested to be

  9. Influence of siderophore pyoverdine synthesis and iron-uptake on abiotic and biotic surface colonization of Pseudomonas putida S11.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Paramasivan; Shankar, Manoharan; Ilakkiam, Devaraj; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy

    2012-12-01

    Fluorescent pseudomonads produce a characteristic fluorescent pigment, pyoverdines as their primary siderophore for iron acquisition under iron-limiting conditions. Here, we report the identification of a random transposon mutant IST3 of Pseudomonas putida S11 showing tolerance to iron starvation stress condition and increased pyoverdine production. The insertion of the Tn5 transposon was found to be in pstS gene of pstSR operon encoding sensor histidine kinase protein of the two-component signal transduction system. A pyoverdine negative derivative of IST3 mutant constructed was sensitive to iron stress condition. It indicated that increased survival of IST3 under iron-limiting condition was due to higher pyoverdine production. The iron starvation tolerant mutant (IST3) exhibited enhanced pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake in minimal medium which significantly improved its biofilm formation, seed adhesion and competitive root colonization.

  10. Fatty acid biosynthesis in actinomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Gago, Gabriela; Diacovich, Lautaro; Arabolaza, Ana; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Gramajo, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    All organisms that produce fatty acids do so via a repeated cycle of reactions. In mammals and other animals, these reactions are catalyzed by a type I fatty acid synthase (FAS), a large multifunctional protein to which the growing chain is covalently attached. In contrast, most bacteria (and plants) contain a type II system in which each reaction is catalyzed by a discrete protein. The pathway of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is well established and has provided a foundation for elucidating the type II FAS pathways in other bacteria (White et al., 2005). However, fatty acid biosynthesis is more diverse in the phylum Actinobacteria: Mycobacterium, possess both FAS systems while Streptomyces species have only the multi-enzyme FAS II system and Corynebacterium species exclusively FAS I. In this review we present an overview of the genome organization, biochemical properties and physiological relevance of the two FAS systems in the three genera of actinomycetes mentioned above. We also address in detail the biochemical and structural properties of the acyl-CoA carboxylases (ACCases) that catalyzes the first committed step of fatty acid synthesis in actinomycetes, and discuss the molecular bases of their substrate specificity and the structure-based identification of new ACCase inhibitors with anti-mycobacterial properties. PMID:21204864

  11. Oleic acid biosynthesis in cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    VanDusen, W.J.; Jaworski, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    The biosynthesis of fatty acids in cyanobacteria is very similar to the well characterized system found in green plants. However, the initial desaturation of stearic acid in cyanobacteria appears to represent a significant departure from plant systems in which stearoyl-ACP is the exclusive substrate for desaturation. In Anabaena variabilis, the substrate appears to be monoglucosyldiacylglycerol, a lipid not found in plants. The authors examined five different cyanobacteria to determine if the pathway in A. variabilis was generally present in other cyanobacteria. The cyanobacteria studied were A. variabilis, Chlorogloeopsis sp., Schizothrix calcicola, Anacystis marina, and Anacystis nidulans. Each were grown in liquid culture, harvested, and examined for stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity or incubated with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. None of the cyanobacteria contained any stearoyl-ACP desaturase activity in whole homogenates or 105,000g supernatants. All were capable of incorporating /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ into monoglucosyldiacylglycerol and results from incubations of 20 min, 1 hr, 1 hr + 10 hr chase were consistent with monoglucosyldiacylglycerol serving as precursor for monogalctosyldiacylglycerol. Thus, initial evidence is consistent with oleic acid biosynthesis occurring by desaturation of stearoyl-monoglucosyldiacylglycerol in all cyanobacteria.

  12. Lipoarabinomannans: from structure to biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Nigou, Jérôme; Gilleron, Martine; Puzo, Germain

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is one of the most effective human pathogens and the molecular basis of its virulence remains poorly understood. Here, we review our current knowledge about the structure and biosynthesis of the mycobacterial cell-wall lipoglycans, lipoarabinomannans (LAM). LAM are ubiquitous of mycobacteria and appear as the most potent non-peptidic molecules to modulate the host immune response. Nevertheless, LAM structure differs according to the mycobacterial species and three types of LAM have been described: mannose-capped LAM (ManLAM), phospho-myo-inositol-capped LAM (PILAM) and non-capped LAM (AraLAM). The type of capping is a major structural feature determining the ability of LAM to modulate the immune response. ManLAM, found in slow-growing mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis, have been demonstrated to be powerful anti-inflammatory molecules and emerge as key virulence factors that may be relevant drug targets. LAM-like molecules are not only confined to mycobacteria but are also present in actinomycetes (including the genera Rhodococcus, Corynebacterium or Gordonia). This offers the possibility of comparative studies that should help in deciphering the structure-function relationships and biosynthesis of these complex molecules in the future.

  13. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis.

  14. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors - a multifunctional toolbox.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Mizuki; Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2016-01-01

    In the current review, we examine the growing number of existing Cellulose Biosynthesis Inhibitors (CBIs) and based on those that have been studied with live cell imaging we group their mechanism of action. Attention is paid to the use of CBIs as tools to ask fundamental questions about cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26590309

  15. Adsorption to metal oxides of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa siderophore pyoverdine and implications for bacterial biofilm formation on metals.

    PubMed

    Upritchard, Hamish G; Yang, Jing; Bremer, Philip J; Lamont, Iain L; McQuillan, A James

    2007-06-19

    The initiation of biofilm formation is poorly understood, and in particular, the contribution of chemical bond formation between bacterial cells and metal surfaces has received little attention. We have previously used in situ infrared spectroscopy to show, during the initial stages of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, the formation of coordinate covalent bonds between titanium dioxide particle films and pyoverdine, a mixed catecholate and hydroxamate siderophore. Here we show using infrared spectroscopy that pyoverdine can also form covalent bonds with particle films of Fe2O3, CrOOH, and AlOOH. Adsorption to the metal oxides through the catechol-like 2,3-diamino-6,7-dihydroxyquinoline part of pyoverdine was most evident in the infrared spectrum of the adsorbed pyoverdine molecule. Weaker infrared absorption bands that are consistent with the hydroxamic acids of pyoverdine binding covalently to TiO2, Fe2O3, and AlOOH surfaces were also observed. The adsorption of pyoverdine to TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces showed a pH dependence that is indicative of the dominance of the catechol-like ligand of pyoverdine. Infrared absorption bands were also evident for pyoverdine associated with the cells of P. aeruginosa on TiO2 and Fe2O3 surfaces and were notably absent for genetically modified cells unable to synthesize or bind pyoverdine at the cell surface. These studies confirm the generality of pyoverdine-metal bond formation and suggest a wider involvement of siderophores in bacterial biofilm initiation on metals.

  16. Current aspects of auxin biosynthesis in plants.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Auxin is an important plant hormone essential for many aspects of plant growth and development. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most studied auxin in plants, and its biosynthesis pathway has been investigated for over 70 years. Although the complete picture of auxin biosynthesis remains to be elucidated, remarkable progress has been made recently in understanding the mechanism of IAA biosynthesis. Genetic and biochemical studies demonstrate that IAA is mainly synthesized from l-tryptophan (Trp) via indole-3-pyruvate by two-step reactions in Arabidopsis. While IAA is also produced from Trp via indole-3-acetaldoxime in Arabidopsis, this pathway likely plays an auxiliary role in plants of the family Brassicaceae. Recent studies suggest that the Trp-independent pathway is not a major route for IAA biosynthesis, but they reveal an important role for a cytosolic indole synthase in this pathway. In this review, I summarize current views and future prospects of IAA biosynthesis research in plants.

  17. Topographic heterogeneity in cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Y; Muraski, M F

    1988-07-01

    We have examined the membrane topography of cholesterol biosynthesis in cultured human fibroblasts. We fed the cells with radioacetate and then interrupted the biosynthetic pathway so as to trap labeled intermediates in their subcellular locations. We analyzed homogenates of human fibroblasts labeled biosynthetically from radioacetate by centrifugation to equilibrium on sucrose gradients. The following two methods were used to interrupt cholesterol biosynthesis: incubation at 10 degrees C and treatment with 4,4,10 beta-trimethyl-trans-decal-3 beta-ol, a specific inhibitor of oxidosqualene cyclase. Incubation at 10 degrees C caused the accumulation of radiolanosterol at the expense of cholesterol. The lanosterol appeared predominantly at an unusually buoyant density (20% (w/w) sucrose; d = 1.08 g/cm3) as well as at the density normally labeled at 37 degrees C (30% sucrose; d = 1.13 g/cm3). 4,4,10 beta-Trimethyl-trans-decal-3 beta-ol treatment caused the accumulation of labeled squalene and squalene 2,3-oxide. Reversal of the block permitted the label to progress rapidly as a wave into lanosterol and ultimately into cholesterol. The profiles of the three precursors did not coincide, suggesting that they were mostly in different membranes. Squalene was uniquely confined to a density of 1.18 g/cm3 (40% sucrose) while squalene 2,3-oxide appeared in peaks of density 1.08 g/cm3 and 1.13 g/cm3 (20% and 30% sucrose). Lanosterol was in a peak of density 1.13 g/cm3. Pulse-chase experiments showed that lanosterol synthesized in the membranes at 20% sucrose moved rapidly to the membranes at 30% sucrose where it was converted to cholesterol. The density gradient profiles of the following organelle markers also were monitored: plasma membrane, cholesterol mass; Golgi apparatus, galactosyltransferase; endoplasmic reticulum, RNA, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and cytochrome c reductase; peroxisomes, catalase. None of these markers appeared at the buoyant density

  18. Steroid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiehan; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Vihma, Veera

    2015-11-01

    Tissue-specific expression of steroidogenic enzymes allows the modulation of active steroid levels in a local manner. Thus, the measurement of local steroid concentrations, rather than the circulating levels, has been recognized as a more accurate indicator of the steroid action within a specific tissue. Adipose tissue, one of the largest endocrine tissues in the human body, has been established as an important site for steroid storage and metabolism. Locally produced steroids, through the enzymatic conversion from steroid precursors delivered to adipose tissue, have been proven to either functionally regulate adipose tissue metabolism, or quantitatively contribute to the whole body's steroid levels. Most recently, it has been suggested that adipose tissue may contain the steroidogenic machinery necessary for the initiation of steroid biosynthesis de novo from cholesterol. This review summarizes the evidence indicating the presence of the entire steroidogenic apparatus in adipose tissue and discusses the potential roles of local steroid products in modulating adipose tissue activity and other metabolic parameters.

  19. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis. PMID:26169681

  20. Acylphloroglucinol Biosynthesis in Strawberry Fruit.

    PubMed

    Song, Chuankui; Ring, Ludwig; Hoffmann, Thomas; Huang, Fong-Chin; Slovin, Janet; Schwab, Wilfried

    2015-11-01

    Phenolics have health-promoting properties and are a major group of metabolites in fruit crops. Through reverse genetic analysis of the functions of four ripening-related genes in the octoploid strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), we discovered four acylphloroglucinol (APG)-glucosides as native Fragaria spp. fruit metabolites whose levels were differently regulated in the transgenic fruits. The biosynthesis of the APG aglycones was investigated by examination of the enzymatic properties of three recombinant Fragaria vesca chalcone synthase (FvCHS) proteins. CHS is involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis during ripening. The F. vesca enzymes readily catalyzed the condensation of two intermediates in branched-chain amino acid metabolism, isovaleryl-Coenzyme A (CoA) and isobutyryl-CoA, with three molecules of malonyl-CoA to form phlorisovalerophenone and phlorisobutyrophenone, respectively, and formed naringenin chalcone when 4-coumaroyl-CoA was used as starter molecule. Isovaleryl-CoA was the preferred starter substrate of FvCHS2-1. Suppression of CHS activity in both transient and stable CHS-silenced fruit resulted in a substantial decrease of APG glucosides and anthocyanins and enhanced levels of volatiles derived from branched-chain amino acids. The proposed APG pathway was confirmed by feeding isotopically labeled amino acids. Thus, Fragaria spp. plants have the capacity to synthesize pharmaceutically important APGs using dual functional CHS/(phloriso)valerophenone synthases that are expressed during fruit ripening. Duplication and adaptive evolution of CHS is the most probable scenario and might be generally applicable to other plants. The results highlight that important promiscuous gene function may be missed when annotation relies solely on in silico analysis.

  1. Oxidative mobilization of cerium and uranium and enhanced release of "immobile" high field strength elements from igneous rocks in the presence of the biogenic siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, Dennis; Kopf, Sebastian; Bau, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Polyvalent trace elements such as the high field strength elements (HFSE) are commonly considered rather immobile during low-temperature water-rock interaction. Hence, they have become diagnostic tools that are widely applied in geochemical studies. We present results of batch leaching experiments focused on the mobilization of certain HFSE (Y, Zr, Hf, Th, U and rare earth elements) from mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks in the presence and absence, respectively, of the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB). Our data show that DFOB strongly enhances the mobility of these trace elements during low-temperature water-rock interaction. The presence of DFOB produces two distinct features in the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) patterns of leaching solutions, regardless of the mineralogical and chemical composition or the texture of the rock type studied. Bulk rock-normalized REY patterns of leaching solutions with DFOB show (i) a very distinct positive Ce anomaly and (ii) depletion of La and other light REY relative to the middle REY, with a concave downward pattern between La and Sm. These features are not observed in experiments with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid or deionized water. In DFOB-bearing leaching solutions Ce and U are decoupled from and selectively enriched relative to light REY and Th, respectively, due to oxidation to Ce(IV) and U(VI). Oxidation of Ce3+ and U4+ is promoted by the significantly higher stability of the Ce(IV) and U(VI) DFOB complexes as compared to the Ce(III) and U(IV) DFOB complexes. This is similar to the relationship between the Ce(IV)- and Ce(III)-pentacarbonate complexes that cause positive Ce anomalies in alkaline lakes. However, while formation of Ce(IV) carbonate complexes is confined to alkaline environments, Ce(IV) DFOB complexes may produce positive Ce anomalies even in mildly acidic and near-neutral natural waters. Siderophore-promoted dissolution processes also significantly enhance mobility of other 'immobile' HFSE

  2. The Bradyrhizobium japonicum fegA gene encodes an iron-regulated outer membrane protein with similarity to hydroxamate-type siderophore receptors.

    PubMed Central

    LeVier, K; Guerinot, M L

    1996-01-01

    Iron is important in the symbiosis between soybean and its nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Bradyrhizobium japonicum, yet little is known about rhizobial iron acquisition strategies. Analysis of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) from B. japonicum 61A152 identified three iron-regulated OMPs in the size range of several known receptors for Fe(III)-scavenging siderophores. One of the iron-regulated proteins, FegA, was purified and microsequenced, and a reverse genetics approach was used to clone a fegA-containing DNA fragment. Sequencing of this fragment revealed a single open reading frame of 750 amino acids. A putative N-terminal signal sequence of 14 amino acids which would result in a mature protein of 736 amino acids with a molecular mass of 80,851 Da was predicted. FegA shares significant amino acid similarity with several Fe(III)-siderophore receptors from gram-negative bacteria and has greater than 50% amino acid similarity and 33% amino acid identity with two [corrected] bacterial receptors for hydroxamate-type Fe(III)-siderophores. A dendrogram describing total inferred sequence similarity among 36 TonB-dependent OMPs was constructed; FegA grouped with Fe(III)-hydroxamate receptors. The transcriptional start site of fegA was mapped by primer extension analysis, and a putative Fur-binding site was found in the promoter. Primer extension and RNA slot blot analysis demonstrated that fegA was expressed only in cells grown under iron-limiting conditions. This is the first report of the cloning of a gene encoding a putative Fe(III)-siderophore receptor from nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. PMID:8955412

  3. Irp9, encoded by the high-pathogenicity island of Yersinia enterocolitica, is able to convert chorismate into salicylate, the precursor of the siderophore yersiniabactin.

    PubMed

    Pelludat, Cosima; Brem, Daniela; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2003-09-01

    The Irp9 protein of Yersinia enterocolitica participates in the synthesis of salicylate, the precursor of the siderophore yersiniabactin. In Pseudomonas species, salicylate synthesis is mediated by two enzymes: isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate-lyase. Both enzymes are required for complementation of a Yersinia irp9 mutant. However, irp9 is not able to complement Escherichia coli entC for the production of enterobactin, which requires isochorismate as a precursor. These results suggest that Irp9 directly converts chorismate into salicylate.

  4. Alpha-keto acids are novel siderophores in the genera Proteus, Providencia, and Morganella and are produced by amino acid deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, H; Thieken, A; Reissbrodt, R; Jung, G; Winkelmann, G

    1993-01-01

    Growth promotion and iron transport studies revealed that certain alpha-keto acids generated by amino acid deaminases, by enterobacteria of the Proteus-Providencia-Morganella group (of the tribe Proteeae), show significant siderophore activity. Their iron-binding properties were confirmed by the chrome azurol S assay and UV spectra. These compounds form ligand-to-metal charge transfer bands in the range of 400 to 500 nm. Additional absorption bands of the enolized ligands at 500 to 700 nm are responsible for color formation. Siderophore activity was most pronounced with alpha-keto acids possessing an aromatic or heteroaromatic side chain, like phenylpyruvic acid and indolylpyruvic acid, resulting from deamination of phenylalanine and tryptophan, respectively. In addition, alpha-keto acids possessing longer nonpolar side chains, like alpha-ketoisocaproic acid or alpha-ketoisovaleric acid and even alpha-ketoadipic acid, also showed siderophore activity which was absent or negligible with smaller alpha-keto acids or those possessing polar functional groups, like pyruvic acid, alpha-ketobutyric acid, or alpha-ketoglutaric acid. The fact that deaminase-negative enterobacteria, like Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp., could not utilize alpha-keto acids supports the view that specific iron-carboxylate transport systems have evolved in members of the tribe Proteeae and are designed to recognize ferric complexes of both alpha-hydroxy acids and alpha-keto acids, of which the latter can easily be generated by L-amino acid deaminases in an amino acid-rich medium. Exogenous siderophores, like ferric hydroxamates (ferrichromes) and ferric polycarboxylates (rhizoferrin and citrate), were also utilized by members of the tribe Proteeae. Images PMID:8478334

  5. The ferrichrome uptake pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa involves an iron release mechanism with acylation of the siderophore and recycling of the modified desferrichrome.

    PubMed

    Hannauer, Mélissa; Barda, Yaniv; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Shanzer, Abraham; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2010-03-01

    The uptake of iron into Pseudomonas aeruginosa is mediated by two major siderophores produced by the bacterium, pyoverdine and pyochelin. The bacterium is also able of utilize several heterologous siderophores of bacterial or fungal origin. In this work, we have investigated the iron uptake in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by the heterologous ferrichrome siderophore. (55)Fe uptake assays showed that ferrichrome is transported across the outer membrane primarily (80%) by the FiuA receptor and to a lesser extent (20%) by a secondary transporter. Moreover, we demonstrate that like in the uptake of ferripyoverdine and ferripyochelin, the energy required for both pathways of ferrichrome uptake is provided by the inner membrane protein TonB1. Desferrichrome-(55)Fe uptake in P. aeruginosa was also dependent on the expression of the permease FiuB, suggesting that this protein is the inner membrane transporter of the ferrisiderophore. A biomimetic fluorescent analogue of ferrichrome, RL1194, was used in vivo to monitor the kinetics of iron release from ferrichrome in P. aeruginosa in real time. This dissociation involves acylation of ferrichrome and its biomimetic analogue RL1194 and recycling of both modified siderophores into the extracellular medium. FiuC, an N-acetyltransferase, is certainly involved in this mechanism of iron release, since its mutation abolished desferrichrome-(55)Fe uptake. The acetylated derivative reacts with iron in the extracellular medium and is able to be taken up again by the cells. All these observations are discussed in light of the current knowledge concerning ferrichrome uptake in P. aeruginosa and in Escherichia coli. PMID:20047910

  6. The Major Cow Milk Allergen Bos d 5 Manipulates T-Helper Cells Depending on Its Load with Siderophore-Bound Iron

    PubMed Central

    Roth-Walter, Franziska; Pacios, Luis F.; Gomez-Casado, Cristina; Hofstetter, Gerlinde; Roth, Georg A.; Singer, Josef; Diaz-Perales, Araceli; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of allergic sensitization to milk are still elusive. The major allergen Bos d 5 belongs to the lipocalin-family and thus is able to transport numerous ligands. In this study we investigated its ability to bind to iron-siderophore complexes and tested the immune-modulatory properties of Bos d 5 in either forms. Structural and in silico docking analysis of Bos d 5 revealed that Bos d 5 is able to bind to iron via catechol-based flavonoids (quercetin, myricetin, luteolin) that act as siderophores as confirmed by spectral-analysis and iron staining. Calculated dissociation constants of docking analyses were below 1 µM by virtual addition of iron. When incubated with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), only the apo-form of Bos d 5 led to an increase of CD4+positive cells and significantly elevated IL13 and IFNγ-levels. In contrast, holo-Bos d 5 decreased numbers of CD4 expressing cells and induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data give evidence that Bos d 5 is capable of binding iron via siderophores. Moreover, our data support for the first time the notion that the form of application (apo- or holo-form) is decisive for the subsequent immune response. The apo-form promotes Th2 cells and inflammation, whereas the holo-form appears to be immunosuppressive. PMID:25117976

  7. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  8. Sterols of the fungi - Distribution and biosynthesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The importance of sterols in the growth and reproduction in fungi is becoming increasingly apparent. This article concerns the composition and biosynthesis of ergosterol in these organisms. Comparison to plant and animal sterol formation are made.

  9. Deletion of the signalling molecule synthase ScbA has pleiotropic effects on secondary metabolite biosynthesis, morphological differentiation and primary metabolism in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    D'Alia, Davide; Eggle, Daniela; Nieselt, Kay; Hu, Wei‐Shou; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Summary Streptomycetes have high biotechnological relevance as producers of diverse metabolites widely used in medical and agricultural applications. The biosynthesis of these metabolites is controlled by signalling molecules, γ‐butyrolactones, that act as bacterial hormones. In Streptomyces coelicolor, a group of signalling molecules called SCBs (S. coelicolorbutanolides) regulates production of the pigmented antibiotics coelicolor polyketide (CPK), actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin. The γ‐butyrolactone synthase ScbA is responsible for the biosynthesis of SCBs. Here we show the results of a genome‐wide transcriptome analysis of a scbA deletion mutant prior to and during the transition to antibiotic production. We report a strong perturbation in the expression of three pigmented antibiotic clusters in the mutant throughout the growth curve, thus providing a molecular explanation for the antibiotic phenotype observed previously. Our study also revealed, for the first time, that the secondary metabolite cluster responsible for synthesis of the siderophore desferrioxamine is under the control of SCB signalling. Moreover, expression of the genes encoding enzymes for primary metabolism pathways, which supply antibiotic precursors and genes for morphological differentiation, was found shifted earlier in time in the mutant. In conclusion, our time series analysis demonstrates new details of the regulatory effects of the γ‐butyrolactone system in Streptomyces. PMID:21342469

  10. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kevin; Cerda, Ariel; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is one of the most important vegetable cultivated worldwide and the main source of dietary provitamin A. Contrary to other plants, almost all carrot varieties accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids in the root, resulting in a wide variety of colors, including those with purple, yellow, white, red and orange roots. During the first weeks of development the root, grown in darkness, is thin and pale and devoid of carotenoids. At the second month, the thickening of the root and the accumulation of carotenoids begins, and it reaches its highest level at 3 months of development. This normal root thickening and carotenoid accumulation can be completely altered when roots are grown in light, in which chromoplasts differentiation is redirected to chloroplasts development in accordance with an altered carotenoid profile. Here we discuss the current evidence on the biosynthesis of carotenoid in carrot roots in response to environmental cues that has contributed to our understanding of the mechanism that regulates the accumulation of carotenoids, as well as the carotenogenic gene expression and root development in D. carota. PMID:27485223

  11. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Kevin; Cerda, Ariel; Stange, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota) is one of the most important vegetable cultivated worldwide and the main source of dietary provitamin A. Contrary to other plants, almost all carrot varieties accumulate massive amounts of carotenoids in the root, resulting in a wide variety of colors, including those with purple, yellow, white, red and orange roots. During the first weeks of development the root, grown in darkness, is thin and pale and devoid of carotenoids. At the second month, the thickening of the root and the accumulation of carotenoids begins, and it reaches its highest level at 3 months of development. This normal root thickening and carotenoid accumulation can be completely altered when roots are grown in light, in which chromoplasts differentiation is redirected to chloroplasts development in accordance with an altered carotenoid profile. Here we discuss the current evidence on the biosynthesis of carotenoid in carrot roots in response to environmental cues that has contributed to our understanding of the mechanism that regulates the accumulation of carotenoids, as well as the carotenogenic gene expression and root development in D. carota.

  12. Biosynthesis of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes.

    PubMed

    Zamir, L O; Nikolakakis, A; Sauriol, F; Mamer, O

    1999-05-01

    Fusarium culmorum produces two major trichothecenes, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and sambucinol, and some minor apotrichothecenes. It was desired to investigate if during their biosynthesis a C-11-keto intermediate was involved. To verify this postulate, trichodiene, a known precursor to trichothecenes, was synthesized with two deuteriums at C-11 and one at C-15. It was then fed to F. culmorum cultures, and the derived metabolites were purified and analyzed. The results ruled out the involvement of an 11-keto intermediate but revealed two novel apotrichothecenes. The characterization of their structures suggested that one of the 2-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene stereoisomers (2alpha or 2beta) could be converted to sambucinol. These apotrichothecenes were therefore synthesized labeled specifically with two deuteriums at C-4 and C-15 and fed to F. culmorum cultures. Indeed, the result established for the first time that 2alpha-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene was a precursor to sambucinol. A biosynthetic scheme for the production of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes is described.

  13. Salicylic Acid Biosynthesis and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, D'Maris Amick; Vlot, A. Corina; Wildermuth, Mary C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been shown to regulate various aspects of growth and development; it also serves as a critical signal for activating disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and other plant species. This review surveys the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis and metabolism of this critical plant hormone. While a complete biosynthetic route has yet to be established, stressed Arabidopsis appear to synthesize SA primarily via an isochorismate-utilizing pathway in the chloroplast. A distinct pathway utilizing phenylalanine as the substrate also may contribute to SA accumulation, although to a much lesser extent. Once synthesized, free SA levels can be regulated by a variety of chemical modifications. Many of these modifications inactivate SA; however, some confer novel properties that may aid in long distance SA transport or the activation of stress responses complementary to those induced by free SA. In addition, a number of factors that directly or indirectly regulate the expression of SA biosynthetic genes or that influence the rate of SA catabolism have been identified. An integrated model, encompassing current knowledge of SA metabolism in Arabidopsis, as well as the influence other plant hormones exert on SA metabolism, is presented. PMID:22303280

  14. Biosynthesis of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes.

    PubMed

    Zamir, L O; Nikolakakis, A; Sauriol, F; Mamer, O

    1999-05-01

    Fusarium culmorum produces two major trichothecenes, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and sambucinol, and some minor apotrichothecenes. It was desired to investigate if during their biosynthesis a C-11-keto intermediate was involved. To verify this postulate, trichodiene, a known precursor to trichothecenes, was synthesized with two deuteriums at C-11 and one at C-15. It was then fed to F. culmorum cultures, and the derived metabolites were purified and analyzed. The results ruled out the involvement of an 11-keto intermediate but revealed two novel apotrichothecenes. The characterization of their structures suggested that one of the 2-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene stereoisomers (2alpha or 2beta) could be converted to sambucinol. These apotrichothecenes were therefore synthesized labeled specifically with two deuteriums at C-4 and C-15 and fed to F. culmorum cultures. Indeed, the result established for the first time that 2alpha-hydroxy-11alpha-apotrichothecene was a precursor to sambucinol. A biosynthetic scheme for the production of trichothecenes and apotrichothecenes is described. PMID:10552458

  15. Quinolobactin, a new siderophore of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400, the production of which is repressed by the cognate pyoverdine.

    PubMed

    Mossialos, D; Meyer, J M; Budzikiewicz, H; Wolff, U; Koedam, N; Baysse, C; Anjaiah, V; Cornelis, P

    2000-02-01

    Transposon mutant strain 3G6 of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 which was deficient in pyoverdine production, was found to produce another iron-chelating molecule; this molecule was identified as 8-hydroxy-4-methoxy-quinaldic acid (designated quinolobactin). The pyoverdine-deficient mutant produced a supplementary 75-kDa iron-repressed outer membrane protein (IROMP) in addition to the 85-kDa IROMP present in the wild type. The mutant was also characterized by substantially increased uptake of (59)Fe-quinolobactin. The 75-kDa IROMP was produced by the wild type after induction by quinolobactin-containing culture supernatants obtained from the pyoverdine-negative mutant or by purified quinolobactin. Conversely, adding purified wild-type pyoverdine to the growth medium resulted in suppression of the 75-kDa IROMP in the pyoverdine-deficient mutant; however, suppression was not observed when Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pyoverdine, a siderophore utilized by strain 3G6, was added to the culture. Therefore, we assume that the quinolobactin receptor is the 75-kDa IROMP and that the quinolobactin-mediated iron uptake system is repressed by the cognate pyoverdine. PMID:10653708

  16. Outer membrane protein mediating iron uptake via pyoverdinpss, the fluorescent siderophore produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Y S; Gross, D C

    1987-01-01

    In an iron-limited environment Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B301D produces a yellow-green fluorescent siderophore called pyoverdinpss which functions in high-affinity iron transport. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparisons of the outer membrane proteins of strain B301D identified nine proteins which were expressed at low (50 nM) but not at high (10 microM) iron concentrations. Except for the minor protein 8e, the iron-regulated proteins exhibited high molecular weights ranging from approximately 74,000 to 80,000. A mutant of strain B301D incapable of iron uptake (Iu-) from ferric pyoverdinpss lacked the 74,000-molecular-weight protein 4a, which was the major iron-regulated outer membrane protein. In contrast, a nonfluorescent mutant (Flu-) unable to synthesize pyoverdinpss showed no quantitative or qualitative difference in its outer membrane profile from that of the wild-type strain. In plant pathogenicity tests the Iu- and Flu- strains caused typical brown necrotic and sunken lesions in immature sweet cherry fruit which were indistinguishable from those of the wild-type strain. Thus, excretion of pyoverdinpss and subsequent Fe(III) uptake do not have a determinative role in the pathogenicity or virulence of P. syringae pv. syringae. Images PMID:3032911

  17. Reporting a new siderophore based Ca(2+) selective chemosensor that works as a staining agent in the live organism Artemia.

    PubMed

    Raju, M; Nair, Ratish R; Raval, Ishan H; Haldar, Soumya; Chatterjee, Pabitra B

    2015-11-21

    A Ca(2+)-specific chemosensor involving acyclic non-ether and non-carboxylato-type metal chelating ligands is rare. The tetradentate OONO artificial receptor, HL, possessing a sulfur-containing intermediate siderophore aeruginic acid, tethered to a rhodamine 6G based signalling unit in a single molecule has been synthesized. The fluoroionophore required excitation in the visible wavelength (510 nm) and showed highly selective and sensitive detection of Ca(2+) ions in 100% water solution in HEPES buffer at physiological pH (7.4). The probe HL, with LOD as low as 70 nM, behaves reversibly and showed nearly 17-fold enhanced selectivity for Ca(2+) over other cell abundant alkali and alkaline metal ions such as Na(+), K(+), Li(+), and Mg(2+) without any intervention. Job's plot, (1)H NMR titration and ESI-MS data provided corroborative evidence in support of 1 : 1 association between HL and Ca(2+). From a wide range of transition and heavy metal ions series, HL also binds Cu(2+). However, the use of l-cysteine removes the interference from Cu(2+) and results in highly selective detection specificity of HL for Ca(2+). As a reversible "off-on-off" fluorescent chemosensor, it is possible to detect Ca(2+) at as low as 5 μM in the midgut region of the gastrointestinal tract of the live animal Artemia, a brine shrimp. PMID:26460620

  18. Quinolobactin, a New Siderophore of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400, the Production of Which Is Repressed by the Cognate Pyoverdine

    PubMed Central

    Mossialos, Dimitris; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Wolff, Ulrich; Koedam, Nico; Baysse, Christine; Anjaiah, Vanamala; Cornelis, Pierre

    2000-01-01

    Transposon mutant strain 3G6 of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 which was deficient in pyoverdine production, was found to produce another iron-chelating molecule; this molecule was identified as 8-hydroxy-4-methoxy-quinaldic acid (designated quinolobactin). The pyoverdine-deficient mutant produced a supplementary 75-kDa iron-repressed outer membrane protein (IROMP) in addition to the 85-kDa IROMP present in the wild type. The mutant was also characterized by substantially increased uptake of 59Fe-quinolobactin. The 75-kDa IROMP was produced by the wild type after induction by quinolobactin-containing culture supernatants obtained from the pyoverdine-negative mutant or by purified quinolobactin. Conversely, adding purified wild-type pyoverdine to the growth medium resulted in suppression of the 75-kDa IROMP in the pyoverdine-deficient mutant; however, suppression was not observed when Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 pyoverdine, a siderophore utilized by strain 3G6, was added to the culture. Therefore, we assume that the quinolobactin receptor is the 75-kDa IROMP and that the quinolobactin-mediated iron uptake system is repressed by the cognate pyoverdine. PMID:10653708

  19. The Solution Structure, Binding Properties, and Dynamics of the Bacterial Siderophore-binding Protein FepB*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Byron C. H.; Otten, Renee; Krewulak, Karla D.; Mulder, Frans A. A.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) FepB plays a key role in transporting the catecholate siderophore ferric enterobactin from the outer to the inner membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. The solution structures of the 34-kDa apo- and holo-FepB from Escherichia coli, solved by NMR, represent the first solution structures determined for the type III class of PBPs. Unlike type I and II PBPs, which undergo large “Venus flytrap” conformational changes upon ligand binding, both forms of FepB maintain similar overall folds; however, binding of the ligand is accompanied by significant loop movements. Reverse methyl cross-saturation experiments corroborated chemical shift perturbation results and uniquely defined the binding pocket for gallium enterobactin (GaEnt). NMR relaxation experiments indicated that a flexible loop (residues 225–250) adopted a more rigid and extended conformation upon ligand binding, which positioned residues for optimal interactions with the ligand and the cytoplasmic membrane ABC transporter (FepCD), respectively. In conclusion, this work highlights the pivotal role that structural dynamics plays in ligand binding and transporter interactions in type III PBPs. PMID:25173704

  20. Synthesis and iron-binding properties of quinolobactin, a siderophore from a pyoverdine-deficient Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    du Dhardemare, A Moulinet; Serratrice, G; Pierre, J L

    2004-12-01

    Quinolobactin is a new siderophore produced by a pyoverdine deficient mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens. A simple and efficient synthesis of quinolobactin is described, starting from xanthurenic acid. The protonation constants of quinolobactin were determined by potentiometric titrations as pKa2 = 5.50+/-0.07, pKa1 = 10.30+/-0.05. The equilibria of the metal complexes were studied by means of spectrophotometric and potentiometric titrations. The overall stability constants of the quinolobactin-FeIII complexes was found to be log beta111 = 18.60+/-0.10, log beta121 = 32.60+/-0.20, log beta120 = 28.20+/-0.25 resulting in a pFeIII value of 18.2 at pH 7.4. The UV-visible spectral parameters of the [FeL2] are in agreement with a complex containing two ligands coordinated to one Fe3+ cation through the oxygen and nitrogen quinoline atoms. PMID:15689111

  1. Disruption of Transporters Affiliated with Enantio-Pyochelin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 Has Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. In this study, we investigated whether several transporters that are encoded by genes within or adjacent to the enantio-pyochelin biosynthetic cluster, serve as efflux systems for enantio-pyochelin and/or its intermediates. In addition, we determined whether these transporters have broad substrates range specificity using a Phenotype Microarray system. Intriguingly, knockouts of the pchH and fetF transporter genes resulted in mutant strains that secrete higher levels of enantio-pyochelin as well as its intermediates salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. Analyses of these mutants did not indicate significant change in transcription of biosynthetic genes involved in enantio-pyochelin production. In contrast, the deletion mutant of PFL_3504 resulted in reduced transcription of the biosynthetic genes as well as decreased dihydroaeruginoic acid concentrations in the culture supernatant, which could either point to regulation of gene expression by the transporter or its role in dihydroaeruginoic acid transport. Disruption of each of the transporters resulted in altered stress and/or chemical resistance profile of Pf-5, which may reflect that these transporters could have specificity for rather a broad range of substrates. PMID:27442435

  2. Disruption of Transporters Affiliated with Enantio-Pyochelin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 Has Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Penesyan, Anahit; Hassan, Karl A.; Loper, Joyce E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. In this study, we investigated whether several transporters that are encoded by genes within or adjacent to the enantio-pyochelin biosynthetic cluster, serve as efflux systems for enantio-pyochelin and/or its intermediates. In addition, we determined whether these transporters have broad substrates range specificity using a Phenotype Microarray system. Intriguingly, knockouts of the pchH and fetF transporter genes resulted in mutant strains that secrete higher levels of enantio-pyochelin as well as its intermediates salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic acid. Analyses of these mutants did not indicate significant change in transcription of biosynthetic genes involved in enantio-pyochelin production. In contrast, the deletion mutant of PFL_3504 resulted in reduced transcription of the biosynthetic genes as well as decreased dihydroaeruginoic acid concentrations in the culture supernatant, which could either point to regulation of gene expression by the transporter or its role in dihydroaeruginoic acid transport. Disruption of each of the transporters resulted in altered stress and/or chemical resistance profile of Pf-5, which may reflect that these transporters could have specificity for rather a broad range of substrates. PMID:27442435

  3. Veratrole biosynthesis in white campion.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Tariq A; Pichersky, Eran

    2013-05-01

    White campion (Silene latifolia) is a dioecious plant that emits 1,2-dimethoxybenzene (veratrole), a potent pollinator attractant to the nocturnal moth Hadena bicruris. Little is known about veratrole biosynthesis, although methylation of 2-methoxyphenol (guaiacol), another volatile emitted from white campion flowers, has been proposed. Here, we explore the biosynthetic route to veratrole. Feeding white campion flowers with [(13)C9]l-phenylalanine increased guaiacol and veratrole emission, and a significant portion of these volatile molecules contained the stable isotope. When white campion flowers were treated with the phenylalanine ammonia lyase inhibitor 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid, guaiacol and veratrole levels were reduced by 50% and 63%, respectively. Feeding with benzoic acid (BA) or salicylic acid (SA) increased veratrole emission 2-fold, while [(2)H5]BA and [(2)H6]SA feeding indicated that the benzene ring of both guaiacol and veratrole is derived from BA via SA. We further report guaiacol O-methyltransferase (GOMT) activity in the flowers of white campion. The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity, and the peptide sequence matched that encoded by a recently identified complementary DNA (SlGOMT1) from a white campion flower expressed sequence tag database. Screening of a small population of North American white campion plants for floral volatile emission revealed that not all plants emitted veratrole or possessed GOMT activity, and SlGOMT1 expression was only observed in veratrole emitters. Collectively these data suggest that veratrole is derived by the methylation of guaiacol, which itself originates from phenylalanine via BA and SA, and therefore implies a novel branch point of the general phenylpropanoid pathway.

  4. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed. PMID:27236049

  5. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles: A green approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Annu; Ikram, Saiqa; Yudha S, Salprima

    2016-08-01

    Nanotechnology is an immensely developing field due to its extensive range of applications in different areas of technology and science. Different types of methods are employed for synthesis of nanoparticles due to their wide applications. The conventional chemical methods have certain limitations with them either in the form of chemical contaminations during their syntheses procedures or in later applications and use of higher energy. During the last decade research have been focussed on developing simple, clean, non-toxic, cost effective and eco-friendly protocols for synthesis of nanoparticles. In order to get this objective, biosynthesis methods have been developed in order to fill this gap. The biosynthesis of nanoparticles is simple, single step, eco-friendly and a green approach. The biochemical processes in biological agents reduce the dissolved metal ions into nano metals. The various biological agents like plant tissues, fungi, bacteria, etc. are used for biosynthesis for metal nanoparticles. In this review article, we summarised recent literature on biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles which have revolutionised technique of synthesis for their applications in different fields. Due to biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles, it has find its applications in biomedical applications. The protocol and mechanism of biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles along with various applications have also been discussed.

  6. Light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Laura; Karppinen, Katja; Luengo Escobar, Ana; Häggman, Hely; Jaakola, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of the most important environmental factors affecting flavonoid biosynthesis in plants. The absolute dependency of light to the plant development has driven evolvement of sophisticated mechanisms to sense and transduce multiple aspects of the light signal. Light effects can be categorized in photoperiod (duration), intensity (quantity), direction and quality (wavelength) including UV-light. Recently, new information has been achieved on the regulation of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis in fruits, in which flavonoids have a major contribution on quality. This review focuses on the effects of the different light conditions on the control of flavonoid biosynthesis in fruit producing plants. An overview of the currently known mechanisms of the light-controlled flavonoid accumulation is provided. R2R3 MYB transcription factors are known to regulate by differential expression the biosynthesis of distinct flavonoids in response to specific light wavelengths. Despite recent advances, many gaps remain to be understood in the mechanisms of the transduction pathway of light-controlled flavonoid biosynthesis. A better knowledge on these regulatory mechanisms is likely to be useful for breeding programs aiming to modify fruit flavonoid pattern. PMID:25346743

  7. Abscisic acid: biosynthesis, inactivation, homoeostasis and signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Park, Youngmin; Hwang, Inhwan

    2015-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes during plant growth and abiotic stress responses. The endogenous ABA level is controlled by complex regulatory mechanisms involving biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and signal transduction pathways. This complex regulatory network may target multiple levels, including transcription, translation and post-translational regulation of genes involved in ABA responses. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport have been characterized. The local ABA concentration is critical for initiating ABA-mediated signalling during plant development and in response to environmental changes. In this chapter we discuss the mechanisms that regulate ABA biosynthesis, catabolism, transport and homoeostasis. We also present the findings of recent research on ABA perception by cellular receptors, and ABA signalling in response to cellular and environmental conditions.

  8. Bacterial exopolysaccharides: biosynthesis pathways and engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jochen; Sieber, Volker; Rehm, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce a wide range of exopolysaccharides which are synthesized via different biosynthesis pathways. The genes responsible for synthesis are often clustered within the genome of the respective production organism. A better understanding of the fundamental processes involved in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the regulation of these processes is critical toward genetic, metabolic and protein-engineering approaches to produce tailor-made polymers. These designer polymers will exhibit superior material properties targeting medical and industrial applications. Exploiting the natural design space for production of a variety of biopolymer will open up a range of new applications. Here, we summarize the key aspects of microbial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and highlight the latest engineering approaches toward the production of tailor-made variants with the potential to be used as valuable renewable and high-performance products for medical and industrial applications. PMID:26074894

  9. Unconventional membrane lipid biosynthesis in Xanthomonas campestris.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Meriyem; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-09-01

    All bacteria are surrounded by at least one bilayer membrane mainly composed of phospholipids (PLs). Biosynthesis of the most abundant PLs phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL) is well understood in model bacteria such as Escherichia coli. It recently emerged, however, that the diversity of bacterial membrane lipids is huge and that not yet explored biosynthesis pathways exist, even for the common PLs. A good example is the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. It contains PE, PG and CL as major lipids and small amounts of the N-methylated PE derivatives monomethyl PE and phosphatidylcholine (PC = trimethylated PE). Xanthomonas campestris uses a repertoire of canonical and non-canonical enzymes for the synthesis of its membrane lipids. In this minireview, we briefly recapitulate standard pathways and integrate three recently discovered pathways into the overall picture of bacterial membrane biosynthesis.

  10. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters.

  11. Ethylene Biosynthesis-Inducing Xylanase 1

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jeffrey F. D.; Gross, Kenneth C.; Anderson, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Induction of ethylene biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) leaf discs by the ethylene biosynthesis-inducing xylanase (EIX) isolated from Cellulysin or xylan-grown cultures of Trichoderma viride was dependent upon the concentration of xylanase applied and upon the length of incubation. Arrhenius activation energies of 9,100 and 10,500 calories for the Cellulysin and T. viride EIX xylanase activities, respectively, were derived from the Km and Vmax values determined for each enzyme at several temperatures. The two xylanases digested xylan in a strictly endo fashion, releasing neither xylobiose nor free xylose, and no debranching activity was associated with either enzyme. The xylanases released polysaccharides from ground corn cobs, but little or no carbohydrate was released from tobacco mesophyll cell walls incubated with EIX. No heat-stable products capable of inducing ethylene biosynthesis in tobacco leaf discs were found in EIX digests of purified xylans. PMID:16668223

  12. Triterpenoid Biosynthesis and Engineering in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sawai, Satoru; Saito, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Triterpenoid saponins are a diverse group of natural products in plants and are considered defensive compounds against pathogenic microbes and herbivores. Because of their various beneficial properties for humans, saponins are used in wide-ranging applications in addition to medicinally. Saponin biosynthesis involves three key enzymes: oxidosqualene cyclases, which construct the basic triterpenoid skeletons; cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, which mediate oxidations; and uridine diphosphate-dependent glycosyltransferases, which catalyze glycosylations. The discovery of genes committed to saponin biosynthesis is important for the stable supply and biotechnological application of these compounds. Here, we review the identified genes involved in triterpenoid biosynthesis, summarize the recent advances in the biotechnological production of useful plant terpenoids, and discuss the bioengineering of plant triterpenoids. PMID:22639586

  13. Biosynthesis and metabolism of salicylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Leon, J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-05-09

    Pathways of salicylic acid (SA) biosynthesis and metabolism in tobacco have been recently identified. SA, an endogenous regulator of disease resistance, is a product of phenylpropanoid metabolism formed via decarboxylation of trans-cinnamic acid to benzoic acid and its subsequent 2-hydroxylation to SA. In tobacco mosaic virus-inoculated tobacco leaves, newly synthesized SA is rapidly metabolized to SA O-{beta}-D-glucoside and methyl salicylate. Two key enzymes involved in SA biosynthesis and metabolism: benzoic acid 2-hydroxylase, which converts benzoic acid to SA, and UDPglucose:SA glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.35), which catalyzes conversion of SA to SA glucoside have been partially purified and characterized. Progress in enzymology and molecular biology of SA biosynthesis and metabolism will provide a better understanding of signal transduction pathway involved in plant disease resistance. 62 refs., 1 fig.

  14. The Terpenoid Biosynthesis Toolkit of Trichoderma.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Ravindra; Mukherjee, Prasun Kumar

    2016-04-01

    The widely used biotechnologically important fungi belonging to the genus Trichoderma are rich sources of secondary metabolites. Even though the genomes of several Trichoderma spp. have been published, and data are available on the genes involved in biosynthesis of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthases, no genome-wide data are available for the terpenoid biosynthesis machinery in these organisms. In the present study, we have identified the genes involved in terpene biosynthesis in the genomes of three Trichoderma spp., viz., T. virens, T. atroviride and T. reesei. While the genes involved in the condensation steps are highly conserved across the three species, these fungi differed in the number and organization of terpene cyclases. T. virens genome harbours eleven terpene cyclases, while T. atroviride harbours seven, and T. reeseisix in their genomes; seven, three and two being part of putative secondary metabolism related gene clusters. PMID:27396184

  15. Triterpenoid biosynthesis in Euphorbia lathyris latex

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.R.

    1987-11-01

    The structures of triterpenols, not previously been known, from Euphorbia lathyris latex are reported. A method for quantifying very small amounts of these compounds was developed. Concerning the biochemistry of the latex, no exogenous cofactors were required for the biosynthesis and the addition of compounds such as NADPAH and ATP do not stimulate the biosynthesis. The addition of DTE or a similar anti-oxidant was found to help reduce the oxidation of the latex, thus increasing the length of time that the latex remains active. The requirement of a divalent cation and the preference for Mn in the pellet was observed. The effect of several inhibitors on the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids was examined. Mevinolin was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of the triterpenoids from acetate, but not mevalonate. A dixon plot of the inhibition of acetate incorporation showed an I/sub 50/ concentration of 3.2 ..mu..M. Fenpropimorph was found to have little or no effect on the biosynthesis. Tridemorph was found to inhibit the biosynthesis of all of the triterpenoids with an I/sub 50/ of 4 ..mu..M. It was also observed that the cyclopropyl containing triterpenols, cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol were inhibited much more strongly than those containing an 8-9 double bond, lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol. The evidence indicates, but does not definetely prove, that lanosterol and 24-methylenelanosterol are not made from cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol via a ring-opening enzyme such as cycloeucalenol-obtusifoliol isomerase. The possibilty that cycloartenol is made via lanosterol was investigated by synthesizing 4-R-4-/sup 3/H-mevalonic acid and incubating latex with a mixture of this and /sup 14/C-mevalonic acid. From the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio it was shown that cycloartenol and 24-methylenecycloartenol are not made via an intermediate containing as 8-9 double bond. 88 refs., 15 figs., 30 tabs.

  16. The expanding universe of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; Laflamme, P

    2001-06-01

    Characterization of many of the major gene families responsible for the generation of central intermediates and for their decoration, together with the development of large genomics and proteomics databases, has revolutionized our capability to identify exotic and interesting natural-product pathways. Over the next few years, these tools will facilitate dramatic advances in our knowledge of the biosynthesis of alkaloids, which will far surpass that which we have learned in the past 50 years. These tools will also be exploited for the rapid characterization of regulatory genes, which control the development of specialized cell factories for alkaloid biosynthesis.

  17. Combinatorial Biosynthesis of Polyketides – A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Fong T.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-01-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make “unnatural” natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms. PMID:22342766

  18. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  19. The structural biology of phenazine biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Parsons, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The phenazines are a class of over 150 nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds of bacterial and archeal origin. Their redox properties not only explain their activity as broad-specificity antibiotics and virulence factors but also enable them to function as respiratory pigments, thus extending their importance to the primary metabolism of phenazine-producing species. Despite their discovery in the mid-19th century, the molecular mechanisms behind their biosynthesis have only been unraveled in the last decade. Here, we review the contribution of structural biology that has led to our current understanding of phenazine biosynthesis. PMID:25215885

  20. Biosynthesis and biodegradation of wood components

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, T.

    1985-01-01

    A textbook containing 22 chapters by various authors covers the structure of wood, the localization of polysaccharides and lignins in wood cell walls, metabolism and synthetic function of cambial tissue, cell organelles and their function in the biosynthesis of cell wall components, biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides, lignin, cutin, suberin and associated waxes, phenolic acids and monolignols, quinones, flavonoids, tannins, stilbenes and terpenoid wood extractives, the occurrence of extractives, the metabolism of phenolic acids, wood degradation by micro-organisms and fungi, and biodegradation of cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignin, and aromatic extractives of wood. An index is included.

  1. Combinatorial biosynthesis of polyketides--a perspective.

    PubMed

    Wong, Fong T; Khosla, Chaitan

    2012-04-01

    Since their discovery, polyketide synthases have been attractive targets of biosynthetic engineering to make 'unnatural' natural products. Although combinatorial biosynthesis has made encouraging advances over the past two decades, the field remains in its infancy. In this enzyme-centric perspective, we discuss the scientific and technological challenges that could accelerate the adoption of combinatorial biosynthesis as a method of choice for the preparation of encoded libraries of bioactive small molecules. Borrowing a page from the protein structure prediction community, we propose a periodic challenge program to vet the most promising methods in the field, and to foster the collective development of useful tools and algorithms.

  2. Siderophore receptor PupA as a marker to monitor wild-type Pseudomonas putida WCS358 in natural environments.

    PubMed Central

    Raaijmakers, J M; Bitter, W; Punte, H L; Bakker, P A; Weisbeek, P J; Schippers, B

    1994-01-01

    For application of genetically engineered fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., specific markers are required for monitoring of wild-type Pseudomonas strains and their genetically modified derivatives in natural environments. In this study, the specific siderophore receptor PupA of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida WCS358 was used as a marker to monitor wild-type strain WCS358. After introduction into natural soil and rhizosphere environments, strain WCS358 could be recovered efficiently on a medium amended with 300 microM pseudobactin 358. Although low population densisties of indigenous pseudomonads (less than or equal to 10(3)/g of soil or root) were recovered on the pseudobactin 358-amended medium, subsequent agglutination assays with a WCS358-specific polyclonal antiserum enabled accurate monitoring of populations of wild-type strain WCS358 over a range of approximately 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/g of soil or root. Genetic analysis of the background population by PCR and Southern hybridization revealed that natural occurrence of the pupA gene was limited to a very small number of indigenous Pseudomonas spp. which are very closely related to P. putida WCS358. The PupA marker system enabled the study of differences in rhizosphere colonization among wild-type strain WCS358, rifampin-resistant derivative WCS358rr, and Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE. Chromosomally mediated rifampin resistance did not affect the colonizing ability of P. putida WCS358. However, Tn5 mutant WCS358::xylE colonized the radish rhizosphere significantly less than did its parental strain. Images PMID:8017914

  3. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  4. The Pseudomonas fluorescens Siderophore Pyoverdine Weakens Arabidopsis thaliana Defense in Favor of Growth in Iron-Deficient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Avoscan, Laure; Klinguer, Agnès; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Chervin, Christian; Mazurier, Sylvie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wendehenne, David; Besson-Bard, Angélique

    2016-05-01

    Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron-free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron-deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. Under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2,000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth-promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in iron-regulated transporter1 and ferric chelate reductase2 knockout mutants and was prioritized over immunity, as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea This process was accompanied by an overexpression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status. PMID:26956666

  5. Pyochelin, a siderophore of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: physicochemical characterization of the iron(III), copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Brandel, Jérémy; Humbert, Nicolas; Elhabiri, Mourad; Schalk, Isabelle J; Mislin, Gaëtan L A; Albrecht-Gary, Anne-Marie

    2012-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, synthesizing two major siderophores, pyoverdine (Pvd) and pyochelin (Pch), to cover its needs in iron(III). If the high affinity and specificity of Pvd toward iron(III) (pFe = 27.0) was well described in the literature, the physicochemical and coordination properties of Pch toward biologically relevant metals (Fe(III), Cu(II) or Zn(II)) have been only scarcely investigated. We report a thorough physico-chemical investigation of Pch (potentiometry, spectrophotometries, ESI/MS) that highlighted its moderate but significantly higher affinity for Fe(3+) (pFe = 16.0 at p[H] 7.4) than reported previously. We also demonstrated that Pch strongly chelates divalent metals such as Zn(II) (pZn = 11.8 at p[H] 7.4) and Cu(II) (pCu = 14.9 at p[H] 7.4) and forms predominantly 1 : 2 (M(2+)/Pch) complexes. Kinetic studies revealed that the formation of the ferric Pch complexes proceeds through a Eigen-Wilkins dissociative ligand interchange mechanism involving two protonated species of Pch and the Fe(OH)(2+) species of Fe(III). Our physico-chemical parameters supports the previous biochemical studies which proposed that siderophores are not only devoted to iron(III) shuttling but most likely display other specific biological role in the subtle metals homeostasis in microorganisms. This work also represents a step toward deciphering the role of siderophores throughout evolution. PMID:22261733

  6. Is drug release necessary for antimicrobial activity of siderophore-drug conjugates? Syntheses and biological studies of the naturally occurring salmycin “Trojan Horse” antibiotics and synthetic desferridanoxamine-antibiotic conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Wencewicz, Timothy A.; Möllmann, Ute; Long, Timothy E.; Miller, Marvin J.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rise in drug resistance found amongst community acquired infections has sparked renewed interest in developing antimicrobial agents that target resistant organisms and limit the natural selection of immune variants. Recent discoveries have shown that iron uptake systems in bacteria and fungi are suitable targets for developing such therapeutic agents. The use of siderophore-drug conjugates as “Trojan Horse” drug delivery agents has attracted particular interest in this area. This review will discuss efforts in our research group to study the salmycin class of “Trojan Horse” antibiotics. Inspired by the natural design of the salmycins, a series of desferridanoxamine-antibiotic conjugates were synthesized and tested in microbial growth inhibition assays. The results of these studies will be related to understanding the role of drug release in siderophore-mediated drug delivery with implications for future siderophore-drug conjugate design. PMID:19221879

  7. Biosynthesis of pyochelin and dihydroaeruginoic acid requires the iron-regulated pchDCBA operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Serino, L; Reimmann, C; Visca, P; Beyeler, M; Chiesa, V D; Haas, D

    1997-01-01

    The high-affinity siderophore salicylate is an intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of pyochelin, another siderophore and chelator of transition metal ions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The 2.5-kb region upstream of the salicylate biosynthetic genes pchBA was sequenced and found to contain two additional, contiguous genes, pchD and pchC, having the same orientation. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 60-kDa PchD protein was similar to those of the EntE protein (2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-AMP ligase) of Escherichia coli and other adenylate-forming enzymes, suggesting that salicylate might be adenylated at the carboxyl group by PchD. The 28-kDa PchC protein showed similarities to thioesterases of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin and might participate in the release of the product(s) formed from activated salicylate. One potential product, dihydroaeruginoate (Dha), was identified in culture supernatants of iron-limited P. aeruginosa cells. The antifungal antibiotic Dha is thought to arise from the reaction of salicylate with cysteine, followed by cyclization of cysteine. Inactivation of the chromosomal pchD gene by insertion of the transcription and translation stop element omega Sm/Sp abolished the production of Dha and pyochelin, implying that PchD-mediated activation of salicylate may be a common first step in the synthesis of both metabolites. Furthermore, the pchD::omega Sm/Sp mutation had a strong polar effect on the expression of the pchBA genes, i.e., on salicylate synthesis, indicating that the pchDCBA genes constitute a transcriptional unit. A full-length pchDCBA transcript of ca. 4.4 kb could be detected in iron-deprived, growing cells of P. aeruginosa. Transcription of pchD started at tandemly arranged promoters, which overlapped with two Fur boxes (binding sites for the ferric uptake regulator) and the promoter of the divergently transcribed pchR gene encoding an activator of pyochelin biosynthesis. This promoter arrangement allows tight iron

  8. Inhibition of Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis in Cercospora rosicola by Inhibitors of Gibberellin Biosynthesis and Plant Growth Retardants

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Shirley M.; Poling, Stephen M.; Maier, Vincent P.; Orme, Edward D.

    1983-01-01

    The fungus Cercospora rosicola produces abscisic acid (ABA) as a secondary metabolite. We developed a convenient system using this fungus to determine the effects of compounds on the biosynthesis of ABA. Inasmuch as ABA and the gibberellins (GAs) both arise via the isoprenoid pathway, it was of interest to determine if inhibitors of GA biosynthesis affect ABA biosynthesis. All five putative inhibitors of GA biosynthesis tested inhibited ABA biosynthesis. Several plant growth retardants with poorly understood actions in plants were also tested; of these, six inhibited ABA biosynthesis to varying degrees and two had no effect. Effects of plant growth retardants on various branches of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway may help to explain some of the diverse and unexpected results reported for these compounds. Knowledge that certain inhibitors of GA biosynthesis also have the ability to inhibit ABA biosynthesis in C. rosicola indicates the need for further studies in plants on the mode of action of these compounds. PMID:16662775

  9. Biosynthesis of coenzyme Q in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a component of the electron transport chain that participates in aerobic cellular respiration to produce ATP. In addition, CoQ acts as an electron acceptor in several enzymatic reactions involving oxidation-reduction. Biosynthesis of CoQ has been investigated mainly in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the findings have been extended to various higher organisms, including plants and humans. Analyses in yeast have contributed greatly to current understanding of human diseases related to CoQ biosynthesis. To date, human genetic disorders related to mutations in eight COQ biosynthetic genes have been reported. In addition, the crystal structures of a number of proteins involved in CoQ synthesis have been solved, including those of IspB, UbiA, UbiD, UbiX, UbiI, Alr8543 (Coq4 homolog), Coq5, ADCK3, and COQ9. Over the last decade, knowledge of CoQ biosynthesis has accumulated, and striking advances in related human genetic disorders and the crystal structure of proteins required for CoQ synthesis have been made. This review focuses on the biosynthesis of CoQ in eukaryotes, with some comparisons to the process in prokaryotes.

  10. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases.

  11. The lipid biosynthesis hole in the rickettsiales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a complementation assay in E. coli, we have shown that the propionyl-CoA carboxylase complex (PCC) from Wolbachia pipientis wMel, order Rickettsiales, provides for lipid biosynthesis through malonyl-CoA production. Normally, the prototypical prokaryote fatty acid synthesis (FASII) initiation ...

  12. Biosynthesis of sphinganine-analog mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Du, L; Zhu, X; Gerber, R; Huffman, J; Lou, L; Jorgenson, J; Yu, F; Zaleta-Rivera, K; Wang, Q

    2008-06-01

    Sphinganine-analog mycotoxins (SAMT) are polyketide-derived natural products produced by a number of plant pathogenic fungi and are among the most economically important mycotoxins. The toxins are structurally similar to sphinganine, a key intermediate in the biosynthesis of ceramides and sphingolipids, and competitive inhibitors for ceramide synthase. The inhibition of ceramide and sphingolipid biosynthesis is associated with several fatal diseases in domestic animals and esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in humans. SAMT contains a highly reduced, acyclic polyketide carbon backbone, which is assembled by a single module polyketide synthase. The biosynthesis of SAMT involves a unique polyketide chain-releasing mechanism, in which a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme catalyzes the termination, offloading and elongation of the polyketide chain. This leads to the introduction of a new carbon-carbon bond and an amino group to the polyketide chain. The mechanism is fundamentally different from the thioesterase/cyclase-catalyzed polyketide chain releasing found in bacterial and other fungal polyketide biosynthesis. Genetic data suggest that the ketosynthase domain of the polyketide synthase and the chain-releasing enzyme are important for controlling the final product structure. In addition, several post-polyketide modifications have to take place before SAMT become mature toxins.

  13. Evidence for Hydroxamate Siderophores and Other N-Containing Organic Compounds Controlling (239,240)Pu Immobilization and Remobilization in a Wetland Sediment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Kaplan, Daniel I; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Roberts, Kimberly A; Chen, Hongmei; DiDonato, Nicole; Athon, Matthew; Hatcher, Patrick G; Santschi, Peter H

    2015-10-01

    Pu concentrations in wetland surface sediments collected downstream of a former nuclear processing facility in F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), USA, were ∼2.5 times greater than those measured in the associated upland aquifer sediments; similarly, the Pu concentration solid/water ratios were orders of magnitude greater in the wetland than in the low-organic matter content aquifer soils. Sediment Pu concentrations were correlated to total organic carbon and total nitrogen contents and even more strongly to hydroxamate siderophore (HS) concentrations. The HS were detected in the particulate or colloidal phases of the sediments but not in the low molecular weight fractions (<1000 Da). Macromolecules which scavenged the majority of the potentially mobile Pu were further separated from the bulk mobile organic matter fraction ("water extract") via an isoelectric focusing experiment (IEF). An electrospray ionization Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry (ESI FTICR-MS) spectral comparison of the IEF extract and a siderophore standard (desferrioxamine; DFO) suggested the presence of HS functionalities in the IEF extract. This study suggests that while HS are a very minor component in the sediment particulate/colloidal fractions, their concentrations greatly exceed those of ambient Pu, and HS may play an especially important role in Pu immobilization/remobilization in wetland sediments.

  14. Siderophore-mediated oxidation of Ce and fractionation of HREE by Mn (hydr)oxide-coprecipitation and sorption on MnO2: Experimental evidence for negative Ce-anomalies in abiogenic manganese precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Dennis; Tepe, Nathalie; Bau, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We conducted experiments with Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY), where the REY were sorbed on synthetic manganese dioxide as well as on coprecipitating manganese (hydr)oxide in the presence and absence of the siderophore desferrioxamine-B (DFOB). Siderophores are a group of globally abundant biogenic complexing agents which are excreted by plants and bacteria to enhance the bioavailability of Fe in oxic environments. The model siderophore used in this study, DFOB, is a hydroxamate siderophore occurring in almost all environmental settings with concentrations in the nanomolar to millimolar range and is one of the most thoroughly studied siderophores. In the absence of siderophores and other organic ligands, trivalent Ce is usually surface-oxidized to tetravalent Ce during sorption onto manganese (hydr)oxides. Such Mn precipitates, therefore, often show positive Ce anomalies, whereas the ambient solutions exhibit negative Ce anomalies (Ohta and Kawabe, 2001). In marked contrast, however, REY sorption in the presence of DFOB produces negative Ce anomalies in the Mn precipitates and a distinct and characteristic positive Ce anomaly in the residual siderophore-bearing solution. Furthermore, the heavy REY with ionic radii larger than the radius of Sm are also almost completely prevented from sorption onto the Mn solid phases. Sorption of REY onto Mn (hydr)oxides in the presence of DFOB creates a distinct and pronounced fractionation of Ce and the heavy REY from the light and middle REY. Apart from Ce, which is oxidized in solution by the siderophore, the distribution of the other REY mimics the stability constants for multi-dentate complexes of REY with DFOB, as determined by Christenson & Schijf (2011). Heavier REY are forming stronger complexes (and are hence better "protected" from sorption) than light REY, excluding Ce. Preferential partitioning of Ce into the liquid phase during the precipitation of Mn (hydr)oxides has only rarely been described for natural Mn (hydr

  15. Detection of a Serum Siderophore by LC-MS/MS as a Potential Biomarker of Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Cassandra S.; Amankwa, Lawrence N.; Pinto, Linda J.; Fuller, Jeffrey D.; Moore, Margo M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a life-threatening systemic mycosis caused primarily by Aspergillus fumigatus. Early diagnosis of IA is based, in part, on an immunoassay for circulating fungal cell wall carbohydrate, galactomannan (GM). However, a wide range of sensitivity and specificity rates have been reported for the GM test across various patient populations. To obtain iron in vivo, A. fumigatus secretes the siderophore, N,N',N"-triacetylfusarinine C (TAFC) and we hypothesize that TAFC may represent a possible biomarker for early detection of IA. We developed an ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for TAFC analysis from serum, and measured TAFC in serum samples collected from patients at risk for IA. The method showed lower and upper limits of quantitation (LOQ) of 5 ng/ml and 750 ng/ml, respectively, and complete TAFC recovery from spiked serum. As proof of concept, we evaluated 76 serum samples from 58 patients with suspected IA that were investigated for the presence of GM. Fourteen serum samples obtained from 11 patients diagnosed with probable or proven IA were also analyzed for the presence of TAFC. Control sera (n = 16) were analyzed to establish a TAFC cut-off value (≥6 ng/ml). Of the 36 GM-positive samples (≥0.5 GM index) from suspected IA patients, TAFC was considered positive in 25 (69%). TAFC was also found in 28 additional GM-negative samples. TAFC was detected in 4 of the 14 samples (28%) from patients with proven/probable aspergillosis. Log-transformed TAFC and GM values from patients with proven/probable IA, healthy individuals and SLE patients showed a significant correlation with a Pearson r value of 0.77. In summary, we have developed a method for the detection of TAFC in serum that revealed this fungal product in the sera of patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis. A prospective study is warranted to determine whether this method provides improved early detection of IA. PMID:26974544

  16. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis.

  17. [Peculiarities of Proteus mirabilis extracellular metalloproteinase biosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Zamaliutdinova, N M; Sharipova, M R; Bogomol'naia, L M; Bozhokina, E S; Mardanova, A M

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of metalloproteinase by the Proteus mirabilis 5127-1 strain on different media and the influence of glucose and urea on biosynthesis were studied. It was found that the P. mirabilis 5127-1 bacteria secretes metalloproteinase in the medium in two isoforms (52 and 50 kDa). It was established that proteinase synthesis is completely suppressed during the growth of bacteria on synthetic media, as well as in the presence of LB glucose in the medium. It was demonstrated that addition of urea in the medium results in an increase of the culture productivity in the proteinase synthesis. Maximal culture productivity in the proteinase synthesis was found in the medium with natural urine. During the growth of bacteria on artificial urine, proteinase appeared in the medium only after 12 hours of growth as a single isoform. PMID:25872397

  18. Ceramide biosynthesis and metabolism in trophoblast syncytialization.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ambika T; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Aye, Irving L M H; Keelan, Jeffrey A

    2012-10-15

    Sphingolipid mediators such as ceramide are pleiotropic regulators of cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis. We investigated the role of ceramide biosynthesis, metabolism and actions in term human cytotrophoblasts syncytialized over 7 days in culture. Intracellular C16 ceramide levels increased modestly after 3 days in culture, then declined. Ceramidase was present at particularly high levels in syncytialized trophoblasts; inhibition of ceramidase reduced the degree of cell fusion. Exposure to short chain C8 ceramide or aSMase enhanced secretion of the differentiation marker hCG without affecting fusion or cell viability. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of ceramidase reduced the extent of fusion. Inhibition of the ceramide-responsive JNK and PP2A pathways did not abolish the effects of ceramide, and JNK phosphorylation was unresponsive to ceramide; however, ceramide significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt. This study suggests that changes in ceramide biosynthesis and metabolism play a differential role in the biochemical and morphological features of trophoblast differentiation.

  19. Circular Bacteriocins: Biosynthesis and Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Brede, Dag A.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Diep, Dzung B.

    2014-01-01

    Circular bacteriocins are a group of N-to-C-terminally linked antimicrobial peptides, produced by Gram-positive bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Circular bacteriocins generally exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, including against common food-borne pathogens, such as Clostridium and Listeria spp. These peptides are further known for their high pH and thermal stability, as well as for resistance to many proteolytic enzymes, properties which make this group of bacteriocins highly promising for potential industrial applications and their biosynthesis of particular interest as a possible model system for the synthesis of highly stable bioactive peptides. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on this group of bacteriocins, with emphasis on the recent progress in understanding circular bacteriocin genetics, biosynthesis, and mode of action; in addition, we highlight the current challenges and future perspectives for the application of these peptides. PMID:25172850

  20. Chemical genetics to examine cellulose biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Brabham, Chad; DeBolt, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Long-term efforts to decode plant cellulose biosynthesis via molecular genetics and biochemical strategies are being enhanced by the ever-expanding scale of omics technologies. An alternative approach to consider are the prospects for inducing change in plant metabolism using exogenously supplied chemical ligands. Cellulose biosynthesis inhibitors (CBIs) have been identified among known herbicides, during diverse combinatorial chemical libraries screens, and natural chemical screens from microbial agents. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the inhibitory effects of CBIs and further group them by how they influence fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase A proteins. Additional attention is paid to the continuing development of the CBI toolbox to explore the cell biology and genetic mechanisms underpinning effector molecule activity. PMID:23372572

  1. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J.; Interrante, Maria Filsinger; Smolke, Christina D.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. Here, we engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof-of-principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  2. Functional specialization in proline biosynthesis of melanoma.

    PubMed

    De Ingeniis, Jessica; Ratnikov, Boris; Richardson, Adam D; Scott, David A; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; De, Surya K; Kazanov, Marat; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Ronai, Ze'ev; Osterman, Andrei L; Smith, Jeffrey W

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is linked to hyperprolinemia, schizophrenia, cutis laxa, and cancer. In the latter case, tumor cells tend to rely on proline biosynthesis rather than salvage. Proline is synthesized from either glutamate or ornithine; both are converted to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), and then to proline via pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases (PYCRs). Here, the role of three isozymic versions of PYCR was addressed in human melanoma cells by tracking the fate of (13)C-labeled precursors. Based on these studies we conclude that PYCR1 and PYCR2, which are localized in the mitochondria, are primarily involved in conversion of glutamate to proline. PYCRL, localized in the cytosol, is exclusively linked to the conversion of ornithine to proline. This analysis provides the first clarification of the role of PYCRs to proline biosynthesis.

  3. Biosynthesis and toxicological effects of patulin.

    PubMed

    Puel, Olivier; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2010-04-01

    Patulin is a toxic chemical contaminant produced by several species of mold, especially within Aspergillus, Penicillium and Byssochlamys. It is the most common mycotoxin found in apples and apple-derived products such as juice, cider, compotes and other food intended for young children. Exposure to this mycotoxin is associated with immunological, neurological and gastrointestinal outcomes. Assessment of the health risks due to patulin consumption by humans has led many countries to regulate the quantity in food. A full understanding of the molecular genetics of patulin biosynthesis is incomplete, unlike other regulated mycotoxins (aflatoxins, trichothecenes and fumonisins), although the chemical structures of patulin precursors are now known. The biosynthetic pathway consists of approximately 10 steps, as suggested by biochemical studies. Recently, a cluster of 15 genes involved in patulin biosynthesis was reported, containing characterized enzymes, a regulation factor and transporter genes. This review includes information on the current understanding of the mechanisms of patulin toxinogenesis and summarizes its toxicological effects.

  4. Combinatorial biosynthesis--potential and problems.

    PubMed

    Floss, Heinz G

    2006-06-25

    Because of their ecological functions, natural products have been optimized in evolution for interaction with biological systems and receptors. However, they have not necessarily been optimized for other desirable drug properties and thus can often be improved by structural modification. Using examples from the literature, this paper reviews the opportunities for increasing structural diversity among natural products by combinatorial biosynthesis, i.e., the genetic manipulation of biosynthetic pathways. It distinguishes between combinatorial biosynthesis in a narrower sense to generate libraries of modified structures, and metabolic engineering for the targeted formation of specific structural analogs. Some of the problems and limitations encountered with these approaches are also discussed. Work from the author's laboratory on ansamycin antibiotics is presented which illustrates some of the opportunities and limitations.

  5. Functional Specialization in Proline Biosynthesis of Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Adam D.; Scott, David A.; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; De, Surya K.; Kazanov, Marat; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Ronai, Ze'ev; Osterman, Andrei L.; Smith, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Proline metabolism is linked to hyperprolinemia, schizophrenia, cutis laxa, and cancer. In the latter case, tumor cells tend to rely on proline biosynthesis rather than salvage. Proline is synthesized from either glutamate or ornithine; both are converted to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C), and then to proline via pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductases (PYCRs). Here, the role of three isozymic versions of PYCR was addressed in human melanoma cells by tracking the fate of 13C-labeled precursors. Based on these studies we conclude that PYCR1 and PYCR2, which are localized in the mitochondria, are primarily involved in conversion of glutamate to proline. PYCRL, localized in the cytosol, is exclusively linked to the conversion of ornithine to proline. This analysis provides the first clarification of the role of PYCRs to proline biosynthesis. PMID:23024808

  6. Structural basis for phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Oliver B.; Tomasek, David; Jorge, Carla D.; Dufrisne, Meagan Belcher; Kim, Minah; Banerjee, Surajit; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Santos, Helena; Mancia, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol is critical for intracellular signalling and anchoring of carbohydrates and proteins to outer cellular membranes. The defining step in phosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is catalysed by CDP-alcohol phosphotransferases, transmembrane enzymes that use CDP-diacylglycerol as donor substrate for this reaction, and either inositol in eukaryotes or inositol phosphate in prokaryotes as the acceptor alcohol. Here we report the structures of a related enzyme, the phosphatidylinositol-phosphate synthase from Renibacterium salmoninarum, with and without bound CDP-diacylglycerol to 3.6 and 2.5 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal the location of the acceptor site, and the molecular determinants of substrate specificity and catalysis. Functional characterization of the 40%-identical ortholog from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential target for the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs, supports the proposed mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis. This work therefore provides a structural and functional framework to understand the mechanism of phosphatidylinositol-phosphate biosynthesis. PMID:26510127

  7. Complete biosynthesis of opioids in yeast.

    PubMed

    Galanie, Stephanie; Thodey, Kate; Trenchard, Isis J; Filsinger Interrante, Maria; Smolke, Christina D

    2015-09-01

    Opioids are the primary drugs used in Western medicine for pain management and palliative care. Farming of opium poppies remains the sole source of these essential medicines, despite diverse market demands and uncertainty in crop yields due to weather, climate change, and pests. We engineered yeast to produce the selected opioid compounds thebaine and hydrocodone starting from sugar. All work was conducted in a laboratory that is permitted and secured for work with controlled substances. We combined enzyme discovery, enzyme engineering, and pathway and strain optimization to realize full opiate biosynthesis in yeast. The resulting opioid biosynthesis strains required the expression of 21 (thebaine) and 23 (hydrocodone) enzyme activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. This is a proof of principle, and major hurdles remain before optimization and scale-up could be achieved. Open discussions of options for governing this technology are also needed in order to responsibly realize alternative supplies for these medically relevant compounds. PMID:26272907

  8. β-alanine biosynthesis in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Xu, Huimin; White, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    One efficient approach to assigning function to unannotated genes is to establish the enzymes that are missing in known biosynthetic pathways. One group of such pathways is those involved in coenzyme biosynthesis. In the case of the methanogenic archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii as well as most methanogens, none of the expected enzymes for the biosynthesis of the β-alanine and pantoic acid moieties required for coenzyme A are annotated. To identify the gene(s) for β-alanine biosynthesis, we have established the pathway for the formation of β-alanine in this organism after experimentally eliminating other known and proposed pathways to β-alanine from malonate semialdehyde, l-alanine, spermine, dihydrouracil, and acryloyl-coenzyme A (CoA). Our data showed that the decarboxylation of aspartate was the only source of β-alanine in cell extracts of M. jannaschii. Unlike other prokaryotes where the enzyme producing β-alanine from l-aspartate is a pyruvoyl-containing l-aspartate decarboxylase (PanD), the enzyme in M. jannaschii is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent l-aspartate decarboxylase encoded by MJ0050, the same enzyme that was found to decarboxylate tyrosine for methanofuran biosynthesis. A Km of ∼0.80 mM for l-aspartate with a specific activity of 0.09 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at 70°C for the decarboxylation of l-aspartate was measured for the recombinant enzyme. The MJ0050 gene was also demonstrated to complement the Escherichia coli panD deletion mutant cells, in which panD encoding aspartate decarboxylase in E. coli had been knocked out, thus confirming the function of this gene in vivo.

  9. Investigating the Elusive Mechanism of Glycosaminoglycan Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Xylophone V.; Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Ethirajan, Manivannan; Tran, Vy M.; Nguyen, Khiem V.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2009-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis requires numerous biosynthetic enzymes and activated sulfate and sugar donors. Although the sequence of biosynthetic events is resolved using reconstituted systems, little is known about the emergence of cell-specific GAG chains (heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, and dermatan sulfate) with distinct sulfation patterns. We have utilized a library of click-xylosides that have various aglycones to decipher the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis in a cellular system. Earlier studies have shown that both the concentration of the primers and the structure of the aglycone moieties can affect the composition of the newly synthesized GAG chains. However, it is largely unknown whether structural features of aglycone affect the extent of sulfation, sulfation pattern, disaccharide composition, and chain length of GAG chains. In this study, we show that aglycones can switch not only the type of GAG chains, but also their fine structures. Our findings provide suggestive evidence for the presence of GAGOSOMES that have different combinations of enzymes and their isoforms regulating the synthesis of cell-specific combinatorial structures. We surmise that click-xylosides are differentially recognized by the GAGOSOMES to generate distinct GAG structures as observed in this study. These novel click-xylosides offer new avenues to profile the cell-specific GAG chains, elucidate the mechanism of GAG biosynthesis, and to decipher the biological actions of GAG chains in model organisms. PMID:19628873

  10. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  11. Polyketides from dinoflagellates: origins, pharmacology and biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rein, K S; Borrone, J

    1999-10-01

    Dinoflagellates, unicellular marine protists, produce some of the largest and most complex polyketides identified to date. The biological activities of these compounds are quite diverse. Compounds having potential therapeutic value as anti-cancer agents as well as deadly neurotoxins, whose production has resulted in severe public health hazards and economic hardships, are represented in this group of secondary metabolites. Stable isotope feeding experiments have firmly established the polyketide origins of representative compounds from each of the three structural classes, the polyether ladders, the macrocycles and the linear polyethers. Yet some unusual labeling patterns have been observed in each class. Pendant methyl groups are most often derived from C-2 of acetate and deletions of C-1 of acetate are common. Studies on the biosynthesis of dinoflagellate derived polyketides at the genomic level have not been reported, in part due to the peculiarities of the dinoflagellate nucleus and the lack of a dinoflagellate transformation system. Nevertheless, a fundamental understanding of the genetics of polyketide biosynthesis by dinoflagellates could be the catalyst for developing several fruitful avenues of research. Dinoflagellate derived polyketides are reviewed with special emphasis on pharmacology and biosynthesis.

  12. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis, utilization and pharmacological effects.

    PubMed

    Werner-Felmayer, G; Golderer, G; Werner, E R

    2002-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H4-biopterin) is an essential cofactor of a set of enzymes that are of central metabolic importance, i.e. the hydroxylases of the three aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, of ether lipid oxidase, and of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzymes. As a consequence, H4-biopterin plays a key role in a vast number of biological processes and pathological states associated with neurotransmitter formation, vasorelaxation, and immune response. In mammals, its biosynthesis is controlled by hormones, cytokines and certain immune stimuli. This review aims to summarize recent developments concerning regulation of H4-biopterin biosynthetic and regulatory enzymes and pharmacological effects of H4-biopterin in various conditions, e.g. endothelial dysfunction or apoptosis of neuronal cells. Also, approaches towards gene therapy of diseases like the different forms of phenylketonuria or of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. Additional emphasis is given to H4-biopterin biosynthesis and function in non-mammalian species such as fruit fly, zebra fish, fungi, slime molds, the bacterium Nocardia as well as to the parasitic protozoan genus of Leishmania that is not capable of pteridine biosynthesis but has evolved a sophisticated salvage network for scavenging various pteridine compounds, notably folate and biopterin. PMID:12003348

  13. Biosynthesis of plant-derived flavor compounds.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Wilfried; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2008-05-01

    Plants have the capacity to synthesize, accumulate and emit volatiles that may act as aroma and flavor molecules due to interactions with human receptors. These low-molecular-weight substances derived from the fatty acid, amino acid and carbohydrate pools constitute a heterogenous group of molecules with saturated and unsaturated, straight-chain, branched-chain and cyclic structures bearing various functional groups (e.g. alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, esters and ethers) and also nitrogen and sulfur. They are commercially important for the food, pharmaceutical, agricultural and chemical industries as flavorants, drugs, pesticides and industrial feedstocks. Due to the low abundance of the volatiles in their plant sources, many of the natural products had been replaced by their synthetic analogues by the end of the last century. However, the foreseeable shortage of the crude oil that is the source for many of the artificial flavors and fragrances has prompted recent interest in understanding the formation of these compounds and engineering their biosynthesis. Although many of the volatile constituents of flavors and aromas have been identified, many of the enzymes and genes involved in their biosynthesis are still not known. However, modification of flavor by genetic engineering is dependent on the knowledge and availability of genes that encode enzymes of key reactions that influence or divert the biosynthetic pathways of plant-derived volatiles. Major progress has resulted from the use of molecular and biochemical techniques, and a large number of genes encoding enzymes of volatile biosynthesis have recently been reported.

  14. The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ralf R; Leimkühler, Silke

    2015-03-01

    The biosynthesis of the molybdenum cofactors (Moco) is an ancient, ubiquitous, and highly conserved pathway leading to the biochemical activation of molybdenum. Moco is the essential component of a group of redox enzymes, which are diverse in terms of their phylogenetic distribution and their architectures, both at the overall level and in their catalytic geometry. A wide variety of transformations are catalyzed by these enzymes at carbon, sulfur and nitrogen atoms, which include the transfer of an oxo group or two electrons to or from the substrate. More than 50 molybdoenzymes were identified to date. In all molybdoenzymes except nitrogenase, molybdenum is coordinated to a dithiolene group on the 6-alkyl side chain of a pterin called molybdopterin (MPT). The biosynthesis of Moco can be divided into three general steps, with a fourth one present only in bacteria and archaea: (1) formation of the cyclic pyranopterin monophosphate, (2) formation of MPT, (3) insertion of molybdenum into molybdopterin to form Moco, and (4) additional modification of Moco in bacteria with the attachment of a nucleotide to the phosphate group of MPT, forming the dinucleotide variant of Moco. This review will focus on the biosynthesis of Moco in bacteria, humans and plants.

  15. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    SciTech Connect

    Beliaev, A. S.; Thompson, D. K.; Khare, T.; Lim, H.; Brandt, C. C.; Li, G.; Murray, A. E.; Heidelberg, J. F.; Giometti, C. S.; Yates, J., III; Nealson, K. H.; Tiedje, J. M.; Zhou, J.; Biosciences Division; ORNL; Scripps Research Inst.; Michigan State Univ.; The Inst. for Genomic Research; Jet Propulsion Laboratory; California Inst. of Tech.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c{sub 552}, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data.

  16. Gene and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidensis during anaerobic growth with different electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Beliaev, Alex S; Thompson, Dorothea K; Khare, Tripti; Lim, Hanjo; Brandt, Craig C; Li, Guangshan; Murray, Alison E; Heidelberg, John F; Giometti, Carol S; Yates, John; Nealson, Kenneth H; Tiedje, James M; Zhoui, Jizhong

    2002-01-01

    Changes in mRNA and protein expression profiles of Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 during switch from aerobic to fumarate-, Fe(III)-, or nitrate-reducing conditions were examined using DNA microarrays and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE). In response to changes in growth conditions, 121 of the 691 arrayed genes displayed at least a two-fold difference in transcript abundance as determined by microarray analysis. Genes involved in aerobic respiration encoding cytochrome c and d oxidases and TCA cycle enzymes were repressed under anaerobic conditions. Genes induced during anaerobic respiration included those involved in cofactor biosynthesis and assembly (moaACE, ccmHF, nosD, cysG), substrate transport (cysUP, cysTWA, dcuB), and anaerobic energy metabolism (dmsAB, psrC, pshA, hyaABC, hydA). Transcription of genes encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase (napBHGA), cytochrome c552, and prismane was elevated 8- to 56-fold in response to the presence of nitrate, while cymA, ifcA, and frdA were specifically induced three- to eightfold under fumarate-reducing conditions. The mRNA levels for two oxidoreductase-like genes of unknown function and several cell envelope genes involved in multidrug resistance increased two- to fivefold specifically under Fe(III)-reducing conditions. Analysis of protein expression profiles under aerobic and anaerobic conditions revealed 14 protein spots that showed significant differences in abundance on 2-D gels. Protein identification by mass spectrometry indicated that the expression of prismane, dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase, and alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis protein correlated with the microarray data. PMID:11881834

  17. The cell and developmental biology of alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    De Luca, V; St Pierre, B

    2000-04-01

    Plants produce unique natural products as a result of gene mutation and subsequent adaptation of metabolic pathways to create new secondary metabolites. However, their biosynthesis and accumulation remains remarkably under the control of the biotic and abiotic environments. Alkaloid biosynthesis, which requires the adaptation of cellular activities to perform specialized metabolism without compromising general homeostasis, is accomplished by restricting product biosynthesis and accumulation to particular cells and to defined times of plant development. The cell and developmental biology of alkaloid biosynthesis, which is remarkably complex, evolved in part by recruiting pre-existing enzymes to perform new functions.

  18. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Inês B; Fonseca, Bruno M; Matias, Pedro M; Louro, Ricardo O; Moe, Elin

    2016-09-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  19. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Cheng-Chih Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection.

  20. Siderophore-mediated iron uptake in fluorescent Pseudomonas: characterization of the pyoverdine-receptor binding site of three cross-reacting pyoverdines.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Jean-Marie; Geoffroy, Valérie A; Baysse, Christine; Cornelis, Pierre; Barelmann, Insa; Taraz, Kambiz; Budzikiewicz, Herbert

    2002-01-15

    Two Pseudomonas fluorescens and one Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, although producing structurally different pyoverdines, demonstrated highly efficient cross-reactions when tested for pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. A ferripyoverdine receptor-deficient mutant of the P. aeruginosa strain was unable to use any of the three pyoverdines. Moreover, the three strains presented each a specific outer membrane siderophore-receptor pattern. Thus, the capacity of using heterologous pyoverdines was related not to the presence of supplementary specific ferripyoverdine receptors but to the existence within the respective pyoverdine-peptide chains of a common dipeptide motif which should act as the receptor-binding site for the three pyoverdines. Other pyoverdines sharing the same motif but at another position within the peptide chain were not efficient in iron transport, demonstrating the importance of the spatial position of the binding site. PMID:11795869

  1. Impaired maturation of the siderophore pyoverdine chromophore in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 deficient for the cytochrome c biogenesis protein CcmC.

    PubMed

    Baysse, Christine; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Uría Fernández, Diana; Cornelis, Pierre

    2002-07-17

    Pyoverdines are the main siderophores of fluorescent pseudomonads. They comprise a quinoline chromophore, a peptide chain, and a dicarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid amide side chain. Each Pseudomonas species produces a pyoverdine with a different peptide chain. A cytochrome c biogenesis DeltaccmC mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 produces multiple pyoverdine forms, showing differences at the level of the chromophore or the side chain. When grown in the presence of L-cysteine, DeltaccmC produces only ferribactin, a non-fluorescent precursor of pyoverdine, while addition of oxidized glutathione improves pyoverdine production. We suggest that the conversion of ferribactin to pyoverdine does not take place in the DeltaccmC mutant because of lack of oxidizing power in the periplasm. PMID:12123798

  2. Direct Detection of Fungal Siderophores on Bats with White-Nose Syndrome via Fluorescence Microscopy-Guided Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mascuch, Samantha J.; Moree, Wilna J.; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G.; Cheng, Tina L.; Blehert, David S.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Frick, Winifred F.; Meehan, Michael J.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection. PMID:25781976

  3. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  4. Direct detection of fungal siderophores on bats with white-nose syndrome via fluorescence microscopy-guided ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mascuch, Samantha J; Moree, Wilna J; Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Turner, Gregory G; Cheng, Tina L; Blehert, David S; Kilpatrick, A Marm; Frick, Winifred F; Meehan, Michael J; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena

    2015-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the pathogenic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans is decimating the populations of several hibernating North American bat species. Little is known about the molecular interplay between pathogen and host in this disease. Fluorescence microscopy ambient ionization mass spectrometry was used to generate metabolic profiles from the wings of both healthy and diseased bats of the genus Myotis. Fungal siderophores, molecules that scavenge iron from the environment, were detected on the wings of bats with WNS, but not on healthy bats. This work is among the first examples in which microbial molecules are directly detected from an infected host and highlights the ability of atmospheric ionization methodologies to provide direct molecular insight into infection. PMID:25781976

  5. The Molecular Genetics of Mycolic Acid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pawełczyk, Jakub; Kremer, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    Mycolic acids are major and specific long-chain fatty acids that represent essential components of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell envelope. They play a crucial role in the cell wall architecture and impermeability, hence the natural resistance of mycobacteria to most antibiotics, and represent key factors in mycobacterial virulence. Biosynthesis of mycolic acid precursors requires two types of fatty acid synthases (FASs), the eukaryotic-like multifunctional enzyme FAS I and the acyl carrier protein (ACP)-dependent FAS II systems, which consists of a series of discrete mono-functional proteins, each catalyzing one reaction in the pathway. Unlike FAS II synthases of other bacteria, the mycobacterial FAS II is incapable of de novo fatty acid synthesis from acetyl-coenzyme A, but instead elongates medium-chain-length fatty acids previously synthesized by FAS I, leading to meromycolic acids. In addition, mycolic acid subspecies with defined biological properties can be distinguished according to the chemical modifications decorating the meromycolate. Nearly all the genetic components involved in both elongation and functionalization of the meromycolic acid have been identified and are generally clustered in distinct transcriptional units. A large body of information has been generated on the enzymology of the mycolic acid biosynthetic pathway and on their genetic and biochemical/structural characterization as targets of several antitubercular drugs. This chapter is a comprehensive overview of mycolic acid structure, function, and biosynthesis. Special emphasis is given to recent work addressing the regulation of mycolic acid biosynthesis, adding new insights to our understanding of how pathogenic mycobacteria adapt their cell wall composition in response to environmental changes.

  6. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D.; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Spork, Anatol P.; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S.; Van Lanen, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5′-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5′-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C–C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5′-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. PMID:25855790

  7. Massetolide A biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, I; de Kock, M J D; de Waard, P; van Beek, T A; Raaijmakers, J M

    2008-04-01

    Massetolide A is a cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotic produced by various Pseudomonas strains from diverse environments. Cloning, sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, and complementation showed that massetolide A biosynthesis in P. fluorescens SS101 is governed by three nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes, designated massA, massB, and massC, spanning approximately 30 kb. Prediction of the nature and configuration of the amino acids by in silico analysis of adenylation and condensation domains of the NRPSs was consistent with the chemically determined structure of the peptide moiety of massetolide A. Structural analysis of massetolide A derivatives produced by SS101 indicated that most of the variations in the peptide moiety occur at amino acid positions 4 and 9. Regions flanking the mass genes contained several genes found in other Pseudomonas CLP biosynthesis clusters, which encode LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, ABC transporters, and an RND-like outer membrane protein. In contrast to most Pseudomonas CLP gene clusters known to date, the mass genes are not physically linked but are organized in two separate clusters, with massA disconnected from massB and massC. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of massC is strongly reduced when massB is mutated, suggesting that these two genes function in an operon, whereas transcription of massA is independent of massBC and vice versa. Massetolide A is produced in the early exponential growth phase, and biosynthesis appears not to be regulated by N-acylhomoserine lactone-based quorum sensing. Massetolide A production is essential in swarming motility of P. fluorescens SS101 and plays an important role in biofilm formation.

  8. Computer aided gene mining for gingerol biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    James, Priyanka; Baby, Bincy; Charles, SonaSona; Nair, Lekshmysree Saraschandran; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Inspite of the large body of genomic data obtained from the transcriptome of Zingiber officinale, very few studies have focused on the identification and characterization of miRNAs in gingerol biosynthesis. Zingiber officinale transcriptome was analyzed using EST dataset (38169 total) deposited in public domains. In this paper computational functional annotation of the available ESTs and identification of genes which play a significant role in gingerol biosynthesis are described. Zingiber officinale transcriptome was analyzed using EST dataset (38169 total) from ncbi. ESTs were clustered and assembled, resulting in 8624 contigs and 8821 singletons. Assembled dataset was then submitted to the EST functional annotation workflow including blast, gene ontology (go) analysis, and pathway enrichment by kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (kegg) and interproscan. The unigene datasets were further exploited to identify simple sequence repeats that enable linkage mapping. A total of 409 simple sequence repeats were identified from the contigs. Furthermore we examined the existence of novel miRNAs from the ESTs in rhizome, root and leaf tissues. EST analysis revealed the presence of single hypothetical miRNA in rhizome tissue. The hypothetical miRNA is warranted to play an important role in controlling genes involved in gingerol biosynthesis and hence demands experimental validation. The assembly and associated information of transcriptome data provides a comprehensive functional and evolutionary characterization of genomics of Zingiber officinale. As an effort to make the genomic and transcriptomic data widely available to the public domain, the results were integrated into a web-based Ginger EST database which is freely accessible at http://www.kaubic.in/gingerest/. PMID:26229293

  9. Massetolide A Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens▿

    PubMed Central

    de Bruijn, I.; de Kock, M. J. D.; de Waard, P.; van Beek, T. A.; Raaijmakers, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Massetolide A is a cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) antibiotic produced by various Pseudomonas strains from diverse environments. Cloning, sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, and complementation showed that massetolide A biosynthesis in P. fluorescens SS101 is governed by three nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes, designated massA, massB, and massC, spanning approximately 30 kb. Prediction of the nature and configuration of the amino acids by in silico analysis of adenylation and condensation domains of the NRPSs was consistent with the chemically determined structure of the peptide moiety of massetolide A. Structural analysis of massetolide A derivatives produced by SS101 indicated that most of the variations in the peptide moiety occur at amino acid positions 4 and 9. Regions flanking the mass genes contained several genes found in other Pseudomonas CLP biosynthesis clusters, which encode LuxR-type transcriptional regulators, ABC transporters, and an RND-like outer membrane protein. In contrast to most Pseudomonas CLP gene clusters known to date, the mass genes are not physically linked but are organized in two separate clusters, with massA disconnected from massB and massC. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of massC is strongly reduced when massB is mutated, suggesting that these two genes function in an operon, whereas transcription of massA is independent of massBC and vice versa. Massetolide A is produced in the early exponential growth phase, and biosynthesis appears not to be regulated by N-acylhomoserine lactone-based quorum sensing. Massetolide A production is essential in swarming motility of P. fluorescens SS101 and plays an important role in biofilm formation. PMID:17993540

  10. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  11. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  12. Developing New Antibiotics with Combinatorial Biosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Nicola L.

    2000-11-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs), a class of enzymes found in soil bacteria that produce antibiotics such as erythromycin, string together acetate units using basic organic reactions. The manipulation of the sequence of these reactions at the genetic level has resulted in an alteration of the corresponding chemical structure of the antibiotic produced by the bacteria. This process, called combinatorial biosynthesis, allows the generation of many presently unknown complex structures that can be tested for antibacterial activity, thereby contributing to the race against antibiotic-resistant infectious bacteria.

  13. [Recent advances in lanthipeptide biosynthesis - A review].

    PubMed

    Mo, Tianlu; Xue, Lingui; Zhang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Lanthipeptides are a growing class of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptide (RiPP) natural products. These compounds are widely distributed among taxonomically distant species, and their structures and biological activities are diverse, providing an important source for drug research and developement. In this review, we summarized the recent advances in the understanding of structure, classification, evolution and substrate-controlled biosynthetic mechanism of lanthipeptide, attempting to highlight the intriguing chemistry and enzymology in the biosynthesis of this growing family of natural products. PMID:27382781

  14. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Daniel R.; Revtovich, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and

  15. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kirienko, Daniel R; Revtovich, Alexey V; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and increased host

  16. Bioalteration of synthetic Fe(III)-, Fe(II)-bearing basaltic glasses and Fe-free glass in the presence of the heterotrophic bacteria strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Impact of siderophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Anne; Rossano, Stéphanie; Trcera, Nicolas; Huguenot, David; Fourdrin, Chloé; Verney-Carron, Aurélie; van Hullebusch, Eric D.; Guyot, François

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the role of micro-organisms and their siderophores in the first steps of the alteration processes of basaltic glasses in aqueous media. In this regard, three different types of glasses - with or without iron, in the reduced Fe(II) or oxidized Fe(III) states - were prepared on the basis of a simplified basaltic glass composition. Control and Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated experiments were performed in a buffered (pH 6.5) nutrient depleted medium to stimulate the production of the pyoverdine siderophore. Results show that the presence of P. aeruginosa has an effect on the dissolution kinetics of all glasses as most of the calculated elemental release rates are increased compared to sterile conditions. Reciprocally, the composition of the glass in contact with P. aeruginosa has an impact on the bacterial growth and siderophore production. As an essential nutrient for this microbial strain, Fe notably appears to play a central role during biotic experiments. Its presence in the glass stimulates the bacterial growth and minimizes the synthesis of pyoverdine. Moreover the initial Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio in the glasses modulates this synthesis, as pyoverdine is not detected at all in the system in contact with Fe(III)-bearing glass. Finally, the dissolution rates appear to be correlated to siderophore concentrations as they increase with respect to sterile experiments in the order Fe(III)-bearing glass < Fe(II)-bearing glass < Fe-free glass. This increase is attributed to complexation reactions between siderophores and Fe or Al for Fe(II)-bearing glass or Fe-free glass, respectively. The dissolution of an Fe-free glass is significantly improved in the presence of bacteria, as initial dissolution rates are increased by a factor of 3. This study attests to the essential role of siderophores in the P. aeruginosa-promoted dissolution processes of basaltic glasses as well as to the complex relationships between the nutritional potential of the glass and

  17. Essences in Metabolic Engineering of Lignan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Honoo; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Bahabadi, Sedigheh Esmaeilzadeh; Matsumoto, Erika; Ono, Eiichiro; Murata, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are structurally and functionally diverse phytochemicals biosynthesized in diverse plant species and have received wide attentions as leading compounds of novel drugs for tumor treatment and healthy diets to reduce of the risks of lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. However, the lineage-specific distribution and the low-amount of production in natural plants, some of which are endangered species, hinder the efficient and stable production of beneficial lignans. Accordingly, the development of new procedures for lignan production is of keen interest. Recent marked advances in the molecular and functional characterization of lignan biosynthetic enzymes and endogenous and exogenous factors for lignan biosynthesis have suggested new methods for the metabolic engineering of lignan biosynthesis cascades leading to the efficient, sustainable, and stable lignan production in plants, including plant cell/organ cultures. Optimization of light conditions, utilization of a wide range of elicitor treatments, and construction of transiently gene-transfected or transgenic lignan-biosynthesizing plants are mainly being attempted. This review will present the basic and latest knowledge regarding metabolic engineering of lignans based on their biosynthetic pathways and biological activities, and the perspectives in lignan production via metabolic engineering. PMID:25946459

  18. Brassinosteroid biosynthesis and signalling in Petunia hybrida

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Nathalie; Yokota, Takao; Shibata, Kyomi; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Gerats, Tom; Vandenbussche, Michiel; Koes, Ronald; Souer, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal plant hormones that play an important role in the growth and development of plants. The biosynthesis of sterols and BRs as well as the signalling cascade they induce in plants have been elucidated largely through metabolic studies and the analysis of mutants in Arabidopsis and rice. Only fragmentary details about BR signalling in other plant species are known. Here a forward genetics strategy was used in Petunia hybrida, by which 19 families with phenotypic alterations typical for BR deficiency mutants were identified. In all mutants, the endogenous BR levels were severely reduced. In seven families, the tagged genes were revealed as the petunia BR biosynthesis genes CYP90A1 and CYP85A1 and the BR receptor gene BRI1. In addition, several homologues of key regulators of the BR signalling pathway were cloned from petunia based on homology with their Arabidopsis counterparts, including the BRI1 receptor, a member of the BES1/BZR1 transcription factor family (PhBEH2), and two GSK3-like kinases (PSK8 and PSK9). PhBEH2 was shown to interact with PSK8 and 14-3-3 proteins in yeast, revealing similar interactions to those during BR signalling in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, PhBEH2 also interacted with proteins implicated in other signalling pathways. This suggests that PhBEH2 might function as an important hub in the cross-talk between diverse signalling pathways. PMID:23599276

  19. Molecular genetics of carbapenem antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    McGowan, S J; Holden, M T; Bycroft, B W; Salmond, G P

    1999-01-01

    Carbapenems are potent beta-lactam antibiotics with a broad spectrum of activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. As naturally produced metabolites, they have been isolated from species of Streptomyces, Erwinia and Serratia. The latter two members of the Enterobacteriaceae have proved to be genetically amenable and a growing body of research on these organisms now exists concerning the genes responsible for carbapenem biosynthesis and the regulatory mechanisms controlling their expression. A cluster of nine carbapenem (car) genes has been identified on the chromosome of Erwinia carotovora. These genes encode the enzymes required for construction of carbapenem and the proteins responsible for a novel beta-lactam resistance mechanism, conferring carbapenem immunity in the producing host. Although sharing no homology with the well known enzymes of penicillin biosynthesis, two of the encoded proteins are apparently similar to enzymes of the clavulanic acid biosynthetic pathway implying a common mechanism for construction of the beta-lactam ring. In addition, a transcriptional activator is encoded as the first gene of the carbapenem cluster and this allows positive expression of the remaining downstream genes in response to a quorum sensing, N-acyl homoserine lactone, signalling molecule.

  20. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses.

  1. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from (1-{sup 14}C)acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 {mu}M acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl{sub 2}, 1 mM each of the MnCl{sub 2} and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO{sub 3}, and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 {mu}g/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO{sub 3}, divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg{sup 2+} and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor.

  2. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

  3. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  4. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  5. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  6. Plant Sterols: Diversity, Biosynthesis, and Physiological Functions.

    PubMed

    Valitova, J N; Sulkarnayeva, A G; Minibayeva, F V

    2016-08-01

    Sterols, which are isoprenoid derivatives, are structural components of biological membranes. Special attention is now being given not only to their structure and function, but also to their regulatory roles in plants. Plant sterols have diverse composition; they exist as free sterols, sterol esters with higher fatty acids, sterol glycosides, and acylsterol glycosides, which are absent in animal cells. This diversity of types of phytosterols determines a wide spectrum of functions they play in plant life. Sterols are precursors of a group of plant hormones, the brassinosteroids, which regulate plant growth and development. Furthermore, sterols participate in transmembrane signal transduction by forming lipid microdomains. The predominant sterols in plants are β-sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. These sterols differ in the presence of a methyl or an ethyl group in the side chain at the 24th carbon atom and are named methylsterols or ethylsterols, respectively. The balance between 24-methylsterols and 24-ethylsterols is specific for individual plant species. The present review focuses on the key stages of plant sterol biosynthesis that determine the ratios between the different types of sterols, and the crosstalk between the sterol and sphingolipid pathways. The main enzymes involved in plant sterol biosynthesis are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, C24-sterol methyltransferase, and C22-sterol desaturase. These enzymes are responsible for maintaining the optimal balance between sterols. Regulation of the ratios between the different types of sterols and sterols/sphingolipids can be of crucial importance in the responses of plants to stresses. PMID:27677551

  7. Anticoagulant Heparan Sulfate: Structural Specificity and Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Pedersen, Lars C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Heparan sulfate (HS) is present on the surface of endothelial and surrounding tissues in large quantities. It plays important roles in regulating numerous functions of the blood vessel wall, including blood coagulation, inflammation response and cell differentiation. HS is a highly sulfated polysaccharide containing glucosamine and glucuronic/iduronic acid repeating disaccharide units. The unique sulfated saccharide sequences of HS determine its specific functions. Heparin, an analogue of heparan sulfate, is the most commonly used anticoagulant drug. Because of its wide range of biological functions, HS has become an interesting molecule to biochemists, medicinal chemists and developmental biologists. Here, we summarize recent progress towards understanding the interaction between heparan sulfate and blood coagulating factors, the biosynthesis of anticoagulant heparan sulfate and the mechanism of action of heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes. Further, knowledge of the biosynthesis of HS facilitates the development of novel enzymatic approaches to synthesize HS from bacterial capsular polysaccharides and to produce polysaccharide end products with high specificity for the biological target. These advancements provide the foundation for the development of polysaccharide-based therapeutic agents. PMID:17131147

  8. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  9. High-Throughput Screening for Streptomyces Antibiotic Biosynthesis Activators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Wang, Yemin; Guo, Hang; Xu, Min; Deng, Zixin

    2012-01-01

    A genomic cosmid library of Streptomyces clavuligerus was constructed and transferred efficiently by conjugation to Streptomyces lividans, and 12 distinct groups of overlapping cosmid clones that activated the silent actinorhodin biosynthesis gene cluster were identified. This generally applicable high-throughput screening procedure greatly facilitates the identification of antibiotic biosynthesis activators. PMID:22504805

  10. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  11. Genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Probst, Corinna; Ringel, Phillip; Boysen, Verena; Wirsing, Lisette; Alexander, Mariko Matsuda; Mendel, Ralf R; Kruse, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is a trace element that is essential for important cellular processes. To gain biological activity, Mo must be complexed in the molybdenum cofactor (Moco), a pterin derivative of low molecular weight. Moco synthesis is a multi-step pathway that involves a variable number of genes in eukaryotes, which are assigned to four steps of eukaryotic Moco biosynthesis. Moco biosynthesis mutants lack any Moco-dependent enzymatic activities, including assimilation of nitrate (plants and fungi), detoxification of sulfite (humans and plants) and utilization of hypoxanthine as sole N-source (fungi). We report the first comprehensive genetic characterization of the Neurospora crassa (N. crassa) Moco biosynthesis pathway, annotating five genes which encode all pathway enzymes, and compare it with the characterized Aspergillus nidulans pathway. Biochemical characterization of the corresponding knock-out mutants confirms our annotation model, documenting the N. crassa/A. nidulans (fungal) Moco biosynthesis as unique, combining the organizational structure of both plant and human Moco biosynthesis genes.

  12. First Step of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Biosynthesis Cross-talks with Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Ras Signaling in Candida albicans*

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Jain, Priyanka; Pratyusha, Vavilala A.; Kumar, Pravin; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide. It has several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored virulence factors. Inhibiting GPI biosynthesis attenuates its virulence. Building on our previous work, we explore the interaction of GPI biosynthesis in C. albicans with ergosterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphogenesis. This study is also the first report of transcriptional co-regulation existing between two subunits of the multisubunit enzyme complex, GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GnT), involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Using mutational analysis, we show that the accessory subunits, GPI2 and GPI19, of GPI-GnT exhibit opposite effects on ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling (which determines hyphal morphogenesis). This is because the two subunits negatively regulate one another; GPI19 mutants show up-regulation of GPI2, whereas GPI2 mutants show up-regulation of GPI19. Two different models were examined as follows. First, the two GPI-GnT subunits independently interact with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling. Second, the two subunits mutually regulate one another and thereby regulate sterol levels and Ras signaling. Analysis of double mutants of these subunits indicates that GPI19 controls ergosterol biosynthesis through ERG11 levels, whereas GPI2 determines the filamentation by cross-talk with Ras1 signaling. Taken together, this suggests that the first step of GPI biosynthesis talks to and regulates two very important pathways in C. albicans. This could have implications for designing new antifungal strategies. PMID:24356967

  13. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?

    PubMed

    Cook, Sam D; Nichols, David S; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S; McAdam, Erin L; Quittenden, Laura; Ross, John J

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  14. Substrate Control in Stereoselective Lanthionine Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weixin; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Houk, K. N.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are typically highly stereoselective catalysts that enforce a reactive conformation on their native substrates. We report here a rare example where the substrate controls the stereoselectivity of an enzyme-catalyzed Michael-type addition during the biosynthesis of lanthipeptides. These natural products contain thioether crosslinks formed by cysteine attack on dehydrated Ser and Thr residues. We demonstrate that several lanthionine synthetases catalyze highly selective anti additions in which the substrate (and not the enzyme) determines whether the addition occurs from the Re or Si face. A single point mutation in the peptide substrate completely inverted the stereochemical outcome of the enzymatic modification. Quantum mechanical calculations reproduced the experimentally observed selectivity and suggest that conformational restraints imposed by the amino acid sequence on the transition states determine the face selectivity of the Michael-type cyclization. PMID:25515891

  15. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  16. Metabolic model for diversity-generating biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tianero, Ma. Diarey; Pierce, Elizabeth; Raghuraman, Shrinivasan; Sardar, Debosmita; McIntosh, John A.; Heemstra, John R.; Schonrock, Zachary; Covington, Brett C.; Maschek, J. Alan; Cox, James E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Ruffner, Duane E.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    A conventional metabolic pathway leads to a specific product. In stark contrast, there are diversity-generating metabolic pathways that naturally produce different chemicals, sometimes of great diversity. We demonstrate that for one such pathway, tru, each ensuing metabolic step is slower, in parallel with the increasing potential chemical divergence generated as the pathway proceeds. Intermediates are long lived and accumulate progressively, in contrast with conventional metabolic pathways, in which the first step is rate-limiting and metabolic intermediates are short-lived. Understanding these fundamental differences enables several different practical applications, such as combinatorial biosynthesis, some of which we demonstrate here. We propose that these principles may provide a unifying framework underlying diversity-generating metabolism in many different biosynthetic pathways. PMID:26831074

  17. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Płaza, Grażyna A.; Chojniak, Joanna; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance. PMID:25110864

  18. Serine in plants: biosynthesis, metabolism, and functions.

    PubMed

    Ros, Roc; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Krueger, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Serine (Ser) has a fundamental role in metabolism and signaling in living organisms. In plants, the existence of different pathways of Ser biosynthesis has complicated our understanding of this amino acid homeostasis. The photorespiratory glycolate pathway has been considered to be of major importance, whereas the nonphotorespiratory phosphorylated pathway has been relatively neglected. Recent advances indicate that the phosphorylated pathway has an important function in plant metabolism and development. Plants deficient in this pathway display developmental defects in embryos, male gametophytes, and roots. We propose that the phosphorylated pathway is more important than was initially thought because it is the only Ser source for specific cell types involved in developmental events. Here, we discuss its importance as a link between metabolism and development in plants.

  19. Biosynthesis and Heterologous Production of Epothilones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Rolf

    Although a variety of chemical syntheses for the epothilones and various derivatives have been described, modifying the backbone of those natural products remains a major challenge. One alternative to chemical alteration is the elucidation and subsequent manipulation of the biosynthetic pathway via genetic engineering in the producing organism. This type of approach is known as “combinatorial biosynthesis” and holds great promise, especially in conjunction with semi-synthesis methods to alter the structure of the natural product. In parallel, production can be optimized in the natural producer if the regulatory mechanisms governing the biosynthesis are understood. Alternatively, the entire gene cluster can be transferred into a heterologous host, more amenable both to genetic alteration and overexpression.

  20. Biosynthesis of the phytoalexin pisatin. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Preisig, C.L.; Bell, J.N.; Matthews, D.E.; VanEtten, H.D. ); Sun, Yuejin; Hrazdina, G. )

    1990-11-01

    NADPH-dependent reduction of 2{prime},7-dihydroxy-4{prime},5{prime}-methylenedioxyisoflavone to the isoflavanone sophorol, a proposed intermediate step in pisatin biosynthesis, was detected in extracts of Pisum sativum. This isoflavone reductase activity was inducible by treatment of pea seedlings with CuCl{sub 2}. The timing of induction coincided with that of the 6a-hydroxymaackiain 3-O-methyltransferase, which catalyzes the terminal biosynthetic step. Neither enzyme was light inducible. Further NADPH-dependent metabolism of sophorol by extracts of CuCl{sub 2}-treated seedlings was also observed; three products were radiolabeled when ({sup 3}H)sophorol was the substrate, one of which is tentatively identified as maackiain.